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Sample records for major lignin qtl

  1. A knockout mutation in the lignin biosynthesis gene CCR1 explains a major QTL for acid detergent lignin content in Brassica napus seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liezhao; Stein, Anna; Wittkop, Benjamin; Sarvari, Pouya; Li, Jiana; Yan, Xingying; Dreyer, Felix; Frauen, Martin; Friedt, Wolfgang; Snowdon, Rod J

    2012-05-01

    Seed coat phenolic compounds represent important antinutritive fibre components that cause a considerable reduction in value of seed meals from oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The nutritionally most important fibre compound is acid detergent lignin (ADL), to which a significant contribution is made by phenylpropanoid-derived lignin precursors. In this study, we used bulked-segregant analysis in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross of the Chinese oilseed rape lines GH06 (yellow seed, low ADL) and P174 (black seed, high ADL) to identify markers with tight linkage to a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for seed ADL content. Fine mapping of the QTL was performed in a backcross population comprising 872 BC(1)F(2) plants from a cross of an F(7) RIL from the above-mentioned population, which was heterozygous for this major QTL and P174. A 3:1 phenotypic segregation for seed ADL content indicated that a single, dominant, major locus causes a substantial reduction in ADL. This locus was successively narrowed to 0.75 cM using in silico markers derived from a homologous Brassica rapa sequence contig spanning the QTL. Subsequently, we located a B. rapa orthologue of the key lignin biosynthesis gene CINNAMOYL CO-A REDUCTASE 1 (CCR1) only 600 kbp (0.75 cM) upstream of the nearest linked marker. Sequencing of PCR amplicons, covering the full-length coding sequences of Bna.CCR1 homologues, revealed a locus in P174 whose sequence corresponds to the Brassica oleracea wild-type allele from chromosome C8. In GH06, however, this allele is replaced by a homologue derived from chromosome A9 that contains a loss-of-function frameshift mutation in exon 1. Genetic and physical map data infer that this loss-of-function allele has replaced a functional Bna.CCR1 locus on chromosome C8 in GH06 by homoeologous non-reciprocal translocation.

  2. Deploying QTL-seq for rapid delineation of a potential candidate gene underlying major trait-associated QTL in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shouvik; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Bajaj, Deepak; Kujur, Alice; Badoni, Saurabh; Laxmi; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C. L. Laxmipathi; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid high-resolution genome-wide strategy for molecular mapping of major QTL(s)/gene(s) regulating important agronomic traits is vital for in-depth dissection of complex quantitative traits and genetic enhancement in chickpea. The present study for the first time employed a NGS-based whole-genome QTL-seq strategy to identify one major genomic region harbouring a robust 100-seed weight QTL using an intra-specific 221 chickpea mapping population (desi cv. ICC 7184 × desi cv. ICC 15061). The QTL-seq-derived major SW QTL (CaqSW1.1) was further validated by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker-based traditional QTL mapping (47.6% R2 at higher LOD >19). This reflects the reliability and efficacy of QTL-seq as a strategy for rapid genome-wide scanning and fine mapping of major trait regulatory QTLs in chickpea. The use of QTL-seq and classical QTL mapping in combination narrowed down the 1.37 Mb (comprising 177 genes) major SW QTL (CaqSW1.1) region into a 35 kb genomic interval on desi chickpea chromosome 1 containing six genes. One coding SNP (G/A)-carrying constitutive photomorphogenic9 (COP9) signalosome complex subunit 8 (CSN8) gene of these exhibited seed-specific expression, including pronounced differential up-/down-regulation in low and high seed weight mapping parents and homozygous individuals during seed development. The coding SNP mined in this potential seed weight-governing candidate CSN8 gene was found to be present exclusively in all cultivated species/genotypes, but not in any wild species/genotypes of primary, secondary and tertiary gene pools. This indicates the effect of strong artificial and/or natural selection pressure on target SW locus during chickpea domestication. The proposed QTL-seq-driven integrated genome-wide strategy has potential to delineate major candidate gene(s) harbouring a robust trait regulatory QTL rapidly with optimal use of resources. This will further assist us to extrapolate the

  3. mQTL-seq delineates functionally relevant candidate gene harbouring a major QTL regulating pod number in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shouvik; Singh, Mohar; Srivastava, Rishi; Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Rana, Jai C.; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study used a whole-genome, NGS resequencing-based mQTL-seq (multiple QTL-seq) strategy in two inter-specific mapping populations (Pusa 1103 × ILWC 46 and Pusa 256 × ILWC 46) to scan the major genomic region(s) underlying QTL(s) governing pod number trait in chickpea. Essentially, the whole-genome resequencing of low and high pod number-containing parental accessions and homozygous individuals (constituting bulks) from each of these two mapping populations discovered >8 million high-quality homozygous SNPs with respect to the reference kabuli chickpea. The functional significance of the physically mapped SNPs was apparent from the identified 2,264 non-synonymous and 23,550 regulatory SNPs, with 8–10% of these SNPs-carrying genes corresponding to transcription factors and disease resistance-related proteins. The utilization of these mined SNPs in Δ (SNP index)-led QTL-seq analysis and their correlation between two mapping populations based on mQTL-seq, narrowed down two (CaqaPN4.1: 867.8 kb and CaqaPN4.2: 1.8 Mb) major genomic regions harbouring robust pod number QTLs into the high-resolution short QTL intervals (CaqbPN4.1: 637.5 kb and CaqbPN4.2: 1.28 Mb) on chickpea chromosome 4. The integration of mQTL-seq-derived one novel robust QTL with QTL region-specific association analysis delineated the regulatory (C/T) and coding (C/A) SNPs-containing one pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene at a major QTL region regulating pod number in chickpea. This target gene exhibited anther, mature pollen and pod-specific expression, including pronounced higher up-regulated (∼3.5-folds) transcript expression in high pod number-containing parental accessions and homozygous individuals of two mapping populations especially during pollen and pod development. The proposed mQTL-seq-driven combinatorial strategy has profound efficacy in rapid genome-wide scanning of potential candidate gene(s) underlying trait-associated high-resolution robust QTL(s), thereby expediting

  4. A consensus linkage map of oil palm and a major QTL for stem height.

    PubMed

    Lee, May; Xia, Jun Hong; Zou, Zhongwei; Ye, Jian; Rahmadsyah; Alfiko, Yuzer; Jin, Jingjing; Lieando, Jessica Virginia; Purnamasari, Maria Indah; Lim, Chin Huat; Suwanto, Antonius; Wong, Limsoon; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yue, Gen Hua

    2015-02-04

    Oil palm (Elaeis guinensis Jacquin) is the most important source of vegetable oil and fat. Several linkage maps had been constructed using dominant and co-dominant markers to facilitate mapping of QTL. However, dominant markers are not easily transferable among different laboratories. We constructed a consensus linkage map for oil palm using co-dominant markers (i.e. microsatellite and SNPs) and two F1 breeding populations generated by crossing Dura and Pisifera individuals. Four hundreds and forty-four microsatellites and 36 SNPs were mapped onto 16 linkage groups. The map length was 1565.6 cM, with an average marker space of 3.72 cM. A genome-wide scan of QTL identified a major QTL for stem height on the linkage group 5, which explained 51% of the phenotypic variation. Genes in the QTL were predicted using the palm genome sequence and bioinformatic tools. The linkage map supplies a base for mapping QTL for accelerating the genetic improvement, and will be also useful in the improvement of the assembly of the genome sequences. Markers linked to the QTL may be used in selecting dwarf trees. Genes within the QTL will be characterized to understand the mechanisms underlying dwarfing.

  5. A consensus linkage map of oil palm and a major QTL for stem height

    PubMed Central

    Lee, May; Xia, Jun Hong; Zou, Zhongwei; Ye, Jian; Rahmadsyah; Alfiko, Yuzer; Jin, Jingjing; Lieando, Jessica Virginia; Purnamasari, Maria Indah; Lim, Chin Huat; Suwanto, Antonius; Wong, Limsoon; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yue, Gen Hua

    2015-01-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guinensis Jacquin) is the most important source of vegetable oil and fat. Several linkage maps had been constructed using dominant and co-dominant markers to facilitate mapping of QTL. However, dominant markers are not easily transferable among different laboratories. We constructed a consensus linkage map for oil palm using co-dominant markers (i.e. microsatellite and SNPs) and two F1 breeding populations generated by crossing Dura and Pisifera individuals. Four hundreds and forty-four microsatellites and 36 SNPs were mapped onto 16 linkage groups. The map length was 1565.6 cM, with an average marker space of 3.72 cM. A genome-wide scan of QTL identified a major QTL for stem height on the linkage group 5, which explained 51% of the phenotypic variation. Genes in the QTL were predicted using the palm genome sequence and bioinformatic tools. The linkage map supplies a base for mapping QTL for accelerating the genetic improvement, and will be also useful in the improvement of the assembly of the genome sequences. Markers linked to the QTL may be used in selecting dwarf trees. Genes within the QTL will be characterized to understand the mechanisms underlying dwarfing. PMID:25648560

  6. Identification of major and minor QTL for ecologically important morphological traits in three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Shikano, Takahito; Leinonen, Tuomas; Cano, José Manuel; Li, Meng-Hua; Merilä, Juha

    2014-04-16

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies of Pacific three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have uncovered several genomic regions controlling variability in different morphological traits, but QTL studies of Atlantic sticklebacks are lacking. We mapped QTL for 40 morphological traits, including body size, body shape, and body armor, in a F2 full-sib cross between northern European marine and freshwater three-spined sticklebacks. A total of 52 significant QTL were identified at the 5% genome-wide level. One major QTL explaining 74.4% of the total variance in lateral plate number was detected on LG4, whereas several major QTL for centroid size (a proxy for body size), and the lengths of two dorsal spines, pelvic spine, and pelvic girdle were mapped on LG21 with the explained variance ranging from 27.9% to 57.6%. Major QTL for landmark coordinates defining body shape variation also were identified on LG21, with each explaining ≥15% of variance in body shape. Multiple QTL for different traits mapped on LG21 overlapped each other, implying pleiotropy and/or tight linkage. Thus, apart from providing confirmatory data to support conclusions born out of earlier QTL studies of Pacific sticklebacks, this study also describes several novel QTL of both major and smaller effect for ecologically important traits. The finding that many major QTL mapped on LG21 suggests that this linkage group might be a hotspot for genetic determinants of ecologically important morphological traits in three-spined sticklebacks.

  7. Identification of Major and Minor QTL for Ecologically Important Morphological Traits in Three-Spined Sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Shikano, Takahito; Leinonen, Tuomas; Cano, José Manuel; Li, Meng-Hua; Merilä, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies of Pacific three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have uncovered several genomic regions controlling variability in different morphological traits, but QTL studies of Atlantic sticklebacks are lacking. We mapped QTL for 40 morphological traits, including body size, body shape, and body armor, in a F2 full-sib cross between northern European marine and freshwater three-spined sticklebacks. A total of 52 significant QTL were identified at the 5% genome-wide level. One major QTL explaining 74.4% of the total variance in lateral plate number was detected on LG4, whereas several major QTL for centroid size (a proxy for body size), and the lengths of two dorsal spines, pelvic spine, and pelvic girdle were mapped on LG21 with the explained variance ranging from 27.9% to 57.6%. Major QTL for landmark coordinates defining body shape variation also were identified on LG21, with each explaining ≥15% of variance in body shape. Multiple QTL for different traits mapped on LG21 overlapped each other, implying pleiotropy and/or tight linkage. Thus, apart from providing confirmatory data to support conclusions born out of earlier QTL studies of Pacific sticklebacks, this study also describes several novel QTL of both major and smaller effect for ecologically important traits. The finding that many major QTL mapped on LG21 suggests that this linkage group might be a hotspot for genetic determinants of ecologically important morphological traits in three-spined sticklebacks. PMID:24531726

  8. Purification of major lignin peroxidase isoenzymes from Phanerochaete chrysosporium by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Ollikka, P; Leppänen, V M; Anttila, T; Suominen, I

    1995-06-01

    The basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces several isoforms of lignin peroxidase, which catalyzes the oxidative depolymerization of lignin To date, ion-exchange chromatography and preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF) have been commonly used for isolation of lignin peroxidase isoenzymes. In this work we have purified major lignin peroxidases to high purity by a one-step chromatographic method, chromatofocusing. The purified isoenzymes were identified by analytical IEF using isoenzymes purified by preparative IEF as standards. The specific activities and spectral properties of the isoenzymes were comparable with the previously published data. The predominant isoenzyme under the growth conditions used was LiP 4.65. Almost 50% of the lignin peroxidase activity applied into the column was recovered in the LiP 4.65 fraction. The total recovery of the lignin peroxidase activity was over 80%.

  9. A major QTL controls susceptibility to spinal curvature in the curveback guppy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature would benefit medicine and aquaculture. Heritable spinal curvature among otherwise healthy children (i.e. Idiopathic Scoliosis and Scheuermann kyphosis) accounts for more than 80% of all spinal curvatures and imposes a substantial healthcare cost through bracing, hospitalizations, surgery, and chronic back pain. In aquaculture, the prevalence of heritable spinal curvature can reach as high as 80% of a stock, and thus imposes a substantial cost through production losses. The genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature is unknown and so the objective of this work is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy. Prior work with curveback has demonstrated phenotypic parallels to human idiopathic-type scoliosis, suggesting shared biological pathways for the deformity. Results A major effect QTL that acts in a recessive manner and accounts for curve susceptibility was detected in an initial mapping cross on LG 14. In a second cross, we confirmed this susceptibility locus and fine mapped it to a 5 cM region that explains 82.6% of the total phenotypic variance. Conclusions We identify a major QTL that controls susceptibility to curvature. This locus contains over 100 genes, including MTNR1B, a candidate gene for human idiopathic scoliosis. The identification of genes associated with heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy has the potential to elucidate the biological basis of spinal curvature among humans and economically important teleosts. PMID:21269476

  10. QTL Mapping of Kernel Number-Related Traits and Validation of One Major QTL for Ear Length in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Dongao; Ning, Qiang; Shen, Xiaomeng; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Zuxin

    2016-01-01

    The kernel number is a grain yield component and an important maize breeding goal. Ear length, kernel number per row and ear row number are highly correlated with the kernel number per ear, which eventually determines the ear weight and grain yield. In this study, two sets of F2:3 families developed from two bi-parental crosses sharing one inbred line were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for four kernel number-related traits: ear length, kernel number per row, ear row number and ear weight. A total of 39 QTLs for the four traits were identified in the two populations. The phenotypic variance explained by a single QTL ranged from 0.4% to 29.5%. Additionally, 14 overlapping QTLs formed 5 QTL clusters on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7, and 10. Intriguingly, six QTLs for ear length and kernel number per row overlapped in a region on chromosome 1. This region was designated qEL1.10 and was validated as being simultaneously responsible for ear length, kernel number per row and ear weight in a near isogenic line-derived population, suggesting that qEL1.10 was a pleiotropic QTL with large effects. Furthermore, the performance of hybrids generated by crossing 6 elite inbred lines with two near isogenic lines at qEL1.10 showed the breeding value of qEL1.10 for the improvement of the kernel number and grain yield of maize hybrids. This study provides a basis for further fine mapping, molecular marker-aided breeding and functional studies of kernel number-related traits in maize. PMID:27176215

  11. QTL Mapping of Kernel Number-Related Traits and Validation of One Major QTL for Ear Length in Maize.

    PubMed

    Huo, Dongao; Ning, Qiang; Shen, Xiaomeng; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Zuxin

    2016-01-01

    The kernel number is a grain yield component and an important maize breeding goal. Ear length, kernel number per row and ear row number are highly correlated with the kernel number per ear, which eventually determines the ear weight and grain yield. In this study, two sets of F2:3 families developed from two bi-parental crosses sharing one inbred line were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for four kernel number-related traits: ear length, kernel number per row, ear row number and ear weight. A total of 39 QTLs for the four traits were identified in the two populations. The phenotypic variance explained by a single QTL ranged from 0.4% to 29.5%. Additionally, 14 overlapping QTLs formed 5 QTL clusters on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7, and 10. Intriguingly, six QTLs for ear length and kernel number per row overlapped in a region on chromosome 1. This region was designated qEL1.10 and was validated as being simultaneously responsible for ear length, kernel number per row and ear weight in a near isogenic line-derived population, suggesting that qEL1.10 was a pleiotropic QTL with large effects. Furthermore, the performance of hybrids generated by crossing 6 elite inbred lines with two near isogenic lines at qEL1.10 showed the breeding value of qEL1.10 for the improvement of the kernel number and grain yield of maize hybrids. This study provides a basis for further fine mapping, molecular marker-aided breeding and functional studies of kernel number-related traits in maize.

  12. Identification of a major QTL controlling the content of B-type starch granules in Aegilops

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Griffiths, Simon; Leigh, Fiona; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Simmonds, James; Uauy, Cristobal; Trafford, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Starch within the endosperm of most species of the Triticeae has a unique bimodal granule morphology comprising large lenticular A-type granules and smaller near-spherical B-type granules. However, a few wild wheat species (Aegilops) are known to lack B-granules. Ae. peregrina and a synthetic tetraploid Aegilops with the same genome composition (SU) were found to differ in B-granule number. The synthetic tetraploid had normal A- and B-type starch granules whilst Ae. peregrina had only A-granules because the B-granules failed to initiate. A population segregating for B-granule number was generated by crossing these two accessions and was used to study the genetic basis of B-granule initiation. A combination of Bulked Segregant Analysis and QTL mapping identified a major QTL located on the short arm of chromosome 4S that accounted for 44.4% of the phenotypic variation. The lack of B-granules in polyploid Aegilops with diverse genomes suggests that the B-granule locus has been lost several times independently during the evolution of the Triticeae. It is proposed that the B-granule locus is susceptible to silencing during polyploidization and a model is presented to explain the observed data based on the assumption that the initiation of B-granules is controlled by a single major locus per haploid genome. PMID:21227932

  13. A Major Effect QTL on Chromosome 18 for Noise Injury to the Mouse Cochlear Lateral Wall

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Rosen, Allyson D.; Gagnon, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    We recently demonstrated a striking difference among inbred mouse strains in the effects of a single noise exposure, whereby CBA/J and CBA/CaJ (CBA) mice show moderate reversible reduction in the endocochlear potential (EP) while C57BL/6J (B6) mice do not (Ohlemiller, K.K., Gagnon, P.M. 2007. Genetic dependence of cochlear cells and structures injured by noise. Hearing Res. 224, 34-50). Acute EP reduction in CBA was reliably associated with characteristic pathology of the spiral ligament and stria vascularis, both immediately after noise and 8 weeks later. Analysis of B6×CBA F1 hybrid mice indicated that EP reduction and its anatomic correlates are co-inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Further analysis of N2 mice resulting from the backcross of F1 hybrids to B6 mice led us to suggest that the EP reduction phenotype principally reflects the influence of a small number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Here we report the results of QTL mapping of the EP reduction phenotype in CBA/J using 106 N2 mice from a (CBA×B6) × B6 backcross. Correlation of acute post-noise EP with 135 markers distributed throughout the genome revealed a single major effect QTL on chromosome 18 (12.5 cM, LOD 3.57) (Nirep, for Noise-induced reduction in EP QTL), and two marginally significant QTLs on chromosomes 5 and 16 (LOD 1.43 and 1.73, respectively). Our results underscore that fact that different cochlear structures may possess different susceptibilities to noise through the influence of non-overlapping genes. While Nirep and similar-acting QTLs do not appear to influence the extent of permanent hearing loss from a single noise exposure, they could reduce the homeostatic ‘reserve’ of the lateral wall in protracted or continual exposures, and thereby influence long term threshold stability. PMID:19913606

  14. Resistance to a rhabdovirus (VHSV) in rainbow trout: identification of a major QTL related to innate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Dorson, Michel; Mauger, Stéphane; Torhy, Corinne; Ciobotaru, Céline; Hervet, Caroline; Dechamp, Nicolas; Genet, Carine; Boudinot, Pierre; Quillet, Edwige

    2013-01-01

    Health control is a major issue in animal breeding and a better knowledge of the genetic bases of resistance to diseases is needed in farm animals including fish. The detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) will help uncovering the genetic architecture of important traits and understanding the mechanisms involved in resistance to pathogens. We report here the detection of QTL for resistance to Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus (VHSV), a major threat for European aquaculture industry. Two induced mitogynogenetic doubled haploid F2 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) families were used. These families combined the genome of susceptible and resistant F0 breeders and contained only fully homozygous individuals. For phenotyping, fish survival after an immersion challenge with the virus was recorded, as well as in vitro virus replication on fin explants. A bidirectional selective genotyping strategy identified seven QTL associated to survival. One of those QTL was significant at the genome-wide level and largely explained both survival and viral replication in fin explants in the different families of the design (up to 65% and 49% of phenotypic variance explained respectively). These results evidence the key role of innate defence in resistance to the virus and pave the way for the identification of the gene(s) responsible for resistance. The identification of a major QTL also opens appealing perspectives for selective breeding of fish with improved resistance.

  15. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  16. Resistance to a Rhabdovirus (VHSV) in Rainbow Trout: Identification of a Major QTL Related to Innate Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Dorson, Michel; Mauger, Stéphane; Torhy, Corinne; Ciobotaru, Céline; Hervet, Caroline; Dechamp, Nicolas; Genet, Carine; Boudinot, Pierre; Quillet, Edwige

    2013-01-01

    Health control is a major issue in animal breeding and a better knowledge of the genetic bases of resistance to diseases is needed in farm animals including fish. The detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) will help uncovering the genetic architecture of important traits and understanding the mechanisms involved in resistance to pathogens. We report here the detection of QTL for resistance to Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus (VHSV), a major threat for European aquaculture industry. Two induced mitogynogenetic doubled haploid F2 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) families were used. These families combined the genome of susceptible and resistant F0 breeders and contained only fully homozygous individuals. For phenotyping, fish survival after an immersion challenge with the virus was recorded, as well as in vitro virus replication on fin explants. A bidirectional selective genotyping strategy identified seven QTL associated to survival. One of those QTL was significant at the genome-wide level and largely explained both survival and viral replication in fin explants in the different families of the design (up to 65% and 49% of phenotypic variance explained respectively). These results evidence the key role of innate defence in resistance to the virus and pave the way for the identification of the gene(s) responsible for resistance. The identification of a major QTL also opens appealing perspectives for selective breeding of fish with improved resistance. PMID:23390526

  17. Characterization of a major QTL for adult plant resistance to stripe rust in US soft red winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuanfeng; Chen, Zhenbang; Wang, Yingying; Bland, Dan; Buck, James; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Johnson, Jerry

    2011-12-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease of soft red winter wheat in the eastern region of the USA. Pioneer 26R61 has provided effective resistance to stripe rust for 10 years. To elucidate the genetic basis of the resistance, a mapping population of 178 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed using single-seed descent from a cross between Pioneer 26R61 and the susceptible cultivar AGS 2000. A genetic map with 895 markers covering all 21 chromosomes was used for QTL analysis. One major QTL was detected, explaining up to 56.0% of the mean phenotypic variation, flanked by markers Xbarc124 and Xgwm359, and assigned to the distal 22% of the short arm of wheat chromosome 2A. Evidence showed that it was different from Yr17 derived from Ae. ventricosa, the only formally named Yr gene in 2AS, and the QTL was temporarily designated as YrR61. In addition, a minor QTL, QYr.uga-6AS, probably conditioned high-temperature adult plant resistance. The QTL explained 6-7% of the trait variation. Preliminary test of the flanking markers for YrR61, in two cultivars and two promising breeding lines with Pioneer 26R61 in their pedigree, indicated that YrR61 was present in these cultivars and lines, and these markers could therefore be used in marker-assisted selection.

  18. QTL Mapping in Three Rice Populations Uncovers Major Genomic Regions Associated with African Rice Gall Midge Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nasser; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Semagn, Kassa; Sow, Mounirou; Nwilene, Francis; Kolade, Olufisayo; Bocco, Roland; Oyetunji, Olumoye; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    African rice gall midge (AfRGM) is one of the most destructive pests of irrigated and lowland African ecologies. This study aimed to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with AfRGM pest incidence and resistance in three independent bi-parental rice populations (ITA306xBW348-1, ITA306xTOG7106 and ITA306xTOS14519), and to conduct meta QTL (mQTL) analysis to explore whether any genomic regions are conserved across different genetic backgrounds. Composite interval mapping (CIM) conducted on the three populations independently uncovered a total of 28 QTLs associated with pest incidence (12) and pest severity (16). The number of QTLs per population associated with AfRGM resistance varied from three in the ITA306xBW348-1 population to eight in the ITA306xTOG7106 population. Each QTL individually explained 1.3 to 34.1% of the phenotypic variance. The major genomic region for AfRGM resistance had a LOD score and R2 of 60.0 and 34.1% respectively, and mapped at 111 cM on chromosome 4 (qAfrGM4) in the ITA306xTOS14519 population. The meta-analysis reduced the number of QTLs from 28 to 17 mQTLs, each explaining 1.3 to 24.5% of phenotypic variance, and narrowed the confidence intervals by 2.2 cM. There was only one minor effect mQTL on chromosome 1 that was common in the TOS14519 and TOG7106 genetic backgrounds; all other mQTLs were background specific. We are currently fine-mapping and validating the major effect genomic region on chromosome 4 (qAfRGM4). This is the first report in mapping the genomic regions associated with the AfRGM resistance, and will be highly useful for rice breeders.

  19. Partial resistance of Medicago truncatula to Aphanomyces euteiches is associated with protection of the root stele and is controlled by a major QTL rich in proteasome-related genes.

    PubMed

    Djébali, Naceur; Jauneau, Alain; Ameline-Torregrosa, Carine; Chardon, Fabien; Jaulneau, Valérie; Mathé, Catherine; Bottin, Arnaud; Cazaux, Marc; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard; Huguet, Thierry; Jacquet, Christophe

    2009-09-01

    A pathosystem between Aphanomyces euteiches, the causal agent of pea root rot disease, and the model legume Medicago truncatula was developed to gain insights into mechanisms involved in resistance to this oomycete. The F83005.5 French accession and the A17-Jemalong reference line, susceptible and partially resistant, respectively, to A. euteiches, were selected for further cytological and genetic analyses. Microscopy analyses of thin root sections revealed that a major difference between the two inoculated lines occurred in the root stele, which remained pathogen free in A17. Striking features were observed in A17 roots only, including i) frequent pericycle cell divisions, ii) lignin deposition around the pericycle, and iii) accumulation of soluble phenolic compounds. Genetic analysis of resistance was performed on an F7 population of 139 recombinant inbred lines and identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) near the top of chromosome 3. A second study, with near-isogenic line responses to A. euteiches confirmed the role of this QTL in expression of resistance. Fine-mapping allowed the identification of a 135-kb sequenced genomic DNA region rich in proteasome-related genes. Most of these genes were shown to be induced only in inoculated A17. Novel mechanisms possibly involved in the observed partial resistance are proposed.

  20. QTL Mapping in Three Rice Populations Uncovers Major Genomic Regions Associated with African Rice Gall Midge Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Semagn, Kassa; Sow, Mounirou; Nwilene, Francis; Kolade, Olufisayo; Bocco, Roland; Oyetunji, Olumoye; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    African rice gall midge (AfRGM) is one of the most destructive pests of irrigated and lowland African ecologies. This study aimed to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with AfRGM pest incidence and resistance in three independent bi-parental rice populations (ITA306xBW348-1, ITA306xTOG7106 and ITA306xTOS14519), and to conduct meta QTL (mQTL) analysis to explore whether any genomic regions are conserved across different genetic backgrounds. Composite interval mapping (CIM) conducted on the three populations independently uncovered a total of 28 QTLs associated with pest incidence (12) and pest severity (16). The number of QTLs per population associated with AfRGM resistance varied from three in the ITA306xBW348-1 population to eight in the ITA306xTOG7106 population. Each QTL individually explained 1.3 to 34.1% of the phenotypic variance. The major genomic region for AfRGM resistance had a LOD score and R2 of 60.0 and 34.1% respectively, and mapped at 111 cM on chromosome 4 (qAfrGM4) in the ITA306xTOS14519 population. The meta-analysis reduced the number of QTLs from 28 to 17 mQTLs, each explaining 1.3 to 24.5% of phenotypic variance, and narrowed the confidence intervals by 2.2 cM. There was only one minor effect mQTL on chromosome 1 that was common in the TOS14519 and TOG7106 genetic backgrounds; all other mQTLs were background specific. We are currently fine-mapping and validating the major effect genomic region on chromosome 4 (qAfRGM4). This is the first report in mapping the genomic regions associated with the AfRGM resistance, and will be highly useful for rice breeders. PMID:27508500

  1. Identification and validation of a novel major QTL for harvest index in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohong; He, Xiuying; Zhao, Junliang; Cheng, Yongsheng; Xie, Zhimei; Chen, Yuehan; Yang, Tifeng; Dong, Jingfang; Wang, Xiaofei; Liu, Qing; Liu, Wei; Mao, Xingxue; Fu, Hua; Chen, Zhaoming; Liao, Yaoping; Liu, Bin

    2017-09-26

    Harvest index (HI) in rice is defined as the ratio of grain yield (GY) to biomass (BM). Although it has been demonstrated that HI is significantly related to yield and is considered as one of the most important traits in high-yielding rice breeding, HI-based high-yielding rice breeding is difficult due to its polygenic nature and insufficient knowledge on the genetic basis of HI. Therefore, searching for rice varieties with high HI and mapping genes associated with high HI can facilitate marker-assisted breeding for high HI in rice. Yuexiangzhan, a popular indica cultivar with good reputation of high HI was crossed with Shengbasimiao, an indica cultivar with lower HI to develop a recombinant inbred line population, and QTL mapping for HI and its component traits was conducted. In total, five QTLs for HI, three QTLs for GY, and six QTLs for BM were detected in two-year experiments. Among the three GY QTLs, one co-located with the HI QTL on chromosome 8, while the other two co-located with the two tightly-linked BM QTLs on chromosome 3. The co-located QTLs in each of the chromosomal regions produced additive effects in the same direction. Particularly, the HI QTL on chromosome 8, qHI-8, could be detected across two years and explained 42.8% and 44.5% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The existence of qHI-8 was confirmed by the evaluation of the near isogenic lines derived from a residual heterozygous line, and this QTL was delimitated to a 1070 kb interval by substitution mapping. In the present study, the detected GY QTLs overlapped with both HI QTL and BM QTL, suggesting a positive relationship between GY and HI or BM, respectively. With an understanding of the genetic basis for grain yield, harvest index and biomass, it is possible to achieve higher yield through enhancing HI and BM by pyramiding the favorable alleles for the two traits via marker-assisted selection (MAS). As qHI-8 has a large phenotypic effect on HI and expresses stably in different

  2. A major QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Yin, Guangming; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2010-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, the conidial form of Gibberella zeae, is the causal fungal pathogen responsible for Gibberella stalk rot of maize. Using a BC(1)F(1) backcross mapping population derived from a cross between '1145' (donor parent, completely resistant) and 'Y331' (recurrent parent, highly susceptible), two quantitative trait loci (QTLs), qRfg1 and qRfg2, conferring resistance to Gibberella stalk rot have been detected. The major QTL qRfg1 was further confirmed in the double haploid, F(2), BC(2)F(1), and BC(3)F(1) populations. Within a qRfg1 confidence interval, single/low-copy bacterial artificial chromosome sequences, anchored expressed sequence tags, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms, were exploited to develop 59 markers to saturate the qRfg1 region. A step by step narrowing-down strategy was adopted to pursue fine mapping of the qRfg1 locus. Recombinants within the qRfg1 region, screened from each backcross generation, were backcrossed to 'Y331' to produce the next backcross progenies. These progenies were individually genotyped and evaluated for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. Significant (or no significant) difference in resistance reactions between homozygous and heterozygous genotypes in backcross progeny suggested presence (or absence) of qRfg1 in '1145' donor fragments. The phenotypes were compared to sizes of donor fragments among recombinants to delimit the qRfg1 region. Sequential fine mapping of BC(4)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations enabled us to progressively refine the qRfg1 locus to a ~500-kb interval flanked by the markers SSR334 and SSR58. Meanwhile, resistance of qRfg1 to Gibberella stalk rot was also investigated in BC(3)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations. Once introgressed into the 'Y331' genome, the qRfg1 locus could steadily enhance the frequency of resistant plants by 32-43%. Hence, the qRfg1 locus was capable of improving maize resistance to Gibberella stalk rot.

  3. A major QTL introgressed from wild Lycopersicon hirsutum confers chilling tolerance to cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    John Goodstal, F; Kohler, Glenn R; Randall, Leslie B; Bloom, Arnold J; St Clair, Dina A

    2005-09-01

    Many plants of tropical or subtropical origin, such as tomato, suffer damage under chilling temperatures (under 10 degrees C but above 0 degrees C). An earlier study identified several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for shoot turgor maintenance (stm) under root chilling in an interspecific backcross population derived from crossing chilling-susceptible cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and chilling-tolerant wild L. hirsutum. The QTL with the greatest phenotypic effect on stm was located in a 28 cM region on chromosome 9 (designated stm 9), and enhanced chilling-tolerance was conferred by the presence of the Lycopersicon hirsutum allele at this QTL. Here, near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used to verify the effect of stm 9, and recombinant sub-NILs were used to fine map its position. Replicated experiments were performed with NILs and sub-NILs in a refrigerated hydroponic tank in the greenhouse. Sub-NIL data was analyzed using least square means separations, marker-genotype mean t-tests, and composite interval mapping. A dominant QTL controlling shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling was confirmed on chromosome 9 using both NILs and sub-NILs. Furthermore, sub-NILs permitted localization of stm 9 to a 2.7 cM interval within the original 28 cM QTL region. If the presence of the L. hirsutum allele at stm 9 also confers chilling-tolerance in L. esculentum plants grown under field conditions, it has the potential to expand the geographic areas in which cultivated tomato can be grown for commercial production.

  4. Two distinct major QTL for resistance to fire blight co-localize on linkage group 12 in apple genotypes 'Evereste' and Malus floribunda clone 821.

    PubMed

    Durel, C-E; Denancé, C; Brisset, M-N

    2009-02-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus xdomestica) worldwide. No major, qualitative gene for resistance to this disease has been identified so far in apple. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed in two F1 progenies derived from two controled crosses: one between the susceptible rootstock cultivar 'MM106' and the resistant ornamental cultivar 'Evereste' and the other one between the moderately susceptible cultivar 'Golden Delicious' and the wild apple Malus floribunda clone 821, with unknown level of fire blight resistance. Both progenies were inoculated in the greenhouse with the same reference strain of E. amylovora. The length of stem necrosis was scored 7 and 14 days after inoculation. A strong QTL effect was identified in both 'Evereste' and M. floribunda 821 at a similar position on the distal region of linkage group 12 of the apple genome. From 50% to 70% of the phenotypic variation was explained by the QTL in 'Evereste' progeny according to the scored trait. More than 40% of the phenotypic variation was explained by the M. floribunda QTL in the second progeny. It was shown that 'Evereste' and M. floribunda 821 carried distinct QTL alleles at that genomic position. A small additional QTL was identified in 'Evereste' on linkage group 15, which explained about 6% of the phenotypic variation. Although it was not possible to confirm whether or not 'Evereste' and M. floribunda QTL belonged to the same locus or two distinct closely related loci, these QTL can be valuable targets in marker-assisted selection to obtain fire blight resistant apple cultivars and form a starting point for discovering the function of the genes controlling apple fire blight resistance.

  5. QTL and association analysis for skin and fibre pigmentation in sheep provides evidence of a major causative mutation and epistatic effects.

    PubMed

    Raadsma, H W; Jonas, E; Fleet, M R; Fullard, K; Gongora, J; Cavanagh, C R; Tammen, I; Thomson, P C

    2013-08-01

    The pursuits of white features and white fleeces free of pigmented fibre have been important selection objectives for many sheep breeds. The cause and inheritance of non-white colour patterns in sheep has been studied since the early 19th century. Discovery of genetic causes, especially those which predispose pigmentation in white sheep, may lead to more accurate selection tools for improved apparel wool. This article describes an extended QTL study for 13 skin and fibre pigmentation traits in sheep. A total of 19 highly significant, 10 significant and seven suggestive QTL were identified in a QTL mapping experiment using an Awassi × Merino × Merino backcross sheep population. All QTL on chromosome 2 exceeded a LOD score of greater than 4 (range 4.4-30.1), giving very strong support for a major gene for pigmentation on this chromosome. Evidence of epistatic interactions was found for QTL for four traits on chromosomes 2 and 19. The ovine TYRP1 gene on OAR 2 was sequenced as a strong positional candidate gene. A highly significant association (P < 0.01) of grandparental haplotypes across nine segregating SNP/microsatellite markers including one non-synonymous SNP with pigmentation traits could be shown. Up to 47% of the observed variation in pigmentation was accounted for by models using TYRP1 haplotypes and 83% for models with interactions between two QTL probabilities, offering scope for marker-assisted selection for these traits.

  6. Molecular mapping and validation of a major QTL conferring resistance to a defoliating isolate of verticillium wilt in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingju; Yuan, Yanchao; Wei, Ze; Guo, Xian; Guo, Yuping; Zhang, Suqing; Zhao, Junsheng; Zhang, Guihua; Song, Xianliang; Sun, Xuezhen

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb is one of the most destructive diseases of cotton. Development and use of a VW resistant variety is the most practical and effective way to manage this disease. Identification of highly resistant genes/QTL and the underlining genetic architecture is a prerequisite for developing a VW resistant variety. A major QTL qVW-c6-1 conferring resistance to the defoliating isolate V991 was identified on chromosome 6 in LHB22×JM11 F2∶3 population inoculated and grown in a greenhouse. This QTL was further validated in the LHB22×NNG F2∶3 population that was evaluated in an artificial disease nursery of V991 for two years and in its subsequent F4 population grown in a field severely infested by V991. The allele conferring resistance within the QTL qVW-c6-1 region originated from parent LHB22 and could explain 23.1-27.1% of phenotypic variation. Another resistance QTL qVW-c21-1 originated from the susceptible parent JM11 was mapped on chromosome 21, explaining 14.44% of phenotypic variation. The resistance QTL reported herein provides a useful tool for breeding a cotton variety with enhanced resistance to VW.

  7. Molecular Mapping and Validation of a Major QTL Conferring Resistance to a Defoliating Isolate of Verticillium Wilt in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ze; Guo, Xian; Guo, Yuping; Zhang, Suqing; Zhao, Junsheng; Zhang, Guihua; Song, Xianliang; Sun, Xuezhen

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb is one of the most destructive diseases of cotton. Development and use of a VW resistant variety is the most practical and effective way to manage this disease. Identification of highly resistant genes/QTL and the underlining genetic architecture is a prerequisite for developing a VW resistant variety. A major QTL qVW-c6-1 conferring resistance to the defoliating isolate V991 was identified on chromosome 6 in LHB22×JM11 F2∶3 population inoculated and grown in a greenhouse. This QTL was further validated in the LHB22×NNG F2∶3 population that was evaluated in an artificial disease nursery of V991 for two years and in its subsequent F4 population grown in a field severely infested by V991. The allele conferring resistance within the QTL qVW-c6-1 region originated from parent LHB22 and could explain 23.1–27.1% of phenotypic variation. Another resistance QTL qVW-c21-1 originated from the susceptible parent JM11 was mapped on chromosome 21, explaining 14.44% of phenotypic variation. The resistance QTL reported herein provides a useful tool for breeding a cotton variety with enhanced resistance to VW. PMID:24781706

  8. Development of selective markers linked to a major QTL for parthenocarpy in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Koji; Saito, Takeo; Negoro, Satomi; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Nunome, Tsukasa; Ohyama, Akio; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-01

    Parthenocarpy, the ability to set fruits without pollination, is a useful trait for setting fruit under unfavorable conditions. To identify the loci controlling parthenocarpy in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), we constructed linkage maps by using co-dominant simple sequence repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism markers in F(2) populations derived from intraspecific crosses between two non-parthenocarpic lines (LS1934 and Nakate-Shinkuro) and a parthenocarpic line (AE-P03). Total map distances were 1,414.6 cM (ALF2: LS1934 x AE-P03) and 1,153.8 cM (NAF2: Nakate-Shinkuro x AE-P03), respectively. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses revealed two QTLs on chromosomes 3 and 8, which we denoted as Controlling parthenocarpy3.1 (Cop3.1) and Cop8.1, respectively. The percentage of phenotypic variance explained (PVE) of Cop3.1 was 6.3% in ALF2 (LOD = 4.2) and 10.6% in NAF2 (LOD = 3.0). The PVE of Cop8.1 was 45.7% in ALF2 (LOD = 23.8) and 29.7% in NAF2 (LOD = 7.9). Using a population of backcross inbred lines, we confirmed the effect of Cop8.1, but there was no evidence to support the contribution of Cop3.1. We need to verify the effect of Cop3.1 under various temperature conditions. In addition, we clarified the effectiveness of selective SSR markers, emf21H22 and emh11J10, mapped on each side of Cop8.1 in other F(2) populations derived from various parental combinations. This is the first report concerning QTL analysis of parthenocarpy in eggplant using molecular markers. It will be useful in marker-assisted selection and in revealing the genomic mechanism underlying parthenocarpy in eggplant.

  9. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  10. Heading Date QTL in Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Coincide with Major Developmental Genes VERNALIZATION1 and PHOTOPERIOD1.

    PubMed

    Guedira, Mohammed; Xiong, Mai; Hao, Yuan Feng; Johnson, Jerry; Harrison, Steve; Marshall, David; Brown-Guedira, Gina

    2016-01-01

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), time from planting to spike emergence is influenced by genes controlling vernalization requirement and photoperiod response. Characterizing the available genetic diversity of known and novel alleles of VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1) and PHOTOPERIOD1 (PPD1) in winter wheat can inform approaches for breeding climate resilient cultivars. This study identified QTL for heading date (HD) associated with multiple VRN1 and PPD1 loci in a population developed from a cross between two early flowering winter wheat cultivars. When the population was grown in the greenhouse after partial vernalization treatment, major heading date QTLs co-located with the VRN-A1 and VRN-B1 loci. Copy number variation at the VRN-A1 locus influenced HD such that RIL having three copies required longer cold exposure to transition to flowering than RIL having two VRN-A1 copies. Sequencing vrn-B1 winter alleles of the parents revealed multiple polymorphisms in the first intron that were the basis of mapping a major HD QTL coinciding with VRN-B1. A 36 bp deletion in the first intron of VRN-B1 was associated with earlier HD after partial vernalization in lines having either two or three haploid copies of VRN-A1. The VRN1 loci interacted significantly and influenced time to heading in field experiments in Louisiana, Georgia and North Carolina. The PPD1 loci were significant determinants of heading date in the fully vernalized treatment in the greenhouse and in all field environments. Heading date QTL were associated with alleles having large deletions in the upstream regions of PPD-A1 and PPD-D1 and with copy number variants at the PPD-B1 locus. The PPD-D1 locus was determined to have the largest genetic effect, followed by PPD-A1 and PPD-B1. Our results demonstrate that VRN1 and PPD1 alleles of varying strength allow fine tuning of flowering time in diverse winter wheat growing environments.

  11. Heading Date QTL in Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Coincide with Major Developmental Genes VERNALIZATION1 and PHOTOPERIOD1

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yuan Feng; Johnson, Jerry; Harrison, Steve; Marshall, David

    2016-01-01

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), time from planting to spike emergence is influenced by genes controlling vernalization requirement and photoperiod response. Characterizing the available genetic diversity of known and novel alleles of VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1) and PHOTOPERIOD1 (PPD1) in winter wheat can inform approaches for breeding climate resilient cultivars. This study identified QTL for heading date (HD) associated with multiple VRN1 and PPD1 loci in a population developed from a cross between two early flowering winter wheat cultivars. When the population was grown in the greenhouse after partial vernalization treatment, major heading date QTLs co-located with the VRN-A1 and VRN-B1 loci. Copy number variation at the VRN-A1 locus influenced HD such that RIL having three copies required longer cold exposure to transition to flowering than RIL having two VRN-A1 copies. Sequencing vrn-B1 winter alleles of the parents revealed multiple polymorphisms in the first intron that were the basis of mapping a major HD QTL coinciding with VRN-B1. A 36 bp deletion in the first intron of VRN-B1 was associated with earlier HD after partial vernalization in lines having either two or three haploid copies of VRN-A1. The VRN1 loci interacted significantly and influenced time to heading in field experiments in Louisiana, Georgia and North Carolina. The PPD1 loci were significant determinants of heading date in the fully vernalized treatment in the greenhouse and in all field environments. Heading date QTL were associated with alleles having large deletions in the upstream regions of PPD-A1 and PPD-D1 and with copy number variants at the PPD-B1 locus. The PPD-D1 locus was determined to have the largest genetic effect, followed by PPD-A1 and PPD-B1. Our results demonstrate that VRN1 and PPD1 alleles of varying strength allow fine tuning of flowering time in diverse winter wheat growing environments. PMID:27163605

  12. Resistance to tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus in melon is controlled by a major QTL located in chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Cristina; Esteras, Cristina; Martínez, Cecilia; Ferriol, María; Dhillon, Narinder P S; López, Carmelo; Picó, Belén

    2017-07-14

    Identification of three genomic regions and underlying candidate genes controlling the high level of resistance to ToLCNDV derived from a wild melon. SNP markers appropriated for MAS management of resistance. Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) is a bipartite begomovirus that severely affects melon crop (Cucumis melo) in the main production areas of Spain since 2012. In this work, we evaluated the degree of resistance of four accessions (two belonging to the subsp. agrestis var. momordica and two to the wild agrestis group) and their corresponding hybrids with a susceptible commercial melon belonging to the subsp. melo (Piel de Sapo, PS). The analysis using quantitative PCR (qPCR) allowed us to select one wild agrestis genotype (WM-7) with a high level of resistance and use it to construct segregating populations (F 2 and backcrosses). These populations were phenotyped for symptom severity and virus content using qPCR, and genotyped with different sets of SNP markers. Phenotyping and genotyping results in the F 2 and BC1s populations derived from the WM-7 × PS cross were used for QTL analysis. Three genomic regions controlling resistance to ToLCNDV were found, one major locus in chromosome 11 and two additional regions in chromosomes 12 and 2. The highest level of resistance (no or mild symptoms and very low viral titer) was obtained with the homozygous WM-7WM-7 genotype at the major QTL in chromosome 11, even with PSPS genotypes at the other two loci. The resistance derived from WM-7 is useful to develop new melon cultivars and the linked SNPs selected in this paper will be highly useful in marker-assisted breeding for ToLCNDV resistance in melon.

  13. High-resolution mapping of a major effect QTL from wild tomato Solanum habrochaites that influences water relations under root chilling.

    PubMed

    Arms, Erin M; Bloom, Arnold J; St Clair, Dina A

    2015-09-01

    QTL stm9 controlling rapid-onset water stress tolerance in S. habrochaites was high-resolution mapped to a chromosome 9 region that contains genes associated with abiotic stress tolerances. Wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites) exhibits tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought and chilling. Root chilling (6 °C) induces rapid-onset water stress by impeding water movement from roots to shoots. S. habrochaites responds to such changes by closing stomata and maintaining shoot turgor, while cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum) fails to close stomata and wilts. This response (shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling) is controlled by a major QTL (designated stm9) on chromosome 9, which was previously fine-mapped to a 2.7-cM region. Recombinant sub-near-isogenic lines for chromosome 9 were marker-selected, phenotyped for shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling in two sets of replicated experiments (Fall and Spring), and the data were used to high-resolution map QTL stm9 to a 0.32-cM region. QTL mapping revealed a single QTL that was coincident for both the Spring and Fall datasets, suggesting that the gene or genes contributing to shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling reside within the marker interval H9-T1673. In the S. lycopersicum reference genome sequence, this chromosome 9 region is gene-rich and contains representatives of gene families that have been associated with abiotic stress tolerance.

  14. Fine mapping Fhb4, a major QTL conditioning resistance to Fusarium infection in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Xue, Shulin; Li, Guoqiang; Jia, Haiyan; Xu, Feng; Lin, Feng; Tang, Mingzhi; Wang, Yao; An, Xia; Xu, Haibin; Zhang, Lixia; Kong, Zhongxin; Ma, Zhengqiang

    2010-06-01

    Qfhi.nau-4B is a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) against Fusarium graminearum infection identified in the Fusarium head blight-resistant germplasm Wangshuibai. To fine map this QTL, a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 530 lines derived from Nanda2419 x Wangshuibai and the BC(3)F(2) population derived from the cross of a Qfhi.nau-4B near isogenic line (NIL) with susceptible cultivar Mianyang 99-323 as the recurrent parent were screened for recombinants occurred between microsatellite markers Xbarc20 and Xwmc349 that flank Qfhi.nau-4B. A total of 95 recombinants were obtained, including 45 RIL recombinants obtained through reverse-selection of Qfhi.nau-5A and 50 NIL recombinants from the BC(3)F(2) population. Genotyping these recombinant lines with 22 markers mapping to the Xbarc20 and Xwmc349 interval revealed fourteen genotypes of the RIL recombinants as well as of the NIL recombinants. Two-year field evaluation of their resistance to Fusarium infection showed that these lines could be clearly classified into two groups according to percentage of infected spikes. The more resistant class had over 60% less infection than the susceptible class and were common to have Wangshuibai chromatin in the 1.7-cM interval flanked by Xhbg226 and Xgwm149. None of the susceptible recombinants had this Wangshuibai chromatin. Qfhi.nau-4B was thus confined between Xhbg226 and Xgwm149 and named Fhb4. The interval harboring Fhb4 was mapped to 4BL5-0.86-1.00 bin using Chinese Spring deletion lines, a region with about 5.7 times higher recombination rate than the genome average. This study established the basis for map-based cloning of Fhb4.

  15. Identification of a major QTL together with several minor additive or epistatic QTLs for resistance to fire blight in apple in two related progenies.

    PubMed

    Calenge, F; Drouet, D; Denancé, C; Van de Weg, W E; Brisset, M-N; Paulin, J-P; Durel, C-E

    2005-06-01

    Although fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica) worldwide, no major, qualitative gene for resistance to this disease has been identified to date in apple. We conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in two F(1) progenies derived from crosses between the cultivars Fiesta and either Discovery or Prima. Both progenies were inoculated in the greenhouse with the same strain of E. amylovora, and the length of necrosis was scored 7 days and 14 days after inoculation. Additive QTLs were identified using the MAPQTL: software, and digenic epistatic interactions, which are an indication of putative epistatic QTLs, were detected by two-way analyses of variance. A major QTL explaining 34.3--46.6% of the phenotypic variation was identified on linkage group (LG) 7 of Fiesta in both progenies at the same genetic position. Four minor QTLs were also identified on LGs 3, 12 and 13. In addition, several significant digenic interactions were identified in both progenies. These results confirm the complex polygenic nature of resistance to fire blight in the progenies studied and also reveal the existence of a major QTL on LG7 that is stable in two distinct genetic backgrounds. This QTL could be a valuable target in marker-assisted selection to obtain new, fire blight-resistant apple cultivars and forms a starting point for discovering the function of the genes underlying such QTLs involved in fire blight control.

  16. A major QTL corresponding to the Rk locus for resistance to root-knot nematodes in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.).

    PubMed

    Huynh, Bao-Lam; Matthews, William C; Ehlers, Jeffrey D; Lucas, Mitchell R; Santos, Jansen R P; Ndeve, Arsenio; Close, Timothy J; Roberts, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Genome resolution of a major QTL associated with the Rk locus in cowpea for resistance to root-knot nematodes has significance for plant breeding programs and R gene characterization. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) is a susceptible host of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) (RKN), major plant-parasitic pests in global agriculture. To date, breeding for host resistance in cowpea has relied on phenotypic selection which requires time-consuming and expensive controlled infection assays. To facilitate marker-based selection, we aimed to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring the resistance trait. One recombinant inbred line (RIL) and two F2:3 populations, each derived from a cross between a susceptible and a resistant parent, were genotyped with genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The populations were screened in the field for root-galling symptoms and/or under growth-chamber conditions for nematode reproduction levels using M. incognita and M. javanica biotypes. One major QTL was mapped consistently on linkage group VuLG11 of each population. By genotyping additional cowpea lines and near-isogenic lines derived from conventional backcrossing, we confirmed that the detected QTL co-localized with the genome region associated with the Rk locus for RKN resistance that has been used in conventional breeding for many decades. This chromosomal location defined with flanking markers will be a valuable target in marker-assisted breeding and for positional cloning of genes controlling RKN resistance.

  17. Inheritance studies of apple scab resistance and identification of Rvi14, a new major gene that acts together with other broad-spectrum QTL.

    PubMed

    Soufflet-Freslon, V; Gianfranceschi, L; Patocchi, A; Durel, C-E

    2008-08-01

    Scab, caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis, is the most common disease of cultivated apple (Malus xdomestica). The fungal races 6 and 7 have now overcome the major resistance gene Vf, which is widely used in apple breeding programmes. New breeding strategies to achieve durable resistance are thus necessary. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic basis of quantitative resistance of the apple cultivar 'Dülmener Rosenapfel', known to be scab resistant under different environmental conditions. An F1 progeny derived from the cross between the susceptible cultivar 'Gala' and 'Dülmener Rosenapfel' was tested in a greenhouse with a multi-isolate inoculum of V. inaequalis. Rvi14, a new major gene that conditions a chlorotic-type reaction, was mapped on linkage group (LG) 6 in a genomic region not known to be involved in disease resistance. A further three quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance were identified. One co-localized with Rvi14 on LG6, whereas the remaining two were detected on LG11 and LG17, in genomic regions already reported to carry broad-spectrum QTL in other genetic backgrounds. Since a selective genotyping approach was used to detect QTL, an expectation-maximization (EM) computation was used to estimate the corrected QTL contributions to phenotypic variation and was validated by entire progeny genotyping.

  18. fw 2.2:a major QTL controlling fruit weight is common to both red- and green-fruited tomato species.

    PubMed

    Alpert, K B; Grandillo, S; Tanksley, S D

    1995-11-01

    We have shown that a major QTL for fruit weight (fw2.2) maps to the same position on chromosome 2 in the green-fruited wild tomato species, Lycopersicon pennellii and in the red-fruited wild tomato species, L. pimpinellifolium. An introgression line F2 derived from L. esculentum (tomato) x L. pennellii and a backcross 1 (BC1) population derived from L. esculentum x L. pimpinellifolium both place fw2.2 near TG91 and TG167 on chromosome 2 of the tomato highdensity linkage map. fw2.2 accounts for 30% and 47% of the total phenotypic variance in the L. pimpinellifolium and L. pennellii populations, respectively, indicating that this is a major QTL controlling fruit weight in both species. Partial dominance (d/a of 0.44) was observed for the L. pennellii allele of fw 2.2 as compared with the L. esculentum allele. A QTL with very similar phenotypic affects and gene action has also been identified and mapped to the same chromosomal region in other wild tomato accessions: L. cheesmanii and L. pimpinellifolium. Together, these data suggest that fw2.2 represents an orthologous QTL (i.e., derived by speciation as opposed to duplication) common to most, if not all, wild tomato species. High-resolution mapping may ultimately lead to the cloning of this key locus controlling fruit development in tomato.

