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Sample records for major histocompatibility gene

  1. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nancy M.; Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) genes are regulated at the level of transcription. Recent studies have shown that chromatin modification is critical for efficient transcription of these genes, and a number of chromatin modifying complexes recruited to MHC-II genes have been described. The MHC-II genes are segregated from each other by a series of chromatin elements, termed MHC-II insulators. Interactions between MHC-insulators and the promoters of MHC-II genes are mediated by the insulator factor CCCTC-binding protein and are critical for efficient expression. This regulatory mechanism provides a novel view of how the entire MHC-II locus is assembled architecturally and can be coordinately controlled. PMID:20970972

  2. Non-major histocompatibility complex rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2011-01-01

    Recent results from genetic and treatment studies have shed new light on chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided supportive evidence that RA is a disease with a strong genetic background. Interestingly, a series of candidate genes have been identified outside of the classical major histocompatibility (MHC) locus, which had long been regarded as the major contributor to the pathogenesis of this disease. Among these genes, PTPN22 plays an outstanding role. CD40, STAT4, PRM1, and TNFAIP3 also seem to be of relevance. Interestingly, there is a significant overlap between RA susceptibility genes and those of other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes, which suggests common pathogenic mechanisms. Genetic analyses may not only provide new insights into the pathogenesis of RA, but may also open new avenues for therapeutic approaches, because overactive immune-signaling pathways might specifically be addressed by biologic therapies. However, the predictive value of many of the recent findings of large-scale genetic analyses in identifying new genetic polymorphisms remains low. We describe the current knowledge about the role of non-MHC genes in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21542789

  3. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Background Genes in Chickens Influence Susceptibility to High Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chicken’s major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype has profound influence on the resistance or susceptibility to certain pathogens such as B21 MHC haplotype confers resistance to Marek’s disease (MD). However, non-MHC genes are also important in disease resistance. For example, both line...

  4. Major histocompatibility lineages and immune gene function in teleost fishes: the road not taken.

    PubMed

    Stet, René J M; Kruiswijk, Corine P; Dixon, Brian

    2003-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear over the course of the past decade that the immune system genes of teleosts and tetrapods are plainly derived from common ancestral genes. The last 5 years, however, have also made it abundantly clear that in the teleost genome some of these genes are organized in a manner very different from that seen in mammals. These differences are probably the result of differences in life history traits, such as fecundancy, within each group of species when faced with an evolutionary fork in the road shortly after their divergence from each other. One group, the tetrapods, including mammals, chose a highly organized linked major histocompatibility complex, while in teleosts the major histocompatibility genes remained unlinked. In this review we will discuss the structural and functional implications of this different organization, particularly for major histocompatibility genes, but drawing on the current knowledge of some other genes for further support for the hypothesis that each group took a different road, one more traveled and one less taken.

  5. Linkage map of the human major histocompatibility complex including the tumor necrosis factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.; Katzman, P.; Alicot, E.M.; Koller, B.H.; Geraghty, D.E.; Orr, H.T.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T.

    1987-12-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. gene pair has been linked in the human major histocompatibility complex to HLA-B, HLA-C, and, tentatively, HLA-E and HLA-A on one side and to the class III complement/steroid 21-hydroxylase gene cluster on the other by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The TNF genes are located 200 kilobases (kb) centromeric of HLA-B and about 350 kb telomeric of the class III cluster. Together with previous data on the linkage and structures of the class II and class III regions, a restriction map of the entire human major histocompatibility complex of about 3500 kb has been prepared.

  6. Major histocompatibility complex class II genes and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Briggs, D; Welsh, K I

    1991-11-01

    1. In no ethnic group is the overall association between systemic sclerosis and the MHC strong enough for direct clinical use. MHC associations do support the classification of the disease into limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis. 2. Indications are that associations between specific subsets of patients with systemic sclerosis and genetic markers will assume greater importance both diagnostically and prognostically. The group with lung fibrosis look prime candidates, for example. 3. Genetic markers are useful means of relating chemically induced systemic sclerosis like disorders with the classical disease. Vinyl chloride disease provides an example. 4. Evidence is emerging of strong associations between certain genetic markers and autoantibody production; a similar story has emerged in systemic lupus erythematosus. We believe that, eventually, genetic tests will be used to influence treatment in at least a subset of patients with systemic sclerosis but that a dramatic breakthrough will not be made until we know how the genetics of the disease relate to the primary biochemical disease characteristic--that is, the overproduction of collagen. In this respect it has been suggested that the 5' flanking DNA of dermal collagen genes is particularly susceptible to the action of Scl-70 (topoisomerase I). A problem is how to tie this and the other observations discussed above together. The association of autoantibodies with topoisomerase I provides a tentative link between the MHC and collagen gene expression. Although the role and reason for anti-Scl-70 in systemic sclerosis is unknown, humoral autoimmunity, at least in systemic lupus erythematosus, seems to be strongly dependent on specific HLA genes. With an understanding of the function of MHC products at the molecular level, HLA and disease associations can now be analysed on a mechanistic level. For insulin dependent diabetes mellitus it has been shown that the MHC determined

  7. Histocompatibility alloantigens in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Evidence for the influence of multiple genes in the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, C; Mann, D L; Gerber, L N; Barth, W; Perlmann, S; Decker, J L; Nigra, T P

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of HLA-A, B, and Cw antigens as well as the antigens expressed preferentially on B cells and monocytes (DRw and Ia-like) was examined in a normal population and two related disease populations, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. HLA antigens distinguishing the two disease populations were found. Psoriatic patients demonstrated an increase in frequency of HLA-A1, B17, and B13. Patients with psoriatic arthritis demonstrated an increased frequency of HLA-A26, B38, and DRw4. Antigens showing a common increase in frequency in the two disease populations were HLA-Cw6, DRw7, and Ia744. These results demonstrate genetic differences as well as similarities in the two populations of patients with the common clinical feature of psoriasis. In addition to the above analysis, we examined the association of individual alloantigens elevated in frequency in the diseased population. These same alloantigens were examined for association in the normal population. This analysis revealed HLA antigen associations in the two disease groups that differed from the association of several antigens in the normal population. The results suggest that at least two genetic factors, one mapping in the HLA-A, C-B region and one mapping in the HLA-B-DRw region are associated with the disease states. Thus, multiple factors controlled by genes in the major histocompatibility complex appear to contribute to the disease entities under investigation. PMID:6932404

  8. Polymorphism and selection in the major histocompatibility complex DRA and DQA genes in the family Equidae.

    PubMed

    Janova, Eva; Matiasovic, Jan; Vahala, Jiri; Vodicka, Roman; Van Dyk, Enette; Horin, Petr

    2009-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex genes coding for antigen binding and presenting molecules are the most polymorphic genes in the vertebrate genome. We studied the DRA and DQA gene polymorphism of the family Equidae. In addition to 11 previously reported DRA and 24 DQA alleles, six new DRA sequences and 13 new DQA alleles were identified in the genus Equus. Phylogenetic analysis of both DRA and DQA sequences provided evidence for trans-species polymorphism in the family Equidae. The phylogenetic trees differed from species relationships defined by standard taxonomy of Equidae and from trees based on mitochondrial or neutral gene sequence data. Analysis of selection showed differences between the less variable DRA and more variable DQA genes. DRA alleles were more often shared by more species. The DQA sequences analysed showed strong amongst-species positive selection; the selected amino acid positions mostly corresponded to selected positions in rodent and human DQA genes.

  9. Expression Regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and Class II Encoding Genes

    PubMed Central

    van den Elsen, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I and MHC-II molecules play an essential role in the immune response to pathogens by virtue of their ability to present peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. Given this critical role, MHC-I and MHC-II genes are regulated in a tight fashion at the transcriptional level by a variety of transcription factors that interact with conserved cis-acting regulatory promoter elements. In addition to the activities of these regulatory factors, modification of chromatin also plays an essential role in the efficient transcription of these genes to meet with local requirement for an effective immune response. The focus of this review is on the transcription factors that interact with conserved cis-acting promoter elements and the epigenetic mechanisms that modulate induced and constitutive expression of these MHC genes. PMID:22566838

  10. Identification of the class I genes of the mouse major histocompatibility complex by DNA-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Goodenow, R S; McMillan, M; Nicolson, M; Sher, B T; Eakle, K; Davidson, N; Hood, L

    1982-11-18

    DNA-mediated gene transfer was used to identify cloned class I genes from the major histocompatibility complex of the BALB/c mouse. Three genes encoding the transplantation antigens H-2 Kd, Dd and Ld were identified as well as genes encoding the Qa-2,3 and two TL differentiation antigens. As many as 10 putative novel class I genes were detected by the association of their gene products with beta 2-microglobulin. Alloantiserum prepared to one of the novel antigens was used to demonstrate the expression of the previously undetected antigen on spleen cells of various inbred, congeneic, and recombinant congeneic strains of mice. PMID:6815535

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class I genes of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae.

    PubMed

    Betz, U A; Mayer, W E; Klein, J

    1994-11-01

    The coelacanth fish Latimeria chalumnae is the sole surviving species of a phylogenetic lineage that was founded more than 400 million years ago and that has changed morphologically very little since that time. Little is known about the molecular evolution of this "living fossil," considered by some taxonomists to be the closest living relative of tetrapods. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of L. chalumnae major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes. The exon-intron organization of these genes is the same as that of their mammalian counterparts. The genes fall into four families, which we designate Lach-UA through Lach-UD. There are multiple loci in all of the families. Genes of the first two families are transcribed. The Lach-UA family bears the characteristics of functional, polymorphic class I genes; the other three families may be represented by nonclassical genes. All the Lach loci arose by duplication from an ancestral gene after the foundation of the coelacanth lineage. Intergenic variation is highest at positions corresponding to the mammalian peptide-binding region. The closest relatives of the Lach genes among the MHC genes sequenced thus far are those of the amphibian Xenopus.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, J.J.; Godwin, U.; Benedetto, R.; McConnell, T.J.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating on the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the {alpha}1 encoding domain. The encoded {alpha}2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass.

    PubMed

    Hardee, J J; Godwin, U; Benedetto, R; McConnell, T J

    1995-01-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating in the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the alpha 1 encoding domain. The encoded alpha 2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass.

  14. Characterisation of four major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Lau, Quintin; Jobbins, Sarah E; Belov, Katherine; Higgins, Damien P

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have an integral role in the adaptive immune response, as they bind and present antigenic peptides to T helper lymphocytes. In this study of koalas, species-specific primers were designed to amplify exon 2 of the MHC class II DA and DB genes, which contain much of the peptide-binding regions of the α and β chains. A total of two DA α1 domain variants and eight DA β1 (DAB), three DB α1 and five DB β1 variants were amplified from 20 koalas from two free-living populations from South East Queensland and the Port Macquarie region in northern New South Wales. We detected greater variation in the β1 than in the α1 domains as well as evidence of positive selection in DAB. The present study provides a springboard to future investigation of the role of MHC in disease susceptibility in koalas.

  15. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class II B genes in cranes.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Akiyama, Takuya; Nishida, Chizuko; Takami, Kazutoshi; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in cranes. Genomic sequences spanning exons 1 to 4 were amplified and determined in 13 crane species and three other species closely related to cranes. In all, 55 unique sequences were identified, and at least two polymorphic MHC class II B loci were found in most species. An analysis of sequence polymorphisms showed the signature of positive selection and recombination. A phylogenetic reconstruction based on exon 2 sequences indicated that trans-species polymorphism has persisted for at least 10 million years, whereas phylogenetic analyses of the sequences flanking exon 2 revealed a pattern of concerted evolution. These results suggest that both balancing selection and recombination play important roles in the crane MHC evolution. PMID:26452363

  16. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes from the nurse shark.

    PubMed Central

    Bartl, S; Weissman, I L

    1994-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) contains a set of linked genes which encode cell surface proteins involved in the binding of small peptide antigens for their subsequent recognition by T lymphocytes. MHC proteins share structural features and the presence and location of polymorphic residues which play a role in the binding of antigens. In order to compare the structure of these molecules and gain insights into their evolution, we have isolated two MHC class IIB genes from the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Two clones, most probably alleles, encode proteins which differ by 13 amino acids located in the putative antigen-binding cleft. The protein structure and the location of polymorphic residues are similar to their mammalian counterparts. Although these genes appear to encode a typical MHC protein, no T-cell-mediated responses have been demonstrated in cartilaginous fish. The nurse shark represents the most phylogenetically primitive organism in which both class IIA [Kasahara, M., Vazquez, M., Sato, K., McKinney, E.C. & Flajnik, M.F. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 89, 6688-6692] and class IIB genes, presumably encoding the alpha/beta heterodimer, have been isolated. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8278377

  17. Major histocompatibility complex and host background genes in chickens influence resistance to high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chicken’s major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype has a profound influence on the resistance or susceptibility to certain pathogens such as B21 MHC haplotype confers resistance to Marek’s disease (MD). However, non-MHC genes are also important in disease resistance. For example, both li...

  18. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, A.R. Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA American Red Cross Blood Services-Northeast Region, Dedham, MA ); Wagner, R.; Khatri, K.; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z.; Alper, C.A. ); Yunis, E.J. American Red Cross Blood Services-Northeast Region, Dedham, MA )

    1991-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype (HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8) or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) halotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 amd has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8-or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes.

  19. Ancestral major histocompatibility complex DRB genes beget conserved patterns of localized polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, L K; Nepom, G T

    1996-01-01

    Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are characterized by extensive polymorphism within species and also by a remarkable conservation of contemporary human allelic sequences in evolutionarily distant primates. Mechanisms proposed to account for strict nucleotide conservation in the context of highly variable genes include the suggestion that intergenic exchange generates repeated sets of MHC DRB polymorphisms [Gyllensten, U. B., Sundvall, M. & Erlich, H. A. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 3686-3690; Lundberg, A. S. & McDevitt, H. 0. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 6545-6549]. We analyzed over 50 primate MHC DRB sequences, and identified nucleotide elements within macaque and baboon DRB6-like sequences with deletions corresponding to specific exon 2 hypervariable regions, which encode a discrete alpha helical segment of the MHC antigen combining site. This precisely localized deletion provides direct evidence implicating segmental exchange of MHC-encoded DRB gene fragments as one of the evolutionary mechanisms both generating and maintaining MHC diversity. Intergenic exchange at this site may be fundamental to the diversification of immune protection in populations by permitting alteration in the specificity of the MHC that determines the repertoire of antigens bound. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8643583

  20. Relationship between major histocompatibility antigens and disease

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Histocompatibility antigens, virus infections, and disease are discussed relative to avenues of research in humans with arenavirus infections. The data implicating a relationship between histocompatibility complexes in man and animals and diseases of the central nervous system are reviewed. Histocompatibility antigens may share common antigenic determinants with viruses, act as receptor sites for attachment of viruses, and be altered by viruses. In addition, genes regulating immune responses to a variety of natural and synthetic antigens are linked, in many species, to the major histocompatibility complex. Since injury associated with virus infections may be largely due to the activity of the immune system, study of immune response genes may provide insight into understanding resistance to disease. Further, histoincompatibility reactions can activate latent viruses with resultant disease. PMID:60183

  1. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ejsmond, Maciej Jan; Radwan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process). Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation. PMID:26599213

  2. Persistent Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection occurs in the absence of functional major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganta, Roman Reddy; Wilkerson, Melinda J.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rokey, Aaron M.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We investigated the impact of two genes that control macrophage and T-cell function on murine resistance to E. chaffeensis. Congenic pairs of wild-type and toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4)- or major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-deficient mice were used for these studies. Wild-type mice cleared the infection within 2 weeks, and the response included macrophage activation and the synthesis of E. chaffeensis-specific Th1-type immunoglobulin G response. The absence of a functional tlr4 gene depressed nitric oxide and interleukin 6 secretion by macrophages and resulted in short-term persistent infections for > or =30 days. In the absence of MHC-II alleles, E. chaffeensis infections persisted throughout the entire 3-month evaluation period. Together, these data suggest that macrophage activation and cell-mediated immunity, orchestrated by CD4(+) T cells, are critical for conferring resistance to E. chaffeensis.

  3. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  4. Distribution and origin of bovine major histocompatibility complex class II DQA1 genes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S; Chen, S; Miki, M; Kado, M; Aida, Y

    2008-09-01

    We sequenced the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQA1 gene in 352 Japanese cattle (95 Japanese Black, 91 Holstein, 102 Japanese Shorthorn and 64 Jersey cattle) using a new sequence-based typing method. In total, 19 bovine MHC (BoLA)-DQA1 alleles, of which two were novel alleles, were detected. The Holstein, Jersey, Japanese Shorthorn and Japanese Black breeds had 13, 12, 10 and 15 alleles, respectively. The dendrogram that was constructed by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of the DQA1 gene allele frequencies of the four Japanese cattle breeds showed that the Holstein and Japanese Black breeds were closest to each other, with Jersey being farther from these two breeds than Japanese Shorthorn. In addition, Wu-Kabat analysis showed that the DQA1 alleles of the Holstein and Japanese Black were the most and least polymorphic, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the DQA1 gene of Bovidae such as cattle, sheep, bison and goat were more similar to pig SLA-DQA genes than to human HLA-DQA1 and dog DLA-DQA genes. The cattle, goat, bison, sheep, human and pig DQA1 molecules had similar rates of amino acid sequence polymorphism, but the distribution of their polymorphic residues differed from that in the dog DQA1 protein. However, the Bovidae DQA1 molecule had more polymorphic residues than the human, pig and dog DQA molecules at two regions, namely positions 52-53 and 65-66. This indicates that the Bovidae DQA1 locus is more polymorphic than the DQA loci of other species.

  5. The major histocompatibility complex genes impact pain response in DA and DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Li, Li; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Xie, Wen; Zhao, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the difference in basal pain sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation between Dark-Agouti (DA) rats and a novel congenic DA.1U rats is major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes dependent. In the present study, we further used DA and DA.1U rats to investigate the role of MHC genes in formalin-induced pain model by behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. Behavioral results showed biphasic nociceptive behaviors increased significantly following the intraplantar injection of formalin in the hindpaw of DA and DA.1U rats. The main nociceptive behaviors were lifting and licking, especially in DA rats (P<0.001 and P<0.01). The composite pain scores (CPS) in DA rats were significantly higher than those in DA.1U rats in both phases of the formalin test (P<0.01). Electrophysiological results also showed the biphasic increase in discharge rates of C and Aδ fibers of L5 dorsal root in the two strains, and the net change of the discharge rate of DA rats was significantly higher than that of DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The mechanical thresholds decreased after formalin injection in both strains (P<0.01), and the net change in the mechanical threshold in DA was greater than that in DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The expression of RT1-B, representation of MHC class II molecule, in laminae I-II of L4/5 spinal cord in DA rats was significantly higher than that in DA.1U rats in the respective experimental group (P<0.05). These results suggested that both DA and DA.1U rats exhibited nociceptive responses in formalin-induced pain model and DA rats were more sensitive to noxious chemical stimulus than DA.1U rats, indicating that MHC genes might contribute to the difference in pain sensitivity.

  6. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A R; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. Only 1 of the DR4, DQw8 haplotypes was [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] and 2 were HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8; most were the presumed fragments (SC31, DR4, DQw8) or (SC21, DR4, DQw8) or DR4, DQw8 with some other complotype. Of the patients with DRw6, DQw5, all were DRw14, DQw5, and 6 had a rare Caucasian haplotype, HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5. Four of 6 of these were found in patients of Italian extraction, as was the 1 normal example. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 and has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8- or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes. Images PMID:1675792

  7. Divergent selection on locally adapted major histocompatibility complex immune genes experimentally proven in the field

    PubMed Central

    Eizaguirre, Christophe; Lenz, Tobias L; Kalbe, Martin; Milinski, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Although crucial for the understanding of adaptive evolution, genetically resolved examples of local adaptation are rare. To maximize survival and reproduction in their local environment, hosts should resist their local parasites and pathogens. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with its key function in parasite resistance represents an ideal candidate to investigate parasite-mediated local adaptation. Using replicated field mesocosms, stocked with second-generation lab-bred three-spined stickleback hybrids of a lake and a river population, we show local adaptation of MHC genotypes to population-specific parasites, independently of the genetic background. Increased allele divergence of lake MHC genotypes allows lake fish to fight the broad range of lake parasites, whereas more specific river genotypes confer selective advantages against the less diverse river parasites. Hybrids with local MHC genotype gained more body weight and thus higher fitness than those with foreign MHC in either habitat, suggesting the evolutionary significance of locally adapted MHC genotypes. PMID:22583762

  8. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  9. Specific suppression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in astrocytes by brain-enriched gangliosides

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effect of brain-enriched gangliosides on constitutive and cytokine- inducible expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II genes in cultured astrocytes was studied. Before treatment with gangliosides, astrocytes expressed constitutive MHC class I but not class II molecules, however, the expression of both MHC class I and II cell surface molecules on astrocytes was induced to high levels by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Constitutive and IFN-gamma-inducible expression of MHC class I and II molecules was suppressed by treatment of astrocytes with exogenous bovine brain gangliosides in a dose- dependent manner. Constitutive and induced MHC class I and II mRNA levels were also suppressed by gangliosides, indicating control through transcriptional mechanisms. This was consistent with the ability of gangliosides to suppress the binding activity of transcription factors, especially NF-kappa B-like binding activity, important for the expression of both MHC class I and II genes. These studies may be important for understanding mechanisms of central nervous system (CNS)- specific regulation of major histocompatibility molecules in neuroectodermal cells and the role of gangliosides in regulating MHC- restricted antiviral and autoimmune responses within the CNS. PMID:8376939

  10. Characterization and evolution of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in the aye-aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis.

    PubMed

    Go, Yasuhiro; Rakotoarisoa, Gilbert; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Shima, Taizo; Koyama, Naoki; Randrianjafy, Albert; Mora, Roger; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2005-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex genes (Mhc-DQB and Mhc-DRB) were sequenced in seven aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariecsis), which is an endemic and endangered species in Madagascar. An aye-aye from a north-eastern population showed genetic relatedness to individuals of a north-western population and had a somewhat different repertoire from another north-eastern individual. These observations suggest that the extent of genetic variation in Mhc genes is not excessively small in the aye-aye in spite of recent rapid destruction of their habitat by human activities. In light of Mhc gene evolution, trans-species and allelic polymorphisms can be estimated to have been retained for more than 50 Ma (million years) based on the time scale of lemur evolution. PMID:15322927

  11. Extensive polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex DRA gene in Balkan donkeys: perspectives on selection and genealogy.

    PubMed

    Arbanasić, Haidi; Galov, Ana; Ambriović-Ristov, Andreja; Grizelj, Juraj; Arsenos, Georgios; Marković, Božidarka; Dovenski, Toni; Vince, Silvijo; Curik, Ino

    2013-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) contains genes important for immune response in mammals, and these genes exhibit high polymorphism and diversity. The DRA gene, a member of the MHC class II family, is highly conserved across a large number of mammalian species, but it displays exceptionally rich sequence variations in Equidae members. We analyzed allelic polymorphism of the DRA locus in 248 donkeys sampled across the Balkan Peninsula (Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia, Greece and Montenegro). Five known alleles and two new alleles were identified. The new allele Eqas-DRA*0601 was found to carry a synonymous mutation, and new allele Eqas-DRA*0701, a non-synonymous mutation. We further analyzed the historical selection and allele genealogy at the DRA locus in equids. Signals of positive selection obtained by various tests were ambiguous. A conservative conclusion is that DRA polymorphism occurred relatively recently and that positive selection has been acting on the DRA locus for a relatively brief period.

  12. Genomic polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium in human major histocompatibility complex-encoded antigen-processing genes

    SciTech Connect

    van Endert, P.M.; Lopez, M.T.; Patel, S.D.; McDevitt, H.O. ); Monaco, J.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Recently, two subunits of a large cytosolic protease and two putative peptide transporter proteins were found to be encoded by genes within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). These genes have been suggested to be involved in the processing of antigenic proteins for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Because of the high degree of polymorphism in MHC genes, and previous evidence for both functional and polypeptide sequence polymorphism in the proteins encoded by the antigen-processing genes, we tested DNA from 27 consanguineous human cell lines for genomic polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. These studies demonstrate a strong linkage disequilibrium between TAP1 and LMP2 RFLPs. Moreover, RFLPs, as well as a polymorphic stop codon in the telomeric TAP2 gene, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR alleles and RFLPs in the HLA-DO gene. A high rate of recombination, however, seems to occur in the center of the complex, between the TAP1 and TAP2 genes.

  13. Identification and mapping of two divergent, unlinked major histocompatibility complex class II B genes in Xiphophorus fishes.

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, T J; Godwin, U B; Norton, S F; Nairn, R S; Kazianis, S; Morizot, D C

    1998-01-01

    We have isolated two major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes from the inbred fish strain Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 A. We mapped one of these genes, designated here as DXB, to linkage group III, linked to a malic enzyme locus, also syntenic with human and mouse MHC. Comparison of genomic and cDNA clones shows the gene consists of six exons and five introns. The encoded beta1 domain has three amino acids deleted and a cytoplasmic tail nine amino acids longer than in other teleost class II beta chains, more similar to HLA-DRB, clawed frog Xela-F3, and nurse shark Gici-B. Key residues for disulfide bonds, glycosylation, and interaction with alpha chains are conserved. These same features are also present in a swordtail (Xiphophorus helleri) genomic DXB PCR clone. A second type of class II B clone was amplified by PCR from X. maculatus and found to be orthologous to class II genes identified in other fishes. This DAB-like gene is 63% identical to the X. maculatus DXB sequence in the conserved beta2-encoding exon and was mapped to new unassigned linkage group LG U24. The DXB gene, then, represents an unlinked duplicated locus not previously identified in teleosts. PMID:9691047

  14. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Positive selection drives the evolution of a major histocompatibility complex gene in an endangered Mexican salamander species complex.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Karen E; Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M; DeWoody, J Andrew; Parra-Olea, Gabriela; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2015-06-01

    Immune gene evolution can be critical to species survival in the face of infectious disease. In particular, polymorphism in the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) helps vertebrates combat novel and diverse pathogens by increasing the number of pathogen-derived proteins that can initiate the host's acquired immune response. In this study, we used a combination of presumably adaptive and neutral markers to investigate MHC evolution in populations of five salamander species within the Ambystoma velasci complex, a group consisting of 15 recently diverged species, several of which are endangered. We isolated 31 unique MHC class II β alleles from 75 total individuals from five species in this complex. MHC heterozygosity was significantly lower than expected for all five species, and we found no clear relationship between number of MHC alleles and species range, life history, or level of heterozygosity. We inferred a phylogeny representing the evolutionary history of Ambystoma MHC, with which we found signatures of positive selection on the overall gene, putative peptide-binding residues, and allelic lineages. We identified several instances of trans-species polymorphism, a hallmark of balancing selection observed in other groups of closely related species. In contrast, we did not detect comparable allelic diversity or signatures of selection on neutral loci. Additionally, we identified 17 supertypes among the 44 unique Ambystoma alleles, indicating that these sequences may encode functionally distinct MHC variants. We therefore have strong evidence that positive selection is a major evolutionary force driving patterns of MHC polymorphism in this recently radiated species complex.

  16. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene) in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weicai; Bei, Yongjian; Li, Hanhua

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  17. Characterization, Polymorphism and Selection of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DAB Genes in Vulnerable Chinese Egret (Egretta eulophotes)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeng; Zhou, Xiaoping; Lin, Qingxian

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an excellent molecular marker for the studies of evolutionary ecology and conservation genetics because it is a family of highly polymorphic genes that play a key role in vertebrate immune response. In this study, the functional genes of MHC Class II B (DAB) were isolated for the first time in a vulnerable species, the Chinese egret (Egrettaeulophotes). Using a full length DNA and cDNA produced by PCR and RACE methods, four potential MHC DAB loci were characterized in the genome of this egret and all four were expressed in liver and blood. At least four copies of the MHC gene complex were similar to two copies of the minimal essential MHC complex of chicken, but are less complex than the multiple copies expressed in passerine species. In MHC polymorphism, 19 alleles of exon 2 were isolated from 48 individuals using PCR. No stop codons or frameshift mutations were found in any of the coding regions. The signatures of positive selection detected in potential peptide-binding regions by Bayesian analysis, suggesting that all of these genes were functional. These data will provide the fundamental basis for further studies to elucidate the mechanisms and significance of MHC molecular adaptation in vulnerable Chinese egret and other ardeids. PMID:24019955

  18. Characterization of class II β chain major histocompatibility complex genes in a family of Hawaiian honeycreepers: 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    PubMed

    Jarvi, Susan I; Bianchi, Kiara R; Farias, Margaret Em; Txakeeyang, Ann; McFarland, Thomas; Belcaid, Mahdi; Asano, Ashley

    2016-07-01

    Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) have evolved in the absence of mosquitoes for over five million years. Through human activity, mosquitoes were introduced to the Hawaiian archipelago less than 200 years ago. Mosquito-vectored diseases such as avian malaria caused by Plasmodium relictum and Avipoxviruses have greatly impacted these vulnerable species. Susceptibility to these diseases is variable among and within species. Due to their function in adaptive immunity, the role of major histocompatibility complex genes (Mhc) in disease susceptibility is under investigation. In this study, we evaluate gene organization and levels of diversity of Mhc class II β chain genes (exon 2) in a captive-reared family of Hawaii 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens). A total of 233 sequences (173 bp) were obtained by PCR+1 amplification and cloning, and 5720 sequences were generated by Roche 454 pyrosequencing. We report a total of 17 alleles originating from a minimum of 14 distinct loci. We detected three linkage groups that appear to represent three distinct haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed one variable cluster resembling classical Mhc sequences (DAB) and one highly conserved, low variability cluster resembling non-classical Mhc sequences (DBB). High net evolutionary divergence values between DAB and DBB resemble that seen between chicken BLB system and YLB system genes. High amino acid identity among non-classical alleles from 12 species of passerines (DBB) and four species of Galliformes (YLB) was found, suggesting that these non-classical passerine sequences may be related to the Galliforme YLB sequences. PMID:26971289

  19. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  20. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hilary C.; O’Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. PMID:25953959

  1. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-05-07

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general.

  2. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility complex gene (Dk) products on immunogenic variants of a spontaneous murine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlow, D A; Kerbel, R S; Feltis, J T; Elliott, B E

    1985-08-01

    Both immunogenic and nonimmunogenic variant clones were isolated from a recently obtained spontaneous murine adenocarcinoma after treatment (xenogenization) with either the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate or the DNA hypomethylating agent, and "gene activator," 5-azacytidine. Clonal analysis of the untreated tumor population confirmed that immunogenic variants arose as a consequence of the xenogenization protocol. At a dose of 10(6) cells per mouse, nonimmunogenic variants, like the parental tumor line, grew progressively in normal syngeneic recipients. In contrast, immunogenic variants were rejected in normal syngeneic mice and grew progressively only in T-cell-deficient nude mice. Serologic analysis of the respective clonal variants revealed that immunogenic variants expressed substantially elevated (fourfold to tenfold) levels of class I H-2Dk antigen relative to parental or nonimmunogenic cell lines. Two variants exhibiting marginal immunogenicity expressed high and low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen, respectively suggesting that elevated MHC expression, although possibly a contributing factor, did not account for the immunogenic phenotype in all cases. Finally, the immunogenic phenotype of two variants decayed with time in culture. Clones in the process of reversion lost their elevated Dk gene expression and became progressively more tumorigenic in normal syngeneic mice. Together, these data are consistent with a hypothesis that elevated MHC expression can contribute to the immunogenic phenotype of originally low MHC-expressing tumors and that the reduced level of MHC observed in certain clinical cancers may have significant implications with regard to immunologic aspects of the tumor-host relationship.

  3. Selection and Trans-Species Polymorphism of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes in the Order Crocodylia

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Miles, Lee G.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85–90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  4. Evolutionary history of black grouse major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes revealed through single locus sequence-based genotyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplications are frequently observed in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) of many species, and as a consequence loci belonging to the same MHC class are often too similar to tell apart. In birds, single locus genotyping of MHC genes has proven difficult due to concerted evolution homogenizing sequences at different loci. But studies on evolutionary history, mode of selection and heterozygosity correlations on the MHC cannot be performed before it is possible to analyse duplicated genes separately. In this study we investigate the architecture and evolution of the MHC class IIB genes in black grouse. We developed a sequence-based genotyping method for separate amplification of the two black grouse MHC class IIB genes BLB1 and BLB2. Based on this approach we are able to study differences in structure and selection between the two genes in black grouse and relate these results to the chicken MHC structure and organization. Results Sequences were obtained from 12 individuals and separated into alleles using the software PHASE. We compared nucleotide diversity measures and employed selection tests for BLB1 and BLB2 to explore their modes of selection. Both BLB1 and BLB2 are transcribed and display classic characteristics of balancing selection as predicted for expressed MHC class IIB genes. We found evidence for both intra- and interlocus recombination or gene conversion, as well as indication for positive but differential selection at both loci. Moreover, the two loci appear to be linked. Phylogenetic analyses revealed orthology of the black grouse MHC class IIB genes to the respective BLB loci in chicken. Conclusions The results indicate that the duplication of the BLB gene occurred before the species divergence into black grouse, chicken and pheasant. Further, we conclude that BLB1 and BLB2 in black grouse are subjected to homogenizing concerted evolution due to interlocus genetic exchange after species divergence. The loci are in linkage

  5. Positive selection drives the evolution of a major histocompatibility complex gene in an endangered Mexican salamander species complex.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Karen E; Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M; DeWoody, J Andrew; Parra-Olea, Gabriela; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2015-06-01

    Immune gene evolution can be critical to species survival in the face of infectious disease. In particular, polymorphism in the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) helps vertebrates combat novel and diverse pathogens by increasing the number of pathogen-derived proteins that can initiate the host's acquired immune response. In this study, we used a combination of presumably adaptive and neutral markers to investigate MHC evolution in populations of five salamander species within the Ambystoma velasci complex, a group consisting of 15 recently diverged species, several of which are endangered. We isolated 31 unique MHC class II β alleles from 75 total individuals from five species in this complex. MHC heterozygosity was significantly lower than expected for all five species, and we found no clear relationship between number of MHC alleles and species range, life history, or level of heterozygosity. We inferred a phylogeny representing the evolutionary history of Ambystoma MHC, with which we found signatures of positive selection on the overall gene, putative peptide-binding residues, and allelic lineages. We identified several instances of trans-species polymorphism, a hallmark of balancing selection observed in other groups of closely related species. In contrast, we did not detect comparable allelic diversity or signatures of selection on neutral loci. Additionally, we identified 17 supertypes among the 44 unique Ambystoma alleles, indicating that these sequences may encode functionally distinct MHC variants. We therefore have strong evidence that positive selection is a major evolutionary force driving patterns of MHC polymorphism in this recently radiated species complex. PMID:25846208

  6. Organization and evolution of D region class I genes in the mouse major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chromosome walking has been used to study the organization of the class I genes in the D and Qa regions of the MHC of the BALB/c mouse and in the D region of the AKR mouse. Five and eight class I genes are found in the D and Qa regions of the BALB/c mouse, respectively, while the AKR mouse contains only a single class I D region gene that has been identified by transfection as the Dk gene. Restriction map homologies and crosshybridization experiments suggest that the multiple class I genes in the D region of the BALB/c mouse have been generated by unequal crossing-over involving class I genes from the Qa region. The expanded D region of BALB/c and other H-2d haplotype mouse strains appears to be metastable, since evidence for gene contraction in the Dd region has been found in two mutant strains. Thus the D region and also the Qa region class I genes are in a dynamic state, evolving by gene expansion and contraction. PMID:3701254

  7. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-01-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. Images PMID:3023867

  8. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-04-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. PMID:3023867

  9. Genetic polymorphism of the swine major histocompatibility complex ( SLA) class I genes, SLA-1, -2 and -3.

    PubMed

    Ando, Asako; Kawata, Hisako; Shigenari, Atsuko; Anzai, Tatsuya; Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Sada, Masaharu; Goto, Rieko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Iwanaga, Takahiro; Fujimura, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Gojobori, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2003-12-01

    In order to identify and characterize genetic polymorphism of the swine major histocompatibility complex ( Mhc: SLA) class I genes, RT-PCR products of the second and third exons of the three SLA classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3 were subjected to nucleotide determination. These analyses allowed the identification of four, eight and seven alleles at the SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3 loci, respectively, from three different breeds of miniature swine and one mixed breed. Among them, 12 alleles were novel. Construction of a phylogenetic tree using the nucleotide sequences of those 19 alleles indicated that the SLA-1 and -2 genes are more closely related to each other than to SLA-3. Selective forces operating at single amino acid sites of the SLA class I molecules were analyzed by the Adaptsite Package program. Ten positive selection sites were found at the putative antigen recognition sites (ARSs). Among the 14 positively selected sites observed in the human MHC ( HLA) classical class I molecules, eight corresponding positions in the SLA class I molecules were inferred as positively selected. On the other hand, four amino acids at the putative ARSs were identified as negatively selected in the SLA class I molecules. These results suggest that selective forces operating in the SLA class I molecules are almost similar to those of the HLA class I molecules, although several functional sites for antigen and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition by the SLA class I molecules may be different from those of the HLA class I molecules.

  10. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A.J.; Bailey, E.; Woodward, J.G.

    1986-03-05

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a /sup 32/P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family.

  11. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  12. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  13. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, S.N.; Miyasaka, T.; Polat, M.; Kikuya, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Mingala, C.N.; Villanueva, M.A.; Salces, A.J.; Onuma, M.; Aida, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  14. Clarifying the association of genes within the major histocompatibility complex with narcolepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Acton, R.T.; Watson, B.; Rivers, C.

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DR2 and DQwl has been reported to be strongly associated with narcolepsy. The particular phenotype and strength of these associations varies between races. For example DQB*0601 has been reported associated with some African American (AA) narcoleptics while some Caucasian American (CA) narcoleptics do not possess DR2 or DQw1. We have sought to clarify the relationship of MHC genes with narcolepsy in the local CA and AA population. There was no significant difference in the frequency of DR phenotypes in CA or AA narcoleptics compared to race, age, sex and geographic region-matched controls. DR2 was increased in CA cataplexy positive (Cat+) narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.028, odds ratio (OR)=2.4) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=<0.001, OR=8.8). DR11 was increased in AA Cat+ narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.004, OR=11.2) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=0.002). DQB1*0601 was not significantly associated with narcolepsy in our AA population. We have assessed the frequency of the TNFa (13 alleles, 1.1Mb telomeric to DQ{alpha}), D6S105 (13 alleles, 1kb telomeric of HLA-A), and GLP-1R (19 alleles, 18.5 Mb centromeric of DQ{alpha}), dinucleotide repeats in narcoleptics compared to controls. The TNFa allele 117 was increased in CA Cat+ vs. controls (p=0.003). The GLP-1R allele 144 was increased in CA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.02). In AA narcoleptics, the TNFa allele 109 was significantly increased (p=0.04) along with the D6S105 allele 130 (p=0.02) compared to controls. The D6S105 allele 130 was increased in AA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.03). The GLP-1R allele 154 was significantly decreased in AA Cat+ vs. Cat- (p=0.04). These data suggest that DR and/or DQ genes are not responsible for narcolepsy and that cataplexy is associated with different regions around the MHC in various racial groups.

  15. Molecular identification, polymorphism, and expression analysis of major histocompatibility complex class IIA and B genes of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Xi; Chen, Song-Lin

    2006-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II has a central role in the adaptive immune system by presenting foreign peptides to the T-cell receptor. The full lengths of MHC class II A and B cDNA were cloned from turbot by homology cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE PCR), and genomic organization, molecular polymorphism, and expression of turbot class IIB gene were examined to study the function of class IIB gene in fish. The deduced amino acid sequence of turbot class II A (GenBank accession no.DQ001730) and turbot class IIB (GenBank accession no. DQ094170) had 69.8%, 67.6%, 65.5%, 59.2%, 54.5%, 52.8%, 46.2%, 46.6%, 28.3%, 28.5%, 22.2% identity and 71.5%, 70.7%, 67.1%, 68.4%, 46.7%, 53.5%, 46.7%, 50.0%, 25.2%, 29.2%, 27.6% identity with those of Japanese flounder, striped sea bass, red sea bream, cichlid, rainbow trout, Atlantic salmon, carp, zebrafish, nurse shark, mouse and human, respectively. Eleven class IIB alleles were identified from three turbot individuals. The amino acid sequence of turbot class IIB designated as Scma-DAB*0101 had 86.9%, 88.6%, 88.6%, 89.4%, 87.8%, 86.9%, 84.1%, 86.5%, 87.3%, 77.1%, and 86.9% identity with those of turbot class IIB 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 (Scma-DAB*0201- Scma-DAB*1201), respectively. Six different class IIB alleles observed in a single individual may infer the existence of three loci at least. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that turbot class IIA and B were ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues. Challenge of turbot with pathogenic bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum, resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of MHC class IIB mRNA from 24 h to 48 h after infection in liver and head kidney, and a significant decrease from 24 h to 72 h after infection in spleen, followed by an increase after 96 h, respectively.

  16. The major histocompatibility complex of primates.

    PubMed

    Heise, E R; Cook, D J; Schepart, B S; Manning, C H; McMahan, M R; Chedid, M; Keever, C A

    1987-08-31

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encodes cell surface glycoproteins that function in self-nonself recognition and in allograft rejection. Among primates, the MHC has been well defined only in the human; in the chimpanzee and in two species of macaque monkeys the MHC is less well characterized. Serologic, biochemical and genetic evidence indicates that the basic organization of the MHC linkage group has been phylogenetically conserved. However, the number of genes and their linear relationship on the chromosomes differ between species. Class I MHC loci encode molecules that are the most polymorphic genes known. These molecules are ubiquitous in their tissue distribution and typically are recognized together with nominal antigens by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Class II MHC loci constitute a smaller family of serotypes serving as restricting elements for regulatory T lymphocytes. The distribution of class II antigens is limited mainly to cell types serving immune functions, and their expression is subject to up and down modulation. Class III loci code for components C2, C4 and Factor B (Bf) of the complement system. Interspecies differences in the extent of polymorphism occur, but the significance of this finding in relation to fitness and natural selection is unclear. Detailed information on the structure and regulation of MHC gene expression will be required to understand fully the biologic role of the MHC and the evolutionary relationships between species. Meanwhile, MHC testing has numerous applications to biomedical research, especially in preclinical tissue and organ transplantation studies, the study of disease mechanisms, parentage determination and breeding colony management. In this review, the current status of MHC definition in nonhuman primates will be summarized. Special emphasis is placed on the CyLA system of M. fascicularis which is a major focus in our laboratory. A highly polymorphic cynomolgus MHC has been partially characterized and consists

  17. Gene Conversion in the Evolution of Both the H-2 and Qa Class I Genes of the Murine Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kuhner, M.; Watts, S.; Klitz, W.; Thomson, G.; Goodenow, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of gene conversion in the evolution of the class I gene family of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), we have used a computer algorithm to detect clustered sequence similarities among 24 class I DNA sequences from the H-2, Qa, and Tla regions of the murine MHC. Thirty-four statistically significant clusters were detected; individual analysis of the clusters suggested at least 25 past gene conversion or recombination events. These clusters are comparable in size to the conversions observed in the spontaneously occurring H-2K(bm) and H-2K(km2) mutations, and are distributed throughout all exons of the class I gene. Thus, gene conversion does not appear to be restricted to the regions of the class I gene encoding their antigen-presentation function. Moreover, both the highly polymorphic H-2 loci and the relatively monomorphic Qa and Tla loci appear to have participated as donors and recipients in conversion events. If gene conversion is not limited to the highly polymorphic loci of the MHC, then another factor, presumably natural selection, must be responsible for maintaining the observed differences in level of variation. PMID:2076814

  18. cDNA cloning and genetic polymorphism of the swine major histocompatibility complex (SLA) class II DMA gene.

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Kawata, H; Murakami, T; Shigenari, A; Shiina, T; Sada, M; Tsuji, T; Toriu, A; Nakanishi, Y; Mitsuhashi, T; Sekikawa, K; Inoko, H

    2001-04-01

    cDNA clones corresponding to the swine histocompatibility complex (SLA: swine leucocyte antigen)-DM alpha chain were isolated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from the third exon in the human HLA-DMA gene as a probe. Amino acid comparative analysis revealed that these clones were more closely related to the bovine and human DMA genes than to the other swine class II genes alpha chain genes, DRA, DQA and DOA. These results suggest that the SLA-DMA gene is expressed and may function, like HLA-DM, as an important modulator in class II restricted antigen processing in swine. Furthermore, based on the sequences and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) patterns in the SLA-DMA gene, no allelic variation was recognized in the second exon, but five allelic variations were recognized in the third exon in five different breeds of swine. These DMA alleles were defined by variation at four nucleotide positions. Two of these alleles resulted in an amino acid substitution. These results suggest that SLA-DMA has little polymorphism as observed in HLA-DMA and mouse H2-Ma.

  19. Reproductive failure and the major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, K.; Gill, T.J. III; Ho, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    The association between HLA sharing and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) was tested in 123 couples and the association between HLA sharing, and the outcome of treatment for unexplained infertility by in vitro fertilization (IVF) was tested in 76 couples, by using a new shared-allele test in order to identify more precisely the region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influencing these reproductive defects. The shared-allele test circumvents the problem of rare alleles at HLA loci and at the same time provides a substantial gain in power over the simple {chi}{sup 2} test. Two statistical methods, a corrected homogeneity test and a bootstrap approach, were developed to compare the allele frequencies at each of the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ loci; they were not statistically different amount the three patient groups and the control group. There was a significant excess of HLA-DR sharing in couples with RSA and a significant excess of HLA-DQ sharing in couples with unexplained infertility who failed treatment by IVF. These findings indicate that genes located in different parts of the class II region of the MHC affect different aspects of reproduction and strongly suggest that the sharing of HLA antigens per se is not the mechanism involved in the reproductive defects. The segment of the MHC that has genes affecting reproduction also has genes associated with different autoimmune diseases, and this juxtaposition may explain the association between reproductive defects and autoimmune diseases. 58 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  20. Transcription specificity of the class Ib genes SLA-6, SLA-7 and SLA-8 of the swine major histocompatibility complex and comparison with class Ia genes.

    PubMed

    Kusza, S; Flori, L; Gao, Y; Teillaud, A; Hu, R; Lemonnier, G; Bosze, Z; Bourneuf, E; Vincent-Naulleau, S; Rogel-Gaillard, C

    2011-10-01

    Our aim was to analyse the transcription levels of the three non-classical class Ib genes SLA-6, SLA-7 and SLA-8 of the swine major histocompatibility complex in various tissues and conditions and to compare them to the transcription levels of classical class Ia genes. Twenty-five adult tissues from two pig breeds, pig renal PK15 cells infected with the Pseudorabies virus, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide or a mixture of phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin were included in our study. Relative transcription was quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. On average, in adult tissues and PBMCs and compared to SLA-6, the transcription level of SLA-Ia genes was 100-1000 times higher, the level of SLA-8 was 10-20 times higher, and that of SLA-7 was five times higher. Thus, SLA-8 is the most transcribed SLA-Ib gene, followed by the SLA-7 and SLA-6 genes. The highest transcription levels of SLA-Ib transcripts were found in the lymphoid organs, followed by the lung and the digestive tract. The tissue variability of expression levels was widest for the SLA-6 gene, with a 1:32 ratio between the lowest and highest levels in contrast to a 1:12 ratio for the SLA-7 and SLA-8 genes and a 1:16 ratio for the SLA-Ia genes. During PK-15 infection and PBMC stimulation, SLA-Ia and SLA-8 genes were downregulated, whereas SLA-6 and SLA-7 were upregulated, downregulated or not significantly modified. Our overall results confirm the tissue-wide transcription of the three SLA-Ib genes and suggest that they have complementary roles.

  1. Cloning of the major histocompatibility complex class II promoter binding protein affected in a hereditary defect in class II gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Reith, W; Barras, E; Satola, S; Kobr, M; Reinhart, D; Sanchez, C H; Mach, B

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression is directly involved in the control of normal and abnormal immune responses. In humans, HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP class II heterodimers are encoded by a family of alpha- and beta-chain genes clustered in the major histocompatibility complex. Their expression is developmentally controlled and normally restricted to certain cell types. This control is mediated by cis-acting sequences in class II promoters and by trans-acting regulatory factors. Several nuclear proteins bind to class II promoter sequences. In a form of hereditary immunodeficiency characterized by a defect in a trans-acting regulatory factor controlling class II gene transcription, we have observed that one of these nuclear factors (RF-X) does not bind to its target sequence (the class II X box). A cDNA encoding RF-X was isolated by screening a phage expression library with an X-box binding-site probe. The recombinant protein has the binding specificity of RF-X, including a characteristic gradient of affinity for the X boxes of HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ promoters. RF-X mRNA is present in the regulatory mutants, indicating a defect in the synthesis of a functional form of the RF-X protein. Images PMID:2498880

  2. Cooperativity between the J and S elements of class II major histocompatibility complex genes as enhancers in normal and class II- negative patient and mutant B cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The class II major histocompatibility complex genes all contain in their proximal promoters three cis-elements called S, X, and Y that are conserved in both sequence and position, and a fourth element, J, conserved in sequence but not in position. J, X, and Y and, to some extent, S, have been shown to be functionally important in regulation of expression of these genes. In the present study, a protein factor that binds cooperatively to the S plus J elements of the promoter of the class II major histocompatibility complex gene DPA has been detected. Moreover, functional cooperativity between S and J in activation of the enhancerless -40 interferon-beta (-40 IFN-beta) promoter has been demonstrated. Finally, the latter assay appears to subdivide complementation group A of class II negative human B cell lines that includes both mutants generated in vitro and cells from patients with the bare lymphocyte syndrome (type II). In three of these cell lines, the enhancerless -40 IFN-beta promoter containing the S plus J elements was functionally active, while in the others it was inactive. PMID:7790817

  3. Major histocompatibility complex class I genes in murine fibrosarcoma IC9 are down regulated at the level of the chromatin structure.

    PubMed Central

    Maschek, U; Pülm, W; Segal, S; Hämmerling, G J

    1989-01-01

    The fibrosarcoma IC9 is deficient in the expression of the major histocompatibility complex class I genes Kb, Kk, and Dk and expresses only the Db molecule. Because class I deficiency may enable tumor cells to escape the immune response by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, we investigated why the class I genes are not expressed. Expression of the silent class I genes could not be induced, but all known DNA-binding factors specific for class I genes could be detected in nuclear extracts of IC9 cells. After cloning of the silent Kb gene from the IC9 cells and subsequent transfection of this cloned Kb gene into LTK- and IC9 cells, normal Kb antigens were expressed on the cell surface of both cell lines. Digestion of the chromatin of IC9 cells with micrococcal nuclease and DNase I showed a decreased nuclease sensitivity of the silent class I genes in comparison with active genes and the absence of DNase I hypersensitive sites in the promoter region of the silent Dk gene. These findings demonstrate that class I expression is turned off by a cis-acting regulatory mechanism at the level of the chromatin structure. Images PMID:2506438

  4. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for induced Graves' disease in female mice of two large RI families and combined data with earlier findings to provide phenotypes for 178 genotypes. TSHR antibodies measured by inhibition of TSH binding to its receptor were highly significantly linked in the BXD set to the major histocompatibility region (chromosome 17), consistent with observations in 3 other RI families. In the LXS family, we detected linkage between T4 levels after TSHR-adenovirus immunization and the Ig heavy chain variable region (Igvh, chromosome 12). This observation is a key finding because components of the antigen binding region of Igs determine antibody specificity and have been previously linked to induced thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Data from the LXS family provide the first evidence in mice of a direct link between induced hyperthyroidism and Igvh genes. A role for major histocompatibility genes has now been established for genetic susceptibility to Graves' disease in both humans and mice. Future studies using arrays incorporating variation in the complex human Ig gene locus will be necessary to determine whether Igvh genes are also linked to Graves' disease in humans. PMID:25051451

  5. Association of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class 1 Chain-Related Gene A Dimorphism with Type 1 Diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the Algerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Belanteur, Khadidja; Amroun, Habiba; Benyahia, Amel; Heniche, Amel; Azzouz, Malha; Mimouni, Safia; Gervais, Thibaud; Latinne, Dominique; Boudiba, Aissa; Attal, Nabila; Abbadi, Mohamed Cherif

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA-129) dimorphism was investigated in 73 autoimmune diabetes patients (type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) and 75 controls from Algeria. Only MICA-129 Val allele and MICA-129 Val/Val genotype frequencies were higher among patients than in the control group. Statistical analysis of the estimated extended HLA-DR-DQ-MICA haplotypes shown that individual effects of MICA alleles on HLA-DQ2-DR3-MICA-129 Val/Val and HLA-DQ8-DR4-MICA-129 Val/Val haplotypes were significantly higher in patients than in the control groups. These preliminary data might suggest a relevant role of MICA-129 Val/Val single nucleotide polymorphism (weak/weak binders of NKG2D receptor) in the pathogenesis of T1D and LADA. PMID:22323559

  6. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Counteracts Cortical Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats. PMID:24621597

  7. Brief review of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex: the genes, their distribution on chromosome 16, and their contributions to disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marcia M; Taylor, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    Nearly all genes presently mapped to chicken chromosome 16 (GGA 16) have either a demonstrated role in immune responses or are considered to serve in immunity by reason of sequence homology with immune system genes defined in other species. The genes are best described in regional units. Among these, the best known is the polymorphic major histocompatibility complex-B (MHC-B) region containing genes for classical peptide antigen presentation. Nearby MHC-B is a small region containing two CD1 genes, which encode molecules known to bind lipid antigens and which will likely be found in chickens to present lipids to specialized T cells, as occurs with CD1 molecules in other species. Another region is the MHC-Y region, separated from MHC-B by an intervening region of tandem repeats. Like MHC-B, MHC-Y is polymorphic. It contains specialized class I and class II genes and c-type lectin-like genes. Yet another region, separated from MHC-Y by the single nucleolar organizing region (NOR) in the chicken genome, contains olfactory receptor genes and scavenger receptor genes, which are also thought to contribute to immunity. The structure, distribution, linkages and patterns of polymorphism in these regions, suggest GGA 16 evolves as a microchromosome devoted to immune defense. Many GGA 16 genes are polymorphic and polygenic. At the moment most disease associations are at the haplotype level. Roles of individual MHC genes in disease resistance are documented in only a very few instances. Provided suitable experimental stocks persist, the availability of increasingly detailed maps of GGA 16 genes combined with new means for detecting genetic variability will lead to investigations defining the contributions of individual loci and more applications for immunogenetics in breeding healthy poultry.

  8. Brief review of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex: the genes, their distribution on chromosome 16, and their contributions to disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marcia M.; Taylor, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all genes presently mapped to chicken chromosome 16 (GGA 16) have either a demonstrated role in immune responses or are considered to serve in immunity by reason of sequence homology with immune system genes defined in other species. The genes are best described in regional units. Among these, the best known is the polymorphic major histocompatibility complex-B (MHC-B) region containing genes for classical peptide antigen presentation. Nearby MHC-B is a small region containing two CD1 genes, which encode molecules known to bind lipid antigens and which will likely be found in chickens to present lipids to specialized T cells, as occurs with CD1 molecules in other species. Another region is the MHC-Y region, separated from MHC-B by an intervening region of tandem repeats. Like MHC-B, MHC-Y is polymorphic. It contains specialized class I and class II genes and c-type lectin-like genes. Yet another region, separated from MHC-Y by the single nucleolar organizing region (NOR) in the chicken genome, contains olfactory receptor genes and scavenger receptor genes, which are also thought to contribute to immunity. The structure, distribution, linkages and patterns of polymorphism in these regions, suggest GGA 16 evolves as a microchromosome devoted to immune defense. Many GGA 16 genes are polymorphic and polygenic. At the moment most disease associations are at the haplotype level. Roles of individual MHC genes in disease resistance are documented in only a very few instances. Provided suitable experimental stocks persist, the availability of increasingly detailed maps of GGA 16 genes combined with new means for detecting genetic variability will lead to investigations defining the contributions of individual loci and more applications for immunogenetics in breeding healthy poultry. PMID:26740135

  9. Characterization and genotyping of the DRB1 gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the Marmota monax, animal model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Larruskain, Amaia; García-Etxebarria, Koldo; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Jugo, Begoña M

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-containing genes are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates. MHC genes code for proteins that are critical in the immune system response. In this study, the polymorphism of the second exon of the MHC class II DRB gene was characterized in the Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax). Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the best available animal model for the study of chronic hepatitis B infection in humans. In the genotyped animals we found fifteen alleles, which were expressed in two independent loci and that were named DRB1A and DRB1B in this work. The 15 alleles investigated showed an elevated divergence. A significant excess of non-synonymous substitutions was detected, which could indicate that a historical positive selection is acting in the woodchuck DRB1 genes. This hypothesis was confirmed in our study by the high variability in or near the antigen binding sites (ABS) and by the results obtained in sequence variability analyses. This analysis identified the presence of a microsatellite sequence that is located at the start of the second intron, which could further allow the development of a fast and cheap semiautomatic sequencing method.

  10. Characterization and genotyping of the DRB1 gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the Marmota monax, animal model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Larruskain, Amaia; García-Etxebarria, Koldo; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Jugo, Begoña M

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-containing genes are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates. MHC genes code for proteins that are critical in the immune system response. In this study, the polymorphism of the second exon of the MHC class II DRB gene was characterized in the Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax). Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the best available animal model for the study of chronic hepatitis B infection in humans. In the genotyped animals we found fifteen alleles, which were expressed in two independent loci and that were named DRB1A and DRB1B in this work. The 15 alleles investigated showed an elevated divergence. A significant excess of non-synonymous substitutions was detected, which could indicate that a historical positive selection is acting in the woodchuck DRB1 genes. This hypothesis was confirmed in our study by the high variability in or near the antigen binding sites (ABS) and by the results obtained in sequence variability analyses. This analysis identified the presence of a microsatellite sequence that is located at the start of the second intron, which could further allow the development of a fast and cheap semiautomatic sequencing method. PMID:25458311

  11. Human class II major histocompatibility complex gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma leads to loss of tumorigenicity, immunity against subsequent tumor challenge, and elimination of microscopic preestablished tumors.