  19. Genetic Dissection of a Major Anthocyanin QTL Contributing to Pollinator-Mediated Reproductive Isolation Between Sister Species of Mimulus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yao-Wu; Sagawa, Janelle M.; Young, Riane C.; Christensen, Brian J.; Bradshaw, Harvey D.

    2013-01-01

    Prezygotic barriers play a major role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, which is a prerequisite for speciation. However, despite considerable progress in identifying genes and mutations responsible for postzygotic isolation, little is known about the genetic and molecular basis underlying prezygotic barriers. The bumblebee-pollinated Mimulus lewisii and the hummingbird-pollinated M. cardinalis represent a classic example of pollinator-mediated prezygotic isolation between two sister species in sympatry. Flower color differences resulting from both carotenoid and anthocyanin pigments contribute to pollinator discrimination between the two species in nature. Through fine-scale genetic mapping, site-directed mutagenesis, and transgenic experiments, we demonstrate that a single-repeat R3 MYB repressor, ROSE INTENSITY1 (ROI1), is the causal gene underlying a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the largest effect on anthocyanin concentration and that cis-regulatory change rather than coding DNA mutations cause the allelic difference between M. lewisii and M. cardinalis. Together with the genomic resources and stable transgenic tools developed here, these results suggest that Mimulus is an excellent platform for studying the genetics of pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation and the molecular basis of morphological evolution at the most fundamental level—gene by gene, mutation by mutation. PMID:23335333

  20. Genetic dissection of a major anthocyanin QTL contributing to pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation between sister species of Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yao-Wu; Sagawa, Janelle M; Young, Riane C; Christensen, Brian J; Bradshaw, Harvey D

    2013-05-01

    Prezygotic barriers play a major role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, which is a prerequisite for speciation. However, despite considerable progress in identifying genes and mutations responsible for postzygotic isolation, little is known about the genetic and molecular basis underlying prezygotic barriers. The bumblebee-pollinated Mimulus lewisii and the hummingbird-pollinated M. cardinalis represent a classic example of pollinator-mediated prezygotic isolation between two sister species in sympatry. Flower color differences resulting from both carotenoid and anthocyanin pigments contribute to pollinator discrimination between the two species in nature. Through fine-scale genetic mapping, site-directed mutagenesis, and transgenic experiments, we demonstrate that a single-repeat R3 MYB repressor, ROSE INTENSITY1 (ROI1), is the causal gene underlying a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the largest effect on anthocyanin concentration and that cis-regulatory change rather than coding DNA mutations cause the allelic difference between M. lewisii and M. cardinalis. Together with the genomic resources and stable transgenic tools developed here, these results suggest that Mimulus is an excellent platform for studying the genetics of pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation and the molecular basis of morphological evolution at the most fundamental level-gene by gene, mutation by mutation.

  1. Support for the reproductive ground plan hypothesis of social evolution and major QTL for ovary traits of Africanized worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Graham, Allie M; Munday, Michael D; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Rueppell, Olav

    2011-04-13

    The reproductive ground plan hypothesis of social evolution suggests that reproductive controls of a solitary ancestor have been co-opted during social evolution, facilitating the division of labor among social insect workers. Despite substantial empirical support, the generality of this hypothesis is not universally accepted. Thus, we investigated the prediction of particular genes with pleiotropic effects on ovarian traits and social behavior in worker honey bees as a stringent test of the reproductive ground plan hypothesis. We complemented these tests with a comprehensive genome scan for additional quantitative trait loci (QTL) to gain a better understanding of the genetic architecture of the ovary size of honey bee workers, a morphological trait that is significant for understanding social insect caste evolution and general insect biology. Back-crossing hybrid European x Africanized honey bee queens to the Africanized parent colony generated two study populations with extraordinarily large worker ovaries. Despite the transgressive ovary phenotypes, several previously mapped QTL for social foraging behavior demonstrated ovary size effects, confirming the prediction of pleiotropic genetic effects on reproductive traits and social behavior. One major QTL for ovary size was detected in each backcross, along with several smaller effects and two QTL for ovary asymmetry. One of the main ovary size QTL coincided with a major QTL for ovary activation, explaining 3/4 of the phenotypic variance, although no simple positive correlation between ovary size and activation was observed. Our results provide strong support for the reproductive ground plan hypothesis of evolution in study populations that are independent of the genetic stocks that originally led to the formulation of this hypothesis. As predicted, worker ovary size is genetically linked to multiple correlated traits of the complex division of labor in worker honey bees, known as the pollen hoarding syndrome. The

  2. Support for the reproductive ground plan hypothesis of social evolution and major QTL for ovary traits of Africanized worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reproductive ground plan hypothesis of social evolution suggests that reproductive controls of a solitary ancestor have been co-opted during social evolution, facilitating the division of labor among social insect workers. Despite substantial empirical support, the generality of this hypothesis is not universally accepted. Thus, we investigated the prediction of particular genes with pleiotropic effects on ovarian traits and social behavior in worker honey bees as a stringent test of the reproductive ground plan hypothesis. We complemented these tests with a comprehensive genome scan for additional quantitative trait loci (QTL) to gain a better understanding of the genetic architecture of the ovary size of honey bee workers, a morphological trait that is significant for understanding social insect caste evolution and general insect biology. Results Back-crossing hybrid European x Africanized honey bee queens to the Africanized parent colony generated two study populations with extraordinarily large worker ovaries. Despite the transgressive ovary phenotypes, several previously mapped QTL for social foraging behavior demonstrated ovary size effects, confirming the prediction of pleiotropic genetic effects on reproductive traits and social behavior. One major QTL for ovary size was detected in each backcross, along with several smaller effects and two QTL for ovary asymmetry. One of the main ovary size QTL coincided with a major QTL for ovary activation, explaining 3/4 of the phenotypic variance, although no simple positive correlation between ovary size and activation was observed. Conclusions Our results provide strong support for the reproductive ground plan hypothesis of evolution in study populations that are independent of the genetic stocks that originally led to the formulation of this hypothesis. As predicted, worker ovary size is genetically linked to multiple correlated traits of the complex division of labor in worker honey bees, known as

  3. Mapping a major QTL responsible for dwarf architecture in Brassica napus using a single-nucleotide polymorphism marker approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yankun; Chen, Wenjing; Chu, Pu; Wan, Shubei; Yang, Mao; Wang, Mingming; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-08-18

    Key genes related to plant type traits have played very important roles in the "green revolution" by increasing lodging resistance and elevating the harvest indices of crop cultivars. Although there have been numerous achievements in the development of dwarfism and plant type in Brassica napus breeding, exploring new materials conferring oilseed rape with efficient plant types that provide higher yields is still of significance in breeding, as well as in elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant development. Here, we report a new dwarf architecture with down-curved leaf mutant (Bndwf/dcl1) isolated from an ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS)-mutagenized B. napus line, together with its inheritance and gene mapping, and pleiotropic effects of the mapped locus on plant-type traits. We constructed a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map using a backcross population derived from the Bndwf/dcl1 mutant and the canola cultivar 'zhongshuang11' ('ZS11') and mapped the dwarf architecture with the down-curved leaf dominant locus, BnDWF/DCL1, in a 6.58-cM interval between SNP marker bins M46180 and M49962 on the linkage group (LG) C05 of B. napus. Further mapping with other materials derived from Bndwf/dcl1 narrowed the interval harbouring BnDWF/DCL1 to 175 kb in length and this interval contained 16 annotated genes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mappings with the backcross population for plant type traits, including plant height, branching height, main raceme length and average branching interval, indicated that the mapped QTLs for plant type traits were located at the same position as the BnDWF/DCL1 locus. This study suggests that the BnDWF/DCL1 locus is a major pleiotropic locus/QTL in B. napus, which may reduce plant height, alter plant type traits and change leaf shape, and thus may lead to compact plant architecture. Accordingly, this locus may have substantial breeding potential for increasing planting density.

  4. A high-density genetic map identifies a novel major QTL for boron efficiency in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Didi; Hua, Yingpeng; Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Low boron (B) seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs) and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14-46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus.

  5. A High-Density Genetic Map Identifies a Novel Major QTL for Boron Efficiency in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Low boron (B) seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs) and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14–46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus. PMID:25375356

  6. Phenotyping pipeline reveals major seedling root growth QTL in hexaploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Jonathan A.; Wingen, Luzie U.; Griffiths, Marcus; Pound, Michael P.; Gaju, Oorbessy; Foulkes, M. John; Le Gouis, Jacques; Griffiths, Simon; Bennett, Malcolm J.; King, Julie; Wells, Darren M.

    2015-01-01

    Seedling root traits of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have been shown to be important for efficient establishment and linked to mature plant traits such as height and yield. A root phenotyping pipeline, consisting of a germination paper-based screen combined with image segmentation and analysis software, was developed and used to characterize seedling traits in 94 doubled haploid progeny derived from a cross between the winter wheat cultivars Rialto and Savannah. Field experiments were conducted to measure mature plant height, grain yield, and nitrogen (N) uptake in three sites over 2 years. In total, 29 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seedling root traits were identified. Two QTLs for grain yield and N uptake co-localize with root QTLs on chromosomes 2B and 7D, respectively. Of the 29 root QTLs identified, 11 were found to co-localize on 6D, with four of these achieving highly significant logarithm of odds scores (>20). These results suggest the presence of a major-effect gene regulating seedling root vigour/growth on chromosome 6D. PMID:25740921

  7. Phenotyping pipeline reveals major seedling root growth QTL in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Jonathan A; Wingen, Luzie U; Griffiths, Marcus; Pound, Michael P; Gaju, Oorbessy; Foulkes, M John; Le Gouis, Jacques; Griffiths, Simon; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, Julie; Wells, Darren M

    2015-04-01

    Seedling root traits of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have been shown to be important for efficient establishment and linked to mature plant traits such as height and yield. A root phenotyping pipeline, consisting of a germination paper-based screen combined with image segmentation and analysis software, was developed and used to characterize seedling traits in 94 doubled haploid progeny derived from a cross between the winter wheat cultivars Rialto and Savannah. Field experiments were conducted to measure mature plant height, grain yield, and nitrogen (N) uptake in three sites over 2 years. In total, 29 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seedling root traits were identified. Two QTLs for grain yield and N uptake co-localize with root QTLs on chromosomes 2B and 7D, respectively. Of the 29 root QTLs identified, 11 were found to co-localize on 6D, with four of these achieving highly significant logarithm of odds scores (>20). These results suggest the presence of a major-effect gene regulating seedling root vigour/growth on chromosome 6D. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Mapping and confirmation of a major left ventricular mass QTL on rat chromosome 1 by contrasting SHRSP and F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Katja; Koplin, Gerold; Aliu, Bujar; Schulte, Leonard; Schulz, Angela; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2013-09-16

    An abnormal increase in left ventricular (LV) mass, i.e., LV hypertrophy (LVH), represents an important target organ damage in arterial hypertension and has been associated with poor clinical outcome. Genetic factors are contributing to variation in LV mass in addition to blood pressure and other factors such as dietary salt intake. We set out to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for LV mass by comparing the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHRSP) rat with LVH and normotensive Fischer rats (F344) with contrasting low LV mass. To this end we performed a genome-wide QTL mapping analysis in 232 F2 animals derived from SHRSP and F344 exposed to high-salt (4% in chow) intake for 8 wk. We mapped one major QTL for LV mass on rat chromosome 1 (RNO1) that demonstrated strong linkage (peak logarithm of odds score 8.4) to relative LV weight (RLVW) and accounted for ∼19% of the variance of this phenotype in F2 rats. We therefore generated a consomic SHRSP-1(F344) strain in which RNO1 from F344 was introgressed into the SHRSP background. Consomic and SHRSP animals showed similar blood pressures during conventional intra-arterial measurements, while RLVW was already significantly lower (-17.7%, P<0.05) in SHRSP-1(F344) in response to a normal-salt diet; a similar significant reduction of LV mass was also observed in consomic rats after high-salt intake (P<0.05 vs. SHRSP). Thus, a major QTL on RNO1 was confirmed with significant impact on LV mass in the hypertensive background of SHRSP.

  9. The flowering locus Hr colocalizes with a major QTL affecting winter frost tolerance in Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Lejeune-Hénaut, I; Hanocq, E; Béthencourt, L; Fontaine, V; Delbreil, B; Morin, J; Petit, A; Devaux, R; Boilleau, M; Stempniak, J J; Thomas, M; Lainé, A L; Foucher, F; Baranger, A; Burstin, J; Rameau, C; Giauffret, C

    2008-05-01

    An understanding of the genetic determinism of frost tolerance is a prerequisite for the development of frost tolerant cultivars for cold northern areas. In legumes, it is not known to which extent vernalization requirement or photoperiod responsiveness are necessary for the development of frost tolerance. In pea (Pisum sativum L.) however, the flowering locus Hr is suspected to influence winter frost tolerance by delaying floral initiation until after the main winter freezing periods have passed. The objective of this study was to dissect the genetic determinism of frost tolerance in pea by QTL analysis and to assess the genetic linkage between winter frost tolerance and the Hr locus. A population of 164 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from the cross Champagne x Terese was evaluated both in the greenhouse and in field conditions to characterize the photoperiod response from which the allele at the Hr locus was inferred. In addition, the population was also assessed for winter frost tolerance in 11 field conditions. Six QTL were detected, among which three were consistent among the different experimental conditions, confirming an oligogenic determinism of frost tolerance in pea. The Hr locus was found to be the peak marker for the highest explanatory QTL of this study. This result supports the hypothesis of the prominent part played by the photoperiod responsiveness in the determinism of frost tolerance for this species. The consistency of three QTL makes these positions interesting targets for marker-assisted selection.

  10. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  11. A major QTL and an SSR marker associated with glycoalkaloid content in potato tubers from Solanum tuberosum x S. sparsipilum located on chromosome I.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Kirsten Kørup; Kirk, Hanne Grethe; Olsson, Kerstin; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Christiansen, Jørgen

    2008-06-01

    New potato (Solanum tuberosum) varieties are required to contain low levels of the toxic glycoalkaloids and a potential approach to obtain this is through marker-assisted selection (MAS). Before applying MAS it is necessary to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for glycoalkaloid content in potato tubers and identify markers that link tightly to this trait. In this study, tubers of a dihaploid BC(1) population, originating from a cross between 90-HAF-01 (S. tuberosum(1)) and 90-HAG-15 (S. tuberosum(2) x S. sparsipilum), were evaluated for content of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine (total glycoalkaloid, TGA) after field trials. In addition, tubers were assayed for TGA content after exposure to light. A detailed analysis of segregation patterns indicated that a major QTL is responsible for the TGA content in tubers of this potato population. One highly significant QTL was mapped to chromosome I of the HAG and the HAF parent. Quantitative trait loci for glycoalkaloid production in foliage of different Solanum species have previously been mapped to this chromosome. In the present research, QTLs for alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine content were mapped to the same location as for TGA content. Similar results were observed for tubers exposed to light. The simple sequence repeat marker STM5136 was closely linked to the identified QTL.

  12. QTL mapping identifies a major locus for resistance in wheat to Sunn pest (Eurygaster integriceps) feeding at the vegetative growth stage.

    PubMed

    Emebiri, L C; Tan, M-K; El-Bouhssini, M; Wildman, O; Jighly, A; Tadesse, W; Ogbonnaya, F C

    2017-02-01

    This research provides the first report of a major locus controlling wheat resistance to Sunn pest. It developed and validated SNP markers that will be useful for marker-assisted selection. Sunn pest (Eurygaster integriceps Puton) is the most destructive insect pest of bread wheat and durum wheat in West and Central Asia and East Europe. Breeding for resistance at the vegetative stage of growth is vital in reducing the damage caused by overwintered adult populations that feed on shoot and leaves of seedlings, and in reducing the next generation of pest populations (nymphs and adults), which can cause damage to grain quality by feeding on spikes. In the present study, two doubled haploid (DH) populations involving resistant landraces from Afghanistan were genotyped with the 90k SNP iSelect assay and candidate gene-based KASP markers. The DH lines and parents were phenotyped for resistance to Sunn pest feeding, using artificial infestation cages at Terbol station, in Lebanon, over three years. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified a single major locus on chromosome 4BS in the two populations, with the resistance allele derived from the landrace accessions, IG139431 and IG139883. The QTL explained a maximum of 42 % of the phenotypic variation in the Cham6 × IG139431 and 56 % in the Cham6 × IG139883 populations. SNP markers closest to the QTL showed high similarity to rice genes that putatively encode proteins for defense response to herbivory and wounding. The markers were validated in a large, unrelated population of parental wheat genotypes. All wheat lines carrying the 'C-G' haplotype at the identified SNPs were resistant, suggesting that selection based on a haplotype of favourable alleles would be effective in predicting resistance status of unknown genotypes.

  13. Mapping of a major QTL associated with protein content on chromosome 2B in hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Terasawa, Yohei; Ito, Miwako; Tabiki, Tadashi; Nagasawa, Koichi; Hatta, Koichi; Nishio, Zenta

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling wheat grain protein content (GPC) and flour protein content (FPC) was identified using doubled haploid (DH) lines developed from a cross between the hard red winter wheat variety ‘Yumechikara’ with a high protein content used for bread making, and the soft red winter wheat ‘Kitahonami’ with a low protein content used for Japanese white salted noodles. A single major QTL, QGpc.2B-yume, was identified on the short arm of wheat chromosome 2B for both the GPC and FPC over 3 years of testing. QGpc.2B-yume was mapped on the flanking region of microsatellite marker Xgpw4382. The DH lines grouped by the haplotype of the closest flanking microsatellite marker Xgpw4382 showed differences of 1.0% and 1.1% in mean GPC and FPC, respectively. Yield-component-related traits were not affected by the haplotype of QGpc.2B-yume, and major North American hard red winter wheat varieties showed the high-protein haplotype. Unlike Gpc-B1 derived from tetraploid wheat, QGpc.2B-yume has no negative effects on yield-component-related traits and should be useful for wheat breeding to increase GPC and FPC. PMID:27795672

  14. Mapping of a major QTL associated with protein content on chromosome 2B in hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Yohei; Ito, Miwako; Tabiki, Tadashi; Nagasawa, Koichi; Hatta, Koichi; Nishio, Zenta

    2016-09-01

    A quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling wheat grain protein content (GPC) and flour protein content (FPC) was identified using doubled haploid (DH) lines developed from a cross between the hard red winter wheat variety 'Yumechikara' with a high protein content used for bread making, and the soft red winter wheat 'Kitahonami' with a low protein content used for Japanese white salted noodles. A single major QTL, QGpc.2B-yume, was identified on the short arm of wheat chromosome 2B for both the GPC and FPC over 3 years of testing. QGpc.2B-yume was mapped on the flanking region of microsatellite marker Xgpw4382. The DH lines grouped by the haplotype of the closest flanking microsatellite marker Xgpw4382 showed differences of 1.0% and 1.1% in mean GPC and FPC, respectively. Yield-component-related traits were not affected by the haplotype of QGpc.2B-yume, and major North American hard red winter wheat varieties showed the high-protein haplotype. Unlike Gpc-B1 derived from tetraploid wheat, QGpc.2B-yume has no negative effects on yield-component-related traits and should be useful for wheat breeding to increase GPC and FPC.

  15. Genome-wide association study identified three major QTL for carcass weight including the PLAG1-CHCHD7 QTN for stature in Japanese Black cattle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) for carcass weight were previously mapped on several chromosomes in Japanese Black half-sib families. Two QTL, CW-1 and CW-2, were narrowed down to 1.1-Mb and 591-kb regions, respectively. Recent advances in genomic tools allowed us to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in cattle to detect associations in a general population and estimate their effect size. Here, we performed a GWAS for carcass weight using 1156 Japanese Black steers. Results Bonferroni-corrected genome-wide significant associations were detected in three chromosomal regions on bovine chromosomes (BTA) 6, 8, and 14. The associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on BTA 6 were in linkage disequilibrium with the SNP encoding NCAPG Ile442Met, which was previously identified as a candidate quantitative trait nucleotide for CW-2. In contrast, the most highly associated SNP on BTA 14 was located 2.3-Mb centromeric from the previously identified CW-1 region. Linkage disequilibrium mapping led to a revision of the CW-1 region within a 0.9-Mb interval around the associated SNP, and targeted resequencing followed by association analysis highlighted the quantitative trait nucleotides for bovine stature in the PLAG1-CHCHD7 intergenic region. The association on BTA 8 was accounted for by two SNP on the BovineSNP50 BeadChip and corresponded to CW-3, which was simultaneously detected by linkage analyses using half-sib families. The allele substitution effects of CW-1, CW-2, and CW-3 were 28.4, 35.3, and 35.0 kg per allele, respectively. Conclusion The GWAS revealed the genetic architecture underlying carcass weight variation in Japanese Black cattle in which three major QTL accounted for approximately one-third of the genetic variance. PMID:22607022

  16. Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Alternaria brassicae in Arabidopsis thaliana: QTL Mapping Reveals Two Major Resistance-Conferring Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rajarammohan, Sivasubramanian; Kumar, Amarendra; Gupta, Vibha; Pental, Deepak; Pradhan, Akshay K.; Kaur, Jagreet

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria brassicae, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen, causes Alternaria blight, one of the most important diseases of oleiferous Brassica crops. The current study utilized Arabidopsis as a model to decipher the genetic architecture of defense against A. brassicae. Significant phenotypic variation that was largely genetically determined was observed among Arabidopsis accessions in response to pathogen challenge. Three biparental mapping populations were developed from three resistant accessions viz. CIBC-5, Ei-2, and Cvi-0 and two susceptible accessions – Gre-0 and Zdr-1 (commonly crossed to CIBC-5 and Ei-2). A total of six quantitative trait locus (QTLs) governing resistance to A. brassicae were identified, five of which were population-specific while one QTL was common between all the three mapping populations. Interestingly, the common QTL had varying phenotypic contributions in different populations, which can be attributed to the genetic background of the parental accessions. The presence of both common and population-specific QTLs indicate that resistance to A. brassicae is quantitative, and that different genes may mediate resistance to the pathogen in different accessions. Two of the QTLs had moderate-to-large effects, one of which explained nearly 50% of the variation. The large effect QTLs may therefore contain genes that could play a significant role in conferring resistance even in heterologous hosts. PMID:28286515

  17. A single major QTL controls expression of larval Cry1F resistance trait in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and is independent of midgut receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Lopez, Miriam D; Wang, Haichuan; Fraser, Lisa M; Kroemer, Jeremy A; Spencer, Terrence; Kim, Kyung S; Abel, Craig A; Hellmich, Richard L; Siegfried, Blair D

    2011-08-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an introduced crop pest in North America that causes major damage to corn and reduces yield of food, feed, and biofuel materials. The Cry1F toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) expressed in transgenic hybrid corn is highly toxic to O. nubilalis larvae and effective in minimizing feeding damage. A laboratory colony of O. nubilalis was selected for high levels of Cry1F resistance (>12,000-fold compared to susceptible larvae) and is capable of survival on transgenic hybrid corn. Genetic linkage maps with segregating AFLP markers show that the Cry1F resistance trait is controlled by a single quantitative trait locus (QTL) on linkage group 12. The map position of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers indicated that midgut Bt toxin-receptor genes, alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N, and cadherin, are not linked with the Cry1F QTL. Evidence suggests that genes within this genome interval may give rise to a novel Bt toxin resistance trait for Lepidoptera that appears independent of known receptor-based mechanisms of resistance.

  18. Genetic analysis for rice seedling vigor and fine mapping of a major QTL qSSL1b for seedling shoot length

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anpeng; Liu, Chaolei; Chen, Guang; Hong, Kai; Gao, Yang; Tian, Peng; Peng, Youlin; Zhang, Bin; Ruan, Banpu; Jiang, Hongzhen; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Gao, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    Seedling vigor is an important agricultural trait as direct-seeded rice technology becomes widely applied. In order to investigate the genetic mechanisms underlying seedling vigor in rice, seeds of 132 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from 93-11 and PA64s, harvested from Lingshui and Hangzhou were cultivated in the nutrient solution, and four indices for seedling vigor were measured including seedling shoot length (SSL), seedling root length (SRL), seedling wet weight (SWW) and seedling dry weight (SDW). Significant correlations were observed among the indices, and also between 1000-seed weight (TSW) and SWW or SDW. Combined with a high-resolution genetic map generated from sequencing of the RILs, 65 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on all chromosomes with interval of 1.93 Mb on average. Among 57 QTLs for seedling vigor, 28 were detected from seeds harvested in both sites and 33 were first identified. With BC3F2 derived from 93-11 and a CSSL harboring segments from PA64s in 93-11 background, a major QTL for SSL, qSSL1b was fine mapped within 80.5 kb between two InDel markers. Our study provides a platform for further cloning of the QTL and dissecting the molecular basis for seedling vigor at early seedling stage in rice. PMID:28744184

  19. Genetic analysis for rice seedling vigor and fine mapping of a major QTL qSSL1b for seedling shoot length.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anpeng; Liu, Chaolei; Chen, Guang; Hong, Kai; Gao, Yang; Tian, Peng; Peng, Youlin; Zhang, Bin; Ruan, Banpu; Jiang, Hongzhen; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Gao, Zhenyu

    2017-06-01

    Seedling vigor is an important agricultural trait as direct-seeded rice technology becomes widely applied. In order to investigate the genetic mechanisms underlying seedling vigor in rice, seeds of 132 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from 93-11 and PA64s, harvested from Lingshui and Hangzhou were cultivated in the nutrient solution, and four indices for seedling vigor were measured including seedling shoot length (SSL), seedling root length (SRL), seedling wet weight (SWW) and seedling dry weight (SDW). Significant correlations were observed among the indices, and also between 1000-seed weight (TSW) and SWW or SDW. Combined with a high-resolution genetic map generated from sequencing of the RILs, 65 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on all chromosomes with interval of 1.93 Mb on average. Among 57 QTLs for seedling vigor, 28 were detected from seeds harvested in both sites and 33 were first identified. With BC3F2 derived from 93-11 and a CSSL harboring segments from PA64s in 93-11 background, a major QTL for SSL, qSSL1b was fine mapped within 80.5 kb between two InDel markers. Our study provides a platform for further cloning of the QTL and dissecting the molecular basis for seedling vigor at early seedling stage in rice.

  20. Fine mapping of a major QTL for flag leaf width in rice, qFLW4, which might be caused by alternative splicing of NAL1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingliang; Luo, Ju; Shao, Gaoneng; Wei, Xiangjin; Tang, Shaoqing; Sheng, Zhonghua; Song, Jian; Hu, Peisong

    2012-05-01

    Leaf width is an important agricultural trait in rice. QTL mapping in a recombinant inbred line population derived from the cross between the javanica cultivar D50 (narrow-leaved) and the indica cultivar HB277 (wide-leaved) identified five QTLs controlling flag leaf width. Fine mapping of the major QTL qFLW4 narrowed its location to a 74.8 kb interval between the SSR loci RM17483 and RM17486, a region which also contains the gene NAL1 (Narrow leaf 1). There was no difference in the level of NAL1 expression between cvs. D50 and HB277, but an analysis of the NAL1 transcripts showed that while most (if not all) of those produced in cv. D50 were full-length, two-thirds of those in HB277 were non-functional due to either loss or gain of sequence. The inference was that NAL1 is probably synonymous with qFLW4, and that the functional difference between the two alleles was due to alternative splicing. The analysis of expression of other known genes involved in the determination of leaf width provided no evidence of their having any clear functional association with qFLW4/NAL1.

  1. A high-density SNP map for accurate mapping of seed fibre QTL in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liezhao; Qu, Cunmin; Wittkop, Benjamin; Yi, Bin; Xiao, Yang; He, Yajun; Snowdon, Rod J; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    A high density genetic linkage map for the complex allotetraploid crop species Brassica napus (oilseed rape) was constructed in a late-generation recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers assayed by the Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array. The linkage map contains 9164 SNP markers covering 1832.9 cM. 1232 bins account for 7648 of the markers. A subset of 2795 SNP markers, with an average distance of 0.66 cM between adjacent markers, was applied for QTL mapping of seed colour and the cell wall fiber components acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose and hemicellulose. After phenotypic analyses across four different environments a total of 11 QTL were detected for seed colour and fiber traits. The high-density map considerably improved QTL resolution compared to the previous low-density maps. A previously identified major QTL with very high effects on seed colour and ADL was pinpointed to a narrow genome interval on chromosome A09, while a minor QTL explaining 8.1% to 14.1% of variation for ADL was detected on chromosome C05. Five and three QTL accounting for 4.7% to 21.9% and 7.3% to 16.9% of the phenotypic variation for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, were also detected. To our knowledge this is the first description of QTL for seed cellulose and hemicellulose in B. napus, representing interesting new targets for improving oil content. The high density SNP genetic map enables navigation from interesting B. napus QTL to Brassica genome sequences, giving useful new information for understanding the genetics of key seed quality traits in rapeseed.

  2. A High-Density SNP Map for Accurate Mapping of Seed Fibre QTL in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liezhao; Qu, Cunmin; Wittkop, Benjamin; Yi, Bin; Xiao, Yang; He, Yajun; Snowdon, Rod J.; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    A high density genetic linkage map for the complex allotetraploid crop species Brassica napus (oilseed rape) was constructed in a late-generation recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers assayed by the Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array. The linkage map contains 9164 SNP markers covering 1832.9 cM. 1232 bins account for 7648 of the markers. A subset of 2795 SNP markers, with an average distance of 0.66 cM between adjacent markers, was applied for QTL mapping of seed colour and the cell wall fiber components acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose and hemicellulose. After phenotypic analyses across four different environments a total of 11 QTL were detected for seed colour and fiber traits. The high-density map considerably improved QTL resolution compared to the previous low-density maps. A previously identified major QTL with very high effects on seed colour and ADL was pinpointed to a narrow genome interval on chromosome A09, while a minor QTL explaining 8.1% to 14.1% of variation for ADL was detected on chromosome C05. Five and three QTL accounting for 4.7% to 21.9% and 7.3% to 16.9% of the phenotypic variation for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, were also detected. To our knowledge this is the first description of QTL for seed cellulose and hemicellulose in B. napus, representing interesting new targets for improving oil content. The high density SNP genetic map enables navigation from interesting B. napus QTL to Brassica genome sequences, giving useful new information for understanding the genetics of key seed quality traits in rapeseed. PMID:24386142

  3. qDTY1.1, a major QTL for rice grain yield under reproductive-stage drought stress with a consistent effect in multiple elite genetic backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses causing drastic reductions in yield in rainfed rice environments. The suitability of grain yield (GY) under drought as a selection criterion has been reported in the past few years. Most of the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for GY under drought in rice reported so far has been in the background of low-yielding susceptible varieties. Such QTLs have not shown a similar effect in multiple high- yielding drought-susceptible varieties, thus limiting their use in marker-assisted selection. Genetic control of GY under reproductive-stage drought stress (RS) in elite genetic backgrounds was studied in three F3:4 mapping populations derived from crosses of N22, a drought-tolerant aus cultivar, with Swarna, IR64, and MTU1010, three high-yielding popular mega-varieties, with the aim to identify QTLs for GY under RS that show a consistent effect in multiple elite genetic backgrounds. Three populations were phenotyped under RS in the dry seasons (DS) of 2009 and 2010 at IRRI. For genotyping, whole-genome scans for N22/MTU1010 and bulked segregant analysis for N22/Swarna and N22/IR64 were employed using SSR markers. Results A major QTL for GY under RS, qDTY1.1, was identified on rice chromosome 1 flanked by RM11943 and RM431 in all three populations. In combined analysis over two years, qDTY1.1 showed an additive effect of 29.3%, 24.3%, and 16.1% of mean yield in N22/Swarna, N22/IR64, and N22/MTU1010, respectively, under RS. qDTY1.1 also showed a positive effect on GY in non-stress (NS) situations in N22/Swarna, N22/IR64 over both years, and N22/MTU1010 in DS2009. Conclusions This is the first reported QTL in rice with a major and consistent effect in multiple elite genetic backgrounds under both RS and NS situations. Consistency of the QTL effect across different genetic backgrounds makes it a suitable candidate for use in marker-assisted breeding. PMID:22008150

  4. Saturation Mapping of a Major Effect QTL for Stripe Rust Resistance on Wheat Chromosome 2B in Cultivar Napo 63 Using SNP Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Qilin; Liu, Shengjie; Huang, Shuo; Mu, Jingmei; Zeng, Qingdong; Huang, Lili; Han, Dejun; Kang, Zhensheng

    2017-01-01

    Stripe rust or yellow rust (YR), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most important diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Widespread deployment of resistant cultivars is the best means of achieving durable disease control. The red grain, spring wheat cultivar Napo 63 produced by CIMMYT in the 1960s shows a high level of adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in the field. To elucidate the genetic basis of resistance in this cultivar we evaluated 224 F2:3 lines and 175 F2:6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between Napo 63 and the Pst-susceptible line Avocet S. The maximum disease severity (MDS) data of F2:3 lines and the relative area under the disease progress curve (rAUDPC) data of RILs were collected during the 2014–2015 and 2015–2016 wheat growing seasons, respectively. Combined bulked segregant analysis and 90K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays placed 275 of 511 polymorphic SNPs on chromosome 2B. Sixty four KASP markers selected from the 275 SNPs and 76 SSR markers on 2B were used to identify a chromosome region associated with rust response. A major effect QTL, named Qyrnap.nwafu-2BS, was identified by inclusive composite interval mapping and was preliminarily mapped to a 5.46 cM interval flanked by KASP markers 90K-AN34 and 90K-AN36 in chromosome 2BS. Fourteen KASP markers more closely linked to the locus were developed following a 660K SNP array analysis. The QTL region was finally narrowed to a 0.9 cM interval flanked by KASP markers 660K-AN21 and 660K-AN57 in bin region 2BS-1-0.53. The resistance of Napo 63 was stable across all environments, and as a QTL, explained an average 66.1% of the phenotypic variance in MDS of F2:3 lines and 55.7% of the phenotypic variance in rAUDPC of F5:6 RILs. The short genetic interval and flanking KASP markers developed in the study will facilitate marker-assisted selection, gene pyramiding, and eventual positional cloning of Qyrnap.nwafu-2BS. PMID:28491075

  5. QTL analysis for some quantitative traits in bread wheat*

    PubMed Central

    Pushpendra, Kumar Gupta; Harindra, Singh Balyan; Pawan, Laxminarayan Kulwal; Neeraj, Kumar; Ajay, Kumar; Reyazul, Rouf Mir; Amita, Mohan; Jitendra, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was conducted in bread wheat for 14 important traits utilizing data from four different mapping populations involving different approaches of QTL analysis. Analysis for grain protein content (GPC) suggested that the major part of genetic variation for this trait is due to environmental interactions. In contrast, pre-harvest sprouting tolerance (PHST) was controlled mainly by main effect QTL (M-QTL) with very little genetic variation due to environmental interactions; a major QTL for PHST was detected on chromosome arm 3AL. For grain weight, one QTL each was detected on chromosome arms 1AS, 2BS and 7AS. QTL for 4 growth related traits taken together detected by different methods ranged from 37 to 40; nine QTL that were detected by single-locus as well as two-locus analyses were all M-QTL. Similarly, single-locus and two-locus QTL analyses for seven yield and yield contributing traits in two populations respectively allowed detection of 25 and 50 QTL by composite interval mapping (CIM), 16 and 25 QTL by multiple-trait composite interval mapping (MCIM) and 38 and 37 QTL by two-locus analyses. These studies should prove useful in QTL cloning and wheat improvement through marker aided selection. PMID:17973342

  6. Transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant plant biopolymer mainly present in the secondary walls of tracheary elements and fibers in wood. Understanding how lignin is biosynthesized has long been an interest to plant biologists and will have a significant impact on tree biotechnology. Lignin is polymerized from monolignols that are synthesized through the lignin biosynthetic pathway. To make lignin, all the genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway need to be coordinately turned on. It has been shown that a common cis-element, namely the AC element, is present in the majority of the lignin biosynthetic genes and required for their expression in lignifying cells. Important progress has been made in the identification of transcription factors that bind to the AC elements and are potentially involved in the coordinated regulation of lignin biosynthesis. The Arabidopsis MYB58 and MYB63 as well as their poplar ortholog PtrMYB28 are transcriptional activators of the lignin biosynthetic pathway, whereas the eucalyptus EgMYB2 and pine PtMYB4 transcription factors are likely Arabidopsis MYB46 orthologs involved in the regulation of the entire secondary wall biosynthetic program. It was found that the transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis is under the control of the same transcriptional network regulating the biosynthesis of other secondary wall components, including cellulose and xylan. The identification of transcription factors directly activating lignin biosynthetic genes provides unprecedented tools to potentially manipulate the amount of lignin in wood and other plant products based on our needs.

  7. Development of molecular markers linked to the 'Fiesta' linkage group 7 major QTL for fire blight resistance and their application for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad A; Durel, Charles-Eric; Duffy, Brion; Drouet, Damien; Kellerhals, Markus; Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    A fire blight resistance QTL explaining 34.3%-46.6% of the phenotypic variation was recently identified on linkage group 7 of apple cultivar 'Fiesta' (F7). However, markers flanking this QTL were AFLP and RAPD markers unsuitable for marker-assisted selection (MAS). Two RAPD markers bracketing the QTL have been transformed into SCAR (sequence-characterized amplified region) markers, and an SSR marker specific for the region was developed. Pedigree analysis of 'Fiesta' with these markers enabled tracking of the F7 QTL allele back to 'Cox's Orange Pippin'. Stability of the effect of this QTL allele in different backgrounds was analyzed by inoculating progeny plants of a cross between 'Milwa', a susceptible cultivar, and '1217', a moderately resistant cultivar, and a set of cultivars that carry or lack the allele conferring increased fire blight resistance. Progenies and cultivars that carried both markers were significantly more resistant than those that did not carry both markers, indicating high stability of the F7 QTL allele in different backgrounds. This stability and the availability of reproducible markers bracketing the QTL make this locus promising for use in MAS.

  8. In-depth investigation of enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass wastes based on three major components: Cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lili; Yan, Rong; Liu, Yongqiang; Jiang, Wenju

    2010-11-01

    The artificial biomass based on three biomass components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) were developed on the basis of a simplex-lattice approach. Together with a natural biomass sample, they were employed in enzymatic hydrolysis researches. Different enzyme combines of two commercial enzymes (ACCELLERASE 1500 and OPTIMASH BG) showed a potential to hydrolyze hemicellulose completely. Negligible interactions among the three components were observed, and the used enzyme ACCELLERASE 1500 was proven to be weak lignin-binding. On this basis, a multiple linear-regression equation was established for predicting the reducing sugar yield based on the component proportions in a biomass. The hemicellulose and cellulose in a biomass sample were found to have different contributions in staged hydrolysis at different time periods. Furthermore, the hydrolysis of rice straw was conducted to validate the computation approach through considerations of alkaline solution pretreatment and combined enzymes function, so as to understand better the nature of biomass hydrolysis, from the aspect of three biomass components.

  9. From lignin association to nano-/micro-particle preparation: Extracting higher value of lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Wenwen; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Cheng, Gang

    2016-09-26

    As the most abundant source of renewable aromatic compounds on the planet, lignin is gaining growing interest in replacing petroleum-based chemicals and products. Value-added applications of lignin are also essential for economic viability for future bio-refineries. It is however an under-utilized natural resource due to its structural heterogeneities. Lignin nanoparticles offer many opportunities for value-added applications of lignin. The solution structures of lignin were proposed as one of the key elements in controlling lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Fundamental understanding of solutionstructures of lignin aid in designing better fabrication of lignin nanoparticles. A deeper understanding of the observed experimental results also points to the need for detailed studies of lignin in solution. Lastly, this review consists of two major topics, the solution structures of lignin and lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Suggestions for future studies regarding these two topics were also put forward.

  10. From lignin association to nano-/micro-particle preparation: Extracting higher value of lignin

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Wenwen; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; ...

    2016-09-26

    As the most abundant source of renewable aromatic compounds on the planet, lignin is gaining growing interest in replacing petroleum-based chemicals and products. Value-added applications of lignin are also essential for economic viability for future bio-refineries. It is however an under-utilized natural resource due to its structural heterogeneities. Lignin nanoparticles offer many opportunities for value-added applications of lignin. The solution structures of lignin were proposed as one of the key elements in controlling lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Fundamental understanding of solutionstructures of lignin aid in designing better fabrication of lignin nanoparticles. A deeper understanding of the observed experimental results also pointsmore » to the need for detailed studies of lignin in solution. Lastly, this review consists of two major topics, the solution structures of lignin and lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Suggestions for future studies regarding these two topics were also put forward.« less

  11. From lignin association to nano-/micro-particle preparation: Extracting higher value of lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Wenwen; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Cheng, Gang

    2016-09-26

    As the most abundant source of renewable aromatic compounds on the planet, lignin is gaining growing interest in replacing petroleum-based chemicals and products. Value-added applications of lignin are also essential for economic viability for future bio-refineries. It is however an under-utilized natural resource due to its structural heterogeneities. Lignin nanoparticles offer many opportunities for value-added applications of lignin. The solution structures of lignin were proposed as one of the key elements in controlling lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Fundamental understanding of solutionstructures of lignin aid in designing better fabrication of lignin nanoparticles. A deeper understanding of the observed experimental results also points to the need for detailed studies of lignin in solution. Lastly, this review consists of two major topics, the solution structures of lignin and lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Suggestions for future studies regarding these two topics were also put forward.

  12. A Major QTL, Which Is Co-located with cly1, and Two Minor QTLs Are Associated with Glume Opening Angle in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XinZhong; Guo, BaoJian; Lan, GuoFang; Li, HongTao; Lin, Shen; Ma, Jun; Lv, Chao; Xu, RuGen

    2016-01-01

    Cleistogamous and chasmogamous are two opposing phenomena for flowering in barley. Cleistogamy limits the rate of outcrossing, and increases the cost of producing hybrid barley seeds. Selecting chasmogamous lines with a large glume opening angle (GOA) is essential for the utilization of barley heterosis. In the current study, 247 DH lines derived from a cross between Yangnongpi7 and Yang0187 were used to identify and validate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with the GOA in different environments using SSR markers. Three QTLs associated with barley GOA were mapped on chromosomes 2H and 7H. The major QTL QGOA-2H-2 was mapped on chromosome 2H with the flanking markers of KDH and GBM1498, explaining 63.92% of the phenotypic variation. The marker KDH was developed from the gene Cly1, which was the candidate gene for QGOA-2H-2. This new marker can be used to identify barley chasmogamous lines with a large GOA. The two minor QTLs were validated at all three locations across two seasons after removing DH lines carrying the candidate gene Cly1 of QGOA-2H-2. PMID:27822223

  13. Verification and fine mapping of qGW1.05, a major QTL for grain weight in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiang; Dong, Yongbin; Shi, Qingling; Zhang, Long; Chen, Huanqing; Hu, Chunhui; Li, Yuling

    2017-04-12

    Grain weight, one of the important factors to determine corn yield, is a typical quantitative inheritance trait. However, the molecular genetic basis of grain weight still remains limited. In our previous researches, a major QTL associated with grain weight, qGW1.05, has been identified between SSR markers umc1601 and umc1754 at bin locus 1.05-1.06 in maize. Here, its genetic and environmental stabiliteis were verified using a BC3F2 population to identify the effect of qGW1.05 on grain weight. Further, qGW1.05-NILs were obtained by MAS successfully. Via a large BC6F2 segregation population, together with polymorphic microsatellite markers developed between the parents to screen the genotype of the recombinant plants, qGW1.05 was positioned to a 1.11 Mb genome interval. Furthermore, the progenies of 15 recombinants were tested to confirm the effect of qGW1.05 on grain weight. Combining collinearity among cereal crops and genome annotation, the several candidate genes taking part in grain development were identified in the qGW1.05 region. In this study, qGW1.05 was limited to a 1.11 Mb region on chromosome 1, which established the foundation for understanding the molecular basis underlying kernel development and improving grain weight through MAS using the tightly flanking molecular markers in maize.

  14. Identification of a Differentially Expressed TIR-NBS-LRR Gene in a Major QTL Associated to Leaf Rust Resistance in Salix

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tom; Rönnberg-Wästljung, Ann-Christin; Stenlid, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An earlier identified major quantitative trait locus for resistance towards the willow leaf rust fungus Melampsora larici-epitea in a Salix viminalis x (S. viminalis × S. schwerinii) population was used to identify potential resistance genes to the rust pathogen. Screening a genomic bacterial artificial chromosome library with markers from the peak position of the QTL region revealed one gene with TIR-NBS-LRR (Toll Interleukin1 Receptor-Nucleotide Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat) domain structure indicative of a resistance gene. The resistance gene analog was denoted RGA1 and further analysis revealed a number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the LRR domain between the resistant and susceptible Salix genotypes. Gene expression levels under controlled conditions showed a significantly lower constitutive expression of RGA1 in the susceptible genotype. In addition, the susceptible genotype showed a significantly reduced expression level of the RGA1 gene at 24 hours post inoculation with M. larici-epitea. This indicates that the pathogen may actively suppress RGA1 gene expression allowing a compatible plant-pathogen interaction and causing infection. PMID:28002449

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling protein, oil, and five major fatty acids’ contents in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improved seed composition in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) for protein and oil quality is one of the major goals of soybean breeders. A group of genes that act as quantitative traits with their effects can alter protein, oil, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids percentage in soy...

  16. Parallels in lignin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Banks, Jo Ann

    2008-01-01

    A hallmark of vascular plants is the development of a complex water-conducting system, which is physically reinforced by the heterogeneous aromatic polymer lignin. Syringyl lignin, a major building block of lignin, is often thought to be uniquely characteristic of angiosperms; however, it was demonstrated over fifty years ago that that syringyl lignin is found in another group of plants, known as the lycophytes, the ancestors of which diverged from all the other vascular plant lineages 400 million years ago.1 To determine the biochemical basis for this common biosynthetic ability, we isolated and characterized cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (P450s) from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and compared them to the enzyme that is required for syringyl lignin synthesis in angiosperms. Our results showed that one of these P450s encodes an enzyme that is functionally analogous to but phylogenetically independent from its angiosperm counterpart. Here, we discuss the evolution of lignin biosynthesis in vascular plants and the role of Selaginella moellendorffii in plant comparative biology and genomics. PMID:19704782

  17. Major QTL for Carrot Color are Associated with Carotenoid Biosynthetic Genes and Interact Epistatically in a Domesticated x Wild Carrot Cross

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild carrot roots are white and do not accumulate pigments while the cultivated carrot is one of the richest sources of carotenoid pigments – mainly provitamin A alpha and beta carotenes. In this study we performed QTL analyses for pigment content on a carotenoid biosynthesis function map based on t...

  18. Enzymatic conversion of lignin into renewable chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Timothy D H; Rahmanpour, Rahman

    2015-12-01

    The aromatic heteropolymer lignin is a major component of plant cell walls, and is produced industrially from paper/pulp manufacture and cellulosic bioethanol production. Conversion of lignin into renewable chemicals is a major unsolved problem in the development of a biomass-based biorefinery. The review describes recent developments in the understanding of bacterial enzymes for lignin breakdown, such as DyP peroxidases, bacterial laccases, and beta-etherase enzymes. The use of pathway engineering methods to construct genetically modified microbes to convert lignin to renewable chemicals (e.g. vanillin, adipic acid) via fermentation is discussed, and the search for novel applications for lignin (e.g. carbon fibre).

  19. Preparation and Analysis of Biomass Lignins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    Lignin, comprised primarily of three randomly polymerized phenylpropenyl monomers, is, arguably, the second most common organic molecule on earth. In current biorefinery applications, lignin is burned, usually in concentrated pulping or hydrolysis liquor, as a source of process steam and both internal and exported electricity. The aromatic content of lignin makes it a potentially attractive feedstock for high-value aromatic chemicals, polymers, and carbon products (graphite, activated carbon, and carbon fiber). Revenue from production of lignin-based chemicals could play a major role in biorefinery profitability if cost-effective methods for lignin separation and purification can be developed. This chapter presents descriptions of methods for assessing and purifying biorefinery lignins so that they can be evaluated for use as feedstock for production of chemical products. Areas covered are: (1) initial evaluations of as-received lignin samples (visual, microscopic, separable organics); (2) analysis of common contaminants (bulk and filterable ash and particulate contaminants in liquid and dry lignin samples); (3) preparation of lignins for experimental use as chemical feedstock (prefiltration, filtration using bench-scale chemical apparatus and larger scale bag filters, one-step lignin precipitation, two-step carbohydrate and lignin precipitation, desalting of dry powdered or precipitated lignin, and lyophilization). These methods have been used successfully at the bench scale to produce the 1-50 kg amounts of wood and grass lignins typically required for bench-scale assessment as chemical feedstocks.

  20. Recent advances in oxidative valorization of lignin

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Zhang, Xiao

    2017-07-21

    Lignin, an aromatic macromolecule synthesized by all higher plants, is one of the most intriguing natural materials for utilization across a wide range of applications. Depolymerization and fragmentation of lignin into small chemicals constituents which can either replace current market products or be used building blocks for new material synthesis is a focus of current lignin valorization strategies. And among the variety of lignin degradation chemistries, catalytic oxidation of lignin presents an energy efficient means of lignin depolymerization and generating selective reaction products. Our review provides a summary of the recent advancements in oxidative lignin valorization couched in a discussionmore » on how these chemistries may contribute to the degradation of the lignin macromolecule through three major approaches: 1) inter-unit linkages cleavage; 2) propanyl side-chain oxidative modification; and 3) oxidation of the aromatic ring and ring cleavage reactions.« less

  1. Ensemble Learning of QTL Models Improves Prediction of Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yang; Holland, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) models can provide useful insights into trait genetic architecture because of their straightforward interpretability but are less useful for genetic prediction because of the difficulty in including the effects of numerous small effect loci without overfitting. Tight linkage between markers introduces near collinearity among marker genotypes, complicating the detection of QTL and estimation of QTL effects in linkage mapping, and this problem is exacerbated by very high density linkage maps. Here we developed a thinning and aggregating (TAGGING) method as a new ensemble learning approach to QTL mapping. TAGGING reduces collinearity problems by thinning dense linkage maps, maintains aspects of marker selection that characterize standard QTL mapping, and by ensembling, incorporates information from many more markers-trait associations than traditional QTL mapping. The objective of TAGGING was to improve prediction power compared with QTL mapping while also providing more specific insights into genetic architecture than genome-wide prediction models. TAGGING was compared with standard QTL mapping using cross validation of empirical data from the maize (Zea mays L.) nested association mapping population. TAGGING-assisted QTL mapping substantially improved prediction ability for both biparental and multifamily populations by reducing both the variance and bias in prediction. Furthermore, an ensemble model combining predictions from TAGGING-assisted QTL and infinitesimal models improved prediction abilities over the component models, indicating some complementarity between model assumptions and suggesting that some trait genetic architectures involve a mixture of a few major QTL and polygenic effects. PMID:26276383

  2. Statistical properties of interval mapping methods on quantitative trait loci location: impact on QTL/eQTL analyses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection on a huge amount of phenotypes, like eQTL detection on transcriptomic data, can be dramatically impaired by the statistical properties of interval mapping methods. One of these major outcomes is the high number of QTL detected at marker locations. The present study aims at identifying and specifying the sources of this bias, in particular in the case of analysis of data issued from outbred populations. Analytical developments were carried out in a backcross situation in order to specify the bias and to propose an algorithm to control it. The outbred population context was studied through simulated data sets in a wide range of situations. The likelihood ratio test was firstly analyzed under the "one QTL" hypothesis in a backcross population. Designs of sib families were then simulated and analyzed using the QTL Map software. On the basis of the theoretical results in backcross, parameters such as the population size, the density of the genetic map, the QTL effect and the true location of the QTL, were taken into account under the "no QTL" and the "one QTL" hypotheses. A combination of two non parametric tests - the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test - was used in order to identify the parameters that affected the bias and to specify how much they influenced the estimation of QTL location. Results A theoretical expression of the bias of the estimated QTL location was obtained for a backcross type population. We demonstrated a common source of bias under the "no QTL" and the "one QTL" hypotheses and qualified the possible influence of several parameters. Simulation studies confirmed that the bias exists in outbred populations under both the hypotheses of "no QTL" and "one QTL" on a linkage group. The QTL location was systematically closer to marker locations than expected, particularly in the case of low QTL effect, small population size or low density of markers, i.e. designs with low power

  3. Targeted linkage map densification to improve cell wall related QTL detection and interpretation in maize.

    PubMed

    Courtial, Audrey; Thomas, Justine; Reymond, Matthieu; Méchin, Valérie; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Barrière, Yves

    2013-05-01

    Several QTLs for cell wall degradability and lignin content were previously detected in the F288 × F271 maize RIL progeny, including a set of major QTLs located in bin 6.06. Unexpectedly, allelic sequencing of genes located around the bin 6.06 QTL positions revealed a monomorphous region, suggesting that these QTLs were likely "ghost" QTLs. Refining the positions of all QTLs detected in this population was thus considered, based on a linkage map densification in most important QTL regions, and in several large still unmarked regions. Re-analysis of data with an improved genetic map (173 markers instead of 108) showed that ghost QTLs located in bin 6.06 were then fractionated over two QTL positions located upstream and downstream of the monomorphic region. The area located upstream of bin 6.06 position carried the major QTLs, which explained from 37 to 59 % of the phenotypic variation for per se values and extended on only 6 cM, corresponding to a physical distance of 2.2 Mbp. Among the 92 genes present in the corresponding area of the B73 maize reference genome, nine could putatively be considered as involved in the formation of the secondary cell wall [bHLH, FKBP, laccase, fasciclin, zinc finger C2H2-type and C3HC4-type (two genes), NF-YB, and WRKY]. In addition, based on the currently improved genetic map, eight QTLs were detected in bin 4.09, while only one QTL was highlighted in the initial investigation. Moreover, significant epistatic interaction effects were shown for all traits between these QTLs located in bin 4.09 and the major QTLs located in bin 6.05. Three genes related to secondary cell wall assembly (ZmMYB42, COV1-like, PAL-like) underlay QTL support intervals in this newly identified bin 4.09 region. The current investigations, even if they were based only on one RIL progeny, illustrated the interest of a targeted marker mapping on a genetic map to improve QTL position.