    PubMed

    Hock, R A; Reynolds, B D; Tucker-McClung, C L; Kwok, W W

    1995-01-01

    Immunological recognition of transformed cells is critically important to limit tumor development and proliferation. Because established tumors have escaped immune recognition and elimination, novel strategies to enhance antitumor immunity have been developed. A unique approach has used the introduction of genes encoding major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens into tumor cells. Experiments in mice have shown that the expression of syngeneic class II MHC antigens in tumor cells completely abrogates tumorigenicity and induces tumor-specific immunity. In this study we sought to determine whether a more effective antitumor immune response would be generated by introducing xenogeneic class II MHC genes into tumor cells. To address this question we used recombinant retroviruses to express human class II MHC genes in a highly malignant murine neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a. We found that normal mice inoculated with Neuro-2a expressing the human class II MHC antigen did not develop tumors and were immune to subsequent challenge with unmodified Neuro-2a cells. In addition, mice bearing small established Neuro-2a tumors were cured by vaccination with Neuro-2a expressing human class II MHC. We hypothesize that a similar approach using retroviral-mediated transduction of class II MHC genes into human tumor cells may be an effective alternative to current cancer treatment.

  12. Extensive polymorphism and evidence of selection pressure on major histocompatibility complex DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 class II genes in Croatian grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Arbanasić, H; Huber, Đ; Kusak, J; Gomerčić, T; Hrenović, J; Galov, A

    2013-01-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the mammalian immune system and have become important molecular markers for measuring fitness-related genetic variation in wildlife populations. Because of human persecution and habitat fragmentation, the grey wolf has become extinct from a large part of Western and Central Europe, and remaining populations have become isolated. In Croatia, the grey wolf population, part of the Dinaric-Balkan population, shrank nearly to extinction during the 20th century, and is now legally protected. Using the cloning-sequencing method, we investigated the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of exon 2 of MHC class II DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 genes in 77 individuals. We identified 13 DRB1, 7 DQA1 and 11 DQB1 highly divergent alleles, and 13 DLA-DRB1/DQA1/DQB1 haplotypes. Selection analysis comparing the relative rates of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (d(N)/d(S)) showed evidence of positive selection pressure acting on all three loci. Trans-species polymorphism was found, suggesting the existence of balancing selection. Evolutionary codon models detected considerable difference between alpha and beta chain gene selection patterns: DRB1 and DQB1 appeared to be under stronger selection pressure, while DQA1 showed signs of moderate selection. Our results suggest that, despite the recent contraction of the Croatian wolf population, genetic variability in selectively maintained immune genes has been preserved. PMID:23134500

  13. Making the animal model for AIDS research more precise: the impact of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes on pathogenesis and disease progression in SIV-infected monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sauermann, U

    2001-09-01

    Experimentally infected rhesus monkeys serve as an indispensable animal model to assess the pathogenesis, to validate therapy approaches and to develop vaccination strategies against viral diseases such as AIDS threatening the human population. Upon infection with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a retrovirus closely related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), macaques develop clinical manifestations similar to those of HIV-infected humans. As in humans, the disease course is variable. Polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are required for the initiation and regulation of a specific immune response and represent a major host factor accounting for the differential outcome of infection. During the last few years, our understanding of the structure and function of the rhesus macaque MHC has increased substantially. Functional studies have led to the identification of specific SIV and HIV peptide epitopes presented by rhesus macaque MHC molecules. The subsequent development of MHC class I tetramers has allowed further insight into the cellular immune response following SIV-infection. Detailed studies demonstrated that viral escape mutants are generated during the acute and chronic phase of infection and explain why control of viral replication ultimately fails. Furthermore, particular MHC haplotypes which influence disease progression have been discovered. Thus, MHC-typing can have a prognostic potential. The further elucidation of the rhesus macaque MHC and the search for other relevant genes will remain an important task for future research and will stimulate all immunologically-related investigations in macaques. PMID:11899095

  14. Major histocompatibility complex class I chain related (MIC) A gene, TNFa microsatellite alleles and TNFB alleles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients from Latvia.

    PubMed

    Nikitina Zake, Liene; Cimdina, Ija; Rumba, Ingrida; Dabadghao, Preethi; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2002-05-01

    In order to analyze involvement of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) microsatellite polymorphisms as well as TNFB gene in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), we studied 128 patients divided into groups according to clinical features [monoarthritis (n = 14), oligoarthritis (n = 58), polyarthritis (n = 50), and systemic (n = 6)], and 114 age- and sex-matched healthy controls from Latvia. DNA samples were amplified with specific primers and used for genotyping of MICA and TNFa microsatellite. Typing for a biallelic NcoI polymerase chain reaction RFLP polymorphism located at the first intron of TNFB gene was done as follows: restriction digests generated fragments of 555bp and 185bp for TNFB*1 allele, and 740bp for TNFB*2 allele. The results were compared between cases and controls. We found significant increase of MICA allele A4 (p = 0.009; odds ratio [OR] = 2.3) and allele TNFa2 (p = 0.0001; OR = 4.4) in patients compared with controls. The frequency of allele TNFa9 was significantly decreased (p = 0.0001; OR = 0.1) in patients with JIA. No significant differences of TNFB allele frequency were found. Our data suggest that MICA and TNFa microsatellite polymorphisms may be used as markers for determination of susceptibility and protection from JIA.

  15. Identification of a Colonial Chordate Histocompatibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Newman, Aaron M.; Corey, Daniel M.; Sahoo, Debashis; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F.; Passarelli, Benedetto; Koh, Winston; Ishizuka, Katherine J.; Palmeri, Karla J.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Keasar, Chen; Fan, H. Christina; Mantalas, Gary L.; Sinha, Rahul; Penland, Lolita; Quake, Stephen R.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Histocompatibility is the basis by which multicellular organisms of the same species distinguish self from non-self. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying histocompatibility reactions in lower organisms. Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate, a sister group of vertebrates, that exhibits a genetically determined natural transplantation reaction, whereby self-recognition between colonies leads to formation of parabionts with a common vasculature, whereas rejection occurs between incompatible colonies. Using genetically defined lines, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and genomics, we identified a single gene that encodes self/non-self and determines “graft” outcomes in this organism. This gene is significantly upregulated in colonies poised to undergo fusion or rejection, is highly expressed in the vasculature, and is functionally linked to histocompatibility outcomes. These findings establish a platform for advancing the science of allorecognition. PMID:23888037

  16. Rapid Evolution of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Genes in Primates Generates New Disease Alleles in Humans via Hitchhiking Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Takashi; Ota, Masao; Shimizu, Sayoko; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Nami; Takasu, Miwa; Anzai, Tatsuya; Kulski, Jerzy K.; Kikkawa, Eri; Naruse, Taeko; Kimura, Natsuki; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kohara, Sakae; Iwamoto, Chie; Umehara, Yumi; Meyer, Alice; Wanner, Valérie; Sano, Kazumi; Macquin, Cécile; Ikeo, Kazuho; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Gojobori, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Bahram, Seiamak

    2006-01-01

    A plausible explanation for many MHC-linked diseases is lacking. Sequencing of the MHC class I region (coding units or full contigs) in several human and nonhuman primate haplotypes allowed an analysis of single nucleotide variations (SNV) across this entire segment. This diversity was not evenly distributed. It was rather concentrated within two gene-rich clusters. These were each centered, but importantly not limited to, the antigen-presenting HLA-A and HLA-B/-C loci. Rapid evolution of MHC-I alleles, as evidenced by an unusually high number of haplotype-specific (hs) and hypervariable (hv) (which could not be traced to a single species or haplotype) SNVs within the classical MHC-I, seems to have not only hitchhiked alleles within nearby genes, but also hitchhiked deleterious mutations in these same unrelated loci. The overrepresentation of a fraction of these hvSNV (hv1SNV) along with hsSNV, as compared to those that appear to have been maintained throughout primate evolution (trans-species diversity; tsSNV; included within hv2SNV) tends to establish that the majority of the MHC polymorphism is de novo (species specific). This is most likely reminiscent of the fact that these hsSNV and hv1SNV have been selected in adaptation to the constantly evolving microbial antigenic repertoire. PMID:16702430

  17. Balancing selection and genetic drift at major histocompatibility complex class II genes in isolated populations of golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small, isolated populations often experience loss of genetic variation due to random genetic drift. Unlike neutral or nearly neutral markers (such as mitochondrial genes or microsatellites), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in these populations may retain high levels of polymorphism due to balancing selection. The relative roles of balancing selection and genetic drift in either small isolated or bottlenecked populations remain controversial. In this study, we examined the mechanisms maintaining polymorphisms of MHC genes in small isolated populations of the endangered golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) by comparing genetic variation found in MHC and microsatellite loci. There are few studies of this kind conducted on highly endangered primate species. Results Two MHC genes were sequenced and sixteen microsatellite loci were genotyped from samples representing three isolated populations. We isolated nine DQA1 alleles and sixteen DQB1 alleles and validated expression of the alleles. Lowest genetic variation for both MHC and microsatellites was found in the Shennongjia (SNJ) population. Historical balancing selection was revealed at both the DQA1 and DQB1 loci, as revealed by excess non-synonymous substitutions at antigen binding sites (ABS) and maximum-likelihood-based random-site models. Patterns of microsatellite variation revealed population structure. FST outlier analysis showed that population differentiation at the two MHC loci was similar to the microsatellite loci. Conclusions MHC genes and microsatellite loci showed the same allelic richness pattern with the lowest genetic variation occurring in SNJ, suggesting that genetic drift played a prominent role in these isolated populations. As MHC genes are subject to selective pressures, the maintenance of genetic variation is of particular interest in small, long-isolated populations. The results of this study may contribute to captive breeding and translocation programs

  18. Identification of two major histocompatibility (MH) class II A genes and their association to Vibrio anguillarum infection in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Wang, Xubo; Zhang, Quanqi; Wang, Zhigang; Qi, Jie; Yi, Qilin; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Yanan; Yu, Haiyang

    2012-03-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II antigens are important in vertebrate immune system. In the present study, the full cDNA sequence of class II A gene was synthesized by RACE-PCR from half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis), and its open reading frame (ORF) polymorphism was studied. The whole cDNA sequence was 992 bp in length, including the ORF with 717 bp. Twenty-five alleles were identified and clustered into two distinct groups according to the specific nucleotides/ amino acids in specific positions. Eleven alleles belonged to Cyse-DAA while fourteen alleles belonged to Cyse-DBA. Four Cyse-DAA alleles were observed in one individual, and three to five Cyse-DBA alleles were observed in each of the three detected individuals, which indicated that at least two loci existed in each gene. Moreover, in order to study the function of the alleles in resistance to infection, 200 individuals were intraperitoneally injected with Vibrio anguillarum and the first 20 dead individuals and 20 surviving ones were selected for genotype analysis. Fifty-six alleles were identified among the 40 individuals. Twenty-nine alleles belonged to Cyse-DAA and the other 27 alleles belonged to Cyse-DBA. Eighteen alleles were selected for studying their function in resistance to infection. Alleles Cyse-DAA*0201, Cyse-DAA*1101, Cyse-DBA*0401, Cyse-DBA*1102, Cyse-DBA*1801 and Cyse-DBA*2201 were identified only in surviving individuals, while alleles Cyse- DAA*0901, Cyse-DBA*1101 and Cyse-DBA*1401 occurred more frequently in dead individuals. This study confirmed the existence and polymorphism of two class II A genes as well as the relationship between alleles of class II A genes and disease susceptibility/ resistance in half-smooth tongue sole.

  19. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution.

  20. Brief Note Low diversity of the major histocompatibility complex class II DRA gene in domestic goats (Capra hircus) in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, L P; E, G X; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S; Zhao, Z Q; Zhang, J H; Ma, Y H; Sun, Y W; Zhong, T; Zhang, H P; Huang, Y F

    2015-01-01

    DRA encodes the alpha chain of the DR heterodimer, is closely linked to DRB and is considered almost monomorphic in major histocompatibility complex region. In this study, we identified the exon 2 of DRA to evaluate the immunogenetic diversity of Chinese south indigenous goat. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in an untranslated region and one synonymous substitution in coding region were identified. These data suggest that high immunodiversity in native Chinese population. PMID:26125900

  1. The major histocompatibility complex in monotremes: an analysis of the evolution of Mhc class I genes across all three mammalian subclasses.

    PubMed

    Miska, Katarzyna B; Harrison, Gavan A; Hellman, Lars; Miller, Robert D

    2002-09-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones of expressed, functional major histocompatibility complex class-I ( Mhc-I) genes from two species of monotremes: the duck-billed platypus and the short-beaked echidna. The cDNA clones were isolated from libraries constructed from spleen RNA, clearly establishing their expression in at least this one peripheral lymphoid organ. From the presence of conserved amino acid residues, it appears the expressed sequences encode molecules that likely function as classical Mhc-I. These clones were isolated using monotreme Mhc-I processed pseudogenes as probes. These processed pseudogenes were isolated from genomic DNA and, based on their structure, are likely independently derived in the platypus and echidna. When all the monotreme sequences were included in phylogenetic analyses, we found no apparent orthologous relationships between the platypus and echidna Mhc-I. Analyses that included a large number of Mhc-I sequences from other taxa support a separate monotreme Mhc-I clade, basal to a therian Mhc-I clade that is comprised of sequences from marsupial and placental mammals. The phylogenies also support the hypothesis that Mhc-I genes of placental mammals, marsupials, and monotremes are derived from three separate lineages of Mhc-I genes, best explained by two rounds of duplications and deletions. The first round would have occurred prior to the divergence of monotremes and therians, and the second prior to the divergence of marsupials and placental mammals. The sequences described here represent the first reported functional monotreme Mhc-I, as well as the first processed pseudogenes of any type from monotremes.

  2. Sequence polymorphism of two major histocompatibility (MH) class II B genes and their association with Vibrio anguillarum infection in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Quanqi; Yu, Yan; Li, Shuo; Zhong, Qiwang; Sun, Yeying; Wang, Zhigang; Qi, Jie; Zhai, Jieming; Wang, Xubo

    2011-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B molecules play an important role in the adaptive immune response in fish. Previous study has reported that two highly polymorphic class II B genes, Cyse-DAB and Cyse-DBB exist in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis). In this study, the polymorphism within exon 2 of the class II B genes following bacterial challenge was evaluated. Two hundred C. semilaevis individuals were injected intraperitoneally with Vibrio anguillarum. Muscle tissue from the first 20 dead and 20 of the survivors was collected for genotyping. Sixty alleles from the 40 individuals were isolated, of which 32 belonged to Cyse-DAB and 28 belonged to Cyse-DBB. The rate of d N (non-synonymous substitution) was higher than that of d S (synonymous substitution) in the PBRs (peptide binding residues) of both class II B genes. Conversely, the rate of d S was higher than d N in the non-PBRs and the complete exon 2 sequence. Thus, the results suggest that positive selection has occurred in the PBRs and purifying selection in the non-PBRs and exon 2. Thirteen class II B alleles were used to study the association between alleles and resistance to infection. Though not significant, alleles Cyse-DAB*0601, Cyse-DAB*0706, and Cyse-DBB*0101, Cyse-DBB*1301 were only found in surviving individuals and may represent alleles that have resistance against V. anguillarum infection. Alleles Cyse-DAB*0701 and Cyse-DAB*1301 were significantly more prevalent in dead individuals than in surviving ones and may represent alleles that are associated with increased susceptibility to V. anguillarum infection.

  3. Disentangling the effects of recombination, selection, and demography on the genetic variation at a major histocompatibility complex class II gene in the alpine chamois.

    PubMed

    Mona, S; Crestanello, B; Bankhead-Dronnet, S; Pecchioli, E; Ingrosso, S; D'Amelio, S; Rossi, L; Meneguz, P G; Bertorelle, G

    2008-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) harbours some of the most polymorphic loci in vertebrate genomes. MHC genes are thought to be subject to some form of balancing selection, most likely pathogen-mediated selection. Hence, MHC genes are excellent candidates for exploring adaptive processes. In this study, we investigated the genetic variation at exon 2 of the DRB class II MHC locus in 191 alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) from 10 populations in the eastern Alps of Italy. In particular, we were interested in distinguishing and estimating the relative impact of selective and demographic factors, while taking into account the confounding effect of recombination. The extremely high d(n)/d(s) ratio and the presence of trans-species polymorphisms suggest that a strong long-term balancing selection effect has been operating at this locus throughout the evolutionary history of this species. We analysed patterns of genetic variation within and between populations, and the mitochondrial D-loop polymorphism patterns were analysed to provide a baseline indicator of the effects of demographic processes. These analyses showed that (i) the chamois experienced a demographic decline in the last 5000-30 000 years, most likely related to the postglacial elevation in temperature; (ii) this demographic process can explain the results of neutrality tests applied to MHC variation within populations, but cannot justify the much weaker divergence between populations implied by MHC as opposed to mitochondrial DNA; (iii) similar sets of divergent alleles are probably maintained with similar frequencies by balancing selection in different populations, and this mechanism is also operating in small isolated populations, which are strongly affected by drift.

  4. MOLECULAR GENETICS OF THE SWINE MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX, THE SLA COMPLEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  5. Characterization and 454 pyrosequencing of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I genes in the great tit reveal complexity in a passerine system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The critical role of Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) genes in disease resistance and their highly polymorphic nature make them exceptional candidates for studies investigating genetic effects on survival, mate choice and conservation. Species that harbor many Mhc loci and high allelic diversity are particularly intriguing as they are potentially under strong selection and studies of such species provide valuable information as to the mechanisms maintaining Mhc diversity. However comprehensive genotyping of complex multilocus systems has been a major challenge to date with the result that little is known about the consequences of this complexity in terms of fitness effects and disease resistance. Results In this study, we genotyped the Mhc class I exon 3 of the great tit (Parus major) from two nest-box breeding populations near Oxford, UK that have been monitored for decades. Characterization of Mhc class I exon 3 was adopted and bidirectional sequencing was carried using the 454 sequencing platform. Full analysis of sequences through a stepwise variant validation procedure allowed reliable typing of more than 800 great tits based on 214,357 reads; from duplicates we estimated the repeatability of typing as 0.94. A total of 862 alleles were detected, and the presence of at least 16 functional loci was shown - the highest number characterized in a wild bird species. Finally, the functional alleles were grouped into 17 supertypes based on their antigen binding affinities. Conclusions We found extreme complexity at the Mhc class I of the great tit both in terms of allelic diversity and gene number. The presence of many functional loci was shown, together with a pseudogene family and putatively non-functional alleles; there was clear evidence that functional alleles were under strong balancing selection. This study is the first step towards an in-depth analysis of this gene complex in this species, which will help understanding how parasite

  6. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Gene and Newcastle Disease Virus Titre and Body Weight in Leung Hang Khao Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Molee, A.; Kongroi, K.; Kuadsantia, P.; Poompramun, C.; Likitdecharote, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene on resistance to Newcastle disease virus and body weight of the Thai indigenous chicken, Leung Hang Khao (Gallus gallus domesticus). Blood samples were collected for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis from 485 chickens. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used to classify single nucleotide polymorphisms of class II MHC. Body weights were measured at the ages of 3, 4, 5, and 7 months. Titres of Newcastle disease virus at 2 weeks to 7 months were determined and the correlation between body weight and titre was analysed. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and body weight and titre were analysed by a generalized linear model. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified: C125T, A126T, C209G, C242T, A243T, C244T, and A254T. Significant correlations between log titre and body weight were found at 2 and 4 weeks. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and titre were found for C209G and A254T, and between all single nucleotide polymorphisms (except A243T) and body weight. The results showed that class II MHC is associated with both titre of Newcastle disease virus and body weight in Leung Hang Khao chickens. This is of concern because improved growth traits are the main goal of breeding selection. Moreover, the results suggested that MHC has a pleiotropic effect on the titre and growth performance. This mechanism should be investigated in a future study. PMID:26732325

  7. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution. PMID:26606731

  8. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Markers in Conservation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ujvari, Beata; Belov, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Human impacts through habitat destruction, introduction of invasive species and climate change are increasing the number of species threatened with extinction. Decreases in population size simultaneously lead to reductions in genetic diversity, ultimately reducing the ability of populations to adapt to a changing environment. In this way, loss of genetic polymorphism is linked with extinction risk. Recent advances in sequencing technologies mean that obtaining measures of genetic diversity at functionally important genes is within reach for conservation programs. A key region of the genome that should be targeted for population genetic studies is the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). MHC genes, found in all jawed vertebrates, are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genomes. They play key roles in immune function via immune-recognition and -surveillance and host-parasite interaction. Therefore, measuring levels of polymorphism at these genes can provide indirect measures of the immunological fitness of populations. The MHC has also been linked with mate-choice and pregnancy outcomes and has application for improving mating success in captive breeding programs. The recent discovery that genetic diversity at MHC genes may protect against the spread of contagious cancers provides an added impetus for managing and protecting MHC diversity in wild populations. Here we review the field and focus on the successful applications of MHC-typing for conservation management. We emphasize the importance of using MHC markers when planning and executing wildlife rescue and conservation programs but stress that this should not be done to the detriment of genome-wide diversity. PMID:21954351

  9. Major histocompatibility complex I in brain development and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    McAllister, A Kimberley

    2014-02-15

    Although the etiology of schizophrenia (SZ) remains unknown, it is increasingly clear that immune dysregulation plays a central role. Genome-wide association studies reproducibly indicate an association of SZ with immune genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Moreover, environmental factors that increase risk for SZ, such as maternal infection, alter peripheral immune responses as well as the expression of immune molecules in the brain. MHC class I (MHCI) molecules might mediate both genetic and environmental contributions to SZ through direct effects on brain development in addition to mediating immunity. MHCI molecules are expressed on neurons in the central nervous system throughout development and into adulthood, where they regulate many aspects of brain development, including neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and function, long-term and homeostatic plasticity, and activity-dependent synaptic refinement. This review summarizes our current understanding of MHCI expression and function in the developing brain as well as its involvement in maternal immune activation, from the perspective of how these roles for MHCI molecules might contribute to the pathogenesis of SZ.

  10. Extended major histocompatibility complex haplotypes in type I diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Raum, D; Awdeh, Z; Yunis, E J; Alper, C A; Gabbay, K H

    1984-01-01

    We have studied major histocompatibility complex markers in Caucasian patients with type I diabetes mellitus and their families. The frequencies of extended haplotypes that were composed of specific HLA-B, HLA-DR, BF, C2, C4A, and C4B allelic combinations, which occurred more commonly than expected, were compared on random diabetic and normal chromosomes in the study families. We demonstrated that all of the previously recognized increases in HLA-B8, B18, B15, DR3, and perhaps DR4 could be ascribed to the increase among diabetic haplotypes of a few extended haplotypes: [HLA B8, DR3, SC01, GLO2]; [HLA-B18, DR3, F1C30]; [HLA-B15, DR4, SC33]; and [HLA-BW38, DR4, SC21]. In fact, HLA-DR3 on nonextended haplotypes was "protective", with a relative risk considerably less than 1.0. There was a paucity or absence among diabetic patients of several extended haplotypes of normal chromosomes, notably [HLA-B7, DR2, SC31] and [HLA-BW44, DR4, SC30]. The extended haplotype [HLA-BW38, DR4, SC21] is found only in Ashkenazi Jewish patients, which suggests that extended haplotypes mark specific mutations that arise in defined ethnic groups. The data show that no known MHC allele, including HLA-DR3 and possibly HLA-DR4, is per se a marker for or itself a susceptibility gene for type I diabetes. Rather, extended haplotypes, with relatively fixed alleles, are either carriers or noncarriers of susceptibility genes for this disease. Thus, the increased frequency (association) or the decreased frequency (protection) of individual MHC alleles is largely explainable by these extended haplotypes. PMID:6746903

  11. Haplessly hoping: macaque major histocompatibility complex made easy.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Bohn, Patrick S; Nimityongskul, Francesca A; Starrett, Gabriel J; O'Connor, David H

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products control the repertoire of T cell responses that an individual may create against pathogens and foreign tissues. This text will review the current understanding of MHC genetics in nonhuman primates, with a focus on Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). These closely related macaque species provide important experimental models for studies of infectious disease pathogenesis, vaccine development, and transplantation research. Recent advances resulting from the application of several cost effective, high-throughput approaches, with deep sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to perform MHC genotyping of large macaque cohorts. Pyrosequencing of cDNA amplicons with a Roche/454 GS Junior instrument, provides excellent resolution of MHC class I allelic variants with semi-quantitative estimates of relative levels of transcript abundance. Introduction of the Illumina MiSeq platform significantly increased the sample throughput, since the sample loading workflow is considerably less labor intensive, and each instrument run yields approximately 100-fold more sequence data. Extension of these sequencing methods from cDNA to genomic DNA amplicons further streamlines the experimental workflow and opened opportunities for retrospective MHC genotyping of banked DNA samples. To facilitate the reporting of MHC genotypes, and comparisons between groups of macaques, this text also introduces an intuitive series of abbreviated rhesus MHC haplotype designations based on a major Mamu-A or Mamu-B transcript characteristic for ancestral allele combinations. The authors believe that the use of MHC-defined macaques promises to improve the reproducibility, and predictability of results from pre-clinical studies for translation to humans.

  12. The influence of the swine major histocompatibility genes on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to immunization with an aromatic-dependent mutant of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, J S; Kennedy, B W; Mallard, B A; Wilkie, B N

    1993-01-01

    Eighty-two major histocompatibility complex (MHC) swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs from 16 litters were examined for serum agglutinating antibody titer and O-polysaccharide (O-ps) specific peripheral blood lymphocyte blastogenesis following two parenteral vaccinations with 1 x 10(8) aromatic-dependent (aroA) Salmonella typhimurium and following oral challenge with 1 x 10(12) virulent parent S. typhimurium. Least mean squares analysis allowed separate determinations of the effects of MHC genotype, dam, sire and litter. In most cases only litter significantly influenced both lymphocyte blastogenesis and antibody titer before and after vaccination and following challenge. However, pig SLA haplotype significantly influenced the degree of O-ps specific lymphocyte proliferation six days after the second vaccination (p < 0.004). Lymphocyte proliferation and serum agglutinating antibody response six days after primary vaccination were negatively correlated (r2 = -0.68, p < 0.001). In most cases, "dd" and "gg" homozygous and "dg" heterozygous pigs, having the same MHC class II region, behaved immunologically as a group distinct from the other genotypes. PMID:8431799

  13. From genome-wide to candidate gene: an investigation of variation at the major histocompatibility complex in common bottlenose dolphins exposed to harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Cammen, Kristina M; Wilcox, Lynsey A; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    The role the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays in response to exposure to environmental toxins is relatively poorly understood, particularly in comparison to its well-described role in pathogen immunity. We investigated associations between MHC diversity and resistance to brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). A previous genome-wide association study investigating an apparent difference in harmful algal bloom (HAB) resistance among dolphin populations in the Gulf of Mexico identified genetic variation associated with survival in close genomic proximity to multiple MHC class II loci. Here, we characterized genetic variation at DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB loci in dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle, including dolphins that died during HABs and dolphins presumed to have survived HAB exposure. We found that DRB and DQB exhibited patterns of genetic differentiation among geographic regions that differed from neutral microsatellite loci. In addition, genetic differentiation at DRB across multiple pairwise comparisons of live and dead dolphins was greater than differentiation observed at neutral loci. Our findings at these MHC loci did not approach the strength of association with survival previously described for a nearby genetic variant. However, the results provide evidence that selective pressures at the MHC vary among dolphin populations that differ in the frequency of HAB exposure and that the overall composition of DRB variants differs between dolphin survivors and non-survivors of HABs. These results may suggest a potential role of MHC diversity in variable survival of bottlenose dolphins exposed to HABs.

  14. A molecular map of the chicken major histocompatibility complex: the class II beta genes are closely linked to the class I genes and the nucleolar organizer.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemot, F; Billault, A; Pourquié, O; Béhar, G; Chaussé, A M; Zoorob, R; Kreibich, G; Auffray, C

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned in a cosmid vector four DNA clusters covering 320 kb of the chicken MHC (B complex), including five class II (B-L) beta genes defining two related isotypic families. Additional B complex genes have been revealed using tissue-specific cDNA probes. A cosmid fragment has been used to isolate a cDNA for a class I (B-F) transcript. This transcript, that is by far the most divergent known member of the class I gene family, hybridized to six B-F genes present in the cosmids. One of the clusters was shown to contain two rRNA transcriptional units from the nucleolar organizer region (NOR), marking the telomeric boundary of the B complex. None of the other B complex genes hybridizes to, or has the transcriptional characteristics of mammalian MHC class II alpha or class III genes. The map we have obtained shows that the B complex does not contain well defined class I and class II regions since B-F and B-L beta genes are closely associated with unrelated genes. Moreover, class II beta genes are very closely linked to class I genes in two clusters, and to the NOR in a third one. Images PMID:3141149

  15. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Malaria: Focus on Plasmodium vivax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose

    2016-01-01

    The importance of host and parasite genetic factors in malaria resistance or susceptibility has been investigated since the middle of the last century. Nowadays, of all diseases that affect man, malaria still plays one of the highest levels of selective pressure on human genome. Susceptibility to malaria depends on exposure profile, epidemiological characteristics, and several components of the innate and adaptive immune system that influences the quality of the immune response generated during the Plasmodium lifecycle in the vertebrate host. But it is well known that the parasite’s enormous capacity of genetic variation in conjunction with the host genetics polymorphism is also associated with a wide spectrum of susceptibility degrees to complicated or severe forms of the disease. In this scenario, variations in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) associated with host resistance or susceptibility to malaria have been identified and used as markers in host–pathogen interaction studies, mainly those evaluating the impact on the immune response, acquisition of resistance, or increased susceptibility to infection or vulnerability to disease. However, due to the intense selective pressure, number of cases, and mortality rates, the majority of the reported associations reported concerned Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Studies on the MHC polymorphism and its association with Plasmodium vivax, which is the most widespread Plasmodium and the most prevalent species outside the African continent, are less frequent but equally important. Despite punctual contributions, there are accumulated evidences of human genetic control in P. vivax infection and disease. Herein, we review the current knowledge in the field of MHC and derived molecules (HLA Class I, Class II, TNF-α, LTA, BAT1, and CTL4) regarding P. vivax malaria. We discuss particularly the results of P. vivax studies on HLA class I and II polymorphisms in relation to host susceptibility, naturally

  16. Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIB polymorphism in an ancient Spanish breed.

    PubMed

    Atlija, Marina; Gutíerrez-Gil, Beatriz; Arranz, Juan-Jose; Semmer, Jördis; Stear, Michael J; Buitkamp, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    Genes from the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II region are involved in the presentation of antigens. Therefore, they have the key role in regulating the immune response and in the resistance to infections. We investigated the Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIB genes, DRB and DQB, in Churra sheep, one of the most important indigenous breeds of Spain. These genes are among the most polymorphic in the mammalian genome. Furthermore, often different numbers of class IIB genes per haplotype exist, complicating the genotyping and sequencing of these genes. Especially the DQB region is only partially characterized in sheep and the repertoire of DRB and DQB alleles in Churra sheep, an ancient breed, is unknown. Here, we sequenced the class IIB genes for 15 rams that are the pedigree heads of a selection Nucleus herd. In total, we found 12 DRB and 25 DQB alleles. From these, 3 and 15 were new, respectively. Fourteen haplotypes carrying one or two DQB alleles could be deduced and the evolutionary relationship of these was investigated by phylogenetic trees. Based on the sequences of these most common class II alleles, a more efficient genotyping system for larger numbers of Churra sheep will be developed. PMID:26184839

  17. Human peripheral blood leucocyte non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene mouse model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease and the role of host major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    King, M A; Covassin, L; Brehm, M A; Racki, W; Pearson, T; Leif, J; Laning, J; Fodor, W; Foreman, O; Burzenski, L; Chase, T H; Gott, B; Rossini, A A; Bortell, R; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L

    2009-01-01

    Immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immune-deficient (scid) mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2rγnull) engraft readily with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Here, we report a robust model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease (GVHD) based on intravenous injection of human PBMC into 2 Gy conditioned NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice. These mice develop xenogeneic GVHD consistently (100%) following injection of as few as 5 × 106 PBMC, regardless of the PBMC donor used. As in human disease, the development of xenogeneic GVHD is highly dependent on expression of host major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules and is associated with severely depressed haematopoiesis. Interrupting the tumour necrosis factor-α signalling cascade with etanercept, a therapeutic drug in clinical trials for the treatment of human GVHD, delays the onset and progression of disease. This model now provides the opportunity to investigate in vivo mechanisms of xenogeneic GVHD as well as to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents rapidly. PMID:19659776

  18. Tissue-specific and cell surface expression of human major histocompatibility complex class I heavy (HLA-B7) and light (beta 2-microglobulin) chain genes in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, J W; Nolan, J A; Conrad, P J; Vasavada, H A; Vasavada, H H; Ploegh, H L; Ganguly, S; Janeway, C A; Weissman, S M

    1988-01-01

    We introduced the human genes HLA-B7 and B2M encoding the heavy (HLA-B7) and light [beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m)] chains of a human major histocompatibility complex class I antigen into separate lines of transgenic mice. The tissue-specific pattern of HLA-B7 RNA expression was similar to that of endogenous class I H-2 genes, although the HLA-B7 gene was about 10-fold underexpressed in liver. Identical patterns of RNA expression were detected whether the HLA-B7 gene contained 12 or 0.66 kilobase(s) (kb) of 5' flanking sequence. The level of expression was copy number dependent and as efficient as that of H-2 genes; gamma interferon enhanced HLA-B7 RNA expression in parallel to that of H-2. In addition to the mechanism(s) responsible for gamma interferon-enhanced expression, there must be at least one other tissue-specific mechanism controlling the constitutive levels of class I RNA. Tissue-specific human beta 2m RNA expression was similar to that of mouse beta 2m, including high-level expression in liver. Cell surface HLA-B7 increased 10- to 17-fold on T cells and on a subset of thymocytes from HLA-B7/B2M doubly transgenic mice compared to HLA-B7 singly transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of HLA-B7 on thymocytes resembled that of H-2K as opposed to H-2D. These results confirm that coexpression of both human chains is required for efficient surface expression and that HLA-B7 may share a regulatory mechanism with H-2K, which distinguishes it from H-2D. Images PMID:2459712

  19. Gamma interferon and 5-azacytidine cause transcriptional elevation of class I major histocompatibility complex gene expression in K562 leukemia cells in the absence of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, E; Karr, R W; Frost, J P; Gonwa, T A; Ginder, G D

    1986-05-01

    We studied the effects of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) on HLA class I gene expression, differentiation, and proliferative capacity of K562 human leukemia cells. In the uninduced state, K562 cells show little or no class I gene expression but actively express the erythroid-specific gamma-globin gene as well as genes associated with cell proliferation, including the transferrin receptor, c-myc, and alpha-actin genes At both the surface protein and mRNA levels, IFN-gamma induces class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression, but does not alter the expression of the gamma-globin, transferrin receptor, c-myc, or alpha-actin genes. A 10-fold maximal induction of both class I surface protein and mRNA occurs at 48 h and is reversible upon withdrawal of IFN-gamma from the culture medium. In vitro nuclear run-on transcription assays were performed to directly establish that IFN-gamma exerts an early effect at the level of transcription, with maximal transcription rates occurring within 4 h. The difference between the time course of transcription induction and that of mRNA accumulation suggests that the regulation of class I gene expression in this human leukemic cell line also involves posttranscriptional mechanisms. Measurements of cell proliferation rates and cell cycle distribution, as well as the reversibility of the effects of IFN-gamma, demonstrate that the selective induction of class I genes in these cells occurs in the absence of differentiation.

  20. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  1. Recovery of CD4+ T Cells in HIV patients with a stable virologic response to antiretroviral therapy is associated with polymorphisms of interleukin-6 and central major histocompatibility complex genes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Rosenow, Ann A; James, Ian R; Roberts, Steven G; Nolan, Richard C; French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in genes associated with HIV disease progression and/or immune activation affect CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV patients who began combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency and achieved stable control of plasma viremia. Patients with CD4 T-cell counts <300 cells/microL (n = 33) and >400 cells/microL (n = 37) on ART were compared. A multiple case-control logistic regression associated carriage of BAT1(1,2) or interleukin (IL)6-174(2,2) with low CD4 T-cell counts (P = 0.012). BAT1*2 uniquely marks the central major histocompatibility complex region of a conserved haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,BAT1*2,TNFA-308*2,DR3,DQ2). There was no association between alleles carried at CCR5Delta32, CCR5 59029, CCR5 59353, CCR2+190 (V64I), SDF1 3'UTR, IL1A+4845, IL1B+3953, IL4-589, IL10-592, IL10-R1+536, IL10-R1+1112, IL12B 3'UTR, TNFA-308, or TNFA-1031 and CD4 T-cell counts. We suggest that immune activation and/or CD4 T-cell apoptosis in HIV patients on effective ART is influenced by genetic factors.

  2. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC class II gene

  3. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-10-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC

  4. Identification of the transcription factors NF-YA and NF-YB as factors A and B that bound to the promoter of the major histocompatibility complex class II gene I-A beta.

    PubMed Central

    Celada, A; McKercher, S R; Maki, R A

    1996-01-01

    The Y box is a conserved sequence in the promoter of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes, which contains a CCAAT sequence (CCAAT box). Previously, we partially purified the DNA-binding protein that recognizes the Y box of the I-A beta gene and showed that it consisted of two components (factors A and B) both of which were necessary for optimal DNA binding. The genes for the heteromeric protein NF-Y (NF-YA and NF-YB), which binds to the I-E alpha Y box have been cloned. We subsequently isolated the genes for NF-YA and NF-YB using oligonucleotides designed from the published sequences. NF-YA and NF-YB were tested for binding to the I-A beta and I-E alpha Y boxes. While neither NF-YA or NF-YB alone bound to the Y box, when the components were mixed the complex bound to the I-A beta Y box with high affinity. Moreover, NF-YA and NF-YB could be complemented for binding to DNA by factor B or factor A, respectively. These results suggest that the active binding protein is NF-YA in factor A extracts and NF-YB in factor B extracts. Finally, antibodies against NF-YA and NF-YB were shown to induce a supershift when nuclear extracts were added to the double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide covering the Y box of the I-A beta gene. Antisense expression constructs of both NF-YA and NF-YB were made and their effect on expression from the I-A beta promoter was tested. Either antisense construction, when transfected into cells, lowered the expression of a reporter gene linked to the I-A beta promoter. This study provides direct evidence of the identification of NF-YA and NF-YB as the previously described factors A and B. Moreover, these results strongly implicate NF-Y in the expression of the MHC class II gene I-A beta. PMID:8760361

  5. FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATION OF MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY (MH) VARIATION USING AN ESTUARINE FISH POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, there has been a dramatic expansion of studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation aimed at discovering functional differences in immunity across wild populations of diverse vertebrate species. Some species with relatively low genetic diversity or under ...

  6. Canine parvovirus enteritis, canine distemper, and major histocompatibility complex genetic variation in Mexican wolves.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Philip W; Lee, Rhonda N; Buchanan, Colleen

    2003-10-01

    The endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was recently reintroduced into Arizona and New Mexico (USA). In 1999 and 2000, pups from three litters that were part of the reintroduction program died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. Overall, half (seven of 14) of the pups died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. The parents and their litters were analyzed for variation at the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene DRB1. Similar MHC genes are related to disease resistance in other species. All six of the surviving pups genotyped for the MHC gene were heterozygous while five of the pups that died were heterozygous and one was homozygous. Resistance to pathogens is an important aspect of the management and long-term survival of endangered taxa, such as the Mexican wolf.

  7. Evidence of a second polymorphic ELA class I (ELA-B) locus and gene order for three loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Bernoco, D; Byrns, G; Bailey, E; Lew, A M

    1987-01-01

    Two antisera, B-442 and R-2046, were produced by immunizing offspring with purified peripheral blood lymphocytes from a parent matched for the ELA-A specificity carried on the unshared haplotype. Absorption analysis demonstrated that these antisera contained at least two families of cytotoxic antibodies, one directed against antigens present on T and B cells, and a second directed preferentially against antigens present on surface Ig positive cells. Immunoprecipitation studies using these antisera demonstrated that both antisera contain antibodies specific for glycoproteins with molecular weights characteristic of class I and class II MHC antigens. In lymphocyte typing tests of unfractionated lymphocytes, only the class I activity was readily detectable since the class II activity killed less than 25% of the cells. Family studies demonstrated that these antisera recognize products of genes linked to the ELA system. Based on two recombinants in an extended family it became apparent that the specificities detected by B-442 and R-2046 are not products of the ELA-A locus, but rather they are products of at least one other locus, defined in this paper as ELA-B. In this family a third recombinant was found between the A blood group system and the ELA-A locus. Based on these three recombinants, the most probable linear relationship of the following genes is: A blood group system/ELA-A/ELA-B.

  8. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  9. A trans-acting major histocompatibility complex-linked gene whose alleles determine gain and loss changes in the antigenic structure of a classical class I molecule

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The RT1.A locus of the rat MHC encodes the H chain of the single classical class I molecule of this species. One of the alleles of this polymorphic locus, RT1.Aa, is present in several laboratory inbred, congenic, and MHC recombinant rat strains. Studies of the RT1.Aa class I molecule from a number of these strains as a target for CTL show that its antigenicity, both as an alloantigen and a restricting element, is subject to gain and loss alterations by the action of a gene mapping in the MHC to the right of RT1.A. This locus is apparently present in two allelic forms (one possibly a null allele) corresponding to the presence or absence of a dominant transacting modifier, and has been named class I modification, or cim. The antigenic change brought about by cim is scarcely detectable serologically but highly immunogenic for CTL. Biochemical investigations show that cim affects the post- translational modification of RT1.Aa. PMID:2475574

  10. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    PubMed

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    /ml, where an 8-fold reduction in IL-2 augmented NK lysis was observed (p < 0.01). These results suggest that IL-2 activated human NK lysis of porcine xenografts may be inhibited by strategies which increase PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules, introduce HLA class I genes into PAEC, or use soluble HLA class I peptides. PMID:9869836

  11. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  12. Extended major histocompatibility complex haplotypes in patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, C A; Fleischnick, E; Awdeh, Z; Katz, A J; Yunis, E J

    1987-01-01

    We have studied major histocompatibility complex markers in randomly ascertained Caucasian patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy and their families. The frequencies of extended haplotypes, defined as haplotypes of specific HLA-B, DR, BF, C2, C4A, and C4B allelic combinations, occurring more frequently than expected, were compared on patient chromosomes, on normal chromosomes from the study families, and on chromosomes from normal families. Over half of patient chromosomes consisted almost entirely of two extended haplotypes [HLA-B8, DR3, SC01] and [HLA-B44, DR7, FC31] which, with nonextended HLA-DR7, accounted for the previously observed HLA markers of this disease: HLA-B8, DR3, and DR7. There was no increase in HLA-DR3 on nonextended haplotypes or in other extended haplotypes with HLA-DR3 or DR7. The distribution of homozygotes and heterozygotes for HLA-DR3 and DR7 was consistent with recessive inheritance of the major histocompatibility complex-linked susceptibility gene for gluten-sensitive enteropathy. On the other hand, by odds ratio analysis and from the sum of DR3 and DR7 homozygotes compared with DR3/DR7 heterozygotes, there was an increase in heterozygotes and a decrease in homozygotes suggesting the presence of modifying phenomena. PMID:3793924

  13. Identification of 32 major histocompatibility complex class I alleles in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Li, A; Li, L; Yan, X; Fa, Y; Zeng, L; Fan, J; Liu, B; Sun, Z

    2014-09-01

    The African green monkey may be an ideal replacement for the rhesus monkey in biomedical research, but relatively little is known about the genetic background of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In analysis of 12 African green monkeys, 13 Chae-A and 19 Chae-B alleles were identified. Among these alleles, 12 Chae-A and 9 Chae-B were new lineages. The full amino acid length deduced for Chae-A genes is 365 amino acids, but for Chae-B genes, the lengths are 365, 362, 361, and 359 amino acids, respectively. There were 1-3 Chae-A alleles and 2-5 Chae-B alleles in each animal. In African green monkeys, rhesus monkeys, and cynomolgus monkeys, the MHC-A and MHC-B alleles display trans-species polymorphism, rather than being clustered in a species-specific fashion.

  14. Characterisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in the Australian Cane Toad, Rhinella marina

    PubMed Central

    Lillie, Mette; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I is a highly variable gene family that encodes cell-surface receptors vital for recognition of intracellular pathogens and initiation of immune responses. The MHC class I has yet to be characterised in bufonid toads (Order: Anura; Suborder: Neobatrachia; Family: Bufonidae), a large and diverse family of anurans. Here we describe the characterisation of a classical MHC class I gene in the Australian cane toad, Rhinella marina. From 25 individuals sampled from the Australian population, we found only 3 alleles at this classical class I locus. We also found large number of class I alpha 1 alleles, implying an expansion of class I loci in this species. The low classical class I genetic diversity is likely the result of repeated bottleneck events, which arose as a result of the cane toad's complex history of introductions as a biocontrol agent and its subsequent invasion across Australia. PMID:25093458

  15. Associations between the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A transmembrane (MICA-TM) polymorphism and susceptibility to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Gwan Gyu; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A transmembrane (MICA-TM) polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A meta-analysis was conducted to establish the association between the MICA-TM A9 allele and psoriasis and PsA in the general population and each ethnic group. Ten studies (6 psoriasis, 4 PsA) involving 2,002 cases and 1,933 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The Asian controls showed the lowest A9 allele prevalence (16.6%), whereas the European controls had the highest allele prevalence (33.3%). Meta-analysis revealed a significant association between the MICA-TM A9 allele and the entire study population, which included the psoriasis and PsA cases (OR 1.703; 95% CI 1.301-2.229; p = 1.0 × 10(-5)). We further divided the entire study population into the psoriasis and PsA groups. Meta-analysis revealed a significant association between the MICA-TM A9 allele and the entire study population (OR 1.427, 95% CI 1.021-1.994; p = 0.037) and Asians (OR 1.264; 95% CI 1.014-1.576; p = 0.037). A significant association was found between the MICA-TM A9 allele and PsA (OR 2.227; 95% CI 1.462-3.393; p = 1.9 × 10(-5)) and Europeans (OR 2.039; 95% CI 1.285-3.235; p = 0.002). This meta-analysis showed that the MICA-TM A9 allele is associated with psoriasis susceptibility in Asian populations and that the MICA-TM A9 allele is associated with a PsA risk in Europeans.

  16. Mechanism of induction of class I major histocompatibility antigen expression by murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Faller, D V; Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C

    1988-03-01

    Alterations in expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens on tumor cells clearly correlate with the tumorgenicity and metastatic potential of those cells. These changes in the biological behavior of the tumor cells are presumably secondary to resulting changes in their susceptibility to immune recognition and destruction. Murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) exert regulatory effects on class I genes of the MHC locus. MuLV infection results in substantial increases in cell surface expression of all three class I MHC antigens. These viral effects on MHC antigen expression profoundly influence immune-mediated interaction with the infected cells, as assessed by cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition and killing. Control of class I MHC and beta-2 microglobulin genes by MuLV takes place via a trans-acting molecular mechanism. MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular MHC genes, transfected xenogeneic class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to a bacterial reporter gene. These findings indicate that MuLV exerts its effects on MHC expression via a trans mechanism. The MuLV-responsive sequences on the MHC genes appear to lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for those genes.

  17. The Missing Link in Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion: the BDLF3 Gene Induces Ubiquitination and Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Laura L.; Williams, Luke R.; White, Claire; Forrest, Calum; Rowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to spread and persist in human populations relies on a balance between host immune responses and EBV immune evasion. CD8+ cells specific for EBV late lytic cycle antigens show poor recognition of target cells compared to immediate early and early antigen-specific CD8+ cells. This phenomenon is due in part to the early EBV protein BILF1, whose immunosuppressive activity increases with lytic cycle progression. However, published data suggest the existence of a hitherto unidentified immune evasion protein further enhancing protection against late EBV antigen-specific CD8+ cells. We have now identified the late lytic BDLF3 gene as the missing link accounting for efficient evasion during the late lytic cycle. Interestingly, BDLF3 also contributes to evasion of CD4+ cell responses to EBV. We report that BDLF3 downregulates expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in the absence of any effect upon other surface molecules screened, including CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD71 (transferrin receptor). BDLF3 both enhanced internalization of surface MHC molecules and reduced the rate of their appearance at the cell surface. The reduced expression of surface MHC molecules correlated with functional protection against CD8+ and CD4+ T cell recognition. The molecular mechanism was identified as BDLF3-induced ubiquitination of MHC molecules and their subsequent downregulation in a proteasome-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Immune evasion is a necessary feature of viruses that establish lifelong persistent infections in the face of strong immune responses. EBV is an important human pathogen whose immune evasion mechanisms are only partly understood. Of the EBV immune evasion mechanisms identified to date, none could explain why CD8+ T cell responses to late lytic cycle genes are so infrequent and, when present, recognize lytically infected target cells so poorly relative to CD8+ T cells specific for

  18. Variability with altitude of major histocompatibility complex-related microsatellite loci in goats from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Huang, Y F; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S

    2015-11-19

    We aimed to use microsatellite BM1258 loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as an indicator of the influence of genetic diversity of immunity in goats (Dazu Black, Hechuan White, Meigu, and Tibetan goat). In total, 132 animals comprising 50 Dazu Black goats, 24 Hechuan White goats, 34 Meigu goats, and 24 Tibetan goats were examined. Collectively, 18 different alleles and 42 genotypes were found. The overall observed levels of heterozygosity showed large divergence from the expected levels in the four breeds, and an increase in the mean number of alleles of BM1258 accompanied decreasing altitude of the livestock's habitat. Our results indicate that low-altitude regions or plains were more conducive to genetic material exchange and gene flow between different populations. In addition, it seems that the breeds from low-altitude regions were less susceptible to problems introduced by commercial animals.

  19. Major histocompatibility complex markers and red cell antibodies to the Rh (D) antigen. Absence of association.

    PubMed

    Kruskall, M S; Yunis, E J; Watson, A; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A

    1990-01-01

    Between 20 and 35 percent of Rh(D) antigen-negative individuals do not develop antibodies to D even after multiple transfusions of Rh-positive red cells. To evaluate the possibility that antibody production after exposure to the D antigen was related to a major histocompatibility complex immune response gene, analysis of the HLA genotypes of 38 Rh-sensitized women and their families was performed. No significant deviations were found in the frequency of any individual HLA class I, II, or III allele or of any extended haplotype (fixed allelic combinations of HLA-B, HLA-DR, and the complement components BF, C2, C4A, and C4B). Type 1 errors due to the extreme allelic polymorphism of the HLA system, as well as the ethnic variation in patient groups, may have contributed to HLA allele-antibody responder relationships reported in earlier studies.

  20. Variability with altitude of major histocompatibility complex-related microsatellite loci in goats from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Huang, Y F; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to use microsatellite BM1258 loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as an indicator of the influence of genetic diversity of immunity in goats (Dazu Black, Hechuan White, Meigu, and Tibetan goat). In total, 132 animals comprising 50 Dazu Black goats, 24 Hechuan White goats, 34 Meigu goats, and 24 Tibetan goats were examined. Collectively, 18 different alleles and 42 genotypes were found. The overall observed levels of heterozygosity showed large divergence from the expected levels in the four breeds, and an increase in the mean number of alleles of BM1258 accompanied decreasing altitude of the livestock's habitat. Our results indicate that low-altitude regions or plains were more conducive to genetic material exchange and gene flow between different populations. In addition, it seems that the breeds from low-altitude regions were less susceptible to problems introduced by commercial animals. PMID:26600522

  1. Molecular genetics of the swine major histocompatibility complex, the SLA complex.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Joan K; Ho, Chak-Sum; Wysocki, Michal; Smith, Douglas M

    2009-03-01

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span approximately 1.1, 0.7 and 0.5Mb, respectively, making the swine MHC the smallest among mammalian MHC so far examined and the only one known to span the centromere. This review summarizes recent updates to the Immuno Polymorphism Database-MHC (IPD-MHC) website (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/sla/) which serves as the repository for maintaining a list of all SLA recognized genes and their allelic sequences. It reviews the expression of SLA proteins on cell subsets and their role in antigen presentation and regulating immune responses. It concludes by discussing the role of SLA genes in swine models of transplantation, xenotransplantation, cancer and allergy and in swine production traits and responses to infectious disease and vaccines.

  2. Evolutionary instability of the major histocompatibility complex class I loci in New World primates

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid, Luis F.; Shufflebotham, Clare; Ruiz, Francisco J.; Yeager, Meredith; Hughes, Austin L.; Watkins, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Homologues of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) HLA-A, -B, -E, -F, and -G loci are present in all the Catarrhini (Old World primates, apes, and humans), and some of their allelic lineages have survived several speciation events. Analysis of 26 MHC class I cDNAs from seven different genera of New World primates revealed that the Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets) are an exception to these rules of MHC stability. In gene trees of primate MHC class I genes, sequences from the Callitrichinae cluster in a genus-specific fashion, whereas in the other genera of New World primates, as in the Catarrhini, they cluster in a transgeneric way. The genus-specific clustering of the Callitrichinae cDNAs indicates that there is no orthology between MHC class I loci in genera of this phyletic group. Additionally, the Callitrichinae genera exhibit limited variability of their MHC class I genes, in contrast to the high variability displayed by all other primates. Each Callitrichinae genus, therefore, expresses its own set of MHC class I genes, suggesting that an unusually high rate of turnover of loci occurs in this subfamily. The limited variability of MHC class I genes in the Callitrichinae is likely the result of the recent origin of these loci. PMID:9405648

  3. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  4. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhki, N; O'Brien, S J

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. We present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations. Images PMID:1967831

  5. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhki, Naoya; O'Brien, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. The authors present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations.

  6. Population-dependent contribution of the major histocompatibility complex region to schizophrenia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuo; Hattori, Eiji; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Tasuku; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-10-01

    There is consistent data from European cohorts suggesting a genetic contribution from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. However, the genomic complexity and ethnicity-specific diversity found in the MHC cause difficulties in identifying causal variants or genes, and there is a need for studies encompassing the entire MHC region in multiple ethnic populations. Here, we report on association signals in the MHC region, with schizophrenia in the Japanese population. We genotyped and imputed a total of 10,131 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), spanning the entire MHC interval. The analysis included 3302 participants (1518 schizophrenics and 1784 healthy controls) from the Japanese population. In this study, we present evidence for association at rs494620, located in the SLC44A4 gene. The association survived after correction for multiple testing (unadjusted P=7.78×10(-5), empirical P=0.0357). The imputation results detected the highest association at rs707937 in the MSH5-SAPCD1 gene (imputed P=8.40×10(-5)). In expression analysis using postmortem brains from schizophrenia and control samples, MSH5-SAPCD1 showed marginally significant expression differences in Brodmann's area 46 (P=0.044 by unpaired t test with Welch's correction, P=0.099 by Mann-Whitney U test). Our study further strengthens evidence for the involvement of the MHC in schizophrenia across populations, and provides insight into population-specific mechanisms for the MHC region in schizophrenia susceptibility.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex loci are associated with susceptibility of Atlantic salmon to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Kristina M.; Winton, James R.; Schulze, Angela D.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Ming, Tobi J.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens of salmonids and is a leading cause of death among cultured juvenile fish. Although several vaccine strategies have been developed, some of which are highly protective, the delivery systems are still too costly for general use by the aquaculture industry. More cost effective methods could come from the identification of genes associated with IHNV resistance for use in selective breeding. Further, identification of susceptibility genes may lead to an improved understanding of viral pathogenesis and may therefore aid in the development of preventive and therapeutic measures. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), involved in the primary recognition of foreign pathogens in the acquired immune response, are associated with resistance to a variety of diseases in vertebrate organisms. We conducted a preliminary analysis of MHC disease association in which an aquaculture strain of Atlantic salmon was challenged with IHNV at three different doses and individual fish were genotyped at three MHC loci using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), followed by sequencing of all differentiated alleles. Nine to fourteen alleles per exon-locus were resolved, and alleles potentially associated with resistance or susceptibility were identified. One allele (Sasa-B-04) from a potentially non-classical class I locus was highly associated with resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis (p < 0.01). This information can be used to design crosses of specific haplotypes for family analysis of disease associations.

  8. Endothelial activation by hydrogen peroxide. Selective increases of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and major histocompatibility complex class I.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, J. R.; Johnson, D. R.; Pober, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Products of activated leukocytes may alter vascular endothelial cell (EC) function. For example, ECs respond to leukocyte-derived cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or interleukin-1, by reversibly altering levels of expression of specific gene products that promote inflammation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide, a product of TNF-activated neutrophils, can produce irreversible EC injury and death. In this study, we have investigated the effects of subinjurious concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on EC inflammatory functions. Treatment with 50 to 100 mumol/L hydrogen peroxide selectively increases surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and major histocompatibility complex class I, but not endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (also known as E-selectin), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or gp96, a constitutively expressed EC surface protein. Increased major histocompatibility complex class I and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 surface expression is associated with specifically increased messenger RNA levels, suggesting selective endothelial gene activation. Hydrogen peroxide does not activate the transcription factor Nuclear Factor kappa B, an important mediator of TNF-induced gene expression. Co-treatment with hydrogen peroxide inhibits TNF-induced gene expression at 4 hours, an effect which can be attributed to reversible inhibition of TNF binding to EC surface receptors. Hydrogen peroxide also antagonizes the actions of interleukin-1. At 24 hours, TNF and hydrogen peroxide produce, at most, additive increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and major histocompatibility complex class I. These results suggest that subinjurious concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can activate endothelium and that the effects of hydrogen peroxide on ECs differ from those of inflammatory cytokines. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8098585

  9. Geographic variation of the major histocompatibility complex in Eastern Atlantic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus).

    PubMed

    Cammen, K; Hoffman, J I; Knapp, L A; Harwood, J; Amos, W

    2011-02-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection maintains high genetic diversity in many vertebrates, particularly in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) immune system gene family, which is often associated with disease susceptibility. In large natural populations where subpopulations face different pathogen pressures, the MHC should show greater genetic differentiation within a species than neutral markers. We examined genetic diversity at the MHC-DQB locus and nine putatively neutral microsatellite markers in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from eight United Kingdom (UK) colonies, the Faeroe Islands and Sable Island, Canada. Five DQB alleles were identified in grey seals, which varied in prevalence across the grey seal range. Among the seal colonies, significant differences in DQB allele and haplotype frequencies and in average DQB heterozygosity were observed. Additionally, the DQB gene exhibited greater differentiation among colonies compared with neutral markers, yet a weaker pattern of isolation by distance (IBD). After correcting for the underlying IBD pattern, subpopulations breeding in similar habitats were more similar to one another in DQB allele frequencies than populations breeding in different habitats, but the same did not hold true for microsatellites, suggesting that habitat-specific pathogen pressure influences MHC evolution. Overall, the data are consistent with selection at MHC-DQB loci in grey seals with both varying selective pressures and geographic population structure appearing to influence the DQB genetic composition of breeding colonies. PMID:21199032

  10. Sequence-based evidence for major histocompatibility complex-disassortative mating in a colonial seabird

    PubMed Central

    Juola, Frans A.; Dearborn, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a polymorphic gene family associated with immune defence, and it can play a role in mate choice. Under the genetic compatibility hypothesis, females choose mates that differ genetically from their own MHC genotypes, avoiding inbreeding and/or enhancing the immunocompetence of their offspring. We tested this hypothesis of disassortative mating based on MHC genotypes in a population of great frigatebirds (Fregata minor) by sequencing the second exon of MHC class II B. Extensive haploid cloning yielded two to four alleles per individual, suggesting the amplification of two genes. MHC similarity between mates was not significantly different between pairs that did (n = 4) or did not (n = 42) exhibit extra-pair paternity. Comparing all 46 mated pairs to a distribution based on randomized re-pairings, we observed the following (i): no evidence for mate choice based on maximal or intermediate levels of MHC allele sharing (ii), significantly disassortative mating based on similarity of MHC amino acid sequences, and (iii) no evidence for mate choice based on microsatellite alleles, as measured by either allele sharing or similarity in allele size. This suggests that females choose mates that differ genetically from themselves at MHC loci, but not as an inbreeding-avoidance mechanism. PMID:21613297

  11. Does intra-individual major histocompatibility complex diversity keep a golden mean?

    PubMed

    Woelfing, Benno; Traulsen, Arne; Milinski, Manfred; Boehm, Thomas

    2009-01-12

    An adaptive immune response is usually initiated only if a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule presents pathogen-derived peptides to T-cells. Every MHC molecule can present only peptides that match its peptide-binding groove. Thus, it seems advantageous for an individual to express many different MHC molecules to be able to resist many different pathogens. However, although MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes of vertebrates, each individual has only a very small subset of the diversity at the population level. This is an evolutionary paradox. We provide an overview of the current data on infection studies and mate-choice experiments and conclude that overall evidence suggests that intermediate intra-individual MHC diversity is optimal. Selective forces that may set an upper limit to intra-individual MHC diversity are discussed. An updated mathematical model based on recent findings on T-cell selection can predict the natural range of intra-individual MHC diversity. Thus, the aim of our review is to evaluate whether the number of MHC alleles usually present in individuals may be optimal to balance the advantages of presenting an increased range of peptides versus the disadvantages of an increased loss of T-cells.

  12. Comparative genome organization of the major histocompatibility complex: lessons from the Felidae.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S J; Yuhki, N

    1999-02-01

    The mammalian major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has taught both immunologists and evolutionary biologists a great deal about the patterns and processes that have led to immune defenses. Driven principally by human and mouse studies, comparative MHC projects among other mammalian species offer certain advantages in connecting MHC genome characters to natural situations. We have studied the MHC in the domestic cat and in several wild species of Felidae. Our observations affirm class I and class II homology with other mammalian orders, derivative gene duplications during the Felidae radiation, abundant persistent trans-species allele polymorphism, recombination-derived amino acid motifs, and inverted ratios of non-synonymous to silent substitutions in the MHC peptide-binding regions, consistent with overdominant selection in class I and II genes. MHC diversity as quantified in population studies is a powerful barometer of historic demographic reduction for several endangered species including cheetahs, Asiatic lions, Florida panthers and tigers. In two cases (Florida panther and cheetah), reduced MHC variation may be contributing to uniform population sensitivity to emerging infectious pathogens. The Felidae species, nearly all endangered and monitored for conservation concerns, have allowed a glimpse of species adaptation, mediated by MHC divergence, using comparative inferences drawn from human and mouse models.

  13. Class I major histocompatibility proteins are an essential component of the simian virus 40 receptor.

    PubMed

    Breau, W C; Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1992-04-01

    The class I molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) present endogenously synthesized antigenic peptide fragments to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We show here that these proteins are an essential component of the cell surface receptor for simian virus 40 (SV40). First, SV40 binding to cells can be blocked by two monoclonal antibodies against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins but not by monoclonal antibodies specific for other cell surface proteins. Second, SV40 does not bind to cells of two different human lymphoblastoid cell lines which do not express surface class I MHC proteins because of genetic defects in the beta 2-microglobulin gene in one line and in the HLA complex in the other. Transfection of these cell lines with cloned genes for beta 2-microglobulin and HLA-B8, respectively, restored expression of their surface class I MHC proteins and resulted in concomitant SV40 binding. Finally, SV40 binds to purified HLA proteins in vitro and selectively binds to class I MHC proteins in a cell surface extract.

  14. Engineering an intracellular pathway for major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T C; Guarnieri, F G; Staveley-O'Carroll, K F; Viscidi, R P; Levitsky, H I; Hedrick, L; Cho, K R; August, J T; Pardoll, D M

    1995-01-01

    The presentation of antigenic peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to CD4+ T cells is critical to the function of the immune system. In this study, we have utilized the sorting signal of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein LAMP-1 to target a model antigen, human papillomavirus 16 E7 (HPV-16 E7), into the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. The LAMP-1 sorting signal reroutes the antigen into the MHC class II processing pathway, resulting in enhanced presentation to CD4+ cells in vitro. In vivo immunization experiments in mice demonstrated that vaccinia containing the chimeric E7/LAMP-1 gene generated greater E7-specific lymphoproliferative activity, antibody titers, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activities than vaccinia containing the wild-type HPV-16 E7 gene. These results suggest that specific targeting of an antigen to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments enhances MHC class II presentation and vaccine potency. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524826

  15. THE HUMAN MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX AS A PARADIGM IN GENOMICS RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Knight, Julian C

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery more than 50 years ago, the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21.3 has been at the forefront of human genetic research. Here, we review from a historical perspective the major advances in our understanding of the nature and consequences of genetic variation which have involved the MHC, as well as highlighting likely future directions. As a consequence of its particular genomic structure, its remarkable polymorphism and its early implication in numerous diseases, the MHC has been considered as a model region for genomics, being the first substantial region to be sequenced and establishing fundamental concepts of linkage disequilibrium, haplotypic structure and meiotic recombination. Recently, the MHC became the first genomic region to be entirely re-sequenced for common haplotypes, while studies mapping gene expression phenotypes across the genome have strongly implicated variation in the MHC. This review shows how the MHC continues to provide new insights and remains in the vanguard of contemporary research in human genomics. PMID:19468039

  16. Major histocompatibility complex variation and mate choice in a lekking bird, the great snipe (Gallinago media).

    PubMed

    Ekblom, R; Saether, S A; Grahn, M; Fiske, P; Kålås, J A; Höglund, J

    2004-12-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a major part in the activation of the vertebrate immune system. In addition, they also appear to function as cues for mate choice. In mammals especially, several kinds of MHC-dependent mate choice have been hypothesized and observed. These include choice of mates that share no or few alleles with the choosing individual, choice of mates with alleles that differ as much as possible from the choosing individual, choice of heterozygous mates, choice of certain genotypes and choice of rare alleles. We investigated these different aspects of mate choice in relation to MHC in a lekking bird species, the great snipe (Gallinago media). We found no evidence for MHC disassortative mating, no preference for males with many MHC alleles and no preference for rare alleles. However, we did find that some allelic lineages were more often found in males with mating success than in males without mating success. Females do not seem to use themselves as references for the MHC-dependent mate choice, rather they seem to prefer males with certain allele types. We speculate that these alleles may be linked to resistance to common parasites. PMID:15548294

  17. Pervasive haplotypic variation in the spliceo-transcriptome of the human major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Taylor, Martin S.; Lockstone, Helen E.; Plant, Katharine; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Durrant, Caroline; Broxholme, John; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.

    2011-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21 is a paradigm for genomics, showing remarkable polymorphism and striking association with immune and non-immune diseases. The complex genomic landscape of the MHC, notably strong linkage disequilibrium, has made resolving causal variants very challenging. A promising approach is to investigate gene expression levels considered as tractable intermediate phenotypes in mapping complex diseases. However, how transcription varies across the MHC, notably relative to specific haplotypes, remains unknown. Here, using an original hybrid tiling and splice junction microarray that includes alternate allele probes, we draw the first high-resolution strand-specific transcription map for three common MHC haplotypes (HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3, HLA-A3-B7-Cw7-DR15, and HLA-A26-B18-Cw5-DR3-DQ2) strongly associated with autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. We find that haplotype-specific differences in gene expression are common across the MHC, affecting 96 genes (46.4%), most significantly the zing finger protein gene ZFP57. Differentially expressed probes are correlated with polymorphisms between haplotypes, consistent with cis effects that we directly demonstrate for ZFP57 in a cohort of healthy volunteers (P = 1.2 × 10−14). We establish that alternative splicing is significantly more frequent in the MHC than genome-wide (72.5% vs. 62.1% of genes, P ≤ 1 × 10−4) and shows marked haplotypic differences. We also unmask novel and abundant intergenic transcription involving 31% of transcribed blocks identified. Our study reveals that the renowned MHC polymorphism also manifests as transcript diversity, and our novel haplotype-based approach marks a new step toward identification of regulatory variants involved in the control of MHC-associated phenotypes and diseases. PMID:21628452

  18. Genomic organization of duplicated major histocompatibility complex class I regions in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Morten F; Harstad, Håvard; Grimholt, Unni; Beetz-Sargent, Marianne; Cooper, Glenn A; Reid, Linda; Bakke, Hege G; Phillips, Ruth B; Miller, Kristina M; Davidson, William S; Koop, Ben F

    2007-01-01

    Background We have previously identified associations between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and resistance towards bacterial and viral pathogens in Atlantic salmon. To evaluate if only MHC or also closely linked genes contributed to the observed resistance we ventured into sequencing of the duplicated MHC class I regions of Atlantic salmon. Results Nine BACs covering more than 500 kb of the two duplicated MHC class I regions of Atlantic salmon were sequenced and the gene organizations characterized. Both regions contained the proteasome components PSMB8, PSMB9, PSMB9-like and PSMB10 in addition to the transporter for antigen processing TAP2, as well as genes for KIFC1, ZBTB22, DAXX, TAPBP, BRD2, COL11A2, RXRB and SLC39A7. The IA region contained the recently reported MHC class I Sasa-ULA locus residing approximately 50 kb upstream of the major Sasa-UBA locus. The duplicated class IB region contained an MHC class I locus resembling the rainbow trout UCA locus, but although transcribed it was a pseudogene. No other MHC class I-like genes were detected in the two duplicated regions. Two allelic BACs spanning the UBA locus had 99.2% identity over 125 kb, while the IA region showed 82.5% identity over 136 kb to the IB region. The Atlantic salmon IB region had an insert of 220 kb in comparison to the IA region containing three chitin synthase genes. Conclusion We have characterized the gene organization of more than 500 kb of the two duplicated MHC class I regions in Atlantic salmon. Although Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are closely related, the gene organization of their IB region has undergone extensive gene rearrangements. The Atlantic salmon has only one class I UCA pseudogene in the IB region while trout contains the four MHC UCA, UDA, UEA and UFA class I loci. The large differences in gene content and most likely function of the salmon and trout class IB region clearly argues that sequencing of salmon will not necessarily provide information

  19. Fine Mapping Major Histocompatibility Complex Associations in Psoriasis and Its Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Han, Buhm; Tsoi, Lam C.; Stuart, Philip E.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Chandran, Vinod; Pellett, Fawnda; Pollock, Remy; Bowcock, Anne M.; Krueger, Gerald G.; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J.; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K.; Franke, Andre; Nair, Rajan P.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C∗06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10−364). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C∗06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C∗12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQα1 amino acid position 53; p < 5.0 × 10−8), but no apparent risk conferred by MICA. We further evaluated risk of two major clinical subtypes of PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (pomnibus = 2.2 × 10−11), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC. PMID:25087609

  20. Transduction of a Foreign Histocompatibility Gene into the Arterial Wall Induces Vasculitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis represents a disease characterized by focal inflammation within arteries at multiple sites in the vasculature. Therapeutic interventions in this disease are empirical and often unsuccessful, and the mechanisms of immune injury are not well-defined. The direct transfer of recombinant genes and their expression in the arterial wall provides an opportunity to explore the pathogenesis and treatment of vascular disease. In this report, an animal model for vasculitis has been developed. Inflammation has been elicited by direct gene transfer of a foreign class I major histocompatibility complex gene, HLA-B7, to specific sites in porcine arteries. Transfer and expression of this recombinant gene was confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and cytolytic T cells specific for HLA-B7 were detected. These findings demonstrate that expression of a recombinant gene in the vessel wall can induce a focal immune response and suggest that vessel damage induced by cell-mediated immune injury can initiate vasculitis.

  1. T cell receptor genes in a series of class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones specific for a Plasmodium berghei nonapeptide: implications for T cell allelic exclusion and antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We report here the first extensive study of a T cell repertoire for a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. We have found that the T cell receptors (TCRs) carried by 28 H-2Kd-restricted CTL clones specific for a single Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite nonapeptide are highly diverse in terms of V alpha, J alpha, and J beta segments and aminoacid composition of the junctional regions. However, despite this extensive diversity, a high proportion of the TCRs contain the same V beta segment. These results are in contrast to most previously reported T cell responses towards class II MHC-peptide complexes, where the TCR repertoires appeared to be much more limited. In our study, the finding of a dominant V beta in the midst of otherwise highly diverse TCRs suggests the importance of the V beta segment in shaping the T cell repertoire specific for a given MHC-peptide complex. As an additional finding, we observed that nearly all clones have rearranged both TCR alpha loci. Moreover, as many as one-third of the CTL clones that we analyzed apparently display two productive alpha rearrangements. This argues against a regulated model of sequential recombination at the alpha locus and consequently raises the question of whether allelic exclusion of the TCR alpha chain is achieved at all. PMID:1836010

  2. Broadly targeted CD8⁺ T cell responses restricted by major histocompatibility complex E.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Scott G; Wu, Helen L; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Hughes, Colette M; Hammond, Katherine B; Ventura, Abigail B; Reed, Jason S; Gilbride, Roxanne M; Ainslie, Emily; Morrow, David W; Ford, Julia C; Selseth, Andrea N; Pathak, Reesab; Malouli, Daniel; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Nelson, Jay A; Gillespie, Geraldine M; Walters, Lucy C; Brackenridge, Simon; Sharpe, Hannah R; López, César A; Früh, Klaus; Korber, Bette T; McMichael, Andrew J; Gnanakaran, S; Sacha, Jonah B; Picker, Louis J

    2016-02-12

    Major histocompatibility complex E (MHC-E) is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed, nonclassical MHC class Ib molecule with limited polymorphism that is primarily involved in the regulation of natural killer (NK) cells. We found that vaccinating rhesus macaques with rhesus cytomegalovirus vectors in which genes Rh157.5 and Rh157.4 are deleted results in MHC-E-restricted presentation of highly varied peptide epitopes to CD8αβ(+) T cells, at ~4 distinct epitopes per 100 amino acids in all tested antigens. Computational structural analysis revealed that MHC-E provides heterogeneous chemical environments for diverse side-chain interactions within a stable, open binding groove. Because MHC-E is up-regulated to evade NK cell activity in cells infected with HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus, and other persistent viruses, MHC-E-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses have the potential to exploit pathogen immune-evasion adaptations, a capability that might endow these unconventional responses with superior efficacy. PMID:26797147

  3. Ancient, highly polymorphic human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 intron sequence

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, M.D.; Quinn, D.L.; Lebo, R.V.; Simons, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    A 438 basepair intron 1 sequence adjacent to exon 2 in the human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 gene defined 16 allelic variants in 69 individuals from wide ethnic backgrounds. In contrast, the most variable coding region spanned by the 247 basepair exon 2 defined 11 allelic variants. Our phylogenetic human intron 1 tree derived by the Bootstrap algorithm reflects the same relative allelic relationships as the reported DQA1 exon 2 have cosegregated since divergence of the human races. Comparison of human alleles to a Rhesus monkey DQA1 first intron sequence found only 10 nucleotide substitutions unique to Rhesus, with the other 428 positions (98%) found in at least one human allele. This high degree of homology reflects the evolutionary stability of intron sequences since these two species diverged over 20 million years ago. Because more intron 1 alleles exist than exon 2 alleles, these polymorphic introns can be used to improve tissue typing for transplantation, paternity testing, and forensics and to derive more complete phylogenetic trees. These results suggest that introns represent a previously underutilized polymorphic resource. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex similarity and sexual selection: different does not always mean attractive.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Clelia; Congiu, Leonardo; Pilastro, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Females that mate multiply have the possibility to exert postcopulatory choice and select more compatible sperm to fertilize eggs. Prior work suggests that dissimilarity in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in determining genetic compatibility between partners. Favouring a partner with dissimilar MHC alleles would result in offspring with high MHC diversity and therefore with enhanced survival thanks to increased resistance to pathogens and parasites. The high variability of MHC genes may further allow discrimination against the sperm from related males, reducing offspring homozygosity and inbreeding risk. Despite the large body of work conducted at precopulatory level, the role of MHC similarity between partners at postcopulatory level has been rarely investigated. We used an internal fertilizing fish with high level of multiple matings (Poecilia reticulata) to study whether MHC similarity plays a role in determining the outcome of fertilization when sperm from two males compete for the same set of eggs. We also controlled for genomewide similarity by determining similarity at 10 microsatellite loci. Contrary to prediction, we found that the more MHC-similar male sired more offspring while similarity at the microsatellite loci did not predict the outcome of sperm competition. Our results suggest that MHC discrimination may be involved in avoidance of hybridization or outbreeding rather than inbreeding avoidance. This, coupled with similar findings in salmon, suggests that the preference for MHC-dissimilar mates is far from being unanimous and that pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection can indeed act in opposite directions. PMID:25940673

  5. Broadly targeted CD8+ T cell responses restricted by major histocompatibility complex E

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hansen, Scott G.; Wu, Helen L.; Burwits, Benjamin J.; Hughes, Colette M.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Reed, Jason S.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Ainslie, Emily; Morrow, David W.; et al

    2016-02-12

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-E is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed, nonclassical, MHC-Ib molecule with limited polymorphism primarily involved in regulation of NK cell reactivity via interaction with NKG2/CD94 receptors. We found that vaccination of rhesus macaques with Rh157.5/.4 gene-deleted rhesus Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) vectors uniquely diverts MHC-E function to presentation of highly diverse peptide epitopes to CD8α/β+ T cells, approximately 4 distinct epitopes per 100 amino acids, in all tested protein antigens. Computational structural analysis revealed that a relatively stable, open binding groove in MHC-E attains broad peptide binding specificity by imposing a similar backbone configuration on bound peptides with fewmore » restrictions based on amino acid side chains. Since MHC-E is up-regulated on cells infected with HIV/SIV and other persistent viruses to evade NK cell activity, MHC-E-restricted CD8+ T cell responses have the potential to exploit pathogen immune evasion adaptations, a capability that might endow these unconventional responses with superior efficacy.« less

  6. Genetic variation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in wild Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Phuc, Hoa; Fulton, Janet E; Berres, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multi-family gene cluster that encodes proteins with immuno-responsive function. While studies of MHC in domesticated poultry are relatively common, very little is known about this highly polymorphic locus in wild Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus), the natural progenitor of domestic chickens. We investigated the diversity of MHC within and among four wild Red Junglefowl populations across diversified natural habitats in South Central Vietnam. Based on a SNP panel of 84 sites spanning 210 Kb of the MHC-B locus, we identified 310 unique haplotypes in 398 chromosomes. None of these haplotypes have been described before and we did not observe any of the wild Red Junglefowl haplotypes in domesticated chickens. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 94.51% of observed haplotype variation was accounted for at the within individual level. Little genetic variance was apportioned within and among populations, the latter accounting only for 0.83%. We also found evidence of increased recombination, including numerous hotspots, and limited linkage disequilibrium among the 84 SNP sites. Compared to an average haplotype diversity of 3.55% among seventeen lines of domestic chickens, our results suggest extraordinarily high haplotype diversity remains in wild Red Junglefowl and is consistent with a pattern of balancing selection. Wild Red Junglefowl in Vietnam, therefore, represent a rich resource of natural genomic variation independent from artificial selection. PMID:26839415

  7. Cryptic female choice favours sperm from major histocompatibility complex-dissimilar males.

    PubMed

    Løvlie, Hanne; Gillingham, Mark A F; Worley, Kirsty; Pizzari, Tommaso; Richardson, David S

    2013-10-22

    Cryptic female choice may enable polyandrous females to avoid inbreeding or bias offspring variability at key loci after mating. However, the role of these genetic benefits in cryptic female choice remains poorly understood. Female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, bias sperm use in favour of unrelated males. Here, we experimentally investigate whether this bias is driven by relatedness per se, or by similarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), genes central to vertebrate acquired immunity, where polymorphism is critical to an individual's ability to combat pathogens. Through experimentally controlled natural matings, we confirm that selection against related males' sperm occurs within the female reproductive tract but demonstrate that this is more accurately predicted by MHC similarity: controlling for relatedness per se, more sperm reached the eggs when partners were MHC--dissimilar. Importantly, this effect appeared largely owing to similarity at a single MHC locus (class I minor). Further, the effect of MHC similarity was lost following artificial insemination, suggesting that male phenotypic cues might be required for females to select sperm differentially. These results indicate that postmating mechanisms that reduce inbreeding may do so as a consequence of more specific strategies of cryptic female choice promoting MHC diversity in offspring. PMID:24004935

  8. Major histocompatibility complex similarity and sexual selection: different does not always mean attractive.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Clelia; Congiu, Leonardo; Pilastro, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Females that mate multiply have the possibility to exert postcopulatory choice and select more compatible sperm to fertilize eggs. Prior work suggests that dissimilarity in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in determining genetic compatibility between partners. Favouring a partner with dissimilar MHC alleles would result in offspring with high MHC diversity and therefore with enhanced survival thanks to increased resistance to pathogens and parasites. The high variability of MHC genes may further allow discrimination against the sperm from related males, reducing offspring homozygosity and inbreeding risk. Despite the large body of work conducted at precopulatory level, the role of MHC similarity between partners at postcopulatory level has been rarely investigated. We used an internal fertilizing fish with high level of multiple matings (Poecilia reticulata) to study whether MHC similarity plays a role in determining the outcome of fertilization when sperm from two males compete for the same set of eggs. We also controlled for genomewide similarity by determining similarity at 10 microsatellite loci. Contrary to prediction, we found that the more MHC-similar male sired more offspring while similarity at the microsatellite loci did not predict the outcome of sperm competition. Our results suggest that MHC discrimination may be involved in avoidance of hybridization or outbreeding rather than inbreeding avoidance. This, coupled with similar findings in salmon, suggests that the preference for MHC-dissimilar mates is far from being unanimous and that pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection can indeed act in opposite directions.

  9. Individual odor recognition in procellariiform chicks: potential role for the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Terence W; Nevitt, Gabrielle A

    2009-07-01

    Since the groundbreaking work of Wenzel, Bang, and Grubb in the 1960s, enormous progress has been made toward elucidating the sense of smell in procellariiform seabirds. Although it is now well established that adult procellariiforms use olfaction in many behaviors, such as for foraging, nest relocation, and mate recognition, the olfactory abilities of petrel chicks are less well understood. Recent studies have shown that petrel chicks can recognize prey-related odors and odors associated with their nest before leaving their burrow for the first time. The recognition of burrow odors by petrel chicks is unlikely to be used for homing, and we have suggested that chicks may be learning personal odors associated with the nest's occupants for use later in life in the context of kin recognition or mate choice. The source of personal odors in petrels is unknown. However, in other vertebrates, the major histocompatibility complex influences body odors, which in turn influence mating preferences. It is not currently known whether this highly polymorphic gene region influences body odors and individual recognition in the procellariiforms, but this could be a fruitful area of future research. PMID:19686174

  10. Human Herpesvirus 7 U21 Tetramerizes To Associate with Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecules

    PubMed Central

    May, Nathan A.; Wang, Qiuhong; Balbo, Andrea; Konrad, Sheryl L.; Buchli, Rico; Hildebrand, William H.; Schuck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The U21 gene product from human herpesvirus 7 binds to and redirects class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to a lysosomal compartment. The molecular mechanism by which U21 reroutes class I MHC molecules to lysosomes is not known. Here, we have reconstituted the interaction between purified soluble U21 and class I MHC molecules, suggesting that U21 does not require additional cellular proteins to interact with class I MHC molecules. Our results demonstrate that U21, itself predicted to contain an MHC class I-like protein fold, interacts tightly with class I MHC molecules as a tetramer, in a 4:2 stoichiometry. These observations have helped to elucidate a refined model describing the mechanism by which U21 escorts class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. IMPORTANCE In this report, we show that the human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) immunoevasin U21, itself a class I MHC-like protein, binds with high affinity to class I MHC molecules as a tetramer and escorts them to lysosomes, where they are degraded. While many class I MHC-like molecules have been described in detail, this unusual viral class I-like protein functions as a tetramer, associating with class I MHC molecules in a 4:2 ratio, illuminating a functional significance of homooligomerization of a class I MHC-like protein. PMID:24390327

  11. Spatial variation and low diversity in the major histocompatibility complex in walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Fales, Krystal; Jay, Chadwick V.; Sage, George K.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Increased global temperature and associated changes to Arctic habitats will likely result in the northward advance of species, including an influx of pathogens novel to the Arctic. How species respond to these immunological challenges will depend in part on the adaptive potential of their immune response system. We compared levels of genetic diversity at a gene associated with adaptive immune response [Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC), DQB exon 2] between populations of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus), a sea ice-dependent Arctic species. Walrus was represented by only five MHC DQB alleles, with frequency differences observed between Pacific and Atlantic populations. MHC DQB alleles appear to be under balancing selection, and most (80 %; n = 4/5) of the alleles were observed in walruses from both oceans, suggesting broad scale differences in the frequency of exposure and diversity of pathogens may be influencing levels of heterozygosity at DQB in walruses. Limited genetic diversity at MHC, however, suggests that walrus may have a reduced capacity to respond to novel immunological challenges associated with shifts in ecological communities and environmental stressors predicted for changing climates. This is particularly pertinent for walrus, since reductions in summer sea ice may facilitate both northward expansion of marine species and associated pathogens from more temperate regions, and exchange of marine mammals and associated pathogens through the recently opened Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in the Canadian high Arctic.

  12. DNase I hypersensitive sites flank the mouse class II major histocompatibility complex during B cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, S

    1991-01-01

    The mouse class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encodes a polymorphic, multigene family important in the immune response, and is expressed mainly on mature B cells, on certain types of dendritic cells and is also inducible by gamma-interferon on antigen presenting cells. To study the regulatory elements which control this expression pattern, we have examined the chromatin structure flanking the class II MHC region, in particular during B cell differentiation. Using a panel of well-characterised mouse cell lines specific for different stages of B cell development (pre-B, B, plasma cell) as well as non-B cell lines, we have mapped the DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites adjacent to the mouse MHC class II region. The results presented show, for the first time that there are specific hypersensitive sites flanking the class II MHC locus during pre B cell, B cell and plasma cell stages of B cell differentiation, irrespective of the status of class II MHC expression. These hypersensitive sites are not found in T cell, fibroblast or uninduced myelomonocytic cell lines. This suggests that these DHS sites define a developmentally stable, chromatin structure, which can be used as a marker of B cell lineage commitment and may indicate that a combination of these hypersensitive sites reflect regulatory proteins involved in the immediate expression of a particular class II MHC gene or possibly control of the entire locus. Images PMID:1923768

  13. Autoimmune diabetes can be induced in transgenic major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an autoimmune disease marked by hyperglycemia and mononuclear cell infiltration of insulin- producing beta islet cells. Predisposition to IDDM in humans has been linked to the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and islet cells often become aberrantly class II positive during the course of the disease. We have used two recently described transgenic lines to investigate the role of class II molecules and CD4+ T cells in the onset of autoimmune insulitis. Mice that are class II deficient secondary to a targeted disruption of the A beta b gene were bred to mice carrying a transgene for the lymphocytic choriomenigitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein (GP) targeted to the endocrine pancreas. Our results indicate that class II-deficient animals with and without the GP transgene produce a normal cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to whole LCMV. After infection with LCMV, GP-transgenic class II-deficient animals develop hyperglycemia as rapidly as their class II-positive littermates. Histologic examination of tissue sections from GP- transgenic class II-deficient animals reveals lymphocytic infiltrates of the pancreatic islets that are distinguishable from those of their class II-positive littermates only by the absence of infiltrating CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that in this model of autoimmune diabetes, CD4+ T cells and MHC class II molecules are not required for the development of disease. PMID:8101862

  14. Measuring complexity, nonextensivity and chaos in the DNA sequence of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Pavlos, E. G.; Xenakis, M. N.; Clark, Peter; Duke, Jamie; Monos, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze 4 Mb sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), which is a DNA segment on chromosome 6 with high gene density, controlling many immunological functions and associated with many diseases. The analysis is based on modern theoretical and mathematical tools of complexity theory, such as nonlinear time series analysis and Tsallis non-extensive statistics. The results revealed that the DNA complexity and self-organization can be related to fractional dynamical nonlinear processes with low-dimensional deterministic chaotic and non-extensive statistical character, which generate the DNA sequences under the extremization of Tsallis q-entropy principle. While it still remains an open question as to whether the DNA walk is a fractional Brownian motion (FBM), a static anomalous diffusion process or a non-Gaussian dynamical fractional anomalous diffusion process, the results of this study testify for the latter, providing also a possible explanation for the previously observed long-range power law correlations of nucleotides, as well as the long-range correlation properties of coding and non-coding sequences present in DNA sequences.

  15. Cryptic female choice favours sperm from major histocompatibility complex-dissimilar males

    PubMed Central

    Løvlie, Hanne; Gillingham, Mark A. F.; Worley, Kirsty; Pizzari, Tommaso; Richardson, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic female choice may enable polyandrous females to avoid inbreeding or bias offspring variability at key loci after mating. However, the role of these genetic benefits in cryptic female choice remains poorly understood. Female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, bias sperm use in favour of unrelated males. Here, we experimentally investigate whether this bias is driven by relatedness per se, or by similarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), genes central to vertebrate acquired immunity, where polymorphism is critical to an individual's ability to combat pathogens. Through experimentally controlled natural matings, we confirm that selection against related males' sperm occurs within the female reproductive tract but demonstrate that this is more accurately predicted by MHC similarity: controlling for relatedness per se, more sperm reached the eggs when partners were MHC-dissimilar. Importantly, this effect appeared largely owing to similarity at a single MHC locus (class I minor). Further, the effect of MHC similarity was lost following artificial insemination, suggesting that male phenotypic cues might be required for females to select sperm differentially. These results indicate that postmating mechanisms that reduce inbreeding may do so as a consequence of more specific strategies of cryptic female choice promoting MHC diversity in offspring. PMID:24004935

  16. CD1-restricted CD4+ T cells in major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Rather unexpectedly, major histocompatibility complex class II- deficient mice have a significant population of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes. We have investigated these cells at the population and clonal levels. CD4+ T lymphocytes from class II-deficient animals are thymically derived, appear early in ontogeny, exhibit the phenotype of resting memory cells, are potentially functional by several criteria, and have a diverse T cell receptor repertoire. They do not include substantially elevated numbers of NK1.1+ cells. Hybridomas derived after polyclonal stimulation of the CD4+ lymphocytes from class II- deficient animals include a subset with an unusual reactivity pattern, responding to splenocytes from many mouse strains including the strain of origin. Most members of this subset recognize the major histocompatibility complex class Ib molecule CD1; their heterogeneous reactivities and T cell receptor usage further suggest the involvement of peptides and/or highly variable posttranslational modifications. PMID:7561702

  17. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  18. Major histocompatibility complex haplotype studies in Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J; Khatri, K; Wagner, R; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A

    1990-01-01

    Of 26 Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 24 (92.3%) carried the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II alleles HLA-DR4, DQw3, of which all were of the subtype DR4, DQw8. From studies of the patients and their families, haplotypes were defined. It was found that, of the patients who carried HLA-DR4, DQw8, 75% carried one or the other (and in one case, both) of two haplotypes [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4] or HLA-B35, SC31, DR4. The former is a known extended haplotype among normal Jews, with a frequency of 0.102, and the latter may also be an extended haplotype in this ethnic group, with a frequency of 0.017 among normal haplotypes from Jews. Of the remaining DR4-positive patients, all but one had a presumed D-region segment (defined as SC21, DR4, DQw8 or SC31, DR4, DQw8 with variable HLA-B) of these haplotypes. Only one patient had DR4, DQw8 without any other markers of the extended haplotypes. The number of homozygotes and heterozygotes for DR4, DQw8 was consistent with dominant but not recessive (P less than 0.01) inheritance of a class II or a class II-linked susceptibility gene for the disease. Since the disease is entirely attributable to the presence of an antibody to an intraepidermal intercellular cement substance, it is likely that the class II susceptibility gene (on [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8], HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, or their segments, in Jewish patients) controls the production of the antibody as a dominantly expressed immune response gene. Images PMID:2217197

  19. Pathogen burden, co-infection and major histocompatibility complex variability in the European badger (Meles meles).

    PubMed

    Sin, Yung Wa; Annavi, Geetha; Dugdale, Hannah L; Newman, Chris; Burke, Terry; MacDonald, David W

    2014-10-01

    Pathogen-mediated selection is thought to maintain the extreme diversity in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, operating through the heterozygote advantage, rare-allele advantage and fluctuating selection mechanisms. Heterozygote advantage (i.e. recognizing and binding a wider range of antigens than homozygotes) is expected to be more detectable when multiple pathogens are considered simultaneously. Here, we test whether MHC diversity in a wild population of European badgers (Meles meles) is driven by pathogen-mediated selection. We examined individual prevalence (infected or not), infection intensity and co-infection of 13 pathogens from a range of taxa and examined their relationships with MHC class I and class II variability. This population has a variable, but relatively low, number of MHC alleles and is infected by a variety of naturally occurring pathogens, making it very suitable for the investigation of MHC-pathogen relationships. We found associations between pathogen infections and specific MHC haplotypes and alleles. Co-infection status was not correlated with MHC heterozygosity, but there was evidence of heterozygote advantage against individual pathogen infections. This suggests that rare-allele advantages and/or fluctuating selection, and heterozygote advantage are probably the selective forces shaping MHC diversity in this species. We show stronger evidence for MHC associations with infection intensity than for prevalence and conclude that examining both pathogen prevalence and infection intensity is important. Moreover, examination of a large number and diversity of pathogens, and both MHC class I and II genes (which have different functions), provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms driving MHC diversity.

  20. Pathogen burden, co-infection and major histocompatibility complex variability in the European badger (Meles meles).

    PubMed

    Sin, Yung Wa; Annavi, Geetha; Dugdale, Hannah L; Newman, Chris; Burke, Terry; MacDonald, David W

    2014-10-01

    Pathogen-mediated selection is thought to maintain the extreme diversity in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, operating through the heterozygote advantage, rare-allele advantage and fluctuating selection mechanisms. Heterozygote advantage (i.e. recognizing and binding a wider range of antigens than homozygotes) is expected to be more detectable when multiple pathogens are considered simultaneously. Here, we test whether MHC diversity in a wild population of European badgers (Meles meles) is driven by pathogen-mediated selection. We examined individual prevalence (infected or not), infection intensity and co-infection of 13 pathogens from a range of taxa and examined their relationships with MHC class I and class II variability. This population has a variable, but relatively low, number of MHC alleles and is infected by a variety of naturally occurring pathogens, making it very suitable for the investigation of MHC-pathogen relationships. We found associations between pathogen infections and specific MHC haplotypes and alleles. Co-infection status was not correlated with MHC heterozygosity, but there was evidence of heterozygote advantage against individual pathogen infections. This suggests that rare-allele advantages and/or fluctuating selection, and heterozygote advantage are probably the selective forces shaping MHC diversity in this species. We show stronger evidence for MHC associations with infection intensity than for prevalence and conclude that examining both pathogen prevalence and infection intensity is important. Moreover, examination of a large number and diversity of pathogens, and both MHC class I and II genes (which have different functions), provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms driving MHC diversity. PMID:25211523

  1. Low major histocompatibility complex class II DQA diversity in the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ruan, Xiang-Dong; Ge, Yun-Fa; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2007-01-01

    Background The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals due to habitat fragmentation and loss. Although the captive breeding program for this species is now nearly two decades old, researches on the genetic background of such captive populations, especially on adaptive molecular polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are still limited. In this study, we characterized adaptive variation of the giant panda's MHC DQA gene by PCR amplification of its antigen-recognizing region (i.e. the exon 2) and subsequent single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and sequence analyses. Results The results revealed a low level of DQA exon 2 diversity in this rare animal, presenting 6 alleles from 61 giant panda individuals. The observed polymorphism was restricted to 9 amino acid substitutions, all of which occurred at and adjacent to positions forming the functionally important antigen-binding sites. All the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significantly higher rate of non-synonymous than synonymous substitutions at the antigen-binding sites indicated positive selection for diversity in the locus. Conclusion The DQA allelic diversity of giant pandas was low relative to other vertebrates. Nonetheless, the pandas exhibited more alleles in DQA than those in DRB, suggesting the alpha chain genes would play a leading role when coping with certain pathogens and thus should be included in conservation genetic investigation. The microsatellite and MHC loci might predict long-term persistence potential and short-term survival ability, respectively. Consequently, it is recommended to utilize multiple suites of microsatellite markers and multiple MHC loci to detect overall genetic variation in order to design unbiased conservation strategies. PMID:17555583

  2. Major histocompatibility complex variation in red wolves: evidence for common ancestry with coyotes and balancing selection.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, P W; Lee, R N; Garrigan, D

    2002-10-01

    We examined variation at a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene (DRB1) in the captive red wolf population and samples of coyotes from Texas and North Carolina. We found 4 alleles in the 48 red wolves, 8 alleles in the 10 coyotes from Texas and 15 alleles in the 29 coyotes from North Carolina. Two of the four alleles found in red wolves, Caru-2 and Caru-4, were found in both the Texas and North Carolina coyote samples. Allele Caru-1, previously found in gray wolves, was also found in the North Carolina sample. The most frequent red wolf allele, Caru-3, was not found in any of the coyote samples. However, an allele found in both the Texas and North Carolina coyote samples is only one nucleotide (one amino acid) different from this red wolf allele. Overall, it appears from examination of this MHC gene that red wolves are more closely related to coyotes than to gray wolves. There were a number of different types of evidence supporting the action of balancing selection in red wolves. Namely, there was: (i) an excess of heterozygotes compared with expectations; (ii) a higher rate of nonsynonymous than synonymous substitution for the functionally important antigen-binding site positions; (iii) an eight times higher average heterozygosity of individual amino acids at the positions identified as part of the antigen-binding site than those not associated with it; (iv) the amino acid divergence of four red wolf alleles was greater than that expected from a simulation of genetic drift; and (v) the distribution of alleles, and the distributions of amino acids at many positions were more even than expected from neutrality. Examination of the level and pattern of linkage disequilibria between pairs of sites suggest that the heterozygosity, substitution and frequencies at individual amino acids are not highly dependent upon each other.

  3. [Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in mammals' and its importance for studies of rare species (with Felidae family as an example)].

    PubMed

    Tarasian, K K; Sorokin, P A; Kholodova, M V; Rozhnov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) appears to be a suitable tool for solving various tasks of popu- lationgenetics. Information on genetic basis of immunity facilitates understanding of evolutionary his- tory and assessment of current state and prospects of studied population/species survival. On the one hand, MHC variability is maintained through pathogen dependent mechanisms, i.e., directional selection of individuals resistant to diseases, that are present in the environment and balancing selection which gives advantage to those individuals carrying unusual or rare alleles of MHC genes. On the other hand, MHC genes have an influence on reproduction efficiency of individuals. Because of MHC polygeny, its studying requires an application of methods that introduce additional stages between amplification of a certain gene segment and its sequencing. In the article, different tech- niques of allele separation are considered, as well as a simplified version of MHC variability analysis based on the examination of microsatellite loci. Despite the high information value of MHC, it is still not used in zoological studies as often as it deserves. Using as an example predatory mammals of Felidae family which contains quite a few threatened species, we show that a majority of studies on MHC in wild cats is descriptive ones and only few of them deal with genes comparative analysis. The rise of interest to the studies of major histocompatibility complex in non-model species may help not only in solving the fundamental problems of evolution and phylogenetic structure of the family but also in planning the measures for conservation of rare and endangered species exposed to various anthropogenic stresses. PMID:25786311

  4. Introgression from domestic goat generated variation at the major histocompatibility complex of Alpine ibex.

    PubMed

    Grossen, Christine; Keller, Lukas; Biebach, Iris; Croll, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex). At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2), Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8%) to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection.

  5. Introgression from Domestic Goat Generated Variation at the Major Histocompatibility Complex of Alpine Ibex

    PubMed Central

    Grossen, Christine; Keller, Lukas; Biebach, Iris; Croll, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex). At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2), Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8%) to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection. PMID:24945814

  6. Characterization of class I- and class II-like major histocompatibility complex loci in pedigrees of North Atlantic right whales.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Roxanne M; Murray, Brent W; White, Bradley N

    2014-01-01

    North Atlantic right whales have one of the lowest levels of genetic variation at minisatellite loci, microsatellite loci, and mitochondrial control region haplotypes among mammals. Here, adaptive variation at the peptide binding region of class I and class II DRB-like genes of the major histocompatibility complex was assessed. Amplification of a duplicated region in 222 individuals revealed at least 11 class II alleles. Six alleles were assigned to the locus Eugl-DRB1 and 5 alleles were assigned to the locus Eugl-DRB2 by assessing segregation patterns of alleles from 81 parent/offspring pedigrees. Pedigree analysis indicated that these alleles segregated into 12 distinct haplotypes. Genotyping a smaller subset of unrelated individuals (n = 5 and 10, respectively) using different primer sets revealed at least 2 class II pseudogenes (with ≥ 4 alleles) and at least 3 class I loci (with ≥ 6 alleles). Class II sequences were significantly different from neutrality at peptide binding sites suggesting loci may be under the influence of balancing selection. Trans-species sharing of alleles was apparent for class I and class II sequences. Characterization of class II loci represents the first step in determining the relationship between major histocompatibility complex variability and factors affecting health and reproduction in this species.

  7. Characterization of class I- and class II-like major histocompatibility complex loci in pedigrees of North Atlantic right whales.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Roxanne M; Murray, Brent W; White, Bradley N

    2014-01-01

    North Atlantic right whales have one of the lowest levels of genetic variation at minisatellite loci, microsatellite loci, and mitochondrial control region haplotypes among mammals. Here, adaptive variation at the peptide binding region of class I and class II DRB-like genes of the major histocompatibility complex was assessed. Amplification of a duplicated region in 222 individuals revealed at least 11 class II alleles. Six alleles were assigned to the locus Eugl-DRB1 and 5 alleles were assigned to the locus Eugl-DRB2 by assessing segregation patterns of alleles from 81 parent/offspring pedigrees. Pedigree analysis indicated that these alleles segregated into 12 distinct haplotypes. Genotyping a smaller subset of unrelated individuals (n = 5 and 10, respectively) using different primer sets revealed at least 2 class II pseudogenes (with ≥ 4 alleles) and at least 3 class I loci (with ≥ 6 alleles). Class II sequences were significantly different from neutrality at peptide binding sites suggesting loci may be under the influence of balancing selection. Trans-species sharing of alleles was apparent for class I and class II sequences. Characterization of class II loci represents the first step in determining the relationship between major histocompatibility complex variability and factors affecting health and reproduction in this species. PMID:24381183

  8. Polarisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex II Host Genotype with Pathogenesis of European Brown Hare Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Iacovakis, Christos; Mamuris, Zissis; Moutou, Katerina A.; Touloudi, Antonia; Hammer, Anne Sofie; Valiakos, George; Giannoulis, Themis; Stamatis, Costas; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Athanasiou, Labrini V.; Kantere, Maria; Asferg, Tommy; Giannakopoulos, Alexios; Salomonsen, Charlotte M.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Birtsas, Periklis; Petrovska, Liljana; Hannant, Duncan; Billinis, Charalambos

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted in order to determine the occurrence of European Brown Hare Syndrome virus (EBHSV) in Denmark and possible relation between disease pathogenesis and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) host genotype. Liver samples were examined from 170 brown hares (hunted, found sick or dead), collected between 2004 and 2009. Macroscopical and histopathological findings consistent with EBHS were detected in 24 (14.1%) hares; 35 (20.6%) had liver lesions not typical of the syndrome, 50 (29.4%) had lesions in other tissues and 61 (35.9%) had no lesions. Sixty five (38.2%) of 170 samples were found to be EBHSV-positive (RT-PCR, VP60 gene). In order to investigate associations between viral pathogenesis and host genotype, variation within the exon 2 DQA gene of MHC was assessed. DQA exon 2 analysis revealed the occurrence of seven different alleles in Denmark. Consistent with other populations examined so far in Europe, observed heterozygosity of DQA (Ho = 0.1180) was lower than expected (He = 0.5835). The overall variation for both nucleotide and amino acid differences (2.9% and 14.9%, respectively) were lower in Denmark than those assessed in other European countries (8.3% and 16.9%, respectively). Within the peptide binding region codons the number of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) was much higher than synonymous substitutions (dS), which would be expected for MHC alleles under balancing selection. Allele frequencies did not significantly differ between EBHSV-positive and -negative hares. However, allele Leeu-DQA*30 was detected in significantly higher (P = 0.000006) frequency among the positive hares found dead with severe histopathological lesions than among those found sick or apparently healthy. In contrast, the latter group was characterized by a higher frequency of the allele Leeu-DQA*14 as well as the proportion of heterozygous individuals (P = 0.000006 and P = 0.027). These data reveal a polarisation between EBHSV pathogenesis

  9. Macrophage cell lines derived from major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Two bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell lines, C2D and C2Dt, were isolated from major histocompatibility class II negative knock-out mice. The C2D cell line was stabilized by continuous culture in colony-stimulating factor-1 and the C2Dt cell line was transformed with SV40 virus large T antigen. These cells exhibited phenotypic properties of macrophages including morphology and expression of Mac 1 and Mac 2 cell surface molecules. These cells also had comparable growth to the bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line B6MP102. These new cell lines were not spontaneously cytotoxic and were only capable of modest killing of F5b tumor cells when stimulated with LPS and interferon-gamma, but not when stimulated with LPS alone or with staphylococcal exotoxin. C2D and C2Dt cells phagocytosed labeled Staphylococcus aureus similarly to B6MP102 cells but less well than C2D peritoneal macrophages. These cell lines secreted interleukin-6, but not tumor necrosis factor or nitric oxide in response to LPS or staphlococcal enterotoxins A or B C2D(t) cells were tumorigenic in C2D and C57BL/6J mice but C2D cells were not. These data suggest that macrophage cell lines can be established from bone marrow cells of major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice.

  10. MH2c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hischenhuber, B.; Frommlet, F.; Schreiner, W.; Knapp, B.

    2012-07-01

    Major histocompatibility proteins share a common overall structure or peptide binding groove. Two binding groove domains, on the same chain for major histocompatibility class I or on two different chains for major histocompatibility class II, contribute to that structure that consists of two α-helices (“wall”) and a sheet of eight anti-parallel beta strands (“floor”). Apart from the peptide presented in the groove, the major histocompatibility α-helices play a central role for the interaction with the T cell receptor. This study presents a generalized mathematical approach for the characterization of these helices. We employed polynomials of degree 1 to 7 and splines with 1 to 2 nodes based on polynomials of degree 1 to 7 on the α-helices projected on their principal components. We evaluated all models with a corrected Akaike Information Criterion to determine which model represents the α-helices in the best way without overfitting the data. This method is applicable for both the stationary and the dynamic characterization of α-helices. By deriving differential geometric parameters from these models one obtains a reliable method to characterize and compare α-helices for a broad range of applications. Catalogue identifier: AELX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 327 565 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 433 656 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab Computer: Personal computer architectures Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed) RAM: Depends on the trajectory size, min. 1 GB (Matlab) Classification: 2.1, 4.9, 4.14 External routines: Curve Fitting Toolbox and Statistic Toolbox of

  11. Organization and characteristics of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis)

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Rui; Ruan, Jue; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Chen, Min-Min; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the genome of Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) (YFP) or other cetaceans. In this study, a high-quality YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed. We then determined the organization and characterization of YFP MHC class II region by screening the BAC library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. The YFP MHC class II region consists of two segregated contigs (218,725 bp and 328,435 bp respectively) that include only eight expressed MHC class II genes, three pseudo MHC genes and twelve non-MHC genes. The YFP has fewer MHC class II genes than ruminants, showing locus reduction in DRB, DQA, DQB, and loss of DY. In addition, phylogenic and evolutionary analyses indicated that the DRB, DQA and DQB genes might have undergone birth-and-death evolution, whereas the DQB gene might have evolved under positive selection in cetaceans. These findings provide an essential foundation for future work, such as estimating MHC genetic variation in the YFP or other cetaceans. This work is the first report on the MHC class II region in cetaceans and offers valuable information for understanding the evolution of MHC genome in cetaceans. PMID:26932528

  12. Organization and characteristics of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis).

    PubMed

    Ruan, Rui; Ruan, Jue; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Chen, Min-Min; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the genome of Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) (YFP) or other cetaceans. In this study, a high-quality YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed. We then determined the organization and characterization of YFP MHC class II region by screening the BAC library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. The YFP MHC class II region consists of two segregated contigs (218,725 bp and 328,435 bp respectively) that include only eight expressed MHC class II genes, three pseudo MHC genes and twelve non-MHC genes. The YFP has fewer MHC class II genes than ruminants, showing locus reduction in DRB, DQA, DQB, and loss of DY. In addition, phylogenic and evolutionary analyses indicated that the DRB, DQA and DQB genes might have undergone birth-and-death evolution, whereas the DQB gene might have evolved under positive selection in cetaceans. These findings provide an essential foundation for future work, such as estimating MHC genetic variation in the YFP or other cetaceans. This work is the first report on the MHC class II region in cetaceans and offers valuable information for understanding the evolution of MHC genome in cetaceans. PMID:26932528

  13. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 binds to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, P; Diez, A; Mourad, W; Parsonnet, J; Geha, R S; Chatila, T

    1989-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a 22-kDa exotoxin produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus and implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. In common with other staphylococcal exotoxins, TSST-1 has diverse immunological effects. These include the induction of interleukin 2 receptor expression, interleukin 2 synthesis, proliferation of human T lymphocytes, and stimulation of interleukin 1 synthesis by human monocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate that TSST-1 binds with saturation kinetics and with a dissociation constant of 17-43 nM to a single class of binding sites on human mononuclear cells. There was a strong correlation between the number of TSST-1 binding sites and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, and interferon-gamma induced the expression of class II molecules as well as TSST-1 binding sites on human skin-derived fibroblasts. Monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR, but not to HLA-DP or HLA-DQ, strongly inhibited TSST-1 binding. Affinity chromatography of 125I-labeled cell membranes over TSST-1-agarose resulted in the recovery of two bands of 35 kDa and 31 kDa that comigrated, respectively, with the alpha and beta chains of HLA-DR and that could be immunoprecipitated with anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies. Binding of TSST-1 was demonstrated to HLA-DR and HLA-DQ L-cell transfectants. These results indicate that major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represent the major binding site for TSST-1 on human cells. Images PMID:2542966

  14. Quantitative online prediction of peptide binding to the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Zygouri, Christianna; Flower, Darren R

    2004-01-01

    With its implications for vaccine discovery, the accurate prediction of T cell epitopes is one of the key aspirations of computational vaccinology. We have developed a robust multivariate statistical method, based on partial least squares, for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to major histocompatibility complexes (MHC), the principal checkpoint on the antigen presentation pathway. As a service to the immunobiology community, we have made a Perl implementation of the method available via a World Wide Web server. We call this server MHCPred. Access to the server is freely available from the URL: http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred. We have exemplified our method with a model for peptides binding to the common human MHC molecule HLA-B*3501. PMID:14629978

  15. Genetic Variation of Major Histocompatibility Complex and Microsatellite Loci: A Comparison in Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, W. M.; Hedrick, P. W.; Muggli-Cockett, N. E.; Kalinowski, S.; Penedo, MCT.; Ramey-II, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Examining and comparing genetic variation for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and microsatellite (MS) loci in the same individuals provides an opportunity to understand the forces influencing genetic variation. We examined five MHC and three MS loci in 235 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) from 14 populations and found that both types of loci were highly variable and were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Mean F(ST) values for both markers were very similar and MHC and MS genetic variability was predominantly distributed within rather than among populations. However, analyses of genetic distances and tree topologies revealed different spatial patterns of variation for the two types of loci. Collectively, these results indicated that neutral forces substantially influenced MS and MHC variation, and they provided limited evidence for selection acting on the MHC. PMID:9071595

  16. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    PubMed

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  17. Molecular characterization by high-resolution isoelectric focusing of the products encoded by the class II region loci of the major histocompatibility complex in humans. I. DR and DQ gene variants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez de Cordoba, S; Nunez-Roldan, A; Winchester, R; Marshall, P; Carrier, C; Mollen, N; Walker, M; Ginsberg-Fellner, F; Rubinstein, P

    1987-09-01

    We describe a new approach to the analysis of the structural polymorphism of the DR beta, DQ alpha, and DQ beta polypeptide chains of human histocompatibility class II antigens. In comparison to conventional two-dimensional gel studies, this method provides sharper definition of the protein bands and side-by-side comparisons within the same gel, thereby permitting the detection of minor differences in the isoelectric points of the protein chains. Using this methodology we have analyzed the IEF polymorphism and the variability in the number of the DR beta chains encoded by different DR haplotypes. Twenty DR beta chain variants, which include the products of no less than two separate DR beta loci, have been thus far identified. Alleles at one of these loci are assumed to code for DR beta chains carrying the DR alloespecificities DR1, DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5, DRw6, DR7, and DR8. Alleles at a second DR beta locus encode DR beta chains that may be shared by serologically DR-different haplotypes and carry supertypic serologic specificities (i.e., DRw52 and DRw53). We also demonstrate here that the structural polymorphisms of the DQ alpha and DQ beta chains are more extensive than previously thought, report the characterization of 14 DQ beta variants, and define their relationship to the previously described DQw serologic specificities. In addition, we describe the class II haplotype associations observed for the different DR and DQ variants characterized. PMID:3679903

  18. Major Histocompatibility Class II Pathway Is Not Required for the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Willemin, Gilles; Roger, Catherine; Bauduret, Armelle; Minehira, Kaori

    2013-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms within major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) genes have been associated with an increased risk of drug-induced liver injury. However, it has never been addressed whether the MHC II pathway plays an important role in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of liver disease. We used a mouse model that has a complete knockdown of genes in the MHC II pathway (MHCII(Δ/Δ)). Firstly we studied the effect of high-fat diet-induced hepatic inflammation in these mice. Secondly we studied the development of carbon-tetra-chloride- (CCl4-) induced hepatic cirrhosis. After the high-fat diet, both groups developed obesity and hepatic steatosis with a similar degree of hepatic inflammation, suggesting no impact of the knockdown of MHC II on high-fat diet-induced inflammation in mice. In the second study, we confirmed that the CCl4 injection significantly upregulated the MHC II genes in wild-type mice. The CCl4 treatment significantly induced genes related to the fibrosis formation in wild-type mice, whereas this was lower in MHCII(Δ/Δ) mice. The liver histology, however, showed no detectable difference between groups, suggesting that the MHC II pathway is not required for the development of hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4.