  4. Confirmation and Fine Mapping of a Major QTL for Aflatoxin Resistance in Maize Using a Combination of Linkage and Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Cui, Min; Zhang, Jimin; Zhang, Lei; Li, Chenliu; Kan, Xin; Sun, Qian; Deng, Dexiang; Yin, Zhitong

    2016-01-01

    Maize grain contamination with aflatoxin from Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus) is a serious health hazard to animals and humans. To map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with resistance to A. flavus, we employed a powerful approach that differs from previous methods in one important way: it combines the advantages of the genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) and traditional linkage mapping analysis. Linkage mapping was performed using 228 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), and a highly significant QTL that affected aflatoxin accumulation, qAA8, was mapped. This QTL spanned approximately 7 centi-Morgan (cM) on chromosome 8. The confidence interval was too large for positional cloning of the causal gene. To refine this QTL, GWAS was performed with 558,629 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an association population comprising 437 maize inbred lines. Twenty-five significantly associated SNPs were identified, most of which co-localised with qAA8 and explained 6.7% to 26.8% of the phenotypic variation observed. Based on the rapid linkage disequilibrium (LD) and the high density of SNPs in the association population, qAA8 was further localised to a smaller genomic region of approximately 1500 bp. A high-resolution map of the qAA8 region will be useful towards a marker-assisted selection (MAS) of A. flavus resistance and a characterisation of the causal gene. PMID:27598199

  5. Detection of two major grain yield QTL in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under heat, drought and high yield potential environments.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Dion; Reynolds, Matthew; Mullan, Daniel; Izanloo, Ali; Kuchel, Haydn; Langridge, Peter; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    A large proportion of the worlds' wheat growing regions suffers water and/or heat stress at some stage during the crop growth cycle. With few exceptions, there has been no utilisation of managed environments to screen mapping populations under repeatable abiotic stress conditions, such as the facilities developed by the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Centre (CIMMYT). Through careful management of irrigation and sowing date over three consecutive seasons, repeatable heat, drought and high yield potential conditions were imposed on the RAC875/Kukri doubled haploid population to identify genetic loci for grain yield, yield components and key morpho-physiological traits under these conditions. Two of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTL) were located on chromosome 3B and had a large effect on canopy temperature and grain yield, accounting for up to 22 % of the variance for these traits. The locus on chromosome arm 3BL was detected under all three treatments but had its largest effect under the heat stress conditions, with the RAC875 allele increasing grain yield by 131 kg ha(-1) (or phenotypically, 7 % of treatment average). Only two of the eight yield QTL detected in the current study (including linkage groups 3A, 3D, 4D 5B and 7A) were previously detected in the RAC875/Kukri doubled haploid population; and there were also different yield components driving grain yield. A number of discussion points are raised to understand differences between the Mexican and southern Australian production environments and explain the lack of correlation between the datasets. The two key QTL detected on chromosome 3B in the present study are candidates for further genetic dissection and development of molecular markers.

  6. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  7. Lignin nanoparticle synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole; Wheeler, David R.; Benko, David A.

    2015-08-11

    A method including reducing a particle size of lignin particles to an average particle size less than 40 nanometers; after reducing the particle size, combining the lignin particles with a polymeric material; and forming a structure of the combination. A method including exposing lignin to a diazonium precursor including a functional group; modifying the lignin by introducing the functional group to the lignin; and combining the modified lignin with a polymeric material to form a composite. An apparatus including a composite of a polymer and lignin wherein the lignin has an average particle size less than 100 micrometers.

  8. Marker Aided Incorporation of Saltol, a Major QTL Associated with Seedling Stage Salt Tolerance, into Oryza sativa ‘Pusa Basmati 1121’

    PubMed Central

    Babu, N. Naresh; Krishnan, S. Gopala; Vinod, K. K.; Krishnamurthy, S. L.; Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Madan P.; Singh, Renu; Ellur, Ranjith K.; Rai, Vandna; Bollinedi, Haritha; Bhowmick, Prolay K.; Yadav, Ashutosh K.; Nagarajan, Mariappan; Singh, Nagendra K.; Prabhu, Kumble V.; Singh, Ashok K.

    2017-01-01

    Pusa Basmati 1121 (PB1121), an elite Basmati rice cultivar is vulnerable to salinity at seedling stage. A study was undertaken to impart seedling-stage salt tolerance into PB1121 by transferring a quantitative trait locus (QTL), Saltol, using FL478 as donor, through marker assisted backcrossing. Sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) marker RM 3412, tightly linked to Saltol was used for foreground selection. Background recovery was estimated using 90 genome-wide STMS markers. Systematic phenotypic selection helped in accelerated recovery of recurrent parent phenome (RPP). A set of 51 BC3F2 lines homozygous for Saltol were advanced to develop four improved near isogenic lines (NILs) of PB1121 with seedling stage salt tolerance. The background genome recovery in the NILs ranged from 93.3 to 99.4%. The improved NILs were either similar or better than the recurrent parent PB1121 for yield, grain and cooking quality and duration. Biochemical analyses revealed significant variation in shoot and root Na+ and K+ concentrations. Correlation between shoot and root Na+ concentration was stronger than that between root and shoot K+ concentration. The effect of QTL integration into the NILs was studied through expression profiling of OsHKT1;5, one of the genes present in the Saltol region. The NILs had significantly higher OsHKT1;5 expression than the recurrent parent PB1121, but lower than FL478 on salt exposure validating the successful introgression of Saltol in the NILs. This was also confirmed under agronomic evaluation, wherein the NILs showed greater salt tolerance at seedling stage. One of the NILs, Pusa1734-8-3-3 (NIL3) showed comparable yield and cooking quality to the recurrent parent PB1121, with high field level seedling stage salinity tolerance and shorter duration. This is the first report of successful introgression of Saltol into a Basmati rice cultivar. PMID:28184228

  9. ZmGA3ox2, a candidate gene for a major QTL, qPH3.1, for plant height in maize.

    PubMed

    Teng, Feng; Zhai, Lihong; Liu, Ruixiang; Bai, Wei; Wang, Liqiu; Huo, Dongao; Tao, Yongsheng; Zheng, Yonglian; Zhang, Zuxin

    2013-02-01

    Maize plant height is closely associated with biomass, lodging resistance and grain yield. Determining the genetic basis of plant height by characterizing and cloning plant height genes will guide the genetic improvement of crops. In this study, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for plant height, qPH3.1, was identified on chromosome 3 using populations derived from a cross between Zong3 and its chromosome segment substitution line, SL15. The plant height of the two lines was obviously different, and application of exogenous gibberellin A(3) removed this difference. QTL mapping placed qPH3.1 within a 4.0 cM interval, explaining 32.3% of the phenotypic variance. Furthermore, eight homozygous segmental isolines (SILs) developed from two larger F(2) populations further narrowed down qPH3.1 to within a 12.6 kb interval. ZmGA3ox2, an ortholog of OsGA3ox2, which encodes a GA3 β-hydroxylase, was positionally cloned. Association mapping identified two polymorphisms in ZmGA3ox2 that were significantly associated with plant height across two experiments. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that SL15 had higher ZmGA3ox2 expression relative to Zong3. The resultant higher GA(1) accumulation led to longer internodes in SL15 because of increased cell lengths. Moreover, a large deletion in the coding region of ZmGA3ox2 is responsible for the dwarf mutant d1-6016. The successfully isolated qPH3.1 enriches our knowledge on the genetic basis of plant height in maize, and provides an opportunity for improvement of plant architecture in maize breeding.

  10. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-10-20

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the (bio)processing of lignocellulosic feedstocks, more effective degradation methods of lignin are in demand. Nature has found ways to fully degrade lignin through the production of dedicated ligninolytic enzyme systems. While such enzymes have been well thoroughly studied for ligninolytic fungi, only in recent years biochemical studies on bacterial enzymes capable of lignin modification have intensified. This has revealed several types of enzymes available to bacteria that enable them to act on lignin. Two major classes of bacterial lignin-modifying enzymes are DyP-type peroxidases and laccases. Yet, recently also several other bacterial enzymes have been discovered that seem to play a role in lignin modifications. In the present review, we provide an overview of recent advances in the identification and use of bacterial enzymes acting on lignin or lignin-derived products.

  11. Cell Wall Composition and Underlying QTL in an F1 Pseudo-Testcross Population of Switchgrass

    DOE PAGES

    Serba, Desalegn D.; Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; ...

    2016-04-23

    Natural genetic variation for reduced recalcitrance can be used to improve switchgrass for biofuel production. A full-sib switchgrass mapping population developed by crossing a lowland genotype, AP13, and upland genotype, VS16, was evaluated at three locations (Ardmore and Burneyville, OK and Watkinsville, GA). Biomass harvested after senescence in 2009 and 2010 was evaluated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for sugar release using enzymatic hydrolysis and for lignin content and syringyl/guaiacyl lignin monomer (S/G) ratio using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS). Glucose and xylose release ranged from 120 to 313 and 123 to 263 mg g-1, respectively, whilemore » lignin content ranged from 19 to 27% of the dry biomass. Statistically significant differences were observed among the genotypes and the environments for the cell wall composition traits. Regression analysis showed that a unit increase in lignin content reduced total sugar release by an average of 10 mg g-1. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis detected 9 genomic regions underlying sugar release and 14 for lignin content. The phenotypic variation explained by the individual QTL identified for sugar release ranged from 4.5 to 9.4 and for lignin content from 3.8 to 11.1%. Mapping of the QTL regions to the switchgrass genome sequence (v1.1) found that some of the QTL colocalized with genes involved in carbohydrate processing and metabolism, plant development, defense systems, and transcription factors. Finally, the markers associated with QTL can be implemented in breeding programs to efficiently develop improved switchgrass cultivars for biofuel production.« less

  12. Cell Wall Composition and Underlying QTL in an F1 Pseudo-Testcross Population of Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Serba, Desalegn D.; Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Decker, Stephen R.; Daverdin, Guillaume; Devos, Katrien M.; Brummer, E. Charles; Saha, Malay C.

    2016-04-23

    Natural genetic variation for reduced recalcitrance can be used to improve switchgrass for biofuel production. A full-sib switchgrass mapping population developed by crossing a lowland genotype, AP13, and upland genotype, VS16, was evaluated at three locations (Ardmore and Burneyville, OK and Watkinsville, GA). Biomass harvested after senescence in 2009 and 2010 was evaluated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for sugar release using enzymatic hydrolysis and for lignin content and syringyl/guaiacyl lignin monomer (S/G) ratio using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS). Glucose and xylose release ranged from 120 to 313 and 123 to 263 mg g-1, respectively, while lignin content ranged from 19 to 27% of the dry biomass. Statistically significant differences were observed among the genotypes and the environments for the cell wall composition traits. Regression analysis showed that a unit increase in lignin content reduced total sugar release by an average of 10 mg g-1. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis detected 9 genomic regions underlying sugar release and 14 for lignin content. The phenotypic variation explained by the individual QTL identified for sugar release ranged from 4.5 to 9.4 and for lignin content from 3.8 to 11.1%. Mapping of the QTL regions to the switchgrass genome sequence (v1.1) found that some of the QTL colocalized with genes involved in carbohydrate processing and metabolism, plant development, defense systems, and transcription factors. Finally, the markers associated with QTL can be implemented in breeding programs to efficiently develop improved switchgrass cultivars for biofuel production.

  13. Lignin conversion: Opportunities and challenges for the integrated biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shangxian; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-06-21

    The utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and products represents one of the most imminent challenges in the modern biorefinery because most of the bioprocesses for lignocellulosic biofuels results in a lignin-containing waste stream. Considering lignin's abundance and relatively high energy content, this waste stream can be used as a feedstock for value-added products to improve the sustainability and economic feasibility of the biorefinery. Bioconversion of lignin with microbes recently emerged as an alternative lignin-valorization approach with significant potential. Typically, the microbial bioconversion of lignin requires three major steps: lignin depolymerization, aromatic compounds catabolism, and target product biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in lignin bioconversion to address the challenges in each of the three steps. In conclusion, we further discuss strategies and perspectives for future research to address the challenges in bioconversion of lignin.

  14. Lignin conversion: Opportunities and challenges for the integrated biorefinery

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shangxian; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-06-21

    The utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and products represents one of the most imminent challenges in the modern biorefinery because most of the bioprocesses for lignocellulosic biofuels results in a lignin-containing waste stream. Considering lignin's abundance and relatively high energy content, this waste stream can be used as a feedstock for value-added products to improve the sustainability and economic feasibility of the biorefinery. Bioconversion of lignin with microbes recently emerged as an alternative lignin-valorization approach with significant potential. Typically, the microbial bioconversion of lignin requires three major steps: lignin depolymerization, aromatic compounds catabolism, and target product biosynthesis. In thismore » review, we summarize the most recent advances in lignin bioconversion to address the challenges in each of the three steps. In conclusion, we further discuss strategies and perspectives for future research to address the challenges in bioconversion of lignin.« less

  15. Lignin conversion: Opportunities and challenges for the integrated biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shangxian; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-06-21

    The utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and products represents one of the most imminent challenges in the modern biorefinery because most of the bioprocesses for lignocellulosic biofuels results in a lignin-containing waste stream. Considering lignin's abundance and relatively high energy content, this waste stream can be used as a feedstock for value-added products to improve the sustainability and economic feasibility of the biorefinery. Bioconversion of lignin with microbes recently emerged as an alternative lignin-valorization approach with significant potential. Typically, the microbial bioconversion of lignin requires three major steps: lignin depolymerization, aromatic compounds catabolism, and target product biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in lignin bioconversion to address the challenges in each of the three steps. In conclusion, we further discuss strategies and perspectives for future research to address the challenges in bioconversion of lignin.

  16. Valorization of Lignin to Simple Phenolic Compounds over Tungsten Carbide: Impact of Lignin Structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiwei; Zhang, Bo; Qi, Zaojuan; Li, Changzhi; Ji, Jianwei; Dai, Tao; Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2017-02-08

    Lignins isolated from representative hardwood, softwood, and grass materials were effectively hydrocracked to aromatics catalyzed by tungsten carbide over activated carbon (W2 C/AC). The effects of botanical species and fractionation methods on lignin structure and the activity of W2 C/AC were studied in detail. Gas permeation chromatography (GPC), FTIR, elemental analysis, and 2 D HSQC NMR showed that all the extracted samples shared the basic skeleton of lignin, whereas the fractionation method significantly affected the structure. The organosolv process provided lignin with a structure more similar to the native lignin, which was labile to be depolymerized by W2 C/AC. Softwood lignins (i.e., spruce and pine) possessed higher molecular weights than hardwood lignins (i.e., poplar and basswood); whereas corn stalk lignin that has noncanonical subunits and exhibited the lowest molecular weight owing to its shorter growth period. β-O-4 bonds were the major linkages in all lignin samples, whereas softwood lignins contained more resistant linkages of β-5 and less β-β than corn stalk and hardwood lignins; as a result, lowest hydrocracking efficiency was obtained in softwood lignins, followed by corn stalk and hardwood lignins. 2 D HSQC NMR spectra of lignin and the liquid oil as well as the solid residue showed that W2 C/AC exhibited high activity not only in β-O-4 cleavage, but also in deconstruction of other ether linkages between aromatic units, so that high yield of liquid oil was obtained from lignin. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Techniques for characterizing lignin

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Daniel J. Yelle; Umesh P. Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Many techniques are available to characterize lignin. The techniques presented in this chapter are considered nondegradative, which are commonly applied to lignin. A brief discussion of lignin structure is included with this chapter to aid the reader in understanding why the discussed characterization techniques are appropriate for the study of lignin. Because the...

  18. QTL mapping of resistance to gray leaf spot in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Ling; Fan, Xingming; Tan, Jing; Chen, Wei; Xu, Mingliang

    2012-12-01

    Gray leaf spot (GLS), caused by the causal fungal pathogen Cercospora zeae-maydis, is one of the most serious foliar diseases of maize worldwide. In the current study, a highly resistant inbred line Y32 and a susceptible line Q11 were used to produce segregating populations for both genetic analysis and QTL mapping. The broad-sense heritability (H (2)) for GLS resistance was estimated to be as high as 0.85, indicating that genetic factors played key roles in phenotypic variation. In initial QTL analysis, four QTL, located on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, and 8, were detected to confer GLS resistance. Each QTL could explain 2.53-23.90 % of the total phenotypic variation, predominantly due to additive genetic effects. Two major QTL, qRgls1 and qRgls2 on chromosomes 8 and 5, were consistently detected across different locations and replicates. Compared to the previous results, qRgls2 is located in a 'hotspot' for GLS resistance; while, qRgls1 does not overlap with any other known resistance QTL. Furthermore, the major QTL-qRgls1 was fine-mapped into an interval of 1.4 Mb, flanked by the markers GZ204 and IDP5. The QTL-qRgls1 could enhance the resistance percentages by 19.70-61.28 %, suggesting its usefulness to improve maize resistance to GLS.

  19. Identification of candidate genes associated with cell wall digestibility and eQTL (expression quantitative trait loci) analysis in a Flint x Flint maize recombinant inbred line population.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun; Uzarowska, Anna; Ouzunova, Milena; Landbeck, Matthias; Wenzel, Gerhard; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2007-01-18

    Cell-wall digestibility is the major target for improving the feeding value of forage maize. An understanding of the molecular basis for cell-wall digestibility is crucial towards breeding of highly digestible maize. 865 candidate ESTs for cell-wall digestibility were selected according to the analysis of expression profiles in 1) three sets of brown-midrib isogenic lines in the genetic background of inbreds 1332 (1332 and 1332 bm3), 5361 (5361 and 5361 bm3), and F2 (F2, F2 bm1, F2 bm2, and F2 bm3), 2) the contrasting extreme lines of FD (Flint x Dent, AS08 x AS 06), DD1 (Dent x Dent, AS11 x AS09), and DD2 (Dent x Dent, AS29 x AS30) mapping populations, and 3) two contrasting isogenic inbreds, AS20 and AS21. Out of those, 439 ESTs were assembled on our "Forage Quality Array", a small microarray specific for cell wall digestibility related experiments. Transcript profiles of 40 lines of a Flint x Flint population were monitored using the Forage Quality Array, which were contrasting for cell wall digestibility. Using t-tests (p < 0.01), the expression patterns of 102 ESTs were significantly different between high and low quality groups. Using interval mapping, eQTL (LOD > or = 2.4) were detected for 20% (89 of 439) of the spotted ESTs. On average, these eQTL explained 39% of the transcription variation of the corresponding ESTs. Only 26% (23 of 89) ESTs detected a single eQTL. eQTL hotspots, containing greater than 5% of the total number of eQTL, were located in chromosomal bins 1.07, 1.12, 3.05, 8.03, and 9.04, respectively. Bin 3.05 was co-localized with a cell-wall digestibility related QTL cluster. 102 candidate genes for cell-wall digestibility were validated by genetical genomics approach. Although the cDNA array highlights gene types (the tested gene and any close family members), trans-acting factors or metabolic bottlenecks seem to play the major role in controlling heritable variation of gene expression related to cell-wall digestibility, since no in silico

  20. Identification of candidate genes associated with cell wall digestibility and eQTL (expression quantitative trait loci) analysis in a Flint × Flint maize recombinant inbred line population

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chun; Uzarowska, Anna; Ouzunova, Milena; Landbeck, Matthias; Wenzel, Gerhard; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell-wall digestibility is the major target for improving the feeding value of forage maize. An understanding of the molecular basis for cell-wall digestibility is crucial towards breeding of highly digestible maize. Results 865 candidate ESTs for cell-wall digestibility were selected according to the analysis of expression profiles in 1) three sets of brown-midrib isogenic lines in the genetic background of inbreds 1332 (1332 and 1332 bm3), 5361 (5361 and 5361 bm3), and F2 (F2, F2 bm1, F2 bm2, and F2 bm3), 2) the contrasting extreme lines of FD (Flint × Dent, AS08 × AS 06), DD1 (Dent × Dent, AS11 × AS09), and DD2 (Dent × Dent, AS29 × AS30) mapping populations, and 3) two contrasting isogenic inbreds, AS20 and AS21. Out of those, 439 ESTs were assembled on our "Forage Quality Array", a small microarray specific for cell wall digestibility related experiments. Transcript profiles of 40 lines of a Flint × Flint population were monitored using the Forage Quality Array, which were contrasting for cell wall digestibility. Using t-tests (p < 0.01), the expression patterns of 102 ESTs were significantly different between high and low quality groups. Using interval mapping, eQTL (LOD ≥ 2.4) were detected for 20% (89 of 439) of the spotted ESTs. On average, these eQTL explained 39% of the transcription variation of the corresponding ESTs. Only 26% (23 of 89) ESTs detected a single eQTL. eQTL hotspots, containing greater than 5% of the total number of eQTL, were located in chromosomal bins 1.07, 1.12, 3.05, 8.03, and 9.04, respectively. Bin 3.05 was co-localized with a cell-wall digestibility related QTL cluster. Conclusion 102 candidate genes for cell-wall digestibility were validated by genetical genomics approach. Although the cDNA array highlights gene types (the tested gene and any close family members), trans-acting factors or metabolic bottlenecks seem to play the major role in controlling heritable variation of gene expression related to cell

  1. Fine mapping and identification of candidate rice genes associated with qSTV11(SG), a major QTL for rice stripe disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tackmin; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Soo-Kwon; Hwang, Un-Ha; Cho, Jun-Hyun; Kwak, Do-Yeon; Youn, Yeong-Nam; Yeo, Un-Sang; Song, You-Chun; Nam, Jaesung; Kang, Hang-Won; Nam, Min-Hee; Park, Dong-Soo

    2012-09-01

    Rice stripe disease, caused by rice stripe virus (RSV) is a serious constraint to rice production in subtropical regions of East Asia. We performed fine mapping of a RSV resistance QTL on chromosome 11, qSTV11 ( SG ), using near-isogenic lines (NILs, BC(6)F(4)) derived from a cross between the highly resistant variety, Shingwang, and the highly susceptible variety, Ilpum, using 11 insertion and deletion (InDel) markers. qSTV11 ( SG ) was localized to a 150-kb region between InDel 11 (17.86 Mbp) and InDel 5 (18.01 Mbp). Among the two markers in this region, InDel 7 is diagnostic of RSV resistance in 55 Korean japonica and indica rice varieties. InDel 7 could also distinguish the allele type of Nagdong, Shingwang, Mudgo, and Pe-bi-hun from Zenith harboring the Stv-b ( i ) allele. As a result, qSTV11 ( SG ) is likely to be the Stv-b ( i ) allele. There were 21 genes in the 150-kb region harboring the qSTV11 ( SG ) locus. Three of these genes, LOC_Os11g31430, LOC_Os11g31450, and LOC_Os11g31470, were exclusively expressed in the susceptible variety. These expression profiles were consistent with the quantitative nature along with incomplete dominance of RSV resistance. Sequencing of these genes showed that there were several amino acid substitutions between susceptible and resistant varieties. Putative functions of these candidate genes for qSTV11 (SG) are discussed.

  2. Formaldehyde stabilization facilitates lignin monomer production during biomass depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Amiri, Masoud Talebi; Questell-Santiago, Ydna M; Héroguel, Florent; Li, Yanding; Kim, Hoon; Meilan, Richard; Chapple, Clint; Ralph, John; Luterbacher, Jeremy S

    2016-10-21

    Practical, high-yield lignin depolymerization methods could greatly increase biorefinery productivity and profitability. However, development of these methods is limited by the presence of interunit carbon-carbon bonds within native lignin, and further by formation of such linkages during lignin extraction. We report that adding formaldehyde during biomass pretreatment produces a soluble lignin fraction that can be converted to guaiacyl and syringyl monomers at near theoretical yields during subsequent hydrogenolysis (47 mole % of Klason lignin for beech and 78 mole % for a high-syringyl transgenic poplar). These yields were three to seven times those obtained without formaldehyde, which prevented lignin condensation by forming 1,3-dioxane structures with lignin side-chain hydroxyl groups. By depolymerizing cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin separately, monomer yields were between 76 and 90 mole % for these three major biomass fractions. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Two distinct classes of QTL determine rust resistance in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemin; Mace, Emma; Hunt, Colleen; Cruickshank, Alan; Henzell, Robert; Parkes, Heidi; Jordan, David

    2014-12-31

    Agriculture is facing enormous challenges to feed a growing population in the face of rapidly evolving pests and pathogens. The rusts, in particular, are a major pathogen of cereal crops with the potential to cause large reductions in yield. Improving stable disease resistance is an on-going major and challenging focus for many plant breeding programs, due to the rapidly evolving nature of the pathogen. Sorghum is a major summer cereal crop that is also a host for a rust pathogen Puccinia purpurea, which occurs in almost all sorghum growing areas of the world, causing direct and indirect yield losses in sorghum worldwide, however knowledge about its genetic control is still limited. In order to further investigate this issue, QTL and association mapping methods were implemented to study rust resistance in three bi-parental populations and an association mapping set of elite breeding lines in different environments. In total, 64 significant or highly significant QTL and 21 suggestive rust resistance QTL were identified representing 55 unique genomic regions. Comparisons across populations within the current study and with rust QTL identified previously in both sorghum and maize revealed a high degree of correspondence in QTL location. Negative phenotypic correlations were observed between rust, maturity and height, indicating a trend for both early maturing and shorter genotypes to be more susceptible to rust. The significant amount of QTL co-location across traits, in addition to the consistency in the direction of QTL allele effects, has provided evidence to support pleiotropic QTL action across rust, height, maturity and stay-green, supporting the role of carbon stress in susceptibility to rust. Classical rust resistance QTL regions that did not co-locate with height, maturity or stay-green QTL were found to be significantly enriched for the defence-related NBS-encoding gene family, in contrast to the lack of defence-related gene enrichment in multi-trait effect

  4. Modulating lignin in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  5. Multi-environment multi-QTL association mapping identifies disease resistance QTL in barley germplasm from Latin America.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Lucia; Germán, Silvia; Pereyra, Silvia; Hayes, Patrick M; Pérez, Carlos A; Capettini, Flavio; Locatelli, Andres; Berberian, Natalia M; Falconi, Esteban E; Estrada, Rigoberto; Fros, Dario; Gonza, Victor; Altamirano, Hernan; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Neyra, Edgar; Orjeda, Gisella; Sandoval-Islas, Sergio; Singh, Ravi; Turkington, Kelly; Castro, Ariel J

    2015-03-01

    Multi-environment multi-QTL mixed models were used in a GWAS context to identify QTL for disease resistance. The use of mega-environments aided the interpretation of environment-specific and general QTL. Diseases represent a major constraint for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) production in Latin America. Spot blotch (caused by Cochliobolus sativus), stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp. hordei) and leaf rust (caused by Puccinia hordei) are three of the most important diseases that affect the crop in the region. Since fungicide application is not an economically or environmentally sound solution, the development of durably resistant varieties is a priority for breeding programs. Therefore, new resistance sources are needed. The objective of this work was to detect genomic regions associated with field level plant resistance to spot blotch, stripe rust, and leaf rust in Latin American germplasm. Disease severities measured in multi-environment trials across the Americas and 1,096 SNPs in a population of 360 genotypes were used to identify genomic regions associated with disease resistance. Optimized experimental design and spatial modeling were used in each trial to estimate genotypic means. Genome-Wide Association Mapping (GWAS) in each environment was used to detect Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). All significant environment-specific QTL were subsequently included in a multi-environment-multi-QTL (MEMQ) model. Geographical origin and inflorescence type were the main determinants of population structure. Spot blotch severity was low to intermediate while leaf and stripe rust severity was high in all environments. Mega-environments were defined by locations for spot blotch and leaf rust. Significant marker-trait associations for spot blotch (9 QTL), leaf (6 QTL) and stripe rust (7 QTL) and both global and environment-specific QTL were detected that will be useful for future breeding efforts.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphism tightly linked to a major QTL on chromosome 7A for both kernel length and kernel weight in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thousand-kernel weight (TKW) is one of the major components of grain yield in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Identifying major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for TKW and developing diagnostic markers are prerequisite for success in marker-assisted selection (MAS) to improve wheat yield through breeding....

  7. Plant lignin content altered by soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Alison E; Grussu, Dominic; Kam, Jason; Caul, Sandra; Halpin, Claire

    2015-04-01

    Questions have been raised in various fields of research about the consequences of plants with modified lignin production. As a result of their roles in nutrient cycling and plant diversity, plant-soil interactions should be a major focus of ecological studies on lignin-modified plants. However, most studies have been decomposition studies conducted in a single soil or in sterile soil. Thus, we understand little about plant-soil interactions in living lignin-modified plants. In lignin mutants of three different barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivars and their corresponding wild-types associated with three different soil microbial communities, we asked: do plant-soil microbiome interactions influence the lignin content of plants?; does a mutation in lignin production alter the outcome of plant-soil microbiome interactions?; does the outcome of plant-soil microbiome interactions depend on host genotype or the presence of a mutation altering lignin production? In roots, the soil community explained 6% of the variation in lignin content, but, in shoots, the soil community explained 21% of the variation in lignin content and was the only factor influencing lignin content. Neither genotype nor mutations in lignin production explained associations with fungi. Lignin content changes in response to a plant's soil microbial community, and may be a defensive response to particular components of the soil community.

  8. Analytical pyrolysis of hardwood and softwood lignins and its use in lignin-type determination of hardwood vessel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Obst, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Pyrolysis, GC and mass spectrometry were performed on milled wood lignins and wood samples. Among the major pyrolysis products identified from loblolly pine lignin were: guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, coniferaldehyde and coniferyl alcohol. White oak lignin pyrolysis products included: guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, vanillin, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, 4-methyl-2,6-dimethoxyphenol, syringaldehyde and sinapaldehyde. By the identification of pyrolysis products it is thus possible to classify lignins as either guaiacyl-type or syringyl/guaiacyl-type. Pyrolysis of isolated vessel elements from white oak, white birch (Betula papyrifera) and American elm (Ulmus americana) indicated that vessel lignin is of the syringyl/guaiacyl type. 14 references.

  9. Animal bioavailability of defined xenobiotic lignin metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Arjmand, M.; Gennity, I.; Winkler, R. ); Struble, C.B.; Aschbacher, P.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Lignin has been recognized as a major component of bound pesticide residues in plants and is thought to be undigestible in animals. Two defined ring-U-{sup 14}C-labeled chloroaniline/lignin metabolites have now been fed to rats, where a release of {approximately}66% of the bound xenobiotic occurred in the form of simple chloroaniline derivatives. The observed high degree of bioavailability indicates that bound pesticidal residues may possess ecotoxicological significance. In parallel studies, the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was more efficient, and a soil system was much less efficient, in the degradation of the (ring-U-{sup 14}C)chloroaniline/lignin metabolites.

  10. Human QTL linkage mapping.

    PubMed

    Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John

    2009-06-01

    Human quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage mapping, although based on classical statistical genetic methods that have been around for many years, has been employed for genome-wide screening for only the last 10-15 years. In this time, there have been many success stories, ranging from QTLs that have been replicated in independent studies to those for which one or more genes underlying the linkage peak have been identified to a few with specific functional variants that have been confirmed in in vitro laboratory assays. Despite these successes, there is a general perception that linkage approaches do not work for complex traits, possibly because many human QTL linkage studies have been limited in sample size and have not employed the family configurations that maximize the power to detect linkage. We predict that human QTL linkage studies will continue to be productive for the next several years, particularly in combination with RNA expression level traits that are showing evidence of regulatory QTLs of large effect sizes and in combination with high-density genome-wide SNP panels. These SNP panels are being used to identify QTLs previously localized by linkage and linkage results are being used to place informative priors on genome-wide association studies.

  11. Two functionally distinct members of the MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) family of transporters potentially underlie two major Al tolerance QTL in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop yields are significantly reduced by aluminum (Al) toxicity on acidic soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world’s arable land. Al-activated release of ligands (such as organic acids) from the roots is a major plant Al tolerance mechanism. In maize, Al-activated root citrate exudation plays an...

  12. Effect of population size on the estimation of QTL: a test using resistance to barley stripe rust.

    PubMed

    Vales, M I; Schön, C C; Capettini, F; Chen, X M; Corey, A E; Mather, D E; Mundt, C C; Richardson, K L; Sandoval-Islas, J S; Utz, H F; Hayes, P M

    2005-11-01

    The limited population sizes used in many quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection experiments can lead to underestimation of QTL number, overestimation of QTL effects, and failure to quantify QTL interactions. We used the barley/barley stripe rust pathosystem to evaluate the effect of population size on the estimation of QTL parameters. We generated a large (n = 409) population of doubled haploid lines derived from the cross of two inbred lines, BCD47 and Baronesse. This population was evaluated for barley stripe rust severity in the Toluca Valley, Mexico, and in Washington State, USA, under field conditions. BCD47 was the principal donor of resistance QTL alleles, but the susceptible parent also contributed some resistance alleles. The major QTL, located on the long arm of chromosome 4H, close to the Mlo gene, accounted for up to 34% of the phenotypic variance. Subpopulations of different sizes were generated using three methods-resampling, selective genotyping, and selective phenotyping-to evaluate the effect of population size on the estimation of QTL parameters. In all cases, the number of QTL detected increased with population size. QTL with large effects were detected even in small populations, but QTL with small effects were detected only by increasing population size. Selective genotyping and/or selective phenotyping approaches could be effective strategies for reducing the costs associated with conducting QTL analysis in large populations. The method of choice will depend on the relative costs of genotyping versus phenotyping.

  13. Single-base substitution in P1B-ATPase gene is associated with a major QTL for seed cadmium concentration in soybean.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Eduardo R; Hajika, Makita; Takahashi, Ryoji

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a pollutant metal present in soils and toxic to biologic organisms. Previous studies using recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cultivars Harosoy and Fukuyutaka revealed a major quantitative trait loci for seed Cd concentration (cd1) in chromosome 9. The genome sequence of Williams 82 suggested that a P(1B)-ATPase gene involved in the transport of metals was located in the vicinity of cd1. cDNA sequencing suggested existence of two types of transcripts: one (GmHMA1a) consisting of 9 exons and 8 introns and the other (GmHMA1b) consisting of 8 exons and 7 introns. The putative polypeptide, GmHMA1a, consisted of 885 amino acids, whereas premature termination of translation of GmHMA1b generated a putative polypeptide with 559 amino acids. GmHMA1a had a 49.8% similarity with AtHMA3, a P(1B)-ATPase of Arabidopsis. GmHMA1a of Fukuyutaka differed from that of Harosoy by a single-base substitution that led to an amino acid substitution from E to G at amino acid position 608. A derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (dCAPS) marker was developed to detect the base substitution, and this dCAPS marker was successfully associated with seed Cd concentration. Transgenic experiments may be necessary to verify that GmHMA1 actually corresponds to cd1.

  14. Computational Design of Lignin Depolymerization Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive, for which quantum mechanical calculations can offer fundamental insights. In this work, a computational approach has been used to elucidate the reductive deconstruction pathway of a ruthenium-catalyzed system. Transition states have been computed to determine the rate-limiting steps for a catalyst that cleaves arylether linkages. Our calculations are supported by experimental synthesis and kinetic and thermodynamic measurements of the deconstruction of model lignin dimers by a ruthenium catalyst with the ultimate objective of designing new catalysts to eventually utilize lignin in biorefineries.

  15. Meta-analysis of grain yield QTL identified during agricultural drought in grasses showed consensus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the last few years, efforts have been made to identify large effect QTL for grain yield under drought in rice. However, identification of most precise and consistent QTL across the environments and genetics backgrounds is essential for their successful use in Marker-assisted Selection. In this study, an attempt was made to locate consistent QTL regions associated with yield increase under drought by applying a genome-wide QTL meta-analysis approach. Results The integration of 15 maps resulted in a consensus map with 531 markers and a total map length of 1821 cM. Fifty-three yield QTL reported in 15 studies were projected on a consensus map and meta-analysis was performed. Fourteen meta-QTL were obtained on seven chromosomes. MQTL1.2, MQTL1.3, MQTL1.4, and MQTL12.1 were around 700 kb and corresponded to a reasonably small genetic distance of 1.8 to 5 cM and they are suitable for use in marker-assisted selection (MAS). The meta-QTL for grain yield under drought coincided with at least one of the meta-QTL identified for root and leaf morphology traits under drought in earlier reports. Validation of major-effect QTL on a panel of random drought-tolerant lines revealed the presence of at least one major QTL in each line. DTY12.1 was present in 85% of the lines, followed by DTY4.1 in 79% and DTY1.1 in 64% of the lines. Comparative genomics of meta-QTL with other cereals revealed that the homologous regions of MQTL1.4 and MQTL3.2 had QTL for grain yield under drought in maize, wheat, and barley respectively. The genes in the meta-QTL regions were analyzed by a comparative genomics approach and candidate genes were deduced for grain yield under drought. Three groups of genes such as stress-inducible genes, growth and development-related genes, and sugar transport-related genes were found in clusters in most of the meta-QTL. Conclusions Meta-QTL with small genetic and physical intervals could be useful in Marker-assisted selection individually and in

  16. Analysis of Lignin-Polysaccharide Complexes Formed during Grass Lignin Degradation by Cultures of Pleurotus Species.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, A; Bocchini, P; Galletti, G C; Martinez, A T

    1996-06-01

    A brown material, precipitable with ethanol, was formed during wheat straw and lignin degradation by liquid cultures of different species of Pleurotus. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that most of the precipitable material was formed from exopolysaccharide secreted by the fungus but it also contained an aromatic fraction. The results of acid hydrolysis, methylation analysis, and Smith degradation indicated that the major exopolysaccharide produced by these fungi is a (1(symbl)3)-(beta)-glucan branched at C-6 every two or three residues along the main chain. The presence of lignin or straw in the culture medium had little effect on the composition and structure of the extracellular polysaccharide. Cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided an estimation of the aromatic content of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes, assigning 20% of the total (sup13)C signal in the material recovered from cultures of Pleurotus eryngii in lignin medium to aromatic carbon. Analytical pyrolysis indicated that the aromatic fractions of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes were derived from lignin, since products characteristic of pyrolytic breakdown of H (p-hydroxyphenylpropane), G (guaiacylpropane), and S (syringylpropane) lignin units were identified. These complexes cannot be fractionated by treatment with polyvinylpyrrolidone or extraction with lignin solvents, suggesting that the two polymers were chemically linked. Moreover, differences in composition with respect to the original lignin indicated that this macromolecule was modified by the fungi during the process of formation of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes.

  17. Fine-mapping of qRL6.1, a major QTL for root length of rice seedlings grown under a wide range of NH4(+) concentrations in hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Obara, Mitsuhiro; Tamura, Wataru; Ebitani, Takeshi; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Tadashi; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2010-08-01

    Root system development is an important target for improving yield in cereal crops. Active root systems that can take up nutrients more efficiently are essential for enhancing grain yield. In this study, we attempted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in root system development by measuring root length of rice seedlings grown in hydroponic culture. Reliable growth conditions for estimating the root length were first established to renew nutrient solutions daily and supply NH4(+) as a single nitrogen source. Thirty-eight chromosome segment substitution lines derived from a cross between 'Koshihikari', a japonica variety, and 'Kasalath', an indica variety, were used to detect QTL for seminal root length of seedlings grown in 5 or 500 microM NH4(+). Eight chromosomal regions were found to be involved in root elongation. Among them, the most effective QTL was detected on a 'Kasalath' segment of SL-218, which was localized to the long-arm of chromosome 6. The 'Kasalath' allele at this QTL, qRL6.1, greatly promoted root elongation under all NH4(+) concentrations tested. The genetic effect of this QTL was confirmed by analysis of the near-isogenic line (NIL) qRL6.1. The seminal root length of the NIL was 13.5-21.1% longer than that of 'Koshihikari' under different NH4(+) concentrations. Toward our goal of applying qRL6.1 in a molecular breeding program to enhance rice yield, a candidate genomic region of qRL6.1 was delimited within a 337 kb region in the 'Nipponbare' genome by means of progeny testing of F2 plants/F3 lines derived from a cross between SL-218 and 'Koshihikari'.

  18. Systems biology-guided biodesign of consolidated lignin conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lu; Cheng, Yanbing; Pu, Yunqiao; Sun, Su; Li, Xiao; Jin, Mingjie; Pierson, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Dennis C.; Dale, Bruce E.; Dai, Susie Y.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-07-12

    Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer on the earth, yet its utilization for fungible products is complicated by its recalcitrant nature and remains a major challenge for sustainable lignocellulosic biorefineries. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to reveal the carbon utilization pattern and lignin degradation mechanisms in a unique lignin-utilizing Pseudomonas putida strain (A514). The mechanistic study further guided the design of three functional modules to enable a consolidated lignin bioconversion route. First, P. putida A514 mobilized a dye peroxidase-based enzymatic system for lignin depolymerization. This system could be enhanced by overexpressing a secreted multifunctional dye peroxidase to promote a two-fold enhancement of cell growth on insoluble kraft lignin. Second, A514 employed a variety of peripheral and central catabolism pathways to metabolize aromatic compounds, which can be optimized by overexpressing key enzymes. Third, the β-oxidation of fatty acid was up-regulated, whereas fatty acid synthesis was down-regulated when A514 was grown on lignin and vanillic acid. Therefore, the functional module for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production was designed to rechannel β-oxidation products. As a result, PHA content reached 73% per cell dry weight (CDW). Further integrating the three functional modules enhanced the production of PHA from kraft lignin and biorefinery waste. Furthermore, this study elucidated lignin conversion mechanisms in bacteria with potential industrial implications and laid out the concept for engineering a consolidated lignin conversion route.

  19. Systems biology-guided biodesign of consolidated lignin conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Lu; Cheng, Yanbing; Pu, Yunqiao; ...

    2016-07-12

    Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer on the earth, yet its utilization for fungible products is complicated by its recalcitrant nature and remains a major challenge for sustainable lignocellulosic biorefineries. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to reveal the carbon utilization pattern and lignin degradation mechanisms in a unique lignin-utilizing Pseudomonas putida strain (A514). The mechanistic study further guided the design of three functional modules to enable a consolidated lignin bioconversion route. First, P. putida A514 mobilized a dye peroxidase-based enzymatic system for lignin depolymerization. This system could be enhanced by overexpressing a secreted multifunctional dyemore » peroxidase to promote a two-fold enhancement of cell growth on insoluble kraft lignin. Second, A514 employed a variety of peripheral and central catabolism pathways to metabolize aromatic compounds, which can be optimized by overexpressing key enzymes. Third, the β-oxidation of fatty acid was up-regulated, whereas fatty acid synthesis was down-regulated when A514 was grown on lignin and vanillic acid. Therefore, the functional module for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production was designed to rechannel β-oxidation products. As a result, PHA content reached 73% per cell dry weight (CDW). Further integrating the three functional modules enhanced the production of PHA from kraft lignin and biorefinery waste. Furthermore, this study elucidated lignin conversion mechanisms in bacteria with potential industrial implications and laid out the concept for engineering a consolidated lignin conversion route.« less

  20. Systems biology-guided biodesign of consolidated lignin conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lu; Cheng, Yanbing; Pu, Yunqiao; Sun, Su; Li, Xiao; Jin, Mingjie; Pierson, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Dennis C.; Dale, Bruce E.; Dai, Susie Y.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-07-12

    Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer on the earth, yet its utilization for fungible products is complicated by its recalcitrant nature and remains a major challenge for sustainable lignocellulosic biorefineries. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to reveal the carbon utilization pattern and lignin degradation mechanisms in a unique lignin-utilizing Pseudomonas putida strain (A514). The mechanistic study further guided the design of three functional modules to enable a consolidated lignin bioconversion route. First, P. putida A514 mobilized a dye peroxidase-based enzymatic system for lignin depolymerization. This system could be enhanced by overexpressing a secreted multifunctional dye peroxidase to promote a two-fold enhancement of cell growth on insoluble kraft lignin. Second, A514 employed a variety of peripheral and central catabolism pathways to metabolize aromatic compounds, which can be optimized by overexpressing key enzymes. Third, the β-oxidation of fatty acid was up-regulated, whereas fatty acid synthesis was down-regulated when A514 was grown on lignin and vanillic acid. Therefore, the functional module for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production was designed to rechannel β-oxidation products. As a result, PHA content reached 73% per cell dry weight (CDW). Further integrating the three functional modules enhanced the production of PHA from kraft lignin and biorefinery waste. Furthermore, this study elucidated lignin conversion mechanisms in bacteria with potential industrial implications and laid out the concept for engineering a consolidated lignin conversion route.

  1. p-Hydroxyphenyl (H) Units Lower the Degree of Polymerization in Lignin: Chemical Control in Lignin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, A. K.; Parks, J. M.; Davis, M. F.; Smith, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin, composed predominantly of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) subunits, is a major component of plant cell walls that imparts resistance toward chemical and microbial deconstruction of plant biomass, rendering its conversion inefficient and costly. Previous studies have shown that alterating lignin composition, i.e., the relative abundance of H, G and S subunits, promises more efficient extraction of sugars from plant biomass. Smaller and less branched lignin chains are more easily extracted during pretreatment, making cellulose more readily degradable. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we show that the incorporation of H subunits into lignin via b-b and b-5 interunit linkages reduces the degree of polymerization in lignin. Frontier molecular orbital analyses of lignin dimers and trimers show that H as a terminal subunit on a growing lignin polymer linked via b-b and b-5 linkage cannot undergo radical formation, preventing further chain growth by endwise polymerization resulting in lignin polymers with lower degree of polymerization. These results indicate that, for endwise polymerization in lignin synthesis, there exists a chemical control that may lay a significant role in determining the structure of lignin.

  2. Experimental Study of Mechanistic Acid Deconstruction of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Katahira, R.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of biomass, which remains highly underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in studying the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. Model dimers, imitating H, S, and G lignins, were synthesized with the most abundant {beta} - O - 4 linkage in lignin. These compounds were then depolymerized using various acids and at different operating conditions. The deconstruction products were analyzed to complement the QM studies and investigate proposed mechanisms.

  3. Characteristics of lignin from flax shives as affected by extraction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kelly; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2010-10-20

    Lignin, a polyphenolic molecule, is a major constituent of flax shives. This polyphenolic molecular structure renders lignin a potential source of a variety of commercially viable products such as fine chemicals. This work compares the performance of different lignin isolation methods. Lignin from flax shive was isolated using both conventional alkaline extraction method and a novel experimental pressurized low polarity water (PLPW) extraction process. The lignin yields and chemical composition of the lignin fractions were determined. The conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h, extracted 92 g lignin per kg flax shives, while lignin yields from the PLPW extracts ranged from 27 to 241 g lignin per kg flax shives. The purity and monomeric composition of the lignins obtained from the different extraction conditions was assessed via UV spectroscopy and alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. Lignin obtained from conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h was of low purity and exhibited the lowest yields of nitrobenzene oxidation products. With respect to alkali assisted PLPW extractions, temperature created an opposing effect on lignin yield and nitrobenzene oxidation products. More lignin was extracted as temperature increased, yet the yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products decreased. The low yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products may be attributed to either the formation of condensed structures or the selective dissolution of condensed structures of lignin during the pressurized alkaline high temperature treatment. Analytical pyrolysis, using pyroprobe GC-MS, was used to investigate the molecular composition of the lignin samples. The total yield of pyrolysis lignin products was 13.3, 64.7, and 30.5% for the 1.25 M NaOH extracted lignin, alkaline assisted PLPW extracted lignin, and the unprocessed flax shives, respectively. Key lignin derived compounds such as guaiacol, 4-vinyl guaiacol, 4-methyl guaiacol

  4. QTL analysis of fruit cluster abundance in grape (Vitis sp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainably maximizing yield or productivity of fruit over time is a major goal of modern viticulture. One major yield component is the number of fruit or flower clusters present on a single shoot of the current year’s growth. A quantitative trail loci (QTL) study was conducted on both average numbe...

  5. Metabolic engineering of novel lignin in biomass crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lignin, a phenolic polymer in the secondary-thickened plant cell wall, is the major cause of lignocellulosic biomass recalcitrance toward efficient industrial processing. From an applications perspective, it is desirable that secondary cell walls of second generation bioenergy crops have lignin that...

  6. The Paleozoic Origin of Enzymatic Lignin Decomposition Reconstructed from 31 Fungal Genomes

    Treesearch

    Dimitrios Floudas; Manfred Binder; Robert Riely; Kerrie Barry; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Angel T. Martínez; Robert Otillar; Joseph W. Spatafora; Jagjit S. Yadav; Andrea Aerts; Isabelle Benoit; Alex Boyd; Alexis Carlson; Alex Copeland; Pedro M. Coutinho; Ronald P. deVries; Patricia Ferreira; Keisha Findley; Brian Foster; Jill Gaskell; Dylan Glotzer; Pawe³ Górecki; Joseph Heitman; Cedar Hesse; Chiaki Hori; Kiyohiko Igarashi; Joel A. Jurgens; Nathan Kallen; Phil Kersten; Annegret Kohler; Ursula Kües; T. K. ArunKumar; Alan Kuo; Kurt LaButti; Luis F. Larrondo; Erika Lindquist; Albee Ling; Vincent Lombard; Susan Lucas; Taina Lundell; Rachael Martin; David J. McLaughlin; Ingo Morgenstern; Emanuelle Morin; Claude Murat; Laszlo G. Nagy; Matt Nolan; Robin A. Ohm; Aleksandrina Patyshakuliyeva; Antonis Rokas; Francisco J. Ruiz-Dueñas; Grzegorz Sabat; Asaf Salamov; Masahiro Samejima; Jeremy Schmutz; Jason C. Slot; Franz St. John; Jan Stenlid; Hui Sun; Sheng Sun; Khajamohiddin Syed; Adrian Tsang; Ad Wiebenga; Darcy Young; Antonio Pisabarro; Daniel C. Eastwood; Francis Martin; Dan Cullen; Igor V. Grigoriev; David S. Hibbett

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non–lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study)...

  7. Fine-mapping of qRL6.1, a major QTL for root length of rice seedlings grown under a wide range of NH4+ concentrations in hydroponic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Wataru; Ebitani, Takeshi; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Tadashi; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Root system development is an important target for improving yield in cereal crops. Active root systems that can take up nutrients more efficiently are essential for enhancing grain yield. In this study, we attempted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in root system development by measuring root length of rice seedlings grown in hydroponic culture. Reliable growth conditions for estimating the root length were first established to renew nutrient solutions daily and supply NH4+ as a single nitrogen source. Thirty-eight chromosome segment substitution lines derived from a cross between ‘Koshihikari’, a japonica variety, and ‘Kasalath’, an indica variety, were used to detect QTL for seminal root length of seedlings grown in 5 or 500 μM NH4+. Eight chromosomal regions were found to be involved in root elongation. Among them, the most effective QTL was detected on a ‘Kasalath’ segment of SL-218, which was localized to the long-arm of chromosome 6. The ‘Kasalath’ allele at this QTL, qRL6.1, greatly promoted root elongation under all NH4+ concentrations tested. The genetic effect of this QTL was confirmed by analysis of the near-isogenic line (NIL) qRL6.1. The seminal root length of the NIL was 13.5–21.1% longer than that of ‘Koshihikari’ under different NH4+ concentrations. Toward our goal of applying qRL6.1 in a molecular breeding program to enhance rice yield, a candidate genomic region of qRL6.1 was delimited within a 337 kb region in the ‘Nipponbare’ genome by means of progeny testing of F2 plants/F3 lines derived from a cross between SL-218 and ‘Koshihikari’. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1328-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20390245

  8. Fungal demethylation of Kraft lignin.

    PubMed

    Zou, Linyou; Ross, Brian M; Hutchison, Leonard J; Christopher, Lew P; Dekker, Robert F H; Malek, Lada

    2015-06-01

    Demethylation of industrial lignin has been for long coveted as a pathway to the production of an abundant natural substitute for fossil-oil derived phenol. In an attempt to possibly identify a novel Kraft lignin-demethylating enzyme, we surveyed a collection of fungi by using selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). This method readily identifies methanol resulting from lignin demethylation activity. Absidia cylindrospora, and unidentified Cylindrocladium sp. and Aspergillus sp. were shown to metabolize lignin via different pathways, based on the HPLC analysis of lignin fragments. Of these three, Cylindrocladium and Aspergillus were shown to retain most of the lignin intact after 3 weeks in culture, while removing about 40% of the available methoxy groups. Our results demonstrate that after optimization of culture and lignin recovery methods, biological modification of Kraft lignin may be a feasible pathway to obtaining demethylated lignin for further industrial use.

  9. In situ micro-spectroscopic investigation of lignin in poplar cell walls pretreated by maleic acid

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; ...

    2015-08-27

    In higher plant cells, lignin provides necessary physical support for plant growth and resistance to attack by microorganisms. For the same reason, lignin is considered to be a major impediment to the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by hydrolytic enzymes. Furthermore, the in situ variation of lignin in plant cell walls is important for better understanding of the roles lignin play in biomass recalcitrance.

  10. QTL mapping of physiological traits associated with salt tolerance in Medicago truncatula Recombinant Inbred Lines.

    PubMed

    Arraouadi, Soumaya; Badri, Mounawer; Abdelly, Chedly; Huguet, Thierry; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2012-02-01

    In this study, QTL mapping of physiological traits in the model Legume (Medicago truncatula) was performed using a set of RILs derived from LR5. Twelve parameters associated with Na+ and K+ content in leaves, stems and roots were measured. Broad-sense heritability of these traits was ranged from 0.15 to 0.83 in control and from 0.14 to 0.61 in salt stress. Variation among RILs was dependent on line, treatment and line by treatment effect. We mapped 6 QTLs in control, 2 in salt stress and 5 for sensitivity index. No major QTL was identified indicating that tolerance to salt stress is governed by several genes with low effects. Detected QTL for leaf, stem and root traits did not share the same map locations, suggesting that genes controlling transport of Na+ and K+ may be different. The maximum of QTL was observed on chromosome 1, no QTL was detected on chromosomes 5 and 6.

  11. QTL mapping in eggplant reveals clusters of yield-related loci and orthology with the tomato genome.

    PubMed

    Portis, Ezio; Barchi, Lorenzo; Toppino, Laura; Lanteri, Sergio; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Felicioni, Nazzareno; Fusari, Fabio; Barbierato, Valeria; Cericola, Fabio; Valè, Giampiero; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its widespread cultivation and nutritional and economic importance, the eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genome has not been extensively explored. A lack of knowledge of the patterns of inheritance of key agronomic traits has hindered the exploitation of marker technologies to accelerate its genetic improvement. An already established F2 intraspecific population of eggplant bred from the cross '305E40' x '67/3' was phenotyped for 20 agronomically relevant traits at two sites. Up to seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) per trait were identified and the percentage of the phenotypic variance (PV) explained per QTL ranged from 4 to 93%. Not all the QTL were detectable at both sites, but for each trait at least one major QTL (PV explained ≥ 10%) was identified. Although no detectable QTL x environment interaction was found, some QTL identified were location-specific. Many of the fruit-related QTL clustered within specific chromosomal regions, reflecting either linkage and/or pleiotropy. Evidence for putative tomato orthologous QTL/genes was obtained for several of the eggplant QTL. Information regarding the inheritance of key agronomic traits was obtained. Some of the QTL, along with their respective linked markers, may be useful in the context of marker-assisted breeding.