  19. Genetic diversity of the class II major histocompatibility DRA locus in European, Asiatic and African domestic donkeys.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Marie; Alloggio, Ingrid; Qablan, Moneeb; Vyskocil, Mirko; Baumeisterova, Aneta; Sloboda, Michal; Putnova, Lenka; Vrtkova, Irena; Modry, David; Horin, Petr

    2011-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes coding for antigen presenting molecules are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genome. The MHC class II DRA gene shows only small variation in many mammalian species, but it exhibits relatively high level of polymorphism in Equidae, especially in donkeys. This extraordinary degree of polymorphism together with signatures of selection in specific amino acids sites makes the donkey DRA gene a suitable model for population diversity studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the DRA gene diversity in three different populations of donkeys under infectious pressure of protozoan parasites, Theileria equi and Babesia caballi. Three populations of domestic donkeys from Italy (N = 68), Jordan (N = 43), and Kenya (N = 78) were studied. A method of the donkey MHC DRA genotyping based on PCR-RFLP and sequencing was designed. In addition to the DRA gene, 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci were genotyped. The presence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi parasites in peripheral blood was investigated by PCR. Allele and genotype frequencies, observed and expected heterozygosities and F(IS) values were computed as parameters of genetic diversity for all loci genotyped. Genetic distances between the three populations were estimated based on F(ST) values. Statistical associations between parasite infection and genetic polymorphisms were sought. Extensive DRA locus variation characteristic for Equids was found. The results showed differences between populations both in terms of numbers of alleles and their frequencies as well as variation in expected heterozygosity values. Based on comparisons with neutral microsatellite loci, population sub-structure characteristics and association analysis, convincing evidence of pathogen-driven selection at the population level was not provided. It seems that genetic diversity observed in the three populations reflects mostly effects of selective breeding and their different

  20. Sexual selection explains more functional variation in the mammalian major histocompatibility complex than parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Winternitz, J. C.; Minchey, S. G.; Garamszegi, L. Z.; Huang, S.; Stephens, P. R.; Altizer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding drivers of genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is vitally important for predicting how vertebrate immune defence might respond to future selection pressures and for preserving immunogenetic diversity in declining populations. Parasite-mediated selection is believed to be the major selective force generating MHC polymorphism, and while MHC-based mating preferences also exist for multiple species including humans, the general importance of mate choice is debated. To investigate the contributions of parasitism and sexual selection in explaining among-species variation in MHC diversity, we applied comparative methods and meta-analysis across 112 mammal species, including carnivores, bats, primates, rodents and ungulates. We tested whether MHC diversity increased with parasite richness and relative testes size (as an indicator of the potential for mate choice), while controlling for phylogenetic autocorrelation, neutral mutation rate and confounding ecological variables. We found that MHC nucleotide diversity increased with parasite richness for bats and ungulates but decreased with parasite richness for carnivores. By contrast, nucleotide diversity increased with relative testes size for all taxa. This study provides support for both parasite-mediated and sexual selection in shaping functional MHC polymorphism across mammals, and importantly, suggests that sexual selection could have a more general role than previously thought. PMID:23966643

  1. Myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a member of a subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily encoded within the major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Dautigny, A. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N. ); Nussbaum, J.H.; Roussel, G. ); Pontarotti, P. ); Mather, I.H. ); Artzt, K. ); Lindahl, K.F. )

    1993-09-01

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is found on the surface of myelinating oligodendrocytes and external lamellae of myelin sheaths in the central nervous system, and it is target antigen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis. The authors have isolated bovine, mouse, and rat MOG cDNA clones and shown that the developmental pattern of MOG expression in the rat central nervous system coincides with the late stages of myelination. The amino-terminal, extracellular domain of MOG has characteristics of an immunoglobulin variable domain and is 46% and 41% identical with the amino terminus of bovine butyrophilin (expressed in the lactating mammary gland) and B-G antigens of the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC), respectively; these proteins thus form a subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The homology between MOG and B-G extends beyond their structure and genetic mapping to their ability to induce strong antibody responses and has implications for the role of MOG in pathological, autoimmune conditions. The authors colocalized the MOG and BT genes to the human MHC on chromosome 6p21.3-p22. The mouse MOG gene was mapped to the homologous band C of chromosome 17, within the M region of the mouse MHC. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  2. A complex alloantigen system in Florida sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis pratensis: Evidence for the major histocompatibility (B) system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Gee, G.F.; Miller, M.M.; Briles, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The B blood group system constitutes the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in birds. The Mhc is a cluster of genes largely devoted to the processing and presentation of antigen. The Mhc is highly polymorphic in many species and, thus, useful in the evaluation of genetic diversity for fitness traits within populations of a variety of animals. Correlations found between particular Mhc haplotypes and resistance to certain diseases emphasize the importance of understanding the functional significance of diversity of the Mhc, particularly in species threatened with extinction. As part of studies focused on genetic diversity in wild birds, serological techniques were used to define a highly polymorphic alloantigen system in seven families of Florida sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pratensis). The results of analyses with antisera produced within the crane families and with chicken Mhc antigen-specific reagents revealed a single major alloantigen system that is likely the Mhc of the Florida sandhill crane. Preliminary experiments indicate that these crane alloantisera will provide a means of defining .the Mhc in other species of cranes.

  3. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  4. Cytokines Regulate Proteolysis in Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II–Dependent Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Edda; Meraner, Paul; Weber, Ekkehard; Fang, I-Fei; Stingl, Georg; Ploegh, Hidde; Maurer, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Endo/lysosomal proteases control two key events in antigen (Ag) presentation: the degradation of protein Ag and the generation of peptide-receptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Here we show that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL)-1β rapidly increase the activity of cathepsin (cat) S and catB in human dendritic cells (DCs). As a consequence, a wave of MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation ensues in a catS-dependent fashion. In contrast, the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 renders DCs incapable of upregulating catS and catB activity and in fact, attenuates the level of both enzymes. Suppressed catS and catB activity delays MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation and impairs Ag degradation. In DCs exposed to tetanus toxoid, IL-10 accordingly reduces the number of MHC class II–peptide complexes accessible to tetanus toxoid–specific T cell receptors, as analyzed by measuring T cell receptor downregulation in Ag-specific T cell clones. Thus, the control of protease activity by pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines is an essential feature of the Ag presentation properties of DCs. PMID:11304549

  5. High-Resolution Patterns of Meiotic Recombination across the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Michael; Perfetto, Stephen P.; Klitz, William; Nelson, George; Carrington, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Definitive characteristics of meiotic recombination events over large (i.e., >1 Mb) segments of the human genome remain obscure, yet they are essential for establishing the haplotypic structure of the genome and for efficient mapping of complex traits. We present a high-resolution map of recombination at the kilobase level across a 3.3-Mb interval encompassing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Genotyping of 20,031 single sperm from 12 individuals resulted in the identification and fine mapping of 325 recombinant chromosomes within genomic intervals as small as 7 kb. Several principal characteristics of recombination in this region were observed: (1) rates of recombination can differ significantly between individuals; (2) intense hot spots of recombination occur at least every 0.8 Mb but are not necessarily evenly spaced; (3) distribution in the location of recombination events can differ significantly among individuals; (4) between hot spots, low levels of recombination occur fairly evenly across 100-kb segments, suggesting the presence of warm spots of recombination; and (5) specific sequence motifs associate significantly with recombination distribution. These data provide a plausible model for recombination patterns of the human genome overall. PMID:12297984

  6. Covalent assembly of a soluble T cell receptor-peptide-major histocompatibility class I complex.

    PubMed Central

    Grégoire, C; Lin, S Y; Mazza, G; Rebai, N; Luescher, I F; Malissen, B

    1996-01-01

    We used stepwise photochemical cross-linking for specifically assembling soluble and covalent complexes made of a T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and a class I molecule of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) bound to an antigenic peptide. For that purpose, we have produced in myeloma cells a single-chain Fv construct of a TCR specific for a photoreactive H-2Kd-peptide complex. Photochemical cross-linking of this TCR single-chain Fv with a soluble form of the photoreactive H-2Kd-peptide ligand resulted in the formation of a ternary covalent complex. We have characterized the soluble ternary complex and showed that it reacted with antibodies specific for epitopes located either on the native TCR or on the Kd molecules. By preventing the fast dissociation kinetics observed with most T cell receptors, this approach provides a means of preparing soluble TCR-peptide-MHC complexes on large-scale levels. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692966

  7. Major histocompatibility complex linked databases and prediction tools for designing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satarudra Prakash; Mishra, Bhartendu Nath

    2016-03-01

    Presently, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is receiving considerable interest owing to its remarkable role in antigen presentation and vaccine design. The specific databases and prediction approaches related to MHC sequences, structures and binding/nonbinding peptides have been aggressively developed in the past two decades with their own benchmarks and standards. Before using these databases and prediction tools, it is important to analyze why and how the tools are constructed along with their strengths and limitations. The current review presents insights into web-based immunological bioinformatics resources that include searchable databases of MHC sequences, epitopes and prediction tools that are linked to MHC based vaccine design, including population coverage analysis. In T cell epitope forecasts, MHC class I binding predictions are very accurate for most of the identified MHC alleles. However, these predictions could be further improved by integrating proteasome cleavage (in conjugation with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) binding) prediction, as well as T cell receptor binding prediction. On the other hand, MHC class II restricted epitope predictions display relatively low accuracy compared to MHC class I. To date, pan-specific tools have been developed, which not only deliver significantly improved predictions in terms of accuracy, but also in terms of the coverage of MHC alleles and supertypes. In addition, structural modeling and simulation systems for peptide-MHC complexes enable the molecular-level investigation of immune processes. Finally, epitope prediction tools, and their assessments and guidelines, have been presented to immunologist for the design of novel vaccine and diagnostics.

  8. Adaptive tolerance to a pathogenic fungus drives major histocompatibility complex evolution in natural amphibian populations

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have been affected globally by the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and we are just now beginning to understand how immunogenetic variability contributes to disease susceptibility. Lineages of an expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II locus involved in acquired immunity are associated with chytridiomycosis susceptibility in controlled laboratory challenge assays. Here, we extend these findings to natural populations that vary both in exposure and response to Bd. We find that MHC alleles and supertypes associated with Bd survival in the field show a molecular signal of positive selection, while those associated with susceptibility do not, supporting the hypothesis that heritable Bd tolerance is rapidly evolving. We compare MHC supertypes to neutral loci to demonstrate where selection versus demography is shaping MHC variability. One population with Bd tolerance in nature shows a significant signal of directional selection for the same allele (allele Q) that was significantly associated with survival in an earlier laboratory study. Our findings indicate that selective pressure for Bd survival drives rapid immunogenetic adaptation in some natural populations, despite differences in environment and demography. Our field-based analysis of immunogenetic variation confirms that natural amphibian populations have the evolutionary potential to adapt to chytridiomycosis. PMID:27009220

  9. Binding and activation of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient macrophages by staphylococcal exotoxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Macrophages from C2D transgenic mice deficient in the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II proteins were used to identify binding sites for superantigens distinct from the MHC class II molecule. Iodinated staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB) and exfoliative toxins A and B (ETA and ETB) bound to C2D macrophages in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner. All four toxins increased F-actin concentration within 30 s of their addition to C2D macrophages, indicating that signal transduction occurred in response to toxin in the absence of class II MHC. Furthermore, ETA, ETB, SEA, and, to a lesser extent, SEB induced C2D macrophages to produce interleukin 6. Several molecular species on C2D macrophages with molecular masses of 140, 97, 61, 52, 43, and 37 kDa bound SEA in immunoprecipitation experiments. These data indicate the presence of novel, functionally active toxin binding sites on murine macrophages distinct from MHC class II molecules.

  10. Recombination and selection in the major histocompatibility complex of the endangered forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii)

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ruibo; Shafer, Aaron B.A.; Laguardia, Alice; Lin, Zhenzhen; Liu, Shuqiang; Hu, Defu

    2015-01-01

    The forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) is a high elevation species distributed across western China and northern Vietnam. Once abundant, habitat loss and poaching has led to a dramatic decrease in population numbers prompting the IUCN to list the species as endangered. Here, we characterized the genetic diversity of a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus and teased apart driving factors shaping its variation. Seven DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among a group of randomly sampled forest musk deer from a captive population in the Sichuan province of China. Compared to other endangered or captive ungulates, forest musk deer have relatively low levels of MHC genetic diversity. Non-synonymous substitutions primarily occurred in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), with analyses suggesting that recombination and selection has shaped the genetic diversity across the locus. Specifically, inter-allelic recombination generated novel allelic combinations, with evidence for both positive selection acting on the PBR and negative selection on the non-PBR. An improved understanding of functional genetic variability of the MHC will facilitate better design and management of captive breeding programs for this endangered species. PMID:26603338

  11. Properties and Applications of Single-Chain Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Brzostek, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Stable major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules at the cell surface consist of three separate, noncovalently associated components: the class I heavy chain, the β2-microglobulin light chain, and a presented peptide. These three components are assembled inside cells via complex pathways involving many other proteins that have been studied extensively. Correct formation of disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is central to this process of MHC class I assembly. For a single specific peptide to be presented at the cell surface for possible immune recognition, between hundreds and thousands of peptide-containing precursor polypeptides are required, so the overall process is relatively inefficient. To increase the efficiency of antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules, and for possible therapeutic purposes, single-chain molecules have been developed in which the three, normally separate components have been joined together via flexible linker sequences in a single polypeptide chain. Remarkably, these single-chain MHC class I molecules fold up correctly, as judged by functional recognition by cells of the immune system, and more recently by X-ray crystallographic structural data. This review focuses on the interesting properties and potential of this new type of engineered MHC class I molecule. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 645–655. PMID:21126187

  12. Major Histocompatibility Complex I Expression by Motor Neurons and Its Implication in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nardo, Giovanni; Trolese, Maria Chiara; Bendotti, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal expression of major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI)-related molecules in adults and during CNS diseases is involved in the synaptic plasticity and axonal regeneration with mechanisms either dependent or independent of their immune functions. Motor neurons are highly responsive in triggering the expression of MHCI molecules during normal aging or following insults and diseases, and this has implications in the synaptic controls, axonal regeneration, and neuromuscular junction stability of these neurons. We recently reported that MHCI and immunoproteasome are strongly activated in spinal motor neurons and their peripheral motor axon in a mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) during the course of the disease. This response was prominent in ALS mice with slower disease progression in which the axonal structure and function was better preserved than in fast-progressing mice. This review summarizes and discusses our observations in the light of knowledge about the possible role of MHCI in motor neurons providing additional insight into the pathophysiology of ALS. PMID:27379008

  13. Recombination and selection in the major histocompatibility complex of the endangered forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii).

    PubMed

    Cai, Ruibo; Shafer, Aaron B A; Laguardia, Alice; Lin, Zhenzhen; Liu, Shuqiang; Hu, Defu

    2015-01-01

    The forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) is a high elevation species distributed across western China and northern Vietnam. Once abundant, habitat loss and poaching has led to a dramatic decrease in population numbers prompting the IUCN to list the species as endangered. Here, we characterized the genetic diversity of a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus and teased apart driving factors shaping its variation. Seven DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among a group of randomly sampled forest musk deer from a captive population in the Sichuan province of China. Compared to other endangered or captive ungulates, forest musk deer have relatively low levels of MHC genetic diversity. Non-synonymous substitutions primarily occurred in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), with analyses suggesting that recombination and selection has shaped the genetic diversity across the locus. Specifically, inter-allelic recombination generated novel allelic combinations, with evidence for both positive selection acting on the PBR and negative selection on the non-PBR. An improved understanding of functional genetic variability of the MHC will facilitate better design and management of captive breeding programs for this endangered species. PMID:26603338

  14. Efficient major histocompatibility complex class I presentation of exogenous antigen upon phagocytosis by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsovics-Bankowski, M; Clark, K; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1993-01-01

    Antigens in extracellular fluids can be processed and presented with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by a subset of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chicken egg ovalbumin (Ova) linked to beads was presented with MHC class I molecules by these cells up to 10(4)-fold more efficiently than soluble Ova. This enhanced presentation was observed with covalently or noncovalently linked Ova and with beads of different compositions. A key parameter in the activity of these conjugates was the size of the beads. The APC that is responsible for this form of presentation is a macrophage. These cells internalize the antigen constructs through phagocytosis, since cytochalasin B inhibited presentation. Processing of the antigen and association with MHC class I molecules appears to occur intracellularly as presentation was observed under conditions where there was no detectable release of peptides into the extracellular fluids. When injected in vivo in C57BL/6 mice, Ova-beads, but not soluble Ova, primed CD4- CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Similar results were obtained in BALB/c mice immunized with beta-galactosidase-beads. The implications of these findings for development of nonliving vaccines that stimulate CTL immunity are discussed. PMID:8506338

  15. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells.

  16. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  17. Major histocompatibility complex diversity influences parasite resistance and innate immunity in sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Joachim; Kalbe, Martin; Aeschlimann, Peter B; Häberli, Michael A; Wegner, K Mathias; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Milinski, Manfred

    2004-01-22

    Proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a central role in the presentation of antigens to the adaptive immune system. The MHC also influences the odour-based choice of mates in humans and several animal taxa. It has recently been shown that female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) aim at a moderately high MHC diversity in their offspring when choosing a mate. Do they optimize the immune systems of their offspring? Using three-spined sticklebacks that varied in their individual numbers of MHC class IIB molecules, we tested, experimentally, whether allelic diversity at the MHC influences parasite resistance and immune parameters. We found that sticklebacks with low MHC diversity suffered more from parasite infection after experimental exposure to Schistocephalus solidus tapeworms and Glugea anomala microsporidians. They also showed the highest proportion of granulocytes and the strongest respiratory burst reaction, which are correlates of innate immunity. This indicates a strong activity of the innate immune system after challenge by parasites when MHC diversity is suboptimal. Individuals with very high allelic diversity at the MHC seemed inferior to those with moderately high diversity. Such a pattern is consistent with theoretical expectations of an optimal balance between the number of recognizable antigens and self-tolerance. PMID:15058398

  18. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  19. Major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted alloreactive CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Louise H; Goodall, Jane C; Gaston, J S Hill

    2004-05-01

    Although it is well established that CD4+ T cells generally recognize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, MHC class I-reactive CD4+ T cells have occasionally been reported. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of six MHC class I-reactive CD4+ T-cell lines, obtained by co-culture of CD4+ peripheral blood T cells with the MHC class II-negative, transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-negative cell line, T2, transfected with human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27. Responses were inhibited by the MHC class I-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), W6/32, demonstrating the direct recognition of MHC class I molecules. In four cases, the restriction element was positively identified as HLA-A2, as responses by these clones were completely inhibited by MA2.1, an HLA-A2-specific mAb. Interestingly, three of the CD4+ T-cell lines only responded to cells expressing HLA-B27, irrespective of their restricting allele, implicating HLA-B27 as a possible source of peptides presented by the stimulatory MHC class I alleles. In addition, these CD4+ MHC class I alloreactive T-cell lines could recognize TAP-deficient cells and therefore may have particular clinical relevance to situations where the expression of TAP molecules is decreased, such as viral infection and transformation of cells. PMID:15096184

  20. Diacylglycerol kinase α regulates tubular recycling endosome biogenesis and major histocompatibility complex class I recycling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2014-11-14

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) presents intracellular-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and its subcellular itinerary is important in regulating the immune response. While a number of diacylglycerol kinase isoforms have been implicated in clathrin-dependent internalization, MHC I lacks the typical motifs known to mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Here we show that depletion of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), a kinase devoid of a clathrin-dependent adaptor protein complex 2 binding site, caused a delay in MHC I recycling to the plasma membrane without affecting the rate of MHC I internalization. We demonstrate that DGKα knock-down causes accumulation of intracellular and surface MHC I, resulting from decreased degradation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DGKα is required for the generation of phosphatidic acid required for tubular recycling endosome (TRE) biogenesis. Moreover, we show that DGKα forms a complex with the TRE hub protein, MICAL-L1. Given that MICAL-L1 and the F-BAR-containing membrane-tubulating protein Syndapin2 associate selectively with phosphatidic acid, we propose a positive feedback loop in which DGKα generates phosphatidic acid to drive its own recruitment to TRE via its interaction with MICAL-L1. Our data support a novel role for the involvement of DGKα in TRE biogenesis and MHC I recycling.

  1. Major histocompatibility complex peptide ligands as olfactory cues in human body odour assessment.

    PubMed

    Milinski, Manfred; Croy, Ilona; Hummel, Thomas; Boehm, Thomas

    2013-03-22

    In many animal species, social communication and mate choice are influenced by cues encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The mechanism by which the MHC influences sexual selection is a matter of intense debate. In mice, peptide ligands of MHC molecules activate subsets of vomeronasal and olfactory sensory neurons and influence social memory formation; in sticklebacks, such peptides predictably modify the outcome of mate choice. Here, we examine whether this evolutionarily conserved mechanism of interindividual communication extends to humans. In psychometric tests, volunteers recognized the supplementation of their body odour by MHC peptides and preferred 'self' to 'non-self' ligands when asked to decide whether the modified odour smelled 'like themselves' or 'like their favourite perfume'. Functional magnetic resonance imaging indicated that 'self'-peptides specifically activated a region in the right middle frontal cortex. Our results suggest that despite the absence of a vomeronasal organ, humans have the ability to detect and evaluate MHC peptides in body odour. This may provide a basis for the sensory evaluation of potential partners during human mate choice.

  2. Major histocompatibility complex selection dynamics in pathogen-infected túngara frog (Physalaemus pustulosus) populations.

    PubMed

    Kosch, Tiffany A; Bataille, Arnaud; Didinger, Chelsea; Eimes, John A; Rodríguez-Brenes, Sofia; Ryan, Michael J; Waldman, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Pathogen-driven selection can favour major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles that confer immunological resistance to specific diseases. However, strong directional selection should deplete genetic variation necessary for robust immune function in the absence of balancing selection or challenges presented by other pathogens. We examined selection dynamics at one MHC class II (MHC-II) locus across Panamanian populations of the túngara frog, Physalaemus pustulosus, infected by the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We compared MHC-II diversity in highland túngara frog populations, where amphibian communities have experienced declines owing to Bd, with those in the lowland region that have shown no evidence of decline. Highland region frogs had MHC variants that confer resistance to Bd. Variant fixation appeared to occur by directional selection rather than inbreeding, as overall genetic variation persisted in populations. In Bd-infected lowland sites, however, selective advantage may accrue to individuals with only one Bd-resistance allele, which were more frequent. Environmental conditions in lowlands should be less favourable for Bd infection, which may reduce selection for specific Bd resistance in hosts. Our results suggest that MHC selection dynamics fluctuate in túngara frog populations as a function of the favourability of habitat to pathogen spread and the vulnerability of hosts to infection. PMID:27531158

  3. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells. PMID:27448212

  4. Histocompatibility as adaptive response to discriminatory within-organism conflict: a historical model.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Owen M

    2015-02-01

    Multicellular tissue compatibility, or histocompatibility, restricts fusion to close kin. Histocompatibility depends on hypervariable cue genes, which often have more than 100 alleles in a population. To explain the evolution of histocompatibility, I here take a historical approach. I focus on the specific example of marine invertebrate histocompatibility. I use simple game-theoretical models to show that histocompatibility can evolve through five steps. These steps include the evolution of indiscriminate fusion, the evolution of discriminatory within-organism conflict, the evolution of minor histocompatibility, the evolution of major histocompatibility, and the evolution of major histocompatibility cue polymorphism. Allowing for gradual evolution reveals discriminatory within-organism conflict as a selective pressure for histocompatibility and associated cue polymorphism. Existing data from marine invertebrates and other organisms are consistent with this hypothesis.

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class II molecules can protect from diabetes by positively selecting T cells with additional specificities.

    PubMed

    Lühder, F; Katz, J; Benoist, C; Mathis, D

    1998-02-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes is heavily influenced by genes encoded within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), positively by some class II alleles and negatively by others. We have explored the mechanism of MHC class II-mediated protection from diabetes using a mouse model carrying the rearranged T cell receptor (TCR) transgenes from a diabetogenic T cell clone derived from a nonobese diabetic mouse. BDC2.5 TCR transgenics with C57Bl/6 background genes and two doses of the H-2(g7) allele exhibited strong insulitis at approximately 3 wk of age and most developed diabetes a few weeks later. When one of the H-2(g7) alleles was replaced by H-2(b), insulitis was still severe and only slightly delayed, but diabetes was markedly inhibited in both its penetrance and time of onset. The protective effect was mediated by the Abetab gene, and did not merely reflect haplozygosity of the Abetag7 gene. The only differences we observed in the T cell compartments of g7/g7 and g7/b mice were a decrease in CD4(+) cells displaying the transgene-encoded TCR and an increase in cells expressing endogenously encoded TCR alpha-chains. When the synthesis of endogenously encoded alpha-chains was prevented, the g7/b animals were no longer protected from diabetes. g7/b mice did not have a general defect in the production of Ag7-restricted T cells, and antigen-presenting cells from g7/b animals were as effective as those from g7/g7 mice in stimulating Ag7-restricted T cell hybridomas. These results argue against mechanisms of protection involving clonal deletion or anergization of diabetogenic T cells, or one depending on capture of potentially pathogenic Ag7-restricted epitopes by Ab molecules. Rather, they support a mechanism based on MHC class II-mediated positive selection of T cells expressing additional specificities. PMID:9449718

  6. Major histocompatibility complex variation in insular populations of the Egyptian vulture: inferences about the roles of genetic drift and selection.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rosa; Alcaide, Miguel; Rico, Ciro; Lemus, Jesus A; Blanco, Guillermo; Hiraldo, Fernando; Donázar, Jose A

    2011-06-01

    Insular populations have attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists because of their morphological and ecological peculiarities with respect to their mainland counterparts. Founder effects and genetic drift are known to distribute neutral genetic variability in these demes. However, elucidating whether these evolutionary forces have also shaped adaptive variation is crucial to evaluate the real impact of reduced genetic variation in small populations. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are classical examples of evolutionarily relevant loci because of their well-known role in pathogen confrontation and clearance. In this study, we aim to disentangle the partial roles of genetic drift and natural selection in the spatial distribution of MHC variation in insular populations. To this end, we integrate the study of neutral (22 microsatellites and one mtDNA locus) and MHC class II variation in one mainland (Iberia) and two insular populations (Fuerteventura and Menorca) of the endangered Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Overall, the distribution of the frequencies of individual MHC alleles (n=17 alleles from two class II B loci) does not significantly depart from neutral expectations, which indicates a prominent role for genetic drift over selection. However, our results point towards an interesting co-evolution of gene duplicates that maintains different pairs of divergent alleles in strong linkage disequilibrium on islands. We hypothesize that the co-evolution of genes may counteract the loss of genetic diversity in insular demes, maximize antigen recognition capabilities when gene diversity is reduced, and promote the co-segregation of the most efficient allele combinations to cope with local pathogen communities.

  7. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class IIβ alleles of New World ranid frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Major histocompatibility complex variation in insular populations of the Egyptian vulture: inferences about the roles of genetic drift and selection.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rosa; Alcaide, Miguel; Rico, Ciro; Lemus, Jesus A; Blanco, Guillermo; Hiraldo, Fernando; Donázar, Jose A

    2011-06-01

    Insular populations have attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists because of their morphological and ecological peculiarities with respect to their mainland counterparts. Founder effects and genetic drift are known to distribute neutral genetic variability in these demes. However, elucidating whether these evolutionary forces have also shaped adaptive variation is crucial to evaluate the real impact of reduced genetic variation in small populations. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are classical examples of evolutionarily relevant loci because of their well-known role in pathogen confrontation and clearance. In this study, we aim to disentangle the partial roles of genetic drift and natural selection in the spatial distribution of MHC variation in insular populations. To this end, we integrate the study of neutral (22 microsatellites and one mtDNA locus) and MHC class II variation in one mainland (Iberia) and two insular populations (Fuerteventura and Menorca) of the endangered Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Overall, the distribution of the frequencies of individual MHC alleles (n=17 alleles from two class II B loci) does not significantly depart from neutral expectations, which indicates a prominent role for genetic drift over selection. However, our results point towards an interesting co-evolution of gene duplicates that maintains different pairs of divergent alleles in strong linkage disequilibrium on islands. We hypothesize that the co-evolution of genes may counteract the loss of genetic diversity in insular demes, maximize antigen recognition capabilities when gene diversity is reduced, and promote the co-segregation of the most efficient allele combinations to cope with local pathogen communities. PMID:21535276

  9. Variation in positively selected major histocompatibility complex class I loci in rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis).

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew R; Cheviron, Zachary A; Carling, Matthew D

    2014-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a highly variable family of genes involved in parasite recognition and the initiation of adaptive immune system responses. Variation in MHC loci is maintained primarily through parasite-mediated selection or disassortative mate choice. To characterize MHC diversity of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis), an abundant South American passerine, we examined allelic and nucleotide variation in MHC class I exon 3 using pyrosequencing. Exon 3 comprises a substantial portion of the peptide-binding region (PBR) of class I MHC and thus plays an important role in intracellular pathogen defense. We identified 98 putatively functional alleles that produce 56 unique protein sequences across at least 6 paralogous loci. Allelic diversity per individual and exon-wide nucleotide diversity were relatively low; however, we found specific amino acid positions with high nucleotide diversity and signatures of positive selection (elevated d N /d S ) that may correspond to the PBR. Based on the variation in physicochemical properties of amino acids at these "positively selected sites," we identified ten functional MHC supertypes. Spatial variation in nucleotide diversity and the number of MHC alleles, proteins, and supertypes per individual suggests that environmental heterogeneity may affect patterns of MHC diversity. Furthermore, populations with high MHC diversity have higher prevalence of avian malaria, consistent with parasite-mediated selection on MHC. Together, these results provide a framework for subsequent investigations of selective agents acting on MHC in Z. capensis. PMID:25186067

  10. Major histocompatibility complex diversity is positively associated with stream water temperatures in proximate populations of sockeye salmon.

    PubMed

    Larson, W A; Lisi, P J; Seeb, J E; Seeb, L W; Schindler, D E

    2016-09-01

    Local adaptation to heterogeneous environments generates population diversity within species, significantly increasing ecosystem stability and flows of ecosystem services. However, few studies have isolated the specific mechanisms that create and maintain this diversity. Here, we examined the relationship between water temperature in streams used for spawning and genetic diversity at a gene involved in immune function [the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)] in 14 populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) sampled across the Wood River basin in south-western Alaska. The largest influence on MHC diversity was lake basin, but we also found a significant positive correlation between average water temperature and MHC diversity. This positive relationship between temperature and MHC diversity appears to have been produced by natural selection at very local scales rather than neutral processes, as no correlation was observed between temperature and genetic diversity at 90 neutral markers. Additionally, no significant relationship was observed between temperature variability and MHC diversity. Although lake basin was the largest driver of differences in MHC diversity, our results also demonstrate that fine-scale differences in water temperature may generate variable selection regimes in populations that spawn in habitats separated by as little as 1 km. Additionally, our results indicated that some populations may be reaching a maximum level of MHC diversity. We postulate that salmon from populations in warm streams may delay spawning until late summer to avoid thermal stress as well as the elevated levels of pathogen prevalence and virulence associated with warm temperatures earlier in the summer.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex diversity is positively associated with stream water temperatures in proximate populations of sockeye salmon.

    PubMed

    Larson, W A; Lisi, P J; Seeb, J E; Seeb, L W; Schindler, D E

    2016-09-01

    Local adaptation to heterogeneous environments generates population diversity within species, significantly increasing ecosystem stability and flows of ecosystem services. However, few studies have isolated the specific mechanisms that create and maintain this diversity. Here, we examined the relationship between water temperature in streams used for spawning and genetic diversity at a gene involved in immune function [the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)] in 14 populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) sampled across the Wood River basin in south-western Alaska. The largest influence on MHC diversity was lake basin, but we also found a significant positive correlation between average water temperature and MHC diversity. This positive relationship between temperature and MHC diversity appears to have been produced by natural selection at very local scales rather than neutral processes, as no correlation was observed between temperature and genetic diversity at 90 neutral markers. Additionally, no significant relationship was observed between temperature variability and MHC diversity. Although lake basin was the largest driver of differences in MHC diversity, our results also demonstrate that fine-scale differences in water temperature may generate variable selection regimes in populations that spawn in habitats separated by as little as 1 km. Additionally, our results indicated that some populations may be reaching a maximum level of MHC diversity. We postulate that salmon from populations in warm streams may delay spawning until late summer to avoid thermal stress as well as the elevated levels of pathogen prevalence and virulence associated with warm temperatures earlier in the summer. PMID:27341174

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class II antigens are required for both cytokine production and proliferation induced by mercuric chloride in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Möller, G; Abedi-Valugerdi, M

    1997-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases induced by mercuric chloride are genetically determined, at least one gene being major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked. Previously, we showed that in vitro mercury stimulation induced a high proliferative response in lymphocytes from susceptible mice (high-responders) and that the proliferative response could be restored in lymphocytes from low-responders by pretreating the cells with mercury. We also found that the continuous presence of mercury induced IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, while pretreatment with mercury induced IL-4 production. In this study, we showed that anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibodies blocked both the mercury-induced proliferative responses in lymphocytes from high-responders and the restored proliferative responses in low-responders. In addition, anti-MHC class II antibodies also inhibited the mercury-induced IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-4 cytokine production in vitro. The results demonstrate that MHC class II antigens directly participate in mercury-induced cytokine production and cell activation, and are required at the onset of the initiation.

  13. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules protect motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Song, SungWon; Miranda, Carlos J; Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; McConnell, Michael J; Walker, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic to motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of MNs to cell death remain unclear. Here we report that astrocytes derived from either mice bearing mutations in genes associated with ALS or human subjects with ALS reduce the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on MNs; reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MNs against astrocyte toxicity. Overexpression of a single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects human MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, whereas knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, on human astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. Thus, our data indicate that, in ALS, loss of MHCI expression on MNs renders them more vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity. PMID:26928464

  14. Class I and class II major histocompatibility molecules play a role in bone marrow-derived macrophage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Simske, S. J.; Beharka, A. A.; Balch, S.; Luttges, M. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play significant roles in T cell development and immune function. We show that MHCI- and MHCII-deficient mice have low numbers of macrophage precursors and circulating monocytes, as well as abnormal bone marrow cell colony-stimulating factor type 1 secretion and bone composition. We suggest that MHCI and MHCII molecules play a significant role in macrophage development.

  15. Structure-based clustering of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins for broad-based T-cell vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2014-01-01

    Structure-based clustering technique is useful for identifying superfamilies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins with similar binding specificities. The resolved MHC superfamilies play an important role in vaccine development, from discovering new targets for broad-based vaccines and therapeutics to optimizing the affinity and selectivity of hits. Here, we describe a protocol and provide a summary for grouping MHC proteins according to their structural interaction characteristics.

  16. Stereospecific alignment of the X and Y elements is required for major histocompatibility complex class II DRA promoter function.

    PubMed Central

    Vilen, B J; Cogswell, J P; Ting, J P

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes involve several cis-acting DNA elements, including the X and Y boxes. These two elements are conserved within all murine and human class II genes and are required for accurate and efficient transcription from MHC class II promoters. Interestingly, the distance between the X and Y elements is also evolutionarily conserved at 18 to 20 bp. To investigate the function of the invariant spacing in the human MHC class II gene, HLA-DRA, we constructed a series of spacing mutants which alters the distance between the X and Y elements by integral and half-integral turns of the DNA helix. Transient transfection of the spacing constructs into Raji cells revealed that inserting integral turns of the DNA helix (+20 and +10 bp) did not reduce promoter activity, while inserting or deleting half-integral turns of the DNA helix (+15, +5, and -5 bp) drastically reduced promoter activity. The loss of promoter function in these half-integral turn constructs was due neither to the inability of the X and Y elements to bind proteins nor to improper binding of the X- and Y-box-binding proteins. These data indicate that the X and Y elements must be aligned on the same side of the DNA helix to ensure normal function. This requirement for stereospecific alignment strongly suggests that the X- and Y-box-binding proteins either interact directly or are components of a larger transcription complex which assembles on one face of the DNA double helix. Images PMID:1901941

  17. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1–2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression distinguishes two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    All mature B cells coexpress major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, I-A and I-E, which are restriction elements required for antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells. However, the expression of class II during the early stages of B cell development has been unclear. We demonstrate here that there is a difference in the expression of class II during murine B cell development in the fetal liver and adult bone marrow (BM). These differences define two distinct B cell developmental pathways. The Fetal-type (FT) pathway is characterized by pre-B and immature IgM+ B cells generated in the fetal liver which initially lack all class II expression. In contrast, the Adult-type (AT) pathway is typified by B cells developing in the adult BM which express class II molecules from the pre-B cell stage. In vitro stromal cell cultures of sorted fetal liver and adult BM pro-B cells indicated that the difference in I-A expression during B cell development is intrinsic to the progenitors. In addition, we show that FT B cell development is not restricted to the fetal liver but occurs in the peritoneal cavities, spleens, liver, and BM of young mice up to at least 1 mo of age. The AT B cell development begins to emerge after birth but is, however, restricted to the BM environment. These findings indicate that there are two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny, each of which could contribute differentially to the immune repertoire and thus the functions of B cell subsets and lineages. PMID:7913950

  19. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1-2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  20. Sequence variation at the major histocompatibility complex locus DQ beta in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas)

    PubMed

    Murray, B W; Malik, S; White, B N

    1995-07-01

    Genetic variation at the Major Histocompatibility Complex locus DQ beta was analyzed in 233 beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from seven populations: St. Lawrence Estuary, eastern Beaufort Sea, eastern Chukchi Sea, western Hudson Bay, eastern Hudson Bay, southeastern Baffin Island, and High Arctic and in 12 narwhals (Monodon monoceros) sympatric with the High Arctic beluga population. Variation was assessed by amplification of the exon coding for the peptide binding region via the polymerase chain reaction, followed by either cloning and DNA sequencing or single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. Five alleles were found across the beluga populations and one in the narwhal. Pairwise comparisons of these alleles showed a 5:1 ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions per site leading to eight amino acid differences, five of which were nonconservative substitutions, centered around positions previously shown to be important for peptide binding. Although the amount of allelic variation is low when compared with terrestrial mammals, the nature of the substitutions in the peptide binding sites indicates an important role for the DQ beta locus in the cellular immune response of beluga whales. Comparisons of allele frequencies among populations show the High Arctic population to be different (P < or = .005) from the other beluga populations surveyed. In these other populations an allele, Dele-DQ beta*0101-2, was found in 98% of the animals, while in the High Arctic it was found in only 52% of the animals. Two other alleles were found at high frequencies in the High Arctic population, one being very similar to the single allele found in narwhal. PMID:7659014

  1. Dynamics of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Association with the Human Peptide-loading Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Panter, Michaela S.; Jain, Ankur; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Ha, Taekjip; Cresswell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although the human peptide-loading complex (PLC) is required for optimal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) antigen presentation, its composition is still incompletely understood. The ratio of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and MHC I to tapasin, which is responsible for MHC I recruitment and peptide binding optimization, is particularly critical for modeling of the PLC. Here, we characterized the stoichiometry of the human PLC using both biophysical and biochemical approaches. By means of single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull), we determined a TAP/tapasin ratio of 1:2, consistent with previous studies of insect-cell microsomes, rat-human chimeric cells, and HeLa cells expressing truncated TAP subunits. We also report that the tapasin/MHC I ratio varies, with the PLC population comprising both 2:1 and 2:2 complexes, based on mutational and co-precipitation studies. The MHC I-saturated PLC may be particularly prevalent among peptide-selective alleles, such as HLA-C4. Additionally, MHC I association with the PLC increases when its peptide supply is reduced by inhibiting the proteasome or by blocking TAP-mediated peptide transport using viral inhibitors. Taken together, our results indicate that the composition of the human PLC varies under normal conditions and dynamically adapts to alterations in peptide supply that may arise during viral infection. These findings improve our understanding of the quality control of MHC I peptide loading and may aid the structural and functional modeling of the human PLC. PMID:22829594

  2. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1-2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas.

  3. Microsatellite and major histocompatibility complex variation in an endangered rattlesnake, the Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus).

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Collin P; Duvall, Melvin R; Swanson, Bradley J; Phillips, Christopher A; Dreslik, Michael J; Baker, Sarah J; King, Richard B

    2016-06-01

    Genetic diversity is fundamental to maintaining the long-term viability of populations, yet reduced genetic variation is often associated with small, isolated populations. To examine the relationship between demography and genetic variation, variation at hypervariable loci (e.g., microsatellite DNA loci) is often measured. However, these loci are selectively neutral (or near neutral) and may not accurately reflect genomewide variation. Variation at functional trait loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), can provide a better assessment of adaptive genetic variation in fragmented populations. We compared patterns of microsatellite and MHC variation across three Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus) populations representing a gradient of demographic histories to assess the relative roles of natural selection and genetic drift. Using 454 deep amplicon sequencing, we identified 24 putatively functional MHC IIB exon 2 alleles belonging to a minimum of six loci. Analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates provided evidence of historical positive selection at the nucleotide level, and Tajima's D provided support for balancing selection in each population. As predicted, estimates of microsatellite allelic richness, observed, heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity varied among populations in a pattern qualitatively consistent with demographic history and abundance. While MHC allelic richness at the population and individual levels revealed similar trends, MHC nucleotide diversity was unexpectedly high in the smallest population. Overall, these results suggest that genetic variation in the Eastern Massasauga populations in Illinois has been shaped by multiple evolutionary mechanisms. Thus, conservation efforts should consider both neutral and functional genetic variation when managing captive and wild Eastern Massasauga populations. PMID:27516858

  4. Structural Requirements and Biological Significance of Interactions between Peptides and the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, H. M.; Buus, S.; Colon, S.; Miles, C.; Sette, A.

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that T cells recognize a complex between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction-element and peptide-antigen fragments. Two aspects of this complex formation are considered in this paper: (1) what is the nature of the specificity of the interactions that allows a few MHC molecules to serve as restriction elements for a large universe of antigens; and (2) what is the relative contribution of determinant selection (i.e. antigen-MHC complex formation) and Tcell repertoire in determining the capacity of an individual to respond to an antigen? By analysing single amino acid substitution analogues of a peptide antigen (Ova 325-335) as well as by analysing the structural similarities between unrelated peptides capable of binding to the same MHC molecule, we have been able to document the very permissive nature of the antigen--MHC interaction. Despite this permissiveness of binding, it is possible to define certain structural features of peptides that are associated with the capacity to bind to a particular MHC specificity. With respect to the question of the relative role of determinant selection' and 'holes in the T-cell repertoire' in determining immune responsiveness, we present data that suggest both mechanisms operate in concert with one another. Thus only about 30% of a collection of peptides that in sum represent the sequence of a protein molecule were found to bind to Ia. Although immunogenicity was restricted to those peptides that were capable of binding to Ia (i.e. determinant selection was operative), we found that about 40% of Ia-binding peptides were not immunogenic (i.e. there were also 'holes in the T-cell repertoire').

  5. A single nucleotide difference at the 3' end of an intron causes differential splicing of two histocompatibility genes.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, A L; Thompson, N A; Kvist, S

    1986-01-01

    The murine histocompatibility class I genes, H-2 Kb and Kk, display considerable homology at their 3' ends. In fact, from exon 5 to the termination codon, only two nucleotides differ between the two genes, one at the 5' end and the other at the 3' end of intron 7. Despite this similarity, the gene products have distinctly different mol. wts as determined by SDS-PAGE. By constructing two hybrid genes, pC2 and pC4, we demonstrated that it is the cytoplasmic parts of the antigens (encoded by exons 6-8) which are responsible for the major difference in mol. wt. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to change the two nucleotides in intron 7 of the H-2 Kk gene to those present in the H-2 Kb gene. S1 nuclease mapping has been used to identify the actual splice site of the authentic Kb and Kk genes, the hybrid genes and the mutagenized genes. We have shown that it is the 3' nucleotide difference, nine nucleotides upstream of the 3' splice site, which causes the different excision of intron 7 of the Kb gene. The 5' nucleotide difference does not alter the splicing. The choice of branch points and 3' splice signals for intron 7 of five H-2 class I genes, is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3013627

  6. Posttranscriptional Inhibition of Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Presentation on Hepatocytes and Lymphoid Cells in Chronic Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Tomasz I.; Hodgson, Paul D.; Churchill, Norma D.

    2000-01-01

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), similar to human hepatitis B virus, causes acute liver inflammation that can progress to chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. WHV also invades cells of the host lymphatic system, where it persists for life. We report here that acute and chronic hepadnavirus hepatitis is characterized by a profound difference in the expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on the surface of infected hepatocytes and, notably, lymphoid cells. While acute WHV infection is accompanied by the enhanced hepatocyte surface presentation of class I MHC antigen and upregulated transcription of the relevant hepatic genes, inhibition of class I antigen display on liver cells is a uniform hallmark of chronic WHV infection. This inhibition in chronic hepatitis occurs despite augmented (as in acute infection) expression of hepatic genes for class I MHC heavy chain, β2-microglobulin, and transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2). Further, the class I antigen inhibition is not related to the histological severity of hepatocellular injury, the extent of lymphocytic infiltrations, the level of intrahepatic gamma interferon induction, or the hepatic WHV load. Importantly, the antigen expression is also inhibited on organ lymphoid cells of chronically infected hosts. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that the defective presentation of class I MHC molecules on cells supporting persistent WHV replication is due to viral posttranscriptional interference. This event may diminish the susceptibility of infected hepatocytes to virus-specific T-cell-mediated elimination, hinder virus clearance, and deregulate the class I MHC-dependent functions of the host immune system. This multifarious effect could be critical for perpetuation of liver damage and evasion of the antiviral immunological surveillance in chronic infection and therefore could be supportive of hepadnavirus persistence. PMID:10775584

  7. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  8. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Chapes, S K; Hoynowski, S M; Woods, K M; Armstrong, J W; Beharka, A A; Iandolo, J J

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines. PMID:8359928

  9. Ancestral polymorphism at the major histocompatibility complex (MHCIIß) in the Nesospiza bunting species complex and its sister species (Rowettia goughensis)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an important component of the vertebrate immune system and is frequently used to characterise adaptive variation in wild populations due to its co-evolution with pathogens. Passerine birds have an exceptionally diverse MHC with multiple gene copies and large numbers of alleles compared to other avian taxa. The Nesospiza bunting species complex (two species on Nightingale Island; one species with three sub-species on Inaccessible Island) represents a rapid adaptive radiation at a small, isolated archipelago, and is thus an excellent model for the study of adaptation and speciation. In this first study of MHC in Nesospiza buntings, we aim to characterize MHCIIß variation, determine the strength of selection acting at this gene region and assess the level of shared polymorphism between the Nesospiza species complex and its putative sister taxon, Rowettia goughensis, from Gough Island. Results In total, 23 unique alleles were found in 14 Nesospiza and 2 R. goughensis individuals encoding at least four presumably functional loci and two pseudogenes. There was no evidence of ongoing selection on the peptide binding region (PBR). Of the 23 alleles, 15 were found on both the islands inhabited by Nesospiza species, and seven in both Nesospiza and Rowettia; indications of shared, ancestral polymorphism. A gene tree of Nesospiza MHCIIß alleles with several other passerine birds shows three highly supported Nesospiza-specific groups. All R. goughensis alleles were shared with Nesospiza, and these alleles were found in all three Nesospiza sequence groups in the gene tree, suggesting that most of the observed variation predates their phylogenetic split. Conclusions Lack of evidence of selection on the PBR, together with shared polymorphism across the gene tree, suggests that population variation of MHCIIß among Nesospiza and Rowettia is due to ancestral polymorphism rather than local selective forces. Weak or no

  10. Genetic Variation on the BAT1-NFKBIL1-LTA Region of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class III Associates with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Marchesani, Marja; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Mäntylä, Päivi; Paju, Susanna; Buhlin, Kåre; Suominen, Anna L.; Contreras, Johanna; Knuuttila, Matti; Hernandez, Marcela; Huumonen, Sisko; Nieminen, Markku S.; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology. We investigated whether human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms (6p21.3) are associated with periodontal parameters. Parogene 1 population samples (n = 169) were analyzed with 13,245 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MHC region. Eighteen selected SNPs (P ≤ 0.001) were replicated in Parogene 2 population samples (n = 339) and the Health 2000 Survey (n = 1,420). All subjects had a detailed clinical and radiographic oral health examination. Serum lymphotoxin-α (LTA) concentrations were measured in the Parogene populations, and the protein was detected in inflamed periodontal tissue. In the Parogene 1 population, 10 SNPs were associated with periodontal parameters. The strongest associations emerged from the parameters bleeding on probing (BOP) and a probing pocket depth (PPD) of ≥6 mm with the genes BAT1, NFKBIL1, and LTA. Six SNPs, rs11796, rs3130059, rs2239527, rs2071591, rs909253, and rs1041981 (r2, ≥0.92), constituted a risk haplotype. In the Parogene 1 population, the haplotype had the strongest association with the parameter BOP, a PPD of ≥6 mm, and severe periodontitis with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 2.63 (2.21 to 3.20), 2.90 (2.37 to 3.52), and 3.10 (1.63 to 5.98), respectively. These results were replicated in the other two populations. High serum LTA concentrations in the Parogene population were associated with the periodontitis risk alleles of the LTA SNPs (rs909253 and rs1041981) of the haplotype. In addition, the protein was expressed in inflamed gingival connective tissue. We identified a novel BAT1-NFKBIL1-LTA haplotype as a significant contributor to the risk of periodontitis. The genetic polymorphisms in the MHC class III region may be functionally important in periodontitis susceptibility. PMID:24566624

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class II DAB alleles associated with intestinal parasite load in the vulnerable Chinese egret (Egretta eulophotes).

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoping; Fang, Wenzhen; Lin, Qingxian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism has been hypothesized to result from many mechanisms such as rare-allele advantage, heterozygote advantage, and allele counting. In the study reported herein, 224 vulnerable Chinese egrets (Egretta eulophotes) were used to examine these hypotheses as empirical results derived from bird studies are rare. Parasite survey showed that 147 (65.63%) individuals were infected with 1-3 helminths, and 82.31% of these infected individuals carried Ascaridia sp. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction technique, 10 DAB1, twelve DAB2, and three DAB3 exon 2 alleles were identified at each single locus. A significant association of the rare allele Egeu-DAB2*05 (allele frequency: 0.022) with helminth resistance was found for all helminths, as well as for the most abundant morphotype Ascaridia sp. in the separate analyses. Egeu-DAB2*05 occurred frequently in uninfected individuals, and individuals carrying Egeu-DAB2*05 had significantly lower helminth morphotypes per individual (HMI) (the number of HMI) and the fecal egg count values. Further, the parasite infection measurements were consistently lower in individuals with an intermediate number of different alleles in the duplicated DAB loci. Significantly, heterozygosity within each DAB locus was not correlated with any parasite infection measurements. These results indicate that the diversity in MHC Egeu-DAB gene is associated with intestinal parasite load and maintained by pathogen-driven selection that probably operate through both the rare-allele advantage and the allele counting strategy, and suggest that Egeu-DAB2*05 might be a valuable indicator of better resistance to helminth diseases in the vulnerable Chinese egret. PMID:27386085

  12. Polymorphism in the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex and Early Viral Decline during Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Leland J.; Im, KyungAh; Wahed, Abdus S.; Bugawan, Teodorica; Li, Jia; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Erlich, Henry; Rosen, Hugo R.; Liang, T. Jake; Yang, Huiying

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of the viral decline immediately after the start of therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may have prognostic potential for ultimate sustained virologic response. Considerable interindividual variability in the decline has been reported, including differences by race. The human major histocompatability complex (MHC) genes encode the human leukocyte antigens, which are important in the immune response to viral infections. We examined whether carriage of specific human MHC alleles are associated with the rate of the early viral decline. Longitudinal viral level data (baseline and days 1, 2, 7, 14, and 28 of treatment), medium resolution MHC genotyping, and random coefficients models were used to examine associations between MHC class I and class II allele carriage and the dynamics of the viral decline in 180 African-Americans (AAs) and 194 Caucasian Americans (CAs) with genotype-1 HCV infection over the first 28 days of treatment with peginterferon α2a plus ribavirin. Baseline viral levels were similar by race, irrespective of allele carriage. However, the rate of change in the viral decline was associated with both allele and race. Among the four subgroups defined by race and specific allele, the fastest rates of decline were observed (in terms of estimated mean viral declines log10 IU/ml during the first four weeks) in CA noncarriers for A*03 (2.75; P = 0.018), in CA carriers for Cw*03 (2.99; P = 0.046), and in CA noncarriers for DQA1*04 (2.66; P = 0.018) or DQB1*0402 (2.65; P = 0.018). MHC alleles are associated with the viral decline during the first 28 days of peginterferon therapy. PMID:18852273

  13. Major histocompatibility complex class I evolution in songbirds: universal primers, rapid evolution and base compositional shifts in exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Miguel; Liu, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) have become an important marker for the investigation of adaptive genetic variation in vertebrates because of their critical role in pathogen resistance. However, despite significant advances in the last few years the characterization of MHC variation in non-model species still remains a challenging task due to the redundancy and high variation of this gene complex. Here we report the utility of a single pair of primers for the cross-amplification of the third exon of MHC class I genes, which encodes the more polymorphic half of the peptide-binding region (PBR), in oscine passerines (songbirds; Aves: Passeriformes), a group especially challenging for MHC characterization due to the presence of large and complex MHC multigene families. In our survey, although the primers failed to amplify exon 3 from two suboscine passerine birds, they amplified exon 3 of multiple MHC class I genes in all 16 species of oscine songbirds tested, yielding a total of 120 sequences. The 16 songbird species belong to 14 different families, primarily within the Passerida, but also in the Corvida. Using a conservative approach based on the analysis of cloned amplicons (n = 16) from each species, we found between 3 and 10 MHC sequences per individual. Each allele repertoire was highly divergent, with the overall number of polymorphic sites per species ranging from 33 to 108 (out of 264 sites) and the average number of nucleotide differences between alleles ranging from 14.67 to 43.67. Our survey in songbirds allowed us to compare macroevolutionary dynamics of exon 3 between songbirds and non-passerine birds. We found compelling evidence of positive selection acting specifically upon peptide-binding codons across birds, and we estimate the strength of diversifying selection in songbirds to be about twice that in non-passerines. Analysis using comparative methods suggest weaker evidence for a higher GC content in the 3rd codon position of

  14. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex antigens in invading glioma cells: stealth invasion of the brain.

    PubMed

    Zagzag, David; Salnikow, Konstantin; Chiriboga, Luis; Yee, Herman; Lan, Li; Ali, M Aktar; Garcia, Roberto; Demaria, Sandra; Newcomb, Elizabeth W

    2005-03-01

    Invasion into surrounding brain tissue is a fundamental feature of gliomas and the major reason for treatment failure. The process of brain invasion in gliomas is not well understood. Differences in gene expression and/or gene products between invading and noninvading glioma cells may identify potential targets for new therapies. To look for genes associated with glioma invasion, we first employed Affymetrix microarray Genechip technology to identify genes differentially expressed in migrating glioma cells in vitro and in invading glioma cells in vivo using laser capture microdissection. We observed upregulation of a variety of genes, previously reported to be linked to glioma cell migration and invasion. Remarkably, major histocompatiblity complex (MHC) class I and II genes were significantly downregulated in migrating cells in vitro and in invading cells in vivo. Decreased MHC expression was confirmed in migrating glioma cells in vitro using RT-PCR and in invading glioma cells in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of human and murine glioblastomas for beta2 microglobulin, a marker of MHC class I protein expression. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe the downregulation of MHC class I and II antigens in migrating and invading glioma cells, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. These results suggest that the very process of tumor invasion is associated with decreased expression of MHC antigens allowing glioma cells to invade the surrounding brain in a 'stealth'-like manner.

  15. Reassociation with beta 2-microglobulin is necessary for Kb class I major histocompatibility complex binding of exogenous peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Rock, K L; Rothstein, L E; Gamble, S R; Benacerraf, B

    1990-01-01

    T lymphocytes recognize endogenously produced antigenic peptides in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded molecules. Peptides from the extracellular fluid can be displayed in association with class I and class II MHC molecules. Here we report that mature Kb class I MHC molecules bind peptides upon dissociation and reassociation of their light chain. Intact Kb heterodimers, unlike class II MHC molecules, are relatively unreceptive to binding peptides. This property may maintain segregation of class I and class II MHC-restricted peptides and has implications for the use of peptides as vaccines. Images PMID:2217182

  16. A Recombinant Antibody with the Antigen-Specific, Major Histocompatibility Complex-Restricted Specificity of T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Peter S.; Stryhn, Anette; Hansen, Bjarke E.; Fugger, Lars; Engberg, Jan; Buus, Soren

    1996-03-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined peptide/MHC complexes.

  17. A synthetic peptide from the third hypervariable region of major histocompatibility complex class II beta chain as a vaccine for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Topham, D J; Nag, B; Arimilli, S; Sriram, S

    1994-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, T-cell-mediated, demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system and represents a model for human multiple sclerosis. The present study demonstrates that vaccination of SJL/J mice with an 18-amino acid synthetic peptide from the third hypervariable region of the murine class II MHC IAs beta chain (IAs beta 58-75; 18-mer peptide) is capable of eliciting auto-anti-IAs antibodies specific for the IAs beta chain and preventing and treating EAE. A similar approach may be useful in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases in which susceptibility is linked to class II MHC genes. Images PMID:8058747

  18. The major histocompatibility complex class II-linked cim locus controls the kinetics of intracellular transport of a classical class I molecule

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The dominant trans-acting major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked class I modifier (cim) locus, previously recognized through its ability to determine altered alloantigenicity of a rat class I molecule, RT1.A3, is shown here to influence class I intracellular transport. The MHC recombinant laboratory rat strains PVG.R1 and PVG.R8 display unusually long retention of RT1.Aa within the endoplasmic reticulum or cis-Golgi. In appropriate F1 hybrid cells heterozygous for RT1.Aa and another class I MHC allele, RT1.Ac, only the RT1.Aa protein is subject to slow transport. The cim gene product therefore shows class I allele specificity in its action, cim appears to be a polymorphic locus whose product is directly involved in the processes of class I MHC assembly and/or intracellular transport. PMID:2007857

  19. Role of chain pairing for the production of functional soluble IA major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Structural studies of cellular receptor molecules involved in immune recognition require the production of large quantities of the extracellular domains of these glycoproteins. The murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted response has been extensively studied by functional means, but the engineering and purification of the native, empty form of the most-studied murine MHC class II molecule, IA, has been difficult to achieve. IA molecules, which are the murine equivalent of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DQ molecules, have a low efficiency of chain pairing, which results in poor transport to the cell surface and in the appearance of mixed isotype pairs. We have engineered soluble IA molecules whose pairing has been forced by the addition of leucine zipper peptide dimers at their COOH-terminus. The molecules are secreted "empty" into the extracellular medium and can be loaded with single peptide after purification. These IA molecules have been expressed in milligram quantity for crystallization as well as for activation of T cells and measurement of MHC class II-T cell receptor interactions. PMID:8642319

  20. Evolution of the major histocompatibility complex: Isolation of class II beta cDNAs from two monotremes, the platypus and the short-beaked echidna.

    PubMed

    Belov, Katherine; Lam, Mary K P; Hellman, Lars; Colgan, Donald J

    2003-09-01

    Extant mammals are composed of three lineages: the eutherians, the marsupials and the monotremes. The majority of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex (MHC) data is based on the eutherian mammals, which generally have three classical MHC class II beta chain gene clusters - DRB, DQB and DPB, as well as the non-classical DMB and DOB. Marsupial DMB, DAB and DBB have been characterised. Confusion still surrounds the relationship of the marsupial DAB and DBB genes with the classical eutherian class II clusters. Here we present the first monotreme MHC class II beta chain sequences. Four MHC class II beta chain sequences were isolated from a spleen cDNA library from the short-beaked echidna, and one from a spleen cDNA library from platypus using a brushtail possum DAB probe. Given the non-orthologous relationship of the monotreme sequences with marsupial and eutherian beta chain clusters, we recommend that the five new monotreme sequences be assigned the nomenclature 'DZB', signifying the description of a new mammalian beta chain cluster. Our analysis suggests that all mammalian beta chain sequences (except DMB) evolved from a common ancestor. Maximum likelihood analysis places the monotreme beta chain sequences at the base of the mammalian clade, indicating their ancestral status. However, within the mammalian clade, monophyletic clades are not robust, and elucidation of the order of gene duplication that gave rise to the present-day gene clusters is not yet possible.

  1. A synthetic random basic copolymer with promiscuous binding to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules inhibits T-cell proliferative responses to major and minor histocompatibility antigens in vitro and confers the capacity to prevent murine graft-versus-host disease in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, P G; Aharoni, R; Chen, Y; Chen, J; Teitelbaum, D; Arnon, R; Sela, M; Chao, N J

    1996-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a T-cell-mediated disease of transplanted donor T cells recognizing host alloantigens. Data presented in this report show, to our knowledge, for the first time that a synthetic copolymer of the amino acids L-Glu, L-Lys, L-Ala, and L-Tyr (molecular ratio, 1.9:6.0:4.7:1.0; Mr, 6000-8500) [corrected], termed GLAT, with promiscuous binding to multiple major histocompatibility complex class II alleles is capable of preventing lethal GVHD in the B10.D2 --> BALB/c model (both H-2d) across minor histocompatibility barriers. Administration of GLAT over a limited time after transplant significantly reduced the incidence, onset, and severity of disease. GLAT also improved long-term survival from lethal GVHD: 14/25 (56%) of experimental mice survived > 140 days after transplant compared to 2/26 of saline-treated or to 1/10 of hen egg lysozyme-treated control mice (P < 0.01). Long-term survivors were documented to be fully chimeric by PCR analysis of a polymorphic microsatellite region in the interleukin 1beta gene. In vitro, GLAT inhibited the mixed lymphocyte culture in a dose-dependent fashion across a variety of major barriers tested. Furthermore, GLAT inhibited the response of nylon wool-enriched T cells to syngeneic antigen-presenting cells presenting minor histocompatibility antigens. Prepulsing of the antigen-presenting cells with GLAT reduced the proliferative response, suggesting that GLAT inhibits antigen presentation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8643529

  2. Natural selection of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Tarr, C.L.; Mcintosh, C.E.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The native Hawaiian honeycreepers represent a classic example of adaptive radiation and speciation, but currently face one the highest extinction rates in the world. Although multiple factors have likely influenced the fate of Hawaiian birds, the relatively recent introduction of avian malaria is thought to be a major factor limiting honeycreeper distribution and abundance. We have initiated genetic analyses of class II ?? chain Mhc genes in four species of honeycreepers using methods that eliminate the possibility of sequencing mosaic variants formed by cloning heteroduplexed polymerase chain reaction products. Phylogenetic analyses group the honeycreeper Mhc sequences into two distinct clusters. Variation within one cluster is high, with dN > d S and levels of diversity similar to other studies of Mhc (B system) genes in birds. The second cluster is nearly invariant and includes sequences from honeycreepers (Fringillidae), a sparrow (Emberizidae) and a blackbird (Emberizidae). This highly conserved cluster appears reminiscent of the independently segregating Rfp-Y system of genes defined in chickens. The notion that balancing selection operates at the Mhc in the honeycreepers is supported by transpecies polymorphism and strikingly high dN/dS ratios at codons putatively involved in peptide interaction. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were invariant in the i'iwi, but were highly variable in the 'amakihi. By contrast, levels of variability of class II ?? chain Mhc sequence codons that are hypothesized to be directly involved in peptide interactions appear comparable between i'iwi and 'amakihi. In the i'iwi, natural selection may have maintained variation within the Mhc, even in the face of what appears to a genetic bottleneck.

  3. New horizons in mouse immunoinformatics: reliable in silico prediction of mouse class I histocompatibility major complex peptide binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2004-11-21

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a main cornerstone of modern informatic disciplines. Predictive computational models, based on QSAR technology, of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding affinity have now become a vital component of modern day computational immunovaccinology. Historically, such approaches have been built around semi-qualitative, classification methods, but these are now giving way to quantitative regression methods. The additive method, an established immunoinformatics technique for the quantitative prediction of peptide-protein affinity, was used here to identify the sequence dependence of peptide binding specificity for three mouse class I MHC alleles: H2-D(b), H2-K(b) and H2-K(k). As we show, in terms of reliability the resulting models represent a significant advance on existing methods. They can be used for the accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes and are freely available online ( http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred). PMID:15534705

  4. Reassociation with beta 2-microglobulin is necessary for Db class I major histocompatibility complex binding of an exogenous influenza peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Rock, K L; Gamble, S; Rothstein, L; Benacerraf, B

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 365-380 of the influenza nucleoprotein (NP365-380) has been previously shown to associate with class I major histocompatibility complex-encoded molecules and to stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocytes [Townsend, A. R. M., Rothbard, J., Gotch, F. M., Bahadur, G., Wraith, D. & McMichael, A. J. (1986) Cell 44, 959-968]. We find that intact Db class I heterodimers on the cell surface are unreceptive to binding this antigen. However, NP365-380 readily associates with Db molecules on the plasma membrane in the presence of exogenous beta 2-microglobulin. In addition, there is a second pathway through which this peptide associates with class I molecules that requires energy and de novo protein synthesis. These findings have implications for maintaining the immunological identity of cells and for the use of peptides as vaccines for priming cytolytic T-cell immunity. Images PMID:1986378

  5. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class 1 proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-class...

  6. Dominating expression of negative regulatory factors downmodulates major histocompatibility complex Class-II expression on dendritic cells in chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Tomer, Shallu; Chawla, Yogesh K; Duseja, Ajay; Arora, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to development of functionally impaired dendritic cells (DCs) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients infected with genotype 3 virus. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted on the cohorts of CHC individuals identified as responders or non-responders to antiviral therapy. Myeloid DCs were isolated from the peripheral blood of each subject using CD1c (BDCA1)+ DC isolation Kit. Monocytes from healthy donor were cultured with DC growth factors such as IL-4 and GM-CSF either in the presence or absence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral proteins followed by LPS stimulation. Phenotyping was done by flowcytometry and gene expression profiling was evaluated by real-time PCR. RESULTS: Non-responders [sustained virological response (SVR)-ve] to conventional antiviral therapy had significantly higher expression of genes associated with interferon responsive element such as IDO1 and PD-L1 (6-fold) and negative regulators of JAK-STAT pathway such as SOCS (6-fold) as compared to responders (SVR+ve) to antiviral therapy. The down-regulated genes in non-responders included factors involved in antigen processing and presentation mainly belonging to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class-II family as HLA-DP, HLA-DQ (2-fold) and superoxide dismutase (2-fold). Cells grown in the presence of HCV viral proteins had genes down-regulated for factors involved in innate response, interferon signaling, DC maturation and co-stimulatory signaling to T-cells, while the genes for cytokine signaling and Toll-like receptors (4-fold) were up-regulated as compared to cells grown in absence of viral proteins. CONCLUSION: Underexpressed MHC class-II genes and upregulated negative regulators in non-responders indicate diminished capacity to present antigen and may constitute mechanism of functionally defective state of DCs. PMID:27298560

  7. Pathogenicity of Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia-associated vaccine-induced alloantibodies correlates with Major Histocompatibility Complex class I expression

    PubMed Central

    Benedictus, Lindert; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Otten, Henny; Jan Lebbink, Robert; van Kooten, Peter J. S.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.; Rutten, Victor P. M. G.; Koets, Ad P.

    2015-01-01

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP), a fatal bleeding syndrome of neonatal calves, is caused by maternal alloantibodies absorbed from colostrum and is characterized by lymphocytopenia, thrombocytopenia and bone marrow hypoplasia. An inactivated viral vaccine is the likely source of alloantigens inducing BNP-associated alloantibodies in the dam. In this study the specificity of BNP alloantibodies was assessed and was linked to the pathology of BNP. We demonstrated that Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC I) and Very Late Antigen-3, an integrin α3/β1 heterodimer, were the major targets of BNP alloantibodies. However, alloantibody binding to various bovine cell types correlated with MHC I expression, rather than integrin β1 or α3 expression. Likewise, alloantibody-dependent complement-mediated cell lysis correlated strongly with MHC I expression. Examination of several tissues of third trimester bovine foetuses revealed that cells, shown to be affected in calves with BNP, were characterized by high MHC class I expression and high levels of alloantibody binding. We conclude that in spite of the heterogeneous specificity of BNP associated maternal alloantibodies, MHC I-specific antibodies mediate the pathogenicity of BNP in the calf and that cells with high MHC I expression were preferentially affected in BNP. PMID:26235972

  8. Pathogenicity of Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia-associated vaccine-induced alloantibodies correlates with Major Histocompatibility Complex class I expression.

    PubMed

    Benedictus, Lindert; Luteijn, Rutger D; Otten, Henny; Lebbink, Robert Jan; van Kooten, Peter J S; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Rutten, Victor P M G; Koets, Ad P

    2015-01-01

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP), a fatal bleeding syndrome of neonatal calves, is caused by maternal alloantibodies absorbed from colostrum and is characterized by lymphocytopenia, thrombocytopenia and bone marrow hypoplasia. An inactivated viral vaccine is the likely source of alloantigens inducing BNP-associated alloantibodies in the dam. In this study the specificity of BNP alloantibodies was assessed and was linked to the pathology of BNP. We demonstrated that Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC I) and Very Late Antigen-3, an integrin α3/β1 heterodimer, were the major targets of BNP alloantibodies. However, alloantibody binding to various bovine cell types correlated with MHC I expression, rather than integrin β1 or α3 expression. Likewise, alloantibody-dependent complement-mediated cell lysis correlated strongly with MHC I expression. Examination of several tissues of third trimester bovine foetuses revealed that cells, shown to be affected in calves with BNP, were characterized by high MHC class I expression and high levels of alloantibody binding. We conclude that in spite of the heterogeneous specificity of BNP associated maternal alloantibodies, MHC I-specific antibodies mediate the pathogenicity of BNP in the calf and that cells with high MHC I expression were preferentially affected in BNP. PMID:26235972

  9. Major histocompatibility complex controls the trajectory but not host-specific adaptation during virulence evolution of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Erin E.; Adler, Frederick R.; Granger, Donald L.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2004-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a critical role in immune recognition and are the most genetically diverse loci known. One hypothesis to explain this diversity postulates that pathogens adapt to common MHC haplotypes and thus favour selection of new or rare alleles. To determine whether the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans adapts to MHC-dependent immune responses, it was serially passaged in two independent replicate lines of five B10 MHC-congenic strains and Balb/c mice. All passaged lines increased in virulence as measured by reduced host survival. MHC influenced the rate (trajectory) of virulence increase during passages as measured by significant differences in mortality rate (p < 0.001). However, when the post-passage strains were tested, no MHC differences in mortality rate remained and only minor differences in titres were observed. Also contrary to expectations, increased virulence in three lines passaged in B10 mice had a larger effect in Balb/c mice, and the evolution of virulence in lines passaged in alternating hosts was not retarded. To our knowledge, these data represent the first experimental test of MHC-specific adaptation in a non-viral pathogen. The failure to observe MHC effects despite dramatically increased virulence and host-genotype-specific adaptation to non-MHC genes suggests that escape of MHC-dependent immune recognition may be difficult for pathogens with unlimited epitopes or that other virulence factors can swamp MHC effects. PMID:15306300

  10. Low Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Variation in the Endangered Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis): Inferences About the Role of Balancing Selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiyang; Lin, Wenzhi; Zhou, Ruilian; Gui, Duan; Yu, Xinjian; Wu, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    It has been widely reported that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is under balancing selection due to its immune function across terrestrial and aquatic mammals. The comprehensive studies at MHC and other neutral loci could give us a synthetic evaluation about the major force determining genetic diversity of species. Previously, a low level of genetic diversity has been reported among the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using both mitochondrial marker and microsatellite loci. Here, the expression and sequence polymorphism of 2 MHC class II genes (DQB and DRB) in 32 S. chinensis from PRE collected between 2003 and 2011 were investigated. High ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, codon-based selection analysis, and trans-species polymorphism (TSP) support the hypothesis that balancing selection acted on S. chinensis MHC sequences. However, only 2 haplotypes were detected at either DQB or DRB loci. Moreover, the lack of deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg expectation at DRB locus combined with the relatively low heterozygosity at both DQB locus and microsatellite loci suggested that balancing selection might not be sufficient, which further suggested that genetic drift associated with historical bottlenecks was not mitigated by balancing selection in terms of the loss of MHC and neutral variation in S. chinensis. The combined results highlighted the importance of maintaining the genetic diversity of the endangered S. chinensis. PMID:26787544

  11. Low Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Variation in the Endangered Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis): Inferences About the Role of Balancing Selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiyang; Lin, Wenzhi; Zhou, Ruilian; Gui, Duan; Yu, Xinjian; Wu, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    It has been widely reported that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is under balancing selection due to its immune function across terrestrial and aquatic mammals. The comprehensive studies at MHC and other neutral loci could give us a synthetic evaluation about the major force determining genetic diversity of species. Previously, a low level of genetic diversity has been reported among the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using both mitochondrial marker and microsatellite loci. Here, the expression and sequence polymorphism of 2 MHC class II genes (DQB and DRB) in 32 S. chinensis from PRE collected between 2003 and 2011 were investigated. High ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, codon-based selection analysis, and trans-species polymorphism (TSP) support the hypothesis that balancing selection acted on S. chinensis MHC sequences. However, only 2 haplotypes were detected at either DQB or DRB loci. Moreover, the lack of deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg expectation at DRB locus combined with the relatively low heterozygosity at both DQB locus and microsatellite loci suggested that balancing selection might not be sufficient, which further suggested that genetic drift associated with historical bottlenecks was not mitigated by balancing selection in terms of the loss of MHC and neutral variation in S. chinensis. The combined results highlighted the importance of maintaining the genetic diversity of the endangered S. chinensis.

  12. Trophoblast Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression Is Associated with Immune-Mediated Rejection of Bovine Fetuses Produced by Cloning.

    PubMed

    Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Wilhelm, Amanda; Sessions, Benjamin R; Hicks, Brady A; Schlafer, Donald H; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Trophoblast cells from bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) conceptuses express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins early in gestation, and this may be one cause of the significant first-trimester embryonic mortality observed in these pregnancies. MHC-I homozygous-compatible (n = 9), homozygous-incompatible (n = 8), and heterozygous-incompatible (n = 5) SCNT pregnancies were established. The control group consisted of eight pregnancies produced by artificial insemination. Uterine and placental samples were collected on Day 35 ± 1 of pregnancy, and expression of MHC-I, leukocyte markers, and cytokines were examined by immunohistochemistry. Trophoblast cells from all SCNT pregnancies expressed MHC-I, while trophoblast cells from age-matched control pregnancies were negative for MHC-I expression. Expression of MHC-I antigens by trophoblast cells from SCNT pregnancies was associated with lymphocytic infiltration in the endometrium. Furthermore, MHC-I-incompatible conceptuses, particularly the heterozygous-incompatible ones, induced a more pronounced lymphocytic infiltration than MHC-I-compatible conceptuses. Cells expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, gamma/deltaTCR, and MHC-II were increased in the endometrium of SCNT pregnancies compared to the control group. CD4(+) lymphocytes were increased in MHC-I-incompatible pregnancies compared to MHC-I-compatible and control pregnancies. CD8(+), FOXP3(+), and natural killer cells were increased in MHC-I heterozygous-incompatible SCNT pregnancies compared to homozygous SCNT and control pregnancies.

  13. The contribution of major histocompatibility complex contacts to the affinity and kinetics of T cell receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Lim, Hong-Sheng; Knapp, Berhard; Deane, Charlotte M.; Aleksic, Milos; Dushek, Omer; van der Merwe, P. Anton

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and antigenic peptide in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is a crucial step in T cell activation. The relative contributions of TCR:peptide and TCR:MHC contacts to the overall binding energy remain unclear. This has important implications for our understanding of T cell development and function. In this study we used site directed mutagenesis to estimate the contribution of HLA-A2 side-chains to the binding of four TCRs. Our results show that these TCRs have very different energetic ‘footprints’ on HLA-A2, with no residues contributing to all TCR interactions. The estimated overall contribution of MHC side-chains to the total interaction energy was variable, with lower limits ranging from 11% to 50%. Kinetic analysis suggested a minor and variable contribution of MHC side-chains to the transition state complex, arguing against a two-step mechanism for TCR binding. PMID:27734930

  14. Mate choice for major histocompatibility complex genetic divergence as a bet-hedging strategy in the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Evans, Melissa L; Dionne, Mélanie; Miller, Kristina M; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-22

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent mating preferences have been observed across vertebrate taxa and these preferences are expected to promote offspring disease resistance and ultimately, viability. However, little empirical evidence linking MHC-dependent mate choice and fitness is available, particularly in wild populations. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of previously observed patterns of MHC-dependent mate choice in a wild population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Québec, Canada, by examining the relationship between MHC genetic variation and adult reproductive success and offspring survival over 3 years of study. While Atlantic salmon choose their mates in order to increase MHC diversity in offspring, adult reproductive success was in fact maximized between pairs exhibiting an intermediate level of MHC dissimilarity. Moreover, patterns of offspring survival between years 0+ and 1+, and 1+ and 2+ and population genetic structure at the MHC locus relative to microsatellite loci indicate that strong temporal variation in selection is likely to be operating on the MHC. We interpret MHC-dependent mate choice for diversity as a likely bet-hedging strategy that maximizes parental fitness in the face of temporally variable and unpredictable natural selection pressures.

  15. Unusual association of beta 2-microglobulin with certain class I heavy chains of the murine major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed Central

    Bushkin, Y; Tung, J S; Pinter, A; Michaelson, J; Boyse, E A

    1986-01-01

    Class I products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprise a heavy chain of about 45 kDa noncovalently linked to a 12-kDa beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) light chain encoded on a different chromosome. We find that class I products of some mouse strains include an additional 62-kDa molecule which on the following evidence consists of a heavy chain linked covalently with beta 2m. Production of the 62-kDa protein invariably accorded with the occurrence of cysteine at position 121 of the heavy chain (Kb,Kbm1,Kbm3,Dd, and Ld). Substitution of arginine at position 121 invariably accorded with absence of the 62-kDa protein (Kbm6,Kbm7,Kbm9,Kd, and Db). On the basis of observed production versus nonproduction of the 62-kDa molecule, predictions are made regarding residue 121 in class I products for which this is not yet known; namely, Kk, Ks, and Dk, which produce the 62-kDa molecule, as compared with Kj, Qa-2, and TL, which do not. Reported differences in immunologic reactivity between Kb mutant strains with Arg-121 in place of Cys-121 imply that the occurrence of 62-kDa class I products in mice of Cys-121 genotype has functional consequences. Images PMID:3510435

  16. Stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism permits tolerance of vascularized composite allografts across a full major histocompatibility mismatch in swine.

    PubMed

    Mathes, David W; Solari, Mario G; Gazelle, Guy Scott; Butler, Peter E M; Wu, Anette; Nazzal, Adam; Nielsen, Gunnlauger P; Huang, Christene A; Sachs, David H; Lee, Wei Ping Andrew; Randolph, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that vascularized composite allografts (VCA) could be accepted in a robust model of hematopoietic chimerism by injecting allogeneic bone marrow cells (BMC) into swine fetuses. Outbred Yorkshire sows and boars were screened to ensure the absence of the major histocompatibility (MHC) allele SLA(cc) of inbred MGH miniature swine and then mated. Bone marrow harvested from an SLA(cc) swine donor was T-cell depleted and injected intravenously into the fetuses between days 50-55 of gestation. After birth, the piglets were studied with flow cytometry to detect donor cells and mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays to assess their response to donor. Donor-matched VCAs from SLA(cc) donors were performed on four chimeric and two nonchimeric swine. The results showed donor cell engraftment and multilineage macrochimerism after the in utero transplantation of adult BMC, and chimeric animals were unresponsive to donor antigens in vitro. Both control VCAs were rejected by 21 days and were alloreactive. Chimeric animals accepted the VCAs and never developed antidonor antibodies or alloreactivity to donor. These results confirm that the intravascular, in utero transplantation of adult BMC leads to donor cell chimerism and donor-specific tolerance of VCAs across a full MHC barrier in this animal model.

  17. Persistent measles virus infection enhances major histocompatibility complex class I expression and immunogenicity of murine neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gopas, J; Itzhaky, D; Segev, Y; Salzberg, S; Trink, B; Isakov, N; Rager-Zisman, B

    1992-01-01

    The effect of persistent measles virus infection on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens was studied. Mouse neuroblastoma cells C1300, clone NS20Y, were persistently infected with the Edmonston strain of measles virus. The persistently infected cell line, NS20Y/MS, expressed augmented levels of both H-2Kk and H-2Dd MHC class I glycoproteins. Activation of two interferon(IFN)-induced enzymes, known to be part of the IFN system: (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase and double-stranded-RNA-activated protein kinase, was detected. Measles-virus-infected cells elicited cytotoxic T lymphocytes that recognized and lysed virus-infected and uninfected neuroblastoma cells in an H-2-restricted fashion. Furthermore, immunization of mice with persistently infected cells conferred resistance to tumor growth after challenge with the highly malignant NS20Y cells. The rationale for using measles virus for immunotherapy is that most patients develop lifelong immunity after recovery or vaccination from this infection. Patients developing cancer are likely to have memory cells. A secondary response induced by measles-virus-infected cells may therefore induce an efficient immune response against non-infected tumour cells.

  18. Comparison of peptide-major histocompatibility complex tetramers and dextramers for the identification of antigen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Dolton, G; Lissina, A; Skowera, A; Ladell, K; Tungatt, K; Jones, E; Kronenberg-Versteeg, D; Akpovwa, H; Pentier, J M; Holland, C J; Godkin, A J; Cole, D K; Neller, M A; Miles, J J; Price, D A; Peakman, M; Sewell, A K

    2014-07-01

    Fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) multimers are widely used for flow cytometric visualization of antigen-specific T cells. The most common multimers, streptavidin-biotin-based 'tetramers', can be manufactured readily in the laboratory. Unfortunately, there are large differences between the threshold of T cell receptor (TCR) affinity required to capture pMHC tetramers from solution and that which is required for T cell activation. This disparity means that tetramers sometimes fail to stain antigen-specific T cells within a sample, an issue that is particularly problematic when staining tumour-specific, autoimmune or MHC class II-restricted T cells, which often display TCRs of low affinity for pMHC. Here, we compared optimized staining with tetramers and dextramers (dextran-based multimers), with the latter carrying greater numbers of both pMHC and fluorochrome per molecule. Most notably, we find that: (i) dextramers stain more brightly than tetramers; (ii) dextramers outperform tetramers when TCR-pMHC affinity is low; (iii) dextramers outperform tetramers with pMHC class II reagents where there is an absence of co-receptor stabilization; and (iv) dextramer sensitivity is enhanced further by specific protein kinase inhibition. Dextramers are compatible with current state-of-the-art flow cytometry platforms and will probably find particular utility in the fields of autoimmunity and cancer immunology. PMID:24673376

  19. Vaccine-induced antibodies linked to bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) recognize cattle major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I).

    PubMed

    Deutskens, Fabian; Lamp, Benjamin; Riedel, Christiane M; Wentz, Eveline; Lochnit, Günter; Doll, Klaus; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Rümenapf, Till

    2011-01-01

    A mysterious disease affecting calves, named bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP), emerged in 2007 in several European countries. Epidemiological studies revealed a connection between BNP and vaccination with an inactivated vaccine against bovine virus diarrhea (BVD). Alloantibodies reacting with blood leukocytes of calves were detected in serum and colostrum of dams, which have given birth to calves affected by BNP. To understand the linkage between vaccination and the development of alloantibodies, we determined the antigens reacting with these alloantibodies. Immunoprecipitation of surface proteins from bovine leukocytes and kidney cells using sera from dams with a confirmed case of BNP in their gestation history reacted with two dominant protein species of 44 and 12 kDa. These proteins were not detected by sera from dams, free of BVDV and not vaccinated against BVD, and from sera of animals vaccinated with a different inactivated BVD vaccine. The 44 kDa protein was identified by mass spectrometry analysis as MHC I, the other as β-2-microglobulin. The presence of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) in the vaccine was confirmed by Western blot using a MHC I specific monoclonal antibody. A model of BNP pathogenesis is proposed. PMID:21878124

  20. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  1. A single peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand triggers digital cytokine secretion in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Brameshuber, Mario; Zeng, Xun; Xie, Jianming; Li, Qi-jing; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Valitutti, Salvatore; Davis, Mark M

    2013-11-14

    We have developed a single-molecule imaging technique that uses quantum-dot-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands to study CD4(+) T cell functional sensitivity. We found that naive T cells, T cell blasts, and memory T cells could all be triggered by a single pMHC to secrete tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) cytokines with a rate of ∼1,000, ∼10,000, and ∼10,000 molecules/min, respectively, and that additional pMHCs did not augment secretion, indicating a digital response pattern. We also found that a single pMHC localized to the immunological synapse induced the slow formation of a long-lasting T cell receptor (TCR) cluster, consistent with a serial engagement mechanism. These data show that scaling up CD4(+) T cell cytokine responses involves increasingly efficient T cell recruitment rather than greater cytokine production per cell. PMID:24120362

  2. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:157–171. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1262 PMID:25264139

  3. Cross-linking staphylococcal enterotoxin A bound to major histocompatibility complex class I is required for TNF-alpha secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, A. D.; Chapes, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of how superantigens function to activate cells has been linked to their ability to bind and cross-link the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecule. Cells that lack the MHCII molecule also respond to superantigens, however, with much less efficiency. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to confirm that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) could bind the MHCI molecule and to test the hypothesis that cross-linking SEA bound to MHCII-deficient macrophages would induce a more robust cytokine response than without cross-linking. We used a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an immunprecipitation assay to directly demonstrate that MHCI molecules bind SEA. Directly cross-linking MHCI using monoclonal antibodies or cross-linking bound SEA with an anti-SEA antibody or biotinylated SEA with avidin increased TNF-alpha and IL-6 secretion by MHCII(-/-) macrophages. The induction of a vigorous macrophage cytokine response by SEA/anti-SEA cross-linking of MHCI offers a mechanism to explain how MHCI could play an important role in superantigen-mediated pathogenesis. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Transgenic mice with enhanced neuronal major histocompatibility complex class I expression recover locomotor function better after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Selvan; Bilousova, Tina; Zdunowski, Sharon; Wu, Zhongqi-Phyllis; Middleton, Blake; Boudzinskaia, Maia; Wong, Bonnie; Ali, Noore; Zhong, Hui; Yong, Jing; Washburn, Lorraine; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Dang, Hoa; Edgerton, V Reggie; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J K; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-03-01

    Mice that are deficient in classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) have abnormalities in synaptic plasticity and neurodevelopment and have more extensive loss of synapses and reduced axon regeneration after sciatic nerve transection, suggesting that MHCI participates in maintaining synapses and axon regeneration. Little is known about the biological consequences of up-regulating MHCI's expression on neurons. To understand MHCI's neurobiological activity better, and in particular its role in neurorepair after injury, we have studied neurorepair in a transgenic mouse model in which classical MHCI expression is up-regulated only on neurons. Using a well-established spinal cord injury (SCI) model, we observed that transgenic mice with elevated neuronal MHCI expression had significantly better recovery of locomotor abilities after SCI than wild-type mice. Although previous studies have implicated inflammation as both deleterious and beneficial for recovery after SCI, our results point directly to enhanced neuronal MHCI expression as a beneficial factor for promoting recovery of locomotor function after SCI.

  5. Failure of expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens to alter tumor immunogenicity of a spontaneous murine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlow, D A; Kerbel, R S; Elliott, B E

    1989-05-10

    We have shown previously that clonal immunogenic variants of murine mammary adenocarcinoma 10.1 can be isolated after treatment in vitro with the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-aza). Such immunogenic variants frequently express elevated class I major histocompatibility complex antigens relative to the level of expression in the parent tumor and are rejected in syngeneic mice by a T-cell-dependent process. To ascertain whether elevated immunogenicity is a function of increased class I antigen expression, we isolated high class I antigen expressors from 5-aza-treated 10.1 cells by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Clonal variants displaying any increase in class I antigen expression were more efficient stimulators of allo-class I antigen-specific cytolytic T-cell precursors. However, these variants displayed unaltered tumorigenicity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Thus, phenotypic changes other than, or in addition to, elevated class I antigen expression cause the reduced tumorigenicity of immunogenic clones of 10.1 cells isolated after 5-aza treatment.

  6. Assembly and Function of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) I Peptide-loading Complex Are Conserved Across Higher Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Andreas; Jedamzick, Johanna; Herbring, Valentina; Fischbach, Hanna; Hartmann, Jessica; Parcej, David; Koch, Joachim; Tampé, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules depends on the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). For efficient antigen supply to MHC I molecules in the ER, TAP assembles a macromolecular peptide-loading complex (PLC) by recruiting tapasin. In evolution, TAP appeared together with effector cells of adaptive immunity at the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates and diversified further within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we compared TAP function and interaction with tapasin of a range of species within two classes of jawed vertebrates. We found that avian and mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 form heterodimeric complexes across taxa. Moreover, the extra N-terminal domain TMD0 of mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 as well as avian TAP2 recruits tapasin. Strikingly, however, only TAP1 and TAP2 from the same taxon can form a functional heterodimeric translocation complex. These data demonstrate that the dimerization interface between TAP1 and TAP2 and the tapasin docking sites for PLC assembly are conserved in evolution, whereas elements of antigen translocation diverged later in evolution and are thus taxon specific. PMID:25320083

  7. Transplantation of islet cells across major histocompatibility barriers after total lymphoid irradiation and infusion of allogeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, L.D.; Scharp, D.W.; Lacy, P.E.; Slavin, S.

    1982-08-01

    Diabetic Lewis rats (AgB1/L) were evaluated as recipients of allogeneic Wistar-Furth (AgB2/2) isolated adult islets without the use of standard recipient immunosuppression. One group was treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and Wistar-Furth bone marrow cell reconstitution to proven chimerism prior to islet transplantation. This group returned to a prediabetic state following Wistar-Furth islet transplantation without any evidence of rejection for 100 days posttransplant. A second group of Lewis rats received only TLI without bone marrow treatment. They gave a varying result following islet transplantation with one recipient showing evidence of prolonged islet survival. A third chimeric control group did not receive isolated islets and did not alter their diabetic state. A fourth group was not given TLI nor donor bone marrow cells and uniformly rejected their allogeneic islets by 7 days. Thus, allogeneic adult islets will survive across major rat histocompatibility barriers using TLI and donor bone marrow chimerism as the only form of immunosuppression.

  8. Trophoblast Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression Is Associated with Immune-Mediated Rejection of Bovine Fetuses Produced by Cloning.

    PubMed

    Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Wilhelm, Amanda; Sessions, Benjamin R; Hicks, Brady A; Schlafer, Donald H; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Trophoblast cells from bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) conceptuses express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins early in gestation, and this may be one cause of the significant first-trimester embryonic mortality observed in these pregnancies. MHC-I homozygous-compatible (n = 9), homozygous-incompatible (n = 8), and heterozygous-incompatible (n = 5) SCNT pregnancies were established. The control group consisted of eight pregnancies produced by artificial insemination. Uterine and placental samples were collected on Day 35 ± 1 of pregnancy, and expression of MHC-I, leukocyte markers, and cytokines were examined by immunohistochemistry. Trophoblast cells from all SCNT pregnancies expressed MHC-I, while trophoblast cells from age-matched control pregnancies were negative for MHC-I expression. Expression of MHC-I antigens by trophoblast cells from SCNT pregnancies was associated with lymphocytic infiltration in the endometrium. Furthermore, MHC-I-incompatible conceptuses, particularly the heterozygous-incompatible ones, induced a more pronounced lymphocytic infiltration than MHC-I-compatible conceptuses. Cells expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, gamma/deltaTCR, and MHC-II were increased in the endometrium of SCNT pregnancies compared to the control group. CD4(+) lymphocytes were increased in MHC-I-incompatible pregnancies compared to MHC-I-compatible and control pregnancies. CD8(+), FOXP3(+), and natural killer cells were increased in MHC-I heterozygous-incompatible SCNT pregnancies compared to homozygous SCNT and control pregnancies. PMID:27385783

  9. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomazou, Eleni M; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Lefebvre, Gregory; Andrews, Robert; Ellis, Peter; Jackson, David K; Langford, Cordelia; Francis, Matthew D; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Miretti, Marcos; Coggill, Penny; Ottaviani, Diego; Sheer, Denise; Murrell, Adele; Beck, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP), array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs). Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics. PMID:18513384

  10. In situ detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells in brain and heart using major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Jia, Ting; Elowsky, Christian; Li, Qingsheng; Zhou, You; Reddy, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This report demonstrates the use of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II dextramers for detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells in situ in myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in SJL mice and cardiac myosin heavy chain-α (Myhc) 334-352-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in A/J mice. Two sets of cocktails of dextramer reagents were used, where dextramers(+) cells were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM): EAE, IA(s)/PLP 139-151 dextramers (specific)/anti-CD4 and IA(s)/Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) 70-86 dextramers (control)/anti-CD4; and EAM, IA(k)/Myhc 334-352 dextramers/anti-CD4 and IA(k)/bovine ribonuclease (RNase) 43-56 dextramers (control)/anti-CD4. LSCM analysis of brain sections obtained from EAE mice showed the presence of cells positive for CD4 and PLP 139-151 dextramers, but not TMEV 70-86 dextramers suggesting that the staining obtained with PLP 139-151 dextramers was specific. Likewise, heart sections prepared from EAM mice also revealed the presence of Myhc 334-352, but not RNase 43-56-dextramer(+) cells as expected. Further, a comprehensive method has also been devised to quantitatively analyze the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in the 'Z' serial images. PMID:25145797

  11. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  12. Dissociation of β2-microglobulin determines the surface quality control of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Sebastián; Venugopalan, Vaishnavi; Fritzsche, Susanne; Kulicke, Corinna; Hein, Zeynep; Springer, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I proteins, which present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the surface of all nucleated cells, are endocytosed and destroyed rapidly once their peptide ligand has dissociated. The molecular mechanism of this cellular quality control process, which prevents rebinding of exogenous peptides and thus erroneous immune responses, is unknown. To identify the nature of the decisive step in endocytic sorting of class I molecules and its location, we have followed the removal of optimally and suboptimally peptide-loaded murine H-2K(b) class I proteins from the cell surface. We find that the binding of their light chain, β2-microglobulin (β2m), protects them from endocytic destruction. Thus, the extended survival of suboptimally loaded K(b) molecules at 25°C is attributed to decreased dissociation of β2m. Because all forms of K(b) are constantly internalized but little β2m-receptive heavy chain is present at the cell surface, it is likely that β2m dissociation and recognition of the heavy chain for lysosomal degradation take place in an endocytic compartment.

  13. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I proteins are critical for maintaining neuronal structural complexity in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Lazarczyk, Maciej J; Kemmler, Julia E; Eyford, Brett A; Short, Jennifer A; Varghese, Merina; Sowa, Allison; Dickstein, Daniel R; Yuk, Frank J; Puri, Rishi; Biron, Kaan E; Leist, Marcel; Jefferies, Wilfred A; Dickstein, Dara L

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) proteins have been implicated in neuronal function through the modulation of neuritogenesis, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation during development. However, the involvement of MHCI in the aged brain is unclear. Here we demonstrate that MHCI deficiency results in significant dendritic atrophy along with an increase in thin dendritic spines and a reduction in stubby spines in the hippocampus of aged (12 month old) mice. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a decrease in spine head diameter and post synaptic density (PSD) area, as well as an increase in overall synapse density, and non-perforated, small spines. Interestingly, we found that the changes in synapse density and morphology appear relatively late (after the age of 6 months). Finally, we found a significant age dependent increase in the levels of the glutamate receptor, GluN2B in aged MHCI knockout mice, with no change in GluA2/3, VGluT1, PSD95 or synaptophysin. These results indicate that MHCI may be also be involved in maintaining brain integrity at post-developmental stages notably in the modulation of neuronal and spine morphology and synaptic function during non-pathological aging which could have significant implications for cognitive function. PMID:27229916

  14. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, D.; Dolivo, G.; Marti, E.; Sieme, H.; Wedekind, C.

    2015-01-01

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies. PMID:25904670

  15. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dambrauskas, Zilvinas; Svensson, Helena; Joshi, Meghnad; Hyltander, Anders; Naredi, Peter; Iresjö, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are two stress-inducible ligands that bind to the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating cytotoxicity of NK and T cells. Release of MIC molecules from the cell surface is thought to constitute an immune escape mechanism of tumor cells and thus could be associated with more aggressive course of tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the expression of MICA/B in ductal pancreatic carcinoma and serum in relation to tumor stage, differentiation and survival. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera from patients with pancreatic cancer were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC), western blotting and ELISA, respectively. MICA/B expression was present in 17 of 22 (77%) of the tumors but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Poorly differentiated tumors showed more pronounced MICA/B expression compared to differentiated tumors, but did not correlate significantly to other tumor characteristics. MICA/B-negative tumors displayed significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases (p<0.01), and less mortality within 3 years following resection (p<0.02). In conclusion, tissue levels of MICA/B expression were elevated in pancreatic cancer cells without elevated levels in serum, despite well-recognized acute phase reactants in serum. Poorly differentiated tumors showed high MICA/B expression, which was related to extended tumor lymph node metastases and less frequent long-term survival.

  16. The cellular environment regulates in situ kinetics of T-cell receptor interaction with peptide major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Natarajan, Kannan; Li, Zhenhai; Margulies, David H; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    T cells recognize antigens at the two-dimensional (2D) interface with antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which trigger T-cell effector functions. T-cell functional outcomes correlate with 2D kinetics of membrane-embedded T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to surface-tethered peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHCs). However, most studies have measured TCR-pMHC kinetics for recombinant TCRs in 3D by surface plasmon resonance, which differs drastically from 2D measurements. Here, we compared pMHC dissociation from native TCR on the T-cell surface to recombinant TCR immobilized on glass surface or in solution. Force on TCR-pMHC bonds regulated their lifetimes differently for native than recombinant TCRs. Perturbing the cellular environment suppressed 2D on-rates but had no effect on 2D off-rate regardless of whether force was applied. In contrast, for the TCR interacting with its monoclonal antibody, the 2D on-rate was insensitive to cellular perturbations and the force-dependent off-rates were indistinguishable for native and recombinant TCRs. These data present novel features of TCR-pMHC kinetics that are regulated by the cellular environment, underscoring the limitations of 3D kinetics in predicting T-cell functions and calling for further elucidation of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate 2D kinetics in physiological settings.

  17. Constraints within major histocompatibility complex class I restricted peptides: Presentation and consequences for T-cell recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Theodossis, Alex; Guillonneau, Carole; Welland, Andrew; Ely, Lauren K.; Clements, Craig S.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Webb, Andrew I.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Mulder, Roger J.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Doherty, Peter C.; McCluskey, James; Purcell, Anthony W.; Turner, Stephen J.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-03-24

    Residues within processed protein fragments bound to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) glycoproteins have been considered to function as a series of 'independent pegs' that either anchor the peptide (p) to the MHC-I and/or interact with the spectrum of {alpha}{beta}-T-cell receptors (TCRs) specific for the pMHC-I epitope in question. Mining of the extensive pMHC-I structural database established that many self- and viral peptides show extensive and direct interresidue interactions, an unexpected finding that has led us to the idea of 'constrained' peptides. Mutational analysis of two constrained peptides (the HLA B44 restricted self-peptide (B44DP{alpha}-EEFGRAFSF)) and an H2-D{sup b} restricted influenza peptide (D{sup b}PA, SSLENFRAYV) demonstrated that the conformation of the prominently exposed arginine in both peptides was governed by interactions with MHC-I-orientated flanking residues from the peptide itself. Using reverse genetics in a murine influenza model, we revealed that mutation of an MHC-I-orientated residue (SSLENFRAYV {yields} SSLENARAYV) within the constrained PA peptide resulted in a diminished cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and the recruitment of a limited pMHC-I specific TCR repertoire. Interactions between individual peptide positions can thus impose fine control on the conformation of pMHC-I epitopes, whereas the perturbation of such constraints can lead to a previously unappreciated mechanism of viral escape.

  18. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene’s (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  19. Amino Acid Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Core Affect Infectious Virus Production and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Sugiyama, Nao; Kang, Wonseok; Masaski, Takahiro; Murayama, Asako; Yamada, Norie; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Tsukuda, Senko; Watashi, Koichi; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wakita, Takaji; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kato, Takanobu

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) polymorphisms in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core protein have been reported to be a potent predictor for poor response to interferon (IFN)-based therapy and a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of these polymorphisms with genotype 1b/2a chimeric viruses that contained polymorphisms of Arg/Gln at aa 70 and Leu/Met at aa 91. We found that infectious virus production was reduced in cells transfected with chimeric virus RNA that had Gln at aa 70 (aa70Q) compared with RNA with Arg at aa 70 (aa70R). Using flow cytometry analysis, we confirmed that HCV core protein accumulated in aa70Q clone transfected cells, and it caused a reduction in cell-surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules induced by IFN treatment through enhanced protein kinase R phosphorylation. We could not detect any effects due to the polymorphism at aa 91. In conclusion, the polymorphism at aa 70 was associated with efficiency of infectious virus production, and this deteriorated virus production in strains with aa70Q resulted in the intracellular accumulation of HCV proteins and attenuation of MHC class I molecule expression. These observations may explain the strain-associated resistance to IFN-based therapy and hepatocarcinogenesis of HCV. PMID:26365522

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class II compatibility, but not class I, predicts mate choice in a bird with highly developed olfaction.

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Westerdahl, Helena; Pontarp, Mikael; Canbäck, Björn; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Miquel, Christian; Taberlet, Pierre; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Mate choice for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) compatibility has been found in several taxa, although rarely in birds. MHC is a crucial component in adaptive immunity and by choosing an MHC-dissimilar partner, heterozygosity and potentially broad pathogen resistance is maximized in the offspring. The MHC genotype influences odour cues and preferences in mammals and fish and hence olfactory-based mate choice can occur. We tested whether blue petrels, Halobaena caerulea, choose partners based on MHC compatibility. This bird is long-lived, monogamous and can discriminate between individual odours using olfaction, which makes it exceptionally well suited for this analysis. We screened MHC class I and II B alleles in blue petrels using 454-pyrosequencing and quantified the phylogenetic, functional and allele-sharing similarity between individuals. Partners were functionally more dissimilar at the MHC class II B loci than expected from random mating (p = 0.033), whereas there was no such difference at the MHC class I loci. Phylogenetic and non-sequence-based MHC allele-sharing measures detected no MHC dissimilarity between partners for either MHC class I or II B. Our study provides evidence of mate choice for MHC compatibility in a bird with a high dependency on odour cues, suggesting that MHC odour-mediated mate choice occurs in birds.

  1. Defective major histocompatibility complex class I expression on lymphoid cells in autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y; Nathan, D M; Li, F; Li, X; Faustman, D L

    1993-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), a chronic autoimmune disease, have recently been shown to have decreased surface expression of MHC class I antigens. Since IDDM and other autoimmune diseases share a strong genetic association with MHC class II genes, which may in turn be linked to genes that affect MHC class I expression, we studied other autoimmune diseases to determine whether MHC class I expression is abnormal. Fresh PBLs were isolated from patients with IDDM, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves' disease, systemic lupus erythematosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Nondiabetic and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients served as controls. MHC class I expression was measured with a conformationally dependent monoclonal antibody, W6/32. Freshly prepared PBLs from the autoimmune diseases studied and the corresponding fresh EBV-transformed B cell lines had decreased MHC class I expression compared with PBLs from normal volunteers and non-insulin-dependent (nonautoimmune) diabetic patients. Only 3 of more than 180 donors without IDDM or other clinically recognized autoimmune disease had persistently decreased MHC class I expression; one patient was treated with immunosuppressive drugs, and subsequent screening of the other two patients revealed high titers of autoantibodies, revealing clinically occult autoimmunity. Patients with nonautoimmune inflammation (osteomyelitis or tuberculosis) had normal MHC class I expression. Autoimmune diseases are characterized by decreased expression of MHC class I on lymphocytes. MHC class I expression may be necessary for self-tolerance, and abnormalities in such expression may lead to autoimmunity. PMID:8486790

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Upregulates NLRC5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression through RIG-I Induction in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuancheng; Liu, Taixiang; Shi, Hengfei; Wang, Jingjing; Ji, Ping; Wang, Hongwei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract viral infection in infants, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The host antiviral response to RSV acts via retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We show here that RSV infection upregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression through the induction of NLRC5, a NOD-like, CARD domain-containing intracellular protein that has recently been identified as a class I MHC transactivator (CITA). RSV infection of A549 cells promotes upregulation of NLRC5 via beta interferon (IFN-β) production, since the NLRC5-inducing activity in a conditioned medium from RSV-infected A549 cells was removed by antibody to IFN-β, but not by antibody to IFN-γ. RSV infection resulted in RIG-I upregulation and induction of NLRC5 and MHC-I. Suppression of RIG-I induction significantly blocked NLRC5, as well as MHC-I, upregulation and diminished IRF3 activation. Importantly, Vero cells deficient in interferon production still upregulated MHC-I following introduction of the RSV genome by infection or transfection, further supporting a key role for RIG-I. A model is therefore proposed in which the host upregulates MHC-I expression during RSV infection directly via the induction of RIG-I and NLRC5 expression. Since elevated expression of MHC-I molecules can sensitize host cells to T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity or immunopathologic damage, the results have significant implications for the modification of immunity in RSV disease. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. Infection early in life is linked to persistent wheezing and allergic asthma in later life, possibly related to upregulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) on the cell surface, which facilitates cytotoxic T cell activation and antiviral immunity. Here, we show that RSV infection of lung epithelial

  3. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L.; Leo, Paul J.; Pointon, Jenny J.; Robinson, Philip C.; Weisman, Michael H.; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S.; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A.; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A.; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D.; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M.; Inman, Robert D.; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D.; Evans, David M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in addition to effects due to HLA-B*27 alleles, several other HLA-B alleles also affect susceptibility. After controlling for the associated haplotypes in HLA-B, we observe independent associations with variants in the HLA-A, HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. We also demonstrate that the ERAP1 SNP rs30187 association is not restricted only to carriers of HLA-B*27 but also found in HLA-B*40:01 carriers independently of HLA-B*27 genotype. PMID:25994336

  4. Major Histocompatibility Complex Based Resistance to a Common Bacterial Pathogen of Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Barribeau, Seth M.; Villinger, Jandouwe; Waldman, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Given their well-developed systems of innate and adaptive immunity, global population declines of amphibians are particularly perplexing. To investigate the role of the major histocompatibilty complex (MHC) in conferring pathogen resistance, we challenged Xenopus laevis tadpoles bearing different combinations of four MHC haplotypes (f, g, j, and r) with the bacterial pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila in two experiments. In the first, we exposed ff, fg, gg, gj, and jj tadpoles, obtained from breeding MHC homozygous parents, to one of three doses of A. hydrophila or heat-killed bacteria as a control. In the second, we exposed ff, fg, fr, gg, rg, and rr tadpoles, obtained from breeding MHC heterozygous parents and subsequently genotyped by PCR, to A. hydrophila, heat-killed bacteria or media alone as controls. We thereby determined whether the same patterns of MHC resistance emerged within as among families, independent of non-MHC heritable differences. Tadpoles with r or g MHC haplotypes were more likely to die than were those with f or j haplotypes. Growth rates varied among MHC types, independent of exposure dose. Heterozygous individuals with both susceptible and resistant haplotypes were intermediate to either homozygous genotype in both size and survival. The effect of the MHC on growth and survival was consistent between experiments and across families. MHC alleles differentially confer resistance to, or tolerance of, the bacterial pathogen, which affects tadpoles' growth and survival. PMID:18629002

  5. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II synthesis by interleukin-10

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Anne-Sophie; Coulton, Gary; Londei, Marco

    2002-01-01

    We have shown previously that interleukin-10 (IL-10) blocks the development and T-cell stimulatory capacity of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, without apparently down-regulating the surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules or human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules. In the majority of donors (60%), the cell surface levels of HLA-DR actually increased upon IL-10 treatment. Here we have shown that IL-10 does not regulate HLA-DR transcription as assessed by polymerase chain reation. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis showed that IL-10 primarily increased the intracellular pool of HLA-DR. In fact, IL-10 directly increased HLA-DR protein synthesis. However, IL-10 did not significantly alter the synthesis of invariant chain (Ii), which plays a crucial role in the assembly, transport and loading of newly formed HLA class II molecules, nor the amount of Ii reaching the cell-surface. In contrast, IL-10 increased the amount of HLA-DR-bound Iip33 shortly after the HLA-DR complex assembly. We postulate that, upon IL-10 treatment, immature Ii-associated HLA II molecules can still transit to the cell surface as they do in immature dendritic cells and recycle to the intracellular space, where they accumulate. A higher proportion of Ii-associated HLA-DR, coupled to increased membrane recycling, may contribute to the lower T-cell stimulatory capacity of IL-10-treated dendritic cells. PMID:12047752

  6. Antigen capture and major histocompatibility class II compartments of freshly isolated and cultured human blood dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) represent potent antigen-presenting cells for the induction of T cell-dependent immune responses. Previous work on antigen uptake and presentation by human DC is based largely on studies of blood DC that have been cultured for various periods of time before analysis. These cultured cells may therefore have undergone a maturation process from precursors that have different capacities for antigen capture and presentation. We have now used immunoelectron microscopy and antigen presentation assays to compare freshly isolated DC (f-DC) and cultured DC (c-DC). f-DC display a round appearance, whereas c-DC display characteristic long processes. c-DC express much more cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II than f-DC. The uptake of colloidal gold-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA), however, is greater in f-DC, as is the presentation of 65-kD heat shock protein to T cell clones. The most striking discovery is that the majority of MHC class II molecules in both f-DC and c-DC occur in intracellular vacuoles with a complex shape (multivesicular and multilaminar). These MHC class II enriched compartments (MIIC) represent the site to which BSA is transported within 30 min. Although MIIC appear as more dense structures with less MHC class II molecules in f-DC than c-DC, the marker characteristics are very similar. The MIIC in both types of DC are acidic, contain invariant chain, and express the recently described HLA-DM molecule that can contribute to antigen presentation. CD19+ peripheral blood B cells have fewer MIIC and surface MHC class II expression than DCs, while monocytes had low levels of MIIC and surface MHC class II. These results demonstrate in dendritic cells the elaborate development of MIIC expressing several of the components that are required for efficient antigen presentation. PMID:7790816

  7. Coronavirus induction of class I major histocompatibility complex expression in murine astrocytes is virus strain specific

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Neurotropic strains of mouse hepatitis viruses (MHV) such as MHV-A59 (A59) and MHV-4 (JHMV) cause acute and chronic encephalomyelitis and demyelination in susceptible strains of mice and rats. They are widely used as models of human demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), in which immune mechanisms are thought to participate in the development of lesions in the central nervous system (CNS). The effects of MHV infection on target cell functions in the CNS are not well understood, but A59 has been shown to induce the expression of MHC class I molecules in glial cells after in vivo and in vitro infection. Changes in class I expression in infected cells may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of MHV infection in the CNS. In this communication, a large panel of MHV strains was tested for their ability to stimulate class I expression in primary astrocytes in vitro. The data show that the more hepatotropic strains, such as MHV-A59, MHV-1, MHV-2, MHV-3, MHV-D, MHV-K, and MHV-NuU, were potent inducers of class I expression in astrocytes during acute infection, measured by radioimmunoassay. The Kb molecule was preferentially expressed over Db. By contrast, JHMV and several viral strains derived from it did not stimulate the expression of class I molecules. Assays of virus infectivity indicated that the class I-inducing activity did not correlate with the ability of the individual viral strain to replicate in astrocytes. However, exposure of the viruses or the supernatants from infected astrocytes to ultraviolet light abolished the class I-inducing activity, indicating that infectious virus is required for class I expression. These data also suggest that class I expression was induced directly by virus infection, and not by the secretion of a soluble substance into the medium by infected astrocytes. Finally, analyses of A59/JHMV recombinant viral strains suggest that class I-inducing activity resides in one of the A59 structural genes. PMID:8064222

  8. Transcription of non-classic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in the bovine placenta throughout gestation and after Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Larissa Sarmento; da Silva Mol, Juliana Pinto; de Macedo, Auricélio Alves; Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Dos Santos Ribeiro, Diego Luiz; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Carvalho Neta, Alcina Vieira

    2015-10-15

    Transcription of non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was assessed in the bovine placenta throughout gestation. Additionally, the effect of Brucella abortus infection on expression of non-classical MHC-I was also evaluated using a chorioallantoic membrane explant model of infection. The non-classical MHC-I genes MICB and NC3 had higher levels of transcription in the intercotyledonary region when compared to the placentome, which had higher levels of transcription at the second trimester of gestation. NC1 and classical MHC-I had very low levels of transcription throughout gestation. Trophoblastic cells of B. abortus-infected chorioallantoic membrane explants had an increase in transcription of non-classical MHC-I at 4h post infection. Therefore, this study provides an analysis of non-classical MHC-I transcription at different stages of gestation and different placental tissues, and during B. abortus infection. These findings provide additional knowledge on immune regulation in placental tissues, a known immune-privileged site.

  9. Patterns of selection and allele diversity of class I and class II major histocompatibility loci across the species range of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka).

    PubMed

    McClelland, Erin K; Ming, Tobi J; Tabata, Amy; Kaukinen, Karia H; Beacham, Terry D; Withler, Ruth E; Miller, Kristina M

    2013-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), an important component of the vertebrate immune system, provides an important suite of genes to examine the role of genetic diversity at non-neutral loci for population persistence. We contrasted patterns of diversity at the two classical MHC loci in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), MHC class I (UBA) and MHC class II (DAB), and neutral microsatellite loci across 70 populations spanning the species range from Washington State to Japan. There was no correlation in allelic richness or heterozygosity between MHC loci or between MHC loci and microsatellites. The two unlinked MHC loci may be responding to different selective pressures; the distribution of FST values for the two loci was uncorrelated, and evidence for both balancing and directional selection on alleles and lineages of DAB and UBA was observed in populations throughout the species range but rarely on both loci within a population. These results suggest that fluctuating selection has resulted in the divergence of MHC loci in contemporary populations. PMID:24033436

  10. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a) the parental species don’t share alleles, and b) one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis), then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus) and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica) by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management. PMID:23006678

  11. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  12. T cell receptor interaction with peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and superantigen/MHC ligands is dominated by antigen

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    While recent evidence strongly suggests that the third complementarity determining regions (CDR3s) of T cell receptors (TCRs) directly contact antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, the nature of other TCR contact(s) is less clear. Here we probe the extent to which different antigens can affect this interaction by comparing the responses of T cells bearing structurally related TCRs to cytochrome c peptides and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) presented by 13 mutant antigen-presenting cell (APC) lines. Each APC expresses a class II MHC molecule (I-Ek) with a single substitution of an amino acid residue predicted to be located on the MHC alpha helices and to point "up" towards the TCR. We find that very limited changes (even a single amino acid) in either a CDR3 loop of the TCR or in a contact residue of the antigenic peptide can have a profound effect on relatively distant TCR/MHC interactions. The extent of these effects can be as great as that observed between T cells bearing entirely different TCRs and recognizing different peptides. We also find that superantigen presentation entails a distinct mode of TCR/MHC interaction compared with peptide presentation. These data suggest that TCR/MHC contacts can be made in a variety of ways between the same TCR and MHC, with the final configuration apparently dominated by the antigen. These observations suggest a molecular basis for recent reports in which either peptide analogues or superantigens trigger distinct pathways of T cell activation. PMID:8393480

  13. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs.