  12. QTL Mapping in Eggplant Reveals Clusters of Yield-Related Loci and Orthology with the Tomato Genome

    PubMed Central

    Portis, Ezio; Barchi, Lorenzo; Toppino, Laura; Lanteri, Sergio; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Felicioni, Nazzareno; Fusari, Fabio; Barbierato, Valeria; Cericola, Fabio; Valè, Giampiero; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its widespread cultivation and nutritional and economic importance, the eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genome has not been extensively explored. A lack of knowledge of the patterns of inheritance of key agronomic traits has hindered the exploitation of marker technologies to accelerate its genetic improvement. An already established F2 intraspecific population of eggplant bred from the cross ‘305E40’ x ‘67/3’ was phenotyped for 20 agronomically relevant traits at two sites. Up to seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) per trait were identified and the percentage of the phenotypic variance (PV) explained per QTL ranged from 4 to 93%. Not all the QTL were detectable at both sites, but for each trait at least one major QTL (PV explained ≥10%) was identified. Although no detectable QTL x environment interaction was found, some QTL identified were location-specific. Many of the fruit-related QTL clustered within specific chromosomal regions, reflecting either linkage and/or pleiotropy. Evidence for putative tomato orthologous QTL/genes was obtained for several of the eggplant QTL. Information regarding the inheritance of key agronomic traits was obtained. Some of the QTL, along with their respective linked markers, may be useful in the context of marker-assisted breeding. PMID:24586828

  13. Isolation and characterization of new lignin streams derived from extractive-ammonia (EA) pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Foston, Marcus; Bokade, Vijay; Azarpira, Ali; Lu, Fachuang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Ralph, John; Dale, Bruce; Balan, Venkatesh

    2016-05-05

    One of the key challenges facing lignin conversion to fuels and chemicals is related to the level of carbohydrate and ash impurities found in extracted lignin. Structural modifications of lignin may also occur as a result of biomass pretreatment and harsh lignin extraction protocols. Extractive-Ammonia (EA) is a new pretreatment technology that uses liquid ammonia to cleave lignin–carbohydrate complexes, decrystallize cellulose, solubilize lignin, and selectively extract lignin from lignocellulosic biomass, enabling better utilization of both lignin and carbohydrate components in a biorefinery. The EA-based biorefinery produces two different lignin-rich streams, with different properties, that could potentially be upgraded to fuels and chemicals using green processes. In this work, a water/ethanol-based fractionation method was developed to enrich the ammonia-soluble extractives, resulting in a major product stream containing 92% lignin. Detailed characterization of the various streams resulting from EA treatment, including compositional analysis, structural characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry, elemental analysis, molecular weight analysis, and thermo-gravimetric analysis provides a broad evaluation of the EA-derived lignin product stream structures and properties, assessing their potential for commercial applications. In summary, EA-derived lignins preserve much of lignin's functionality, including the sensitive β-aryl ether units. Furthermore, nitrogen incorporation was observed in the lignin-rich streams, notably due to the presence of hydroxycinnamoyl amides formed during ammonia pretreatment.

  14. Isolation and characterization of new lignin streams derived from extractive-ammonia (EA) pretreatment

    DOE PAGES

    da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Foston, Marcus; Bokade, Vijay; ...

    2016-05-05

    One of the key challenges facing lignin conversion to fuels and chemicals is related to the level of carbohydrate and ash impurities found in extracted lignin. Structural modifications of lignin may also occur as a result of biomass pretreatment and harsh lignin extraction protocols. Extractive-Ammonia (EA) is a new pretreatment technology that uses liquid ammonia to cleave lignin–carbohydrate complexes, decrystallize cellulose, solubilize lignin, and selectively extract lignin from lignocellulosic biomass, enabling better utilization of both lignin and carbohydrate components in a biorefinery. The EA-based biorefinery produces two different lignin-rich streams, with different properties, that could potentially be upgraded to fuelsmore » and chemicals using green processes. In this work, a water/ethanol-based fractionation method was developed to enrich the ammonia-soluble extractives, resulting in a major product stream containing 92% lignin. Detailed characterization of the various streams resulting from EA treatment, including compositional analysis, structural characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry, elemental analysis, molecular weight analysis, and thermo-gravimetric analysis provides a broad evaluation of the EA-derived lignin product stream structures and properties, assessing their potential for commercial applications. In summary, EA-derived lignins preserve much of lignin's functionality, including the sensitive β-aryl ether units. Furthermore, nitrogen incorporation was observed in the lignin-rich streams, notably due to the presence of hydroxycinnamoyl amides formed during ammonia pretreatment.« less

  15. Lignin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Tonin, Fabio; Rosini, Elena

    2015-04-01

    A main goal of green biotechnology is to reduce our dependence on fossil reserves and to increase the use of renewable materials. For this, lignocellulose, which is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, represents the most promising feedstock. The latter is a complex aromatic heteropolymer formed by radical polymerization of guaiacyl, syringyl, and p-hydroxyphenyl units linked by β-aryl ether linkages, biphenyl bonds and heterocyclic linkages. Accordingly, lignin appears to be a potentially valuable renewable aromatic chemical, thus representing a main pillar in future biorefinery. The resistance of lignin to breakdown is the main bottleneck in this process, although a variety of white-rot fungi, as well as bacteria, have been reported to degrade lignin by employing different enzymes and catabolic pathways. Here, recent investigations have expanded the range of natural biocatalysts involved in lignin degradation/modification and significant progress related to enzyme engineering and recombinant expression has been made. The present review is focused primarily on recent trends in ligninolytic green biotechnology to suggest the potential (industrial) application of ligninolytic enzymes. Future perspectives could include synergy between natural enzymes from different sources (as well as those obtained by protein engineering) and other pretreatment methods that may be required for optimal results in enzyme-based, environmentally friendly, technologies.

  16. QTL mapping of powdery mildew resistance in WI 2757 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoming; Li, Yuhong; Pandey, Sudhakar; Yandell, Brain S; Pathak, Mamta; Weng, Yiqun

    2013-08-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a very important disease of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Resistant cultivars have been deployed in production for a long time, but the genetic mechanisms of PM resistance in cucumber are not well understood. A 3-year QTL mapping study of PM resistance was conducted with 132 F2:3 families derived from two cucumber inbred lines WI 2757 (resistant) and True Lemon (susceptible). A genetic map covering 610.4 cM in seven linkage groups was developed with 240 SSR marker loci. Multiple QTL mapping analysis of molecular marker data and disease index of the hypocotyl, cotyledon and true leaf for responses to PM inoculation identified six genomic regions in four chromosomes harboring QTL for PM resistance in WI 2757. Among the six QTL, pm1.1 and pm1.2 in chromosome 1 conferred leaf resistance. Minor QTL pm3.1 (chromosome 3) and pm4.1 (chromosome 4) contributed to disease susceptibility. The two major QTL, pm5.1 and pm5.2 were located in an interval of ~40 cM in chromosome 5 with each explaining 21.0-74.5 % phenotypic variations. Data presented herein support two recessively inherited, linked major QTL in chromosome 5 plus minor QTL in other chromosomes that control the PM resistance in WI 2757. The QTL pm5.2 for hypocotyl resistance plays the most important role in host resistance. Multiple observations in the same year revealed the importance of scoring time in the detection of PM resistance QTL. Results of this study provided new insights into phenotypic and genetic mechanisms of powdery mildew resistance in cucumber.

  17. QTL mapping of freezing tolerance: links to fitness and adaptive trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Christopher G; Ågren, Jon; Atchison, Rachel A; Schemske, Douglas W

    2014-09-01

    Local adaptation, defined as higher fitness of local vs. nonlocal genotypes, is commonly identified in reciprocal transplant experiments. Reciprocally adapted populations display fitness trade-offs across environments, but little is known about the traits and genes underlying fitness trade-offs in reciprocally adapted populations. We investigated the genetic basis and adaptive significance of freezing tolerance using locally adapted populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from Italy and Sweden. Previous reciprocal transplant studies of these populations indicated that subfreezing temperature is a major selective agent in Sweden. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to identify the contribution of freezing tolerance to previously demonstrated local adaptation and genetic trade-offs. First, we compared the genomic locations of freezing tolerance QTL to those for previously published QTL for survival in Sweden, and overall fitness in the field. Then, we estimated the contributions to survival and fitness across both field sites of genotypes at locally adaptive freezing tolerance QTL. In growth chamber studies, we found seven QTL for freezing tolerance, and the Swedish genotype increased freezing tolerance for five of these QTL. Three of these colocalized with locally adaptive survival QTL in Sweden and with trade-off QTL for overall fitness. Two freezing tolerance QTL contribute to genetic trade-offs across environments for both survival and overall fitness. A major regulator of freezing tolerance, CBF2, is implicated as a candidate gene for one of the trade-off freezing tolerance QTL. Our study provides some of the first evidence of a trait and gene that mediate a fitness trade-off in nature. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) in sheep. III. QTL for carcass composition traits derived from CT scans and aligned with a meta-assembly for sheep and cattle carcass QTL.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Colin R; Jonas, Elisabeth; Hobbs, Matthew; Thomson, Peter C; Tammen, Imke; Raadsma, Herman W

    2010-09-16

    An (Awassi × Merino) × Merino single-sire backcross family with 165 male offspring was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for body composition traits on a framework map of 189 microsatellite loci across all autosomes. Two cohorts were created from the experimental progeny to represent alternative maturity classes for body composition assessment. Animals were raised under paddock conditions prior to entering the feedlot for a 90-day fattening phase. Body composition traits were derived in vivo at the end of the experiment prior to slaughter at 2 (cohort 1) and 3.5 (cohort 2) years of age, using computed tomography. Image analysis was used to gain accurate predictions for 13 traits describing major fat depots, lean muscle, bone, body proportions and body weight which were used for single- and two-QTL mapping analysis. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, three highly significant (LOD ≥ 3), 15 significant (LOD ≥ 2), and 11 suggestive QTL (1.7 ≤ LOD < 2) were detected on eleven chromosomes. Regression analysis confirmed 28 of these QTL and an additional 17 suggestive (P < 0.1) and two significant (P < 0.05) QTL were identified using this method. QTL with pleiotropic effects for two or more tissues were identified on chromosomes 1, 6, 10, 14, 16 and 23. No tissue-specific QTL were identified.A meta-assembly of ovine QTL for carcass traits from this study and public domain sources was performed and compared with a corresponding bovine meta-assembly. The assembly demonstrated QTL with effects on carcass composition in homologous regions on OAR1, 2, 6 and 21.

  19. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  20. Lignin analysis using microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Ajila, C M; Brar, Satinder K; Tyagi, R D; Verma, M; Valero, J R

    2012-10-01

    Lignin quantification in apple pomace residues was carried out using a microwave oven to replace traditional refluxing during the mild acidolysis step to augment the selectivity of this step towards cleavage of lignin-carbohydrate bonds and to reduce the time needed to quantify lignin. The pressure, temperature and time were optimized by response surface methodology and the results were compared to the Klason lignin methodology. Temperature and pressure had a significant positive effect (p < 0.05) on the determination of lignin. However, the time was also significant (p < 0.05) on lignin quantification. The optimal conditions of digestion were: 30 bar, 170 °C for 15 min. The digestion using microwave (lignin content = 33 % w/w) was more accurate (p < 0.05) than the the traditional refluxing (lignin content = 27 % w/w).

  1. Computational Mechanistic Studies of Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Model Dimers for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sturgeon, M. R.; Chmely, S. C.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous alkyl-aromatic polymer that constitutes up to 30% of plant cell walls, and is used for water transport, structure, and defense. The highly irregular and heterogeneous structure of lignin presents a major obstacle in the development of strategies for its deconstruction and upgrading. Here we present mechanistic studies of the acid-catalyzed cleavage of lignin aryl-ether linkages, combining both experimental studies and quantum chemical calculations. Quantum mechanical calculations provide a detailed interpretation of reaction mechanisms including possible intermediates and transition states. Solvent effects on the hydrolysis reactions were incorporated through the use of a conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and with cluster models including explicit water molecules in the first solvation shell. Reaction pathways were computed for four lignin model dimers including 2-phenoxy-phenylethanol (PPE), 1-(para-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenoxy-ethanol (HPPE), 2-phenoxy-phenyl-1,3-propanediol (PPPD), and 1-(para-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenoxy-1,3-propanediol (HPPPD). Lignin model dimers with a para-hydroxyphenyl ether (HPPE and HPPPD) show substantial differences in reactivity relative to the phenyl ether compound (PPE and PPPD) which have been clarified theoretically and experimentally. The significance of these results for acid deconstruction of lignin in plant cell walls will be discussed.

  2. Through Lignin Biodegradation to Lignin-based Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Yan

    The consequences of strong noncovalent intermolecular interactions between oligomeric and/or polymeric lignin components are encountered during enzyme-catalyzed lignin degradation and in the properties of lignin-based plastics. A new chapter in the 30-year quest for functional lignin-depolymerizing enzymes has been opened. The lignin-degrading capacity of the flavin-dependent monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase acting as a putative lignin depolymerase, has been characterized using a water-soluble native softwood lignin substrate under mildly acidic aqueous conditions. When macromolecular lignins undergo lignin-depolymerase catalyzed degradation, the cleaved components tend to associate with one another, or with nearby associated lignin complexes, through processes mediated by the enzyme acting in a non-catalytic capacity. As a result, the radius of gyration (Rg) falls rapidly to approximately constant values, while the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of the substrate rises more slowly to an extent dependent on enzyme concentration. Xylanase, when employed in an auxiliary capacity, is able to facilitate dissociation of the foregoing complexes through its interactions with the lignin depolymerase. The flavin-dependent lignin depolymerase must be reduced before reaction with oxygen can occur to form the hydroperoxy intermediate that hydroxylates the lignin substrate prior to cleavage. In the absence of the cofactor, NADH, the necessary reducing power can be provided (albeit more slowly) by the lignin substrate itself. Under such conditions, a simultaneous decrease in R g and Mw is initially observed during the enzymatic process through which the lignin is cleaved. The partially degraded product-lignins arising from lignin depolymerase activity can be readily converted into polymeric materials with mechanical properties that supersede those of polystyrene. Methylation and blending of ball-milled softwood lignins with miscible low-Tg polymers, or simple low

  3. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  4. Lignin-rich Enzyme Lignin (LREL), a Cellulase-treated Lignin-Carbohydrate Derived from Plants, Activates Myeloid Dendritic Cells via Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Ryohei; Koizumi, Hideki; Aoki, Dan; Watanabe, Yuta; Sugihara, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Lignin-carbohydrates, one of the major cell wall components, are believed to be the structures that form chemical linkage between lignin and cell wall polysaccharides. Due to the molecular complexity of lignin-containing substances, their isolation and the assignment of their biological activities have so far remained a difficult task. Here, we extracted two lignin-containing carbohydrates, lignin-rich enzyme lignin (LREL) and pure enzyme lignin (PEL), from barley husk and demonstrated that they act as immune stimulators of dendritic cells (DCs), which are particularly important in linking innate and adaptive immunity. Thioacidolysis, acid hydrolysis, and mild alkali hydrolysis of both LREL and PEL revealed that their immunostimulatory activities depended on the lignin structure and/or content, neutral sugar content (especially the characteristic distribution of galactose and mannose), and presence of an ester bond. Furthermore, we showed that the immunostimulatory potency of the lignin-carbohydrate depended on its molecular weight and degree of polymerization. We also demonstrated that the LREL-induced activation of DCs was mediated via TLR4. Thus, LREL-induced increases in the expression levels of several cell surface marker proteins, production of inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 and TNF-α, and activation and nuclear translocation of transcription factors, as was observed in the WT DCs, were completely abrogated in DCs derived from the TLR4−/− mice but not in DCs derived from the TLR2−/−, TLR7−/−, and TLR9−/− mice. We further demonstrated that LRELs isolated from other plant tissues also activated DCs. These immunostimulatory activities of lignin-carbohydrates, extracted from edible plant tissues, could have potential relevance in anti-infectious immunity and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25548274

  5. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  6. Extracting lignins from mill wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1977-01-01

    Addition of quaternary ammonium compound and activated charcoal to pulp and mill wastes precipitates lignins in sludge mixture. Methanol dissolves lignins for separation from resulting slurry. Mineral acid reprecipitates lignins in filtered solution. Quaternary ammonium compound, activated charcoal, as well as water may be recovered and recycled from this process.

  7. Extracting lignins from mill wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1977-01-01

    Addition of quaternary ammonium compound and activated charcoal to pulp and mill wastes precipitates lignins in sludge mixture. Methanol dissolves lignins for separation from resulting slurry. Mineral acid reprecipitates lignins in filtered solution. Quaternary ammonium compound, activated charcoal, as well as water may be recovered and recycled from this process.

  8. Validation of QTL for resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in different pea genetic backgrounds using near-isogenic lines.

    PubMed

    Lavaud, C; Lesné, A; Piriou, C; Le Roy, G; Boutet, G; Moussart, A; Poncet, C; Delourme, R; Baranger, A; Pilet-Nayel, M-L

    2015-11-01

    Marker-assisted backcrossing was used to generate pea NILs carrying individual or combined resistance alleles at main Aphanomyces resistance QTL. The effects of several QTL were successfully validated depending on genetic backgrounds. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) validation is an important and often overlooked step before subsequent research in QTL cloning or marker-assisted breeding for disease resistance in plants. Validation of QTL controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces root rot, one of the most damaging diseases of pea worldwide, is of major interest for the future development of resistant varieties. The aim of this study was to validate, in different genetic backgrounds, the effects of various resistance alleles at seven main resistance QTL recently identified. Five backcross-assisted selection programs were developed. In each, resistance alleles at one to three of the seven main Aphanomyces resistance QTL were transferred into three genetic backgrounds, including two agronomically important spring (Eden) and winter (Isard) pea cultivars. The subsequent near-isogenic lines (NILs) were evaluated for resistance to two reference strains of the main A. euteiches pathotypes under controlled conditions. The NILs carrying resistance alleles at the major-effect QTL Ae-Ps4.5 and Ae-Ps7.6, either individually or in combination with resistance alleles at other QTL, showed significantly reduced disease severity compared to NILs without resistance alleles. Resistance alleles at some minor-effect QTL, especially Ae-Ps2.2 and Ae-Ps5.1, were also validated for their individual or combined effects on resistance. QTL × genetic background interactions were observed, mainly for QTL Ae-Ps7.6, the effect of which increased in the winter cultivar Isard. The pea NILs are a novel and valuable resource for further understanding the mechanisms underlying QTL and their integration in breeding programs.

  9. Meta-QTL for resistance to white mold in common bean.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Renato C C; Oraguzie, O Blessing; Soler, Alvaro; Arkwazee, Haidar; Myers, James R; Ferreira, Juan J; Song, Qijian; McClean, Phil; Miklas, Phillip N

    2017-01-01

    White mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a major disease that limits common bean production and quality worldwide. The host-pathogen interaction is complex, with partial resistance in the host inherited as a quantitative trait with low to moderate heritability. Our objective was to identify meta-QTL conditioning partial resistance to white mold from individual QTL identified across multiple populations and environments. The physical positions for 37 individual QTL were identified across 14 recombinant inbred bi-parental populations (six new, three re-genotyped, and five from the literature). A meta-QTL analysis of the 37 QTL was conducted using the genetic linkage map of Stampede x Red Hawk population as the reference. The 37 QTL condensed into 17 named loci (12 previously named and five new) of which nine were defined as meta-QTL WM1.1, WM2.2, WM3.1, WM5.4, WM6.2, WM7.1, WM7.4, WM7.5, and WM8.3. The nine meta-QTL had confidence intervals ranging from 0.65 to 9.41 Mb. Candidate genes shown to express under S. sclerotiorum infection in other studies, including cell wall receptor kinase, COI1, ethylene responsive transcription factor, peroxidase, and MYB transcription factor, were found within the confidence interval for five of the meta-QTL. The nine meta-QTL are recommended as potential targets for MAS for partial resistance to white mold in common bean.

  10. Fusarium Head Blight Resistance QTL in the Spring Wheat Cross Kenyon/86ISMN 2137

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, Curt A.; Brûlé-Babel, Anita L.; Fedak, George; Martin, Richard A.; McCallum, Brent D.; Gilbert, Jeannie; Hiebert, Colin W.; Pozniak, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a very important disease of wheat globally. Damage caused by F. graminearum includes reduced grain yield, reduced grain functional quality, and results in the presence of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol in Fusarium-damaged kernels. The development of FHB resistant wheat cultivars is an important component of integrated management. The objective of this study was to identify QTL for FHB resistance in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of the spring wheat cross Kenyon/86ISMN 2137. Kenyon is a Canadian spring wheat, while 86ISMN 2137 is an unrelated spring wheat. The RIL population was evaluated for FHB resistance in six FHB nurseries. Nine additive effect QTL for FHB resistance were identified, six from Kenyon and three from 86ISMN 2137. Rht8 and Ppd-D1a co-located with two FHB resistance QTL on chromosome arm 2DS. A major QTL for FHB resistance from Kenyon (QFhb.crc-7D) was identified on chromosome 7D. The QTL QFhb.crc-2D.4 from Kenyon mapped to the same region as a FHB resistance QTL from Wuhan-1 on chromosome arm 2DL. This result was unexpected since Kenyon does not share common ancestry with Wuhan-1. Other FHB resistance QTL on chromosomes 4A, 4D, and 5B also mapped to known locations of FHB resistance. Four digenic epistatic interactions were detected for FHB resistance, which involved eight QTL. None of these QTL were significant based upon additive effect QTL analysis. This study provides insight into the genetic basis of native FHB resistance in Canadian spring wheat. PMID:27790188

  11. Meta-QTL for resistance to white mold in common bean

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcellos, Renato C. C.; Oraguzie, O. Blessing; Soler, Alvaro; Arkwazee, Haidar; Myers, James R.; Ferreira, Juan J.; Song, Qijian; McClean, Phil; Miklas, Phillip N.

    2017-01-01

    White mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a major disease that limits common bean production and quality worldwide. The host-pathogen interaction is complex, with partial resistance in the host inherited as a quantitative trait with low to moderate heritability. Our objective was to identify meta-QTL conditioning partial resistance to white mold from individual QTL identified across multiple populations and environments. The physical positions for 37 individual QTL were identified across 14 recombinant inbred bi-parental populations (six new, three re-genotyped, and five from the literature). A meta-QTL analysis of the 37 QTL was conducted using the genetic linkage map of Stampede x Red Hawk population as the reference. The 37 QTL condensed into 17 named loci (12 previously named and five new) of which nine were defined as meta-QTL WM1.1, WM2.2, WM3.1, WM5.4, WM6.2, WM7.1, WM7.4, WM7.5, and WM8.3. The nine meta-QTL had confidence intervals ranging from 0.65 to 9.41 Mb. Candidate genes shown to express under S. sclerotiorum infection in other studies, including cell wall receptor kinase, COI1, ethylene responsive transcription factor, peroxidase, and MYB transcription factor, were found within the confidence interval for five of the meta-QTL. The nine meta-QTL are recommended as potential targets for MAS for partial resistance to white mold in common bean. PMID:28199342

  12. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Bin [West Lebanon, NH; Wyman, Charles E [Norwich, VT

    2011-01-25

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  13. NMR of lignins

    Treesearch

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  14. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  15. Conversion of lignin into a precursor for the production of graphitic carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.M.; Serio, M.A.; Kroo, E.

    1995-11-01

    Lignin is the most abundant renewable aromatic material. There are roughly 25 x 10{sup 6} tons of lignin produced each year as a byproduct of pulp and papermaking which has a fuel value of between $0.00 and $0.04 per pound. Carbon materials are among the highest value products can be produced from lignin. Consequently, the development of processes which can utilize lignins for carbon fibers or the production of other high value carbon materials has the potential for a high payoff. It would also result in the utilization of lignin as a raw material for high technology, internationally competitive industries. The ability to form graphitic carbon materials from pitch depends on the development of a liquid crystal system called mesophase. A major problem with using lignin as a precursor for the production of mesophase pitch is the high oxygen functional group concentration of lignin which makes it reactive toward crosslinking. Hydrothermal treatment of lignin allows for selective removal of the reactive oxygen functional groups from lignin which normally prevent extensive mesophase formation. Hydrothermal pretreatment of lignin substantially increases the mesophase content of lignin-derived pitch. This development will make lignin a suitable precursor for a range of carbon materials applications.

  16. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  17. Lignin-Based Thermoplastic Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Kelley, Stephen S; Venditti, Richard A

    2016-04-21

    Lignin-based thermoplastic materials have attracted increasing interest as sustainable, cost-effective, and biodegradable alternatives for petroleum-based thermoplastics. As an amorphous thermoplastic material, lignin has a relatively high glass-transition temperature and also undergoes radical-induced self-condensation at high temperatures, which limits its thermal processability. Additionally, lignin-based materials are usually brittle and exhibit poor mechanical properties. To improve the thermoplasticity and mechanical properties of technical lignin, polymers or plasticizers are usually integrated with lignin by blending or chemical modification. This Review attempts to cover the reported approaches towards the development of lignin-based thermoplastic materials on the basis of published information. Approaches reviewed include plasticization, blending with miscible polymers, and chemical modifications by esterification, etherification, polymer grafting, and copolymerization. Those lignin-based thermoplastic materials are expected to show applications as engineering plastics, polymeric foams, thermoplastic elastomers, and carbon-fiber precursors.

  18. Validation of linkage between BCWD resistance and spleen size QTL on Omy19 in rainbow trout: Pleiotropy versus linkage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, and results in significant economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. Previously, we identified a major QTL for BCWD resistance on Omy19 (h2q=0.57-0.67) as well as a QTL for surrogate measures of disease resi...

  19. Barley stripe rust resistance QTL: Development and validation of SNP markers for resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) linked with seedling and field resistance to barley stripe rust were mapped in 156 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a Lenetah by Grannelose Zweizeilige (GZ) cross. A major QTL for seedling resistance on chromosome 4H (LOD = 15.94 at 97.19 cM) was identified,...

  20. Lignin down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and klason lignin analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyuck; Ong, Rebecca Garlock; Mei, Chuansheng; Sticklen, Mariam

    2014-07-23

    To facilitate the use of lignocellulosic biomass as an alternative bioenergy resource, during biological conversion processes, a pretreatment step is needed to open up the structure of the plant cell wall, increasing the accessibility of the cell wall carbohydrates. Lignin, a polyphenolic material present in many cell wall types, is known to be a significant hindrance to enzyme access. Reduction in lignin content to a level that does not interfere with the structural integrity and defense system of the plant might be a valuable step to reduce the costs of bioethanol production. In this study, we have genetically down-regulated one of the lignin biosynthesis-related genes, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (ZmCCR1) via a double stranded RNA interference technique. The ZmCCR1_RNAi construct was integrated into the maize genome using the particle bombardment method. Transgenic maize plants grew normally as compared to the wild-type control plants without interfering with biomass growth or defense mechanisms, with the exception of displaying of brown-coloration in transgenic plants leaf mid-ribs, husks, and stems. The microscopic analyses, in conjunction with the histological assay, revealed that the leaf sclerenchyma fibers were thinned but the structure and size of other major vascular system components was not altered. The lignin content in the transgenic maize was reduced by 7-8.7%, the crystalline cellulose content was increased in response to lignin reduction, and hemicelluloses remained unchanged. The analyses may indicate that carbon flow might have been shifted from lignin biosynthesis to cellulose biosynthesis. This article delineates the procedures used to down-regulate the lignin content in maize via RNAi technology, and the cell wall compositional analyses used to verify the effect of the modifications on the cell wall structure.

  1. Lignin Down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and Klason Lignin Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyuck; Ong, Rebecca Garlock; Mei, Chuansheng; Sticklen, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the use of lignocellulosic biomass as an alternative bioenergy resource, during biological conversion processes, a pretreatment step is needed to open up the structure of the plant cell wall, increasing the accessibility of the cell wall carbohydrates. Lignin, a polyphenolic material present in many cell wall types, is known to be a significant hindrance to enzyme access. Reduction in lignin content to a level that does not interfere with the structural integrity and defense system of the plant might be a valuable step to reduce the costs of bioethanol production. In this study, we have genetically down-regulated one of the lignin biosynthesis-related genes, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (ZmCCR1) via a double stranded RNA interference technique. The ZmCCR1_RNAi construct was integrated into the maize genome using the particle bombardment method. Transgenic maize plants grew normally as compared to the wild-type control plants without interfering with biomass growth or defense mechanisms, with the exception of displaying of brown-coloration in transgenic plants leaf mid-ribs, husks, and stems. The microscopic analyses, in conjunction with the histological assay, revealed that the leaf sclerenchyma fibers were thinned but the structure and size of other major vascular system components was not altered. The lignin content in the transgenic maize was reduced by 7-8.7%, the crystalline cellulose content was increased in response to lignin reduction, and hemicelluloses remained unchanged. The analyses may indicate that carbon flow might have been shifted from lignin biosynthesis to cellulose biosynthesis. This article delineates the procedures used to down-regulate the lignin content in maize via RNAi technology, and the cell wall compositional analyses used to verify the effect of the modifications on the cell wall structure. PMID:25080235

  2. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Resistance to Late Blight in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Panthee, Dilip R; Piotrowski, Ann; Ibrahem, Ragy

    2017-07-22

    Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Montagne, Bary) is a devastating disease of tomato worldwide. There are three known major genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-3, conferring resistance to late blight. In addition to these three genes, it is also believed that there are additional factors or quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to late blight. Precise molecular mapping of all those major genes and potential QTL is important in the development of suitable molecular markers and hence, marker-assisted selection (MAS). The objective of the present study was to map the genes and QTL associated with late blight resistance in a tomato population derived from intra-specific crosses. To achieve this objective, a population, derived from the crossings of NC 1CELBR × Fla. 7775, consisting of 250 individuals at F2 and F2-derived families, were evaluated in replicated trials. These were conducted at Mountain Horticultural Crops Reseach & Extension Center (MHCREC) at Mills River, NC, and Mountain Research Staion (MRS) at Waynesville, NC in 2011, 2014, and 2015. There were two major QTL associated with late blight resistance located on chromosomes 9 and 10 with likelihood of odd (LOD) scores of more than 42 and 6, explaining 67% and 14% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The major QTLs are probably caused by the Ph-2 and Ph-3 genes. Furthermore, there was a minor QTL on chromosomes 12, which has not been reported before. This minor QTL may be novel and may be worth investigating further. Source of resistance to Ph-2, Ph-3, and this minor QTL traces back to line L3707, or Richter's Wild Tomato. The combination of major genes and minor QTL may provide a durable resistance to late blight in tomato.

  3. Chlorination and Cleavage of Lignin Structures by Fungal Chloroperoxidases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia; Srebotnik, Ewald; Hammel, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    Two fungal chloroperoxidases (CPOs), the heme enzyme from Caldariomyces fumago and the vanadium enzyme from Curvularia inaequalis, chlorinated 1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxypropane, a dimeric model compound that represents the major nonphenolic structure in lignin. Both enzymes also cleaved this dimer to give 1-chloro-4-ethoxy-3-methoxybenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-ethoxy-5-methoxybenzene, and they depolymerized a synthetic guaiacyl lignin. Since fungal CPOs occur in soils and the fungi that produce them are common inhabitants of plant debris, CPOs may have roles in the natural production of high-molecular-weight chloroaromatics and in lignin breakdown. PMID:12902304

  4. Chlorination and cleavage of lignin structures by fungal chloroperoxidases.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia; Srebotnik, Ewald; Hammel, Kenneth E

    2003-08-01

    Two fungal chloroperoxidases (CPOs), the heme enzyme from Caldariomyces fumago and the vanadium enzyme from Curvularia inaequalis, chlorinated 1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxypropane, a dimeric model compound that represents the major nonphenolic structure in lignin. Both enzymes also cleaved this dimer to give 1-chloro-4-ethoxy-3-methoxybenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-ethoxy-5-methoxybenzene, and they depolymerized a synthetic guaiacyl lignin. Since fungal CPOs occur in soils and the fungi that produce them are common inhabitants of plant debris, CPOs may have roles in the natural production of high-molecular-weight chloroaromatics and in lignin breakdown.

  5. Identification of the Submergence Tolerance QTL Come Quick Drowning1 (CQD1) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Akman, Melis; Kleine, Rogier; van Tienderen, Peter H; Schranz, M Eric

    2017-02-16

    Global climate change is predicted to increase water precipitation fluctuations and lead to localized prolonged floods in agricultural fields and natural plant communities. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of submergence tolerance is crucial in order to improve plant survival under these conditions. In this study, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in Arabidopsis to identify novel candidate genes for increased submergence tolerance by using Kas-1 and Col (gl1) parental accessions and their derived recombinant inbred lines (RILs). We measured survival after submergence in dark for a 13-day period and used median lethal time, LT50 values for the QTL analysis. A major QTL, the Come Quick, Drowning (CQD1) locus, was detected in 2 independent experiments on the lower arm of chromosome 5 involved in higher submergence tolerance in the parental accession Kas-1. For fine-mapping, we then constructed near isogenic lines (NILs) by backcrossing the CQD1 QTL region. We also analyzed QTL regions related to size, leaf number, flowering, or survival in darkness and none of the QTL related to these traits overlapped with CQD1. The submergence tolerance QTL, CQD1, region detected in this study includes genes that have potential to be novel candidates effecting submergence tolerance such as trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and respiratory burst oxidase protein D. Gene expression and functional analysis for these genes under submergence would reveal the significance of these novel candidates and provide new perspectives for understanding genetic basis of submergence tolerance.

  6. Main Effect QTL with Dominance Determines Heterosis for Dynamic Plant Height in Upland Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Lianguang; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Yumei; Su, Ying; Wang, Xiaocui; Li, Yuhua; Abduweli, Abdugheni; Cai, Shihu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Plant height, which shows dynamic development and heterosis, is a major trait affecting plant architecture and has an indirect influence on economic yield related to biological yield in cotton. In the present study, we carried out dynamic analysis for plant height and its heterosis by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping at multiple developmental stages using two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and their backcross progeny. At the single-locus level, 47 QTL were identified at five developmental stages in two hybrids. In backcross populations, QTL identified at an early stage mainly showed partial effects and QTL detected at a later stage mostly displayed overdominance effects. At the two-locus level, we found that main effect QTL played a more important role than epistatic QTL in the expression of heterosis in backcross populations. Therefore, this study implies that the genetic basis of plant height heterosis shows dynamic character and main effect QTL with dominance determines heterosis for plant height in Upland cotton. PMID:27565885

  7. Main Effect QTL with Dominance Determines Heterosis for Dynamic Plant Height in Upland Cotton.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lianguang; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Yumei; Su, Ying; Wang, Xiaocui; Li, Yuhua; Abduweli, Abdugheni; Cai, Shihu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-10-13

    Plant height, which shows dynamic development and heterosis, is a major trait affecting plant architecture and has an indirect influence on economic yield related to biological yield in cotton. In the present study, we carried out dynamic analysis for plant height and its heterosis by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping at multiple developmental stages using two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and their backcross progeny. At the single-locus level, 47 QTL were identified at five developmental stages in two hybrids. In backcross populations, QTL identified at an early stage mainly showed partial effects and QTL detected at a later stage mostly displayed overdominance effects. At the two-locus level, we found that main effect QTL played a more important role than epistatic QTL in the expression of heterosis in backcross populations. Therefore, this study implies that the genetic basis of plant height heterosis shows dynamic character and main effect QTL with dominance determines heterosis for plant height in Upland cotton. Copyright © 2016 Shang et al.

  8. Predicting Enzyme Adsorption to Lignin Films by Calculating Enzyme Surface Hydrophobicity*

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Yarbrough, John M.; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; Resch, Michael G.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  9. Modifying lignin to improve bioenergy feedstocks: strengthening the barrier against pathogens?†

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Scott E.; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a ubiquitous polymer present in cell walls of all vascular plants, where it rigidifies and strengthens the cell wall structure through covalent cross-linkages to cell wall polysaccharides. The presence of lignin makes the cell wall recalcitrant to conversion into fermentable sugars for bioenergy uses. Therefore, reducing lignin content and modifying its linkages have become major targets for bioenergy feedstock development through either biotechnology or traditional plant breeding. In addition, lignin synthesis has long been implicated as an important plant defense mechanism against pathogens, because lignin synthesis is often induced at the site of pathogen attack. This article explores the impact of lignin modifications on the susceptibility of a range of plant species to their associated pathogens, and the implications for development of feedstocks for the second-generation biofuels industry. Surprisingly, there are some instances where plants modified in lignin synthesis may display increased resistance to associated pathogens, which is explored in this article. PMID:23577013

  10. xQTL workbench: a scalable web environment for multi-level QTL analysis.

    PubMed

    Arends, Danny; van der Velde, K Joeri; Prins, Pjotr; Broman, Karl W; Möller, Steffen; Jansen, Ritsert C; Swertz, Morris A

    2012-04-01

    xQTL workbench is a scalable web platform for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) at multiple levels: for example gene expression (eQTL), protein abundance (pQTL), metabolite abundance (mQTL) and phenotype (phQTL) data. Popular QTL mapping methods for model organism and human populations are accessible via the web user interface. Large calculations scale easily on to multi-core computers, clusters and Cloud. All data involved can be uploaded and queried online: markers, genotypes, microarrays, NGS, LC-MS, GC-MS, NMR, etc. When new data types come available, xQTL workbench is quickly customized using the Molgenis software generator. xQTL workbench runs on all common platforms, including Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. An online demo system, installation guide, tutorials, software and source code are available under the LGPL3 license from http://www.xqtl.org. m.a.swertz@rug.nl.

  11. Insights into lignin degradation and its potential industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Solbiati, Jose O; Cann, Isaac K O

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulose is an abundant biomass that provides an alternative source for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The depolymerization of the carbohydrate polymers in lignocellulosic biomass is hindered by lignin, which is recalcitrant to chemical and biological degradation due to its complex chemical structure and linkage heterogeneity. The role of fungi in delignification due to the production of extracellular oxidative enzymes has been studied more extensively than that of bacteria. The two major groups of enzymes that are involved in lignin degradation are heme peroxidases and laccases. Lignin-degrading peroxidases include lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP). LiP, MnP, and VP are class II extracellular fungal peroxidases that belong to the plant and microbial peroxidases superfamily. LiPs are strong oxidants with high-redox potential that oxidize the major non-phenolic structures of lignin. MnP is an Mn-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various phenolic substrates but is not capable of oxidizing the more recalcitrant non-phenolic lignin. VP enzymes combine the catalytic activities of both MnP and LiP and are able to oxidize Mn(2+) like MnP, and non-phenolic compounds like LiP. DyPs occur in both fungi and bacteria and are members of a new superfamily of heme peroxidases called DyPs. DyP enzymes oxidize high-redox potential anthraquinone dyes and were recently reported to oxidize lignin model compounds. The second major group of lignin-degrading enzymes, laccases, are found in plants, fungi, and bacteria and belong to the multicopper oxidase superfamily. They catalyze a one-electron oxidation with the concomitant four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Fungal laccases can oxidize phenolic lignin model compounds and have higher redox potential than bacterial laccases. In the presence of redox mediators, fungal laccases can oxidize non

  12. Lignin as renewable raw material.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Flores, Francisco García; Dobado, José A

    2010-11-22

    Lignin is by far the most abundant substance based on aromatic moieties in nature, and the largest contributor to soil organic matter. Millions of tonnes of several lignin preparations are produced by the paper industry every year, and a minimal amount of lignin is isolated by direct extraction of lignin from plants. Lignin is used either directly or chemically modified, as a binder, dispersant agent for pesticides, emulsifier, heavy metal sequestrant, or component for composites and copolymers. For value-added applications of lignin to be improved, medium- and long-term conversion technologies must be developed, especially for the preparation of low-molecular-weight compounds as an alternative to the petrochemical industry.

  13. Rapid identification of fruit length loci in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based QTL analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing-zhen; Fu, Wen-yuan; Wang, Yun-zhu; Qin, Xiao-dong; Wang, Jing; Li, Ji; Lou, Qun-feng; Chen, Jin-feng

    2016-01-01

    The cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) exhibits extensive variations in fruit size and shape. Fruit length is an important agronomic and domesticated trait controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Nonetheless, the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that determine cucumber fruit length remain unclear. QTL-seq is an efficient strategy for QTL identification that takes advantage of bulked-segregant analysis (BSA) and next-generation sequencing (NGS). In the present study, we conducted QTL mapping and QTL-seq of cucumber fruit length. QTL mapping identified 8 QTLs for immature and mature fruit length. A major-effect QTL fl3.2, which explained a maximum of 38.87% of the phenotypic variation, was detected. A genome-wide comparison of SNP profiles between two DNA bulks identified 6 QTLs for ovary length. QTLs ovl3.1 and ovl3.2 both had major effects on ovary length with a △ (SNP-index) of 0.80 (P < 0.01) and 0.74 (P < 0.01), respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR of fruit size-related homologous genes localized in the consensus QTL FL3.2 was conducted. Four candidate genes exhibited increased expression levels in long fruit genotypes. Our results demonstrated the power of the QTL-seq method in rapid QTL detection and provided reliable QTL regions for fine mapping of fruit length-related loci and for identifying candidate genes. PMID:27271557

  14. Rapid identification of fruit length loci in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based QTL analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Zhen; Fu, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Yun-Zhu; Qin, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Jing; Li, Ji; Lou, Qun-Feng; Chen, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-07

    The cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) exhibits extensive variations in fruit size and shape. Fruit length is an important agronomic and domesticated trait controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Nonetheless, the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that determine cucumber fruit length remain unclear. QTL-seq is an efficient strategy for QTL identification that takes advantage of bulked-segregant analysis (BSA) and next-generation sequencing (NGS). In the present study, we conducted QTL mapping and QTL-seq of cucumber fruit length. QTL mapping identified 8 QTLs for immature and mature fruit length. A major-effect QTL fl3.2, which explained a maximum of 38.87% of the phenotypic variation, was detected. A genome-wide comparison of SNP profiles between two DNA bulks identified 6 QTLs for ovary length. QTLs ovl3.1 and ovl3.2 both had major effects on ovary length with a △ (SNP-index) of 0.80 (P < 0.01) and 0.74 (P < 0.01), respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR of fruit size-related homologous genes localized in the consensus QTL FL3.2 was conducted. Four candidate genes exhibited increased expression levels in long fruit genotypes. Our results demonstrated the power of the QTL-seq method in rapid QTL detection and provided reliable QTL regions for fine mapping of fruit length-related loci and for identifying candidate genes.

  15. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein.

  16. Influence of lignin level on release of hemicellulose-derived sugars in liquid hot water.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Kong, Xiaoying; Qi, Wei; Wang, Wen; Wang, Qiong; Tan, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Lignin layers surrounding hemicelluloses and cellulose in the plant cell walls protect them from deconstruction. This recalcitrance to sugar release is a major limitation for cost-effective industrial conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. Many literatures had reported the contribution of lignin removal to cellulose accessibility to enzyme, but less to the hemicellulose hydrolysis. Herein, beech xylan with lignin addition, partly delignified sugarcane bagasse (SB), energy sorghum hybrids (ESH) were treated in liquid hot water (LHW) to investigate the effect of lignin on hemicellulose decomposition. The addition of lignin can enhance the low degree of polymerization of xylooligomers production resulted from the acid catalyzed cleavage of lignin-derived acidic products. However, a negative correlation was observed initially between the lignin level and the total xylose yield from ESH. Furthermore, samples with lignin addition or high lignin content had a great resistant to harsh reaction environment, about 93.5% total xylose lost but only 52.3% released due to the lack of lignin protection for the sample with 100% lignin removal.

  17. Laccase-mediated synthesis of lignin-core hyperbranched copolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Cannatelli, Mark D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2017-06-06

    Lignin, one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass, is the second most abundant biopolymer found in nature. The pulp and paper industry has long produced lignin on the scale of millions of tons annually as a by-product of the pulping process, and the dawn of cellulosic ethanol production has further contributed to this amount. Historically, lignin has been perceived as a waste material and burned as a fuel for the pulping process. But, recent research has been geared toward developing cost-effective technologies to convert lignin into valuable commodities. Attributing to the polyphenolic structure of lignin, enzymatic modification ofmore » its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) has demonstrated to be highly successful. The current study aims at developing lignin-core hyperbranched copolymers via the laccase-assisted copolymerization of kraft lignin with methylhydroquinone and a trithiol. Based on the physical properties of the resulting material, it is likely that crosslinking reactions have taken place during the drying process to produce a copolymeric network rather than discrete hyperbranched copolymers, with NMR data providing evidence of covalent bonding between monomers. A preliminary thermal analysis data reveals that the copolymeric material possesses a moderate glass transition temperature and exhibits good thermostability, thus may have potential application as a lignin-based thermoplastic. Scanning electron microscopy images confirm the smooth, glossy surface of the material and that it is densely packed. Our results are a sustainable, ecofriendly, economic method to create an exciting novel biomaterial from a renewable feedstock while further enhancing lignin valorization.« less

  18. Laccase-mediated synthesis of lignin-core hyperbranched copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cannatelli, Mark D; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2017-08-01

    Lignin, one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass, is the second most abundant biopolymer found in nature. The pulp and paper industry has long produced lignin on the scale of millions of tons annually as a by-product of the pulping process, and the dawn of cellulosic ethanol production has further contributed to this amount. Historically, lignin has been perceived as a waste material and burned as a fuel for the pulping process. However, recent research has been geared toward developing cost-effective technologies to convert lignin into valuable commodities. Attributing to the polyphenolic structure of lignin, enzymatic modification of its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) has demonstrated to be highly successful. The current study aims at developing lignin-core hyperbranched copolymers via the laccase-assisted copolymerization of kraft lignin with methylhydroquinone and a trithiol. Based on the physical properties of the resulting material, it is likely that crosslinking reactions have taken place during the drying process to produce a copolymeric network rather than discrete hyperbranched copolymers, with NMR data providing evidence of covalent bonding between monomers. Preliminary thermal analysis data reveals that the copolymeric material possesses a moderate glass transition temperature and exhibits good thermostability, thus may have potential application as a lignin-based thermoplastic. Scanning electron microscopy images confirm the smooth, glossy surface of the material and that it is densely packed. The presented results are a sustainable, ecofriendly, economic method to create an exciting novel biomaterial from a renewable feedstock while further enhancing lignin valorization.

  19. Effect of liquid hot water pretreatment severity on properties of hardwood lignin and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ladisch, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Lignin, one of the major components of lignocellulosic biomass, plays an inhibitory role on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. This work examines the role of lignin in pretreated hardwood, where extents of cellulose hydrolysis decrease, rather than increase with increasing severity of liquid hot water pretreatment. Hardwood pretreated with liquid hot water at severities ranging from log Ro  = 8.25 to 12.51 resulted in 80-90% recovery of the initial lignin in the residual solids. The ratio of acid insoluble lignin (AIL) to acid soluble lignin (ASL) increased and the formation of spherical lignin droplets on the cell wall surface was observed as previously reported in the literature. When lignins were isolated from hardwoods pretreated at increasing severities and characterized based on glass transition temperature (Tg ), the Tg of isolated lignins was found to increase from 171 to 180°C as the severity increased from log Ro  = 10.44 to 12.51. The increase in Tg suggested that the condensation reactions of lignin molecules occurred during pretreatment and altered the lignin structure. The contribution of the changes in lignin properties to enzymatic hydrolysis were examined by carrying out Avicel hydrolysis in the presence of isolated lignins. Lignins derived from more severely pretreated hardwoods had higher Tg values and showed more pronounced inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis.

  20. QTL affecting stress response to crowding in a rainbow trout broodstock population.

    PubMed

    Rexroad, Caird E; Vallejo, Roger L; Liu, Sixin; Palti, Yniv; Weber, Gregory M

    2012-11-07

    Genomic analyses have the potential to impact selective breeding programs by identifying markers that serve as proxies for traits which are expensive or difficult to measure. Also, identifying genes affecting traits of interest enhances our understanding of their underlying biochemical pathways. To this end we conducted genome scans of seven rainbow trout families from a single broodstock population to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) having an effect on stress response to crowding as measured by plasma cortisol concentration. Our goal was to estimate the number of major genes having large effects on this trait in our broodstock population through the identification of QTL. A genome scan including 380 microsatellite markers representing 29 chromosomes resulted in the de novo construction of genetic maps which were in good agreement with the NCCCWA genetic map. Unique sets of QTL were detected for two traits which were defined after observing a low correlation between repeated measurements of plasma cortisol concentration in response to stress. A highly significant QTL was detected in three independent analyses on Omy16, many additional suggestive and significant QTL were also identified. With linkage-based methods of QTL analysis such as half-sib regression interval mapping and a variance component method, we determined that the significant and suggestive QTL explain about 40-43% and 13-27% of the phenotypic trait variation, respectively. The cortisol response to crowding stress is a complex trait controlled in a sub-sample of our broodstock population by multiple QTL on at least 8 chromosomes. These QTL are largely different from others previously identified for a similar trait, documenting that population specific genetic variants independently affect cortisol response in ways that may result in different impacts on growth. Also, mapping QTL for multiple traits associated with stress response detected trait specific QTL which indicate the significance of

  1. Lignin Valorization: Improving Lignin Processing in the Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Ragauskas, Arthur; Beckham, Gregg; Biddy, Mary J; Chandra, Richard; Chen, Fang; Davis, Dr. Mark F.; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard; Gilna, Paul; Keller, Martin; Langan, Paul; Naskar, Amit K; Saddler, Jack N; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wyman, Charles E,; Harber, Karen S

    2014-01-01

    Research and development activities directed toward commercial production of cellulosic ethanol have created the opportunity to dramatically increase the transformation of lignin to value-added products. Here we highlight recent advances in this lignin valorization effort. Discovery of genetic variants in native populations of bioenergy crops and direct manipulation of biosynthesis pathways have produced lignin feedstocks with favorable properties for recovery and downstream conversion. Advances in analytical chemistry and computational modeling detail the structure of the modified lignin and direct bioengineering strategies for future targeted properties. Refinement of biomass pretreatment technologies has further facilitated lignin recovery, and this coupled with genetic engineering will enable new uses for this biopolymer, including low-cost carbon fibers, engineered plastics and thermoplastic elastomers, polymeric foams, fungible fuels, and commodity chemicals.

  2. Lignin valorization: improving lignin processing in the biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ragauskas, Arthur J; Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J; Chandra, Richard; Chen, Fang; Davis, Mark F; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard A; Gilna, Paul; Keller, Martin; Langan, Paul; Naskar, Amit K; Saddler, Jack N; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wyman, Charles E

    2014-05-16

    Research and development activities directed toward commercial production of cellulosic ethanol have created the opportunity to dramatically increase the transformation of lignin to value-added products. Here, we highlight recent advances in this lignin valorization effort. Discovery of genetic variants in native populations of bioenergy crops and direct manipulation of biosynthesis pathways have produced lignin feedstocks with favorable properties for recovery and downstream conversion. Advances in analytical chemistry and computational modeling detail the structure of the modified lignin and direct bioengineering strategies for future targeted properties. Refinement of biomass pretreatment technologies has further facilitated lignin recovery, and this coupled with genetic engineering will enable new uses for this biopolymer, including low-cost carbon fibers, engineered plastics and thermoplastic elastomers, polymeric foams, fungible fuels, and commodity chemicals.

  3. QTL Analysis for Resistance to Blast Disease in U.S. Weedy Rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Qi, Xinshuai; Gealy, Dave R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Caicedo, Ana L; Jia, Yulin

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of adaptation is of great importance in evolutionary biology. U.S. weedy rice is well adapted to the local conditions in U.S. rice fields. Rice blast disease is one of the most destructive diseases of cultivated rice worldwide. However, information about resistance to blast in weedy rice is limited. Here, we evaluated the disease reactions of 60 U.S. weedy rice accessions with 14 blast races, and investigated the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with blast resistance in two major ecotypes of U.S. weedy rice. Our results revealed that U.S. weedy rice exhibited a broad resistance spectrum. Using genotyping by sequencing, we identified 28 resistance QTL in two U.S. weedy rice ecotypes. The resistance QTL with relatively large and small effects suggest that U.S. weedy rice groups have adapted to blast disease using two methods, both major resistance (R) genes and QTL. Three genomic loci shared by some of the resistance QTL indicated that these loci may contribute to no-race-specific resistance in weedy rice. Comparing with known blast disease R genes, we found that the R genes at these resistance QTL are novel, suggesting that U.S. weedy rice is a potential source of novel blast R genes for resistant breeding.

  4. Calculation of IR-spectra of structural fragments of lignins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.; Ishankhodzhaeva, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    To study structure of softwood lignins the experimental and theoretical IR-spectra in middle IR-diapason were analyzed. To interpret these data the quantum chemical calculations of IR-spectra of general dimmer fragments of softwood lignins by method of density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set were carried out. These calculations showed that frequencies of normal vibrations of fragment with β-alkyl-aryl linkage are close to the experimental values of the IR absorption bands of lignin, and infrared spectrum of this structure is similar to the experimental spectrum of lignin. The calculations with accounting for the solvent showed a strong increase in the intensity of the majority of the bands and the solvent effect on the frequencies of vibrations.

  5. Lignin Bioproducts to Enable Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, Charles E.; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-09-15

    Here we report that today's and tomorrow's biofuels production facilities could benefit tremendously from increasing the value from the large amount of lignin that results from biofuels operations. Certainly, the scientific community, and biofuels industry has begun to recognize the challenges and opportunities associated with lignin.

  6. Lignin Bioproducts to Enable Biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Wyman, Charles E.; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-09-15

    Here we report that today's and tomorrow's biofuels production facilities could benefit tremendously from increasing the value from the large amount of lignin that results from biofuels operations. Certainly, the scientific community, and biofuels industry has begun to recognize the challenges and opportunities associated with lignin.