  14. Unusual association of. beta. /sub 2/-microglobulin with certain class I heavy chains of the murine major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bushkin, Y.; Tung, J.S.; Pinter, A.; Michaelson, J.; Boyse, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Class I products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprise a heavy chain of about 45 kDa noncovalently linked to a 12-kDa ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin (..beta../sub 2/m) light chain encoded on a different chromosome. The authors find that class I products of some mouse strains include an additional 62-kDa molecule which on the following evidence consists of a heavy chain linked covalently with ..beta../sub 2/m. Production of the 62-kDa protein invariably accorded with the occurrence of cysteine at position 121 of the heavy chain (K/sup b/, K/sup bm3/, D/sup d/, and L/sup d/). Substitution of arginine at position 121 invariably accorded with absence of the 62-kDa protein (K/sup bm6/, K/sup bm7/, K/sup bm9/, K/sup d/, and D/sup b/). On the basis of observed production versus nonproduction of the 62-kDa molecule, predictions are made regarding residue 121 in class I products for which this is not yet known; namely, K/sup k/, K/sup s/, and D/sup k/, which produce the 62-kDa molecule, as compared with K/sup j/, Qa-2, and TL, which do not. Reported differences in immunologic reactivity between K/sup b/ mutant strains with Arg-121 in place of Cys-121 imply that the occurrence of 62-kDa class I products in mice of Cys-121 genotype has functional consequences. Lymph node cells were labelled with (/sup 35/S)cysteine and Na/sup 125/I.

  15. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lu; Cho, Sangwoo; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Kerzic, Melissa C.; Dam, Julie; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined with mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally. PMID:18426793

  16. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin I (SEI) in Complex with a Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Marisa M.; Guan, Rongjin; Swaminathan, Chittoor P.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2009-01-01

    Superantigens are bacterial or viral proteins that elicit massive T cell activation through simultaneous binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and T cell receptors. This activation results in uncontrolled release of inflammatory cytokines, causing toxic shock. A remarkable property of superantigens, which distinguishes them from T cell receptors, is their ability to interact with multiple MHC class II alleles independently of MHC-bound peptide. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that staphylococcal and streptococcal superantigens belonging to the zinc family bind to a high affinity site on the class II β-chain. However, the basis for promiscuous MHC recognition by zinc-dependent superantigens is not obvious, because the β-chain is polymorphic and the MHC-bound peptide forms part of the binding interface. To understand how zinc-dependent superantigens recognize MHC, we determined the crystal structure, at 2.0 Å resolution, of staphylococcal enterotoxin I bound to the human class II molecule HLA-DR1 bearing a peptide from influenza hemagglutinin. Interactions between the superantigen and DR1 β-chain are mediated by a zinc ion, and 22% of the buried surface of peptide·MHC is contributed by the peptide. Comparison of the staphylococcal enterotoxin I·peptide·DR1 structure with ones determined previously revealed that zinc-dependent superantigens achieve promiscuous binding to MHC by targeting conservatively substituted residues of the polymorphic β-chain. Additionally, these superantigens circumvent peptide specificity by engaging MHC-bound peptides at their conformationally conserved N-terminal regions while minimizing sequence-specific interactions with peptide residues to enhance cross-reactivity. PMID:16829512

  17. Testing for post-copulatory selection for major histocompatibility complex genotype in a semi-free-ranging primate population.

    PubMed

    Setchell, Joanna M; Abbott, Kristin M; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Knapp, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genotype influences mate choice. However, few studies have investigated MHC-mediated post-copulatory mate choice under natural, or even semi-natural, conditions. We set out to explore this question in a large semi-free-ranging population of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) using MHC-DRB genotypes for 127 parent-offspring triads. First, we showed that offspring MHC heterozygosity correlates positively with parental MHC dissimilarity suggesting that mating among MHC dissimilar mates is efficient in increasing offspring MHC diversity. Second, we compared the haplotypes of the parental dyad with those of the offspring to test whether post-copulatory sexual selection favored offspring with two different MHC haplotypes, more diverse gamete combinations, or greater within-haplotype diversity. Limited statistical power meant that we could only detect medium or large effect sizes. Nevertheless, we found no evidence for selection for heterozygous offspring when parents share a haplotype (large effect size), genetic dissimilarity between parental haplotypes (we could detect an odds ratio of ≥1.86), or within-haplotype diversity (medium-large effect). These findings suggest that comparing parental and offspring haplotypes may be a useful approach to test for post-copulatory selection when matings cannot be observed, as is the case in many study systems. However, it will be extremely difficult to determine conclusively whether post-copulatory selection mechanisms for MHC genotype exist, particularly if the effect sizes are small, due to the difficulty in obtaining a sufficiently large sample. PMID:23677678

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S.

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Molecular and Immunological Significance of Chimpanzee Major Histocompatibility Complex Haplotypes for Hepatitis C Virus Immune Response and Vaccination Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Nascimbeni, Michelina; Blaustein, Joshua B.; Mihalik, Kathleen; Rice, Charles M.; Liang, T. Jake; Feinstone, Stephen M.; Rehermann, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The chimpanzee is a critical animal model for studying cellular immune responses to infectious pathogens such as hepatitis B and C viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and malaria. Several candidate vaccines and immunotherapies for these infections aim at the induction or enhancement of cellular immune responses against viral epitopes presented by common human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles. To identify and characterize chimpanzee MHC class I molecules that are functionally related to human alleles, we sequenced 18 different Pan troglodytes (Patr) alleles of 14 chimpanzees, 2 of them previously unknown and 3 with only partially reported sequences. Comparative analysis of Patr binding pockets and binding assays with biotinylated peptides demonstrated a molecular homology between the binding grooves of individual Patr alleles and the common human alleles HLA-A1, -A2, -A3, and -B7. Using cytotoxic T cells isolated from the blood of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected chimpanzees, we then mapped the Patr restriction of these HCV peptides and demonstrated functional homology between the Patr-HLA orthologues in cytotoxicity and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assays. Based on these results, 21 HCV epitopes were selected to characterize the chimpanzees' cellular immune response to HCV. In each case, IFN-γ-producing T cells were detectable in the blood after but not prior to HCV infection and were specifically targeted against those HCV peptides predicted by Patr-HLA homology. This study demonstrates a close functional homology between individual Patr and HLA alleles and shows that HCV infection generates HCV peptides that are recognized by both chimpanzees and humans with Patr and HLA orthologues. These results are relevant for the design and evaluation of vaccines in chimpanzees that can now be selected according to the most frequent human MHC haplotypes. PMID:12021342

  20. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,L.; Cho, S.; Malchiodi, E.; Kerzic, M.; Dam, J.; Mariuzza, R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined with mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally.

  1. Sequence variation at the major histocompatibility complex DRB loci in beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) and narwhal (Monodon monoceros).

    PubMed

    Murray, B W; White, B N

    1998-09-01

    The variation at loci with similarity to DRB class II major histocompatibility complex loci was assessed in 313 beluga collected from 13 sampling locations across North America, and 11 narwhal collected in the Canadian high Arctic. Variation was assessed by amplification of exon 2, which codes for the peptide binding region, via the polymerase chain reaction, followed by either cloning and DNA sequencing or single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. Two DRB loci were identified in beluga: DRB1, a polymorphic locus, and, DRB2, a monomorphic locus. Eight alleles representing five distinct lineages (based on sequence similarity) were found at the beluga DRB1 locus. Although the relative number of alleles is low when compared with terrestrial mammals, the amino acid variation found among the lineages is moderate. At the DRB1 locus, the average number of nonsynonymous substitutions per site is greater than the average number of synonymous substitutions per site (0.0806 : 0.0207, respectively; P<0.01). Most of the 31 amino acid substitutions do not conserve the physiochemical properties of the residue, and 21 of these are located at positions implicated as forming pockets responsible for the selective binding of foreign peptide side chains. Only DRB1 variation was examined in 11 narwhal, revealing a low amount of variation. These data are consistent with an important role for the DRB1 locus in the cellular immune response of beluga. In addition, the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions is similar to that among primate alleles, arguing against a reduction in the balancing selection pressure in the marine environment. Two hypotheses may explain the modest amount of Mhc variation when compared with terrestrial mammals: small population sizes at speciation or a reduced neutral substitution rate in cetaceans. PMID:9716643

  2. Histone deacetylase 1/mSin3A disrupts gamma interferon-induced CIITA function and major histocompatibility complex class II enhanceosome formation.

    PubMed

    Zika, Eleni; Greer, Susanna F; Zhu, Xin-Sheng; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2003-05-01

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is a master transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) promoters. CIITA does not bind DNA, but it interacts with the transcription factors RFX5, NF-Y, and CREB and associated chromatin-modifying enzymes to form an enhanceosome. This report examines the effects of histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/HDAC2) on MHC-II gene induction by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and CIITA. The results show that an inhibitor of HDACs, trichostatin A, enhances IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II expression, while HDAC1/HDAC2 inhibits IFN-gamma- and CIITA-induced MHC-II gene expression. mSin3A, a corepressor of HDAC1/HDAC2, is important for this inhibition, while NcoR, a corepressor of HDAC3, is not. The effect of this inhibition is directed at CIITA, since HDAC1/HDAC2 reduces transactivation by a GAL4-CIITA fusion protein. CIITA binds to overexpressed and endogenous HDAC1, suggesting that HDAC and CIITA may affect each other by direct or indirect association. Inhibition of HDAC activity dramatically increases the association of NF-YB and RFX5 with CIITA, the assembly of CIITA, NF-YB, and RFX5 enhanceosome, and the extent of H3 acetylation at the MHC-II promoter. These results suggest a model where HDAC1/HDAC2 affect the function of CIITA through a disruption of MHC-II enhanceosome and relevant coactivator-transcription factor association and provide evidence that CIITA may act as a molecular switch to modulate MHC-II transcription by coordinating the functions of both histone acetylases and HDACs.

  3. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  4. Species specificity and augmentation of responses to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules in human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Murine T cell responses to human class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules were shown to be a minimum of 20-70-fold lower than responses to allogeneic molecules. Transgenic mice expressing slightly below normal (75-95%) or very high (250-380%) cell surface levels of human CD4 were utilized to determine whether this was due to a species-specific interaction between murine CD4 and class II molecules. Human CD4 was shown to function in signal transduction events in murine T cells based on the ability of anti-human CD4 antibody to synergize with suboptimal doses of anti-murine CD3 antibody in stimulating T cell proliferation. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, T cell responses to human class II molecules were enhanced up to threefold, whereas allogeneic responses were unaltered. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were enhanced at least 10-fold, whereas allogeneic responses were between one and three times the level of normal responses. The relatively greater enhancement of the response to human class II molecules in both lines argues for a preferential interaction between human CD4 and human class II molecules. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were blocked by antibodies to CD4 of either species, indicating participation by both molecules. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to both human and murine class II molecules were almost completely blocked with anti-human CD4 antibody, whereas anti-murine CD4 antibody had no effect. However, anti-murine CD4 continued to synergize with anti-CD3 in stimulating T cell proliferation in these mice. Thus, overexpression of human CD4 selectively impaired the ability of murine CD4 to assist in the process of antigen recognition. The ability of human CD4 to support a strong allogeneic response under these conditions indicates that this molecule can interact with murine class II molecules to a

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of a labeled peptide bound to a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, P C; Altman, J D; Boniface, J J; Sakaguchi, K; Reay, P A; Omichinski, J G; Appella, E; Davis, M M

    1993-07-20

    The formation of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes and their subsequent recognition by T cells is a pivotal event in the initiation of an immune response. While X-ray crystal structures are now available for class I MHC/peptide complexes, little detailed structural information is known about the class II MHC equivalent, and there are no solution structure data for either. A 16 amino acid residue moth cytochrome c peptide (residues 88 to 103) was 13C-labeled for two-dimensional isotope-edited NMR analysis. The peptide was labeled either selectively in the methyl groups of alanine residues or uniformly at every carbon position, and bound to unlabeled soluble mouse I-Ek class II MHC molecules. Although alpha-helical in the native cytochrome c protein and with no uniform structure in solution, the peptide is bound to the I-Ek molecule with the alpha-carbon atoms of the 11 C-terminal residues held in the binding groove. This indicates that the class II MHC peptide binding site is somewhat larger than that of class I MHC molecules (> or = 11 amino acid residues versus 8 to 10 amino acid residues), consistent with recent data on eluted peptides. Despite the large size of the complex (approximately 70 kDa), nuclear Overhauser effects are clearly detectable between peptide side-chains and the MHC molecule. Indications of the buried or exposed nature of particular side-chains within the bound peptide are derived from the NMR data and these are used together with information from previous biological studies to propose a crude model of the interaction of the peptide with the groove of the MHC molecule. We find no evidence for a conformational change in the peptide/MHC complex in the spectra at pH 5.0 versus pH 7.0, despite a 40-fold faster on-rate for the peptide at the lower pH value. PMID:8393933

  6. Major histocompatibility complex-conferred resistance to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease is inherited as a dominant trait in B10 congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Patick, A K; Pease, L R; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

    1990-11-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus into susceptible strains of mice produces chronic demyelinating disease in the central nervous system characterized by persistent viral infection. Immunogenetic data suggest that genes from both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci are important in determining susceptibility or resistance to demyelination. The role of the MHC in determining resistance or susceptibility to disease can be interpreted either as the presence of antigen-presenting molecules that confer resistance to viral infection or as the ability of MHC products to contribute to pathogenesis by acting as viral receptors or by mediating immune attack against virally infected cells. These alternatives can be distinguished by determining whether the contribution of the MHC to resistance is inherited as a recessive or dominant trait. Congenic mice with different MHC haplotypes on identical B10 backgrounds were crossed and quantitatively analyzed for demyelination, infectious virus, and local virus antigen production. F1 hybrid progeny derived from resistant B10 (H-2b), B10.D2 (H-2d), or B10.K (H-2k) and susceptible B10.R111 (H-2r), B10.M (H-2f), or B10.BR (H-2k) parental mice exhibited no or minimal demyelination, indicating that on a B10 background, resistance is inherited as a dominant trait. Although infectious virus, as measured by viral plaque assay, was cleared inefficiently from the central nervous systems of resistant F1 hybrid progeny mice, we found a direct correlation between local viral antigen production and demyelination. These data are consistent with our hypothesis that the immunological basis for resistance is determined by efficient presentation of the viral antigen to the immune system, resulting in local virus clearance and absence of subsequent demyelination.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex-conferred resistance to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease is inherited as a dominant trait in B10 congenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Patick, A K; Pease, L R; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

    1990-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus into susceptible strains of mice produces chronic demyelinating disease in the central nervous system characterized by persistent viral infection. Immunogenetic data suggest that genes from both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci are important in determining susceptibility or resistance to demyelination. The role of the MHC in determining resistance or susceptibility to disease can be interpreted either as the presence of antigen-presenting molecules that confer resistance to viral infection or as the ability of MHC products to contribute to pathogenesis by acting as viral receptors or by mediating immune attack against virally infected cells. These alternatives can be distinguished by determining whether the contribution of the MHC to resistance is inherited as a recessive or dominant trait. Congenic mice with different MHC haplotypes on identical B10 backgrounds were crossed and quantitatively analyzed for demyelination, infectious virus, and local virus antigen production. F1 hybrid progeny derived from resistant B10 (H-2b), B10.D2 (H-2d), or B10.K (H-2k) and susceptible B10.R111 (H-2r), B10.M (H-2f), or B10.BR (H-2k) parental mice exhibited no or minimal demyelination, indicating that on a B10 background, resistance is inherited as a dominant trait. Although infectious virus, as measured by viral plaque assay, was cleared inefficiently from the central nervous systems of resistant F1 hybrid progeny mice, we found a direct correlation between local viral antigen production and demyelination. These data are consistent with our hypothesis that the immunological basis for resistance is determined by efficient presentation of the viral antigen to the immune system, resulting in local virus clearance and absence of subsequent demyelination. Images PMID:2214025

  8. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication. PMID:26637459

  9. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2015-12-04

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication.

  10. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea M.; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Scheef, Elizabeth A.; Reed, Jason S.; Panganiban, Antonito T.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Friedrich, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Nef-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165–173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication. PMID:26637459

  11. High-Density SNP Screening of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Demonstrates Strong Evidence for Independent Susceptibility Regions

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos, Lisa F.; May, Suzanne L.; Ramsay, Patricia P.; Quach, Hong L.; Lane, Julie A.; Nititham, Joanne; Noble, Janelle A.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Quach, Diana L.; Chung, Sharon A.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Moser, Kathy L.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Seldin, Michael F.; Thomson, Glenys; Harley, John B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial genetic contribution to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) risk is conferred by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene(s) on chromosome 6p21. Previous studies in SLE have lacked statistical power and genetic resolution to fully define MHC influences. We characterized 1,610 Caucasian SLE cases and 1,470 parents for 1,974 MHC SNPs, the highly polymorphic HLA-DRB1 locus, and a panel of ancestry informative markers. Single-marker analyses revealed strong signals for SNPs within several MHC regions, as well as with HLA-DRB1 (global p = 9.99×10−16). The most strongly associated DRB1 alleles were: *0301 (odds ratio, OR = 2.21, p = 2.53×10−12), *1401 (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0002), and *1501 (OR = 1.39, p = 0.0032). The MHC region SNP demonstrating the strongest evidence of association with SLE was rs3117103, with OR = 2.44 and p = 2.80×10−13. Conditional haplotype and stepwise logistic regression analyses identified strong evidence for association between SLE and the extended class I, class I, class III, class II, and the extended class II MHC regions. Sequential removal of SLE–associated DRB1 haplotypes revealed independent effects due to variation within OR2H2 (extended class I, rs362521, p = 0.006), CREBL1 (class III, rs8283, p = 0.01), and DQB2 (class II, rs7769979, p = 0.003, and rs10947345, p = 0.0004). Further, conditional haplotype analyses demonstrated that variation within MICB (class I, rs3828903, p = 0.006) also contributes to SLE risk independent of HLA-DRB1*0301. Our results for the first time delineate with high resolution several MHC regions with independent contributions to SLE risk. We provide a list of candidate variants based on biologic and functional considerations that may be causally related to SLE risk and warrant further investigation. PMID:19851445

  12. Equine Herpesvirus 1 Multiply Inserted Transmembrane Protein pUL43 Cooperates with pUL56 in Downregulation of Cell Surface Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Teng; Ma, Guanggang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesviruses have evolved an array of strategies to counteract antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I). Previously, we identified pUL56 of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) as one major determinant of the downregulation of cell surface MHC-I (G. Ma, S. Feineis, N. Osterrieder, and G. R. Van de Walle, J. Virol. 86:3554–3563, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06994-11; T. Huang, M. J. Lehmann, A. Said, G. Ma, and N. Osterrieder, J. Virol. 88:12802–12815, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02079-14). Since pUL56 was able to exert its function only in the context of virus infection, we hypothesized that pUL56 cooperates with another viral protein. Here, we generated and screened a series of EHV-1 single-gene deletion mutants and found that the pUL43 orthologue was required for downregulation of cell surface MHC-I expression at the same time of infection as when pUL56 exerts its function. We demonstrate that the absence of pUL43 was not deleterious to virus growth and that expression of pUL43 was detectable from 2 h postinfection (p.i.) but decreased after 8 h p.i. due to lysosomal degradation. pUL43 localized within Golgi vesicles and required a unique hydrophilic N-terminal domain to function properly. Finally, coexpression of pUL43 and pUL56 in transfected cells reduced the cell surface expression of MHC-I. This process was dependent on PPxY motifs present in pUL56, suggesting that late domains are required for pUL43- and pUL56-dependent sorting of MHC class I for lysosomal degradation. IMPORTANCE We describe here that the poorly characterized herpesviral protein pUL43 is involved in downregulation of cell surface MHC-I. pUL43 is an early protein and degraded in lysosomes. pUL43 resides in the Golgi vesicles and needs an intact N terminus to induce MHC-I downregulation in infected cells. Importantly, pUL43 and pUL56 cooperate to reduce MHC-I expression on the surface of transfected cells. Our results suggest a model for

  13. Major histocompatibility complex class I-specific and -restricted killing of beta 2-microglobulin-deficient cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Glas, R; Franksson, L; Ohlén, C; Höglund, P; Koller, B; Ljunggren, H G; Kärre, K

    1992-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, normally composed of a heavy chain, a beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m), and peptide antigens. beta 2m is considered essential for the assembly and intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules as well as their peptide presentation to CTLs. Contrary to this dogma, we now report the generation of allospecific and restricted CD8+ and TCR alpha beta+ CTLs (where TCR is T-cell receptor) capable of killing beta 2m-deficient cells. Such CTLs were obtained by priming mice with live allogeneic beta 2m- spleen cells or mutant lymphoma cells producing MHC class I protein but no detectable beta 2m. Although both beta 2m- and beta 2m-expressing lymphoma cells were rejected in allogeneic mice, only the former were efficient inducers of CTLs recognizing beta 2m- cells. These CTLs were MHC class I (H-2Kb or Db)-specific and CD8-dependent and did not require serum as a source of external beta 2m in the culture. They could be induced across major and minor histocompatibility barriers. The H-2-restricted CTLs generated in the latter case failed to kill the antigen-processing-deficient target RMA-S cells. The results show that MHC class I heavy chains in beta 2m- cells can be transported to the cell surface and act as antigens or antigen-presenting molecules to allospecific and MHC-restricted CTLs. PMID:1454824

  14. Molecular and biological interaction between major histocompatibility complex class I antigens and luteinizing hormone receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors triggers cellular response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, A R; Cremaschi, G; Sánchez, M L; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L; Podestá, E J

    1988-01-01

    Purified IgG from BALB/c mouse anti-C3H serum exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects in C3H mouse atria and induces testosterone synthesis in C3H mouse Leydig cells. The effect depends on IgG concentration and can be abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor and luteinizing hormone-receptor antagonists. IgG interferes with the binding of dihydroalprenolol and luteinizing hormone. Monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I antigens were active on the Leydig cells of C3H and BALB/c mice. There was a parallelism between the effect of each individual monoclonal antibody with specificity for a particular haplotype and the response of the target cell from the strains carrying such haplotypes. These antibodies could precipitate the soluble luteinizing hormone-receptor complex. The results suggested that bound hormone triggers the association of major histocompatibility class I antigen with the receptor, thereby activating the respective target cells. PMID:2839829

  15. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I loci of the lark sparrow (Chondestes grammacus) and insights into avian MHC evolution.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Amanda C; Hoostal, Matthew J; Bouzat, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    The major histocompatibilty complex (MHC) has become increasingly important in the study of the immunocapabilities of non-model vertebrates due to its direct involvement in the immune response. The characterization of MHC class I loci in the lark sparrow (Chondestes grammacus) revealed multiple MHC class I loci with elevated genetic diversity at exon 3, evidence of differential selection between the peptide binding region (PBR) and non-PBR, and the presence of multiple pseudogenes with limited divergence. The minimum number of functional MHC class I loci was estimated at four. Sequence analysis revealed d N /d S ratios significantly less than one at non-PBR sites, indicative of negative selection, whereas PBR sites associated with antigen recognition showed ratios greater than 1 but non-significant. GenBank surveys and phylogenetic analyses of previously reported avian MHC class I sequences revealed variable signatures of evolutionary processes acting upon this gene family, including gene duplication and potential concerted evolution. An increase in the number of class I loci across species coincided with an increase in pseudogene prevalence, revealing the importance of gene duplication in the expansion of multigene families and the creation of pseudogenes.

  16. Characterization of the oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced major histocompatibility complex class I and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, M; Lantz, M; MacGregor, R D; Garovoy, M R; Hunt, C A

    1994-10-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II genes and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) are regulated by interferon-gamma in a variety of cell types. We have previously shown that the oligodeoxynucleotide 5'-GGG GTT GGT TGT GTT GGG TGT TGT GT-RNH2 (oligo I) inhibits the interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of MHC Class I and ICAM-1 proteins in the K562 cell line. We have now investigated the mechanism of action of oligo I and report that it acts by inhibiting the binding of interferon-gamma to cells. We also show that the dose-response curves, the selectivity profile, and the kinetics of oligo I are consistent with this novel mechanism of action. The dose-response curves for oligo I, obtained using antibodies against the MHC Class I heavy chain, beta 2-microglobulin, or ICAM-1, are almost superimposable at each observation time. MHC Class I induction by 6400 units/ml interferon-alpha or interferon-beta or ICAM-1 enhancement by 800 units/ml tumor necrosis factor-alpha is not inhibited by oligo I. However, the synergistic induction of MHC Class I by mixtures of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma is inhibited. Oligo I belongs to a class of active oligodeoxynucleotides that inhibits interferon-gamma-induced MHC Class I and ICAM-1 in K562 cells. The activity and potency is sequence-dependent, but remarkably different sequences can have comparable effects. The activity of oligo I in the HeLa S3 cell line inhibits the interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of both ICAM-1 and MHC Class II DR and the interferon-gamma-mediated reduction in transferrin receptor expression. Thus, oligo I appears to specifically inhibit interferon-gamma-induced changes in protein expression, which is consistent with oligo I acting at an early step(s) in the induction process. Taken together, our results show that oligo I exerts its effects by inhibiting the association of interferon-gamma with the cell surface, which is a novel mechanism of action for

  17. CD4 binding to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens induces LFA-1-dependent and -independent homotypic adhesion of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kansas, G S; Cambier, J C; Tedder, T F

    1992-01-01

    T helper cells recognize processed antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens present on the surface of B cells and other Ag-presenting cells. This interaction is mediated through the T cell receptor complex with associate recognition of class II molecules by the CD4 molecule. In this study, the binding of a soluble recombinant CD4/Ig heavy chain fusion protein (CD4-gamma 3) or monoclonal antibody (mAb) to class II antigens on human B cells was shown to induce rapid and specific homotypic adhesion of B cells and most B lymphoblastoid cell lines. mAb reactive with CD4 inhibited CD4-gamma 3-induced adhesion and a mutant B lymphoblastoid cell line deficient in class II antigens failed to respond. Induction of homotypic adhesion was dependent on energy metabolism and a functional cytoskeleton, and class II+ pre-B cells did not exhibit adhesion in response to these stimuli, suggesting that cross-linking of class II molecules generated a transmembrane signal and did not simply aggregate cells. In addition, MHC class II-induced adhesion was Fc receptor independent, as 15 mAb of different Ig isotypes reactive with HLA-D or HLA-DQ gene products induced adhesion. Anti-class II mAb and CD4-gamma 3 were able to induce adhesion at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Suboptimal stimulation of B cell lines through HLA-D antigens induced homotypic adhesion that was dependent on the activation of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), and which could be blocked by specific mAb. However, at greater signal strengths, adhesion was not blocked by mAb against the known adhesion receptors, suggesting the induction of a novel adhesion pathway. Consistent with this, homotypic adhesion induced by engagement of MHC class II antigens was observed with LFA-1-deficient B cell lines, and was independent of CD49d or CD18 expression. Thus, the direct engagement of B cell class II antigens by CD4 is likely to generate transmembrane signals which

  18. Role of major histocompatibility complex class I-related molecules A*A5·1 allele in ulcerative colitis in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Min; Xia, Bing; Ge, Liuqing; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Fan; Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Xiaolian; Tan, Jinquan

    2009-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related molecules A (MICA) is a stress-inducible cell surface antigen that is recognized by intestinal epithelial Vδ1 γδ T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ T cells with NKG2D receptor participating in the immunological reaction in the intestinal mucosa. The present study aimed to investigate the functions of the MICA*A5.1 allele in the development of ulcerative colitis (UC) in the Chinese population. The microsatellite polymorphisms of MICA were genotyped in 124 unrelated Chinese patients with UC and 172 ethnically matched healthy controls using a semiautomatic fluorescently labelled polymerase chain reaction. MICA*A5.1-expressing Raji cells were generated by gene transfection. Cytotoxicity of NK cells to Raji cells expressing different MICA molecules was detected using the lactate dehydrogenase method. Soluble MICA in the culture supernatant was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The frequency of MICA*A5.1 was significantly higher in UC patients compared with the healthy controls (29·0% versus 17·4%, P= 0·001, corrected P= 0·005, OR = 1·936, 95% CI 1·310–2·863) and the frequency of a MICA*A5.1/A5.1 homozygous genotype was increased in UC patients (18·5% versus 7% in healthy controls, P= 0·0032, corrected P= 0·048, OR = 3·036, 95% CI 1·447–6·372). Raji cells with MICA*A5.1 expression produced more soluble MICA (t = 5·75, P < 0·01) than Raji cells with full-length MICA expression in culture supernatant. Raji cells with MICA*A5.1 expression were more resistant to killing by NK cells than Raji cells with full-length MICA expression. The MICA*A5.1 allele and MICA*A5.1/A5.1 genotype are significantly associated with Chinese UC patients in central China. MICA*A5.1 may play a role in the development of UC by producing more soluble MICA and resistance to NK cells. PMID:19016911

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 function and its pathogenic role in regulating innate and adaptive immunity in cancer and major histocompatibility complex class I-associated autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fruci, D; Romania, P; D'Alicandro, V; Locatelli, F

    2014-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present antigenic peptides on the cell surface to alert natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells for the presence of abnormal intracellular events, such as virus infection or malignant transformation. The generation of antigenic peptides is a multistep process that ends with the trimming of N-terminal extensions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of ERAP1 in reprogramming the immunogenicity of tumor cells in order to elicit innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses, and in conferring susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in predisposed individuals. In this review, we will provide an overview of the current knowledge about the role of ERAP1 in MHC class I antigen processing and how its manipulation may constitute a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy and treatment of MHC class I-associated autoimmune diseases.

  20. Class II major histocompatibility complex molecules regulate the development of the T4+T8- inducer phenotype of cultured human thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Blue, M L; Daley, J F; Levine, H; Schlossman, S F

    1985-01-01

    We demonstrate that a variety of Ia+ cells has the ability to promote the development of human T4+T8- thymocytes in vitro. Prolonged thymocyte culture in the absence of Ia+ accessory cells results in a predominantly T8+T4- cell population. The generation of T4+ cells in the presence of irradiated Ia+ cells could be suppressed up to 70% by a monoclonal antibody directed against a nonpolymorphic epitope on HLA-DR. Using two-color fluorescence sorting techniques, we were able to identify the activated T4+T8+ thymocyte as the cell that interacts with Ia and gives rise to the T4+T8- cell subset. These results directly and specifically implicate class II major histocompatibility complex molecules in the differentiative pathway of the human thymocyte. Images PMID:2933749

  1. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories. PMID:27347387

  2. Membrane sorting during phagocytosis: selective exclusion of major histocompatibility complex molecules but not complement receptor CR3 during conventional and coiling phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have used immunocytochemical techniques and enzyme cytochemistry to examine the distribution of plasma membrane proteins during coiling phagocytosis of Legionella pneumophila and conventional phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. Whereas class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are relatively excluded from nascent phagosomes during conventional and coiling phagocytosis, the CR3 complement receptor persists in nascent phagosomes. The staining pattern for alkaline phosphatase activity resembles that of MHC molecules, with a marked exclusion of phosphatase activity from L. pneumophila coils and nascent phagosomes. The staining pattern for 5'-nucleotidase activity, on the other hand, resembles that of CR3 with intense staining in the inner layers of L. pneumophila coils. These results demonstrate that the cell has the ability to exclude selectively certain membrane proteins from the nascent phagosome during phagocytosis, thereby producing a phagosomal membrane markedly different from the plasma membrane from which it is derived. PMID:1569400

  3. Specific DNA binding to a major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence by a synthetic 57-residue double zinc finger peptide from a human enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-04-15

    Two 57-residue peptides containing one pair of "zinc fingers" from a human enhancer binding protein were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. One peptide (MBP-DF) contained the native sequence, while the second peptide ([Abu11]MBP-DF) has an alpha-aminobutyric acid residue substituted for a nonconserved cysteine residue at position 11. The peptides were characterized by several chemical and physical methods, and their DNA binding properties were evaluated using gel retardation experiments. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that addition of metal ions such as zinc and cobalt resulted in specific conformational changes in both peptides, indicating that cysteine-11 does not appear to be involved in metal chelation. One-dimensional 1H NMR studies indicate that a stable folded structure is formed upon addition of zinc, and the chemical shift pattern is consistent with that previously observed for one constituent single finger (Omichinski, J., Clore, G. M., Appella, E., Sakaguchi, K., and Gronenborn, A. M. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9324-9334). Gel retardation experiments demonstrate that the peptides are capable of interacting with a 15-mer oligonucleotide comprising a portion of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence and that the interaction is zinc-dependent. The dissociation constant for the [Abu11]MBP-DF peptide is 1.4 x 10(-7) M with maximal binding occurring at a zinc-to-peptide ratio of 2 to 1. The binding specificity observed with respect to related enhancer sequences exhibits the same relative order as noted previously for the whole protein. Studies with point mutants of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer binding sequence indicate that the last GC base pair in a four-guanine stretch plays a pivotal role in the interaction between the peptide and DNA. PMID:2016331

  4. African buffalo maintain high genetic diversity in the major histocompatibility complex in spite of historically known population bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Wenink, P W; Groen, A F; Roelke-Parker, M E; Prins, H H

    1998-10-01

    Historical population collapses caused by rinderpest epidemics are hypothesized to have resulted in notable genetic losses in populations of the African buffalo. Polymorphism in the major histocompatibity complex (MHC) DRB3 gene was probed by means of restriction analysis of the sequence encoding the peptide-binding region. Nucleotide substitution patterns agreed with a positive selection acting on this fitness-relevant locus. Buffalo populations from four National Parks, situated in eastern and southern Africa, each revealed a surprisingly high allelic diversity. Current high levels of heterozygosity may be reconciled with historical bottlenecks by assuming that local extinctions were followed by fast recolonization, in accordance with the high dispersive capabilities of buffalo. The specific amplification of DRB3 alleles also enabled the assignment of individual genotypes. For each population sample a deficiency in the expected number of heterozygous animals was found. As overdominant selection on the MHC is predicted to yield an excess of heterozygous individuals, this may not be a locus-specific effect. Several other explanations are discussed, of which increased homozygosity caused by nonrandom mating of buffalo in populations seems the most probable.

  5. The major histocompatibility class I locus in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.): polymorphism, linkage analysis and protein modelling.

    PubMed

    Grimholt, Unni; Drabløs, Finn; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Høyheim, Bjørn; Stet, René J M

    2002-11-01

    A cDNA library screening using the conserved exon 4 of Atlantic salmon Mhc class I as probe provided the basis for a study on Mhc class I polymorphism in a breeding population. Twelve different alleles were identified in the 82 dams and sires studied. No individual expressed more than two alleles, which corresponded to the diploid segregation patterns of the polymorphic marker residing within the 3'-untranslated tail. Close linkage between the Sasa-UBA and Sasa-TAP2B loci strengthens the claim that Sasa-UBA is the major Mhc class I locus in Atlantic salmon. We found no evidence for a second expressed classical or non-classical Mhc class I locus in Atlantic salmon. A phylogenetic analysis of salmonid Mhc class I sequences showed domains conserved between rainbow trout, brown trout and Atlantic salmon. Evidence for shuffling of the alpha(1) domain was identified and lineages of the remaining alpha(2) through the cytoplasmic tail gene segment can be defined. The coding sequence of one allele was found associated with two different markers, suggesting recombination within the 3'-tail dinucleotide repeat itself. Protein modelling of several Sasa-UBA alleles shows distinct differences in their peptide binding domains and enables a further understanding of the functionality of the high polymorphism. PMID:12439620

  6. Linkage analysis between the major histocompatibility system and insulin-dependent diabetes in families with patients in two consecutive generations.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Chern, M M; Anderson, V E; Noreen, H; Johnson, S; Reinsmoen, N; McCarty, R; King, R; Greenberg, L

    1980-03-01

    We have histocompatibility (HLA) genotyped 28 families with insulin-dependent diabetics in two or more consecutive generations, usually parent and child. This strategy of ascertainment was used to maximize the likelihood of obtaining a homogeneous type of disease within a family, and an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. 76 diabetics and 169 nondiabetics were studied in these families. The frequencies of the antigens Dw3 and Dw4, and the genotype Dw3/Dw4 among the diabetics are 59, 68, and 30%, respectively, as compared with 15, 12, and 2% in normal controls, and 43, 41, and 10% in the nondiabetic relatives of the diabetics. Dw2 is present in only one diabetic (4%), as compared with 18% in normal controls and 17% in nondiabetic relatives.HLA haplotype concordance was analyzed for sib pairs in relation to the haplotype shared by the affected parent/child pair, and for the diabetic sib pairs within each sibship. The results failed to reveal deviations in the expected HLA haplotype assortment. Assuming an autosomal dominant mode and several penetrance levels, linkage analysis between the HLA and diabetes was performed. The total lod score is 0.37 for a recombination fraction of 0.29 at 50% penetrance. Although the linkage and concordance analysis results are inconclusive, they seem to be different from those reported by us for families with normal parents and two or more diabetic sibs. Because ascertainment biases may have influenced these results in an unquantifiable manner, it is not certain whether the two types of families are genetically different. However, the marked difference in the lod scores for the 50% penetrant autosomal recessive model between the two types of families is compatible with a genetic dissimilarity between them. The high frequency of the Dw3 and Dw4 antigens, the Dw3/Dw4 genotype, and the decreased frequency of Dw2, however, indicate the existence of two or more important diabetic genetic factors associated with the D region of the HLA

  7. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Dubravka; Raguz, Selina; De Wit, Ton P. M.; Dingjan, Gemma M.; Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Grosveld, Frank; Hendriks, Rudolf W.

    1997-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5+ B cells, low serum levels of IgM and IgG3, and impaired responses to T cell independent type II (TI-II) antigens. We have generated transgenic mice in which expression of the human Btk gene is driven by the murine class II major histocompatibility complex Ea gene locus control region, which provides gene expression from the pre-B cell stage onwards. When these transgenic mice were mated onto a Btk− background, correction of the xid B cell defects was observed: B cells differentiated to mature IgMlowIgDhigh stages, peritoneal CD5+ B cells were present, and serum Ig levels and in vivo responses to TI-II antigens were in the normal ranges. A comparable rescue by transgenic Btk expression was also observed in heterozygous Btk+/− female mice in those B-lineage cells that were Btk-deficient as a result of X chromosome inactivation. These findings indicate that the Btk− phenotype in the mouse can be corrected by expression of human Btk from the pre-B cell stage onwards. PMID:9012832

  8. Transloading of tumor cells with foreign major histocompatibility complex class I peptide ligand: a novel general strategy for the generation of potent cancer vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, W; Steinlein, P; Buschle, M; Schweighoffer, T; Herbst, E; Mechtler, K; Kirlappos, H; Birnstiel, M L

    1996-01-01

    The major hurdle to be cleared in active immunotherapy of cancer is the poor immunogenicity of cancer cells. In previous attempts to overcome this problem, whole tumor cells have been used as vaccines, either admixed with adjuvant(s) or genetically engineered to express nonself proteins or immunomodulatory factors before application. We have developed a novel approach to generate an immunogeneic, highly effective vaccine: major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-positive cancer cells are administered together with MHC class I-matched peptide ligands of foreign, nonself origin, generated by a procedure we term transloading. Murine tumor lines of the H2-Kd or the H2-Db haplotype, melanoma M-3 and B16-F10, respectively, as well as colon carcinoma CT-26 (H2-Kd), were transloaded with MHC-matched influenza virus-derived peptides and applied as irradiated vaccines. Mice bearing a deposit of live M-3 melanoma cells were efficiently cured by this treatment. In the CT-26 colon carcinoma and the B16-F10 melanoma, high efficacies were obtained against tumor challenge, suggesting the universal applicability of this new type of vaccine. With foreign peptide ligands adapted to the requirements of a desired MHC class I haplotype, this concept may be used for the treatment of human cancers. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790404

  9. Peptide-β2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-β2-microglobulin–MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide–MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9·2 × 108 antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:17472719

  10. Peptide-beta2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-beta2-microglobulin-MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide-MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9.2 x 10(8) antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers: New tools for the detection of antigen-specific, CD4 T cells in basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Krishnan, Bharathi; Reddy, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The advent of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer technology has been a major contribution to T cell immunology, because tetramer reagents permit detection of antigen-specific T cells at the single-cell level in heterogeneous populations by flow cytometry. However, unlike MHC class I tetramers, the utility of MHC class II tetramers has been less frequently reported. MHC class II tetramers can be used successfully to enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in cells activated in vitro, but their use for ex vivo analyses continues to be a problem, due in part to their activation dependency for binding with T cells. To circumvent this problem, we recently reported the creation of a new generation of reagents called MHC class II dextramers, which were found to be superior to their counterparts. In this review, we discuss the utility of class II dextramers vis-a-vis tetramers, with respect to their specificity and sensitivity, including potential applications and limitations. PMID:26207337

  12. Antigen nonspecific effect of major histocompatibility complex haplotype on autoantibody levels in systemic lupus erythematosus-prone lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P L; Creech, E; Nakul-Aquaronne, D; McDaniel, R; Ackler, S; Rapoport, R G; Sobel, E S; Eisenberg, R A

    1993-01-01

    MHC-linked genes strongly influence susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and also regulate responses to exogenous antigens. To begin to understand the mechanism of this MHC effect on disease, we have investigated MHC-congenic mouse strains that develop spontaneous autoimmunity because of the lpr gene. C57BL6/lpr (B6/lpr) mice (H-2b) are known to have substantial levels of autoantibodies to chromatin, single stranded DNA (ssDNA3), and IgG of different murine subclasses (rheumatoid factor). We have crossed the H-2d and the H-2bm12 (la mutant) haplotypes onto the B6/lpr background. Surprisingly, levels of all the autoantibodies were markedly lower in B6/lpr.H-2d, but levels in B6/lpr.H-2bm12 were no different from those in B6/lpr mice. The downregulating influence of the H-2d allele was dominant, and there was no effect on autoantibody fine specificities. The genetics of the H-2d effect and its diffuse influence on multiple autoantibody specificities, in addition to the lack of effect of the bm12 mutation, which modifies the peptide-binding groove of I-A, together raise the question of whether MHC-linked genes other than classical (IR) genes may be responsible for MHC disease associations in this model. Images PMID:7685774

  13. The structure of the antigen-binding groove of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules determines specific selection of self-peptides.

    PubMed Central

    van Bleek, G M; Nathenson, S G

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the effect of diversity in the antigen-binding groove of the Kb, Db, Kbm1, and Kbm8 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the set of self-peptides they present on the cell surface, by using a procedure we recently developed in our laboratory to isolate endogenously processed peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. We found that such naturally processed peptides are 7-10 amino acids long. A major motif of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at positions three and five was found for peptides binding to Kb. The availability of Kb mutant molecules Kbm1 and Kbm8, each with localized clustered changes in the antigen-binding cleft, allowed us to probe the effect of such small alterations on peptide selection. We found that such changes in different regions in the antigen-binding groove exert an absolute effect by changing subsets of self-peptides bound to these MHC molecules. In the Kbm1 mutant, the binding of the characteristic major set of Kb-associated peptides with tyrosine at position three or both positions three and five is abrogated, although this MHC molecule still binds peptides with tyrosine at position seven; the latter peptides also bind to Kb. Kbm8 shares the major Tyr-3, Tyr-5 peptide set that binds to Kb but does not bind the peptides with tyrosine at position seven. Thus differences in binding selectivity in Kbm1 and Kbm8 appear to be the major determinant for the observed alterations in in vivo immune responses. PMID:1763019

  14. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers in mice: II. T cell requirement for engraftment in total lymphoid irradiation-conditioned recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Vallera, D.A.; Soderling, C.C.B.; Carlson, G.J.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the role of T lymphocytes in engraftment of bone marrow (BM) in animals conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) prior to transplantation across major histocompatability barriers.Donor BM (added as a source of lymphohematopoietic stem cells) and spleen cells (added as a source of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-causing cells) were pretreated in vitro with monoclonal anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement (C). T cell-depleted grafts were then given to allogeneic mice conditioned with 900 rad of single dose TLI plus cyclophosphamide (CY). These mice did not engraft. Even in the absence of added spleen cells, elimination of the small T cell population from donor BM grafts prevented engraftment compared with animals that received the same conditioning regimen and untreated donor cells. These control animals demonstrated uniform evidence of engraftment about 1 month after transplantation. Similar findings were reported when recipients were conditioned with fractionated 17 x 100-rad TLI. In TLI plus CY-conditioned recipients, it was also observed that increasing the donation of treated bone marrow cells still did not result in significant engraftment. In contrast to TLI conditioning, when Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells were given to recipients conditioned with total body irradiation (TBI), a high percentage of engraftment was demonstrated by an H-2 microcytotoxicity assay. Plausible mechanisms for these findings are discussed. (JMT)

  15. Introduction of protein or DNA delivered via recombinant Salmonella typhimurium into the major histocompatibility complex class I presentation pathway of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Catic, A; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H; Hess, J

    1999-02-01

    Recombinant (r) Salmonella typhimurium aroA strains which display the hen egg ovalbumin OVA(257-264) peptide SIINFEKL in secreted form were constructed. In addition, attenuated rS. typhimurium pcDNA-OVA constructs harbouring a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding complete OVA were used to introduce the immunodominant OVA(257-264) epitope into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway. Both modes of antigen delivery (DNA and protein) by Salmonella vaccine carriers stimulated OVA(257-264)-specific CD8 T-cell hybridomas. An in vitro infection system was established that allowed both rSalmonella carrier devices to facilitate MHC class I delivery of OVA(257-264) by coexpression of listeriolysin (Hly) or by coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys (Hess J., Gentschev I., Miko D., Welzel M., Ladel C., Goebel W., Kaufmann S.H.E., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 1458-1463). Coexpression of Hly and coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys slightly improved MHC class I processing of OVA. Our data provide further evidence for the feasibility of attenuated, Hly-expressing rS. typhimurium carriers secreting heterologous antigens or harbouring heterologous DNA as effective vaccines for stimulating CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 T cells. PMID:10594975

  16. Introduction of protein or DNA delivered via recombinant Salmonella typhimurium into the major histocompatibility complex class I presentation pathway of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Catic, A; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H; Hess, J

    1999-02-01

    Recombinant (r) Salmonella typhimurium aroA strains which display the hen egg ovalbumin OVA(257-264) peptide SIINFEKL in secreted form were constructed. In addition, attenuated rS. typhimurium pcDNA-OVA constructs harbouring a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding complete OVA were used to introduce the immunodominant OVA(257-264) epitope into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway. Both modes of antigen delivery (DNA and protein) by Salmonella vaccine carriers stimulated OVA(257-264)-specific CD8 T-cell hybridomas. An in vitro infection system was established that allowed both rSalmonella carrier devices to facilitate MHC class I delivery of OVA(257-264) by coexpression of listeriolysin (Hly) or by coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys (Hess J., Gentschev I., Miko D., Welzel M., Ladel C., Goebel W., Kaufmann S.H.E., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 1458-1463). Coexpression of Hly and coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys slightly improved MHC class I processing of OVA. Our data provide further evidence for the feasibility of attenuated, Hly-expressing rS. typhimurium carriers secreting heterologous antigens or harbouring heterologous DNA as effective vaccines for stimulating CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 T cells.

  17. Interaction between the CD8 coreceptor and major histocompatibility complex class I stabilizes T cell receptor-antigen complexes at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A; Glick, Meir; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L; Milicic, Anita; Brenchley, Jason M; Douek, Daniel C; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2005-07-29

    The off-rate (k(off)) of the T cell receptor (TCR)/peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI) interaction, and hence its half-life, is the principal kinetic feature that determines the biological outcome of TCR ligation. However, it is unclear whether the CD8 coreceptor, which binds pMHCI at a distinct site, influences this parameter. Although biophysical studies with soluble proteins show that TCR and CD8 do not bind cooperatively to pMHCI, accumulating evidence suggests that TCR associates with CD8 on the T cell surface. Here, we titrated and quantified the contribution of CD8 to TCR/pMHCI dissociation in membrane-constrained interactions using a panel of engineered pMHCI mutants that retain faithful TCR interactions but exhibit a spectrum of affinities for CD8 of >1,000-fold. Data modeling generates a "stabilization factor" that preferentially increases the predicted TCR triggering rate for low affinity pMHCI ligands, thereby suggesting an important role for CD8 in the phenomenon of T cell cross-reactivity.

  18. Molecular and immunogenetic analysis of major histocompatibility haplotypes in Northern Bobwhite enable direct identification of corresponding haplotypes in an endangered subspecies, the Masked Bobwhite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, B.M.; Goto, R.M.; Miller, M.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of genetic loci coding for haplotypes that have been associated with fitness traits in mammals and birds. Such associations suggest that MHC diversity may be an indicator of overall genetic fitness of endangered or threatened species. The MHC haplotypes of a captive population of 12 families of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) were identified using a combination of immunogenetic and molecular techniques. Alloantisera were produced within families of northern bobwhites and were then tested for differential agglutination of erythrocytes of all members of each family. The pattern of reactions determined from testing these alloantisera identified a single genetic system of alloantigens in the northern bobwhites, resulting in the assignment of a tentative genotype to each individual within the quail families. Restriction fragment patterns of the DNA of each bird were determined using the chicken MHC B-G cDNA probe bg11. The concordance between the restriction fragment patterns and the alloantisera reactions showed that the alloantisera had identified the MHC of the northern bobwhite and supported the tentative genotype assignments, identifying at least 12 northern bobwhite MHC haplotypes.

  19. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  20. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Hemagglutinin Subtype Influence the Infectivity of Type A Influenza Virus for Respiratory Dendritic Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hargadon, Kristian M.; Zhou, Haixia; Albrecht, Randy A.; Dodd, Haley A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in antiviral immunity, functioning both as innate effector cells in early phases of the immune response and subsequently as antigen-presenting cells that activate the adaptive immune response. In the murine respiratory tract, there are several respiratory dendritic cell (RDC) subsets, including CD103+ DC, CD11bhi DC, monocyte/macrophage DC, and plasmacytoid DC. However, little is known about the interaction between these tissue-resident RDC and viruses that are encountered during natural infection in the respiratory tract. Here, we show both in vitro and in vivo that the susceptibility of murine RDC to infection with type A influenza virus varies with the level of MHC class II expression by RDC and with the virus strain. Both CD103+ and CD11bhi RDC, which express the highest basal level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, are highly susceptible to infection by type A influenza virus. However, efficient infection is restricted to type A influenza virus strains of the H2N2 subtype. Furthermore, enhanced infectivity by viruses of the H2N2 subtype is linked to expression of the I-E MHC class II locus product. These results suggest a potential novel role for MHC class II molecules in influenza virus infection and pathogenesis in the respiratory tract. PMID:21917972

  1. Non-Major Histocompatibility Complex Control of Antibody Isotype and Th1 versus Th2 Cytokines during Experimental Infection of Mice with Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Nagabhushanam, Vijaya; Cheers, Christina

    2001-01-01

    Infection of different strains of mice with Mycobacterium avium has revealed genetic control of the immunoglobulin isotype induced and of the balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Female BALB/c or C57BL/10 mice were infected intranasally with 105 M. avium organisms. The antibody response was measured over 18 weeks by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, while numbers of cytokine-producing cells were assessed at 12 to 15 weeks by ELISPOT assay. Upon infection, C57BL/10 mice produced a clear Th1 response with strong gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production, no interleukin-4 (IL-4), and almost entirely immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) antibody. In contrast, BALB/c mice developed T cells producing IL-4, as well as those producing IFN-γ, while the antibody response was a mixture of IgG1 and IgG2a. Antibodies from BALB/c mice were also able to recognize a greater range of antigens than were C56BL/10 mice. B10D2 mice, which carry the BALB/c major histocompatibility complex haplotype on a C57BL/10 background, followed the C57BL/10 cytokine pattern. Mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes did not show a similar response dichotomy. PMID:11179347

  2. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  3. Coevolution of the Major Histocompatibility Complex and the T-Complex in the Mouse. I. Generation and Maintenance of High Complementarity Associations

    PubMed Central

    Uyenoyama, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative model is developed to explore the effects of prezygotic and postzygotic incompatibility on the origin and maintenance of associations between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and the t-complex in the mouse. Incompatibility is represented by a reduction in the rate of conception or gestation of offspring derived from sperm bearing MHC antigens in common with the mother. Incompatibility encourages the evolution of associations from a state of complete independence between the two complexes by promoting the invasion of all novel antigens, including those that exhibit associations with the t-complex. Incompatibility can modify the relative numbers of antigens associated with each haplotype by actively promoting the exclusion or invasion of recombinants that bear formerly +-specific or t-specific antigens on the alternative haplotype. The results of the analysis indicate that the state of complete independence between the MHC and the t-complex is not preserved over evolutionary time in the presence of incompatibility. Further, the expression of incompatibility maintains fully associated states that include a single antigen associated with the t-haplotype and up to three to five antigens associated with the +-haplotype within a single population. PMID:2917711

  4. Costly major histocompatibility complex signals produced only by reproductively active males, but not females, must be validated by a ‘maleness signal’ in three-spined sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Milinski, Manfred; Griffiths, Siân W.; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.; Boehm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory information about individual major histocompatibility complex (MHC) immune genotypes is important for mate choice in several species. For example, during the mate choice decisions of three-spined sticklebacks, females assess males on the basis of odour cues that convey information about their MHC diversity. Here, we show that an additional ‘maleness’ signal is needed to validate the MHC signal. Furthermore, using interaction between natural odour of sticklebacks and synthetic MHC-ligand peptides, we show that MHC signals are conditional on the reproductive state in males. By contrast, we find that gravid females do not produce such signals. Since MHC olfactory signals relevant to mate choice decisions are conditional upon gender and reproductive state, we suggest that their manufacture is likely to be costly to senders, and therefore, potentially conditional on the health/parasitization status of the sender. We hypothesize that shedding of peptide–MHC complexes compromises immune function, selecting against unconditional use of these signals. PMID:19846459

  5. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is related to the parasite load and absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; Silva, Neide Maria; Massa, Virgínia; Alves, Ronaldo; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; Silva, João Santana; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-11-01

    In human and murine models strongyloidiasis induce a Th2 type response. In the current study we investigated the role of different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in the immune response raised against the parasite and the participation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule in the disease outcome in face of the different parasite burden. The C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MHC II(-/-) mice were individually inoculated by subcutaneous injection with 500 or 3000 S. venezuelensis L3. The MHC II(-/-) mice infected with 3000L3 were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection when compared with WT groups, in which the parasite was completely eliminated. The production of Th2 cytokines and specific IgG1 or IgE antibodies against parasite were significantly lowered in MHC II(-/-) infected mice with different larvae inoculums. The infection of MHC II(-/-) mice with S. venezuelensis induced slight inflammatory alterations in the small intestine, and these lesions were lower when compared with WT mice, irrespective of the parasite load utilized to infect animals. Finally, we concluded that MHC class II molecules are essential in the immune response against S. venezuelensis mainly when infection occurs with high parasite inoculum.

  6. Allelic and haplotype variation of major histocompatibility complex class II DRB1 and DQB loci in the St Lawrence beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    1999-07-01

    In order to assess levels of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) variation within the St Lawrence beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) the variation at the beluga Mhc DRB1 class II locus was assessed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the peptide-binding region for 313 whales collected from 13 sampling locations across North America. In addition, samples from west Greenland and the St Lawrence were also typed at the DQB locus, allowing comparison to a previous study and assessment of linkage disequilibrium of alleles at the two loci. Comparisons of DRB1 and DQB allele frequencies among all sampling locations indicated genetic structure (alpha < 0.005). Most of this structure resulted from differences between the different wintering groups. Significant genetic structure (alpha = 0.05) exists among each pair of the following groups at both the DRB1 and DQB loci; St Lawrence, Hudson Strait, Bering Sea, Cunningham Inlet, and Davis Strait (minus Cunningham Inlet), except the St Lawrence and Hudson Strait for the DQB locus. In the St Lawrence population, six of the eight DRB1 alleles are present representing all five known allelic lineages. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium between the DRB1 and DQB is present in two sampling locations, the St Lawrence and Nuussuaq (alpha = 0.05). Analysis of probable DRB1-DQB haplotypes among groups of beluga suggests a haplotype reduction in the St Lawrence. PMID:10447854

  7. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  8. The major histocompatibility complex of the rat,RT 1 : II. biochemical evidence for a complex genetic organization.

    PubMed

    Sporer, R; Black, G; Rigiero, C; Manson, L; Götze, D

    1978-12-01

    Recombinational analysis has shown that the rat MHC,RT1 is divided into two regions:RT1.A, which codes for class I (transplantation) antigens, andRT1.B, which controls the humoral immune response and proliferative response to allogeneic cells as well as the expression of class II (Ia) antigens. Serological and sequence studies suggest that there might be more than one antigen-coding locus within theRT1.A region. Results obtained by sequential immunoprecipitation reveal that both regions code for at least two gene products. By implication, theRT1 complex must therefore harbor at least four loci;RT1.A andD coding for class I glycoproteins (45,000 daltons); andRT1.B andE coding for class II (Ia) glycoproteins (35,000 and 28,000 daltons).