  7. Characteristics of Lignin from Flax Shives as Affected by Extraction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kelly; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Lignin, a polyphenolic molecule, is a major constituent of flax shives. This polyphenolic molecular structure renders lignin a potential source of a variety of commercially viable products such as fine chemicals. This work compares the performance of different lignin isolation methods. Lignin from flax shive was isolated using both conventional alkaline extraction method and a novel experimental pressurized low polarity water (PLPW) extraction process. The lignin yields and chemical composition of the lignin fractions were determined. The conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h, extracted 92 g lignin per kg flax shives, while lignin yields from the PLPW extracts ranged from 27 to 241 g lignin per kg flax shives. The purity and monomeric composition of the lignins obtained from the different extraction conditions was assessed via UV spectroscopy and alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. Lignin obtained from conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h was of low purity and exhibited the lowest yields of nitrobenzene oxidation products. With respect to alkali assisted PLPW extractions, temperature created an opposing effect on lignin yield and nitrobenzene oxidation products. More lignin was extracted as temperature increased, yet the yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products decreased. The low yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products may be attributed to either the formation of condensed structures or the selective dissolution of condensed structures of lignin during the pressurized alkaline high temperature treatment. Analytical pyrolysis, using pyroprobe GC-MS, was used to investigate the molecular composition of the lignin samples. The total yield of pyrolysis lignin products was 13.3, 64.7, and 30.5% for the 1.25 M NaOH extracted lignin, alkaline assisted PLPW extracted lignin, and the unprocessed flax shives, respectively. Key lignin derived compounds such as guaiacol, 4-vinyl guaiacol, 4-methyl guaiacol

  8. Coding Gene SNP Mapping Reveals QTL Linked to Growth and Stress Response in Brook Charr (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Christopher; Vagner, Marie; Derôme, Nicolas; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Growth performance and reduced stress response are traits of major interest in fish production. Growth and stress-related quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been already identified in several salmonid species, but little effort has been devoted to charrs (genus Salvelinus). Moreover, most QTL studies to date focused on one or very few traits, and little investigation has been devoted to QTL identification for gene expression. Here, our objective was to identify QTL for 27 phenotypes related to growth and stress responses in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis), which is one of the most economically important freshwater aquaculture species in Canada. Phenotypes included 12 growth parameters, six blood and plasma variables, three hepatic variables, and one plasma hormone level as well as the relative expression measurements of five genes of interest linked to growth regulation. QTL analysis relied on a linkage map recently built from S. fontinalis consisting of both single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, n = 266) and microsatellite (n =81) markers in an F2 interstrain hybrid population (n = 171). We identified 63 growth-related QTL and four stress-related QTL across 18 of the 40 linkage groups of the brook charr linkage map. Percent variance explained, confidence interval, and allelic QTL effects also were investigated to provide insight into the genetic architecture of growth- and stress-related QTL. QTL related to growth performance and stress response that were identified could be classified into two groups: (1) a group composed of the numerous, small-effect QTL associated with some traits related to growth (i.e., weight) that may be under the control of a large number of genes or pleiotropic genes, and (2) a group of less numerous QTL associated with growth (i.e., gene expression) and with stress-related QTL that display a larger effect, suggesting that these QTL are under the control of a limited number of genes of major effect. This study represents a first step

  9. Deciphering mechanisms underlying the genetic variation of general production and liver quality traits in the overfed mule duck by pQTL analyses.

    PubMed

    François, Yoannah; Vignal, Alain; Molette, Caroline; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Davail, Stéphane; Liaubet, Laurence; Marie-Etancelin, Christel

    2017-04-19

    The aim of this study was to analyse the mechanisms that underlie phenotypic quantitative trait loci (QTL) in overfed mule ducks by identifying co-localized proteomic QTL (pQTL). The QTL design consisted of three families of common ducks that were progeny-tested by using 294 male mule ducks. This population of common ducks was genotyped using a genetic map that included 334 genetic markers located across 28 APL chromosomes (APL for Anas platyrhynchos). Mule ducks were phenotyped for 49 traits related to growth, metabolism, overfeeding ability and meat and fatty liver quality, and 326 soluble fatty liver proteins were quantified. One hundred and seventy-six pQTL and 80 phenotypic QTL were detected at the 5% chromosome-wide significance threshold. The great majority of the identified pQTL were trans-acting and localized on a chromosome other than that carrying the coding gene. The most significant pQTL (1% genome-wide significance) were found for alpha-enolase on APL18 and fatty acid synthase on APL24. Some proteins were associated with numerous pQTL (for example, 17 and 14 pQTL were detected for alpha-enolase and apolipoprotein A1, respectively) and pQTL hotspots were observed on some chromosomes (APL18, 24, 25 and 29). We detected 66 co-localized phenotypic QTL and pQTL for which the significance of the two-trait QTL (2t-QTL) analysis was higher than that of the strongest QTL using a single-trait approach. Among these, 16 2t-QTL were pleiotropic. For example, on APL15, melting rate and abundance of two alpha-enolase spots appeared to be impacted by a single locus that is involved in the glycolytic process. On APLZ, we identified a pleiotropic QTL that modified both the blood level of glucose at the beginning of the force-feeding period and the concentration of glutamate dehydrogenase, which, in humans, is involved in increased glucose absorption by the liver when the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 gene is mutated. We identified pleiotropic loci that affect metabolic

  10. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems.

    PubMed

    Capron, Arnaud; Chang, Xue Feng; Hall, Hardy; Ellis, Brian; Beatson, Rodger P; Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4 × Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes.

  11. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems

    PubMed Central

    Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4×Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes. PMID:23136168

  12. Genoprotective effects of lignin isolated from oil palm black liquor waste.

    PubMed

    Naik, Prashantha; Rozman, Hj Din; Bhat, Rajeev

    2013-07-01

    Black liquor waste (BLW), a major by-product of palm oil extraction process contains lignin as one of the constituents. Lignin isolated from BLW was evaluated for antioxidant and genoprotective properties and was compared with the commercial lignin for overall efficacy. Antioxidant compounds (phenolics and tannins) and antioxidant activities (phosphomolybdenum assay, ABTS(+) and FRAP assays) of lignin isolated from BLW were compared with commercial lignin. Bone marrow micronucleus (MN) test was employed for evaluating the dose-yield protective effect against cyclophosphamide (CP, 50mg/kg b.w.) induced genotoxicity in mouse. Results revealed isolated lignin to exhibit rich antioxidant activities. A decrease in MN frequency and recovery of P/N ratio (P: polychromatic erythrocytes, N: normochromatic erhythocytes) indicated protective effects of lignin against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. The efficacy of BLW-derived lignin as an antioxidant and genoprotective agent was comparable to commercial lignin. Results on lignin isolated from BLW are envisaged to find potential applications in food and/or pharmaceutical industries.

  13. KNOX1 genes regulate lignin deposition and composition in monocots and dicots

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Brad T.; Sinha, Neelima R.; Kang, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Plant secondary cell walls are deposited mostly in vascular tissues such as xylem vessels, tracheids, and fibers. These cell walls are composed of a complex matrix of compounds including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin functions primarily to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of both the transport vessel and the entire plant itself. Since lignin has been identified as a major source of biomass for biofuels, regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis has been a topic of much recent investigation. Biosynthesis and patterning of lignin involves many developmental and environmental cues including evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory modules and hormonal signals. Here, we investigate the role of the class I Knotted1-like-homeobox (KNOX) genes and gibberellic acid in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in a representative monocot and a representative eudicot. Knotted1 overexpressing mutant plants showed a reduction in lignin content in both maize and tobacco. Expression of four key lignin biosynthesis genes was analyzed and revealed that KNOX1 genes regulate at least two steps in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. The negative regulation of lignin both in a monocot and a eudicot by the maize Kn1 gene suggests that lignin biosynthesis may be preserved across large phylogenetic distances. The evolutionary implications of regulation of lignification across divergent species are discussed. PMID:23653631

  14. Exploring regulation in tissues with eQTL networks.

    PubMed

    Fagny, Maud; Paulson, Joseph N; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Sonawane, Abhijeet R; Chen, Cho-Yi; Lopes-Ramos, Camila M; Glass, Kimberly; Quackenbush, John; Platig, John

    2017-09-12

    Characterizing the collective regulatory impact of genetic variants on complex phenotypes is a major challenge in developing a genotype to phenotype map. Using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses, we constructed bipartite networks in which edges represent significant associations between genetic variants and gene expression levels and found that the network structure informs regulatory function. We show, in 13 tissues, that these eQTL networks are organized into dense, highly modular communities grouping genes often involved in coherent biological processes. We find communities representing shared processes across tissues, as well as communities associated with tissue-specific processes that coalesce around variants in tissue-specific active chromatin regions. Node centrality is also highly informative, with the global and community hubs differing in regulatory potential and likelihood of being disease associated.

  15. Breeding lines and host QTL interaction with bacterial strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistance to common bacterial blight (CBB) is controlled by more than 20 QTL (Miklas and Singh, 2007). A QTL on Pv10 linked to SAP6 SCAR markers is derived from common bean. Higher levels of resistance associated with BC420 QTL on Pv06 (Yu et al., 2000) and SU91-CG11 QTL on Pv08 (Pedraza et al., 20...

  16. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  17. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As a...

  18. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As a...

  19. Utilization of chemically modified lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chem, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    A chemical modification method has been developed to convert lignin into lignin graft copolymers. The graft products are macromolecular surface active agents because, within each molecule, a hydrocarbon sidechain has been gown off of a natural oxyphenylpropyl backbone. Surface activity of the graft copolymers was indicated by their capacity to form stable emulsions between incompatible fluid phases and to adhesively bond to wood surfaces. Lignin has been grafted with ethenylbenzene (styrene), 4-methyl-2-oxy-3-oxopent-4-ene (methylmethacrylate), 2-propenamide(acrylamide), 2-propene nitrile (acrylonitrile), cationic monomers, and anionic monomers. Synthesis with anionic, cationic, or polar nonionic monomers produced water soluble, lignin copolymers that were effective dispersing, flocculating, and surface active agents. The nonionic polymers and their hydrolysis products are effective thinners and suspending agents for drilling mud formulations. In reactions with ethenylbenzene, lignin was used to make thermoplastic materials. These products have been shown to be poly(lignin-g-(1-phenylethylene))-containing materials by a series of solubility and extraction tests and are formed with 90% or more grafting efficiency for lignin. These materials have been shown to be thermoplastics, coupling agents for wood and plastic, and biodegradable plastics.

  20. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion, and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.

  1. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    DOE PAGES

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; ...

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion,more » and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.« less

  2. Biochemical transformation of lignin for deriving valued commodities from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Gall, Daniel L; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R

    2017-03-24

    The biochemical properties of lignin present major obstacles to deriving societally beneficial entities from lignocellulosic biomass, an abundant and renewable feedstock. Similar to other biopolymers such as polysaccharides, polypeptides, and ribonucleic acids, lignin polymers are derived from multiple types of monomeric units. However, lignin's renowned recalcitrance is largely attributable to its racemic nature and the variety of covalent inter-unit linkages through which its aromatic monomers are linked. Indeed, unlike other biopolymers whose monomers are consistently inter-linked by a single type of covalent bond, the monomeric units in lignin are linked via non-enzymatic, combinatorial radical coupling reactions that give rise to a variety of inter-unit covalent bonds in mildly branched racemic polymers. Yet, despite the chemical complexity and stability of lignin, significant strides have been made in recent years to identify routes through which valued commodities can be derived from it. This paper discusses emerging biological and biochemical means through which degradation of lignin to aromatic monomers can lead to the derivation of commercially valuable products.

  3. Structural characterization of the lignin from jute (Corchorus capsularis) fibers.

    PubMed

    del Río, José C; Rencoret, Jorge; Marques, Gisela; Li, Jiebing; Gellerstedt, Göran; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2009-11-11

    The structural characteristics of the lignin from jute (Corchorus capsularis ) fibers, which are used for high-quality paper pulp production, were studied. The lignin content (13.3% Klason lignin) was high compared to other nonwoody bast fibers used for pulp production. The lignin structure was characterized by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), 2D-NMR, and thioacidolysis. Upon Py-GC/MS, jute fibers released predominantly products from syringylpropanoid units with the S/G ratio being 2.1 and a H/G/S composition of 2:33:65. 2D-NMR of the milled wood lignin (MWL) isolated from jute fibers showed a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (72% of total side chains), followed by beta-beta' resinol-type linkages (16% of total side chains) and lower amounts of beta-5' phenylcoumaran (4%) and beta-1' spirodienone-type (4%) linkages and cinnamyl end groups (4%). The high predominance of the S-lignin units, together with the high proportion of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages, which are easily cleaved during alkaline cooking, are advantageous for pulping. On the other hand, a small percentage (ca. 4%) of the lignin side chain was found to be acetylated at the gamma-carbon, predominantly over syringyl units. The analysis of desulphurated thioacidolysis dimers provided additional information on the relative abundances of the various carbon-carbon and diaryl ether bonds and the type of units (syringyl or guaiacyl) involved in each of the above linkage types. Interestingly, the major part of the beta-beta' dimers included two syringyl units, indicating that most of the beta-beta' substructures identified in the HSQC spectra were of the syringaresinol type (pinoresinol being absent), as already observed in the lignin of other angiosperms.

  4. Tandem Catalytic Depolymerization of Lignin by Water-Tolerant Lewis Acids and Rhodium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Constant, Sandra; Lancefield, Christopher S; Westwood, Nicholas J; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2016-08-23

    Lignin is an attractive renewable feedstock for aromatic bulk and fine chemicals production, provided that suitable depolymerization procedures are developed. Here, we describe a tandem catalysis strategy for ether linkage cleavage within lignin, involving ether hydrolysis by water-tolerant Lewis acids followed by aldehyde decarbonylation by a Rh complex. In situ decarbonylation of the reactive aldehydes limits loss of monomers by recondensation, a major issue in acid-catalyzed lignin depolymerization. Rate of hydrolysis and decarbonylation were matched using lignin model compounds, allowing the method to be successfully applied to softwood, hardwood, and herbaceous dioxasolv lignins, as well as poplar sawdust, to give the anticipated decarbonylation products and, rather surprisingly, 4-(1-propenyl)phenols. Promisingly, product selectivity can be tuned by variation of the Lewis-acid strength and lignin source. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Comparison of different methods for lignin determination as a basis for calibration of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and implications of lignoproteins.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Kirsten; Blaschke, Lothar; Polle, Andrea

    2002-12-01

    Three commonly employed methods for lignin determination, i.e., the thioglycolic acid (TGA), the acetylbromide (AB), and the acid detergent fiber (ADF) method, were compared using leaves and xylem tissue from five species (Nicotiana tabacum, Populus x canescens, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur, and Picea abies). In each case, cell walls were isolated before lignin determination. Each of the three methods estimated a different lignin concentration in a given tissue, except for spruce wood. The "lignin" concentration determined with the AB method was strongly dependent on whether or not the cell walls were subjected to alkaline hydrolysis to remove covalently bound aromatic nonligneous components before lignin determination. Lignin concentrations determined in hydrolyzed cell walls of different tissues and species by the AB method showed a good correlation with those obtained by the TGA method and, thus, were convertible. In contrast, gravimetrically estimated ADF lignins did not or only moderately correlate with lignins measured with methods based on the UV absorbance of the solubilized lignin degradation products. Leaves of a given species generally contained higher ADF-lignin concentrations than the corresponding stem tissue. Both ADF and TGA lignin data of beech were used to calibrate near-infrared reflectance spectra (NIRS) for lignin prediction. Both NIRS calibration procedures gave good statistical fits with correlation coefficients close to 1, indicating that TGA and ADF lignin concentrations of beech can be estimated by NIRS with high accuracy. However, the two calibrations were based on different empirical terms, showing that TGA and ADF lignins did not share the same physical basis for calibration. C/N analysis revealed the presence of 3.1 and 1.4% nitrogen in ADF lignins of beech leaves and wood, respectively. The major fraction of this nitrogen was recovered in amino acids, which corresponded to 14% and 3% protein in ADF lignins of leaves and wood

  6. Kraft lignin biorefinery: A proposal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-09-01

    Lignin is a huge energy and carbon reserve but owing to its highly biologically recalcitrant nature it is commonly regarded as a waste in lignocellulosic biomass biorefinery. To realize the lignin biorefinery, it is proposed to use Kraft lignin, isolated from black liquor from Kraft pulping mills, as starting material to be fragmented by fast pyrolysis or selective catalysis to aromatic sub-units and to be post-refining with additional cleavage reaction and separation/purification as commodity aromatics pool in chemical industries. This Note calls for research efforts on detailed investigation of the feasibility of this proposed scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Determinants for Enzymatic Digestion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Are Independent of Those for Lignin Abundance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Population

    DOE PAGES

    Penning, Bryan W.; Sykes, Robert W.; Babcock, Nicholas C.; ...

    2014-06-27

    Biotechnological approaches to reduce or modify lignin in biomass crops are predicated on the assumption that it is the principal determinant of the recalcitrance of biomass to enzymatic digestion for biofuels production. We defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the Intermated B73 x 3 Mo17 recombinant inbred maize (Zea mays) population using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry to establish stem lignin content and an enzymatic hydrolysis assay to measure glucose and xylose yield. Among five multiyear QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yieldmore » was shared. A genome-wide association study for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282- member maize association panel provided candidate genes in the 11 QTL of the B73 and Mo17 parents but showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist among this broader pool of maize genetic diversity. B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues independent of allelic variation. Combining these complementary genetic approaches provides a narrowed list of candidate genes. A cluster of SCARECROW-LIKE9 and SCARECROW-LIKE14 transcription factor genes provides exceptionally strong candidate genes emerging from the genome-wide association study. In addition to these and genes associated with cell wall metabolism, candidates include several other transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation and components of cellular signaling pathways. Finally, these results provide new insights and strategies beyond the modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically modified biomass.« less

  8. Genetic Determinants for Enzymatic Digestion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Are Independent of Those for Lignin Abundance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Population

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, Bryan W.; Sykes, Robert W.; Babcock, Nicholas C.; Dugard, Christopher K.; Held, Michael A.; Klimek, John F.; Shreve, Jacob T.; Fowler, Matthew; Ziebell, Angela; Davis, Mark F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Springer, Nathan M.; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Weil, Clifford F.; McCann, Maureen C.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-06-27

    Biotechnological approaches to reduce or modify lignin in biomass crops are predicated on the assumption that it is the principal determinant of the recalcitrance of biomass to enzymatic digestion for biofuels production. We defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the Intermated B73 x 3 Mo17 recombinant inbred maize (Zea mays) population using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry to establish stem lignin content and an enzymatic hydrolysis assay to measure glucose and xylose yield. Among five multiyear QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yield was shared. A genome-wide association study for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282- member maize association panel provided candidate genes in the 11 QTL of the B73 and Mo17 parents but showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist among this broader pool of maize genetic diversity. B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues independent of allelic variation. Combining these complementary genetic approaches provides a narrowed list of candidate genes. A cluster of SCARECROW-LIKE9 and SCARECROW-LIKE14 transcription factor genes provides exceptionally strong candidate genes emerging from the genome-wide association study. In addition to these and genes associated with cell wall metabolism, candidates include several other transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation and components of cellular signaling pathways. Finally, these results provide new insights and strategies beyond the modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically modified biomass.

  9. Genetic Determinants for Enzymatic Digestion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Are Independent of Those for Lignin Abundance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Population.

    PubMed

    Penning, Bryan W; Sykes, Robert W; Babcock, Nicholas C; Dugard, Christopher K; Held, Michael A; Klimek, John F; Shreve, Jacob T; Fowler, Matthew; Ziebell, Angela; Davis, Mark F; Decker, Stephen R; Turner, Geoffrey B; Mosier, Nathan S; Springer, Nathan M; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Weil, Clifford F; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-08-01

    Biotechnological approaches to reduce or modify lignin in biomass crops are predicated on the assumption that it is the principal determinant of the recalcitrance of biomass to enzymatic digestion for biofuels production. We defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the Intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred maize (Zea mays) population using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry to establish stem lignin content and an enzymatic hydrolysis assay to measure glucose and xylose yield. Among five multiyear QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yield was shared. A genome-wide association study for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282-member maize association panel provided candidate genes in the 11 QTL of the B73 and Mo17 parents but showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist among this broader pool of maize genetic diversity. B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues independent of allelic variation. Combining these complementary genetic approaches provides a narrowed list of candidate genes. A cluster of SCARECROW-LIKE9 and SCARECROW-LIKE14 transcription factor genes provides exceptionally strong candidate genes emerging from the genome-wide association study. In addition to these and genes associated with cell wall metabolism, candidates include several other transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation and components of cellular signaling pathways. These results provide new insights and strategies beyond the modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically modified biomass. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Genetic Determinants for Enzymatic Digestion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Are Independent of Those for Lignin Abundance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Population1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Bryan W.; Sykes, Robert W.; Babcock, Nicholas C.; Dugard, Christopher K.; Held, Michael A.; Klimek, John F.; Shreve, Jacob T.; Fowler, Matthew; Ziebell, Angela; Davis, Mark F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Springer, Nathan M.; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Weil, Clifford F.; McCann, Maureen C.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnological approaches to reduce or modify lignin in biomass crops are predicated on the assumption that it is the principal determinant of the recalcitrance of biomass to enzymatic digestion for biofuels production. We defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the Intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred maize (Zea mays) population using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry to establish stem lignin content and an enzymatic hydrolysis assay to measure glucose and xylose yield. Among five multiyear QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yield was shared. A genome-wide association study for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282-member maize association panel provided candidate genes in the 11 QTL of the B73 and Mo17 parents but showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist among this broader pool of maize genetic diversity. B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues independent of allelic variation. Combining these complementary genetic approaches provides a narrowed list of candidate genes. A cluster of SCARECROW-LIKE9 and SCARECROW-LIKE14 transcription factor genes provides exceptionally strong candidate genes emerging from the genome-wide association study. In addition to these and genes associated with cell wall metabolism, candidates include several other transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation and components of cellular signaling pathways. These results provide new insights and strategies beyond the modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically modified biomass. PMID:24972714

  11. Detection and Validation of QTL Affecting Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance in Rainbow Trout Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guangtu; Liu, Sixin; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Rexroad, Caird E.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. Using microsatellite markers in a genome scan, we previously detected significant and suggestive QTL affecting phenotypic variation in survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of BCWD in rainbow trout. In this study, we performed selective genotyping of SNPs from restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequence data from two pedigreed families (2009070 and 2009196) to validate the major QTL from the previous work and to detect new QTL. The use of RAD SNPs in the genome scans increased the number of mapped markers from ~300 to ~5,000 per family. The significant QTL detected in the microsatellites scan on chromosome Omy8 in family 2009070 was validated explaining up to 58% of the phenotypic variance in that family, and in addition, a second QTL was also detected on Omy8. Two novel QTL on Omy11 and 14 were also detected, and the previously suggestive QTL on Omy1, 7 and 25 were also validated in family 2009070. In family 2009196, the microsatellite significant QTL on Omy6 and 12 were validated and a new QTL on Omy8 was detected, but none of the previously detected suggestive QTL were validated. The two Omy8 QTL from family 2009070 and the Omy12 QTL from family 2009196 were found to be co-localized with handling and confinement stress response QTL that our group has previously identified in a separate pedigreed family. With the currently available data we cannot determine if the co-localized QTL are the result of genes with pleiotropic effects or a mere physical proximity on the same chromosome segment. The genetic markers linked to BCWD resistance QTL were used to query the scaffolds of the rainbow trout reference genome assembly and the QTL-positive scaffold sequences were found to include 100 positional candidate genes. Several of the candidate genes located on or near the two Omy8 QTL detected in family 2009070 suggest potential

  12. An overview of natural renewable bio-polymer lignin towards nano and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana

    2017-10-01

    Lignin were said to be major bio-polymer next to cellulose which is an abundant biopolymer. This type of lignin was mostly isolated from woods which were named after their physical, morphological appearances and majorly on extracting sources. Still now there are very few reports on isolation, identification of pure lignin and isolating pathways are also not well defined. Molecular weight of lignin varies from thousands to ten thousands which are not explored accurately. Even-though lignins were surrounded by these many hurdles it has various application studies which were studied and reported. Nowadays researchers focused on synthesizing lignin nanoparticles which were subjected for various application studies in day today life. This lignin contains wide range of applications in several fields like medicinal, industrial, pharmaceuticals, etc., Most of the researcher are focused on applications like anti-oxidant and microbicidal agents. So this review will comprises of outlook of bioprocessing lignin and its application focused on nanoparticles synthesis, anti-oxidant and microbicidal agents. This was the first review on renewable bio-polymer lignin with its bio-pharmaceutical and nanobiotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. QTL for fibre-related traits in grain × sweet sorghum as a tool for the enhancement of sorghum as a biomass crop.

    PubMed

    Shiringani, Amukelani L; Friedt, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Compared to maize and temperate grasses, sorghum has received less attention in terms of improving cell wall components. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) with main effects, epistatic and pleiotropic effects along with QTL × environment (QE) interactions controlling fibre-related traits in sorghum. Neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, fresh leaf mass, stripped stalk mass, dry stalk mass, fresh biomass and dry biomass were analysed from a population of 188 grain × sweet sorghum recombinant inbred lines. A genetic map consisting of 157 DNA markers was constructed, and QTL were detected using composite interval mapping (CIM). CIM detected more than 5 additive QTL per trait explaining 7.1-24.7% of the phenotypic variation. Abundant co-localization of these QTL was observed across all chromosomes, and the highest cluster was identified on chromosome 6. Searching for candidate genes using the confidence interval of our QTL clusters reveals that these clusters might comprise a set of genes that are tightly linked. Some QTL showed multiple effects; however, the allele for each trait was favouring the parent with the increasing effect. QE interactions were observed for QTL showing multiple effects. Additive × additive interaction was observed for 7 out of 10 traits, indicating the importance of epistatic analysis. However, the phenotypic variation explained by digenic interactions was lower compared to the individual QTL. Our results indicate that various genetic components contribute to fibre-related traits and should be considered during the enhancement of sorghum for lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. QTL Analysis of Intraspecific Differences between Two Silene vulgaris Ecotypes

    PubMed Central

    BRATTELER, MARTIN; BALTISBERGER, MATTHIAS; WIDMER, ALEX

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Serpentine soils provide a highly selective substrate for plant colonization and growth and represent an ideal system for studying the evolution of plant-ecotypes. In the present study the aim was to identify the genetic architecture of morphological traits distinguishing serpentine and non-serpentine ecotypes of Silene vulgaris. • Methods Using an F2 mapping population derived from an intraspecific cross between a serpentine and a non-serpentine ecotype of S. vulgaris, the genetic architecture of 12 morphological traits was explored using a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. • Key Results The QTL analysis identified a total of 49 QTLs, of which 24 were classified as major QTLs. The mean number of QTLs per trait category was found to correspond well with numbers reported in the literature for similar crosses. Clustering of QTLs for different traits was found on several linkage groups. • Conclusions Morphological traits that differentiate the two ecotypes are strongly correlated, presumably as a consequence of the joint effects of extensive linkage of QTLs for different traits and directional selection. The signature of consistent directional selection was found for leaf and shoot trait divergence. Intraspecific ecotype differences in S. vulgaris were found to be distributed across the entire genome. The study shows that QTL analyses on non-model organisms can provide novel insights into the genetic basis of plant diversification. PMID:16757498

  15. Salt tolerance in Solanum pennellii: antioxidant response and related QTL

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive soil salinity is an important problem for agriculture, however, salt tolerance is a complex trait that is not easily bred into plants. Exposure of cultivated tomato to salt stress has been reported to result in increased antioxidant content and activity. Salt tolerance of the related wild species, Solanum pennellii, has also been associated with similar changes in antioxidants. In this work, S. lycopersicum M82, S. pennellii LA716 and a S. pennellii introgression line (IL) population were evaluated for growth and their levels of antioxidant activity (total water-soluble antioxidant activity), major antioxidant compounds (phenolic and flavonoid contents) and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase) under both control and salt stress (150 mM NaCl) conditions. These data were then used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for controlling the antioxidant parameters under both stress and nonstress conditions. Results Under control conditions, cultivated tomato had higher levels of all antioxidants (except superoxide dismutase) than S. pennellii. However, under salt stress, the wild species showed greater induction of all antioxidants except peroxidase. The ILs showed diverse responses to salinity and proved very useful for the identification of QTL. Thus, 125 loci for antioxidant content under control and salt conditions were detected. Eleven of the total antioxidant activity and phenolic content QTL matched loci identified in an independent study using the same population, thereby reinforcing the validity of the loci. In addition, the growth responses of the ILs were evaluated to identify lines with favorable growth and antioxidant profiles. Conclusions Plants have a complex antioxidant response when placed under salt stress. Some loci control antioxidant content under all conditions while others are responsible for antioxidant content only under saline or nonsaline

  16. Linkage Disequilibrium with Linkage Analysis of Multiline Crosses Reveals Different Multiallelic QTL for Hybrid Performance in the Flint and Dent Heterotic Groups of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Héloïse; Lehermeier, Christina; Bauer, Eva; Falque, Matthieu; Segura, Vincent; Bauland, Cyril; Camisan, Christian; Campo, Laura; Meyer, Nina; Ranc, Nicolas; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Flament, Pascal; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Menz, Monica; Moreno-González, Jesús; Ouzunova, Milena; Charcosset, Alain; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Moreau, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Multiparental designs combined with dense genotyping of parents have been proposed as a way to increase the diversity and resolution of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies, using methods combining linkage disequilibrium information with linkage analysis (LDLA). Two new nested association mapping designs adapted to European conditions were derived from the complementary dent and flint heterotic groups of maize (Zea mays L.). Ten biparental dent families (N = 841) and 11 biparental flint families (N = 811) were genotyped with 56,110 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and evaluated as test crosses with the central line of the reciprocal design for biomass yield, plant height, and precocity. Alleles at candidate QTL were defined as (i) parental alleles, (ii) haplotypic identity by descent, and (iii) single-marker groupings. Between five and 16 QTL were detected depending on the model, trait, and genetic group considered. In the flint design, a major QTL (R2 = 27%) with pleiotropic effects was detected on chromosome 10, whereas other QTL displayed milder effects (R2 < 10%). On average, the LDLA models detected more QTL but generally explained lower percentages of variance, consistent with the fact that most QTL display complex allelic series. Only 15% of the QTL were common to the two designs. A joint analysis of the two designs detected between 15 and 21 QTL for the five traits. Of these, between 27 for silking date and 41% for tasseling date were significant in both groups. Favorable allelic effects detected in both groups open perspectives for improving biomass production. PMID:25271305

  17. Degradation of carbohydrates and lignins in buried woods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedges, J.I.; Cowie, G.L.; Ertel, J.R.; James, Barbour R.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Spruce, alder, and oak woods deposited in coastal sediments were characterized versus their modern counterparts by quantification of individual neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols as well as by scanning electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The buried spruce wood from a 2500 yr old deposit was unaltered whereas an alder wood from the same horizon and an oak wood from an open ocean sediment were profoundly degraded. Individual sugar and lignin phenol analyses indicate that at least 90 and 98 wt% of the initial total polysaccharides in the buried alder and oak woods, respectively, have been degraded along with 15-25 wt% of the lignin. At least 75% of the degraded biopolymer has been physically lost from these samples. This evidence is supported by the SEM, 13C NMR and elemental analyses, all of which indicate selective loss of the carbohydrate moiety. The following order of stability was observed for the major biochemical constituents of both buried hardwoods: vanillyl and p-hydroxyl lignin structural units > syringyl lignin structural units > pectin > ??-cellulose > hemicellulose. This sequence can be explained by selective preservation of the compound middle lamella regions of the wood cell walls. The magnitude and selectivity of the indicated diagenetic reactions are sufficient to cause major changes in the chemical compositions of wood-rich sedimentary organic mixtures and to provide a potentially large in situ nutrient source. ?? 1985.

  18. Degradation of carbohydrates and lignins in buried woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, John I.; Cowie, Gregory L.; Ertel, John R.; James Barbour, R.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    1985-03-01

    Spruce, alder, and oak woods deposited in coastal sediments were characterized versus their modern counterparts by quantification of individual neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols as well as by scanning electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The buried spruce wood from a 2500 yr old deposit was unaltered whereas an alder wood from the same horizon and an oak wood from an open ocean sediment were profoundly degraded. Individual sugar and lignin phenol analyses indicate that at least 90 and 98 wt% of the initial total polysaccharides in the buried alder and oak woods, respectively, have been degraded along with 15-25 wt% of the lignin. At least 75% of the degraded biopolymer has been physically lost from these samples. This evidence is supported by the SEM, 13C NMR and elemental analyses, all of which indicate selective loss of the carbohydrate moiety. The following order of stability was observed for the major biochemical constituents of both buried hardwoods: vanillyl and p- hydroxyl lignin structural units > syringyl lignin structural units > pectin > α-cellulose > hemicellulose. This sequence can be explained by selective preservation of the compound middle lamella regions of the wood cell walls. The magnitude and selectivity of the indicated diagenetic reactions are sufficient to cause major changes in the chemical compositions of wood-rich sedimentary organic mixtures and to provide a potentially large in situ nutrient source.

  19. QTL meta-analysis of root traits in Brassica napus under contrasting phosphorus supply in two growth systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Thomas, Catherine L.; Xiang, Jinxia; Long, Yan; Wang, Xiaohua; Zou, Jun; Luo, Ziliang; Ding, Guangda; Cai, Hongmei; Graham, Neil S.; Hammond, John P.; King, Graham J.; White, Philip J.; Xu, Fangsen; Broadley, Martin R.; Shi, Lei; Meng, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    A high-density SNP-based genetic linkage map was constructed and integrated with a previous map in the Tapidor x Ningyou7 (TNDH) Brassica napus population, giving a new map with a total of 2041 molecular markers and an average marker density which increased from 0.39 to 0.97 (0.82 SNP bin) per cM. Root and shoot traits were screened under low and ‘normal’ phosphate (Pi) supply using a ‘pouch and wick’ system, and had been screened previously in an agar based system. The P-efficient parent Ningyou7 had a shorter primary root length (PRL), greater lateral root density (LRD) and a greater shoot biomass than the P-inefficient parent Tapidor under both treatments and growth systems. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis identified a total of 131 QTL, and QTL meta-analysis found four integrated QTL across the growth systems. Integration reduced the confidence interval by ~41%. QTL for root and shoot biomass were co-located on chromosome A3 and for lateral root emergence were co-located on chromosomes A4/C4 and C8/C9. There was a major QTL for LRD on chromosome C9 explaining ~18% of the phenotypic variation. QTL underlying an increased LRD may be a useful breeding target for P uptake efficiency in Brassica. PMID:27624881

  20. RECENT ADVANCES IN UNDERSTANDING LIGNIN BIOSYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Whetten, Ross W.; MacKay, John J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.

    1998-06-01

    After a long period of little change, the basic concepts of lignin biosynthesis have been challenged by new results from genetic modification of lignin content and composition. New techniques for making directed genetic changes in plants, as well as improvements in the analytical techniques used to determine lignin content and composition in plant cell walls, have been used in experimental tests of the accepted lignin biosynthetic pathway. The lignins obtained from genetically modified plants have shown unexpected properties, and these findings have extended the known range of variation in lignin content and composition. These results argue that the accepted lignin biosynthetic pathway is either incomplete or incorrect, or both; and also suggest that plants may have a high level of metabolic plasticity in the formation of lignins. If this is so, the properties of novel lignins could be of significant scientific and practical interest.

  1. Roles of silica and lignin in horsetail (Equisetum hyemale), with special reference to mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shigeru; Sato, Kanna; Ito, Fuyu; Komatsubara, Satoshi; Ohata, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2012-02-01

    This research deals with detailed analyses of silica and lignin distribution in horsetail with special reference to mechanical strength. Scanning electron images of a cross-section of an internode showed silica deposited densely only around the outer epidermis. Detailed histochemical analyses of lignin showed no lignin deposition in the silica-rich outer internodes of horsetail, while a characteristic lignin deposition was noticed in the vascular bundle in inner side of internodes. To analyze the structure of horsetail from a mechanical viewpoint, we calculated the response of a model structure of horsetail to a mechanical force applied perpendicularly to the long axis by a finite element method. We found that silica distributed in the outer epidermis may play the major structural role, with lignin's role being limited ensuring that the vascular bundle keep waterproof. These results were in contrast to more modern tall trees like gymnosperms, for which lignin provides mechanical strength. Lignin has the advantage of sticking to cellulose, hemicellulose, and other materials. Such properties make it possible for plants containing lignin to branch. Branching of tree stems aids in competing for light and other atmospheric resources. This type of branching was impossible for ancient horsetails, which relied on the physical properties of silica. From the evolutional view points, over millennia in trees with high lignin content, true branching, and many chlorophyll-containing leaves developed.

  2. Progress and obstacles in the production and application of recombinant lignin-degrading peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Lambertz, Camilla; Ece, Selin; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lignin is 1 of the 3 major components of lignocellulose. Its polymeric structure includes aromatic subunits that can be converted into high-value-added products, but this potential cannot yet been fully exploited because lignin is highly recalcitrant to degradation. Different approaches for the depolymerization of lignin have been tested, including pyrolysis, chemical oxidation, and hydrolysis under supercritical conditions. An additional strategy is the use of lignin-degrading enzymes, which imitates the natural degradation process. A versatile set of enzymes for lignin degradation has been identified, and research has focused on the production of recombinant enzymes in sufficient amounts to characterize their structure and reaction mechanisms. Enzymes have been analyzed individually and in combinations using artificial substrates, lignin model compounds, lignin and lignocellulose. Here we consider progress in the production of recombinant lignin-degrading peroxidases, the advantages and disadvantages of different expression hosts, and obstacles that must be overcome before such enzymes can be characterized and used for the industrial processing of lignin. PMID:27295524

  3. Progress and obstacles in the production and application of recombinant lignin-degrading peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, Camilla; Ece, Selin; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Lignin is 1 of the 3 major components of lignocellulose. Its polymeric structure includes aromatic subunits that can be converted into high-value-added products, but this potential cannot yet been fully exploited because lignin is highly recalcitrant to degradation. Different approaches for the depolymerization of lignin have been tested, including pyrolysis, chemical oxidation, and hydrolysis under supercritical conditions. An additional strategy is the use of lignin-degrading enzymes, which imitates the natural degradation process. A versatile set of enzymes for lignin degradation has been identified, and research has focused on the production of recombinant enzymes in sufficient amounts to characterize their structure and reaction mechanisms. Enzymes have been analyzed individually and in combinations using artificial substrates, lignin model compounds, lignin and lignocellulose. Here we consider progress in the production of recombinant lignin-degrading peroxidases, the advantages and disadvantages of different expression hosts, and obstacles that must be overcome before such enzymes can be characterized and used for the industrial processing of lignin.

  4. Effects of Penicillium chrysogenum var. halophenolicum on kraft lignin: color stabilization and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Remédios, Marlene; Carvalho, Filomena A; Enguita, Francisco J; Cardoso, Carlos; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2016-06-01

    Wood industries and agricultural crops generate an inexhaustible supply of by-products like lignin, which constitutes an environmental problem. Increasing efforts have been done to find new applications for lignin. One of them is as a food additive, but its chemical nature makes it sensitive to browning which constitutes a major drawback for this type of lignin application. In the present study we are documenting how color stabilization of a commercial kraft lignin was achieved after the treatment with Penicillium chrysogenum var. halophenolicum. In addition the fungal capacity to remove lignin is studied together with the effect of its treatment on cytotoxicity of lignin. P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum was able to transform lignin, ensuring its color stability for more than 24 months. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy showed that the fungus contributed to homogenize particle size and hydrodynamic properties in lignin suspensions without increase the toxicity over HeLa cells and human primary fibroblasts. These findings suggest new uses for kraft lignin after P. chrysogenum var. halophenolicum treatment providing an effective approach for improve color stability.

  5. Identification and QTL mapping of whitefly resistance components in Solanum galapagense.

    PubMed

    Firdaus, Syarifin; van Heusden, Adriaan W; Hidayati, Nurul; Supena, Ence Darmo Jaya; Mumm, Roland; de Vos, Ric C H; Visser, Richard G F; Vosman, Ben

    2013-06-01

    Solanum galapagense is closely related to the cultivated tomato and can show a very good resistance towards whitefly. A segregating population resulting from a cross between the cultivated tomato and a whitefly resistant S. galapagense was created and used for mapping whitefly resistance and related traits, which made it possible to study the genetic basis of the resistance. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for adult survival co-localized with type IV trichome characteristics (presence, density, gland longevity and gland size). A major QTL (Wf-1) was found for adult survival and trichome characters on Chromosome 2. This QTL explained 54.1 % of the variation in adult survival and 81.5 % of the occurrence of type IV trichomes. A minor QTL (Wf-2) for adult survival and trichome characters was identified on Chromosome 9. The major QTL was confirmed in F3 populations. Comprehensive metabolomics, based on GCMS profiling, revealed that 16 metabolites segregating in the F2 mapping population were associated with Wf-1 and/or Wf-2. Analysis of the 10 most resistant and susceptible F2 genotypes by LCMS showed that several acyl sugars were present in significantly higher concentration in the whitefly resistant genotypes, suggesting a role for these components in the resistance as well. Our results show that whitefly resistance in S. galapagense seems to inherit relatively simple compared to whitefly resistance from other sources and this offers great prospects for resistance breeding as well as elucidating the underlying molecular mechanism(s) of the resistance.

  6. Probing the lignin nanomechanical properties and lignin lignin interactions using the atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, Miodrag; Benitez, Ivan; Ruano, Melanie; Mavers, Melissa; Jeremic, Milorad; Radotic, Ksenija; Moy, Vincent; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2001-10-01

    By combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force and environmental scanning electron microscopies (ESEMs), herein we present an evidence for the existence of strong intermolecular forces, which are responsible for holding lignin globules together in higher ordered structures. Based on this observation, we provide a support for the hypothesis that lignin globules consist of at least two individual spherical layers, with space in between filled with solvent or gas.

  7. Combining powers of linkage and association mapping for precise dissection of QTL controlling resistance to gray leaf spot disease in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Jafar; Sun, Xiaochun; Gao, Yanxin; Ochsenfeld, Cherie; Bakker, Erica; Ren, Ruihua; Flora, Jonathan; Wang, Xiujuan; Kumpatla, Siva; Meyer, David; Thompson, Steve

    2015-11-10

    Gray Leaf Spot (GLS causal agents Cercospora zeae-maydis and Cercospora zeina) is one of the most important foliar diseases of maize in all areas where the crop is being cultivated. Although in the USA the situation with GLS severity is not as critical as in sub-Saharan Africa or Brazil, the evidence of climate change, increasing corn monoculture as well as the narrow genetic base of North American resistant germplasm can turn the disease into a serious threat to US corn production. The development of GLS resistant cultivars is one way to control the disease. In this study we combined the high QTL detection power of genetic linkage mapping with the high resolution power of genome-wide association study (GWAS) to precisely dissect QTL controlling GLS resistance and identify closely linked molecular markers for robust marker-assisted selection and trait introgression. Using genetic linkage analysis with a small bi-parental mapping population, we identified four GLS resistance QTL on chromosomes 1, 6, 7, and 8, which were validated by GWAS. GWAS enabled us to dramatically increase the resolution within the confidence intervals of the above-mentioned QTL. Particularly, GWAS revealed that QTLGLSchr8, detected by genetic linkage mapping as a locus with major effect, was likely represented by two QTL with smaller effects. Conducted in parallel, GWAS of days-to-silking demonstrated the co-localization of flowering time QTL with GLS resistance QTL on chromosome 7 indicating that either QTLGLSchr7 is a flowering time QTL or it is a GLS resistance QTL that co-segregates with the latter. As a result, this genetic linkage - GWAS hybrid mapping system enabled us to identify one novel GLS resistance QTL (QTLGLSchr8a) and confirm with more refined positions four more previously mapped QTL (QTLGLSchr1, QTLGLSchr6, QTLGLSchr7, and QTLGLSchr8b). Through the novel Single Donor vs. Elite Panel method we were able to identify within QTL confidence intervals SNP markers that would be

  8. Strategies for the Conversion of Lignin to High-Value Polymeric Materials: Review and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Upton, Brianna M; Kasko, Andrea M

    2016-02-24

    The majority of commodity plastics and materials are derived from petroleum-based chemicals, illustrating the strong dependence on products derived from non-renewable energy sources. As the most accessible, renewable form of carbon (in comparison to CO2), lignocellulosic biomass (defined as organic matter available on a renewable basis) has been acknowledged as the most logical carbon-based feedstock for a variety of materials such as biofuels and chemicals. This Review focuses on methods developed to synthesize polymers derived from lignin, monolignols, and lignin-derived chemicals. Major topics include the structure and processing of lignocellulosic biomass to lignin, polymers utilizing lignin as a macromonomer, synthesis of monomers and polymers from monolignols, and polymers from lignin-derived chemicals, such as vanillin.

  9. Separation of kraft lignin from kraft black liquor: Final report, July 1984-April 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kurple, K.R.

    1988-04-15

    The importance of this work is related to the fact that with over 16 million tons of kraft lignin available annually, practically all of it is burned just for its heat value. In essence, kraft lignin has no real value except its heat value. The major accomplishments of this research has shown that it is possible to produce high purity kraft lignin from kraft black liquor. This patented technology represents a way of producing a material that can be utilized in a wide variety of markets. Kraft lignin that was produced using this technology was sent to major corporations who used this kraft lignin as a starting material in their chemical processes. 3 figs.

  10. Mechanochemical modification of lignin and application of the modified lignin for thermoplastics and thermosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Zhang, Jinwen; Xin, Junna

    In this work, mechanochemical modification of lignin and use of the modified lignin in thermoplastics and thermosets were studied. Oleated lignin was successfully prepared by transesterification between lignin and methyl, and the oleation reaction was performed in a solvent-free and room temperature ball milling process with a relatively short time. PLA/lignin blends were prepared through melt extrusion. Compared with the PLA/lignin blends, the PLA/oleated lignin blends exhibited finer dispersion of lignin in the blends, increased glass transition temperature and higher tensile properties, suggesting improved compatibility between lignin and PLA. Carboxylic and anhydride groups were also introduced into the structure of lignin via mechanochemical modification, and the resulting lignin derivatives were used as curing agents for epoxies. The dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability of the cured epoxy resins were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  11. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon.

  12. Time-course expression QTL-atlas of the global transcriptional response of wheat to Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Samad-Zamini, Mina; Schweiger, Wolfgang; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F X; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2017-03-23

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of small grain cereals such as bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). The pathogen switches from a biotrophic to a nectrotrophic lifestyle in course of disease development forcing its host to adapt its defence strategies. Using a genetical genomics approach, we illustrate genome-wide reconfigurations of genetic control over transcript abundances between two decisive time points after inoculation with the causative pathogen Fusarium graminearum. Whole transcriptome measurements have been recorded for 163 lines of a wheat doubled haploid population segregating for several resistance genes yielding 15 552 at 30 h and 15 888 eQTL at 50 h after inoculation. The genetic map saturated with transcript abundance-derived markers identified of a novel QTL on chromosome 6A, besides the previously reported QTL Fhb1 and Qfhs.ifa-5A. We find a highly different distribution of eQTL between time points with about 40% of eQTL being unique for the respective assessed time points. But also for more than 20% of genes governed by eQTL at either time point, genetic control changes in time. These changes are reflected in the dynamic compositions of three major regulatory hotspots on chromosomes 2B, 4A and 5A. In particular, control of defence-related biological mechanisms concentrated in the hotspot at 4A shift to hotspot 2B as the disease progresses. Hotspots do not colocalize with phenotypic QTL, and within their intervals no higher than expected number of eQTL was detected. Thus, resistance conferred by either QTL is mediated by few or single genes. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genetic Dissection of a Genomic Region with Pleiotropic Effects on Domestication Traits in Maize Reveals Multiple Linked QTL

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Zachary H.; Doebley, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The domesticated crop maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, have been used in numerous experiments to investigate the nature of divergent morphologies. This study examines a poorly understood region on the fifth chromosome of maize associated with a number of traits under selection during domestication, using a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping population specific to the fifth chromosome. In contrast with other major domestication loci in maize where large-effect, highly pleiotropic, single genes are responsible for phenotypic effects, our study found the region on chromosome five fractionates into multiple-QTL regions, none with singularly large effects. The smallest 1.5-LOD support interval for a QTL contained 54 genes, one of which was a MADS MIKCC transcription factor, a family of proteins implicated in many developmental programs. We also used simulated trait data sets to investigate the power of our mapping population to identify QTL for which there is a single underlying causal gene. This analysis showed that while QTL for traits controlled by single genes can be accurately mapped, our population design can detect no more than ∼4.5 QTL per trait even when there are 100 causal genes. Thus when a trait is controlled by ≥5 genes in the simulated data, the number of detected QTL can represent a simplification of the underlying causative factors. Our results show how a QTL region with effects on several domestication traits may be due to multiple linked QTL of small effect as opposed to a single gene with large and pleiotropic effects. PMID:24950893

  14. Genome-wide QTL and bulked transcriptomic analysis reveals new candidate genes for the control of tuber carotenoid content in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Raymond; Pont, Simon D A; Morris, Jenny A; McKenzie, Gaynor; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Hedley, Pete E; Ramsay, Gavin; Bryan, Glenn J; Taylor, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide QTL analysis of potato tuber carotenoid content was investigated in populations of Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja that segregate for flesh colour, revealing a novel major QTL on chromosome 9. The carotenoid content of edible plant storage organs is a key nutritional and quality trait. Although the structural genes that encode the biosynthetic enzymes are well characterised, much less is known about the factors that determine overall storage organ content. In this study, genome-wide QTL mapping, in concert with an efficient 'genetical genomics' analysis using bulked samples, has been employed to investigate the genetic architecture of potato tuber carotenoid content. Two diploid populations of Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja were genotyped (AFLP, SSR and DArT markers) and analysed for their tuber carotenoid content over two growing seasons. Common to both populations were QTL that explained relatively small proportions of the variation in constituent carotenoids and a major QTL on chromosome 3 explaining up to 71 % of the variation in carotenoid content. In one of the populations (01H15), a second major carotenoid QTL was identified on chromosome 9, explaining up to 20 % of the phenotypic variation. Whereas the major chromosome 3 QTL was likely to be due to an allele of a gene encoding β-carotene hydroxylase, no known carotenoid biosynthetic genes are located in the vicinity of the chromosome 9 QTL. A unique expression profiling strategy using phenotypically distinct bulks comprised individuals with similar carotenoid content provided further support for the QTL mapping to chromosome 9. This study shows the potential of using the potato genome sequence to link genetic maps to data arising from eQTL approaches to enhance the discovery of candidate genes underlying QTLs.

  15. Molecular mapping of Verticillium wilt resistance QTL clustered on chromosomes D7 and D9 in upland cotton.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Lei; Guo, WangZhen; Zhang, TianZhen

    2009-09-01

    Verticillium wilt is a destructive disease with international consequences for cotton production. Breeding broad-spectrum resistant cultivars is considered to be one of the most effective means for reducing crop losses. A resistant cotton cultivar, 60182, was crossed with a susceptible cultivar, Junmian 1, to identify markers for Verticillium resistance genes and validate the mode of its inheritance. Genetic segregation analysis for Verticillium wilt resistance was evaluated based upon infected leaf percentage in the seedling stage using major gene-polygene mixed inheritance models and joint analysis of P(1), P(2), F(1), B(1), B(2) and F(2) populations obtained from the cultivar cross. We found that resistance of upland cotton cultivar 60182 to isolates BP2, VD8 and T9, and their isoconcentration mixture was controlled by two major genes with additive-dominance-epistatic effects, and the inheritance of the major gene was dominant. Furthermore, a genetic linkage map was constructed using F(2) segregating population and resistance phenotypic data were obtained using F(2:3) families inoculated with different isolates and detected in different developmental stages. The genetic linkage map with 139 loci was comprised of 31 linkage groups covering 1165 cM, with an average distance of 8.38 cM between two markers, or 25.89% of the cotton genome length. From 60182, we found 4 QTL on chromosome D7 and 4 QTL on D9 for BP2, 5 QTL on D7 and 9 QTL on D9 for VD8, 4 QTL on D7 and 5 QTL on D9 for T9 and 3 QTL on D7 and 7 QTL on D7 for mixed pathogens. The QTL mapping results revealed that QTL clusters with high contribution rates were screened simultaneously on chromosomes D9 and D7 by multiple interval mapping (CIM), whether from resistance phenotypic data from different developmental stages or for different isolates. The result is consistent with the genetic model of two major genes in 60182 and suggests broad-spectrum resistance to both defoliating isolates of V. dahliae and

  16. A major QTL associated with Fusarium oxysporum race 1 resistance identified in genetic populations derived from closely related watermelon lines using selective genotyping and genotyping-by-sequencing for SNP discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium wilt is a major soil-borne disease of watermelon caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f. sp. niveum (E.F. Sm.) W.C. Snyder & H.N. Hans (Fon). In this study, a genetic population of 186 F3 families (24 plants in each family) exhibited continuous distribution for Fon race ...

  17. AnimalQTLdb: a livestock QTL database tool set for positional QTL information mining and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Fritz, Eric Ryan; Reecy, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (AnimalQTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL data on livestock animal species from which researchers can easily locate and compare QTL within species. The database tools are also added to link the QTL data to other types of genomic information, such as radiation hybrid (RH) maps, finger printed contig (FPC) physical maps, linkage maps and comparative maps to the human genome, etc. Currently, this database contains data on 1287 pig, 630 cattle and 657 chicken QTL, which are dynamically linked to respective RH, FPC and human comparative maps. We plan to apply the tool to other animal species, and add more structural genome information for alignment, in an attempt to aid comparative structural genome studies (). PMID:17135205

  18. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass benefits from lignin removal, relocation, and/or modification during hydrothermal pretreatment. Phase transition, depolymerization/repolymerization, and solubility effects may all influence these lignin changes. To better understand how lignin is altered, Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides wood samples and cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) isolated from P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides were subjected to batch and flowthrough pretreatments. The residual solids and liquid hydrolysate were characterized by gel permeation chromatography, heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, compositional analysis, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results Changes in the structure of the solids recovered after the pretreatment of CEL and the production of aromatic monomers point strongly to depolymerization and condensation being primary mechanisms for lignin extraction and redeposition. The differences in lignin removal and phenolic compound production from native P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides and CEL suggested that lignin-carbohydrate interactions increased lignin extraction and the extractability of syringyl groups relative to guaiacyl groups. Conclusions These insights into delignification during hydrothermal pretreatment point to desirable pretreatment strategies and plant modifications. Because depolymerization followed by repolymerization appears to be the dominant mode of lignin modification, limiting the residence time of depolymerized lignin moieties in the bulk liquid phase should reduce lignin content in pretreated biomass. In addition, the increase in lignin removal in the presence of polysaccharides suggests that increasing lignin-carbohydrate cross-links in biomass would increase delignification during pretreatment. PMID:23902789

  19. Does elevated N make lignin more recalcitrant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weintraub, M. N.; Rinkes, Z. L.; Grandy, S.; Wickings, K.; Bertrand, I.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in nitrogen (N) availability are often found to reduce decomposition rates of lignin-rich plant litter. However, the biological and chemical mechanisms that cause this inhibitory effect are still unclear. Our goal was to determine why increased N availability inhibits lignin decomposition. We tested two competing hypotheses: 1) decomposers degrade lignin to obtain protected N compounds and stop producing lignin-degrading enzymes if mineral N is available; or 2) chemical reactions between lignin and mineral N make lignin more recalcitrant, thereby limiting the ability of decomposers to break it down. To test these hypotheses, we followed changes in carbon (C) mineralization, microbial biomass and enzyme activities, litter chemistry, and lignin monomer concentrations over a 478-day laboratory incubation of three genotypes of maize stem internodes varying in litter quality. They were factorially combined with either an acidic or neutral pH sandy soil, with and without added N. Adding N reduced C mineralization, microbial biomass, and lignin-degrading enzyme activities in all treatments. Furthermore, our data on litter chemistry and lignin monomers indicate that N addition did not significantly alter the quantity or quality of lignin in any treatment. These results suggest that abiotic interactions between N and lignin compounds did not alter the ability of decomposers to breakdown lignin. Thus, we conclude that mineral N alters microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics, but not lignin chemistry during maize decomposition.

  20. ''The control of lignin synthesis''

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, John E.

    2005-04-07

    In this project we tested the hypothesis that regulation of the synthesis of lignin in secondary xylem cells in conifer trees involves the transport of glucosylated lignin monomers to the wall of xylem cells, followed by de-glucosylation in the cell wall by monolignol-specific glucosidase enzymes, which activates the monomers for lignin polymerization. The information we gathered is relevant to the fundamental understanding of how trees make wood, and to the applied goal of more environmentally friendly pulp and paper production. We characterized the complete genomic structure of the Coniferin-specific Beta-glucosidase (CBG) gene family in the conifers loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and partial genomic sequences were obtained in several other tree species. Both pine species contain multiple CBG genes which raises the possibility of differential regulation, perhaps related to the multiple roles of lignin in development and defense. Subsequent projects will need to include detailed gene expression studies of each gene family member during tree growth and development, and testing the role of each monolignol-specific glucosidase gene in controlling lignin content.

  1. Unravelling lignin formation and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.G. . Inst. of Biological Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    During this study, we established that the Fagaceae exclusively accumulate Z-monolignois/glucosides, and not the E-isomers. Evidence for the presence of a novel E{yields}Z isomerse has been obtained. Our pioneering work in lignin biosynthesis and structure in situ has also progressed smoothly. We established the bonding environments of a woody angiosperm, Leucanea leucocephala, as well as wheat (T. aestivum) and tobacco (N. tabacum). A cell culture system from Pinus taeda was developed which seems ideal for investigating the early stages of lignification. These cultures excrete peroxidase isozymes, considered to be specifically involved in lignin deposition. We also studied the effect of the putative lignin-degrading enzyme, lignin peroxidase, on monolignols and dehydropolymerisates therefrom. In all cases, polymerization was observed, and not degradation; these polymers are identical to that obtained with horseradish peroxidases/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It seems inconceivable that these enzymes can be considered as being primarily responsible for lignin biodegradation.

  2. An insight into the lignin peroxidase of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammed Touaha; Habib, Abdul Musaweer; Chowdhury, Dil Umme Salma; Bhuiyan, Md Iqbal Kaiser; Mostafa, Kazi Md Golam; Mondol, Sobuj; Mosleh, Ivan Mhai

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the deadliest necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species including major food, fiber, and oil crops all throughout the globe. It secretes a cocktail of ligninolytic enzymes along with other hydrolytic enzymes for degrading the woody lignocellulosic plant cell wall and penetrating into the host tissue. Among them, lignin peroxidase has been reported only in Phanerochaete chrysosporium so far. But interestingly, a recent study has revealed a second occurrence of lignin peroxidase in M. phaseolina. However, lignin peroxidases are of much significance biotechnologically because of their potential applications in bio-remedial waste treatment and in catalyzing difficult chemical transformations. Besides, this enzyme also possesses agricultural and environmental importance on account of their role in lignin biodegradation. In the present work, different properties of the lignin peroxidase of M. phaseolina along with predicting the 3-D structure and its active sites were investigated by the use of various computational tools. The data from this study will pave the way for more detailed exploration of this enzyme in wet lab and thereby facilitating the strategies to be designed against such deadly weapons of Macrophomina phaseolina. Furthermore, the insight of such a ligninolytic enzyme will contribute to the assessment of its potentiality as a bioremediation tool.

  3. An insight into the lignin peroxidase of Macrophomina phaseolina

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed Touaha; Habib, Abdul Musaweer; Chowdhury, Dil Umme Salma; Bhuiyan, Md Iqbal Kaiser; Mostafa, Kazi Md Golam; Mondol, Sobuj; Mosleh, Ivan MHAI

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the deadliest necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species including major food, fiber, and oil crops all throughout the globe. It secretes a cocktail of ligninolytic enzymes along with other hydrolytic enzymes for degrading the woody lignocellulosic plant cell wall and penetrating into the host tissue. Among them, lignin peroxidase has been reported only in Phanerochaete chrysosporium so far. But interestingly, a recent study has revealed a second occurrence of lignin peroxidase in M. phaseolina. However, lignin peroxidases are of much significance biotechnologically because of their potential applications in bio-remedial waste treatment and in catalyzing difficult chemical transformations. Besides, this enzyme also possesses agricultural and environmental importance on account of their role in lignin biodegradation. In the present work, different properties of the lignin peroxidase of M. phaseolina along with predicting the 3-D structure and its active sites were investigated by the use of various computational tools. The data from this study will pave the way for more detailed exploration of this enzyme in wet lab and thereby facilitating the strategies to be designed against such deadly weapons of Macrophomina phaseolina. Furthermore, the insight of such a ligninolytic enzyme will contribute to the assessment of its potentiality as a bioremediation tool. PMID:23976830

  4. Monolignol ferulate conjugates are naturally incorporated into plant lignins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Angiosperms represent the majority of terrestrial plants and are the primary research focus for conversion of biomass to liquid fuels and coproducts. Lignin limits our access to fibers and represents a large fraction of the chemical energy stored in plant cell walls. Recently, the incorporation of m...

  5. Lignin modification to improve sorghum for cellulosic and thermal bioenergy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modifying lignin content and composition are major targets for bioenergy feedstock improvement for both cellulosic and thermal bioenergy conversion. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is currently being developed as a dedicated bio-energy feedstock. Our goals are to improve sorghum biomass for both biochemic...

  6. Chlorination and cleavage of lignin structures by fungal chloroperoxidases

    Treesearch

    Patricia Ortiz-Bermudez; Ewald Srebotnik; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2003-01-01

    Two fungal chloroperoxidases (CPOs), the heme enzyme from Caldariomyces fumago and the vanadium enzyme from Curvularia inaequalis, chlorinated 1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxypropane, a dimeric model compound that represents the major nonphenolic structure in lignin. Both enzymes also cleaved this dimer to give 1-chloro-4-ethoxy-3-...

  7. Bond dissociation enthalpies of a pinoresinol lignin model compound

    Treesearch

    Thomas Elder

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The pinoresinol unit is one of the principal interunit linkages in lignin. As such, its chemistry and properties are of major importance in understanding the behavior or the polymer. This work examines the homolytic cleavage of the pinoresinol system, representing the initial step in thermal degradation. The bond dissociation enthalpy of this reaction has...

  8. Genetic, Physiological, and Gene Expression Analyses Reveal That Multiple QTL Enhance Yield of Rice Mega-Variety IR64 under Drought

    PubMed Central

    Swamy B. P., Mallikarjuna; Ahmed, Helal Uddin; Henry, Amelia; Mauleon, Ramil; Dixit, Shalabh; Vikram, Prashant; Tilatto, Ram; Verulkar, Satish B.; Perraju, Puvvada; Mandal, Nimai P.; Variar, Mukund; S., Robin; Chandrababu, Ranganath; Singh, Onkar N.; Dwivedi, Jawaharlal L.; Das, Sankar Prasad; Mishra, Krishna K.; Yadaw, Ram B.; Aditya, Tamal Lata; Karmakar, Biswajit; Satoh, Kouji; Moumeni, Ali; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Leung, Hei; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a highly drought sensitive crop, and most semi dwarf rice varieties suffer severe yield losses from reproductive stage drought stress. The genetic complexity of drought tolerance has deterred the identification of agronomically relevant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that can be deployed to improve rice yield under drought in rice. Convergent evidence from physiological characterization, genetic mapping, and multi-location field evaluation was used to address this challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings Two pairs of backcross inbred lines (BILs) from a cross between drought-tolerant donor Aday Sel and high-yielding but drought-susceptible rice variety IR64 were produced. From six BC4F3 mapping populations produced by crossing the +QTL BILs with the −QTL BILs and IR64, four major-effect QTL - one each on chromosomes 2, 4, 9, and 10 - were identified. Meta-analysis of transcriptome data from the +QTL/−QTL BILs identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) significantly associated with QTL on chromosomes 2, 4, 9, and 10. Physiological characterization of BILs showed increased water uptake ability under drought. The enrichment of DEGs associated with root traits points to differential regulation of root development and function as contributing to drought tolerance in these BILs. BC4F3-derived lines with the QTL conferred yield advantages of 528 to 1875 kg ha−1 over IR64 under reproductive-stage drought stress in the targeted ecosystems of South Asia. Conclusions/Significance Given the importance of rice in daily food consumption and the popularity of IR64, the BC4F3 lines with multiple QTL could provide higher livelihood security to farmers in drought-prone environments. Candidate genes were shortlisted for further characterization to confirm their role in drought tolerance. Differential yield advantages of different combinations of the four QTL reported here indicate that future research should include optimizing QTL

  9. Connecting thermal performance curve variation to the genotype: a multivariate QTL approach.

    PubMed

    Latimer, C A L; Foley, B R; Chenoweth, S F

    2015-01-01

    Thermal performance curves (TPCs) are continuous reaction norms that describe the relationship between organismal performance and temperature and are useful for understanding trade-offs involved in thermal adaptation. Although thermal trade-offs such as those between generalists and specialists or between hot- and cold-adapted phenotypes are known to be genetically variable and evolve during thermal adaptation, little is known of the genetic basis to TPCs - specifically, the loci involved and the directionality of their effects across different temperatures. To address this, we took a multivariate approach, mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) for locomotor activity TPCs in the fly, Drosophila serrata, using a panel of 76 recombinant inbred lines. The distribution of additive genetic (co)variance in the mapping population was remarkably similar to the distribution of mutational (co)variance for these traits. We detected 11 TPC QTL in females and 4 in males. Multivariate QTL effects were closely aligned with the major axes genetic (co)variation between temperatures; most QTL effects corresponded to variation for either overall increases or decreases in activity with a smaller number indicating possible trade-offs between activity at high and low temperatures. QTL representing changes in curve shape such as the 'generalist-specialist' trade-off, thought key to thermal adaptation, were poorly represented in the data. We discuss these results in the light of genetic constraints on thermal adaptation. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Identification of QTL for dorso-caudal chronic pleuritis in 12 crossbred porcine families.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, V R; Sørensen, K K; Christensen, O F; Busch, M E; Vingborg, R K K; Velander, I H; Lund, M S; Bendixen, C

    2010-10-01

    Pleuropneumonia is a major problem in pig production. At the time of slaughter, chronic pleuritis (CP) developed from pleuropneumonia is a common finding, and breeding for a reduced incidence of CP using marker-assisted selection (MAS) would be advantageous. Before applying MAS, quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with the prevalence of CP should be identified. In this study, 7470 pigs from crosses between 12 Danish Duroc boars and 604 sows (Danish Landrace × Danish Large White) were evaluated for CP located on the dorso-caudal part of the lungs. Quantitative trait loci were identified within boar families using both a Binomial logistic regression method and a chi-square test of association. Significant QTL for CP were detected on Sus scrofa chromosomes (SSC) 2, 8, 12, 13, 14 and 18 using both methods. One QTL on SSC 8 was also detected across families. For the QTL identified within families, the odds-ratio of having CP was approximately twice as high for the unfavourable allele compared to the favourable one. These QTL and closely linked markers show promise for the development of gene-specific markers associated with a reduced incidence of CP located on the dorso-caudal part of the lungs.

  11. Ras/MAPK Modifier Loci Revealed by eQTL in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sterken, Mark G; van Bemmelen van der Plaat, Linda; Riksen, Joost A G; Rodriguez, Miriam; Schmid, Tobias; Hajnal, Alex; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, Basten L

    2017-09-07

    The oncogenic Ras/MAPK pathway is evolutionarily conserved across metazoans. Yet, almost all our knowledge on this pathway comes from studies using single genetic backgrounds, whereas mutational effects can be highly background dependent. Therefore, we lack insight in the interplay between genetic backgrounds and the Ras/MAPK-signaling pathway. Here, we used a Caenorhabditis elegans RIL population containing a gain-of-function mutation in the Ras/MAPK-pathway gene let-60 and measured how gene expression regulation is affected by this mutation. We mapped eQTL and found that the majority (∼73%) of the 1516 detected cis-eQTL were not specific for the let-60 mutation, whereas most (∼76%) of the 898 detected trans-eQTL were associated with the let-60 mutation. We detected six eQTL trans-bands specific for the interaction between the genetic background and the mutation, one of which colocalized with the polymorphic Ras/MAPK modifier amx-2 Comparison between transgenic lines expressing allelic variants of amx-2 showed the involvement of amx-2 in 79% of the trans-eQTL for genes mapping to this trans-band. Together, our results have revealed hidden loci affecting Ras/MAPK signaling using sensitized backgrounds in C. elegans These loci harbor putative polymorphic modifier genes that would not have been detected using mutant screens in single genetic backgrounds. Copyright © 2017 Sterken et al.

  12. Independent origins of syringyl lignin in vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Li, Xu; Stout, Jake; Chapple, Clint

    2008-01-01

    Lycophytes arose in the early Silurian (≈400 Mya) and represent a major lineage of vascular plants that has evolved in parallel with the ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. A hallmark of vascular plants is the presence of the phenolic lignin heteropolymer in xylem and other sclerified cell types. Although syringyl lignin is often considered to be restricted in angiosperms, it has been detected in lycophytes as well. Here we report the characterization of a cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Gene expression data, cross-species complementation experiments, and in vitro enzyme assays indicate that this P450 is a ferulic acid/coniferaldehyde/coniferyl alcohol 5-hydroxylase (F5H), and is capable of diverting guaiacyl-substituted intermediates into syringyl lignin biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the Selaginella F5H represents a new family of plant P450s and suggests that it has evolved independently of angiosperm F5Hs. PMID:18505841

  13. ISSUES IN LIGNIN CHEMISTRY. "THE HELSINKI CONNECTION"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This presentation covers advances in lignin chemistry (and our Helsinki connection) on dibenzodioxocins, spirodienones, and reduced structures in lignins. It also explores the various roles in defending lignification theory (based on Freudenberg's original hypothesis) against a supposed new contende...

  14. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  15. Photodegradation of acidolysis lignin from BCMP.

    PubMed

    Azadfallah, Mohammad; Mirshokraei, Seyed Ahmad; Latibari, Ahmad Jahan

    2008-12-15

    A mild acidic dioxane extraction method was employed to isolate lignin from hardwood bleached chemimechanical pulp (BCMP). The isolated lignin was then purified and undergone elemental analysis. To study the photodegradation behavior, the lignin samples were impregnated onto the Whatman filter papers and irradiated with UV light for various periods. The photolyzed lignin was then recovered and analyzed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Phenylpropane-based formula (C(9)) of CMP pulp lignin and the photolyzed samples were then established with elemental analysis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy data. The results indicated that the benzaldehyde and benzoic acid type compounds were the main photodegradation products of BCMP lignin. The lignin photodegradation probably involved the degradation of phenylcoumaran units. Irradiation also increased the phenolic hydroxyl group content and decreased that of methoxyl groups, due to demethoxylation. The degrees of aromatic ring condensation were increased upon continuing the irradiation time, which imples the formation of condensed structures in photolyzed lignin.

  16. Single and multiple resistance QTL delay symptom appearance and slow down root colonization by Aphanomyces euteiches in pea near isogenic lines.

    PubMed

    Lavaud, C; Baviere, M; Le Roy, G; Hervé, M R; Moussart, A; Delourme, R; Pilet-Nayel, M-L

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the effects of resistance QTL on pathogen development cycle is an important issue for the creation of QTL combination strategies to durably increase disease resistance in plants. The oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, causing root rot disease, is one of the major factors limiting the pea crop in the main producing countries. No commercial resistant varieties are currently available in Europe. Resistance alleles at seven main QTL were recently identified and introgressed into pea agronomic lines, resulting in the creation of Near Isogenic Lines (NILs) at the QTL. This study aimed to determine the effect of main A. euteiches resistance QTL in NILs on different steps of the pathogen life cycle. NILs carrying resistance alleles at main QTL in susceptible genetic backgrounds were evaluated in a destructive test under controlled conditions. The development of root rot disease severity and pathogen DNA levels in the roots was measured during ten days after inoculation. Significant effects of several resistance alleles at the two major QTL Ae-Ps7.6 and Ae-Ps4.5 were observed on symptom appearance and root colonization by A. euteiches. Some resistance alleles at three other minor-effect QTL (Ae-Ps2.2, Ae-Ps3.1 and Ae-Ps5.1) significantly decreased root colonization. The combination of resistance alleles at two or three QTL including the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6 (Ae-Ps5.1/Ae-Ps7.6 or Ae-Ps2.2/Ae-Ps3.1/Ae-Ps7.6) had an increased effect on delaying symptom appearance and/or slowing down root colonization by A. euteiches and on plant resistance levels, compared to the effects of individual or no resistance alleles. This study demonstrated the effects of single or multiple resistance QTL on delaying symptom appearance and/or slowing down colonization by A. euteiches in pea roots, using original plant material and a precise pathogen quantification method. Our findings suggest that single resistance QTL can act on multiple or specific steps of the disease development

  17. Lignin degradation during plant litter photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; King, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant compound, after cellulose, synthesized by plants. Numerous studies have demonstrated that initial lignin concentration is negatively correlated with litter decomposition rate under both laboratory and field conditions. Thus lignin is commonly considered to be a "recalcitrant" compound during litter decomposition. However, lignin can also serve as a radiation-absorbing compound during photodegradation, the process through which solar radiation breaks down organic matter. Here, we synthesize recent studies concerning lignin degradation during litter photodegradation and report results from our study on how photodegradation changes lignin chemistry at a molecular scale. Recent field studies have found that litter with high initial lignin concentration does not necessarily exhibit high mass loss during photodegradation. A meta-analysis (King et al. 2012) even found a weak negative correlation between initial lignin concentration and photodegradation rate. Contradicting results have been reported with regard to the change in lignin concentration during photodegradation. Some studies have found significant loss of lignin during photodegradation, while others have not. In most studies, loss of lignin only accounts for a small proportion of the overall mass loss. Using NMR spectroscopy, we found significant loss of lignin structural units containing beta-aryl ether linkages during photodegradation of a common grass litter, Bromus diandrus, even though conventional forage fiber analysis did not reveal changes in lignin concentration. Both our NMR and fiber analyses supported the idea that photodegradation induced loss of hemicellulose, which was mainly responsible for the litter mass loss during photodegradation. Our results suggest that photodegradation induces degradation, but not necessarily complete breakdown, of lignin structures and consequently exposes hemicellulose and cellulose to microbial decomposition. We conclude that lignin

  18. Lignin Depletion Enhances the Digestibility of Cellulose in Cultured Xylem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lacayo, Catherine I.; Hwang, Mona S.; Ding, Shi-You; Thelen, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Plant lignocellulose constitutes an abundant and sustainable source of polysaccharides that can be converted into biofuels. However, the enzymatic digestion of native plant cell walls is inefficient, presenting a considerable barrier to cost-effective biofuel production. In addition to the insolubility of cellulose and hemicellulose, the tight association of lignin with these polysaccharides intensifies the problem of cell wall recalcitrance. To determine the extent to which lignin influences the enzymatic digestion of cellulose, specifically in secondary walls that contain the majority of cellulose and lignin in plants, we used a model system consisting of cultured xylem cells from Zinniaelegans. Rather than using purified cell wall substrates or plant tissue, we have applied this system to study cell wall degradation because it predominantly consists of homogeneous populations of single cells exhibiting large deposits of lignocellulose. We depleted lignin in these cells by treating with an oxidative chemical or by inhibiting lignin biosynthesis, and then examined the resulting cellulose digestibility and accessibility using a fluorescent cellulose-binding probe. Following cellulase digestion, we measured a significant decrease in relative cellulose content in lignin-depleted cells, whereas cells with intact lignin remained essentially unaltered. We also observed a significant increase in probe binding after lignin depletion, indicating that decreased lignin levels improve cellulose accessibility. These results indicate that lignin depletion considerably enhances the digestibility of cellulose in the cell wall by increasing the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic attack. Although other wall components are likely to contribute, our quantitative study exploits cultured Zinnia xylem cells to demonstrate the dominant influence of lignin on the enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This system is simple enough for quantitative image analysis, but realistic enough

  19. QTL analysis of percentage of grains with chalkiness in Japonica rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, Y; Wang, S W

    2012-03-22

    Appearance quality of rice grains is a major problem for rice production in many areas of the world. We conducted a molecular marker-based genetic analysis of percentage of grains with chalkiness (PGWC), which is a determining factor for appearance quality; it strongly affects milling, eating and cooking quality. An F(8) recombinant inbred line population, which consists of 261 lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari (Japonica) and C602 (Japonica), was used for QTL mapping. Three QTLs related to PGWC were detected on chromosomes 5, 8 and 10, together explaining 50.8% of the genetic variation. The 'Koshihikari' alleles qJPGC-5, qJPGC-8 and the 'C602' alleles at qJPGC-10 were associated with reduced PGWC. The QTL contributions to phenotypic variance were 18.2, 9.6 and 25%, respectively. These QTL markers for PGWC could be used for developing improved varieties.

  20. Mapping QTL for Seed Germinability under Low Temperature Using a New High-Density Genetic Map of Rice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ningfei; Shi, Shilai; Shi, Huan; Khanzada, Hira; Wassan, Ghulam M; Zhu, Changlan; Peng, Xiaosong; Yu, Qiuying; Chen, Xiaorong; He, Xiaopeng; Fu, Junru; Hu, Lifang; Xu, Jie; Ouyang, Linjuan; Sun, Xiaotang; Zhou, Dahu; He, Haohua; Bian, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Mapping major quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for rice seed germinability under low temperature (GULT) can provide valuable genetic source for improving cold tolerance in rice breeding. In this study, 124 rice backcross recombinant inbred lines (BRILs) derived from a cross indica cv. Changhui 891 and japonica cv. 02428 were genotyped through re-sequencing technology. A bin map was generated which includes 3057 bins covering distance of 1266.5 cM with an average of 0.41 cM between markers. On the basis of newly constructed high-density genetic map, six QTL were detected ranging from 40 to 140 kb on Nipponbare genome. Among these, two QTL qCGR8 and qGRR11 alleles shared by 02428 could increase GULT and seed germination recovery rate after cold stress, respectively. However, qNGR1 and qNGR4 may be two major QTL affecting indica Changhui 891germination under normal condition. QTL qGRR1 and qGRR8 affected the seed germination recovery rate after cold stress and the alleles with increasing effects were shared by the Changhui 891 could improve seed germination rate after cold stress dramatically. These QTL could be a highly valuable genetic factors for cold tolerance improvement in rice lines. Moreover, the BRILs developed in this study will serve as an appropriate choice for mapping and studying genetic basis of rice complex traits.

  1. Lignin biopolymer based triboelectric nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yukai; Wang, Ruoxing; Lu, Yunmei; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2017-07-01

    Ongoing research in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) focuses on increasing power generation, but obstacles concerning economical and eco-friendly utilization of TENGs continue to prevail. Being the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, lignin offers a valuable opportunity for low-cost TENG applications in biomedical devices, benefitting from its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Here, we develop for the first time a lignin biopolymer based TENGs for harvesting mechanical energy in the environment, which shows great potential for self-powered biomedical devices among other applications and opens doors to new technologies that utilize otherwise wasted materials for economically feasible and ecologically friendly production of energy devices.

  2. Box-Cox transformation for QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqing; Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    The maximum likelihood method of QTL mapping assumes that the phenotypic values of a quantitative trait follow a normal distribution. If the assumption is violated, some forms of transformation should be taken to make the assumption approximately true. The Box-Cox transformation is a general transformation method which can be applied to many different types of data. The flexibility of the Box-Cox transformation is due to a variable, called transformation factor, appearing in the Box-Cox formula. We developed a maximum likelihood method that treats the transformation factor as an unknown parameter, which is estimated from the data simultaneously along with the QTL parameters. The method makes an objective choice of data transformation and thus can be applied to QTL analysis for many different types of data. Simulation studies show that (1) Box-Cox transformation can substantially increase the power of QTL detection; (2) Box-Cox transformation can replace some specialized transformation methods that are commonly used in QTL mapping; and (3) applying the Box-Cox transformation to data already normally distributed does not harm the result.

  3. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  4. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  9. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  10. Iron addition to soil specifically stabilized lignin

    Treesearch

    Steven J. Hall; Whendee L. Silver; Vitaliy I. Timokhin; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2016-01-01

    The importance of lignin as a recalcitrant constituent of soil organic matter (SOM) remains contested. Associations with iron (Fe) oxides have been proposed to specifically protect lignin from decomposition, but impacts of Fe-lignin interactions on mineralization rates remain unclear. Oxygen (O2) fluctuations characteristic of humid tropical...

  11. Enzymatic monitoring of lignin and lignin derivatives biooxidation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Victor; Mamo, Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Lignin oxidation was enzymatically monitored by measuring methanol released during the reaction. The methanol was oxidized to formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide, and the latter used to oxidize ABTS to a product measured spectrophotometrically. The efficiency was comparable to the commonly used gas chromatography method. The assay was fast and inexpensive.

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Kinetics of a Ruthenium-Catalyzed Deconstruction of Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive. In this work, we have investigated the kinetics of the catalytic deconstruction of lignin model compounds using a ruthenium catalyst reported by Bergman et al. in 2010. A series of investigations using NMR spectroscopy and GC/MS will be presented. In addition, we propose detailed mechanisms for lignin depolymerization with ruthenium catalysts. We have also used DFT to compute transition state geometries of catalytic cycle intermediates and compare the values determined computationally with those observed experimentally. Ultimately, our objective is to apply our methods to the design of new homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for the effective deconstruction and valorization of lignin.

  13. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Gorecki, Pawel; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A.; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Kumar, T. K. Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F.; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J.; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C.; John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

    2012-03-12

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

  14. Lignin depolymerization/repolymerization and its critical role for delignification of aspen wood by steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiebing; Henriksson, Gunnar; Gellerstedt, Göran

    2007-11-01

    Steam explosion is an important process for the fractionation of biomass components. In order to understand the behaviour of lignin under the conditions encountered in the steam explosion process, as well as in other types of steam treatment, aspen wood and isolated lignin from aspen were subjected to steam treatment under various conditions. The lignin portion was analyzed using NMR and size exclusion chromatography as major analytical techniques. Thereby, the competition between lignin depolymerization and repolymerization was revealed and the conditions required for these two types of reaction identified. Addition of a reactive phenol, 2-naphthol, was shown to inhibit the repolymerization reaction strongly, resulting in a highly improved delignification by subsequent solvent extraction and an extracted lignin of uniform structure.

  15. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic lignin decomposition reconstructed from 31 fungal genomes.

    PubMed

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martínez, Angel T; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W; Yadav, Jagjit S; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M; de Vries, Ronald P; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Górecki, Paweł; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kües, Ursula; Kumar, T K Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C; St John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S

    2012-06-29

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non-lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

  16. MARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH A QTL FOR GRAIN YIELD IN WHEAT UNDER DROUGHT

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a major abiotic stress that adversely affects wheat production in many regions of the world. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling grain yield and yield components under reduced moisture. A cross between common wheat cultivars ‘Dharwar Dry’ ...

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers linked to QTL for wheat yield traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous improvement in grain yield is one of the major challenges for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding worldwide. This study characterized quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying wheat grain yield and its components using a high-density genetic linkage map developed from a recombinant inbre...

  18. Identification of QTL associated with flower and runner production in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seasonal flowering of strawberry is described as remontant and non-remontant. The genetic basis of this trait is important for breeding. This study was conducted to validate the existence of a major QTL for remontancy and weeks of flowering in F. × ananassa on LG IV, to determine if the level of flo...

  19. Genetic analysis and QTL mapping of seed coat color in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Li, Chun; Zhao, Ruihong; Wang, Cuiying

    2013-01-01

    Seed coat color is an important agronomic trait in sesame, as it is associated with seed biochemical properties, antioxidant content and activity and even disease resistance of sesame. Here, using a high-density linkage map, we analyzed genetic segregation and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sesame seed coat color in six generations (P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2). Results showed that two major genes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects and polygenes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects were responsible for controlling the seed coat color trait. Average heritability of the major genes in the BC1, BC2 and F2 populations was 89.30%, 24.00%, and 91.11% respectively, while the heritability of polygenes was low in the BC1 (5.43%), in BC2 (0.00%) and in F2 (0.89%) populations. A high-density map was constructed using 724 polymorphic markers. 653 SSR, AFLP and RSAMPL loci were anchored in 14 linkage groups (LG) spanning a total of 1,216.00 cM. The average length of each LG was 86.86 cM and the marker density was 1.86 cM per marker interval. Four QTLs for seed coat color, QTL1-1, QTL11-1, QTL11-2 and QTL13-1, whose heritability ranged from 59.33%-69.89%, were detected in F3 populations using CIM and MCIM methods. Alleles at all QTLs from the black-seeded parent tended to increase the seed coat color. Results from QTLs mapping and classical genetic analysis among the P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2 populations were comparatively consistent. This first QTL analysis and high-density genetic linkage map for sesame provided a good foundation for further research on sesame genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  20. Genetic Analysis and QTL Mapping of Seed Coat Color in Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Li, Chun; Zhao, Ruihong; Wang, Cuiying

    2013-01-01

    Seed coat color is an important agronomic trait in sesame, as it is associated with seed biochemical properties, antioxidant content and activity and even disease resistance of sesame. Here, using a high-density linkage map, we analyzed genetic segregation and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sesame seed coat color in six generations (P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2). Results showed that two major genes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects and polygenes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects were responsible for controlling the seed coat color trait. Average heritability of the major genes in the BC1, BC2 and F2 populations was 89.30%, 24.00%, and 91.11% respectively, while the heritability of polygenes was low in the BC1 (5.43%), in BC2 (0.00%) and in F2 (0.89%) populations. A high-density map was constructed using 724 polymorphic markers. 653 SSR, AFLP and RSAMPL loci were anchored in 14 linkage groups (LG) spanning a total of 1,216.00 cM. The average length of each LG was 86.86 cM and the marker density was 1.86 cM per marker interval. Four QTLs for seed coat color, QTL1-1, QTL11-1, QTL11-2 and QTL13-1, whose heritability ranged from 59.33%–69.89%, were detected in F3 populations using CIM and MCIM methods. Alleles at all QTLs from the black-seeded parent tended to increase the seed coat color. Results from QTLs mapping and classical genetic analysis among the P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2 populations were comparatively consistent. This first QTL analysis and high-density genetic linkage map for sesame provided a good foundation for further research on sesame genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:23704951

  1. Lignin-enzyme interaction: Mechanism, mitigation approach, modeling, and research prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zheng, Yi

    2017-07-01

    The adverse environmental impacts of the fossil fuel and the concerns of energy security necessitate the development of alternative clean energy sources from renewable feedstocks. Lignocellulosic biomass is a 2nd generation feedstock used in the production of biofuels and bio-based products that are conventionally derived from fossil resources. The biochemical conversion, which entails biomass pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation, is one major platform used to transform lignocelluloses into biofuels. However, lignin presents many challenges to enzymatic hydrolysis leading to the need of high enzyme dose, low hydrolysis yield, low level of recyclability, high cost of enzymatic hydrolysis (because of the high cost of enzymes), and so on. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysis, which is not cost effective, becomes one of major cost contributors. To mitigate the negative effects of lignin, extensive research has been conducted to explore the fundamental mechanisms of lignin-enzyme interactions to develop technologies to overcome the negative effects of lignin on enzymatic hydrolysis. Non-productive adsorption, which is characterized by hydrophobic, electrostatic and/or hydrogen bonding interactions, is widely known as the primary mechanism governing lignin-enzyme interactions. In addition, lignin-enzyme interaction is also influenced by steric hindrance (i.e., the physical blocking of enzyme access to carbohydrates by lignin). However, the mechanisms underlying the lignin-enzyme interactions remain unclear. This article aims to present a comprehensive review on the lignin-enzyme interactions (i.e. the mechanism, governing driving forces, modeling, and technologies for mitigating the negative effect of lignin). The current challenges inherent in this process and possible avenues of research in cellulosic biorefinery conclude this article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative genome analysis of lignin biosynthesis gene families across the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background As a major component of plant cell wall, lignin plays important roles in mechanical support, water transport, and stress responses. As the main cause for the recalcitrance of plant cell wall, lignin modification has been a major task for bioenergy feedstock improvement. The study of the evolution and function of lignin biosynthesis genes thus has two-fold implications. First, the lignin biosynthesis pathway provides an excellent model to study the coordinative evolution of a biochemical pathway in plants. Second, understanding the function and evolution of lignin biosynthesis genes will guide us to develop better strategies for bioenergy feedstock improvement. Results We analyzed lignin biosynthesis genes from fourteen plant species and one symbiotic fungal species. Comprehensive comparative genome analysis was carried out to study the distribution, relatedness, and family expansion of the lignin biosynthesis genes across the plant kingdom. In addition, we also analyzed the comparative synteny map between rice and sorghum to study the evolution of lignin biosynthesis genes within the Poaceae family and the chromosome evolution between the two species. Comprehensive lignin biosynthesis gene expression analysis was performed in rice, poplar and Arabidopsis. The representative data from rice indicates that different fates of gene duplications exist for lignin biosynthesis genes. In addition, we also carried out the biomass composition analysis of nine Arabidopsis mutants with both MBMS analysis and traditional wet chemistry methods. The results were analyzed together with the genomics analysis. Conclusion The research revealed that, among the species analyzed, the complete lignin biosynthesis pathway first appeared in moss; the pathway is absent in green algae. The expansion of lignin biosynthesis gene families correlates with substrate diversity. In addition, we found that the expansion of the gene families mostly occurred after the divergence of monocots

  3. Solution state NMR of lignins

    Treesearch

    John. Ralph; Jane M. Marita; Sally A. Ralph; Ronald D. Hatfield; Fachuang. Lu; Richard M. Ede; Junpeng. Peng; Larry L. Landucci

    1999-01-01

    Despite the rather random and heterogeneous nature of isolated lignins, many of their intimate structural details are revealed by diagnostic NMR experiments. 13C-NMR was recognized early-on as a high-resolution method for detailed structural characterization, aided by the almost exact agreement between chemical shifts of carbons in good low-molecular...

  4. Detection and validation of QTL affecting bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. Using microsatellites genome scan we have previously detected significant and suggestive QTL with major effects on the phenotypic variation of survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum...

  5. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization (Towards Lignin valorization: How a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from "Lignolysis")

    SciTech Connect

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; Wu, Weihua; Wemmer, Sarah; Wrobel, Steven A.; Tang, Yinjie J.; Singh, Seema

    2016-09-15

    Lignin is a major resources for the production of next generation renewable aromatics. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a bacterium that has been well-studied for the breakdown of lignin-derived compounds. There has been a lot of interest in SYK-6 lignolytic activity and many recent works have focused on understanding the unique catabolic pathway it possesses for the degradation of lignin derived monomers and oligomers. Furthermore, there has been no prior effort in understanding the central fluxome based on lignin derived substrates into value-added chemicals.

  6. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization (Towards Lignin valorization: How a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from "Lignolysis")

    DOE PAGES

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; ...

    2016-09-15

    Lignin is a major resources for the production of next generation renewable aromatics. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a bacterium that has been well-studied for the breakdown of lignin-derived compounds. There has been a lot of interest in SYK-6 lignolytic activity and many recent works have focused on understanding the unique catabolic pathway it possesses for the degradation of lignin derived monomers and oligomers. Furthermore, there has been no prior effort in understanding the central fluxome based on lignin derived substrates into value-added chemicals.

  7. Advanced Chemical Design for Efficient Lignin Bioconversion

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shangxian; Sun, Qining; Pu, Yunqiao; ...

    2017-01-30

    Here, lignin depolymerization mainly involves redox reactions relying on the effective electron transfer. Even though electron mediators were previously used for delignification of paper pulp, no study has established a bioprocess to fragment and solubilize the lignin with an effective laccase–mediator system, in particular, for subsequent microbial bioconversion. Efficient lignin depolymerization was achieved by screening proper electron mediators with laccase to attain a nearly 6-fold increase of kraft lignin solubility compared to the control kraft lignin without laccase treatment. Chemical analysis suggested the release of a low molecular weight fraction of kraft lignin into the solution phase. Moreover, NMR analysismore » revealed that an efficient enzyme–mediator system can promote the lignin degradation. More importantly, the fundamental mechanisms guided the development of an efficient lignin bioconversion process, where solubilized lignin from laccase–HBT treatment served as a superior substrate for bioconversion by Rhodococcus opacus PD630. The cell growth was increased by 106 fold, and the lipid titer reached 1.02 g/L. Overall, the study has manifested that an efficient enzyme–mediator–microbial system can be exploited to establish a bioprocess to solubilize lignin, cleave lignin linkages, modify the structure, and produce substrates amenable to bioconversion.« less

  8. Advanced chemical design for efficient lignin bioconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shangxian; Sun, Qining; Pu, Yunqiao; Lin, Furong; Sun, Su; Wang, Xin; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-12-22

    Here, lignin depolymerization mainly involves redox reactions relying on the effective electron transfer. Even though electron mediators were previously used for delignification of paper pulp, no study has established a bioprocess to fragment and solubilize the lignin with an effective laccase–mediator system, in particular, for subsequent microbial bioconversion. Efficient lignin depolymerization was achieved by screening proper electron mediators with laccase to attain a nearly 6-fold increase of kraft lignin solubility compared to the control kraft lignin without laccase treatment. Chemical analysis suggested the release of a low molecular weight fraction of kraft lignin into the solution phase. Moreover, NMR analysis revealed that an efficient enzyme–mediator system can promote the lignin degradation. More importantly, the fundamental mechanisms guided the development of an efficient lignin bioconversion process, where solubilized lignin from laccase–HBT treatment served as a superior substrate for bioconversion by Rhodococcus opacus PD630. The cell growth was increased by 106 fold, and the lipid titer reached 1.02 g/L. Overall, the study has manifested that an efficient enzyme–mediator–microbial system can be exploited to establish a bioprocess to solubilize lignin, cleave lignin linkages, modify the structure, and produce substrates amenable to bioconversion.

  9. Genetic Dissection of a QTL Affecting Bone Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Sabik, Olivia L.; Medrano, Juan F.; Farber, Charles R.

    2017-01-01

    Parameters of bone geometry such as width, length, and cross-sectional area are major determinants of bone strength. Although these traits are highly heritable, few genes influencing bone geometry have been identified. Here, we dissect a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing femur size. This QTL was originally identified in an F2 cross between the C57BL/6J-hg/hg (HG) and CAST/EiJ strains and was referred to as femur length in high growth mice 2 (Feml2). Feml2 was located on chromosome (Chr.) 9 at ∼20 cM. Here, we show that the HG.CAST-(D9Mit249-D9Mit133)/Ucd congenic strain captures Feml2. In an F2 congenic cross, we fine-mapped the location of Feml2 to an ∼6 Mbp region extending from 57.3 to 63.3 Mbp on Chr. 9. We have identified candidates by mining the complete genome sequence of CAST/EiJ and through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis of growth plates in C57BL/6J × CAST/EiJ F1 hybrids. Interestingly, we also find that the refined location of Feml2 overlaps a cluster of six independent genome-wide associations for human height. This work provides the foundation for the identification of novel genes affecting bone geometry. PMID:28082324

  10. Genetic Dissection of a QTL Affecting Bone Geometry.

    PubMed

    Sabik, Olivia L; Medrano, Juan F; Farber, Charles R

    2017-03-10

    Parameters of bone geometry such as width, length, and cross-sectional area are major determinants of bone strength. Although these traits are highly heritable, few genes influencing bone geometry have been identified. Here, we dissect a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing femur size. This QTL was originally identified in an F2 cross between the C57BL/6J-hg/hg (HG) and CAST/EiJ strains and was referred to as femur length in high growth mice 2 (Feml2). Feml2 was located on chromosome (Chr.) 9 at ∼20 cM. Here, we show that the HG.CAST-(D9Mit249-D9Mit133)/Ucd congenic strain captures Feml2 In an F2 congenic cross, we fine-mapped the location of Feml2 to an ∼6 Mbp region extending from 57.3 to 63.3 Mbp on Chr. 9. We have identified candidates by mining the complete genome sequence of CAST/EiJ and through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis of growth plates in C57BL/6J × CAST/EiJ F1 hybrids. Interestingly, we also find that the refined location of Feml2 overlaps a cluster of six independent genome-wide associations for human height. This work provides the foundation for the identification of novel genes affecting bone geometry.

  11. Identification of QTL underlying vitamin E contents in soybean seed among multiple environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Liu, Huancheng; Han, Yingpeng; Wu, Xiaoxia; Teng, Weili; Liu, Guifeng; Li, Wenbin

    2010-05-01

    Vitamin E (VE) in soybean seed has value for foods, medicines, cosmetics, and animal husbandry. Selection for higher VE contents in seeds along with agronomic traits was an important goal for many soybean breeders. In order to map the loci controlling the VE content, F(5)-derived F(6) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were advanced through single-seed-descent (SSD) to generate a population including 144 RILs. The population was derived from a cross between 'OAC Bayfield', a soybean cultivar with high VE content, and 'Hefeng 25', a soybean cultivar with low VE content. A total of 107 polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers were used to construct a genetic linkage map. Seed VE contents were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography for multiple years and locations (Harbin in 2007 and 2008, Hulan in 2008 and Suihua in 2008). Four QTL associated with alpha-Toc (on four linkage groups, LGs), eight QTL associated with gamma-Toc (on eight LGs), four QTL associated with delta-Toc (on four LGs) and five QTL associated with total VE (on four LGs) were identified. A major QTL was detected by marker Satt376 on linkage group C2 and associated with alpha-Toc (0.0012 > P > 0.0001, 5.0% < R (2) < 17.0%, 25.1 < alpha-Toc < 30.1 microg g(-1)), total VE (P < 0.0001, 7.0% < R (2) < 10.0%, 118.2 < total VE < 478.3 microg g(-1)). A second QTL detected by marker Satt286 on LG C2 was associated with gamma-Toc (0.0003 > P > 0.0001, 6.0% < R (2) < 13.0%, 141.5 < gamma-Toc < 342.4 microg g(-1)) and total VE (P < 0.0001, 2.0% < R (2) < 9.0%, 353.9 < total VE < 404.0 microg g(-1)). Another major QTL was detected by marker Satt266 on LG D1b that was associated with alpha-Toc (0.0002 > P > 0.0001, 4.0% < R (2) < 6.0%, 27.7 < alpha-Toc < 43.7 microg g(-1)) and gamma-Toc (0.0032 > P > 0.0001, 3.0% < R (2) < 10.0%, 69.7 < gamma-Toc < 345.7 microg g(-1)). Since beneficial alleles were all from 'OAC Bayfield', it was concluded that these three QTL would have great potential value for marker

  12. Improving Processing and Performance of Pure Lignin Carbon Fibers through Hardwood and Herbaceous Lignin Blends

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinaei, Omid; Bozell, Joseph J.; Rials, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    Lignin/lignin blends were used to improve fiber spinning, stabilization rates, and properties of lignin-based carbon fibers. Organosolv lignin from Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) were used as blends for making lignin-based carbon fibers. Different ratios of yellow poplar:switchgrass lignin blends were prepared (50:50, 75:25, and 85:15 w/w). Chemical composition and thermal properties of lignin samples were determined. Thermal properties of lignins were analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal analysis confirmed switchgrass and yellow poplar lignin form miscible blends, as a single glass transition was observed. Lignin fibers were produced via melt-spinning by twin-screw extrusion. Lignin fibers were thermostabilized at different rates and subsequently carbonized. Spinnability of switchgrass lignin markedly improved by blending with yellow poplar lignin. On the other hand, switchgrass lignin significantly improved thermostabilization performance of yellow poplar fibers, preventing fusion of fibers during fast stabilization and improving mechanical properties of fibers. These results suggest a route towards a 100% renewable carbon fiber with significant decrease in production time and improved mechanical performance. PMID:28671571

  13. Improving Processing and Performance of Pure Lignin Carbon Fibers through Hardwood and Herbaceous Lignin Blends.

    PubMed

    Hosseinaei, Omid; Harper, David P; Bozell, Joseph J; Rials, Timothy G

    2017-07-01

    Lignin/lignin blends were used to improve fiber spinning, stabilization rates, and properties of lignin-based carbon fibers. Organosolv lignin from Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) were used as blends for making lignin-based carbon fibers. Different ratios of yellow poplar:switchgrass lignin blends were prepared (50:50, 75:25, and 85:15 w/w). Chemical composition and thermal properties of lignin samples were determined. Thermal properties of lignins were analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal analysis confirmed switchgrass and yellow poplar lignin form miscible blends, as a single glass transition was observed. Lignin fibers were produced via melt-spinning by twin-screw extrusion. Lignin fibers were thermostabilized at different rates and subsequently carbonized. Spinnability of switchgrass lignin markedly improved by blending with yellow poplar lignin. On the other hand, switchgrass lignin significantly improved thermostabilization performance of yellow poplar fibers, preventing fusion of fibers during fast stabilization and improving mechanical properties of fibers. These results suggest a route towards a 100% renewable carbon fiber with significant decrease in production time and improved mechanical performance.

  14. Fine mapping QTL for drought resistance traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.) using bulk segregant analysis.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Arvindkumar Shivaji; Poornima, R; Prince, K Silvas Jebakumar; Kanagaraj, P; Sheeba, J Annie; Amudha, K; Suji, K K; Senthil, A; Babu, R Chandra

    2011-09-01

    Drought stress is a major limitation to rice (Oryza sativa L.) yields and its stability, especially in rainfed conditions. Developing rice cultivars with inherent capacity to withstand drought stress would improve rainfed rice production. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to drought resistance traits will help to develop rice cultivars suitable for water-limited environments through molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy. However, QTL mapping is usually carried out by genotyping large number of progenies, which is labour-intensive, time-consuming and cost-ineffective. Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) serves as an affordable strategy for mapping large effect QTLs by genotyping only the extreme phenotypes instead of the entire mapping population. We have previously mapped a QTL linked to leaf rolling and leaf drying in recombinant inbred (RI) lines derived from two locally adapted indica rice ecotypes viz., IR20/Nootripathu using BSA. Fine mapping the QTL will facilitate its application in MAS. BSA was done by bulking DNA of 10 drought-resistant and 12 drought-sensitive RI lines. Out of 343 rice microsatellites markers genotyped, RM8085 co-segregated among the RI lines constituting the respective bulks. RM8085 was mapped in the middle of the QTL region on chromosome 1 previously identified in these RI lines thus reducing the QTL interval from 7.9 to 3.8 cM. Further, the study showed that the region, RM212-RM302-RM8085-RM3825 on chromosome 1, harbours large effect QTLs for drought-resistance traits across several genetic backgrounds in rice. Thus, the QTL may be useful for drought resistance improvement in rice through MAS and map-based cloning.

  15. QTL for the thermotolerance effect of heat hardening, knockdown resistance to heat and chill-coma recovery in an intercontinental set of recombinant inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Norry, Fabian M; Scannapieco, Alejandra C; Sambucetti, Pablo; Bertoli, Carlos I; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-10-01

    The thermotolerance effect of heat hardening (also called short-term acclimation), knockdown resistance to high temperature (KRHT) with and without heat hardening and chill-coma recovery (CCR) are important phenotypes of thermal adaptation in insects and other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster from Denmark and Australia were previously selected for low and high KRHT, respectively. These flies were crossed to construct recombinant inbred lines (RIL). KRHT was higher in heat-hardened than in nonhardened RIL. We quantify the heat-hardening effect (HHE) as the ratio in KRHT between heat-hardened and nonhardened RIL. Composite interval mapping revealed a more complex genetic architecture for KRHT without heat-hardening than for KRHT in heat-hardened insects. Five quantitative trait loci (QTL) were found for KRHT, but only two of them were significant after heat hardening. KRHT and CCR showed trade-off associations for QTL both in the middle of chromosome 2 and the right arm of chromosome 3, which should be the result of either pleiotropy or linkage. The major QTL on chromosome 2 explained 18% and 27-33% of the phenotypic variance in CCR and KRHT in nonhardened flies, respectively, but its KRHT effects decreased by heat hardening. We discuss candidate loci for each QTL. One HHE-QTL was found in the region of small heat-shock protein genes. However, HHE-QTL explained only a small fraction of the phenotypic variance. Most heat-resistance QTL did not colocalize with CCR-QTL. Large-effect QTL for CCR and KRHT without hardening (basal thermotolerance) were consistent across continents, with apparent transgressive segregation for CCR. HHE (inducible thermotolerance) was not regulated by large-effect QTL.

  16. A native QTL for Fusarium head blight resistance in North American barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) independent of height, maturity, and spike type loci.

    PubMed

    Yu, G T; Franckowiak, J D; Neate, S M; Zhang, B; Horsley, R D

    2010-02-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe (teleomorph Gibberella zeae (Schwein.) Petch), is one of the major diseases of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in eastern China, the Upper Midwest of the USA, and the eastern Prairie Provinces of Canada. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling FHB resistance, a recombinant inbred line population (F6:7) was developed from the cross Zhenongda 7/PI 643302. The population was phenotyped for resistance to FHB in two experiments in China and four experiments in North Dakota. Accumulation of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol was determined in one experiment in China and two in North Dakota. Simplified composite interval mapping was performed on the whole genome level using the software MQTL. The QTL FHB-2 from PI 643302 for FHB resistance was found on the distal portion of chromosome 2HL in all six FHB screening environments. This QTL accounted for 14% of phenotypic variation over six environments and was not associated with heading date or plant height. The FHB resistance QTL FHB-2 detected near the end of chromosome 2HL is in a different location from those found previously and is therefore probably unique. Because the QTL was not contributed by the Chinese cultivar Zhenongda 7, it is likely a native QTL present in North American barley. The QTL FHB-2 represents the first reported QTL for native FHB resistance in North American germ plasm and has been given the provisional name Qrgz-2H-14. This QTL should be considered for pyramiding with other FHB QTL previously mapped.

  17. New perspective on glycoside hydrolase binding to lignin from pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Sammond, Deanne W.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Crowley, Michael F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2015-12-18

    Background: Non-specific binding of cellulases to lignin has been implicated as a major factor in the loss of cellulase activity during biomass conversion to sugars. It is believed that this binding may strongly impact process economics through loss of enzyme activities during hydrolysis and enzyme recycling scenarios. The current model suggests glycoside hydrolase activities are lost though non-specific/non-productive binding of carbohydrate-binding domains to lignin, limiting catalytic site access to the carbohydrate components of the cell wall. Results: In this study, we compared component enzyme affinities of a commercial Trichoderma reesei cellulase formulation, Cellic CTec2, towards extracted corn stover lignin using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and p-nitrophenyl substrate activities to monitor component binding, activity loss, and total protein binding. Protein binding was strongly affected by pH and ionic strength. β-D-glucosidases and xylanases, which do not have carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and are basic proteins, demonstrated the strongest binding at low ionic strength, suggesting that CBMs are not the dominant factor in enzyme adsorption to lignin. Despite strong adsorption to insoluble lignin, β-D-glucosidase and xylanase activities remained high, with process yields decreasing only 4–15 % depending on lignin concentration. Conclusion: We propose that specific enzyme adsorption to lignin from a mixture of biomass-hydrolyzing enzymes is a competitive affinity where β-D-glucosidases and xylanases can displace CBM interactions with lignin. Process parameters, such as temperature, pH, and salt concentration influence the individual enzymes’ affinity for lignin, and both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are responsible for this binding phenomenon. Moreover, our results suggest that concern regarding loss of critical cell wall degrading enzymes to lignin adsorption may be unwarranted when complex enzyme

  18. QTL mapping using high-throughput sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in plants dates to the 1980’s, but earlier studies were often hindered by the expense and time required to identify large numbers of polymorphic genetic markers that differentiated the parental genotypes and then to genotype them on large segregating mapping po...

  19. QTL analysis for sugar-regulated leaf senescence supports flowering-dependent and -independent senescence pathways.

    PubMed

    Wingler, Astrid; Purdy, Sarah Jane; Edwards, Sally-Anne; Chardon, Fabien; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2010-01-01

    *The aim of this work was to determine the genetic basis of sugar-regulated senescence and to explore the relationship with other traits, including flowering and nitrogen-use efficiency. *Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for senescence were mapped in the Arabidopsis Bay-0 x Shahdara recombinant-inbred line (RIL) population after growth on glucose-containing medium, which accelerates senescence. The extent of whole-rosette senescence was determined by imaging the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)). *A major QTL on the top of chromosome 4 colocalized with FRI, a major determinant of flowering. This QTL interacted epistatically with a QTL on chromosome 5, where the floral repressor FLC localizes. Vernalization accelerated senescence in late-flowering lines with functional FRI and FLC alleles. Comparison with previous results using the Bay-0 x Shahdara population showed that rapid rosette senescence on glucose-containing medium was correlated with early flowering and high sugar content in compost-grown plants. In addition, correlation was found between the expression of flowering and senescence-associated genes in Arabidopsis accessions. However, an additional QTL on chromosome 3 was not linked to flowering, but to nitrogen-use efficiency. *The results show that whole-rosette senescence is genetically linked to the vernalization-dependent control of flowering, but is also controlled by flowering-independent pathways.

  20. Mapping of QTL for Tolerance to Cereal Yellow Dwarf Virus in Two-rowed Spring Barley

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, L.; Falk, B. W.; Brown-Guedira, G.; Pellerin, E.; Dubcovsky, J.