  9. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4–15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3–27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host. PMID:20706587

  10. Structural analysis of the human interferon gamma receptor: a small segment of the intracellular domain is specifically required for class I major histocompatibility complex antigen induction and antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J R; Jung, V; Schwartz, B; Wang, P; Pestka, S

    1992-01-01

    Mutations of the human interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor intracellular domain have permitted us to define a restricted region of that domain as necessary for both induction of class I major histocompatibility complex antigen by IFN-gamma and protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. This region consists of five amino acids (YDKPH), all of which are conserved in the human and murine receptors. Tyr-457 and His-461 are essential for activity. Approximately 80% of the amino acids of the intracellular domain of the receptor is not required for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen induction or for antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. The observation that there was no protection by IFN-gamma against vesiculostomatitis virus indicates that other factors, in addition to chromosome 21 accessory factor(s), are required to generate the full complement of transduction signals from the human IFN-gamma receptor. Images PMID:1454813

  11. Histocompatible chicken inbred lines: homogeneities in the major histocompatibility complex antigens of the GSP, GSN/1, PNP/DO and BM-C inbred lines assessed by hemagglutination, mixed lymphocyte reaction and skin transplantation.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Marcos B; Mizutani, Makoto; Fujiwara, Akira; Yazawa, Hajime; Yamagata, Takahiro; Shimada, Kiyoshi; Namikawa, Takao

    2007-10-01

    Chicken inbred lines of the GSP, GSN/1, PNP/DO and BM-C have been established by selection of a specific allele at the B blood group locus (MHC B-G region) and other polymorphic loci through pedigree mating. To extend the potential of these inbred lines as experimental animals in Aves, we assessed the antigenic homogeneities of the MHC antigens by three immunological methods. Antigenic variations of red blood cells (RBCs) were surveyed in the inbred lines and a random-bred line (NG) derived from the Nagoya breed by using ten kinds of intact antisera produced in the inbred line of chickens against RBCs of a red junglefowl and hybrids. In the hemagglutination test, no individual variations were found within the inbred line at all, while all the ten antisera detected highly heterogeneous reactions in individuals of the NG. The reciprocal one-way mixed lymphocyte reactions gave constantly higher stimulation responses (P<0.01) between individual pairs from the inbred lines having different B alleles compared to pairs within the inbred line, while lower stimulation was observed between pairs of the GSP and GSN/1 inbred lines both having the B(21) allele. In reciprocal skin transplantation, the transplanted skingrafts within the inbred line and between individuals from the GSP and GSN/1 inbred lines survived more than 100 days, while all the skingrafts showed signs of rejection within 7 days among the inbred lines having different B alleles. The results obtained by the three practical methods coincidentally indicated that the individuals in the respective four inbred lines were histocompatible, and further, that the GSP and GSN/1 individuals were histocompatible. PMID:18075192

  12. Closely Related Mycobacterial Strains Demonstrate Contrasting Levels of Efficacy as Antitumor Vaccines and Are Processed for Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Presentation by Multiple Routes in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Eleanor J.; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile; Selby, Peter J.; Jackson, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacteria expressing recombinant antigens are already being developed as vaccines against both infections and tumors. Little is known about how dendritic cells might process such antigens. Two different mycobacterial species, the fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow-growing M. bovis M. bovis BCG, were engineered to express a model tumor antigen, the Kb-restricted dominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope OVA257-264. Recombinant M. bovis BCG but not recombinant M. smegmatis conferred protection to mice challenged with the B16-OVA tumor cell line. We went on to investigate whether the contrast in antitumor efficacy could be due to differences in how dendritic cells process antigen from the two mycobacterial strains for class I presentation. Both strains of mycobacteria caused phenotypic maturation of dendritic cells, but recombinant M. smegmatis infection led to a greater degree of dendritic cell maturation than recombinant M. bovis BCG infection. Antigen from recombinant M. smegmatis was processed and presented as OVA257-264 on Kb molecules by the dendritic cell line DC2.4 but not by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) or splenic dendritic cells. In contrast, antigen from recombinant M. bovis BCG was presented by all three dendritic cell types as long as the mycobacteria were viable. Such presentation was dependent on proteasome function and nascent major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules in DC2.4 cells but independent of the proteasome and transporter associated with antigen processings (TAP) in BMDC and splenic dendritic cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that antigen vectored by the slow-growing M. bovis BCG but not that vectored by fast-growing, readily destroyed M. smegmatis is processed and presented on MHC class I by in vitro-generated dendritic cells, which has implications for recombinant microbial vaccine development. PMID:15664917

  13. Molecular modeling of a T-cell receptor bound to a major histocompatibility complex molecule: implications for T-cell recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, J. C.; Vargas-Madrazo, E.; Lara-Ochoa, F.; Horjales, E.

    1995-01-01

    The main functions of the T-cell receptor (TCR) involve its specific interaction with short and linear antigenic peptides bound to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In the absence of a 3D structure for TCR and for the TCR/peptide/MHC complex, several attempts to characterize the structural components of the TCR/peptide/MHC interaction have been made. However, this subject is still troublesome. In this paper a computer-based 3D model for a TCR/peptide/MHC complex (5C.C7/moth cytochrome c [MCC] peptide 93-103/I-Ek) was obtained. The complex surface shows a high complementarity between the 5C.C7 structure and the peptide/I-Ek molecule. The mapping of residues involved in the TCR/peptide/MHC interaction shows close agreement with mutational experiments (Jorgensen JL, Reay PA, Ehrich EW, Davis MM, 1992b, Annu Rev Immunol 10:835-873). Moreover, the results are consistent with a recent variability analysis of TCR sequences using three variability indexes (Almagro JC, Zenteno-Cuevas R, Vargas-Madrazo E, Lara-Ochoa F, 1995b, Int J Pept Protein Res 45:180-186). Accordingly, the 3D model of the 5C.C7/MCC peptide 93-103/I-Ek complex provides a framework to generate testable hypotheses about TCR recognition. Thus, starting from this model, the role played by each loop that forms the peptide/MHC binding site of the TCR is discussed. PMID:8528069

  14. Determinant selection of major histocompatibility complex class I- restricted antigenic peptides is explained by class I-peptide affinity and is strongly influenced by nondominant anchor residues

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- peptide affinity to immunodominance of particular peptide antigens (Ags) in the class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is not clearly established. Therefore, we have compared the H-2Kb- restricted binding and presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin (OVA)257-264 (SIINFEKL) determinant to that of a subdominant OVA determinant OVA55-62 (KVVRFDKL). Immunodominance of OVA257-264 was not attributable to the specific T cell repertoire but correlated instead with more efficient Ag presentation. This enhanced Ag presentation could be accounted for by the higher affinity of Kb/OVA257-264 compared with Kb/OVA55-62 despite the presence of a conserved Kb-binding motif in both peptides. Kinetic binding studies using purified soluble H-2Kb molecules (Kbs) and biosensor techniques indicated that the Kon for association of OVA257-264-C6 and Kbs at 25 degrees C was integral of 10- fold faster (5.9 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 versus 6.5 x 10(2) M-1 s-1), and the Koff approximately twofold slower (9.1 x 10(-6) s-1 versus 1.6 x 10(-5) s-1), than the rate constants for interaction of OVA55-62-C6 and Kbs. The association of these peptides with Kb was significantly influenced by multiple residues at presumed nonanchor sites within the peptide sequence. The contribution of each peptide residue to Kb-binding was dependent upon the sequence context and the summed contributions were not additive. Thus the affinity of MHC class I-peptide binding is a critical factor controlling presentation of peptide Ag and immunodominance in the class I-restricted CTL response. PMID:7523572

  15. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers in mice. II. T cell requirement for engraftment in total lymphoid irradiation-conditioned recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Vallera, D.A.; Soderling, C.C.; Carlson, G.J.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the role of T lymphocytes in engraftment of bone marrow (BM) in animals conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) prior to transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers. Donor BM (added as a source of lymphohematopoietic stem cells) and spleen cells (added as a source of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-causing cells) were pretreated in vitro with monoclonal anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement (C). T cell-depleted grafts were then give to allogeneic mice conditioned with 900 rad of single dose TLI plus cyclophosphamide (CY). These mice did not engraft. Even in the absence of added spleen cells, elimination of the small T cell population from donor BM grafts prevented engraftment compared with animals that received the same conditioning regimen and untreated donor cells. These control animals demonstrated uniform evidence of engraftment about 1 month after transplantation. Similar findings were reported when recipients were conditioned with fractionated 17 x 200-rad TLI. In TLI plus CY-conditional recipients, we have also observed that increasing the donation of treated bone marrow cells still did not result in significant engraftment. Furthermore, graft failure in mice receiving normal dosages of anti-Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells was not a strain-restricted phenomenon. Moreover, removal of bone marrow T cells with monoclonal anti-Lyt-1 plus complement also resulted in graft failure in TLI-conditioned recipients. In contrast to TLI conditioning, when Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells were given to recipients conditioned with total body irradiation (TBI), a high percentage of engraftment was demonstrated by an H-2 microcytotoxicity assay. Plausible mechanisms for there findings are discussed.

  16. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatability barriers in mice. III. Treatment of donor grafts with monoclonal antibodies directed against Lyt determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Vellera, D.A.; Soderling, C.C.B.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    We studied the effect of eliminating T cells from donor grafts of mice in a system in which bone marrow was transplanted across major histocompatibility barriers. BALB/c bone marrow (added as a source of hematopoietic stem cells) combined with equal volumes of spleen cells (added as a source of GVHD-promoting cells) was pretreated in vitro with monoclonal anti-Lyt-1.2 or Lyt-2.2 plus absorbed rabbit complement before injection into C57BL/6 total-body-irradiated recipients. Functional activity of anti-Lyt monoclonal antibodies was determined in CML assay. Treatment with anti Lyt-1.2 plus C did not have any anti-stem cell activity, as measured by CFU-S assay, and protected recipients from the onset of lethal GVHD. Treatment with Lyt-2.2 plus C also did not reduce CFU-S; however, mice receiving treated marrow did develop GVHD and were all dead by 2 mo, as were untreated control mice. Surviving ''anti-Lyt-1.2 + C chimeras'' demonstrated a high percentage of donor mononuclear cells in their peripheral blood. Similar results were obtained when C3H/HeN donor BMS was treated with monoclonal anti-Lyt-1.1 plus C and injected into C57BL/6 recipients. These findings show that monoclonal antibodies directed against determinants unrelated to Thy-1 can eliminate T cells in the presence of C and successfully protect transplanted mice from lethal GVHD. They also suggest that these anti-lyt antibodies may be useful tools in determining subpopulations of T cells that contribute to the development of GVHD.

  17. B7-1 expression decreases tumorigenicity and induces partial systemic immunity to murine neuroblastoma deficient in major histocompatibility complex and costimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, E; Xu, Z; Bausero, M A; Dancisak, B B; Gorden, K B; Davis, G; Gray, G S; Orchard, P J; Blazar, B R

    1995-03-01

    Neuroblastoma may escape an immune attack by virtue of its low expression of surface accessory molecules essential in the antitumor response. Murine neuroblastoma, neuro-2a, was transduced with the retroviral vector LB7-1SN to examine the influence of B7-1 expression on the immune response directed against a low major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and class II negative, B7-2, and ICAM-1 negative tumor. Using a retroperitoneal model for implantation of neuroblastoma in its natural site, we demonstrated that expression of B7-1 by neuro-2a reduces its tumorigenicity. Coinjection of B7-1-positive and -negative cells improved survival compared with mice receiving B7-1-negative cells alone. This was dependent on the ratio of B7-1+ to B7-1- neuro-2a cells injected. CD8+ and not CD4+ T-cell depletion significantly increased tumor-induced mortality in syngeneic A/J mice, indicating that B7-1 decreases tumorigenicity primarily by direct constimulation of CD8+ T cells. Rejection of N-2a/B7-1 tumors or preimmunization with irradiated N-2a/B7-1 cells die not increase protection to challenge with unmodified neuro-2a cells over mice vaccinated with N-2a/neo. Furthermore, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursor frequencies were not significantly higher after in vivo priming and in vitro stimulation with irradiated N-2a/B7-1 compared with N-2a/neo, indicating that B7-1 costimulation by the tumor, in the absence of adequate antigen presentation by MHC molecules, may limit the generation of effective CTLs.

  18. Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Inflammatory Response and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Downregulation in Brucella abortus-Infected Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Mariana C.; Hielpos, M. Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  19. Key role of Toll-like receptor 2 in the inflammatory response and major histocompatibility complex class ii downregulation in Brucella abortus-infected alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Oliveira, Sergio C; Baldi, Pablo C

    2014-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  20. Assessment of biodiversity in Chilean cattle using the distribution of major histocompatibility complex class II BoLA-DRB3 allele.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S-N; Miyasaka, T; Matsumoto, Y; Xue, G; Diaz, V de la Barra; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Giovambattista, G; Ortiz, M; Oltra, J; Kanemaki, M; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2015-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLAs) are used extensively as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. In this study, we estimated BoLA-DRB3 allele frequencies using 888 cattle from 10 groups, including seven cattle breeds and three crossbreeds: 99 Red Angus, 100 Black Angus, 81 Chilean Wagyu, 49 Hereford, 95 Hereford × Angus, 71 Hereford × Jersey, 20 Hereford × Overo Colorado, 113 Holstein, 136 Overo Colorado, and 124 Overo Negro cattle. Forty-six BoLA-DRB3 alleles were identified, and each group had between 12 and 29 different BoLA-DRB3 alleles. Overo Negro had the highest number of alleles (29); this breed is considered in Chile to be an 'Old type' European Holstein Friesian descendant. By contrast, we detected 21 alleles in Holstein cattle, which are considered to be a 'Present type' Holstein Friesian cattle. Chilean cattle groups and four Japanese breeds were compared by neighbor-joining trees and a principal component analysis (PCA). The phylogenetic tree showed that Red Angus and Black Angus cattle were in the same clade, crossbreeds were closely related to their parent breeds, and Holstein cattle from Chile were closely related to Holstein cattle in Japan. Overall, the tree provided a thorough description of breed history. It also showed that the Overo Negro breed was closely related to the Holstein breed, consistent with historical data indicating that Overo Negro is an 'Old type' Holstein Friesian cattle. This allelic information will be important for investigating the relationship between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and disease.

  1. Cloning and modeling of CD8 beta in the amphibian ambystoma Mexicanum. Evolutionary conserved structures for interactions with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Fellah, Julien S; Tuffèry, Pierre; Etchebest, Catherine; Guillet, Françoise; Bleux, Christian; Charlemagne, Jacques

    2002-04-17

    Mammalian and avian T-cells exhibit a large number of well characterized surface molecules associated with their maturation degree. Very little is known in comparison with T-cell differentiation in ectothermic vertebrates. This is mainly due to the lack of probes to identify T-cell subsets. We cloned and sequenced the first ectothermic CD8 beta DNA complementary to RNA from an amphibian species, the Mexican axolotl. The CD8 beta chain was 30-36% identical with its avian and mammalian homologues. The extracellular V-like domain contained the two typically conserved cysteines and was followed by a J-like sequence containing the canonical Phe-Gly-X-Gly stretch. The connecting peptide was much longer than in other species and contained potential O-glycosylation sites. The axolotl CD8 beta and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules were modeled using human HLA-A2/CD8 alphaalpha complex as template. The backbone conformation of axolotl CD8 beta matched well with the CD8 alpha-2 subunit of the human complex but significant structural differences were located in the CDR1, CDR2 and DE loops. Both axolotl and human class I showed large negative surface potential. The interacting area of the human CD8 alpha chain and of the corresponding region of axolotl CD8 beta had positive electrostatic potential compatible with complexation with the corresponding class I molecules. The presence of a CD8 beta homologue in an amphibian species implies that it was already present in the Devonian ancestor of amphibians and mammals, i.e. more than 400 million years ago. PMID:12034498

  2. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients’ prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10−5). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6). PMID:26327779

  3. In silico prediction of peptide binding affinity to class I mouse major histocompatibility complexes: a comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) study.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for the in silico identification of T cell epitopes (which form the basis of many vaccines, diagnostics, and reagents) rely on the accurate prediction of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) affinity. A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for the prediction of peptide binding to class I MHC molecules was established using the comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) method. Three MHC alleles were studied: H2-D(b), H2-K(b), and H2-K(k). Models were produced for each allele. Each model consisted of five physicochemical descriptors-steric bulk, electrostatic potentials, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen-bond donor and hydrogen-bond acceptor abilities. The models have an acceptable level of predictivity: cross-validation leave-one-out statistical terms q2 and SEP (standard error of prediction) ranged between 0.490 and 0.679 and between 0.525 and 0.889, respectively. The non-cross-validated statistical terms r2 and SEE (standard error of estimate) ranged between 0.913 and 0.979 and between 0.167 and 0.248, respectively. The use of coefficient contour maps, which indicate favored and disfavored areas for each position of the MHC-bound peptides, allowed the binding specificity of each allele to be identified, visualized, and understood. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of CoMSIA as a method for studying peptide-MHC interactions. The peptides used in this study are available on the Internet (http://www.jenner.ac.uk/AntiJen). The partial least-squares method is available commercially in the SYBYL molecular modeling software package. PMID:16180918

  4. Us3 kinase encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 mediates downregulation of cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I and evasion of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takahiko; Koyanagi, Naoto; Ogawa, Ryo; Shindo, Keiko; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Sato, Ayuko; Arii, Jun; Kato, Akihisa; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Arase, Hisashi; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Detection and elimination of virus-infected cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) depends on recognition of virus-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on the surface of infected cells. In the present study, we showed that inactivation of the activity of viral kinase Us3 encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), the etiologic agent of several human diseases and a member of the alphaherpesvirinae, significantly increased cell surface expression of MHC-I, thereby augmenting CTL recognition of infected cells in vitro. Overexpression of Us3 by itself had no effect on cell surface expression of MHC-I and Us3 was not able to phosphorylate MHC-I in vitro, suggesting that Us3 indirectly downregulated cell surface expression of MHC-I in infected cells. We also showed that inactivation of Us3 kinase activity induced significantly more HSV-1-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice. Interestingly, depletion of CD8(+) T cells in mice significantly increased replication of a recombinant virus encoding a kinase-dead mutant of Us3, but had no effect on replication of a recombinant virus in which the kinase-dead mutation was repaired. These results indicated that Us3 kinase activity is required for efficient downregulation of cell surface expression of MHC-I and mediates evasion of HSV-1-specific CD8(+) T cells. Our results also raised the possibility that evasion of HSV-1-specific CD8(+) T cells by HSV-1 Us3-mediated inhibition of MHC-I antigen presentation might in part contribute to viral replication in vivo.

  5. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  6. Interplay between T Cell Receptor Binding Kinetics and the Level of Cognate Peptide Presented by Major Histocompatibility Complexes Governs CD8+ T Cell Responsiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Melita; Zoete, Vincent; Hebeisen, Michael; Schmid, Daphné; Baumgartner, Petra; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Michielin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Through a rational design approach, we generated a panel of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165-specific T cell receptors (TCR) with increasing affinities of up to 150-fold from the wild-type TCR. Using these TCR variants which extend just beyond the natural affinity range, along with an extreme supraphysiologic one having 1400-fold enhanced affinity, and a low-binding one, we sought to determine the effect of TCR binding properties along with cognate peptide concentration on CD8+ T cell responsiveness. Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) expressed on the surface of various antigen presenting cells were peptide-pulsed and used to stimulate human CD8+ T cells expressing the different TCR via lentiviral transduction. At intermediate peptide concentration we measured maximum cytokine/chemokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and Ca2+ flux for CD8+ T cells expressing TCR within a dissociation constant (KD) range of ∼1–5 μm. Under these same conditions there was a gradual attenuation in activity for supraphysiologic affinity TCR with KD < ∼1 μm, irrespective of CD8 co-engagement and of half-life (t1/2 = ln 2/koff) values. With increased peptide concentration, however, the activity levels of CD8+ T cells expressing supraphysiologic affinity TCR were gradually restored. Together our data support the productive hit rate model of T cell activation arguing that it is not the absolute number of TCR/pMHC complexes formed at equilibrium, but rather their productive turnover, that controls levels of biological activity. Our findings have important implications for various immunotherapies under development such as adoptive cell transfer of TCR-engineered CD8+ T cells, as well as for peptide vaccination strategies. PMID:22549784

  7. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    PubMed

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; de Jong, Ad P J M; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2006-05-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools isolated from uninfected and virus-infected cells. Here we report on a powerful strategy aiming at the rapid, unambiguous identification of naturally processed MHC class I-associated peptides, which are induced by viral infection. The methodology, stable isotope tagging of epitopes (SITE), is based on metabolic labeling of endogenously synthesized proteins during infection. This is accomplished by culturing virus-infected cells with stable isotope-labeled amino acids that are expected to be anchor residues (i.e. residues of the peptide that have amino acid side chains that bind into pockets lining the peptide-binding groove of the MHC class I molecule) for the human leukocyte antigen allele of interest. Subsequently these cells are mixed with an equal number of non-infected cells, which are cultured in normal medium. Finally peptides are acid-eluted from immunoprecipitated MHC molecules and subjected to two-dimensional nanoscale LC-MS analysis. Virus-induced peptides are identified through computer-assisted detection of characteristic, binomially distributed ratios of labeled and unlabeled molecules. Using this approach we identified novel measles virus and respiratory syncytial virus epitopes as well as infection-induced self-peptides in several cell types, showing that SITE is a unique and versatile method for unequivocal identification of disease-related MHC class I epitopes.

  8. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  9. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients' prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10(-5)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6).

  10. A Major Gene for Bovine Ovulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Brian W.; Morris, Chris A.

    2015-01-01

    Half-sib daughters sired by a bull believed to be a carrier of a major gene for high ovulation rate were evaluated for ovulation rate and genotyped in an effort to both test the hypothesis of segregation of a major gene and to map the gene’s location. A total of 131 daughters were produced over four consecutive years at a University of Wisconsin-Madison research farm. All were evaluated for ovulation rate over an average of four estrous cycles using transrectal ultrasonography. The sire and all daughters were genotyped using a 3K SNP chip and the genotype and phenotype data were used in a linkage analysis. Subsequently, daughters recombinant within the QTL region and the sire were genotyped successively with 50K and 777K SNP chips to refine the location of the causative polymorphism. Positional candidate genes within the fine-mapped region were examined for polymorphism by Sanger sequencing of PCR amplicons encompassing coding and 5’ and 3’ flanking regions of the genes. Sire DNA was used as template in the PCR reactions. Strong evidence of a major gene for ovulation rate was observed (p<1x10-28) with the gene localized to bovine chromosome 10. Fine-mapping subsequently reduced the location to a 1.2 Mb region between 13.6 and 14.8 Mb on chromosome 10. The location identified does not correspond to that for any previously identified major gene for ovulation rate. This region contains three candidate genes, SMAD3, SMAD6 and IQCH. While candidate gene screening failed to identify the causative polymorphism, three polymorphisms were identified that can be used as a haplotype to track inheritance of the high ovulation rate allele in descendants of the carrier sire. PMID:26046917

  11. Major genes affecting ovulation rate in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Research conducted since 1980 in relation to inheritance patterns and DNA testing of major genes for prolificacy has shown that major genes have the potential to significantly increase the reproductive performance of sheep flocks throughout the world. Mutations that increase ovulation rate have been discovered in the BMPR-1B, BMP15 and GDF9 genes, and others are known to exist from the expressed inheritance patterns although the mutations have not yet been located. In the case of BMP15, four different mutations have been discovered but each produces the same phenotype. The modes of inheritance of the different prolificacy genes include autosomal dominant genes with additive effects on ovulation rate (BMPR-1B; Lacaune), autosomal over-dominant genes with infertility in homozygous females (GDF9), X-linked over-dominant genes with infertility in homozygous females (BMP15), and X-linked maternally imprinted genes (FecX2). The size of the effect of one copy of a mutation on ovulation rate ranges from an extra 0.4 ovulations per oestrus for the FecX2 mutation to an extra 1.5 ovulations per oestrus for the BMPR-1B mutation. A commercial DNA testing service enables some of these mutations to be used in genetic improvement programmes based on marker assisted selection. PMID:15601592

  12. The CD8+ T cell repertoire in beta 2-microglobulin-deficient mice is biased towards reactivity against self-major histocompatibility class I

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Beta 2-Microglobulin-deficient (beta 2m -/-) mice are reported to lack cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, CD8+ T cells, and the ability to mount MHC class I- specific T cell responses. We have observed that beta 2m -/- mice possess CD8+ T cells that can be induced to perform strong allospecific cytotoxic responses against nonself-MHC class I by in vivo priming. We report that these beta 2m -/- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) differ from those induced in beta 2m-positive littermates in that they cross-react and kill cells expressing self-MHC class I at normal ligand density with beta 2m. beta 2m -/- CTL could even be induced in primary mixed lymphocyte culture by self-MHC class I expressing stimulator cells, whereas allogeneic stimulator cells failed to elicit a response under similar conditions. Cells with a reduced cell surface MHC class I expression were less sensitive, while syngeneic beta 2m -/- cells were resistant to the beta 2m -/- CTL. This antiself-MHC reactivity could not be induced when beta 2m -/- T cells matured in an environment with normal MHC class I expression in bone marrow chimeric mice. Antiself- MHC reactivity was also observed against human peptide loading- deficient cells expressing the appropriate murine class I molecules, suggesting that affinity to self-MHC class I may occur irrespective of peptide content. The results fit with a model where positive and negative selection of CD8+ T cells in beta 2m -/- mice is mediated by low levels of MHC class I free heavy chains. In this model, low ligand density on selecting cells leads to positive selection of rare T cells that bind to low levels of MHC class I free heavy chains, resulting in a very small peripheral CD8+ compartment. Due to low density of the selecting ligand, negative selection does not remove T cells recognizing beta 2m-positive cells expressing self-MHC class I at normal ligand density, which generates a T cell repertoire that would

  13. Heterogenous graft rejection pathways in class I major histocompatibility complex-disparate combinations and their differential susceptibility to immunomodulation induced by intravenous presensitization with relevant alloantigens

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigates the heterogeneity of graft rejection pathways in class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-disparate combinations and the susceptibility of each pathway to immunomodulation induced by intravenous presensitization with alloantigens. Depletion of CD8+ T cells was induced by repeated administration of anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody. CD8+ T cell-depleted mice failed to generate anti- allo class I MHC cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses but exhibited anti- allo class I MHC T cell responses, such as mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)/IL-2 production, that were induced by CD4+ T cells. In contrast, donor-specific intravenous presensitization (DSP), as a model of donor- specific transfusion, induced almost complete elimination of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated MLR/IL-2 production, whereas this regimen did not affect the generation of CTL responses induced by DSP-resistant elements (CD8+ CTL precursors and CD4+ CTL helpers). Prolongation of skin graft survival was not induced by either of the above two regimens alone, but by the combination of these. Prolonged graft survival was obtained irrespective of whether the administration of anti-CD8 antibody capable of eliminating CTL was started before or after DSP. The combination of DSP with injection of anti-CD4 antibody also effectively prolonged graft survival. However, this was the case only when the injection of antibody was started before DSP, because such antibody administration was capable of inhibiting the generation of CTL responses by eliminating DSP-resistant CD4+ CTL helpers. These results indicate that (a) the graft rejection in class I-disparate combinations is induced by CD8+ CTL-involved and -independent pathways that are resistant and susceptible to DSP, respectively; (b) DSP contributes to, but is not sufficient for, the prolongation of graft survival; and (c) the suppression of graft rejection requires an additional treatment for reducing DSP-resistant CTL responses. The results are

  14. Coexpression of class I major histocompatibility antigen and viral RNA in central nervous system of mice infected with Theiler's virus: a model for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, M D; Patick, A K; Prayoonwiwat, N; Rodriguez, M

    1992-09-01

    Chronic infection of susceptible strains of mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination similar to multiple sclerosis. Demyelination induced by TMEV is mediated, in part, by class I-restricted CD8+ T lymphocytes. For these T cells to function, they must recognize virus-infected CNS targets in the presence of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen. Therefore, we studied in vivo expression of class I MHC antigen and viral antigen-RNA in prototypic mouse strains that are susceptible (SJL/J) or resistant (C57BL/10SNJ) to TMEV-induced demyelination. In brains of resistant mice, viral antigen-RNA expression peaked on day 3 after infection and was effectively diminished by day 5 such that few virus-infected cells were ever detected in the spinal cord. In contrast, susceptible mice demonstrated delay in clearance of TMEV from the brain and a subsequent increase and persistence of viral antigen-RNA in the spinal cord for as long as 277 days. Viral infection resulted in "upregulation" of class I MHC expression in the CNS. Class I MHC antigens were expressed as early as 1 day after infection in the choroid plexus of both strains of mice before detection of viral antigen or inflammation. In resistant mice, class I MHC expression predominated in the gray matter of the brain and spinal cord on day 7 after infection but returned to undetectable levels by day 28. In susceptible mice, class I MHC expression in the CNS persisted and was intense in the white matter of the spinal cord throughout chronic infection and demyelination. No class I MHC expression was detected in the CNS of uninfected mice. Coexpression of viral RNA and class I MHC antigen was demonstrated in CNS cells by using simultaneous in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase technique. These results support the hypothesis that a class I-restricted immune response directed against virus-infected cells may be important in the mechanism

  15. Recognition of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class Ib Molecule H2-Q10 by the Natural Killer Cell Receptor Ly49C.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Berry, Richard; Sosnin, Natasha; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Deuss, Felix A; Balaji, Gautham R; LaGruta, Nicole L; Mirams, Michiko; Trapani, Joseph A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G; Andrews, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    Murine natural killer (NK) cells are regulated by the interaction of Ly49 receptors with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I). Although the ligands for inhibitory Ly49 were considered to be restricted to classical MHC (MHC-Ia), we have shown that the non-classical MHC molecule (MHC-Ib) H2-M3 was a ligand for the inhibitory Ly49A. Here we establish that another MHC-Ib, H2-Q10, is a bona fide ligand for the inhibitory Ly49C receptor. H2-Q10 bound to Ly49C with a marginally lower affinity (∼5 μm) than that observed between Ly49C and MHC-Ia (H-2K(b)/H-2D(d), both ∼1 μm), and this recognition could be prevented by cis interactions with H-2K in situ To understand the molecular details underpinning Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition, we determined the crystal structures of H2-Q10 and Ly49C bound H2-Q10. Unliganded H2-Q10 adopted a classical MHC-I fold and possessed a peptide-binding groove that exhibited features similar to those found in MHC-Ia, explaining the diverse peptide binding repertoire of H2-Q10. Ly49C bound to H2-Q10 underneath the peptide binding platform to a region that encompassed residues from the α1, α2, and α3 domains, as well as the associated β2-microglobulin subunit. This docking mode was conserved with that previously observed for Ly49C·H-2K(b) Indeed, structure-guided mutation of Ly49C indicated that Ly49C·H2-Q10 and Ly49C·H-2K(b) possess similar energetic footprints focused around residues located within the Ly49C β4-stand and L5 loop, which contact the underside of the peptide-binding platform floor. Our data provide a structural basis for Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition and demonstrate that MHC-Ib represent an extended family of ligands for Ly49 molecules. PMID:27385590

  16. Down-regulated expression of monocyte/macrophage major histocompatibility complex receptors in human and mouse monocytes by expression of their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yamana, H; Tashiro-Yamaji, J; Hayashi, M; Maeda, S; Shimizu, T; Tanigawa, N; Uchiyama, K; Kubota, T; Yoshida, R

    2014-01-01

    Mouse monocyte/macrophage major histocompatibility complex (MHC) receptor 1 (MMR1; or MMR2) specific for H-2Dd (or H-2Kd) molecules is expressed on monocytes from non-H-2Dd (or non-H-2Kd), but not those from H-2Dd (or H-2Kd), inbred mice. The MMR1 and/or MMR2 is essential for the rejection of H-2Dd- and/or H-2Kd-transgenic mouse skin onto C57BL/6 (H-2DbKb) mice. Recently, we found that human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B44 was the sole ligand of human MMR1 using microbeads that had been conjugated with 80 types of HLA class I molecules covering 94·2% (or 99·4%) and 92·4% (or 96·2%) of HLA-A and B molecules of Native Americans (or Japanese), respectively. In the present study, we also explored the ligand specificity of human MMR2 using microbeads. Microbeads coated with HLA-A32, HLA-B13 or HLA-B62 antigens bound specifically to human embryonic kidney (HEK)293T or EL-4 cells expressing human MMR2 and to the solubilized MMR2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein; and MMR2+ monocytes from a volunteer bound HLA-B62 molecules with a Kd of 8·7 × 10−9 M, implying a three times down-regulation of MMR2 expression by the ligand expression. H-2Kd (or H-2Dd) transgene into C57BL/6 mice down-regulated not only MMR2 (or MMR1) but also MMR1 (or MMR2) expression, leading to further down-regulation of MMR expression. In fact, monocytes from two (i.e. MMR1+/MMR2+ and MMR1–/MMR2–) volunteers bound seven to nine types of microbeads among 80, indicating ≤ 10 types of MMR expression on monocytes. The physiological role of constitutive MMRs on monocytes possibly towards allogeneic (e.g. fetal) cells in the blood appears to be distinct from that of inducible MMRs on macrophages toward allografts in tissue. PMID:24842626

  17. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Parasar, Parveen; Wilhelm, Amanda; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Teng, Lihong; Shi, Bi; Davis, William C; Suarez, Carlos E; New, Daniel D; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-classical MHC-I isoforms, we expressed the MHC proteins in murine P815 and human K562 (MHC-I deficient) cells. Following antibiotic selection, stably transfected cell lines were stained with H1A or W6/32 antibodies to detect expression of the MHC-I proteins by flow cytometry. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00501 and BoLA-NC3*00101) were expressed on the cell surface in both cell lines. Surprisingly, the BoLA-NC4*00201 protein was expressed on the cell membrane of human K562 but not mouse P815 cells. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00401, which lacks a transmembrane domain, and BoLA-NC2*00102) did not exhibit cell surface expression. Nevertheless, Western blot analyses demonstrated expression of the MHC-I heavy chain in all transfected cell lines. Ammonium-sulfate precipitation of proteins from culture supernatants showed that BoLA-NC1*00401 was secreted and that all surface expressed proteins where shed from the cell membrane by the transfected cells. Interestingly, the surface expressed MHC-I proteins were present in culture supernatants at a much higher concentration than BoLA-NC1*00401. This comprehensive study shows that bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins BoLA-NC1*00501, BoLA-NC3*00101, and BoLA-NC4*00201 are expressed as surface isoforms with the latter reaching the cell membrane only in K562 cells. Furthermore, it demonstrated that BoLA-NC1*00401 is a secreted isoform and that significant quantities of membrane associated MHC-I proteins can be shed from the cell membrane. PMID:27473990

  18. HIV-1 Nef binds PACS-2 to assemble a multikinase cascade that triggers major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) down-regulation: analysis using short interfering RNA and knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Katelyn M; Thomas, Laurel; Youker, Robert T; Harriff, Melanie J; Pissani, Franco; You, Huihong; Thomas, Gary

    2008-04-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1, negative factor (Nef) initiates down-regulation of cell-surface major histocompatibility complex-I (MHC-I) by assembling an Src family kinase (SFK)-ZAP70/Syk-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) cascade through the sequential actions of two sites, Nef EEEE(65) and PXXP(75). The internalized MHC-I molecules are then sequestered in endosomal compartments by a process requiring Nef Met(20). How Nef assembles the multikinase cascade to trigger the MHC-I down-regulation pathway is unknown. Here we report that EEEE(65)-dependent binding to the sorting protein PACS-2 targets Nef to the paranuclear region, enabling PXXP(75) to bind and activate a trans-Golgi network (TGN)-localized SFK. This SFK then phosphorylates ZAP-70 to recruit class I PI3K by interaction with the p85 C-terminal Src homology 2 domain. Using splenocytes and embryonic fibroblasts from PACS-2(-/-) mice, we confirm genetically that Nef requires PACS-2 to localize to the paranuclear region and assemble the multikinase cascade. Moreover, genetic loss of PACS-2 or inhibition of class I PI3K prevents Nef-mediated MHC-I down-regulation, demonstrating that short interfering RNA knockdown of PACS-2 phenocopies the gene knock-out. This PACS-2-dependent targeting pathway is not restricted to Nef, because PACS-2 is also required for trafficking of an endocytosed cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor reporter from early endosomes to the TGN. Together, these results demonstrate PACS-2 is required for Nef action and sorting of itinerant membrane cargo in the TGN/endosomal system.

  19. Development of novel major histocompatibility complex class I and class II-deficient NOD-SCID IL2R gamma chain knockout mice for modeling human xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Pino, Steve; Brehm, Michael A; Covassin-Barberis, Laurence; King, Marie; Gott, Bruce; Chase, Thomas H; Wagner, Jennifer; Burzenski, Lisa; Foreman, Oded; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D

    2010-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice have been used as recipients of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for in vivo analyses of human xeno-graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This xeno-GVHD model system in many ways mimics the human disease. The model system is established by intravenous or intraperitoneal injection of human PBMC or spleen cells into unconditioned or irradiated immunodeficient recipient mice. Recently, the development of several stocks of immunodeficient Prkdc ( scid ) (scid) and recombination activating 1 or 2 gene (Rag1 or Rag2) knockout mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the IL2 receptor gamma chain (IL2rgamma) have been reported. The addition of the mutated IL2rgamma gene onto an immunodeficient mouse stock facilitates heightened engraftment with human PBMC. Stocks of mice with mutations in the IL2rgamma gene have been studied in several laboratories on NOD-scid, NOD-Rag1 ( null ), BALB/c-Rag1 ( null ), BALB/c-Rag2 ( null ), and Stock-H2(d)-Rag2 ( null ) strain backgrounds. Parameters to induce human xeno-GVHD in H2(d)-Rag2 ( null ) IL2rgamma ( null ) mice have been published, but variability in the frequency of disease and kinetics of GVHD were observed. The availability of the NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) stock that engrafts more readily with human PBMC than does the Stock-H2(d)-Rag2 ( null ) IL2rgamma ( null ) stock should lead to a more reproducible humanized mouse model of GVHD and for the use in drug evaluation and validation. Furthermore, GVHD in human PBMC-engrafted scid mice has been postulated to result predominately from a human anti-mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II reactivity. Our recent development of NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) beta2m ( null ) and NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) Ab ( null ) stocks of mice now make it possible to investigate directly the role of host MHC class I and class II in the pathogenesis of GVHD in humanized mice using NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) stocks that engraft at high

  20. A genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 2 extending from thrombospondin to paired box gene 1, including the H3 minor histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zuberi, A.R.; Nguyen, H.Q.; Auman, H.J.

    1996-04-01

    The classical minor histocompatibility 3(H3) locus was originally defined by the phenotype of skin graft rejection, which is complex genetic trait. H3 is now known to be a gene complex comprised of a minimum of two functionally interdependent alloantigen-encoding loci, H3a and H3b. H3a encodes a peptide recognized by cytotoxic T cells, and H3b encodes a peptide that stimulates helper T cells. The H3 complex also contains the {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin gene (B2m), and polymorphisms in B2m contribute to the tissue rejection phenotype. We describe a high-density genetic linkage map of a 16-cM region of mouse Chromosome 2 from thromospondin (Thbs1) to paired box gene 1 (Pax1). This genetic map includes H3a, H3b, and B2m. Other genes and anonymous loci have also been placed on the map. H3a maps between D2Mit444 and B2m in close vicinity to several known genes. H3b maps 12 cM distal to H3a, and the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 2 gene (Pcsk2; formerly Nec2) cosegregates with H3b in a high-resolution backcross panel. The H3 complex spans a region that shows conserved synteny to human chromosomes 15q, 2q, and 20p. 59 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Evidence for a conformational change in a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule occurring in the same pH range where antigen binding is enhanced

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Many class II histocompatibility complex molecules bind antigenic peptides optimally at low pH, consistent with their exposure to antigen in acidic endosomal compartments. While it has been suggested that a partially unfolded state serves as an intermediate involved in peptide binding, very little evidence for such a state has been obtained. In this report, we show that the murine class II molecule IE becomes increasingly less stable to sodium dodecyl sulfate-induced dissociation since the pH is decreased in the same range that enhances antigenic peptide binding. Furthermore, at mildly acidic pH levels, IEk binds the fluorescent dye 1-anilino-naphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), a probe for exposed nonpolar sites in proteins, suggesting that protonation produces a molten globule-like state. The association of IEk with a single high-affinity peptide had only a small effect in these two assays, indicating that the changes that occur are distal to the peptide-binding groove. Circular dichroism analysis shows that a pH shift from neutral to mildly acidic pH causes subtle changes in the environment of aromatic residues but does not grossly disrupt the secondary structure of IEk. We propose a model in which perturbations in interdomain contacts outside the peptide-binding domain of IEk occur at acidic pH, producing a partially unfolded state that facilitates optimal antigen binding. PMID:8551214

  2. Target epitope in the Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I recognized by class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kannagi, M; Shida, H; Igarashi, H; Kuruma, K; Murai, H; Aono, Y; Maruyama, I; Osame, M; Hattori, T; Inoko, H

    1992-05-01

    A trans-acting regulatory gene product p40tax (Tax) of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is one of the main target antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for HTLV-I. A CTL epitope within the Tax protein was identified in this report. HTLV-I-specific CD8+ CTL lines established from two HTLV-I carriers with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy or Sjögren syndrome were previously demonstrated to kill predominantly the target cells expressing HTLV-I Tax. The CTL from two patients showed significant levels of cytotoxicity to autologous target cells pulsed with a synthetic peptide of 24 amino acids corresponding to the amino-terminal sequences of the Tax protein. Allogeneic target cells were also sensitized for CTL by this peptide when the target cells have HLA-A2. Tax-specific cytotoxicity, detected as cytolysis of the target cells infected with vaccinia virus-HTLV-I recombinant expressing Tax protein, was almost completely inhibited by competitor cells pulsed with the synthetic peptide. This indicates that a major CTL epitope is present in this peptide. Further analysis using shorter peptides revealed that the core sequence of the CTL epitope was LLFGYPVYV at positions 11 through 19. This sequence can be aligned with the HLA-A2-specific motifs reported recently. PMID:1373197

  3. Latent Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I TAP Inhibitor, BNLF2a, in EBV-Positive Gastric Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Michael J.; Laskow, Thomas; Nakhoul, Hani; Blanchard, Eugene; Liu, Yaozhong; Wang, Xia; Baddoo, Melody; Lin, Zhen; Yin, Qinyan

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BNLF2a gene product provides immune evasion properties to infected cells through inhibition of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-mediated transport of antigen peptides. Although BNLF2a is considered to be a lytic gene, we demonstrate that it is expressed in nearly half of the EBV-associated gastric carcinomas analyzed. Further, we show that BNLF2a expression is dissociated from lytic gene expression. BNLF2a is therefore expressed in this latency setting, potentially helping protect the infected tumor cells from immunosurveillance. PMID:26178981

  4. Editorial: The genetic basis of autoimmune thyroid disease: Time to focus on chromosomal loci other than the major histocompatibility complex (HLA in man)

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, S.M. )

    1993-09-01

    Extensive investigations have demonstrated associations between autoimmune thyroid diseases and HLA but the relative risks are low. Family studies provide a powerful method of investigating genetic factors involved in disease. However, recent data suggest that HLA-region genes are unlikely to determine inheritance of autoimmune thyroid disease. 10 refs.

  5. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manife...

  6. H2-M3 Major Histocompatibility Complex Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells Induced by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection Recognize Proteins Released by Salmonella Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Ugrinovic, S.; Brooks, C. G.; Robson, J.; Blacklaws, B. A.; Hormaeche, C. E.; Robinson, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a typhoid-like disease in mice which has been studied extensively as a model for typhoid fever in humans. CD8 T cells contribute to protection against S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice, but little is known about the specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response. We report here that CD8 T-cell lines derived from S. enterica serovar Typhimurium-infected BALB/c mice lysed bone marrow macrophages infected with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or pulsed with proteins from S. enterica serovar Typhimurium culture supernatants. Cytoxicity was beta-2-microglobulin dependent and largely TAP dependent, although not MHC class Ia restricted, as target cells of several different MHC haplotypes were lysed. The data suggested the participation of class Ib MHC molecules although no evidence for the presence of Qa1-restricted T cells could be found, unlike in previous reports. Instead, the T-cell lines lysed H2-M3-transfected fibroblasts infected with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 or treated with Salmonella culture supernatants. Thus, this report increases the number of MHC class Ib antigen-presenting molecules known for Salmonella antigens to three: Qa-1, HLA-E, and now H2-M3. It also expands the range of pathogens that induce H2-M3-restricted CD8 T cells to include an example of gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16299293

  7. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers. V. Protection of mice from lethal graft-vs. -host disease by pretreatment of donor cells with monoclonal anti-Thy-1. 2 coupled to the toxin ricin

    SciTech Connect

    Vallera, D.A.; Youle, R.J.; Neville, D.M. Jr.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-03-01

    A new method has been devised to eliminate T cells from murine bone marrow grafts across major histocompatibility barriers and thus prevent graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD). The method utilizes a monoclonal antibody directed at the Thy-1.2 antigen but is complement independent. To make anti-Thy-1.2 toxic, the antibody is covalently linked to the toxin ricin. Ricin ordinarily binds, enters, and kills cells through receptors containing galactose. The hybrid protein, anti-Thy-1.2-ricin, can enter and kill cells via the Thy-1.2 receptor. In the presence of lactose the usual entry route for ricin is largely blocked and the hybrid is shown to be a highly selective reagent that is T cell specific in its inhibition of mitogen-stimulated splenocytes. We have used a model of severe and fatal GVHD where BALB/c splenocytes and bone marrow cells are given to irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Over 90% of these mice die by day 70, exhibiting signs of GVHD. When donor cells are pretreated with 0.5 microgram/ml of anti-Thy-1.2-ricin plus 200 mM lactose before injection, 10 of 11 animals survive through day 70 without signs of GVHD. These studies demonstrate that ricin linked to monoclonal antibodies may have utility related to the prevention of GVHD in human bone marrow transplantation.

  8. Salmonella typhimurium delta aroA delta aroD mutants expressing a foreign recombinant protein induce specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, S J; Carbone, F R; Strugnell, R A

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant Salmonella typhimurium aroA aroD mutants which expressed ovalbumin were constructed. The two expression constructs used were based on either pUC18 or pBR322. The pBR322-based construct was more stable in vitro and in vivo than the pUC-based construct. Salmonellae containing the stable pBR322-based plasmid induced major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), in contrast to salmonellae containing the pUC18-based expression construct. The priming of MHC class I-restricted CTL was increased by multiple immunizations. The study described in this report suggest that S. typhimurium delta aro mutants have the capacity to induce MHC class I-restricted CTL against carried antigens and that MHC class I-restricted CTL responses require stable in vivo expression of the target antigen. Further, the results indicate that the Salmonella typhi delta aro mutants currently undergoing evaluation in studies with humans may be good carriers of viral antigens with CTL determinants. Images PMID:8225611

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Modulates In Vivo Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecules on Antigen-Presenting Cells and T-Cell Stimulatory Activity of Dendritic Cells in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Alba Soto, Catalina D.; Mirkin, Gerardo A.; Solana, Maria E.; González Cappa, Stella M.

    2003-01-01

    A striking feature of Chagas' disease is the diversity of clinical presentations. Such variability may be due to the heterogeneity among Trypanosoma cruzi isolates or to the host immune response. Employing two strains which differ in their virulence, we investigated the effect of in vivo infection on professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). Acute infection with the virulent RA strain downregulated the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II on splenic dendritic cells (DC) and inhibited its induction on peritoneal macrophages and splenic B cells. It also impaired the ability of DC to prime allogeneic T cells and to form homotypic clusters, suggesting a low maturation state of these cells. In contrast, the low-virulence K98 strain maintained the expression of MHC class II on DC or stimulated it on peritoneal macrophages and B cells and preserved DC's T-cell priming capacity and homotypic clustering. DC from RA-infected mice elicited a lower activation of T. cruzi-specific T-cell proliferation than those from K98-infected mice. APC from RA-infected mice that reached the chronic phase of infection restored MHC class II levels to those found in K98-infected mice and upregulated costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that the immunosuppression caused by this strain is only transient. Taken together, the results indicate that in vivo infection with T. cruzi modulates APC functionality and that this is accomplished in a strain-dependent manner. PMID:12595432

  10. Human CD4-major histocompatibility complex class II (DQw6) transgenic mice in an endogenous CD4/CD8-deficient background: reconstitution of phenotype and human-restricted function

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To reconstitute the human immune system in mice, transgenic mice expressing human CD4 and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (DQw6) molecules in an endogenous CD4- and CD8-deficient background (mCD4/8-/-), after homologous recombination, have been generated. We report that expression of human CD4 molecule in mCD4/8-/- mice rescues thymocyte development and completely restores the T cell compartment in peripheral lymphoid organs. Upon vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) challenge, the reconstituted mature T cell population effectively provide T help to B cells in immunoglobulin class switching from IgM to specific IgG-neutralizing antibodies. Human CD4+DQw6+ double transgenic mice are tolerant to DQw6 and the DQw6 molecule functions in antigen presentation, effectively generating a human MHC class II-restricted T cell response to streptococcal M6C2 peptide. These data show that both the hCD4 and DQw6 molecules are functional in mCD4/8-/- mice, fully and stably reconstituting this limb of the human immune system in mice. This animal model provides a powerful in vivo tool to dissect the human CD4-human class II MHC interaction, especially its role in human autoimmune diseases, superantigen-mediated diseases, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:7964466

  11. Biochemical comparison of major histocompatibility complex molecules from different subspecies of Mus musculus: evidence for trans-specific evolution of alleles.

    PubMed

    Arden, B; Klein, J

    1982-04-01

    H-2 haplotypes were extracted from wild mice of three subspecies, Mus musculus domesticus, M. m. molossinus, and M. m. castaneus, that are known to have been separated from one another for some 1 to 2 million years. Serologically indistinguishable molecules controlled by some of the polymorphic H-2 loci were compared by tryptic peptide mapping, and the maps were found to be identical. In addition, a number of instances of biochemically indistinguishable H-2 molecules were found among wild mice and inbred strains of the M. m. domesticus subspecies. These findings suggest that some of the H-2 alleles have not altered for greater than 1 million years. To reconcile this apparent stability of H-2 genes with their extraordinary polymorphism (some 100 alleles at each of the polymorphic H-2 loci), it is proposed that the H-2 alleles evolve as if they were separate loci.

  12. Low expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR is associated with hypermethylation of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR alpha gene regions in B cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, H; Compton, L J; Shiomi, N; Steinberg, A D; Jackson, R A; Sasaki, T

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the expression of HLA-DR antigens and the HLA-DR alpha gene methylation was examined in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using permanent B cell lines, we found reduced DR expression in SLE. The low DR expression was correlated with high anti-DNA antibody titers in patients' sera. The amounts of DR alpha message were lower in SLE cells than in normal controls, suggesting that the low expression of DR antigens is associated with gene functions. The extent of DNA methylation was examined at five CCGG sites in the HLA-DR alpha locus. DNA from both SLE and normal cells showed variable methylation patterns. Since the DR alpha gene is a single-copy gene, such a variability is the result of assaying a mixture of transformed clones containing methylated DR alpha gene, with other clones containing unmethylated DR alpha gene. A distinctive feature of normal cells was a consistent methylation pattern: 12 normal cell lines showed exactly the same pattern. In contrast, 28 SLE cell lines showed a cell-line-specific methylation, and hypermethylation at the DR alpha locus. The hypermethylation is often associated with transcriptionally inactive genes. Thus, our results suggest that (a) B cells with hypermethylated DR genes might express no or few DR antigens; (b) the ratio of cells with differently methylated DR genes is consistent in normal individuals, while, in SLE patients, cells with hypermethylated DR genes predominate, resulting in apparently reduced DR antigen expression; and (c) the aberrant DR expression could be associated directly with immunoregulatory dysfunctions in SLE disease. Images PMID:2997276

  13. Dynamics of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Processing and Presentation Pathway in the Course of Malaria Parasite Development in Human Hepatocytes: Implications for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinxia; Trop, Stefanie; Baer, Samantha; Rakhmanaliev, Elian; Arany, Zita; Dumoulin, Peter; Zhang, Hao; Romano, Julia; Coppens, Isabelle; Levitsky, Victor; Levitskaya, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Control of parasite replication exerted by MHC class I restricted CD8+ T-cells in the liver is critical for vaccination-induced protection against malaria. While many intracellular pathogens subvert the MHC class I presentation machinery, its functionality in the course of malaria replication in hepatocytes has not been characterized. Using experimental systems based on specific identification, isolation and analysis of human hepatocytes infected with P. berghei ANKA GFP or P. falciparum 3D7 GFP sporozoites we demonstrated that molecular components of the MHC class I pathway exhibit largely unaltered expression in malaria-infected hepatocytes until very late stages of parasite development. Furthermore, infected cells showed no obvious defects in their capacity to upregulate expression of different molecular components of the MHC class I machinery in response to pro-inflammatory lymphokines or trigger direct activation of allo-specific or peptide-specific human CD8+ T-cells. We further demonstrate that ectopic expression of circumsporozoite protein does not alter expression of critical genes of the MHC class I pathway and its response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, we identified supra-cellular structures, which arose at late stages of parasite replication, possessed the characteristic morphology of merosomes and exhibited nearly complete loss of surface MHC class I expression. These data have multiple implications for our understanding of natural T-cell immunity against malaria and may promote development of novel, efficient anti-malaria vaccines overcoming immune escape of the parasite in the liver. PMID:24086507

  14. Dectin-1-triggered Recruitment of Light Chain 3 Protein to Phagosomes Facilitates Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Presentation of Fungal-derived Antigens*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Becker, Courtney; Lowell, Clifford A.; Underhill, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Dectin-1 is a pattern recognition receptor that is important for innate immune responses against fungi in humans and mice. Dectin-1 binds to β-glucans in fungal cell walls and triggers phagocytosis, production of reactive oxygen by the NADPH oxidase, and inflammatory cytokine production which all contribute to host immune responses against fungi. Although the autophagy pathway was originally characterized for its role in the formation of double-membrane compartments engulfing cytosolic organelles and debris, recent studies have suggested that components of the autophagy pathway may also participate in traditional phagocytosis. In this study, we show that Dectin-1 signaling in macrophages and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells triggers formation of LC3II, a major component of the autophagy machinery. Further, Dectin-1 directs the recruitment of LC3II to phagosomes, and this requires Syk, activation of reactive oxygen production by the NADPH oxidase, and ATG5. Using LC3-deficient dendritic cells we show that whereas LC3 recruitment to phagosomes is not important for triggering phagocytosis, killing or Dectin-1-mediated inflammatory cytokine production, it facilitates recruitment of MHC class II molecules to phagosomes and promotes presentation of fungal-derived antigens to CD4 T cells. PMID:22902620

  15. Crystal structure of swine major histocompatibility complex class I SLA-1 0401 and identification of 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F

    2011-11-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1 0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV(NW9); NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (Ebola(AY9); ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide-SLA-1 0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1 0401 is that Arg(156) has a "one-ballot veto" function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIV(NW9) and Ebola(AY9) bind SLA-1 0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are "featured" peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1 0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A 0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1 0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide-SLA-1 0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation.

  16. Effect of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 on surface expression of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, S R; Rice, P L; Kloszewski, E D; Anderson, R W; Thompson, D L; Tevethia, S S

    1985-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice in response to infection with the serologically distinct herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2) were cross-reactive against target cells infected with either serotype. However, HSV-2-infected cells were shown to be much less susceptible to CTL-mediated lysis, and analysis through the use of HSV-1 X HSV-2 intertypic recombinants mapped the reduced susceptibility to a region contained within 0.82 to 1.00 map units of the HSV-2 genome. The study reported here was undertaken to determine the possible reasons for the reduced susceptibility of HSV-2-infected cells to lysis by CTL. Competition for the specific lysis of labeled HSV-1-infected cells by either HSV-1- or HSV-2-infected, unlabeled inhibitor cells and frequency analysis of the CTL precursor able to recognize HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells suggested that the reduced susceptibility of HSV-2-infected cells to lysis could be explained, at least in part, by reduced levels of target cell recognition. A determination of the surface expression of the critical elements involved in target cell recognition by CTL following infection with HSV-1 or HSV-2 revealed that all the major HSV-specific glycoprotein species were expressed. Infection with both HSV-1 and HSV-2 caused a reduction in the expression of the class I H-2 antigens. However, this reduction was much greater following infection with HSV-2. This suggested that one important factor contributing to reduced lysis of HSV-2-infected cells may be the altered or reduced expression of the class I H-2 self-antigens. PMID:2999432

  17. A mutational analysis of the Abetaz/Aalphad major histocompatibility complex class II molecule that restricts autoreactive T cells in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. The critical influence of alanine at position 69 in the Aalphad chain.