    2016-01-01

    Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV-RPV) causes a serious viral disease affecting small grain crops around the world. In the United States, it frequently is present in California where it causes significant yield losses, and when infections start early in development, plant death. CYDV is transmitted by aphids, and it has been a major impediment to developing malting barley in California. To identify chromosome locations associated with tolerance/resistance to CYDV, a segregating population of 184 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) from a cross of the California adapted malting barley line Butta 12 with the CYDV tolerant Madre Selva was used to construct a genetic map including 180 polymorphic markers mapping to 163 unique loci. Tolerance to CYDV was evaluated in replicated experiments where plants were challenged by aphid mediated inoculation with the isolate CYDV-RPV in a controlled environment. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis revealed the presence of two major QTL for CYDV tolerance from Madre Selva on chromosomes 2H (Qcyd.MaBu-1) and 7H (Qcyd.MaBu-2), and 4 minor QTL from Butta 12 on chromosomes 3H, 4H, and 2H. This paper discusses the contribution of each QTL and their potential value to improve barley tolerance to CYDV. PMID:27212713

  1. Coordinated Genetic Regulation of Growth and Lignin Revealed by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of cDNA Microarray Data in an Interspecific Backcross of Eucalyptus1

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Matias; Myburg, Alexander A.; De León, José P.G.; Kirst, Mariana E.; Scott, Jay; Sederoff, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and transcript level (microarray) data from an interspecific backcross population of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus were integrated to dissect the genetic and metabolic network underlying growth variation. Transcript abundance, measured for 2,608 genes in the differentiating xylem of a 91 (E. grandis × E. globulus) × E. grandis backcross progeny was correlated with diameter variation, revealing coordinated down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis and associated methylation pathways in fast growing individuals. Lignin analysis of wood samples confirmed the content and quality predicted by the transcript levels measured on the microarrays. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of transcript levels of lignin-related genes showed that their mRNA abundance is regulated by two genetic loci, demonstrating coordinated genetic control over lignin biosynthesis. These two loci colocalize with QTLs for growth, suggesting that the same genomic regions are regulating growth, and lignin content and composition in the progeny. Genetic mapping of the lignin genes revealed that most of the key biosynthetic genes do not colocalize with growth and transcript level QTLs, with the exception of the locus encoding the enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthase. This study illustrates the power of integrating quantitative analysis of gene expression data and genetic map information to discover genetic and metabolic networks regulating complex biological traits. PMID:15299141

  2. Can genetic engineering of lignin deposition be accomplished without an unacceptable yield penalty?

    PubMed

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Chapple, Clint

    2013-04-01

    The secondary cell wall polymer lignin impedes the extraction of fermentable sugars from biomass, and has been one of the major impediments in the development of cost-effective biofuel technologies. Unfortunately, attempts to genetically engineer lignin biosynthesis frequently result in dwarfing or developmental abnormalities of unknown cause, thus limiting the benefits of increased fermentable sugar yield. In this brief review, we explore some of the possible mechanisms that could underlie this poorly understood phenomenon, with the expectation that an understanding of the cause of dwarfing in lignin biosynthetic mutants and transgenic plants could lead to new strategies for the development of improved bioenergy feedstocks.

  3. Fabrication of environmentally biodegradable lignin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Frangville, Camille; Rutkevičius, Marius; Richter, Alexander P; Velev, Orlin D; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2012-12-21

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The first method is based on precipitation of low-sulfonated lignin from an ethylene glycol solution by using diluted acidic aqueous solutions, which yields lignin NPs that are stable over a wide range of pH. The second approach is based on the acidic precipitation of lignin from a high-pH aqueous solution which produces NPs stable only at low pH. Our study reveals that lignin NPs from the ethylene glycol-based precipitation contain densely packed lignin domains which explain the stability of the NPs even at high pH. We characterised the properties of the produced lignin NPs and determined their loading capacities with hydrophilic actives. The results suggest that these NPs are highly porous and consist of smaller lignin domains. Tests with microalgae like Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and yeast incubated in lignin NP dispersions indicated that these NPs lack measurable effect on the viability of these microorganisms. Such biodegradable and environmentally compatible NPs can find applications as drug delivery vehicles, stabilisers of cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations, or in other areas where they may replace more expensive and potentially toxic nanomaterials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Biodegradable lignin/polyolefin composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kosikova, B.; Demjanova, V.; Mikulasova, M.; Lora, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    From the view point of environmental protection, the plastic wastes, especially from packing materials, represent a potential waste problem. Various approaches were examined to develop partially or completely biodegradable plastics. New type of partially biodegradable polyolefins was prepared by blending of polypropylene with lignin, which was recovered in the ALCELL process, an organosolv pulping process that uses ethanol-water as the delignifying agent. Films of blends with up to 10% wt ALCELL lignin, prepared in absence of commercial stabilizers, had acceptable mechanical strengths. The effect of lignin on biodegradability of the composite films was examined by comparison of behaviour of both pure and lignin containing films during treatment with fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. It was found that this fungus is able to grow and to produce lignolytic enzymes in the presence of the films containing lignin. Biodegradation of lignin in the composite film was confirmed by the releasing of lignin fragments into the extracellular fluid. Because of measurement of mechanical properties offers a mean of direct estimation of polymer degradation, the degree of biodegradation of the films tested was followed by monitoring of elongation at break. The changes of break at elongation in the course of enzymatic treatment revealed that the lignin/PP composite films are potentially environmentally nonpersisting. The micrographs of the lignin containing films obtained by scanning electron microscopy show the significant changes of the film surface upon degradation with Phanerochaete chrysosporium in contrast to unchanged lignin free film.

  5. Elicitor-Induced Spruce Stress Lignin (Structural Similarity to Early Developmental Lignins).

    PubMed Central

    Lange, B. M.; Lapierre, C.; Sandermann, H.

    1995-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Picea abies (L.) Karst released polymeric material into the culture medium when treated with an elicitor preparation from the spruce needle pathogen Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii. The presence of lignin (about 35%, w/w) was demonstrated by phloroglucinol/HCI reactivity and quantitation with thioglycolic acid. Carbohydrate (about 14%, w/w) and protein (about 32%, w/w) were also detected. Amino acid analysis revealed that hydroxyproline and proline predominated. Thioacidolysis and subsequent Raney nickel desulfurization allowed the analysis of lignin-building units and interunit bonds. Compared with spruce wood lignin, an approximately 20-fold higher relative amount of p-hydroxyphenyl units was determined. A high content of p-hydroxyphenyl units is typical for certain developmental lignins, such as conifer compression wood and middle lamella lignins, as well as all induced cell culture lignins so far analyzed. Cross-linkages of the pinoresinol type ([beta]-[beta]) in the excreted cell culture lignin were markedly increased, whereas [beta]-1 interunit linkages were decreased relative to spruce wood lignin. The amount and nature of cross-linkages were shown to be intermediate between those in wood lignin and in enzymatically prepared lignins. In summary, the elicitor-induced stress lignin was excreted as a lignin-extensin complex that closely resembled early developmental lignins. PMID:12228544

  6. Litter decay rates are determined by lignin chemistry

    Treesearch

    Jennifer M. Talbot; Daniel J. Yelle; James Nowick; Kathleen K. Treseder

    2011-01-01

    Litter decay rates are often correlated with the initial lignin:N or lignin:cellulose content of litter, suggesting that interactions between lignin and more labile compounds are important controls over litter decomposition. The chemical composition of lignin may influence these interactions, if lignin physically or chemically protects labile components from microbial...

  7. Metabolism of environmental chemicals by plants - copolymerization into lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Scheel, D.; Trenck, T.v.d.

    1983-01-01

    Plants have frequently been found to incorporate xenobiotics into ill-defined ''insoluble'' metabolite fractions. Evidence for the lignin nature of such fractions and for the formation of ''insoluble'' metabolite fractions in sterile plant cell cultures is summarized. In several cases, total ''insoluble'' plant metabolite fractions of pesticides were found to be excreted undigested by rats and sheep. Conclusive evidence for covalent incorporation of chemicals into lignin has only recently been obtained. In the case of herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and of the fungicide pentachlorophenol, the derived pesticide/lignin copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography in dimethylformamide, spectral methods, and chemical degradation. In independent studies, artificial lignin was prepared from coniferyl alcohol with the aid of peroxidase/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene quinones and chlorinated anilines could be copolymerized, and the resulting copolymer species were characterized with regard to size distribution and spectral properties. Detailed /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopic studies showed that a major mechanism of copolymerization of the anilines consisted of a nucleophilic addition to the benzylic ..cap alpha..-carbon of lignol quinone-methide intermediates. In addition, covalent linkages involving the aromatic rings were also formed. 61 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Mapping of angular leaf spot resistance QTL in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under different environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for human diet worldwide and the angular leaf spot (ALS) is one of the most devastating diseases of this crop, leading to yield losses as high as 80%. In an attempt to breed resistant cultivars, it is important to first understand the inheritance mode of resistance and to develop tools that could be used in assisted breeding. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling resistance to ALS under natural infection conditions in the field and under inoculated conditions in the greenhouse. Results QTL analyses were made using phenotypic data from 346 recombinant inbreed lines from the IAC-UNA x CAL 143 cross, gathered in three experiments, two of which were conducted in the field in different seasons and one in the greenhouse. Joint composite interval mapping analysis of QTL x environment interaction was performed. In all, seven QTLs were mapped on five linkage groups. Most of them, with the exception of two, were significant in all experiments. Among these, ALS10.1DG,UC presented major effects (R2 between 16% - 22%). This QTL was found linked to the GATS11b marker of linkage group B10, which was consistently amplified across a set of common bean lines and was associated with the resistance. Four new QTLs were identified. Between them the ALS5.2 showed an important effect (9.4%) under inoculated conditions in the greenhouse. ALS4.2 was another major QTL, under natural infection in the field, explaining 10.8% of the variability for resistance reaction. The other QTLs showed minor effects on resistance. Conclusions The results indicated a quantitative inheritance pattern of ALS resistance in the common bean line CAL 143. QTL x environment interactions were observed. Moreover, the major QTL identified on linkage group B10 could be important for bean breeding, as it was stable in all the environments. Thereby, the GATS11b marker is a potential tool

  9. Lignin phenols derivatives in lichens.

    PubMed

    Zavarzina, A G; Romankevich, E A; Peresypkin, V I; Ulyantzev, A S; Belyaev, N A; Zavarzin, A A

    2015-01-01

    Lignin monophenols have been measured in the cupric oxide oxidation products from lichens of different systematic groups. It is shown for the first time that syringyl structures in most lichens strongly dominate over vanillyl and p-hydroxyl ones (S/V 7-583, S/P 3-30). This distinguishes lichens from algae and mosses (p-hydroxyl phenols are dominant) and from higher plants (S/V ratios are from 0 in gymnosperms to 1.1-5.2 in angiosperms). Molecular ratios of phenols as well as the ratios of acids to aldehydes in lichens were different from lignin of higher plants, suggesting contribution of non-lignin phenols in CuO oxidation products. The contents of syringyl and vanillyl phenols in some lichen species were comparable to non-woody tissues of higher plants. Results of the study suggest that lichens can be important source of aromatic structures in soils and hydrosphere, particularly in the regions were lichens are abundant.

  10. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK(-1) , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m(-3) (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templatedmore » carbon.« less

  12. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-12-07

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure-property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon, are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Preparing spherical lignin from rice husk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxi; Zhao, Xu; Ding, Xuefeng; Lei, Hong; Wang, Zichen

    2013-08-01

    Lignin is one of the important branched amorphous polymers, which generally has the irregular and fractal morphology. The preparation of regular sphere of lignin needs long steps and special conditions. In this study, the regular sphere of lignin can be simply prepared from rice husk (RH) under certain conditions. Namely, RH is mixed with 35% ethanol aqueous solution in the proportion of 1:10 (g:mL), non-isothermally heated to 493 K and kept for 5 h. After filtration and air-drying at room temperature, the regular lignin sphere with the diameter of 100-400 nm is obtained. The regular sphere of lignin has the potential utilization in fields such as reactive functional materials, photo sensing materials and surface active materials in cosmetics. The mechanism of formation of the regular spherical lignin is proposed and discussed in this paper.

  14. Data-driven assessment of eQTL mapping methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) is a potentially powerful way to detect transcriptional regulatory relationships at the genomic scale. However, eQTL data sets often go underexploited because legacy QTL methods are used to map the relationship between the expression trait and genotype. Often these methods are inappropriate for complex traits such as gene expression, particularly in the case of epistasis. Results Here we compare legacy QTL mapping methods with several modern multi-locus methods and evaluate their ability to produce eQTL that agree with independent external data in a systematic way. We found that the modern multi-locus methods (Random Forests, sparse partial least squares, lasso, and elastic net) clearly outperformed the legacy QTL methods (Haley-Knott regression and composite interval mapping) in terms of biological relevance of the mapped eQTL. In particular, we found that our new approach, based on Random Forests, showed superior performance among the multi-locus methods. Conclusions Benchmarks based on the recapitulation of experimental findings provide valuable insight when selecting the appropriate eQTL mapping method. Our battery of tests suggests that Random Forests map eQTL that are more likely to be validated by independent data, when compared to competing multi-locus and legacy eQTL mapping methods. PMID:20849587

  15. Fractionation of hemp hurds by organosolv pretreatment and its effect on production of lignin and sugars.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Stefano; Ottolina, Gianluca; Consonni, Roberto; Riva, Sergio; Patel, Ilabahen

    2014-07-01

    Fractionation of hemp hurds into its three main components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, was carried out using organosolv pretreatment. The effect of processing parameters, such as temperature, catalyst concentration, reaction time, and methanol (MeOH) concentration, on the dissolution and recovery of hemicellulose and lignin was determined. More than 75% of total hemicellulose and 75% of total lignin was removed in a single step with low amounts of degradation products under the following conditions: 165 °C, 3% H2 SO4 , 20 min reaction time, and 45% MeOH. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual pretreated biomass yielded up to 60% of cellulose-to-glucose conversion. The maximum recovery of the main components was obtained at a combined severity factor value of around one. Characterization of pretreated biomass and isolated lignin was carried out with FTIR and 2D (13) C-(1) H correlation HSQC NMR spectroscopy, the latter technique providing detailed structural information about the obtained methanol organosolv lignin (MOSL). Results suggested that xylopyranoside is the major carbohydrate associated with hemp lignin. The chemical properties of MOSL samples in terms of their phenolic group content and antioxidant capacity were also investigated. The results showed that MOSL samples have a high phenolic group content and antioxidant capacity relative to Klason lignin.

  16. Spectroscopic Investigation of Lignin Linkages: UV and IR Signatures of Primary Dilignols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Jacob C.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Gord, Joseph R.; Biswas, Bidyut; Ramachandran, P. V.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-06-01

    Lignin is an abundant, aromatic biopolymer ubiquitous to all plant matter; its properties are vital to the structural rigidity of plants as well as protection of the cell wall from degradation. As the major structural framework for plants, the breakdown of lignin for harvestable biomass is a formidable challenge. At a fundamental level, the characterization of lignin sequences and structures lag far behind those of proteins. One of the unique aspects of lignin is that it is composed of only three monolignols which are themselves structurally similar, all of which are aromatic derivatives. The structural complexity of lignin is in large measure due to the unique variety of chemical linkages between these three sub-units. As a result, there is a need for spectroscopic characterization of individual lignin linkages, and for elucidating potential fragmentation pathways and the relative energetics associated with those linkages in the polymer network. In this light, spectroscopic interrogation of these dilignol bichromophores yield signatures characteristic of their specific linkages which can also be found in high-order lignin oligomers. The β-O-4 and β-β linkages have been studied and their UV and IR signatures have been uncovered on a single-conformation basis in a supersonic expansion by use of IR/UV-UV HB and RIDIR spectroscopy. Fragmentation following resonant two-photon ionization of the neutral species was also explored and evidence for linkage-specific fragmentation has been revealed.

  17. Conversion of lignin into value-added materials and chemicals via laccase-assisted copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Cannatelli, Mark D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-19

    With today’s environmental concerns and the diminishing supply of the world’s petroleum-based chemicals and materials, much focus has been directed toward alternative sources. Woody biomass presents a promising option due to its sheer abundance, renewability, and biodegradability. Lignin, a highly irregular polyphenolic compound, is one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass and is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth, surpassed only by cellulose. The pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol industries produce lignin on the scale of millions of tons each year as a by-product. Traditionally, lignin has been viewed as a waste material and burned as an inefficient fuel. However, in recent decades, research has focused on more economical ways to convert lignin into value-added commodities, such as biofuels, biomaterials, and biochemicals, thus developing and strengthening the concept of fully integrated biorefineries. Owing to the phenolic structure of lignin, it is possible to enzymatically graft molecules onto its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) to create exciting novel biomaterials. These environmentally friendly enzymes use oxygen as their only co-substrate and produce water as their sole by-product, and have thus found great industrial application. Furthermore, this mini-review highlights recent advances in the field of laccase-facilitated functionalization of lignin as well as promising future directions for lignin-based polymers.

  18. Conversion of lignin into value-added materials and chemicals via laccase-assisted copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Cannatelli, Mark D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-19

    With today’s environmental concerns and the diminishing supply of the world’s petroleum-based chemicals and materials, much focus has been directed toward alternative sources. Woody biomass presents a promising option due to its sheer abundance, renewability, and biodegradability. Lignin, a highly irregular polyphenolic compound, is one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass and is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth, surpassed only by cellulose. The pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol industries produce lignin on the scale of millions of tons each year as a by-product. Traditionally, lignin has been viewed as a waste material and burned as an inefficient fuel. However, in recent decades, research has focused on more economical ways to convert lignin into value-added commodities, such as biofuels, biomaterials, and biochemicals, thus developing and strengthening the concept of fully integrated biorefineries. Owing to the phenolic structure of lignin, it is possible to enzymatically graft molecules onto its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) to create exciting novel biomaterials. These environmentally friendly enzymes use oxygen as their only co-substrate and produce water as their sole by-product, and have thus found great industrial application. Furthermore, this mini-review highlights recent advances in the field of laccase-facilitated functionalization of lignin as well as promising future directions for lignin-based polymers.

  19. Conversion of lignin into value-added materials and chemicals via laccase-assisted copolymerization

    DOE PAGES

    Cannatelli, Mark D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-19

    With today’s environmental concerns and the diminishing supply of the world’s petroleum-based chemicals and materials, much focus has been directed toward alternative sources. Woody biomass presents a promising option due to its sheer abundance, renewability, and biodegradability. Lignin, a highly irregular polyphenolic compound, is one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass and is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth, surpassed only by cellulose. The pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol industries produce lignin on the scale of millions of tons each year as a by-product. Traditionally, lignin has been viewed as a waste material and burned asmore » an inefficient fuel. However, in recent decades, research has focused on more economical ways to convert lignin into value-added commodities, such as biofuels, biomaterials, and biochemicals, thus developing and strengthening the concept of fully integrated biorefineries. Owing to the phenolic structure of lignin, it is possible to enzymatically graft molecules onto its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) to create exciting novel biomaterials. These environmentally friendly enzymes use oxygen as their only co-substrate and produce water as their sole by-product, and have thus found great industrial application. Furthermore, this mini-review highlights recent advances in the field of laccase-facilitated functionalization of lignin as well as promising future directions for lignin-based polymers.« less

  20. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites.

  1. Conversion of lignin into value-added materials and chemicals via laccase-assisted copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Cannatelli, Mark D; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2016-10-01

    With today's environmental concerns and the diminishing supply of the world's petroleum-based chemicals and materials, much focus has been directed toward alternative sources. Woody biomass presents a promising option due to its sheer abundance, renewability, and biodegradability. Lignin, a highly irregular polyphenolic compound, is one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass and is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth, surpassed only by cellulose. The pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol industries produce lignin on the scale of millions of tons each year as a by-product. Traditionally, lignin has been viewed as a waste material and burned as an inefficient fuel. However, in recent decades, research has focused on more economical ways to convert lignin into value-added commodities, such as biofuels, biomaterials, and biochemicals, thus developing and strengthening the concept of fully integrated biorefineries. Owing to the phenolic structure of lignin, it is possible to enzymatically graft molecules onto its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) to create exciting novel biomaterials. These environmentally friendly enzymes use oxygen as their only co-substrate and produce water as their sole by-product, and have thus found great industrial application. This mini-review highlights recent advances in the field of laccase-facilitated functionalization of lignin as well as promising future directions for lignin-based polymers.

  2. Self-similar multiscale structure of lignin revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker; Heller, William T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Lignin, a major polymeric component of plant cell walls, forms aggregates in vivo and poses a barrier to cellulosic ethanol production. Here, neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that lignin aggregates are characterized by a surface fractal dimension that is invariant under change of scale from 1 1000 A. The simulations also reveal extensive water penetration of the aggregates and heterogeneous chain dynamics corresponding to a rigid core with a fluid surface.

  3. Radical nature of C- lignin

    Treesearch

    Laura Berstis; Thomas Elder; Michael Crowley; Gregg T. Beckham

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered lignin composed of caffeoyl alcohol monolignols or C-lignin is particularly intriguing given its homogeneous, linear polymeric structure and exclusive benzodioxane linkage between monomers. By virtue of this simplified chemistry, the potential emerges for improved valorization strategies with C-lignin relative to other natural heterogeneous...

  4. Efficiency of Lignin Biosynthesis: a Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    AMTHOR, JEFFREY S.

    2003-01-01

    Lignin is derived mainly from three alcohol monomers: p‐coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol. Biochemical reactions probably responsible for synthesizing these three monomers from sucrose, and then polymerizing the monomers into lignin, were analysed to estimate the amount of sucrose required to produce a unit of lignin. Included in the calculations were amounts of respiration required to provide NADPH (from NADP+) and ATP (from ADP) for lignin biosynthesis. Two pathways in the middle stage of monomer biosynthesis were considered: one via tyrosine (found in monocots) and the other via phenylalanine (found in all plants). If lignin biosynthesis proceeds with high efficiency via tyrosine, 76·9, 70·4 and 64·3 % of the carbon in sucrose can be retained in the fraction of lignin derived from p‐coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol, respectively. The corresponding carbon retention values for lignin biosynthesis via phenylalanine are less, at 73·2, 65·7 and 60·7 %, respectively. Energy (i.e. heat of combustion) retention during lignin biosynthesis via tyrosine could be as high as 81·6, 74·5 and 67·8 % for lignin derived from p‐coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol, respectively, with the corresponding potential energy retention values for lignin biosynthesis via phenylalanine being less, at 77·7, 69·5 and 63·9 %, respectively. Whether maximum efficiency occurs in situ is unclear, but these values are targets that can be considered in: (1) plant breeding programmes aimed at maximizing carbon or energy retention from photosynthate; (2) analyses of (minimum) metabolic costs of responding to environmental change or pest attack involving increased lignin biosynthesis; (3) understanding costs of lignification in older tissues; and (4) interpreting carbon balance measurements of organs and plants with large lignin concentrations. PMID:12714366

  5. A comprehensive meta-analysis of plant morphology, yield, stay-green, and virus disease resistance QTL in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Xu, Jing; Deng, Dexiang; Ding, Haidong; Bian, Yunlong; Yin, Zhitong; Wu, Yarong; Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Ye

    2016-02-01

    The meta-QTL and candidate genes will facilitate the elucidation of molecular bases underlying agriculturally important traits and open new avenues for functional markers development and elite alleles introgression in maize breeding program. A large number of QTLs attributed to grain productivity and other agriculturally important traits have been identified and deposited in public repositories. The integration of fruitful QTL becomes a major issue in current plant genomics. To this end, we first collected QTL for six agriculturally important traits in maize, including yield, plant height, ear height, leaf angle, stay-green, and maize rough dwarf disease resistance. The meta-analysis method was then employed to retrieve 113 meta-QTL. Additionally, we also isolated candidate genes for target traits by the bioinformatic technique. Several candidates, including some well-characterized genes, GA3ox2 for plant height, lg1 and lg4 for leaf angle, zfl1 and zfl2 for flowering time, were co-localized with established meta-QTL intervals. Intriguingly, in a relatively narrow meta-QTL region, the maize ortholog of rice yield-related gene GW8/OsSPL16 was believed to be a candidate for yield. Leveraging results presented in this study will provide further insights into the genetic architecture of maize agronomic traits. Moreover, the meta-QTL and candidate genes reported here could be harnessed for the enhancement of stress tolerance and yield performance in maize and translation to other crops.

  6. Detection and replication of QTL underlying resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in adult sheep using the ovine 50K SNP array.

    PubMed

    Atlija, Marina; Arranz, Juan-Jose; Martinez-Valladares, María; Gutiérrez-Gil, Beatriz

    2016-01-20

    Persistence of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection and the related control methods have major impacts on the sheep industry worldwide. Based on the information generated with the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip (50 K chip), this study aims at confirming quantitative trait loci (QTL) that were previously identified by microsatellite-based genome scans and identifying new QTL and allelic variants that are associated with indicator traits of parasite resistance in adult sheep. We used a commercial half-sib population of 518 Spanish Churra ewes with available data for fecal egg counts (FEC) and serum levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) to perform different genome scan QTL mapping analyses based on classical linkage analysis (LA), a combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis (LDLA) and a genome-wide association study (GWAS). For the FEC and IgA traits, we detected a total of three 5 % chromosome-wise significant QTL by LA and 63 significant regions by LDLA, of which 13 reached the 5 % genome-wise significance level. The GWAS also revealed 10 significant SNPs associated with IgAt, although no significant associations were found for LFEC. Some of the significant QTL for LFEC that were detected by LA and LDLA on OAR6 overlapped with a highly significant QTL that was previously detected in a different half-sib population of Churra sheep. In addition, several new QTL and SNP associations were identified, some of which show correspondence with effects that were reported for different populations of young sheep. Other significant associations that did not coincide with previously reported associations could be related to the specific immune response of adult animals. Our results replicate a FEC-related QTL located on OAR6 that was previously reported in Churra sheep and provide support for future research on the identification of the allelic variant that underlies this QTL. The small proportion of genetic variance explained by the detected QTL and the large number of

  7. Lignin Analysis by HPLC and FTIR.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Rivera, Jorge; Terrazas, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is a simple non-destructive technique which allows the user to obtain quick and accurate information about the structure of the constituents of wood. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is an analytical technique useful to determine the ratio of the lignin monomers obtained by the alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation method. Furthermore, lignin content has been commonly determined by wet chemical methods; Klason lignin determination is a quick and accessible method. Here, we detail the procedures for chemical analysis of the wood lignin using these techniques.

  8. Genetic mapping of a QTL controlling source-sink size and heading date in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaodeng; Sun, Bin; Lin, Zechuan; Gao, Zhiqiang; Yu, Ping; Liu, Qunen; Shen, Xihong; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Daibo; Cheng, Shihua; Cao, Liyong

    2015-10-25

    Source size, sink size and heading date (HD) are three important classes of traits that determine the productivity of rice. In this study, a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross between an elite indica line Big Grain1 (BG1) and a japonica line Xiaolijing (XLJ) were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for source-sink size and heading date. Totally, thirty-one QTLs for source size, twenty-two for sink size, four for heading date and seven QTL clusters which included QTLs for multiple traits were identified in three environmental trials. Thirty QTLs could be consistently detected in at least two trials and generally located in the clusters. Using a set of BC4F2 lines, the QTL cluster in C5-1-C5-2 on chromosome 5 was validated to be a major QTL pleiotropically affecting heading date, source size (flag leaf area) and panicle type (neck length of panicle, primary branching number and the ratio of secondary branching number to primary branching number), and was narrowed down to a 309.52Kb region. QTL clusters described above have a large effect on source-sink size and/or heading date, therefore they should be good resources to improve the adaptability and high yield potential of cultivars genetically.

  9. Identification of Novel QTL Governing Root Architectural Traits in an Interspecific Soybean Population

    PubMed Central

    Musket, Theresa A.; Chaky, Julian; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Vuong, Tri D.; Song, Li; Cregan, Perry B.; Nelson, James C.; Shannon, J. Grover; Specht, James E.; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2015-01-01

    Cultivated soybean (Glycine max L.) cv. Dunbar (PI 552538) and wild G. soja (PI 326582A) exhibited significant differences in root architecture and root-related traits. In this study, phenotypic variability for root traits among 251 BC2F5 backcross inbred lines (BILs) developed from the cross Dunbar/PI 326582A were identified. The root systems of the parents and BILs were evaluated in controlled environmental conditions using a cone system at seedling stage. The G. max parent Dunbar contributed phenotypically favorable alleles at a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 8 (Satt315-I locus) that governed root traits (tap root length and lateral root number) and shoot length. This QTL accounted for >10% of the phenotypic variation of both tap root and shoot length. This QTL region was found to control various shoot- and root-related traits across soybean genetic backgrounds. Within the confidence interval of this region, eleven transcription factors (TFs) were identified. Based on RNA sequencing and Affymetrix expression data, key TFs including MYB, AP2-EREBP and bZIP TFs were identified in this QTL interval with high expression in roots and nodules. The backcross inbred lines with different parental allelic combination showed different expression pattern for six transcription factors selected based on their expression pattern in root tissues. It appears that the marker interval Satt315–I locus on chromosome 8 contain an essential QTL contributing to early root and shoot growth in soybean. PMID:25756528

  10. QTL detection power of multi-parental RIL populations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Klasen, J R; Piepho, H-P; Stich, B

    2012-06-01

    A major goal of today's biology is to understand the genetic basis of quantitative traits. This can be achieved by statistical methods that evaluate the association between molecular marker variation and phenotypic variation in different types of mapping populations. The objective of this work was to evaluate the statistical power of quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection of various multi-parental mating designs, as well as to assess the reasons for the observed differences. Our study was based on an empirical data of 20 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, which have been selected to capture the maximum genetic diversity. The examined mating designs differed strongly with respect to the statistical power to detect QTL. We observed the highest power to detect QTL for the diallel cross with random mating design. The results of our study suggested that performing sibling mating within subpopulations of joint-linkage mapping populations has the potential to considerably increase the power for QTL detection. Our results, however, revealed that using designs in which more than two parental alleles segregate in each subpopulation increases the power even more.

  11. QTL detection by multi-parent linkage mapping in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Billotte, N; Jourjon, M F; Marseillac, N; Berger, A; Flori, A; Asmady, H; Adon, B; Singh, R; Nouy, B; Potier, F; Cheah, S C; Rohde, W; Ritter, E; Courtois, B; Charrier, A; Mangin, B

    2010-05-01

    A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis designed for a multi-parent population was carried out and tested in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.), which is a diploid cross-fertilising perennial species. A new extension of the MCQTL package was especially designed for crosses between heterozygous parents. The algorithm, which is now available for any allogamous species, was used to perform and compare two types of QTL search for small size families, within-family analysis and across-family analysis, using data from a 2 x 2 complete factorial mating experiment involving four parents from three selected gene pools. A consensus genetic map of the factorial design was produced using 251 microsatellite loci, the locus of the Sh major gene controlling fruit shell presence, and an AFLP marker of that gene. A set of 76 QTLs involved in 24 quantitative phenotypic traits was identified. A comparison of the QTL detection results showed that the across-family analysis proved to be efficient due to the interconnected families, but the family size issue is just partially solved. The identification of QTL markers for small progeny numbers and for marker-assisted selection strategies is discussed.

  12. QTL detection by multi-parent linkage mapping in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    PubMed Central

    Jourjon, M. F.; Marseillac, N.; Berger, A.; Flori, A.; Asmady, H.; Adon, B.; Singh, R.; Nouy, B.; Potier, F.; Cheah, S. C.; Rohde, W.; Ritter, E.; Courtois, B.; Charrier, A.; Mangin, B.

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis designed for a multi-parent population was carried out and tested in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.), which is a diploid cross-fertilising perennial species. A new extension of the MCQTL package was especially designed for crosses between heterozygous parents. The algorithm, which is now available for any allogamous species, was used to perform and compare two types of QTL search for small size families, within-family analysis and across-family analysis, using data from a 2 × 2 complete factorial mating experiment involving four parents from three selected gene pools. A consensus genetic map of the factorial design was produced using 251 microsatellite loci, the locus of the Sh major gene controlling fruit shell presence, and an AFLP marker of that gene. A set of 76 QTLs involved in 24 quantitative phenotypic traits was identified. A comparison of the QTL detection results showed that the across-family analysis proved to be efficient due to the interconnected families, but the family size issue is just partially solved. The identification of QTL markers for small progeny numbers and for marker-assisted selection strategies is discussed. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1284-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20182696

  13. Multiple QTL Determine Dorsal Abdominal Scale Patterns in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akio; Tsuda, Yoshio; Takagi, Masahiro; Higa, Yukiko; Severson, David W

    2016-09-01

    The mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.) originated in Sub-Saharan Africa as a dark form sylvan species (A. aegypti formosus). Evolution of A. aegypti aegypti type form as a human commensal facilitated its colonization of most semitropical and tropical areas. We investigated the genetic basis for abdominal white scale presence that represents the diagnostic for sylvan A. aegypti formosus (scales absent), from type form (scales present) and A. aegypti queenslandensis form (dense scaling). We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 3 criteria for scale patterns among 192 F1 intercross progeny from matings between a queenslandensis type and an aegypti type form. Results identified 3 QTL determining scale patterns and indicated that classification criteria impact robustness of QTL LOD support. Dark- and light-colored forms exist in sympatry, but vary in multiple phenotypic characteristics, including preferences for vertebrate host, oviposition container, house-entering behavior, and dengue vector competence. Markers associated with 2 QTL regions reflected major reductions in recombination frequencies compared with the standard type form linkage map, suggestive of inversion polymorphisms associated with observed linkage disequilibrium between type-specific characteristics. Understanding the genic basis for differences in A. aegypti forms could inform efforts to develop new mosquito and arboviral disease control strategies. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A New Method to Infer Causal Phenotype Networks Using QTL and Phenotypic Information

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huange; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of genetics and breeding research on multiple phenotypic traits, reconstructing the directional or causal structure between phenotypic traits is a prerequisite for quantifying the effects of genetic interventions on the traits. Current approaches mainly exploit the genetic effects at quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to learn about causal relationships among phenotypic traits. A requirement for using these approaches is that at least one unique QTL has been identified for each trait studied. However, in practice, especially for molecular phenotypes such as metabolites, this prerequisite is often not met due to limited sample sizes, high noise levels and small QTL effects. Here, we present a novel heuristic search algorithm called the QTL+phenotype supervised orientation (QPSO) algorithm to infer causal directions for edges in undirected phenotype networks. The two main advantages of this algorithm are: first, it does not require QTLs for each and every trait; second, it takes into account associated phenotypic interactions in addition to detected QTLs when orienting undirected edges between traits. We evaluate and compare the performance of QPSO with another state-of-the-art approach, the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG) algorithm. Simulation results show that our method has broader applicability and leads to more accurate overall orientations. We also illustrate our method with a real-life example involving 24 metabolites and a few major QTLs measured on an association panel of 93 tomato cultivars. Matlab source code implementing the proposed algorithm is freely available upon request. PMID:25144184

  15. A new method to infer causal phenotype networks using QTL and phenotypic information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huange; van Eeuwijk, Fred A

    2014-01-01

    In the context of genetics and breeding research on multiple phenotypic traits, reconstructing the directional or causal structure between phenotypic traits is a prerequisite for quantifying the effects of genetic interventions on the traits. Current approaches mainly exploit the genetic effects at quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to learn about causal relationships among phenotypic traits. A requirement for using these approaches is that at least one unique QTL has been identified for each trait studied. However, in practice, especially for molecular phenotypes such as metabolites, this prerequisite is often not met due to limited sample sizes, high noise levels and small QTL effects. Here, we present a novel heuristic search algorithm called the QTL+phenotype supervised orientation (QPSO) algorithm to infer causal directions for edges in undirected phenotype networks. The two main advantages of this algorithm are: first, it does not require QTLs for each and every trait; second, it takes into account associated phenotypic interactions in addition to detected QTLs when orienting undirected edges between traits. We evaluate and compare the performance of QPSO with another state-of-the-art approach, the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG) algorithm. Simulation results show that our method has broader applicability and leads to more accurate overall orientations. We also illustrate our method with a real-life example involving 24 metabolites and a few major QTLs measured on an association panel of 93 tomato cultivars. Matlab source code implementing the proposed algorithm is freely available upon request.

  16. QTL involved in the modification of cyanidin compounds in black and red raspberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Bushakra, J M; Krieger, C; Deng, D; Stephens, M J; Allan, A C; Storey, R; Symonds, V V; Stevenson, D; McGhie, T; Chagné, D; Buck, E J; Gardiner, S E

    2013-03-01

    Fruit from Rubus species are highly valued for their flavor and nutritive qualities. Anthocyanin content contributes to these qualities, and although many studies have been conducted to identify and quantify the major anthocyanin compounds from various Rubus species, the genetic control of the accumulation of these complex traits in Rubus is not yet well understood. The identification of the regions of the genome involved in the production of anthocyanins is an important first step in identifying the genes underlying their expression. In this study, ultra and high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC and HPLC) and two newly developed Rubus linkage maps were used to conduct QTL analyses to explore the presence of associations between concentrations of five anthocyanins in fruit and genotype. In total, 27 QTL were identified on the Rubus linkage maps, four of which are associated with molecular markers designed from transcription factors and three of which are associated with molecular markers designed from anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway candidate genes. The results of this study suggest that, while QTL for anthocyanin accumulation have been identified on six of seven Rubus linkage groups (RLG), the QTL on RLG2 and RLG7 may be very important for genetic control of cyanidin modification in Rubus.

  17. AraQTL - workbench and archive for systems genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nijveen, Harm; Ligterink, Wilco; Keurentjes, Joost J B; Loudet, Olivier; Long, Jiao; Sterken, Mark G; Prins, Pjotr; Hilhorst, Henk W; de Ridder, Dick; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, Basten L

    2017-03-01

    Genetical genomics studies uncover genome-wide genetic interactions between genes and their transcriptional regulators. High-throughput measurement of gene expression in recombinant inbred line populations has enabled investigation of the genetic architecture of variation in gene expression. This has the potential to enrich our understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected by and underlying natural variation. Moreover, it contributes to the systems biology of natural variation, as a substantial number of experiments have resulted in a valuable amount of interconnectable phenotypic, molecular and genotypic data. A number of genetical genomics studies have been published for Arabidopsis thaliana, uncovering many expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). However, these complex data are not easily accessible to the plant research community, leaving most of the valuable genetic interactions unexplored as cross-analysis of these studies is a major effort. We address this problem with AraQTL (http://www.bioinformatics.nl/Ara QTL/), an easily accessible workbench and database for comparative analysis and meta-analysis of all published Arabidopsis eQTL datasets. AraQTL provides a workbench for comparing, re-using and extending upon the results of these experiments. For example, one can easily screen a physical region for specific local eQTLs that could harbour candidate genes for phenotypic QTLs, or detect gene-by-environment interactions by comparing eQTLs under different conditions.

  18. New Insights on Eggplant/Tomato/Pepper Synteny and Identification of Eggplant and Pepper Orthologous QTL

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Riccardo; Van Deynze, Allen; Portis, Ezio; Rotino, Giuseppe L.; Toppino, Laura; Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lanteri, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant, pepper, and tomato are the most exploited berry-producing vegetables within the Solanaceae family. Their genomes differ in size, but each has 12 chromosomes which have undergone rearrangements causing a redistribution of loci. The genome sequences of all three species are available but differ in coverage, assembly quality and percentage of anchorage. Determining their syntenic relationship and QTL orthology will contribute to exploit genomic resources and genetic data for key agronomic traits. The syntenic analysis between tomato and pepper based on the alignment of 34,727 tomato CDS to the pepper genome sequence, identified 19,734 unique hits. The resulting synteny map confirmed the 14 inversions and 10 translocations previously documented, but also highlighted 3 new translocations and 4 major new inversions. Furthermore, each of the 12 chromosomes exhibited a number of rearrangements involving small regions of 0.5–0.7 Mbp. Due to high fragmentation of the publicly available eggplant genome sequence, physical localization of most eggplant QTL was not possible, thus, we compared the organization of the eggplant genetic map with the genome sequence of both tomato and pepper. The eggplant/tomato syntenic map confirmed all the 10 translocations but only 9 of the 14 known inversions; on the other hand, a newly detected inversion was recognized while another one was not confirmed. The eggplant/pepper syntenic map confirmed 10 translocations and 8 inversions already detected and suggested a putative new translocation. In order to perform the assessment of eggplant and pepper QTL orthology, the eggplant and pepper sequence-based markers located in their respective genetic map were aligned onto the pepper genome. GBrowse in pepper was used as reference platform for QTL positioning. A set of 151 pepper QTL were located as well as 212 eggplant QTL, including 76 major QTL (PVE ≥ 10%) affecting key agronomic traits. Most were confirmed to cluster in orthologous

  19. QTL, additive and epistatic effects for SCN resistance in PI 437654.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Blake, Sean; Sleper, David A; Shannon, J Grover; Cregan, Perry; Nguyen, Henry T

    2009-04-01

    PI 437654 is a unique accession because of its resistance to nearly all HG types (races) of soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe; SCN). Objectives of this study were to confirm and refine the locations and gene action associated with SCN resistance previously discovered in PI 437654, and to identify new QTLs that may have been missed because of low coverage with genetic markers used in previous studies. Using 205 F(7:9) RILs and 276 SSR and AFLP molecular markers covering 2,406.5 cM of 20 linkage groups (LGs), we confirmed and refined the locations of major SCN resistance QTLs on LG-A2, -B1, and -G previously identified in PI 437654 or other resistant sources. We found that these major QTLs have epistatic effects among them or with other loci for SCN resistance. We also detected some new QTLs with additive or epistatic effects for SCN resistance to different HG types (races) on all LGs except LGs-B2 and -D1b. The QTL on LG-G was associated with resistance to HG types 2.5.7, 1.2.5.7, 0, and 2.7 (races 1, 2, 3, and 5), and it contributed a large proportion of the additive effects. The QTL on LG-A2 was associated with resistance to HG types 2.5.7 and 0 (races 1 and 3). The QTL on LG-B1, associated with resistance to HG types 2.5.7, 0, 2.7 (races 1, 3, and 5), was the similar QTL found in PI 90763 and PI 404198B. In addition to QTL on LGs-A2, -B1 and -G, a novel additive QTL associated with SCN resistance to HG types 0, 2.7, and 1.3.5.6.7 (race 3, 5, and 14) was identified on LG-I flanked by Sat_299 and Sat_189. Several minor QTLs on LGs-C1, D1a, H, and K were also found to be associated with SCN resistance. Confirmation of the new resistance QTL is underway by evaluating another RIL population with a different genetic background.

  20. Lignin phenols used to infer organic matter sources to Sepetiba Bay - RJ, Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, C. E.; Pfeiffer, W. C.; Martinelli, L. A.; Tsamakis, E.; Hedges, J. I.; Keil, R. G.

    2010-04-01

    Lignin phenols were measured in the sediments of Sepitiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in bedload sediments and suspended sediments of the four major fluvial inputs to the bay; São Francisco and Guandu Channels and the Guarda and Cação Rivers. Fluvial suspended lignin yields (Σ8 3.5-14.6 mgC 10 g dw -1) vary little between the wet and dry seasons and are poorly correlated with fluvial chlorophyll concentrations (0.8-50.2 μgC L -1). Despite current land use practices that favor grassland agriculture or industrial uses, fluvial lignin compositions are dominated by a degraded leaf-sourced material. The exception is the Guarda River, which has a slight influence from grasses. The Lignin Phenol Vegetation Index, coupled with acid/aldehyde and 3.5 Db/V ratios, indicate that degraded leaf-derived phenols are also the primary preserved lignin component in the bay. The presence of fringe Typha sp. and Spartina sp. grass beds surrounding portions of the Bay are not reflected in the lignin signature. Instead, lignin entering the bay appears to reflect the erosion of soils containing a degraded signature from the former Atlantic rain forest that once dominated the watershed, instead of containing a significant signature derived from current agricultural uses. A three-component mixing model using the LPVI, atomic N:C ratios, and stable carbon isotopes (which range between -26.8 and -21.8‰) supports the hypothesis that fluvial inputs to the bay are dominated by planktonic matter (78% of the input), with lignin dominated by leaf (14% of the input) over grass (6%). Sediments are composed of a roughly 50-50 mixture of autochthonous material and terrigenous material, with lignin being primarily sourced from leaf.

  1. Advances in Bayesian Multiple QTL Mapping in Experimental Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nengjun; Shriner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Many complex human diseases and traits of biological and/or economic importance are determined by interacting networks of multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) and environmental factors. Mapping QTL is critical for understanding the genetic basis of complex traits, and for ultimate identification of responsible genes. A variety of sophisticated statistical methods for QTL mapping have been developed. Among these developments, the evolution of Bayesian approaches for multiple QTL mapping over the past decade has been remarkable. Bayesian methods can jointly infer the number of QTL, their genomic positions, and their genetic effects. Here, we review recently developed and still developing Bayesian methods and associated computer software for mapping multiple QTL in experimental crosses. We compare and contrast these methods to clearly describe the relationships among different Bayesian methods. We conclude this review by highlighting some areas of future research. PMID:17987056

  2. Integrated Metabolo-Transcriptomics Reveals Fusarium Head Blight Candidate Resistance Genes in Wheat QTL-Fhb2

    PubMed Central

    Dhokane, Dhananjay; Karre, Shailesh; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C.; McCartney, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Background Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium graminearum not only causes severe losses in yield, but also reduces quality of wheat grain by accumulating mycotoxins. Breeding for host plant resistance is considered as the best strategy to manage FHB. Resistance in wheat to FHB is quantitative in nature, involving cumulative effects of many genes governing resistance. The poor understanding of genetics and lack of precise phenotyping has hindered the development of FHB resistant cultivars. Though more than 100 QTLs imparting FHB resistance have been reported, none discovered the specific genes localized within the QTL region, nor the underlying mechanisms of resistance. Findings In our study recombinant inbred lines (RILs) carrying resistant (R-RIL) and susceptible (S-RIL) alleles of QTL-Fhb2 were subjected to metabolome and transcriptome profiling to discover the candidate genes. Metabolome profiling detected a higher abundance of metabolites belonging to phenylpropanoid, lignin, glycerophospholipid, flavonoid, fatty acid, and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways in R-RIL than in S-RIL. Transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of several receptor kinases, transcription factors, signaling, mycotoxin detoxification and resistance related genes. The dissection of QTL-Fhb2 using flanking marker sequences, integrating metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets, identified 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL), callose synthase (CS), basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH041) transcription factor, glutathione S-transferase (GST), ABC transporter-4 (ABC4) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) as putative resistance genes localized within the QTL-Fhb2 region. Conclusion Some of the identified genes within the QTL region are associated with structural resistance through cell wall reinforcement, reducing the spread of pathogen through rachis within a spike and few other genes that detoxify DON, the virulence factor, thus eventually reducing disease severity. In conclusion, we

  3. Linkage disequilibrium with linkage analysis of multiline crosses reveals different multiallelic QTL for hybrid performance in the flint and dent heterotic groups of maize.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Héloïse; Lehermeier, Christina; Bauer, Eva; Falque, Matthieu; Segura, Vincent; Bauland, Cyril; Camisan, Christian; Campo, Laura; Meyer, Nina; Ranc, Nicolas; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Flament, Pascal; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Menz, Monica; Moreno-González, Jesús; Ouzunova, Milena; Charcosset, Alain; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Moreau, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Multiparental designs combined with dense genotyping of parents have been proposed as a way to increase the diversity and resolution of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies, using methods combining linkage disequilibrium information with linkage analysis (LDLA). Two new nested association mapping designs adapted to European conditions were derived from the complementary dent and flint heterotic groups of maize (Zea mays L.). Ten biparental dent families (N = 841) and 11 biparental flint families (N = 811) were genotyped with 56,110 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and evaluated as test crosses with the central line of the reciprocal design for biomass yield, plant height, and precocity. Alleles at candidate QTL were defined as (i) parental alleles, (ii) haplotypic identity by descent, and (iii) single-marker groupings. Between five and 16 QTL were detected depending on the model, trait, and genetic group considered. In the flint design, a major QTL (R(2) = 27%) with pleiotropic effects was detected on chromosome 10, whereas other QTL displayed milder effects (R(2) < 10%). On average, the LDLA models detected more QTL but generally explained lower percentages of variance, consistent with the fact that most QTL display complex allelic series. Only 15% of the QTL were common to the two designs. A joint analysis of the two designs detected between 15 and 21 QTL for the five traits. Of these, between 27 for silking date and 41% for tasseling date were significant in both groups. Favorable allelic effects detected in both groups open perspectives for improving biomass production. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Synergistic enzymatic and microbial lignin conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Cheng; Xie, Shangxian; Pu, Yunqiao; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2015-10-02

    We represent the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and chemicals and it's one of the most imminent challenges in modern biorefineries. However, bioconversion of lignin is highly challenging due to its recalcitrant nature as a phenolic heteropolymer. This study addressed the challenges by revealing the chemical and biological mechanisms for synergistic lignin degradation by a bacterial and enzymatic system, which significantly improved lignin consumption, cell growth and lipid yield. The Rhodococcus opacus cell growth increased exponentially in response to the level of laccase treatment, indicating the synergy between laccase and bacterial cells in lignin degradation. Other treatments like iron and hydrogen peroxide showed limited impact on cell growth. Chemical analysis of lignin under various treatments further confirmed the synergy between laccase and cells at the chemical level. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) suggested that laccase, R. opacus cell and Fenton reaction reagents promoted the degradation of different types of lignin functional groups, elucidating the chemical basis for the synergistic effects. 31P NMR further revealed that laccase treatment had the most significant impact for degrading the abundant chemical groups. The results were further confirmed by the molecular weight analysis and lignin quantification by the Prussian blue assay. The cell–laccase fermentation led to a 17-fold increase of lipid production. Overall, the study indicated that laccase and R. opacus can synergize to degrade lignin efficiently, likely through rapid utilization of monomers generated by laccase to promote the reaction toward depolymerization. The study provided a potential path for more efficient lignin conversion and development of consolidated lignin conversion.

  5. Synergistic enzymatic and microbial lignin conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Cheng; Xie, Shangxian; Pu, Yunqiao; ...

    2015-10-02

    We represent the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and chemicals and it's one of the most imminent challenges in modern biorefineries. However, bioconversion of lignin is highly challenging due to its recalcitrant nature as a phenolic heteropolymer. This study addressed the challenges by revealing the chemical and biological mechanisms for synergistic lignin degradation by a bacterial and enzymatic system, which significantly improved lignin consumption, cell growth and lipid yield. The Rhodococcus opacus cell growth increased exponentially in response to the level of laccase treatment, indicating the synergy between laccase and bacterial cells in lignin degradation. Other treatments like ironmore » and hydrogen peroxide showed limited impact on cell growth. Chemical analysis of lignin under various treatments further confirmed the synergy between laccase and cells at the chemical level. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) suggested that laccase, R. opacus cell and Fenton reaction reagents promoted the degradation of different types of lignin functional groups, elucidating the chemical basis for the synergistic effects. 31P NMR further revealed that laccase treatment had the most significant impact for degrading the abundant chemical groups. The results were further confirmed by the molecular weight analysis and lignin quantification by the Prussian blue assay. The cell–laccase fermentation led to a 17-fold increase of lipid production. Overall, the study indicated that laccase and R. opacus can synergize to degrade lignin efficiently, likely through rapid utilization of monomers generated by laccase to promote the reaction toward depolymerization. The study provided a potential path for more efficient lignin conversion and development of consolidated lignin conversion.« less

  6. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    for the C-O bond hydrogenolysis in model compounds, which mimic the b-O-4, a-O-4, and 4-O-5 linkages of natural lignin. The versatile IRMOF-74(n) series is proposed as a platform for creating efficient hydrogenolysis catalysts as it not only displays tunable pore sizes, but also has the required thermal and chemical stability. The catalytic C-O bond cleavage occurs at 10 bar hydrogen pressure and temperatures as low as 120 degC. The conversion efficiency of the aromatic ether substrates into the corresponding hydrocarbons and phenols varies as PhCH 2 CH 2 OPh > PhCH 2 OPh > PhOPh (Ph = phenyl), while the catalytic activity generally follows the following trend Ni@IRMOF-74>Ti@IRMOF-74>IRMOF-74. Conversions as high as 80%, coupled with good selectivity for hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation, highlight the potential of MOF-based catalysts for the selective cleavage of recalcitrant aryl-ether bonds found in lignin and other biopolymers. This project supports the DOE Integrated Biorefinery Program goals, the objective of which is to convert biomass to fuels and high-value chemicals, by addressing an important technology gap: the lack of low-temperature catalysts suitable for industrial lignin degradation. Biomass, which is %7E30 wt% lignin, constitutes a potentially major source of platform chemicals that could improve overall profitability and productivity of all energy-related products, thereby benefiting consumers and reducing national dependence on imported oil. Additionally, DoD has a strong interest in low-cost drop-in fuels (Navy Biofuel Initiative) and has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with DOE and USDA to develop a sustainable biofuels industry.

  7. Fatness QTL on chicken chromosome 5 and interaction with sex

    PubMed Central

    Abasht, Behnam; Pitel, Frédérique; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Le Roy, Pascale; Demeure, Olivier; Vignoles, Florence; Simon, Jean; Cogburn, Larry; Aggrey, Sammy; Vignal, Alain; Douaire, Madeleine

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting fatness in male chickens were previously identified on chromosome 5 (GGA5) in a three-generation design derived from two experimental chicken lines divergently selected for abdominal fat weight. A new design, established from the same pure lines, produced 407 F2 progenies (males and females) from 4 F1-sire families. Body weight and abdominal fat were measured on the F2 at 9 wk of age. In each sire family, selective genotyping was carried out for 48 extreme individuals for abdominal fat using seven microsatellite markers from GGA5. QTL analyses confirmed the presence of QTL for fatness on GGA5 and identified a QTL by sex interaction. By crossing one F1 sire heterozygous at the QTL with lean line dams, three recombinant backcross 1 (BC1) males were produced and their QTL genotypes were assessed in backcross 2 (BC2) progenies. These results confirmed the QTL by sex interaction identified in the F2 generation and they allow mapping of the female QTL to less than 8 Mb at the distal part of the GGA5. They also indicate that fat QTL alleles were segregating in both fat and lean lines. PMID:16635451

  8. Vibrational fingerprint mapping reveals spatial distribution of functional groups of lignin in plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Ping; Kim, Jeong Im; Zhang, Delong; Xia, Yuanqin; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-09-15

    Highly lignified vascular plant cell walls represent the majority of cellulosic biomass. Complete release of the biomass to deliver renewable energy by physical, chemical, and biological pretreatments is challenging due to the "protection" provided by polymerized lignin, and as such, additional tools to monitor lignin deposition and removal during plant growth and biomass deconstruction would be of great value. We developed a hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscope with 9 cm(-1) spectral resolution and submicrometer spatial resolution. Using this platform, we mapped the aromatic ring of lignin, aldehyde, and alcohol groups in lignified plant cell walls. By multivariate curve resolution of the hyperspectral images, we uncovered a spatially distinct distribution of aldehyde and alcohol groups in the thickened secondary cell wall. These results collectively contribute to a deeper understanding of lignin chemical composition in the plant cell wall.

  9. High shear homogenization of lignin to nanolignin and thermal stability of nanolignin-polyvinyl alcohol blends.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sandeep S; Sharma, Sudhir; Pu, Yunqiao; Sun, Qining; Pan, Shaobo; Zhu, J Y; Deng, Yulin; Ragauskas, Art J

    2014-12-01

    A new method to prepare nanolignin using a simple high shear homogenizer is presented. The kraft lignin particles with a broad distribution ranging from large micron- to nano-sized particles were completely homogenized to nanolignin particles with sizes less than 100 nm after 4 h of mechanical shearing. The (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and (31) P NMR analysis showed that there were no major changes in the chemical composition between the starting kraft lignin particles and the nanolignin obtained after 4 h of mechanical treatment. The nanolignin particles did not show any change in molecular weight distribution and polydispersity compared to the original lignin particles. The nanolignin particles when used with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) increased the thermal stability of nanolignin/PVA blends more effectively compared to the original lignin/PVA blends. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effects of lignin structure on hydrodeoxygenation reactivity of pine wood lignin to valuable chemicals

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hongliang; Ben, Haoxi; Southeast Univ., Nanjing; ...