    PubMed

    Sai, T; Mine, M; Fukuoka, M; Koarada, S; Kimoto, M

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune symptoms of (NZBxNZW)F1 (H-2d/z) mice are reported to be critically related to the heterozygosity at the H-2 complex of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We previously showed that several Abetaz/Aalphad MHC class II molecule-restricted autoreactive T-cell clones from B/WF1 mice were pathogenic upon transfer to preautoimmune B/WF1 mice. In this study, to identify the crucial amino acid residues in Abetaz/Aalphad molecules for T-cell activation, we generated a panel of transfectant cell lines. These transfectant cell lines express the Abetaz/Aalphad MHC molecules with a mutation at each residue alpha11, alpha28, alpha57, alpha69, alpha70, alpha76 of Aalphad chain and beta86 of Abetaz chain. Replacing alpha69 alanine with threonine, valine or serine completely eliminated the ability to stimulate autoreactive T-cell clones without affecting the ability to present foreign antigen keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) or L-plastin peptide to specific T-cell clones. Replacing beta86 valine with aspartic acid resulted in a decrease in the stimulation for antigen-reactive as well as autoreactive T-cell clones. Substitutions at other residues had minimal or no effect on the stimulation of either auto- or antigen-reactive T-cell clones. These results suggest that alanine at residue 69 of the Aalphad chain is critical for the activation of autoreactive Abetaz/Aalphad-restricted T-cell clones. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:10233712

  18. Genetic linkage of IgA deficiency to the major histocompatibility complex: evidence for allele segregation distortion, parent-of-origin penetrance differences, and the role of anti-IgA antibodies in disease predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Vorechovský, I; Webster, A D; Plebani, A; Hammarström, L

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency (IgAD) is characterized by a defect of terminal lymphocyte differentiation, leading to a lack of IgA in serum and mucosal secretions. Familial clustering, variable population prevalence in different ethnic groups, and a predominant inheritance pattern suggest a strong genetic predisposition to IgAD. The genetic susceptibility to IgAD is shared with a less prevalent, but more profound, defect called "common variable immunodeficiency" (CVID). Here we show an increased allele sharing at 6p21 in affected members of 83 multiplex IgAD/CVID pedigrees and demonstrate, using transmission/diseqilibrium tests, family-based associations indicating the presence of a predisposing locus, designated "IGAD1," in the proximal part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The recurrence risk of IgAD was found to depend on the sex of parents transmitting the defect: affected mothers were more likely to produce offspring with IgAD than were affected fathers. Carrier mothers but not carrier fathers transmitted IGAD1 alleles more frequently to the affected offspring than would be expected under random segregation. The differential parent-of-origin penetrance is proposed to reflect a maternal effect mediated by the production of anti-IgA antibodies tentatively linked to IGAD1. This is supported by higher frequency of anti-IgA-positive females transmitting the disorder to children, in comparison with female IgAD nontransmitters, and by linkage data in the former group. Such pathogenic mechanisms may be shared by other MHC-linked complex traits associated with the production of specific autoantibodies, parental effects, and a particular MHC haplotype. PMID:10090895

  19. The role of charge and multiple faces of the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer in binding to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules: support for a bivalent model.

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, P A; Leahy, D J; Mennone, J; Kavathas, P B

    1994-01-01

    The CD8 dimer interacts with the alpha 3 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules through two immunoglobulin variable-like domains. In this study a crystal structure-informed mutational analysis has been performed to identify amino acids in the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer that are likely to be involved in binding to class I. Several key residues are situated on the top face of the dimer within loops analogous to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin. In addition, other important amino acids are located in the A and B beta-strands on the sides of the dimer. The potential involvement of amino acids on both the top and the side faces of the molecule is consistent with a bivalent model for the interaction between a single CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer and two class I molecules and may have important implications for signal transduction in class I-expressing cells. This study also demonstrates a role for the positive surface potential of CD8 in class I binding and complements previous work demonstrating the importance of a negatively charged loop on the alpha 3 domain of class I for CD8 alpha/alpha-class I interaction. We propose a model whereby residues located on the CDR-like loops of the CD8 homodimer interact with the alpha 3 domain of MHC class I while amino acids on the side of the molecule containing the A and B beta-strands contact the alpha 2 domain of class I. Images PMID:8127870

  20. Nef-induced CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) down-regulation are governed by distinct determinants: N-terminal alpha helix and proline repeat of Nef selectively regulate MHC-I trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mangasarian, A; Piguet, V; Wang, J K; Chen, Y L; Trono, D

    1999-03-01

    The Nef protein of primate lentiviruses triggers the accelerated endocytosis of CD4 and of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I), thereby down-modulating the cell surface expression of these receptors. Nef acts as a connector between the CD4 cytoplasmic tail and intracellular sorting pathways both in the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, triggering the de novo formation of CD4-specific clathrin-coated pits (CCP). The downstream partners of Nef in this event are the adapter protein complex (AP) of CCP and possibly a subunit of the vacuolar ATPase. Whether Nef-induced MHC-I down-regulation stems from a similar mechanism is unknown. By comparing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef mutants for their ability to affect either CD4 or MHC-I expression, both in transient-transfection assays and in the context of HIV-1 infection, it was determined that Nef-induced CD4 and MHC-I down-regulation constitute genetically and functionally separate properties. Mutations affecting only CD4 regulation mapped to residues previously shown to mediate the binding of Nef to this receptor, such as W57 and L58, as well as to an AP-recruiting dileucine motif and to an acidic dipeptide in the C-terminal region of the protein. In contrast, mutation of residues in an alpha-helical region in the proximal portion of Nef and amino acid substitutions in a proline-based SH3 domain-binding motif selectively affected MHC-I down-modulation. Although both the N-terminal alpha-helix and the proline-rich region of Nef have been implicated in recruiting Src family protein kinases, the inhibitor herbimycin A did not block MHC-I down-regulation, suggesting that the latter process is not mediated through an activation of this family of tyrosine kinases. PMID:9971776

  1. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  2. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pravin; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas; Saenger, Wolfram

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  3. Endocytosis of the class I major histocompatibility antigen via a phorbol myristate acetate-inducible pathway is a cell-specific phenomenon and requires the cytoplasmic domain [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1989 Sep;109(3):1381

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens are expressed by virtually all mammalian cells, yet their levels of expression and behavior on the cell surface vary in a cell-specific fashion. A panel of lymphoid (both B and T) and nonlymphoid cell lines was used to study the kinetics of internalization of the H-2Ld class I MHC in different cell types. These studies revealed that endocytosis of H-2Ld occurs by both constitutive and PMA-regulated pathways in lymphoid cells, but only by a PMA-refractory pathway in the nonlymphoid cells tested. Transfectant derivatives of the T lymphoma, EL4, which express wild- type or mutant H-2Ld class I MHC antigens, were used to investigate the requirement for the cytoplasmic domain of the class I MHC antigen for its endocytosis in T lymphocytes. These studies showed that modification or deletion of the cytoplasmic domain of H-2Ld abrogates endocytosis via a PMA-regulated pathway. The role of cytoplasmic domain phosphorylation in PMA-inducible endocytosis was examined. The wild- type H-2Ld antigen is phosphorylated in all cell types examined, and this phosphorylation is up-regulated by PMA treatment. In contrast, cytoplasmic domain mutants of H-2Ld fail to be phosphorylated in vivo, in the presence or absence of PMA. The universality of PMA-inducible hyperphosphorylation of the class I MHC antigen among diverse cell types leads us to conclude that phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain, while perhaps necessary, is not sufficient for triggering endocytosis via a PMA-inducible pathway. Furthermore, the results with the cytoplasmic domain mutants of H-2Ld suggest that a structural conformation of the class I MHC cytoplasmic domain is required for endocytosis via this route. PMID:2925787

  4. An Important Role for Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted T Cells, and a Limited Role for Gamma Interferon, in Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Holterman, Ai-Xuan; Rogers, Kathleen; Edelmann, Kurt; Koelle, David M.; Corey, Lawrence; Wilson, Christopher B.

    1999-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) inhibits major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in infected cells and does so much more efficiently in human cells than in murine cells. Given this difference, if MHC class I-restricted T cells do not play an important role in protection of mice from HSV, an important role for these cells in humans would be unlikely. However, the contribution of MHC class I-restricted T cells to the control of HSV infection in mice remains unclear. Further, the mechanisms by which these cells may act to control infection, particularly in the nervous system, are not well understood, though a role for gamma interferon (IFN-γ) has been proposed. To address the roles of MHC class I and of IFN-γ, C57BL/6 mice deficient in MHC class I expression (β2 microglobulin knockout [β2KO] mice), in IFN-γ expression (IFN-γKO mice), or in both (IFN-γKO/β2KO mice) were infected with HSV by footpad inoculation. β2KO mice were markedly compromised in their ability to control infection, as indicated by increased lethality and higher concentrations of virus in the feet and spinal ganglia. In contrast, IFN-γ appeared to play at most a limited role in viral clearance. The results suggest that MHC class I-restricted T cells play an important role in protection of mice against neuroinvasive HSV infection and do so largely by mechanisms other than the production of IFN-γ. PMID:9971787

  5. Efficient In Vitro Refolding and Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain Molecules A (MICA) and Natural Killer Group 2 Member D (NKG2D) Expressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Acheampong, Desmond Omane; Wang, Youfu; Tang, Mingying; Xie, Wei; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex class I-related chain molecules A (MICA) and receptor Natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) are important membrane proteins with immunosurveillance properties which could serve as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy. However, expression of MICA and NKG2D in E. coli often leads to the formation of inclusion bodies. Here, we present simple, inexpensive and convenient protocol for the solubilization and refolding of inclusion bodies of MICA and NKG2D expressed in E. coli. The inclusion bodies were firstly dissolved in strong chaotropic reagent (8M urea) and subsequently purified by immobilized-metal affinity column. The denatured MICA/NKG2D was refolded by gradually removing both denaturant (8M urea) and imidazole via dialysis in dialysis buffer of pH 7.4. The appropriate pH of the dialysis buffer was selected based on the theoretical isoelectric points of MICA and NKG2D which were 5.0 and 5.2 respectively. The folded MICA and NKG2D demonstrated the capacity to bind to recombinant NKG2D and MICA respectively by ELISA, Western blot and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) assays. Additionally, the folded MICA and NKG2D demonstrated significant binding to NKG2D-positive Human leukemic cell line U937 and MICA-positive Human pancreatic carcinoma, epithelial-like cell line (PANC-1) respectively, suggesting successful refolding. Successful refolding was further confirmed by Circular Dichroism spectroscopy (CD). We have successfully dissolved, refolded and characterized inclusion bodies of MICA/NKG2D expressed in E. coli using simple, inexpensive and convenient protocol which can be carried out in laboratories under-resourced.

  6. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  7. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  8. A Method of Screening for Genes of Major Effect

    PubMed Central

    Kinghorn, B. P.; Kennedy, B. W.; Smith, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a method for screening animal populations on an index of calculated probabilities of genotype status at an unknown single locus. Animals selected by such a method might then be candidates in test matings and genetic marker analyses for major gene detection. The method relies on phenotypic measures for a continuous trait plus identification of sire and dam. Some missing phenotypes and missing pedigree information are permitted. The method is an iterative two-step procedure, the first step estimates genotype probabilities and the second step estimates genotypic effects by regressing phenotypes on genotype probabilities, modeled as true genotype status plus error. Prior knowledge or choice of major locus-free heritability for the trait of interest is required, plus initial starting estimates of the effect on phenotype of carrying one and two copies of the unknown gene. Gene frequency can be estimated by this method, but it is demonstrated that the consequences of using an incorrect fixed prior for gene frequency are not particularly adverse where true frequency of the allele with major effect is low. Simulations involving deterministic sampling from the normal distribution lead to convergence for estimates of genotype effects at the true values, for a reasonable range of starting values, illustrating that estimation of major gene effects has a rational basis. In the absence of polygenic effects, stochastic simulations of 600 animals in five generations resulted in estimates of genotypic effects close to the true values. However, stochastic simulations involving generation and fitting of both major genotype and animal polygenic effects showed upward bias in estimates of major genotype effects. This can be partially overcome by not using information from relatives when calculating genotype probabilities-a result which suggests a route to a modified method which is unbiased and yet does use this information. PMID:8514142

  9. Genomic analysis of the major bovine milk protein genes.

    PubMed

    Threadgill, D W; Womack, J E

    1990-12-11

    The genomic arrangement of the major bovine milk protein genes has been determined using a combination of physical mapping techniques. The major milk proteins consist of the four caseins, alpha s1 (CASAS1), alpha s2 (CASAS2), beta (CASB), and kappa (CASK), as well as the two major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin (LALBA) and beta-lactoglobulin (LGB). A panel of bovine X hamster hybrid somatic cells analyzed for the presence or absence of bovine specific restriction fragments revealed the genes coding for the major milk proteins to reside on three chromosomes. The four caseins were assigned to syntenic group U15 and localized to bovine chromosome 6 at q31-33 by in situ hybridization. LALBA segregated with syntenic group U3, while LGB segregated with U16. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed genetic mapping results indicating tight linkage of the casein genes. The four genes reside on less than 200 kb of DNA in the order CASAS1-CASB-CASAS2-CASK. Multiple restriction fragment length polymorphisms were also found at the six loci in three breeds of cattle.

  10. Detection of major gene for Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G; Devor, E J; Cloninger, C R

    1984-01-01

    The families of 250 consecutive, unselected patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) were analyzed. If the parents had either motor or vocal tics, but not both, there was an increased risk of both TS and tics in the offspring. The mode of inheritance of the combined tic-Tourette trait was evaluated in both nuclear families and extended pedigrees. Complex segregation analysis was carried out allowing for possible contributions from both a major autosomal locus and multifactorial inheritance of variation in the background of each genotype. The most likely mode of inheritance was a major semidominant gene, Ts, with low heritability of the multifactorial background variation. This was true regardless of assumptions about the prevalence of the disorder. The hypothesis of strict multifactorial inheritance could not be rejected with nuclear family data alone. However, the hypothesis of no major gene effect was rejected using data on 3 generations for any estimate of lifetime risk less than 12 per 1,000 in the general population. A pure recessive major gene effect was also rejected. With a gene frequency of approximately .5%, the penetrance was estimated to be about 94% in abnormal Ts/Ts homozygotes, 50% in Ts/ts heterozygotes, and less than 0.3% in normal ts/ts homozygotes. More than two of every three cases are heterozygotes, and nearly all other cases are phenocopies or new mutations. This is the first demonstration by segregation analysis of a major gene in a human neuropsychiatric disorder with a frequency approaching 1% of the population. PMID:6587774

  11. The Transmembrane Domain of the Adenovirus E3/19K Protein Acts as an Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Signal and Contributes to Intracellular Sequestration of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sester, Martina; Ruszics, Zsolt; Mackley, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The human adenovirus E3/19K protein is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that abrogates cell surface transport of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) molecules. Previous data suggested that E3/19K comprises two functional modules: a luminal domain for interaction with MHC-I and MICA/B molecules and a dilysine motif in the cytoplasmic tail that confers retrieval from the Golgi apparatus back to the ER. This study was prompted by the unexpected phenotype of an E3/19K molecule that was largely retained intracellularly despite having a mutated ER retrieval motif. To identify additional structural determinants responsible for ER localization, chimeric molecules were generated containing the luminal E3/19K domain and the cytoplasmic and/or transmembrane domain (TMD) of the cell surface protein MHC-I Kd. These chimeras were analyzed for transport, cell surface expression, and impact on MHC-I and MICA/B downregulation. As with the retrieval mutant, replacement of the cytoplasmic tail of E3/19K allowed only limited transport of the chimera to the cell surface. Efficient cell surface expression was achieved only by additionally replacing the TMD of E3/19K with that of MHC-I, suggesting that the E3/19K TMD may confer static ER retention. This was verified by ER retention of an MHC-I Kd molecule with the TMD replaced by that of E3/19K. Thus, we have identified the E3/19K TMD as a novel functional element that mediates static ER retention, thereby increasing the concentration of E3/19K in the ER. Remarkably, the ER retrieval signal alone, without the E3/19K TMD, did not mediate efficient HLA downregulation, even in the context of infection. This suggests that the TMD is required together with the ER retrieval function to ensure efficient ER localization and transport inhibition of MHC-I and MICA/B molecules. PMID:23514889

  12. Analysis of T cell stimulation by superantigen plus major histocompatibility complex class II molecules or by CD3 monoclonal antibody: costimulation by purified adhesion ligands VCAM-1, ICAM-1, but not ELAM-1

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Many ligands of adhesion molecules mediate costimulation of T cell activation. The generality of this emerging concept is best determined by using model systems which exploit physiologically relevant ligands. We developed such an "antigen-specific" model system for stimulation of resting CD4+ human T cells using the following purified ligands: (a) major histocompatibility complex class II plus the superantigen Staphylococcus enterotoxin A, to engage the T cell receptor (TCR); (b) adhesion proteins vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1), to provide potential cell surface costimulatory signals; and (c) recombinant interleukin 1 beta (rIL-1 beta)/rIL-6 as costimulatory cytokines. In this biochemically defined system, we find that resting CD4+ T cells require costimulation in order to respond to TCR engagement. This costimulation can be provided by VCAM-1 or ICAM-1; however adhesion alone is not sufficient since ELAM-1 mediates adhesion but not costimulation. The cytokines IL-1 beta and IL-6 by themselves cannot mediate costimulation, but augment the adhesion ligand-mediated costimulation. Direct comparison with the model of TCR/CD3 engagement by CD3 monoclonal antibody demonstrated comparable costimulatory requirements in both systems, thereby authenticating the commonly used CD3 model. The costimulation mediated by the activation-dependent interaction of the VLA-4 and LFA-1 integrins with their respective ligands VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 leads to increased IL-2R alpha (CD25) expression and proliferation in both CD45RA+ CD4+ and CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells. The integrins also regulate the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In contrast the activation-independent adhesion of CD4+ T cell to ELAM-1 molecules does not lead to T cell stimulation as measured by proliferation, IL-2R alpha expression, or cytokine release. These findings imply

  13. Gene-environment interactions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Klengel, Torsten; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2013-02-01

    Family, twin, and epidemiologic studies have suggested that both genes and environment are important risk factors for the development of major depressive disorder (MDD). In the absence of consistent and strong main genetic effects, numerous studies have supported gene-environment interactions in this disorder. While the impact of negative environmental factors, such as early life stress, traumatic experiences, and negative life events have been established as risk factors, they are not sufficient to predict MDD. This article will review evidence suggesting that genetic variants moderate the effects of adversities on the development of MDD, with a focus on the importance of careful characterization of the stressful life events as well as systemic and molecular mechanisms that potentially mediate these gene-environment interactions.

  14. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of Major Peanut Allergen Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaparkhe, Milind B.; Lee, Tae-Ho; Tan, Xu; Wang, Xiyin; Li, Jingping; Kim, Changsoo; Rainville, Lisa K.; Lemke, Cornelia; Compton, Rosana O.; Robertson, Jon; Gallo, Maria; Bertioli, David J.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) causes one of the most serious food allergies. Peanut seed proteins, Arah1, Arah2, and Arah3, are considered to be among the most important peanut allergens. To gain insights into genome organization and evolution of allergen-encoding genes, approximately 617 kb from the genome of cultivated peanut and 215 kb from a wild relative were sequenced including three Arah1, one Arah2, eight Arah3, and two Arah6 gene family members. To assign polarity to differences between homoeologous regions in peanut, we used as outgroups the single orthologous regions in Medicago, Lotus, common bean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, which diverged from peanut about 50 Ma and have not undergone subsequent polyploidy. These regions were also compared with orthologs in many additional dicot plant species to help clarify the timing of evolutionary events. The lack of conservation of allergenic epitopes between species, and the fact that many different proteins can be allergenic, makes the identification of allergens across species by comparative studies difficult. The peanut allergen genes are interspersed with low-copy genes and transposable elements. Phylogenetic analyses revealed lineage-specific expansion and loss of low-copy genes between species and homoeologs. Arah1 syntenic regions are conserved in soybean, pigeonpea, tomato, grape, Lotus, and Arabidopsis, whereas Arah3 syntenic regions show genome rearrangements. We infer that tandem and segmental duplications led to the establishment of the Arah3 gene family. Our analysis indicates differences in conserved motifs in allergen proteins and in the promoter regions of the allergen-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization studies provide new insights into the evolution of the major peanut allergen-encoding genes. PMID:25193311

  15. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of major peanut allergen gene families.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhe, Milind B; Lee, Tae-Ho; Tan, Xu; Wang, Xiyin; Li, Jingping; Kim, Changsoo; Rainville, Lisa K; Lemke, Cornelia; Compton, Rosana O; Robertson, Jon; Gallo, Maria; Bertioli, David J; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-09-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) causes one of the most serious food allergies. Peanut seed proteins, Arah1, Arah2, and Arah3, are considered to be among the most important peanut allergens. To gain insights into genome organization and evolution of allergen-encoding genes, approximately 617 kb from the genome of cultivated peanut and 215 kb from a wild relative were sequenced including three Arah1, one Arah2, eight Arah3, and two Arah6 gene family members. To assign polarity to differences between homoeologous regions in peanut, we used as outgroups the single orthologous regions in Medicago, Lotus, common bean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, which diverged from peanut about 50 Ma and have not undergone subsequent polyploidy. These regions were also compared with orthologs in many additional dicot plant species to help clarify the timing of evolutionary events. The lack of conservation of allergenic epitopes between species, and the fact that many different proteins can be allergenic, makes the identification of allergens across species by comparative studies difficult. The peanut allergen genes are interspersed with low-copy genes and transposable elements. Phylogenetic analyses revealed lineage-specific expansion and loss of low-copy genes between species and homoeologs. Arah1 syntenic regions are conserved in soybean, pigeonpea, tomato, grape, Lotus, and Arabidopsis, whereas Arah3 syntenic regions show genome rearrangements. We infer that tandem and segmental duplications led to the establishment of the Arah3 gene family. Our analysis indicates differences in conserved motifs in allergen proteins and in the promoter regions of the allergen-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization studies provide new insights into the evolution of the major peanut allergen-encoding genes. PMID:25193311

  16. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of major peanut allergen gene families.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhe, Milind B; Lee, Tae-Ho; Tan, Xu; Wang, Xiyin; Li, Jingping; Kim, Changsoo; Rainville, Lisa K; Lemke, Cornelia; Compton, Rosana O; Robertson, Jon; Gallo, Maria; Bertioli, David J; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-09-04

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) causes one of the most serious food allergies. Peanut seed proteins, Arah1, Arah2, and Arah3, are considered to be among the most important peanut allergens. To gain insights into genome organization and evolution of allergen-encoding genes, approximately 617 kb from the genome of cultivated peanut and 215 kb from a wild relative were sequenced including three Arah1, one Arah2, eight Arah3, and two Arah6 gene family members. To assign polarity to differences between homoeologous regions in peanut, we used as outgroups the single orthologous regions in Medicago, Lotus, common bean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, which diverged from peanut about 50 Ma and have not undergone subsequent polyploidy. These regions were also compared with orthologs in many additional dicot plant species to help clarify the timing of evolutionary events. The lack of conservation of allergenic epitopes between species, and the fact that many different proteins can be allergenic, makes the identification of allergens across species by comparative studies difficult. The peanut allergen genes are interspersed with low-copy genes and transposable elements. Phylogenetic analyses revealed lineage-specific expansion and loss of low-copy genes between species and homoeologs. Arah1 syntenic regions are conserved in soybean, pigeonpea, tomato, grape, Lotus, and Arabidopsis, whereas Arah3 syntenic regions show genome rearrangements. We infer that tandem and segmental duplications led to the establishment of the Arah3 gene family. Our analysis indicates differences in conserved motifs in allergen proteins and in the promoter regions of the allergen-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization studies provide new insights into the evolution of the major peanut allergen-encoding genes.

  17. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  18. Major gene is responsible for anencephaly among Iranian Jews

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.

    1995-03-13

    Anencephaly is relatively frequent in Jews originating from Iran, in particular when its incidence is compared to that of open spina bifida in the same population (12 cases of anencephaly out of 14 cases of neural tube defects). The high incidence of this disorder in Iranian Jews, a relatively isolated community with a very high rate of consanguinity, suggests that anencephaly is caused by a major recessive gene. This possibility is supported by the sex ratio among these patients, which was significantly different from that observed for patients with anencephaly in other populations. 10 refs.

  19. Molecular polymorphism and expression analysis of MHC class II B gene from red sea bream (Chrysophrys major).

    PubMed

    Chen, Song-Lin; Zhang, Yu-Xi; Xu, Mei-Yu; Ji, Xiang-Shan; Yu, Guo-Cai; Dong, Cheng-Fang

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II (major histocompatibility complex class II) plays an important role in the immune response of vertebrates. Its function is to present antigenic peptides to the T-cell receptor. In order to study the function and molecular polymorphism of class II B gene in fish, we have isolated cDNAs encoding class II B from spleen cDNA library of red sea bream (Chrysophrys major) by using EST sequencing, and examined genomic organization, molecular polymorphism and expression of red sea bream class II B gene. As in other vertebrates, five exons and four introns were identified in red sea bream class II B gene. Seven class II B alleles were identified from seven individuals of red sea bream. The deduced amino acid sequence of red sea bream MHC class II B 1(Chma-DAB*0101) had 87.1, 85.1, 87.1, 90.4, 87.1, 90.8% identity with those of red sea bream class II B 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7(Chma-DAB*0201-Chma-DAB*0701), respectively, and had 75.2, 74.5, 55.9, 55.1, 34.3 and 30.4% identity with those of striped sea bass, cichlid, rainbow trout, Atlantic salmon, mouse and human, respectively. Four different class II B alleles were observed in a single individual and two different 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) sequences from this individual may infer the existence of two loci at least. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that high expression was detected in liver, head kidney, kidney, intestine, gill, stomach, hear and spleen, low expression in muscle and blood. Challenge of red sea bream with the pathogenic bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum, resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of MHC class II B mRNA from 5 to 72 h after infection in liver, spleen, head kidney and intestine, followed by a recovery to normal level after 96 h.

  20. Estimating the probability for major gene Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, L.A. Boston Univ. School of Public Health, Boston, MA ); Cupples, L.A. )

    1994-02-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neuropsychiatric illness caused by multiple etiologies. Prediction of whether AD is genetically based in a given family is problematic because of censoring bias among unaffected relatives as a consequence of the late onset of the disorder, diagnostic uncertainties, heterogeneity, and limited information in a single family. The authors have developed a method based on Bayesian probability to compute values for a continuous variable that ranks AD families as having a major gene form of AD (MGAD). In addition, they have compared the Bayesian method with a maximum-likelihood approach. These methods incorporate sex- and age-adjusted risk estimates and allow for phenocopies and familial clustering of age on onset. Agreement is high between the two approaches for ranking families as MGAD (Spearman rank [r] = .92). When either method is used, the numerical outcomes are sensitive to assumptions of the gene frequency and cumulative incidence of the disease in the population. Consequently, risk estimates should be used cautiously for counseling purposes; however, there are numerous valid applications of these procedures in genetic and epidemiological studies. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Altered choroid plexus gene expression in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cortney A.; Thompson, Robert C.; Bunney, William E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Barchas, Jack D.; Myers, Richard M.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Given the emergent interest in biomarkers for mood disorders, we assessed gene expression in the choroid plexus (CP), the region that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Genes that are expressed in the CP can be secreted into the CSF and may be potential biomarker candidates. Given that we have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor family members are differentially expressed in post-mortem brain of subjects with MDD and the CP is a known source of growth factors in the brain, we posed the question whether growth factor dysregulation would be found in the CP of subjects with MDD. We performed laser capture microscopy of the CP at the level of the hippocampus in subjects with MDD and psychiatrically normal controls. We then extracted, amplified, labeled, and hybridized the cRNA to Illumina BeadChips to assess gene expression. In controls, the most highly abundant known transcript was transthyretin. Moreover, half of the 14 most highly expressed transcripts in controls encode ribosomal proteins. Using BeadStudio software, we identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed (p < 0.05) between control and MDD samples. Using pathway analysis we noted that the top network altered in subjects with MDD included multiple members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed downregulation of several transcripts that interact with the extracellular matrix in subjects with MDD. These results suggest that there may be an altered cytoskeleton in the CP in MDD subjects that may lead to a disrupted blood-CSF-brain barrier. PMID:24795602

  2. Analysis of the HLA population data (AHPD) submitted to the 15th International Histocompatibility/Immunogenetics Workshop by using the Gene[rate] computer tools accommodating ambiguous data (AHPD project report).

    PubMed

    Nunes, J M; Riccio, M E; Buhler, S; Di, D; Currat, M; Ries, F; Almada, A J; Benhamamouch, S; Benitez, O; Canossi, A; Fadhlaoui-Zid, K; Fischer, G; Kervaire, B; Loiseau, P; de Oliveira, D C M; Papasteriades, C; Piancatelli, D; Rahal, M; Richard, L; Romero, M; Rousseau, J; Spiroski, M; Sulcebe, G; Middleton, D; Tiercy, J-M; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2010-07-01

    During the 15th International Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIWS), 14 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) laboratories participated in the Analysis of HLA Population Data (AHPD) project where 18 new population samples were analyzed statistically and compared with data available from previous workshops. To that aim, an original methodology was developed and used (i) to estimate frequencies by taking into account ambiguous genotypic data, (ii) to test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) by using a nested likelihood ratio test involving a parameter accounting for HWE deviations, (iii) to test for selective neutrality by using a resampling algorithm, and (iv) to provide explicit graphical representations including allele frequencies and basic statistics for each series of data. A total of 66 data series (1-7 loci per population) were analyzed with this standard approach. Frequency estimates were compliant with HWE in all but one population of mixed stem cell donors. Neutrality testing confirmed the observation of heterozygote excess at all HLA loci, although a significant deviation was established in only a few cases. Population comparisons showed that HLA genetic patterns were mostly shaped by geographic and/or linguistic differentiations in Africa and Europe, but not in America where both genetic drift in isolated populations and gene flow in admixed populations led to a more complex genetic structure. Overall, a fruitful collaboration between HLA typing laboratories and population geneticists allowed finding useful solutions to the problem of estimating gene frequencies and testing basic population diversity statistics on highly complex HLA data (high numbers of alleles and ambiguities), with promising applications in either anthropological, epidemiological, or transplantation studies.

  3. Neurofilament gene expression: a major determinant of axonal caliber

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.N.; Cleveland, D.W.; Griffin, J.W.; Landes, P.W.; Cowan, N.J.; Price, D.L.

    1987-05-01

    Within the wide spectrum of axonal diameters occurring in mammalian nerve fibers, each class of neurons has a relatively restricted range of axonal calibers. The control of caliber has functional significance because diameter is the principal determinant of conduction velocity in myelinated nerve fibers. Previous observations support the hypothesis that neurofilaments (NF) are major intrinsic determinants of axonal caliber in large myelinated nerve fibers. Following interruption of axons (axotomy) by crushing or cutting a peripheral nerve, caliber is reduced in the proximal axonal stumps, which extend from the cell bodies to the site of axotomy. This reduction in axonal caliber in the proximal stumps is associated with a selective diminution in the amount of NF protein undergoing slow axonal transport in these axons, with a decrease in axonal NF content, and with reduced conduction velocity. The present report demonstrates that changes in axonal caliber after axotomy correlate with a selective alteration in NF gene expression. Hybridization with specific cDNAs was used to measure levels of mRNA encoding the 68-kDa neurofilament protein (NF68), ..beta..-tubulin, and actin in lumbar sensory neurons of rat at various times after crushing the sciatic nerve. Between 4 and 42 days after axotomy by nerve crush, the levels of NF68 mRNA were reduced 2- to 3-fold. At the same times, the levels of tubulin and actin mRNAs were increased several-fold. These findings support the hypothesis that the expression of a single set of neuron-specific genes (encoding NF) directly determines axonal caliber, a feature neuronal morphology with important consequences for physiology and behavior.

  4. Targeted gene deletion of Leishmania major genes encoding developmental stage-specific leishmanolysin (GP63).

    PubMed

    Joshi, P B; Sacks, D L; Modi, G; McMaster, W R

    1998-02-01

    The major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania major is a zinc metalloproteinase of 63 kDa referred to as leishmanolysin or GP63, which is encoded by a family of seven genes. Targeted gene replacement was used to delete gp63 genes 1-6 encoding the highly expressed promastigote and constitutively expressed GP63. In the L. major homozygous mutants deficient in gp63 genes 1-6, there was no expression of GP63 as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or fluorescent staining in promastigotes from the procyclic stage (logarithmic growth phase). The remaining L. major gP63 gene 7 was shown to be developmentally regulated, as it was expressed exclusively in infectious metacyclic stage (late stationary growth phase) promastigotes and in lesion amastigotes. The gp63 genes 1-6-deficient mutants showed increased sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. The sensitivity to lysis was greater in procyclics than in metacyclics when compared with the equivalent wild-type stages. Increased resistance of the mutant metacyclic promastigotes correlated with the expression of gp63 gene 7 and was restored to the same levels as wild-type promastigotes by transfection with gp63 gene 1. Thus, expression of GP63 is clearly involved in conferring resistance to complement-mediated lysis. The L. major GP63 1-6 mutants were capable of infecting mouse macrophages and differentiating into amastigotes. Similar levels of infection and subsequent intracellular survival were observed when mouse macrophages were infected in vitro with wild type, GP63 1-6 mutants and mutants transfected with gp63 gene 1. The GP63 1-6 mutants were capable of lesion formation in BALB/c mice and, thus, gp63 genes 1-6 do not play a role in the survival of the parasite within mouse macrophages. The role of gp63 genes 1-6 in parasite development within the sandfly vector was studied. GP63 1-6 mutants grew normally in the blood-engorged midgut of both Phlebotomus argentipes and P. papatasi However

  5. The LPG1 gene family of Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Barron, Tamara; Turco, Salvatore J.; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    In Leishmania major, the core of the abundant surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is structurally related to that of the smaller glycosylinositolphospholipids (GIPLs) in containing galactosylfuranose (Galf ) residues in a Galf (β1, 3)Man motif. However, deletion of the putative Galf-transferase (Galf T) LPG1 affected Galf incorporation in LPG but not GIPLs. We hypothesized that the presumptive GIPL Galf-transferases could be homologous to LPG1, and identified three related genes in the L. major genome. These were termed LPG1L, LPG1R, and LPG1G, the latter of which was found in three identical copies located at the telomeres of chromosomes 5, 19, and 32 based on Leishmania genome project data. Neither LPG1 nor its homologues LPG1L and LPG1R were involved in the biosynthesis of GIPLs, as an lpg1−/lpg1l−/lpg1r− triple knockout (the first such in Leishmania) grew normally and made wild-type levels of Galf-containing GIPLs. In contrast, overexpression of these three led to elevated galactose incorporation in glycoproteins. Galf-containing glycoproteins had not been described in Leishmania but occur at high levels in other closely related trypanosomatids including Trypanosoma cruzi, Crithidia, Leptomonas, and Endotrypanum, and LPG1L and LPG1R homologs were detected in these species. These data suggest that the glyco-synthetic capabilities of Leishmania and perhaps other trypanosomatids may be larger than previously thought, with some activities being ‘cryptic’ in different lineages and potentially serving as reservoirs for glycoconjugate variation during evolution. Future tests will address whether the LPG1G family encodes the hypothesized GIPL-specific Galf T. PMID:15138063

  6. Identification of the major capsid protein gene of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Chee, M; Rudolph, S A; Plachter, B; Barrell, B; Jahn, G

    1989-01-01

    The coding region for the major capsid protein (MCP) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was identified by comparing the protein sequence with the respective sequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV), Epstein-Barr virus, and varicella-zoster virus. The predicted length of the HCMV MCP was 1,370 amino acids. Comparison of the MCP sequences of the different human herpesviruses showed a homology of 25% to the MCP of HSV type 1, a homology of 29% to the MCP of Epstein-Barr virus, and a homology of 23% to the MCP of varicella-zoster virus. A subfragment of the HSV type 1 KpnI i fragment encoding the MCP VP5 cross-hybridized with the HCMV HindIII U fragment containing part of the MCP gene. Northern (RNA) blot analyses with subclones out of the coding region for the HCMV MCP detected one large transcript of about 8 kilobases. A portion of the open reading frame was expressed in Escherichia coli plasmid pBD2 IC2OH as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein and was used to generate polyclonal antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. The obtained antisera reacted in Western immunoblots with the MCP of purified HCMV virions. A monoclonal antibody against the human MCP and a monospecific rabbit antiserum against strain Colburn of simian cytomegalovirus detected the fusion protein as well as the MCP of purified virions in immunoblots. Images PMID:2536837

  7. UPDATE ON SLA GENES AND THEIR IMPACT ON IMMUNE AND DISEASE INTERACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  8. Identification of major blast resistance genes in the southern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes in rice play important roles in preventing infections of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to identify more R genes for different rice growing areas in the Southern US, an extensive field survey of the blast fungus was performed from 2012 to 2013. A total of 500 is...

  9. Major psychological factors affecting acceptance of gene-recombination technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of a causal model that was made to predict the acceptance of gene-recombination technology. A structural equation model was used as a causal model. First of all, based on preceding studies, the factors of perceived risk, perceived benefit, and trust were set up as important psychological factors determining acceptance of gene-recombination technology in the structural equation model. An additional factor, "sense of bioethics," which I consider to be important for acceptance of biotechnology, was added to the model. Based on previous studies, trust was set up to have an indirect influence on the acceptance of gene-recombination technology through perceived risk and perceived benefit in the model. Participants were 231 undergraduate students in Japan who answered a questionnaire with a 5-point bipolar scale. The results indicated that the proposed model fits the data well, and showed that acceptance of gene-recombination technology is explained largely by four factors, that is, perceived risk, perceived benefit, trust, and sense of bioethics, whether the technology is applied to plants, animals, or human beings. However, the relative importance of the four factors was found to vary depending on whether the gene-recombination technology was applied to plants, animals, or human beings. Specifically, the factor of sense of bioethics is the most important factor in acceptance of plant gene-recombination technology and animal gene-recombination technology, and the factors of trust and perceived risk are the most important factors in acceptance of human being gene-recombination technology.

  10. Do Major Roads Reduce Gene Flow in Urban Bird Populations?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuping; Suo, Mingli; Liu, Shenglin; Liang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the negative effects of roads on the genetics of animal populations have been extensively reported, the question of whether roads reduce gene flow in volant, urban bird populations has so far not been addressed. In this study, we assess whether highways decreased gene flow and genetic variation in a small passerine bird, the tree sparrow (Passer montanus). Methodology We assessed genetic differences among tree sparrows (Passer montanus) sampled at 19 sites within Beijing Municipality, China, using 7 DNA microsatellites as genetic markers. Results AMOVA showed that genetic variation between sites, between urban and rural populations, and between opposite sides of the same highway, were very weak. Mantel tests on all samples, and on urban samples only, indicated that the age and number of highways, and the number of ordinary roads, were uncorrelated with genetic differences (FST) among tree sparrows from different urban sites. Birds sampled at urban sites had similar levels of genetic diversity to those at rural sites. There was, however, evidence of some weak genetic structure between urban sites. Firstly, there were significant genetic differences (FST) between birds from opposite sides of the same highway, but no significant FST values between those from sites that were not separated by highways. Secondly, birds from eleven urban sites had loci that significantly deviated from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium but no such deviation was found in birds from rural sites. Conclusion We cannot, therefore, conclusively reject the hypothesis that highways have no effect on the gene flow of tree sparrow populations. Furthermore, since the significance of these results may increase with time, we suggested that research on the influence of highways on gene flow in urban bird populations needs to be conducted over several decades. PMID:24204724

  11. The majority of human genes have regions repeated in other human genes.

    PubMed

    Britten, Roy J

    2005-04-12

    Amino acid sequence comparisons have been made between all of 25,193 human proteins with each of the others by using blast software (National Center for Biotechnology Information) and recording the results for regions that are significantly related in sequence, that is, have an expectation of <1 x 10(-3). The results are presented for each amino acid as the number of identical or similar amino acids matched in these aligned regions. This approach avoids summing or dealing directly with the different regions of any one protein that are often related to different numbers and types of other proteins. The results are presented graphically for a sample of 140 proteins. Relationships are not observed for 26.5% of the 12,728,866 amino acids. The average number of related amino acids is 36.5 for the majority (73.5%) that show relationships. The median number of recognized relationships is approximately 3 for all of the amino acids, and the maximum number is 718. The results demonstrate the overwhelming importance of gene regional duplication forming families of proteins with related domains and show the variety of the resulting patterns of relationship. The magnitude of the set of relationships leads to the conclusion that the principal process by which new gene functions arise has been by making use of preexisting genes. PMID:15802472

  12. Requirement of gene VII in cis for the expression of downstream genes on the major transcript of figwort mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1991-12-01

    The six major conserved genes of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, appear in tandem array on an RNA transcript that spans the entire viral genome. Gene VI, the only cistron that appears as a separate subgenomic RNA, has been reported to transactivate the expression of downstream genes of the full-length transcript. This transcript has a long 5'-leader of about 600 nucleotides followed by a small nonconserved region (gene VII), a smaller intergenic region (57 nucleotides), and the major conserved genes in a closely spaced array. In our present experiments we have constructed expression units containing the promoter for the full-length transcript followed by the 5' leader region, gene VII, and a reporter gene. These have been tested for expression with and without gene VI as a separate plasmid by electroporation into plant protoplasts. A series of these expression units containing truncated versions of the 5' leader region placed upstream of a reporter gene (CAT) showed that gene VI transactivation occurred only when gene VII sequences were present in cis between the leader region and the reporter gene. In addition, a more complete version of the FMV genome containing the reporter gene further downstream (in viral gene IV) showed CAT expression only when gene VII sequences were present in an upstream position. A similar construct failed to express CAT activity when gene VII was absent.

  13. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-. cap alpha. /sub 2/-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Gejyo, F.; Takagaki, K.; Haupt, H.; Schwick, H.G.; Buergi, W.; Marti, T.; Schaller, J.; Rickli, E.; Brossmer, R.

    1988-02-01

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of approx. = 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% ..cap alpha..-helix, 27% ..beta..-sheet, and 22% ..beta..-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in ..beta..-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the ..cap alpha.. chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2703 complexed with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-04-01

    The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2703 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by a single amino acid at heavy-chain residue 59 that is involved in anchoring the peptide N-terminus within the A pocket of the molecule. Two B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. A pocket of the molecule, two HLA-B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized and data sets were collected to high resolution using synchrotron radiation. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2703 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by a single amino acid at heavy-chain residue 59 that is involved in anchoring the peptide N-terminus within the A pocket of the molecule. Two B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} (pVIPR peptide) or P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pLMP2 peptide). Data sets were collected to 1.55 Å (B*2703–pVIPR) or 2.0 Å (B*2703–pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With B*2705–pVIPR as a search model, a clear molecular-replacement solution was found for both B*2703 complexes.

  15. Transplanting the elderly: Balancing aging with histocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, G J; Hemke, A C; Reinders, M E J; de Fijter, J W

    2015-10-01

    Across the world, the proportions of senior citizens (i.e. those ≥65years) increase rapidly and are predicted to constitute over 25% of the general population by 2050. In 2012 already 48% of the population with end stage renal disease (ESRD) was aged 65years or older. Transplantation is considered the preferred treatment option for ESRD offering survival advantage over long-term dialysis in the majority of patients. Indeed, acceptable outcomes have been documented for selected patients over the age of 70years or even cases over 80years. The reality of organ scarcity and prolonged waiting times for a deceased donor kidney transplantation, however, indicate that at best 50% of the selected elderly may have realistic expectations to receive a timely transplant offer. By choice or medical selection, access to transplantation also decreases with increasing age. In order to expedite the chance for elderly to receive a kidney transplant dedicated allocation systems have been developed. These allocation systems, like the Eurotransplant Senior Program (ESP), support preferential local allocation of kidneys from older donors to older patients in order to match recipient and graft life while disregarding histocompatibility for HLA antigens. The consequence has been more acute rejection episodes and an increase in immunosuppressive load. In the elderly, the most common cause of graft loss is death with functioning graft and death from infectious diseases is one of the dominant causes. The Eurotransplant Senior DR-compatible Program (ESDP) was designed to further improve the perspective of successful transplantation in the elderly in terms of life and quality of life by re-introducing matching criteria for HLA-DR in the old-for-old algorithm. PMID:26411382

  16. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the recombinantly expressed human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2704 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-10-01

    Crystallization of HLA-B*2704 in complex with two peptides. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2704 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by three amino acids at heavy-chain residues 77 (Ser instead of Asp), 152 (Glu instead of Val) and 211 (Gly instead of Ala). In contrast to the ubiquitous HLA-B*2705 subtype, HLA-B*2704 occurs only in orientals. Both subtypes are strongly associated with spondyloarthropathies and the peptides presented by these subtypes are suspected to play a role in disease pathogenesis. HLA-B*2704 was crystallized in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitant. Both crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Data sets were collected to 1.60 Å (complex with the self-peptide pVIPR) or to 1.90 Å (complex with the viral peptide pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With HLA-B*2705 complexed with pVIPR as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for the complexes of HLA-B*2704 with both peptides.

  17. The B cell repertoire revealed by major histocompatibility complex- specific helper T cells. I. Frequencies of a genetically defined V region marker among mitogen- and T helper cell-reactive B lymphocytes in normal and immunized mice

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequencies of a genetically defined variable (V) region marker in the B cell subset sensitive to T cell help. To this end we used an alloreactive T cell line that has the property of inducing B cells of the appropriate haplotype to exponential growth and polyclonal antibody synthesis. The frequency obtained with this helper line was also directly compared to that obtained with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that in normal BALB/c mice the frequency of M460-positive clonotypes was respectively, 1/100 and 1/1,000 among the T helper- and LPS-sensitive B cell subsets. In mice immunized with antiidiotype coupled to a thymus-dependent antigen, the differences in the numbers of idiotype-positive precursors were even more accentuated, i.e. 1/20 in the B cell subset triggered by T helper cells and 1/800 in those cells responsive to LPS. The frequencies of the M460 determinant in mice immunized with anti- idiotypes coupled to thymus-independent antigens were not significantly different, in either B cell subset, from those obtained with spleen cells of normal nonimmunized animals. Taken as a whole, our results imply that the V gene repertoire revealed by LPS includes precursor distribution, as this distribution occurs during the early stage of B cell development (potential repertoire), while the repertoire revealed by T helper cells includes the V region distribution of those clones that are selected in the periphery of the functional immune system. PMID:6200567

  18. Immunodominance of a low-affinity major histocompatibility complex-binding myelin basic protein epitope (residues 111-129) in HLA-DR4 (B1*0401) subjects is associated with a restricted T cell receptor repertoire.

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, P A; Vergelli, M; Kalbus, M; Banks, D E; Nagle, J W; Tranquill, L R; Nepom, G T; Biddison, W E; McFarland, H F; Martin, R

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently ascribed in part to a T cell-mediated process targeting myelin components. The T cell response to one candidate autoantigen, myelin basic protein (MBP), in the context of HLA-DR15Dw2, has been previously studied in detail. However, the characteristics of cellular immunity in the context of other MS-associated HLA-DR haplotypes are scarcely known. MBP-specific T cell lines (TCL) were generated from HLA-DR4 (B1*0401)-positive MS subjects. Out of 275 MBP-specific TCL, 178 (64. 7%) specifically recognized region MBP(111-129), predominantly in the context of DRB1*0401. The major T cell epitope for MBP recognition corresponded to residues MBP(116-123). These TCL expressed disparate profiles of cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity. T cell receptor analysis, on the other hand, revealed a strikingly limited heterogeneity of rearrangements. In contrast to MBP(81-99), which binds with high affinity to HLA-DR15 and is recognized by a diverse T cell repertoire, MBP(111-129) binds weakly to DRB1*0401, suggesting that only high affinity T cell receptors might be able to efficiently engage such unstable MHC/peptide complexes, thus accounting for the T cell receptor restriction we observed. This study provides new insight about MBP recognition and proposes an alternative mechanism for immunodominance of self-antigen T cell epitopes in humans. PMID:9218510

  19. Effects of Highly Conserved Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Extended Haplotypes on Iron and Low CD8+ T Lymphocyte Phenotypes in HFE C282Y Homozygous Hemochromatosis Patients from Three Geographically Distant Areas

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Thorstensen, Ketil; Morais, Sandra; da Silva, Berta M.; Pinto, Jorge P.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Acton, Ronald T.; Porto, Graça

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH) is a recessively inherited disorder of iron overload occurring commonly in subjects homozygous for the C282Y mutation in HFE gene localized on chromosome 6p21.3 in linkage disequilibrium with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A locus. Although its genetic homogeneity, the phenotypic expression is variable suggesting the presence of modifying factors. One such genetic factor, a SNP microhaplotype named A-A-T, was recently found to be associated with a more severe phenotype and also with low CD8+T-lymphocyte numbers. The present study aimed to test whether the predictive value of the A-A-T microhaplotype remained in other population settings. In this study of 304 HH patients from 3 geographically distant populations (Porto, Portugal 65; Alabama, USA 57; Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 182), the extended haplotypes involving A-A-T were studied in 608 chromosomes and the CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers were determined in all subjects. Patients from Porto had a more severe phenotype than those from other settings. Patients with A-A-T seemed on average to have greater iron stores (p = 0.021), but significant differences were not confirmed in the 3 separate populations. Low CD8+ T-lymphocytes were associated with HLA-A*03-A-A-T in Porto and Alabama patients but not in the greater series from Nord-Trøndelag. Although A-A-T may signal a more severe iron phenotype, this study was unable to prove such an association in all population settings, precluding its use as a universal predictive marker of iron overload in HH. Interestingly, the association between A-A-T and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, which was confirmed in Porto and Alabama patients, was not observed in Nord-Trøndelag patients, showing that common HLA haplotypes like A*01–B*08 or A*03–B*07 segregating with HFE/C282Y in the three populations may carry different messages. These findings further strengthen the relevance of HH as a good disease model to search for novel candidate loci associated with

  20. Establishment of the reversible peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I Histamer technology: tool for visualization and selection of functionally active antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Sabine; Kaireit, Till; Figueiredo, Constança; Hiller, Oliver; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Geyeregger, Renè; Immenschuh, Stephan; Blasczyk, Rainer; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2012-09-01

    Multimers of soluble peptide-major histocompatibilty complex (pMHC) molecules are used in both basic and clinical immunology. They allow the specific visualization and isolation of antigen-specific T cells from ex vivo samples. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells sorted by pMHC multimers is an effective strategy for treatment of patients with malignancies or infectious diseases after transplantation. We developed a new reversible pMHC multimer called 'Histamer' to enable the specific detection and isolation of antiviral T cells from peripheral blood. HLA-A*02:01/CMVpp65 (495-503) Histamer (A02/CMV Histamer) was generated by coupling 6xHis-tagged pMHC molecules onto cobalt-based magnetic beads. The specificity of the Histamer was evaluated by flow cytometry. Sorting of antiviral CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was performed by magnetic cell separation, followed by the monomerization of the Histamer after addition of the competitor L-histidine. Sorted T cells were analyzed for phenotype and function. The reversible pMHC Histamer proved to be highly specific and sensitive. CMV-specific T cells of up to 99.6% purity were isolated using the Histamer technology. Rapid and complete disassembly of the T-cell surface-bound A02/CMV Histamer followed by the subsequent dissociation of the pMHC monomers from CD8(+) CTL receptors was achieved using 100 mM L-histidine. The function of CMV-specific T cells enriched by Histamer staining did not differ from CTLs induced by standard T-cell assays. This reversible T-cell staining procedure preserves the functionality of antigen-specific T cells and can be adapted to good manufacturing practice conditions. The pMHC Histamer technology offers full flexibility and fulfills all requirements to generate clinical-grade T lymphocytes. PMID:22740564

  1. Sex Biased Gene Expression Profiling of Human Brains at Major Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Zhe; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    There are many differences in brain structure and function between males and females. However, how these differences were manifested during development and maintained through adulthood are still unclear. Here we present a time series analyses of genome-wide transcription profiles of the human brain, and we identified genes showing sex biased expression at major developmental stages (prenatal time, early childhood, puberty time and adulthood). We observed a great number of genes (>2,000 genes) showing between-sex expression divergence at all developmental stages with the greatest number (4,164 genes) at puberty time. However, there are little overlap of sex-biased genes among the major developmental stages, an indication of dynamic expression regulation of the sex-biased genes in the brain during development. Notably, the male biased genes are highly enriched for genes involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease and autism, while no such pattern was seen for the female-biased genes, suggesting that the differences in brain disorder susceptibility between males and females are likely rooted from the sex-biased gene expression regulation during brain development. Collectively, these analyses reveal an important role of sex biased genes in brain development and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26880485

  2. Histone gene number and organisation in Xenopus: Xenopus borealis has a homogeneous major cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P C; Woodland, H R

    1983-01-01

    Using a Xenopus laevis H4 cDNA clone as a probe we have determined that the numbers of H4 histone genes in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis are approximately the same. These numbers are dependent on the hybridization stringency and we measure about 90 H4 genes per haploid genome after a 60 degrees C wash in 3 X SSC. Using histone probes from both Xenopus and sea urchin we have studied the genomic organization of histone genes in these two species. In all of the X.borealis individuals analyzed about 70% of the histone genes were present in a very homogeneous major cluster. These genes are present in the order H1, H2B, H2A, H4 and H3, and the minimum length of the repeated unit is 16kb. In contrast, the histone gene clusters in X.laevis showed considerable sequence variation. However two major cluster types with different gene orders seem to be present in most individuals. The differences in histone gene organization seen in species of Xenopus suggest that even in closely related vertebrates the major histone gene clusters are quite fluid structures in evolutionary terms. Images PMID:6298735

  3. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes.

  4. Inhibition by chloroquine of the class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted presentation of endogenous antigens varies according to the cellular origin of the antigen-presenting cells, the nature of the T-cell epitope, and the responding T cell.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platlet, S; Bertolino, P; Deng, H; Gerlier, D; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1993-01-01

    Chloroquine treatment of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was explored as a tool to investigate the processing pathway for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted presentation of the endogenous secreted hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and transmembrane measles virus haemagglutinin (HA). A 72-hr pretreatment of the APC with 25 microM chloroquine blocked the presentation of the HEL(52-61) T-cell epitope generated from endogenous HEL to the I-Ak-restricted 3A9 T-cell hybridoma by MHC class II-transfected L cells expressing the invariant chain (Ii). The presentation of exogenously added HEL peptides was not affected. Under the same conditions, no inhibition of the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the I-Ed-restricted G28 high-avidity T-cell hybridoma, nor of HA when synthesized by L cells, was observed. When B-lymphoid APC were used, inhibition was observed in every case with a low number of B APC pretreated for 48 hr with chloroquine prior to the T-cell stimulation test. Moreover, addition of chloroquine to untreated B APC during the T-cell stimulation assay was sufficient to inhibit completely the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the B10.D24.42 low avidity T-cell hybridoma. Altogether these studies suggest that an apparent resistance of endogenous Ag presentation to chloroquine inhibition may not necessarily indicate the existence of a non-endosomal pathway but may be due to the nature of the T-cell epitope, to the use of 'non-professional' APC such as L cells, to the use of T cells of high avidity, and to high amounts of pre-existing MHC class II-peptide complexes expressed by the APC. We demonstrate here that, at least in conventional APC such as B cells, class II-restricted presentation of both endogenous secreted HEL and transmembrane HA involves an endosomal pathway. PMID:7508420

  5. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Multiple Spidroin 1 Genes Encoding Major Ampullate Silk Proteins in Nephila clavipes

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, William A.; Marcotte, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by non-repetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We have experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species. PMID:18828837

  7. A major gene controlling warfarin-resistance in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M E; MacSwiney, F J

    1976-04-01

    The spread of a "cream" mutant in a wild population of house mice is reported. The hypothesis that the gene responsible for the colour, extreme chinchilla, ce, has spread because of linkage with a major gene for warfarin-resistance, is tested by a linkage backcross. The results prove that a major gene does exist, that it is very closely linked with frizzy, fr, in chromosome 7, which in turn is linked with ce, that it is fully dominant in females at 4 months of age, and that its partial dominance in males is under the control of modifiers. The symbol War is proposed for the gene. Its position in chromosome 7 is analagous with the position of the resistant gene, Rw2, in the rat in the analagous chromosome. The adaptive significance of the finding is discussed, as also are reports of certain other mutants in wild populations of mice. PMID:1063212

  8. Power of segregation analysis for detection of major gene effects on quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Borecki, I B; Province, M A; Rao, D C

    1994-01-01

    The power to detect major gene effects by rejection of the "no major gene" null hypothesis against a mixed model alternative was determined in random samples of nuclear families over a variety of conditions. Benchmarks have been developed using a varying number of families whose structure includes both parents and three children. Phenotypes were simulated assuming a Mendelian major gene under either recessive or dominant inheritance, with 0-30% residual polygenic heritability. Three trait prevalences--5, 10, and 20%--were considered in combination with increasing displacement between homozygous means, spanning a range of 14 to 36% of the phenotypic variance attributable to the major gene effect. All other assumptions of the traditional mixed model were adopted in the generating models. Segregation analysis was carried out on the simulated data sets and the proportion of samples out of 200 replications in which the null hypothesis q = 0 was rejected is reported as the power. Thus, failure to detect a major gene effect in this context is solely due to sampling variation, since no other perturbations were introduced. In general, there appears to be greater power to detect dominant major gene effects as opposed to recessive ones using otherwise comparable parameter values, and the effect of varying sibship size under dominant models appears to be greater as well. The use of joint vs. conditional likelihood calculations also was evaluated: substantial drops in power were observed when using conditional likelihoods under recessive inheritance, while the differences in power appeared to be nominal under dominant inheritance. The results of this investigation are offered as a guide to assist in the design of family studies whose aim is to detect major gene effects.

  9. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-02-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include nifH, nifD, nifK, nifT, nifY, nifE, nifN, nifX, nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, nifM, and nifF. Although there are significant spatial differences, the identified A. vinelandii nif-specific genes have the same sequential arrangement as the corresponding nif-specific genes from K. pneumoniae. Twelve other potential genes whose expression could be subject to nif-specific regulation were also found interspersed among the identified nif-specific genes. These potential genes do not encode products that are structurally related to the identified nif-specific gene products. Eleven potential nif-specific promoters were identified within the major nif cluster, and nine of these are preceded by an appropriate upstream activator sequence. A + T-rich regions were identified between 8 of the 11 proposed nif promoter sequences and their upstream activator sequences. Site-directed deletion-and-insertion mutagenesis was used to establish a genetic map of the major nif cluster.

  10. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-01-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the