    2017-01-05

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of two dilute acid flow through pretreated softwood lignin samples, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL) and recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), with apparent different physical and chemical structures, was comprehensively studied. A combination of catalysts (HY zeolite and Ru/Al2O3) was employed to investigate the effects of lignin structures, especially condensed structures, on the HDO upgrading process. Results indicated that the condensed structure and short side chains in lignin hindered its HDO conversion under different reaction conditions, including catalyst loading and composition, hydrogen pressure, and reaction time. In addition to lignin structure, HY zeolitemore » was found crucial for lignin depolymerization, while Ru/Al2O3 and relatively high hydrogen pressure (4 MPa) were necessary for upgrading unstable oxy-compounds to cyclohexanes at high selectivity (>95 wt %). Since the lignin structure essentially affects its reactivity during HDO conversion, the yield and selectivity of HDO products can be predicted by detailed characterization of the lignin structure. Furthermore, the insights gained from this study in the fundamental reaction mechanisms based on the lignin structure will facilitate upgrading of lignin to high-value products for applications in the production of both fuels and chemicals.« less

  11. Changes of Lignin Molecular Structures in a Modification of Kraft Lignin Using Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon; Oh, Seungtaek; Lee, Jungmin; Roh, Hyun-Gyoo; Park, Jongshin

    2016-08-05

    The purpose of this study is to modify lignin for better blending with general purpose synthetic polymers. The possible advantages by using this modification would be cost reduction, better physical properties, and biodegradability. In this study, butyrolactone-modified lignin (BLL) and tetrahydrofuran-modified lignin (THFL) were used for aliphatic chain modification of lignin using an acid-catalyzed esterification method in order to mimic the relation of lignin-carbohydrate-complex (LCC) and cellulose. The results of several analyses indicated that lignin was well modified. It was confirmed that the lignin was modified as expected and the reaction sites of the modification, as well as the reaction behaviors, were varied by the reagent types. The result of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) analysis indicated that modified lignin/polymer blends increased the crystallinity due to their good compatibility. It can be confirmed that the type of alkyl chain and the miscibility gap between the alkyl chain-matrix affected the mechanical properties enormously in the fungi-degradable environment. From this study, a new method of lignin modification is proposed, and it is found that modified lignin retains the property of the substituted aliphatic chain well. This method could be a proper lignin modification method.

  12. Changes of Lignin Molecular Structures in a Modification of Kraft Lignin Using Acid Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunghoon; Oh, Seungtaek; Lee, Jungmin; Roh, Hyun-gyoo; Park, Jongshin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to modify lignin for better blending with general purpose synthetic polymers. The possible advantages by using this modification would be cost reduction, better physical properties, and biodegradability. In this study, butyrolactone-modified lignin (BLL) and tetrahydrofuran-modified lignin (THFL) were used for aliphatic chain modification of lignin using an acid-catalyzed esterification method in order to mimic the relation of lignin-carbohydrate-complex (LCC) and cellulose. The results of several analyses indicated that lignin was well modified. It was confirmed that the lignin was modified as expected and the reaction sites of the modification, as well as the reaction behaviors, were varied by the reagent types. The result of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) analysis indicated that modified lignin/polymer blends increased the crystallinity due to their good compatibility. It can be confirmed that the type of alkyl chain and the miscibility gap between the alkyl chain-matrix affected the mechanical properties enormously in the fungi-degradable environment. From this study, a new method of lignin modification is proposed, and it is found that modified lignin retains the property of the substituted aliphatic chain well. This method could be a proper lignin modification method. PMID:28773779

  13. A mixed-model quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis for multiple-environment trial data using environmental covariables for QTL-by-environment interactions, with an example in maize.

    PubMed

    Boer, Martin P; Wright, Deanne; Feng, Lizhi; Podlich, Dean W; Luo, Lang; Cooper, Mark; van Eeuwijk, Fred A

    2007-11-01

    Complex quantitative traits of plants as measured on collections of genotypes across multiple environments are the outcome of processes that depend in intricate ways on genotype and environment simultaneously. For a better understanding of the genetic architecture of such traits as observed across environments, genotype-by-environment interaction should be modeled with statistical models that use explicit information on genotypes and environments. The modeling approach we propose explains genotype-by-environment interaction by differential quantitative trait locus (QTL) expression in relation to environmental variables. We analyzed grain yield and grain moisture for an experimental data set composed of 976 F(5) maize testcross progenies evaluated across 12 environments in the U.S. corn belt during 1994 and 1995. The strategy we used was based on mixed models and started with a phenotypic analysis of multi-environment data, modeling genotype-by-environment interactions and associated genetic correlations between environments, while taking into account intraenvironmental error structures. The phenotypic mixed models were then extended to QTL models via the incorporation of marker information as genotypic covariables. A majority of the detected QTL showed significant QTL-by-environment interactions (QEI). The QEI were further analyzed by including environmental covariates into the mixed model. Most QEI could be understood as differential QTL expression conditional on longitude or year, both consequences of temperature differences during critical stages of the growth.

  14. Detection of QTL controlling feed efficiency and excretion in chickens fed a wheat-based diet.

    PubMed

    Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Rideau, Nicole; Gabriel, Irène; Chantry-Darmon, Céline; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Sellier, Nadine; Chabault, Marie; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Narcy, Agnès

    2015-09-25

    Improving feed efficiency is a major goal in poultry production in order to reduce production costs, increase the possibility of using alternative feedstuffs and decrease the volume of manure. However, in spite of their economic and environmental impact, very few quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been reported on these traits. Thus, we undertook the detection of QTL on 820 meat-type chickens from a F2 cross between D- and D+ lines that were divergently selected on low or high digestive efficiency at 3 weeks of age. Birds were measured for growth between 0 and 23 days, feed intake and feed conversion ratio between 9 and 23 days, breast and abdominal fat yields at 23 days, and the anatomy of their digestive tract (density, relative weight and length of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and ratio of proventriculus to gizzard weight) was examined. To evaluate excretion traits, fresh and dry weight, water content, pH, nitrogen to phosphorus ratio from 0 to 23 days, and pH of gizzard and jejunum contents at 23 days were measured. A set of 3379 single nucleotide polymorphisms distributed on 28 Gallus gallus (GGA) autosomes, the Z chromosome and one unassigned linkage group was used for QTL detection. Using the QTLMap software developed for linkage analyses by interval mapping, we detected 16 QTL for feed intake, 13 for feed efficiency, 49 for anatomy-related traits, seven for growth, six for body composition and ten for excretion. Nine of these QTL were genome-wide significant (four for feed intake on GGA1, one for feed efficiency on GGA2, and four for anatomy on GGA1, 2, 3 and 4). GGA16, 19, and 26 carried many QTL for different types of traits that co-localize at the same position. This study identified several QTL regions that are involved in the control of digestive efficiency in chicken. Further studies are needed to identify the genes that underlie these effects, and to validate these in other commercial populations and for different breeding environments.

  15. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

  16. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is preferably dried and stored until it is used (along with an alkali, an aldehyde and an adhesive filler) in compounding an adhesive of the type generally used in the manufacture of plywood.

  17. A Multiple QTL-Seq Strategy Delineates Potential Genomic Loci Governing Flowering Time in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rishi; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Kumar, Rajendra; Daware, Anurag; Basu, Udita; Shimray, Philanim W.; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of functionally relevant potential genomic loci using an economical, simpler and user-friendly genomics-assisted breeding strategy is vital for rapid genetic dissection of complex flowering time quantitative trait in chickpea. A high-throughput multiple QTL-seq strategy was employed in two inter (Cicer arietinum desi accession ICC 4958 × C reticulatum wild accession ICC 17160)- and intra (ICC 4958 × C. arietinum kabuli accession ICC 8261)-specific RIL mapping populations to identify the major QTL genomic regions governing flowering time in chickpea. The whole genome resequencing discovered 1635117 and 592486 SNPs exhibiting differentiation between early- and late-flowering mapping parents and bulks, constituted by pooling the homozygous individuals of extreme flowering time phenotypic trait from each of two aforesaid RIL populations. The multiple QTL-seq analysis using these mined SNPs in two RIL mapping populations narrowed-down two longer (907.1 kb and 1.99 Mb) major flowering time QTL genomic regions into the high-resolution shorter (757.7 kb and 1.39 Mb) QTL intervals on chickpea chromosome 4. This essentially identified regulatory as well as coding (non-synonymous/synonymous) novel SNP allelic variants from two efl1 (early flowering 1) and GI (GIGANTEA) genes regulating flowering time in chickpea. Interestingly, strong natural allelic diversity reduction (88–91%) of two known flowering genes especially mapped at major QTL intervals as compared to that of background genomic regions (where no flowering time QTLs were mapped; 61.8%) in cultivated vis-à-vis wild Cicer gene pools was evident inferring the significant impact of evolutionary bottlenecks on these loci during chickpea domestication. Higher association potential of coding non-synonymous and regulatory SNP alleles mined from efl1 (36–49%) and GI (33–42%) flowering genes for early and late flowering time differentiation among chickpea accessions was evident. The robustness and

  18. Clubroot resistance QTL are modulated by nitrogen input in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Laperche, A; Aigu, Y; Jubault, M; Ollier, M; Guichard, S; Glory, P; Strelkov, S E; Gravot, A; Manzanares-Dauleux, M J

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen levels can modulate the effectiveness of clubroot resistance in an isolate- and host-specific manner. While the same QTL were detected under high and low nitrogen, their effects were altered. Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is one of the most damaging diseases of oilseed rape and is known to be affected by nitrogen fertilization. However, the genetic factors involved in clubroot resistance have not been characterized under nitrogen-limiting conditions. This study aimed to assess the variability of clubroot resistance under different nitrogen levels and to characterize the impact of nitrogen supply on genetic resistance factors. Linkage analyses and a genome-wide association study were conducted to detect QTL for clubroot resistance and evaluate their sensitivity to nitrogen. The clubroot response of a set of 92 diverse oilseed rape accessions and 108 lines derived from a cross between 'Darmor-bzh' (resistant) and 'Yudal' (susceptible) was studied in the greenhouse under high- and low-nitrogen conditions, following inoculation with the P. brassicae isolates eH and K92-16. Resistance to each isolate was controlled by a major QTL and a few small-effects QTL. While the same QTL were detected under both high and low nitrogen, their effects were altered. Clubroot resistance to isolate eH, but not K92-16, was greater under a low-N supply versus a high-N supply. New sources of resistance were found among the oilseed rape accessions under both low and high-N conditions. The results are discussed relative to the literature and from a crop improvement perspective.

  19. Validation of a 1DL earliness per se (eps) flowering QTL in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Zikhali, Meluleki; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Fish, Lesley; Simmonds, James; Orford, Simon; Wingen, Luzie U; Goram, Richard; Gosman, Nick; Bentley, Alison; Griffiths, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Vernalization, photoperiod and the relatively poorly defined earliness per se (eps) genes regulate flowering in plants. We report here the validation of a major eps quantitative trait locus (QTL) located on wheat 1DL using near isogenic lines (NILs). We used four independent pairs of NILs derived from a cross between Spark and Rialto winter wheat varieties, grown in both the field and controlled environments. NILs carrying the Spark allele, defined by QTL flanking markers Xgdm111 and Xbarc62, consistently flowered 3-5 days earlier when fully vernalized relative to those with the Rialto. The effect was independent of photoperiod under field conditions, short days (10-h light), long days (16-h light) and very long days (20-h light). These results validate our original QTL identified using doubled haploid (DH) populations. This QTL represents variation maintained in elite north-western European winter wheat germplasm. The two DH lines used to develop the NILs, SR9 and SR23 enabled us to define the location of the 1DL QTL downstream of marker Xgdm111. SR9 has the Spark 1DL arm while SR23 has a recombinant 1DL arm with the Spark allele from Xgdm111 to the distal end. Our work suggests that marker assisted selection of eps effects is feasible and useful even before the genes are cloned. This means eps genes can be defined and positionally cloned in the same way as the photoperiod and vernalization genes have been. This validation study is a first step towards fine mapping and eventually cloning the gene directly in hexaploid wheat.

  20. Power and false-positive rate in QTL detection with near-isogenic line libraries.

    PubMed

    Falke, K C; Frisch, M

    2011-04-01

    Libraries of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection in model species and economically important crops. The experimental design and genetic architecture of the considered traits determine the statistical properties of QTL detection. The objectives of our simulation study were to (i) investigate the population sizes required to develop NIL libraries in barley and maize, (ii) compare NIL libraries with nonoverlapping and overlapping donor segments and (iii) study the number of QTLs and the size of their effects with respect to the power and the false-positive rate of QTL detection. In barley, the development of NIL libraries with target segment lengths of 10 c and marker distances of 5 cM was possible using a BC(3)S(2) backcrossing scheme and population sizes of 140. In maize, population sizes larger than 200 were required. Selection for the recipient parent genome at markers flanking the target segments with distances between 5 and 10 cM was required for an efficient control of the false-positive rate. NIL libraries with nonoverlapping donor chromosome segments had a greater power of QTL detection and a smaller false-positive rate than libraries with overlapping segments. Major genes explaining 30% of the genotypic difference between the donor and recipient were successfully detected even with low heritabilities of 0.5, whereas for minor genes explaining 5 !or 10%, high heritabilities of 0.8 or 0.9 were required. The presented results can assist geneticists and breeders in the efficient development of NIL libraries for QTL detection.

  1. Abiotic stress QTL in lettuce crop–wild hybrids: comparing greenhouse and field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Yorike; Hooftman, Danny A P; Uwimana, Brigitte; Schranz, M Eric; van de Wiel, Clemens C M; Smulders, Marinus J M; Visser, Richard G F; Michelmore, Richard W; van Tienderen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The development of stress-tolerant crops is an increasingly important goal of current crop breeding. A higher abiotic stress tolerance could increase the probability of introgression of genes from crops to wild relatives. This is particularly relevant to the discussion on the risks of new GM crops that may be engineered to increase abiotic stress resistance. We investigated abiotic stress QTL in greenhouse and field experiments in which we subjected recombinant inbred lines from a cross between cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and its wild relative L. serriola to drought, low nutrients, salt stress, and aboveground competition. Aboveground biomass at the end of the rosette stage was used as a proxy for the performance of plants under a particular stress. We detected a mosaic of abiotic stress QTL over the entire genome with little overlap between QTL from different stresses. The two QTL clusters that were identified reflected general growth rather than specific stress responses and colocated with clusters found in earlier studies for leaf shape and flowering time. Genetic correlations across treatments were often higher among different stress treatments within the same experiment (greenhouse or field), than among the same type of stress applied in different experiments. Moreover, the effects of the field stress treatments were more correlated with those of the greenhouse competition treatments than to those of the other greenhouse stress experiments, suggesting that competition rather than abiotic stress is a major factor in the field. In conclusion, the introgression risk of stress tolerance (trans-)genes under field conditions cannot easily be predicted based on genomic background selection patterns from controlled QTL experiments in greenhouses, especially field data will be needed to assess potential (negative) ecological effects of introgression of these transgenes into wild relatives. PMID:25360276

  2. The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium: conditions for the production of lignin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepak; Chen, Shulin

    2008-12-01

    Investigating optimal conditions for lignin-degrading peroxidases production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium) has been a topic for numerous researches. The capability of P. chrysosporium for producing lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and manganese peroxidases (MnPs) makes it a model organism of lignin-degrading enzymes production. Focusing on compiling and identifying the factors that affect LiP and MnP production by P. chrysosporium, this critical review summarized the main findings of about 200 related research articles. The major difficulty in using this organism for enzyme production is the instability of its productivity. This is largely due to the poor understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of P. chrysosporium responding to different nutrient sources in the culture medium, such as metal elements, detergents, lignin materials, etc. In addition to presenting the major conclusions and gaps of the current knowledge on lignin-degrading peroxidases production by P. chrysosporium, this review has also suggested further work, such as correlating the overexpression of the intra and extracellular proteins to the nutrients and other culture conditions to discover the regulatory cascade in the lignin-degrading peroxidases production process, which may contribute to the creation of improved P. chrysosporium strains leading to stable enzyme production.

  3. Combination of different methods to assess the fate of lignin in decomposing needle and leave litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbücher, Thimo; Filley, Timothy; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant litter. However, its fate during litter decay is still poorly understood. One reason is the difficult analysis. Commonly used methods utilize different methodological approaches and focus on different aspects, e.g., content of lignin and/or of lignin-derived phenols and the degree of oxidation. The comparability and feasibility of the methods has not been tested so far. Our aims were: (1) to compare different methods with respect to track lignin degradation during plant litter decay and (2) to evaluate possible advantages of combining the different results. We assessed lignin degradation in decaying litter by 13C-TMAH thermochemolysis and CuO oxidation (each combined with GC/MS) and by determination of acid-detergent lignin (ADL) combined with near infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, water-extractable organic matter produced during litter decay was examined for indicators of lignin-derived compounds by UV absorbance at 280 nm, fluorescence spectroscopy, and 13C-TMAH GC/MS. The study included litter samples from 5 different tree species (acer, ash, beech, pine, spruce), exposed in litterbags to degradation in a spruce stand for 27 months. First results suggested stronger lignin degradation in coniferous than in deciduous litter. This was indicated by complementary results from various methods: Conifer litter showed a more pronounced decrease in ADL content and a stronger increase in oxidation degree of side chains (Ac/Al ratios of CuO oxidation and 13C-TMAH products). Furthermore water extracted organic matter from needles showed a higher aromaticity and molecule complexity. Thus properties of water extractable organic matter seemed to reflect the extents of lignin degradation in solid litter samples. Contents of lignin-derived phenols determined with the CuO method (VSC content) hardly changed during decay of needles and leaves. These results thus not matched the trends found with the ADL method. Our results suggested that water

  4. Effect of Penicillium chrysogenum on Lignin Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, A.; Carnicero, A.; Perestelo, F.; de la Fuente, G.; Milstein, O.; Falcón, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    A strain of Penicillium chrysogenum has been isolated from pine forest soils in Tenerife (Canary Islands). This strain was capable of utilizing hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated aromatic compounds, in particular cinnamic acid, as its sole carbon source. In an optimum medium with high levels of nitrogen (25.6 mM) and low levels of glucose (5.5 mM), it was able to decolorize Poly B-411 and to transform kraft, organosolv, and synthetic dehydrogenative polymerisate lignins. After 30 days of incubation, the amount of recovered kraft lignin was reduced to 83.5 and 91.3% of that estimated for uninoculated controls by spectrophotometry and klason lignin, respectively. At the same time, the pattern of molecular mass distribution of the lignin remaining in cultures was changed. The amount of organosolv lignin recovered from cultures was reduced to 90.1 and 94.6% of the initial amount as evaluated by spectrophotometry and klason lignin, respectively. About 6% of total applied radioactivity of O14CH3-organosolv lignin was recovered as 14CO2 after 30 days of incubation, and 18.5% of radioactivity from insoluble O14CH3-organosolv lignin was solubilized. After 26 days of incubation, 2.9% of 14C-β-dehydrogenative polymerisate and 4.1% of 14C-ring-dehydrogenative polymerisate evolved as 14CO2. PMID:16349361

  5. Lignin: Characterization of a Multifaceted Crop Component

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a plant component with important implications for various agricultural disciplines. It confers rigidity to cell walls, and is therefore associated with tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses and the mechanical stability of plants. In animal nutrition, lignin is considered an antinutritive component of forages as it cannot be readily fermented by rumen microbes. In terms of energy yield from biomass, the role of lignin depends on the conversion process. It contains more gross energy than other cell wall components and therefore confers enhanced heat value in thermochemical processes such as direct combustion. Conversely, it negatively affects biological energy conversion processes such as bioethanol or biogas production, as it inhibits microbial fermentation of the cell wall. Lignin from crop residues plays an important role in the soil organic carbon cycling, as it constitutes a recalcitrant carbon pool affecting nutrient mineralization and carbon sequestration. Due to the significance of lignin in several agricultural disciplines, the modification of lignin content and composition by breeding is becoming increasingly important. Both mapping of quantitative trait loci and transgenic approaches have been adopted to modify lignin in crops. However, breeding goals must be defined considering the conflicting role of lignin in different agricultural disciplines. PMID:24348159

  6. The degradation of wheat straw lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiaqi

    2017-03-01

    Lignin is a kind of formed by polymerization of aromatic alcohol, prices are lower and sources of renewable resources. Using lignin as raw material, through the push to resolve together preparation phenolic high value-added fine chemicals alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons, such as the high grade biofuels, can partly replace fossil fuels as raw material to the production process, biomass resources is an important part of the comprehensive utilization of effective components. In lignin push solve clustering method, catalytic hydrogenolysis can directly to the lignin into liquid fuels, low oxygen content in the use of biofuels shows great potential. In this paper, through the optimization of the reaction time, reaction temperature, catalyst type and solvent type, dosage of catalyst, etc factors, determines the alcoholysis - hydrogen solution two-step degradation of lignin, the optimal process conditions: lignin alcoholysis under 50% methanol and NaOH catalyst in the solution, the lignin in methanol solution and 50% hydrogen solution under the Pd/C catalyst. In this process, the degradation of lignin yield can reach 42%.

  7. Development of Lignin-Based Polyurethane Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Perkins, Joshua H; Jackson, Daniel C; Trammell, Neil E; Hunt, Marcus A; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    In our continued effort to develop value-added thermoplastics from lignin, here we report utilizing a tailored feedstock to synthesize mechanically robust thermoplastic polyurethanes at very high lignin contents (75 65 wt %). The molecular weight and glass transition temperature (Tg) of lignin were altered through cross-linking with formaldehyde. The cross-linked lignin was coupled with diisocyanate-based telechelic polybutadiene as a network-forming soft segment. The appearance of two Tg s, around 35 and 154 C, for the polyurethanes indicates the existence of two-phase morphology, a characteristic of thermoplastic copolymers. A calculated Flory-Huggins interaction parameter of 7.71 also suggests phase immiscibility in the synthesized lignin polyurethanes. An increase in lignin loading increased the modulus, and an increase in crosslink-density increased the modulus in the rubbery plateau region of the thermoplastic. This path for synthesis of novel lignin-based polyurethane thermoplastics provides a design tool for high performance lignin-based biopolymers.

  8. Method for regulation of plant lignin composition

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clint

    1999-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the regulation of lignin composition in plant tissue. Plants are transformed with a gene encoding an active F5H gene. The expression of the F5H gene results in increased levels of syringyl monomer providing a lignin composition more easily degraded with chemicals and enzymes.

  9. (Characterization of lignin peroxidases from Phanerochaete)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-14

    Work has continued on characterizing the kinetics of lignin peroxidases and has now expanded to include the chemistry of Mn peroxidases. Progress in these two area in addition to the authors work on the molecular biology of lignin biodegradation is briefly described below. Copies of two reprints and one preprint which have resulted from the work are attached.

  10. Structural elucidation of inhomogeneous lignins from bamboo.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Long; Xue, Bai-Liang; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the inhomogeneous molecular structure of lignin from bamboo is a prerequisite for promoting the "biorefinery" technologies of the bamboo feedstock. A mild and successive method for fractionating native lignin from bamboo species was proposed in the present study. The molecular structure and structural inhomogeneity of the isolated lignin polymers were comprehensively investigated by elemental analysis, carbohydrate analysis, state-of-the-art NMR and analytical pyrolysis techniques (quantitative (13)C NMR, (13)C-DEPT 135 NMR, 2D-HSQC NMR, (31)P NMR, and pyrolysis-GC-MS). The results showed that the proposed method is effective for extracting lignin from bamboo. NMR results showed that syringyl (S) was the predominant unit in bamboo lignin over guaiacyl (G) and p-hydroxyphenyl (H) units. In addition, the lignin was associated with p-coumarates and ferulates via ester and ether bonds, respectively. Moreover, various substructures, such as β-O-4, β-β, β-5, β-1, and α,β-diaryl ether linkages, were identified and quantified by NMR techniques. Based on the results obtained, a proposed schematic diagram of structural heterogeneity of the lignin polymers extracted from the bamboo is presented. In short, well-defined inhomogeneous structures of native lignin from bamboo will facilitate further applications of bamboo in current biorefineries.

  11. QTL involved in the partial restoration of male fertility of C-type cytoplasmic male sterility in maize.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Susanne; Stamp, Peter; Knaak, Carsten; Messmer, Rainer

    2011-07-01

    Partial restoration of male fertility limits the use of C-type cytoplasmic male sterility (C-CMS) for the production of hybrid seeds in maize. Nevertheless, the genetic basis of the trait is still unknown. Therefore, the aim to this study was to identify genomic regions that govern partial restoration by means of a QTL analysis carried out in an F(2) population (n = 180). This population was derived from the Corn Belt inbred lines B37C and K55. F(2)BC(1) progenies were phenotyped at three locations in Switzerland. Male fertility was rated according to the quality and number of anthers as well as the anthesis-silking interval. A weak effect of environment on the expression of partial restoration was reflected by high heritabilities of all fertility-related traits. Partial restoration was inherited like an oligogenic trait. Three major QTL regions were found consistently across environments in the chromosomal bins 2.09, 3.06 and 7.03. Therefore, a marker-assisted counter-selection of partial restoration is promising. Minor QTL regions were found on chromosomes 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8. A combination of partial restorer alleles at different QTL can lead to full restoration of fertility. The maternal parent was clearly involved in the partial restoration, because the restorer alleles at QTL in bins 2.09, 6.04 and 7.03 originated from B37. The three major QTL regions collocated with other restorer genes of maize, a phenomenon, which seems to be typical for restorer genes. Therefore, a study of the clusters of restorer genes in maize could lead to a better understanding of their evolution and function. In this respect, the long arm of chromosome 2 is particularly interesting, because it harbors restorer genes for the three major CMS systems (C, T and S) of maize.

  12. Ferricyanide-based analysis of aqueous lignin suspension revealed sequestration of water-soluble lignin moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua, C. J.; Simmons, B. A.; Singer, S. W.

    2016-06-02

    This study describes the application of a ferricyanide-based assay as a simple and inexpensive assay for rapid analysis of aqueous lignin samples. The assay measures the formation of Prussian blue from the redox reaction between a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric chloride, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin or lignin-derived phenolic moieties. This study revealed that soluble lignin moieties exhibited stronger ferricyanide reactivity than insoluble aggregates. The soluble lignin moieties exhibited higher ferricyanide reactivity because of increased access of the phenolic hydroxyl groups to the ferricyanide reagents. Ferricyanide reactivity of soluble lignin moieties correlated inversely with the molecular weight distributions of the molecules, probably due to the involvement of phenolic hydroxyl groups in bond formation. The insoluble lignin aggregates exhibited low ferricyanide reactivity due to sequestration of the phenolic hydroxyl groups within the solid matrix. The study also highlighted the sequestration of polydispersed water-soluble lignin moieties by insoluble aggregates. The sequestered moieties were released by treatment with 0.01 M NaOH at 37 °C for 180 min. The redox assay was effective on different types of lignin extracts such as Klason lignin from switchgrass, ionic-liquid derived lignin from Eucalyptus and alkali lignin extracts. The assay generated a distinct profile for each lignin sample that was highly reproducible. The assay was also used to monitor consumption of syringic acid by Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. The simplicity and reproducibility of this assay makes it an excellent and versatile tool for qualitative and semi-quantitative characterization and comparative profiling of aqueous lignin samples.

  13. Ferricyanide-based analysis of aqueous lignin suspension revealed sequestration of water-soluble lignin moieties

    DOE PAGES

    Joshua, C. J.; Simmons, B. A.; Singer, S. W.

    2016-06-02

    This study describes the application of a ferricyanide-based assay as a simple and inexpensive assay for rapid analysis of aqueous lignin samples. The assay measures the formation of Prussian blue from the redox reaction between a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric chloride, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin or lignin-derived phenolic moieties. This study revealed that soluble lignin moieties exhibited stronger ferricyanide reactivity than insoluble aggregates. The soluble lignin moieties exhibited higher ferricyanide reactivity because of increased access of the phenolic hydroxyl groups to the ferricyanide reagents. Ferricyanide reactivity of soluble lignin moieties correlated inversely with the molecular weightmore » distributions of the molecules, probably due to the involvement of phenolic hydroxyl groups in bond formation. The insoluble lignin aggregates exhibited low ferricyanide reactivity due to sequestration of the phenolic hydroxyl groups within the solid matrix. The study also highlighted the sequestration of polydispersed water-soluble lignin moieties by insoluble aggregates. The sequestered moieties were released by treatment with 0.01 M NaOH at 37 °C for 180 min. The redox assay was effective on different types of lignin extracts such as Klason lignin from switchgrass, ionic-liquid derived lignin from Eucalyptus and alkali lignin extracts. The assay generated a distinct profile for each lignin sample that was highly reproducible. The assay was also used to monitor consumption of syringic acid by Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. The simplicity and reproducibility of this assay makes it an excellent and versatile tool for qualitative and semi-quantitative characterization and comparative profiling of aqueous lignin samples.« less

  14. Integrating QTL mapping and transcriptomics identifies candidate genes underlying QTLs associated with soybean tolerance to low-phosphorus stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Hengyou; Chu, Shanshan; Li, Hongyan; Chi, Yingjun; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Lv, Haiyan; Yu, Deyue

    2017-01-01

    Soybean is a high phosphorus (P) demand species that is sensitive to low-P stress. Although many quantitative trait loci (QTL) for P efficiency have been identified in soybean, but few of these have been cloned and agriculturally applied mainly due to various limitations on identifying suitable P efficiency candidate genes. Here, we combined QTL mapping, transcriptome profiling, and plant transformation to identify candidate genes underlying QTLs associated with low-P tolerance and response mechanisms to low-P stress in soybean. By performing QTL linkage mapping using 152 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) that were derived from a cross between a P-efficient variety, Nannong 94-156, and P-sensitive Bogao, we identified four major QTLs underlying P efficiency. Within these four QTL regions, 34/81 candidate genes in roots/leaves were identified using comparative transcriptome analysis between two transgressive RILs, low-P tolerant genotype B20 and sensitive B18. A total of 22 phosphatase family genes were up-regulated significantly under low-P condition in B20. Overexpression of an acid phosphatase candidate gene, GmACP2, in soybean hairy roots increased P efficiency by 15.43-24.54 % compared with that in controls. Our results suggest that integrating QTL mapping and transcriptome profiling could be useful for rapidly identifying candidate genes underlying complex traits, and phosphatase-encoding genes, such as GmACP2, play important roles involving in low-P stress tolerance in soybean.

  15. Conversion of kraft lignin under hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Fei

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore hydrothermal conversion of kraft lignin for value-added products. With ranging between 5.4% and 10.6%, total oil yield decreased with the increase of temperature (130, 180, and 230°C), the longer reaction time (15-60min) led to increased total oil yield. Main compound of oils characterized by GC-MS was guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol) in the range of 19-78% of oil depending on different reaction conditions. Residual kraft lignins were characterized by GPC and FTIR with respect to the conversion mechanism of kraft lignin by this process. The conversion of kraft lignin under hydrothermal conditions had something to do with the degradation of β-O-4 linkages, hydroxyl groups, carbonyl groups, aromatic rings resulting in the increased amount of phenolic OH groups in kraft lignin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reconstitution of cellulose and lignin after [C2mim][OAc] pretreatment and its relation to enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tong-Qi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Ming; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-03-01

    Although the effects of cellulose crystallinity and lignin content as two major structural features on enzymatic hydrolysis have been extensively studied, debates regarding their effects still exist. In this study, reconstitution of cellulose and lignin after 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(2)mim][OAc]) pretreatment was proposed as a new method to study their effects on enzymatic digestibility. Different mechanisms of lignin content for reduction of cellulose hydrolysis were found between the proposed method and the traditional method (mixing of cellulose and lignin). The results indicated that a slight change of the crystallinity of the reconstituted materials may play a minor role in the change of enzyme efficiency. In addition, the present study suggested that the lignin content does not significantly affect the digestibility of cellulose, whereas the conversion of cellulose fibers from the cellulose I to the cellulose II crystal phase plays an important role when an ionic liquid pretreatment of biomass was conducted.

  17. Effects of insoluble dietary fibre differing in lignin on performance, gut microbiology, and digestibility in weanling piglets.

    PubMed

    Schedle, Karl; Plitzner, Christian; Ettle, Thomas; Zhao, Lin; Domig, Konrad J; Windisch, Wilhelm

    2008-04-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of insoluble dietary fibre differing in lignin content on performance and parameters of gut microbiology in 48 weanling piglets (8.5 kg mean body weight) fed common diets ad libitum. Fibre sources tested were wheat bran (low lignin) and pollen from Chinese Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) as model of fibre rich in lignin, added to diets as follows: no addition (control), 3.0% wheat bran, 1.27% pine pollen and 2.55% pine pollen. In colonic chyme, bacterial colony counts remained unaffected by treatment, but ammonia contents were reduced by fibre additions (up to -38%). The effects on ammonia were best explained by added cellulose and lignin. Fibre additions reduced apparent (faecal) digestibility of dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) up to -3.5 and -4.3% units with cellulose and lignin being the major determinants for changes in CP digestibility.

  18. Micro-Spectroscopic Imaging of Lignin-Carbohydrate Complexes in Plant Cell Walls and Their Migration During Biomass Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Johnson, David K.; Himmel, Michael E.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Meilan, Richard; Ding, Shi-You

    2015-04-27

    In lignocellulosic biomass, lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer. In plant cell walls, lignin is associated with polysaccharides to form lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC). LCC have been considered to be a major factor that negatively affects the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by cellulosic enzymes. Here, we report a micro-spectroscopic approach that combines fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy to probe in situ lignin concentration and conformation at each cell wall layer. This technique does not require extensive sample preparation or any external labels. Using poplar as a feedstock, for example, we observe variation of LCC in untreated tracheid poplar cell walls. The redistribution of LCC at tracheid poplar cell wall layers is also investigated when the chemical linkages between lignin and hemicellulose are cleaved during pretreatment. Our study would provide new insights into further improvement of the biomass pretreatment process.

  19. Opportunities and challenges in biological lignin valorization

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Johnson, Christopher W.; Karp, Eric M.; Salvachúa, Davinia; Vardon, Derek R.

    2016-12-01

    Lignin is a primary component of lignocellulosic biomass that is an underutilized feedstock in the growing biofuels industry. Despite the fact that lignin depolymerization has long been studied, the intrinsic heterogeneity of lignin typically leads to heterogeneous streams of aromatic compounds, which in turn present significant technical challenges when attempting to produce lignin-derived chemicals where purity is often a concern. In Nature, microorganisms often encounter this same problem during biomass turnover wherein powerful oxidative enzymes produce heterogeneous slates of aromatics compounds. Some microbes have evolved metabolic pathways to convert these aromatic species via ‘upper pathways’ into central intermediates, which can then be funneled through ‘lower pathways’ into central carbon metabolism in a process we dubbed ‘biological funneling’. This funneling approach offers a direct, biological solution to overcome heterogeneity problems in lignin valorization for the modern biorefinery. Coupled to targeted separations and downstream chemical catalysis, this concept offers the ability to produce a wide range of molecules from lignin. This perspective describes research opportunities and challenges ahead for this new field of research, which holds significant promise towards a biorefinery concept wherein polysaccharides and lignin are treated as equally valuable feedstocks. In particular, we discuss tailoring the lignin substrate for microbial utilization, host selection for biological funneling, ligninolytic enzyme–microbe synergy, metabolic engineering, expanding substrate specificity for biological funneling, and process integration, each of which presents key challenges. Ultimately, for biological solutions to lignin valorization to be viable, multiple questions in each of these areas will need to be addressed, making biological lignin valorization a multidisciplinary, co-design problem.

  20. Opportunities and challenges in biological lignin valorization.

    PubMed

    Beckham, Gregg T; Johnson, Christopher W; Karp, Eric M; Salvachúa, Davinia; Vardon, Derek R

    2016-12-01

    Lignin is a primary component of lignocellulosic biomass that is an underutilized feedstock in the growing biofuels industry. Despite the fact that lignin depolymerization has long been studied, the intrinsic heterogeneity of lignin typically leads to heterogeneous streams of aromatic compounds, which in turn present significant technical challenges when attempting to produce lignin-derived chemicals where purity is often a concern. In Nature, microorganisms often encounter this same problem during biomass turnover wherein powerful oxidative enzymes produce heterogeneous slates of aromatics compounds. Some microbes have evolved metabolic pathways to convert these aromatic species via 'upper pathways' into central intermediates, which can then be funneled through 'lower pathways' into central carbon metabolism in a process we dubbed 'biological funneling'. This funneling approach offers a direct, biological solution to overcome heterogeneity problems in lignin valorization for the modern biorefinery. Coupled to targeted separations and downstream chemical catalysis, this concept offers the ability to produce a wide range of molecules from lignin. This perspective describes research opportunities and challenges ahead for this new field of research, which holds significant promise towards a biorefinery concept wherein polysaccharides and lignin are treated as equally valuable feedstocks. In particular, we discuss tailoring the lignin substrate for microbial utilization, host selection for biological funneling, ligninolytic enzyme-microbe synergy, metabolic engineering, expanding substrate specificity for biological funneling, and process integration, each of which presents key challenges. Ultimately, for biological solutions to lignin valorization to be viable, multiple questions in each of these areas will need to be addressed, making biological lignin valorization a multidisciplinary, co-design problem.

  1. Expression of brown-midrib in a spontaneous sorghum mutant is linked to a 5'-UTR deletion in lignin biosynthesis gene SbCAD2.

    PubMed

    Li, Huang; Huang, Yinghua

    2017-09-15

    Brown midrib (bmr) mutants in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses are associated with reduced lignin concentration, altered lignin composition and improved cell wall digestibility, which are desirable properties in biomass development for the emerging lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Studying bmr mutants has considerably expanded our understanding of the molecular basis underlying lignin biosynthesis and perturbation in grasses. In this study, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis, identified and cloned a novel cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase allele (SbCAD2) that has an 8-bp deletion in its 5'-untranslated region (UTR), conferring the spontaneous brown midrib trait and lignin reduction in the sorghum germplasm line PI 595743. Complementation test and gene expression analysis revealed that this non-coding region alteration is associated with the significantly reduced expression of the SbCAD2 in PI 595743 throughout its growth stages. Moreover, a promoter-GUS fusion study with transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants found that SbCAD2 promoter is functionally conserved, driving a specific expression pattern in lignifying vascular tissues. Taken together, our results revealed the genetic basis of bmr occurrence in this spontaneous sorghum mutant and suggested the regulatory region of the SbCAD2 can be a target site for optimizing lignin modification in sorghum and other bioenergy crops.

  2. Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

  3. Mimicry on the QT(L): genetics of speciation in Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Bleiweiss, R

    2001-08-01

    Ecological studies suggest that hummingbird-pollinated plants in North America mimic each other to increase visitation by birds. Published quantitative trait locus (QTL) data for two Mimulus species indicate that floral traits associated with hummingbird versus bee pollination results from a few loci with major effects on morphology, as predicted by classical models for the evolution of mimicry. Thus, the architecture of genetic divergence associated with speciation may depend on the ecological context.

  4. From beavis to beak color: a simulation study to examine how much qtl mapping can reveal about the genetic architecture of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Slate, Jon

    2013-05-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping is frequently used in evolutionary studies to understand the genetic architecture of continuously varying traits. The majority of studies have been conducted in specially created crosses, in which genetic differences between parental lines are identified by linkage analysis. Detecting QTL segregating within populations is more problematic, especially in wild populations, because these populations typically have complicated and unbalanced multigenerational pedigrees. However, QTL mapping can still be conducted in such populations using a variance components mixed model approach, and the advent of appropriate statistical frameworks and better genotyping methods mean that the approach is gaining popularity. In this study it is shown that all studies described to date report evidence of QTL of major effect on trait variation, but that these findings are probably caused by inflated estimates of QTL effect sizes due to the Beavis effect. Using simulations I show that even the most powerful studies conducted to date are likely to give misleading descriptions of the genetic architecture of a trait. I show that an interpretation of a mapping study of beak color in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), that suggested genetic variation was determined by a small number of loci of large effect, which are possibly maintained by antagonistic pleiotropy, is likely to be incorrect. More generally, recommendations are made to how QTL mapping can be combined with other approaches to provide more accurate descriptions of a trait's genetic architecture.

  5. LACCASE Is Necessary and Nonredundant with PEROXIDASE for Lignin Polymerization during Vascular Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiao; Nakashima, Jin; Chen, Fang; Yin, Yanbin; Fu, Chunxiang; Yun, Jianfei; Shao, Hui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Dixon, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of lignin biosynthesis was critical in the transition of plants from an aquatic to an upright terrestrial lifestyle. Lignin is assembled by oxidative polymerization of two major monomers, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol. Although two recently discovered laccases, LAC4 and LAC17, have been shown to play a role in lignin polymerization in Arabidopsis thaliana, disruption of both genes only leads to a relatively small change in lignin content and only under continuous illumination. Simultaneous disruption of LAC11 along with LAC4 and LAC17 causes severe plant growth arrest, narrower root diameter, indehiscent anthers, and vascular development arrest with lack of lignification. Genome-wide transcript analysis revealed that all the putative lignin peroxidase genes are expressed at normal levels or even higher in the laccase triple mutant, suggesting that lignin laccase activity is necessary and nonredundant with peroxidase activity for monolignol polymerization during plant vascular development. Interestingly, even though lignin deposition in roots is almost completely abolished in the lac11 lac4 lac17 triple mutant, the Casparian strip, which is lignified through the activity of peroxidase, is still functional. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that lignin laccase genes have no orthologs in lower plant species, suggesting that the monolignol laccase genes diverged after the evolution of seed plants. PMID:24143805

  6. Linkage mapping and identification of QTL affecting deoxynivalenol (DON) content (Fusarium resistance) in oats (Avena sativa L.).

    PubMed

    He, Xinyao; Skinnes, Helge; Oliver, Rebekah E; Jackson, Eric W; Bjørnstad, Asmund

    2013-10-01

    Mycotoxins caused by Fusarium spp. is a major concern on food and feed safety in oats, although Fusarium head blight (FHB) is often less apparent than in other small grain cereals. Breeding resistant cultivars is an economic and environment-friendly way to reduce toxin content, either by the identification of resistance QTL or phenotypic evaluation. Both are little explored in oats. A recombinant-inbred line population, Hurdal × Z595-7 (HZ595, with 184 lines), was used for QTL mapping and was phenotyped for 3 years. Spawn inoculation was applied and deoxynivalenol (DON) content, FHB severity, days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), and plant height (PH) were measured. The population was genotyped with DArTs, AFLPs, SSRs and selected SNPs, and a linkage map of 1,132 cM was constructed, covering all 21 oat chromosomes. A QTL for DON on chromosome 17A/7C, tentatively designated as Qdon.umb-17A/7C, was detected in all experiments using composite interval mapping, with phenotypic effects of 12.2–26.6 %. In addition, QTL for DON were also found on chromosomes 5C, 9D, 13A, 14D and unknown_3, while a QTL for FHB was found on 11A. Several of the DON/FHB QTL coincided with those for DH, DM and/or PH. A half-sib population of HZ595, Hurdal × Z615-4 (HZ615, with 91 lines), was phenotyped in 2011 for validation of QTL found in HZ595, and Qdon.umb-17A/7C was again localized with a phenotypic effect of 12.4 %. Three SNPs closely linked to Qdon.umb-17A/7C were identified in both populations, and one each for QTL on 5C, 11A and 13A were identified in HZ595. These SNPs, together with those yet to be identified, could be useful in marker-assisted selection to pyramiding resistance QTL.

  7. Aerosol assisted self-assembly as a route to synthesize solid and hollow spherical lignin colloids and its utilization in layer by layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P K; Wimmer, R

    2017-03-01

    Lignin, a major constituent of plant cell-wall and by-product of paper based industries is traditionally used for low value applications (heat or electricity generation), but its potential in high value utilization has also been widely reported. In this work, we synthesized lignin colloidal particles using ultrasonic spray-freezing route without any chemical functionalization of material, and stabilized it by electrostatic route. As per our knowledge, this technique is the first reported method which yields hollow/solid lignin colloids having good particle size control without any chemical functionalization of material. Dioxane soluble fraction of Alkali lignin (d-lignin) was used without any further chemical functionalization. d-lignin dissolved in DMSO was sprayed upon liquid nitrogen cooled copper plate using an ultrasonic nebulizer. The resulting frozen droplets were collected and found to possess hollow and solid morphology. Particles thus obtained were characterized for their size distribution and morphology, and compared to theoretically anticipated values. Size tunability of particles in relation to concentration of sprayed lignin solution was also studied. In addition to that, six layers of lignin colloids were deposited on quartz slide with the aid of negligible UV absorbing polyelectrolyte aqueous solution PDADMAC [Poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride)]. Gradation in UV absorbing ability of lignin with increase in number of layers could be clearly observed. Hollow and solid lignin colloids, apart from their application in sunscreen cosmetics owing to their UV absorbing ability, show potential applications in drug delivery also.

  8. QTL for bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen size are located on rainbow trout chromosome Omy19

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective breeding of aquatic animals for improved disease resistance has become a major focus in aquaculture, although little is known about underlying QTL or correlated traits. At the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA), we have pursued a selective breeding program with t...

  9. Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) identified SNP tightly linked to QTL for pre-harvest sprouting resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pre-harvest sprouting (PHS) of wheat is a major constraint to wheat production in many wheat-growing areas worldwide, because it reduces both wheat grain yield and the end-use quality. To identify markers tightly linked to the quantitative trait loci (QTL) for PHS resistance and seed dormancy (SD), ...

  10. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fruit quality traits and number of weeks of flowering in the cultivated strawberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fruit quality traits and dayneutrality are two major foci of several strawberry breeding programs. The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and molecular markers linked to these traits could improve breeding efficiency. In this work, an F1 population derived from the cross ‘Delmarvel’ × ...

  11. Methanol fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin: impact on the lignin properties.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tomonori; Perkins, Joshua H; Vautard, Frederic; Meyer, Harry M; Messman, Jamie M; Tolnai, Balazs; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    The development of technologies to tune lignin properties for high-performance lignin-based materials is crucial for the utilization of lignin in various applications. Here, the effect of methanol (MeOH) fractionation on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, glass transition temperature (Tg ), thermal decomposition, and chemical structure of lignin were investigated. Repeated MeOH fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin successfully removed the low-molecular-weight fraction. The separated high-molecular-weight lignin showed a Tg of 211 °C and a char yield of 47 %, much higher than those of as-received lignin (Tg 153 °C, char yield 41 %). The MeOH-soluble fraction of lignin showed an increased low-molecular-weight fraction and a lower Tg (117 °C) and char yield (32%). The amount of low-molecular-weight fraction showed a quantitative correlation with both 1/Tg and char yield in a linear regression. This study demonstrated the efficient purification or fractionation technology for lignin; it also established a theoretical and empirical correlation between the physical characteristics of fractionated lignins. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Methanol Fractionation of Softwood Kraft Lignin: Impact on the Lignin Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Perkins, Joshua H; Vautard, Frederic; Meyer III, Harry M; Messman, Jamie M; Tolnai, Balazs; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    The development of technologies to tune lignin properties for high-performance lignin-based materials is crucial for the utilization of lignin in various applications. Here, the effect of methanol (MeOH) fractionation on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition, and chemical structure of lignin were investigated. Repeated MeOH fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin successfully removed the low-molecular-weight fraction. The separated high-molecular-weight lignin showed a Tg of 211 C and a char yield of 47%, much higher than those of asreceived lignin (Tg 153 C, char yield 41%). The MeOH-soluble fraction of lignin showed an increased low-molecular-weight fraction and a lower Tg (117 C) and char yield (32%). The amount of low-molecular-weight fraction showed a quantitative correlation with both 1/Tg and char yield in a linear regression. This study demonstrated the efficient purification or fractionation technology for lignin; it also established a theoretical and empirical correlation between the physical characteristics of fractionated lignins.

  13. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  14. Effect of the Texel muscling QTL (TM-QTL) on spine characteristics in purebred Texel lambs

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, C.L.; Lambe, N.R.; Maltin, C.A.; Knott, S.; Bünger, L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work showed that the Texel muscling QTL (TM-QTL) results in pronounced hypertrophy in the loin muscle, with the largest phenotypic effects observed in lambs inheriting a single copy of the allele from the sire. As the loin runs parallel to the spinal vertebrae, and the development of muscle and bone are closely linked, the primary aim of this study was to investigate if there were any subsequent associations between TM-QTL inheritance and underlying spine characteristics (vertebrae number, VN; spine region length, SPL; average length of individual vertebrae, VL) of the thoracic, lumbar, and thoracolumbar spine regions. Spine characteristics were measured from X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans for 142 purebred Texel lambs which had been previously genotyped. Least-squares means were significantly different between genotype groups for lumbar and thoracic VN and lumbar SPL. Similarly for these traits, contrasts were shown to be significant for particular modes of gene action but overall were inconclusive. In general, the results showed little evidence that spine trait phenotypes were associated with differences in loin muscling associated with the different TM-QTL genotypes. PMID:25844019

  15. Educational Software for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

    2007-01-01

    This educational software was developed to aid teachers and students in their understanding of how the process of identifying the most likely quantitative trait loci (QTL) position is determined between two flanking DNA markers. The objective of the software that we developed was to: (1) show how a QTL is mapped to a position on a chromosome using…

  16. Educational Software for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

    2007-01-01

    This educational software was developed to aid teachers and students in their understanding of how the process of identifying the most likely quantitative trait loci (QTL) position is determined between two flanking DNA markers. The objective of the software that we developed was to: (1) show how a QTL is mapped to a position on a chromosome using…

  17. The Use of Esterified Lignin for Synthesis of Durable Composites

    Treesearch

    S. Olsson; E. Ostmark; R.E. Ibach; C.M. Clemons; K.B. Segerholm; F. Englund

    2011-01-01

    Lignin is a natural polymer and one of the most abundant materials on earth. Despite this fact, lignin is often viewed as a by-product in chemical pulp processing and the use of lignin as a sustainable material is low. However, research and public awareness of sustainability have opened up new possibilities for using lignin as a material.

  18. Primary and secondary lignin pyrolysis reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Jegers, H.E.; Klein, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction pathways involved in the pyrolysis of kraft lignin, kraft lignin plus tetralin, a milled wood lignin, and pine wood were examined. The temporal variations of the quantitative yields of 33 different products, including 12 gases, water, methanol, and 19 phenolics allowed resolution of primary and secondary pathways, description of the influence of reactor design and lignin type on product yields, and formulation of a simple kinetic lumping scheme. Products within separate guaiacol and catechol lumps attained maximal proportions at 7.5 and 15 min, respectively, during kraft lignin pyrolysis at 400/sup 0/C. Within a lump, the secondary reactions of individual species were nearly synchronous. Further, the similarity of the observed rate of the secondary decomposition of guaiacols during kraft lignin pyrolysis with that previously reported for pyrolysis of pure guaiacol suggest that the reactions of lignin's thermally liberated single-ring products are insensitive to the presence of other molecular species or poymer residuum. All of the foregoing indicates that a simple reaction network based on phenol, guaiacol, and catechol lumps could be a useful model of phenolics product evolution.

  19. Lignin from Micro- to Nanosize: Production Methods

    PubMed Central

    Beisl, Stefan; Miltner, Angela; Friedl, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose. It has long been obtained as a by-product of cellulose production in pulp and paper production, but had rather low added-value applications. A changing paper market and the emergence of biorefinery projects should generate vast amounts of lignin with the potential of value addition. Nanomaterials offer unique properties and the preparation of lignin nanoparticles and other nanostructures has therefore gained interest as a promising technique to obtain value-added lignin products. Due to lignin’s high structural and chemical heterogeneity, methods must be adapted to these different types. This review focuses on the ability of different formation methods to cope with the huge variety of lignin types and points out which particle characteristics can be achieved by which method. The current research’s main focus is on pH and solvent-shifting methods where the latter can yield solid and hollow particles. Solvent shifting also showed the capability to cope with different lignin types and solvents and antisolvents, respectively. However, process conditions have to be adapted to every type of lignin and reduction of solvent demand or the integration in a biorefinery process chain must be focused. PMID:28604584

  20. Lignin peroxidase functionalities and prospective applications.

    PubMed

    Falade, Ayodeji O; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Iweriebor, Benson C; Green, Ezekiel; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-02-01

    Ligninolytic extracellular enzymes, including lignin peroxidase, are topical owing to their high redox potential and prospective industrial applications. The prospective applications of lignin peroxidase span through sectors such as biorefinery, textile, energy, bioremediation, cosmetology, and dermatology industries. The litany of potentials attributed to lignin peroxidase is occasioned by its versatility in the degradation of xenobiotics and compounds with both phenolic and non-phenolic constituents. Over the years, ligninolytic enzymes have been studied however; research on lignin peroxidase seems to have been lagging when compared to other ligninolytic enzymes which are extracellular in nature including laccase and manganese peroxidase. This assertion becomes more pronounced when the application of lignin peroxidase is put into perspective. Consequently, a succinct documentation of the contemporary functionalities of lignin peroxidase and, some prospective applications of futuristic relevance has been advanced in this review. Some articulated applications include delignification of feedstock for ethanol production, textile effluent treatment and dye decolourization, coal depolymerization, treatment of hyperpigmentation, and skin-lightening through melanin oxidation. Prospective application of lignin peroxidase in skin-lightening functions through novel mechanisms, hence, it holds high value for the cosmetics sector where it may serve as suitable alternative to hydroquinone; a potent skin-lightening agent whose safety has generated lots of controversy and concern. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Characterization of asparagus lignin by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, S; Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Waldron, K W; Smith, A C; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-09-01

    Lignin is the cell wall component most frequently associated with hardening. Its characterization and quantification are very important to understand the biochemical modifications related to the changes in texture of vegetables such as asparagus (Asparagus officinalis), in which this organoleptic attribute is a very important quality factor. In this study, asparagus lignin from the basal sections of fresh and stored spears was analyzed using 2 methods, the traditional (Klason lignin) and the recently developed derivatization, followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC) method. The latter is a simple and reproducible technique for lignin characterization based on a degradation procedure that produces analyzable monomers and dimers by cleaving alpha- and beta-aryl ethers in lignins. The primary monomers derived from DFRC degradation of lignins are essentially p-coumaryl peracetate, coniferyl peracetate, and sinapyl peracetate. To evaluate the efficiency of the DFRC method, our investigations have been carried on distinct sample types, including wood (data not shown), straw, and asparagus samples. The results have confirmed that lignin composition is affected by plant nature. It has been found that whereas wood samples mostly contain coniferyl units, plant foods, such as straw and asparagus, contain both coniferyl and guaiacyl units.

  2. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-05-01

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 - 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  3. A Tomato Peroxidase Involved in the Synthesis of Lignin and Suberin1

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Mónica; Guerrero, Consuelo; Botella, Miguel A.; Barceló, Araceli; Amaya, Iraida; Medina, María I.; Alonso, Francisco J.; de Forchetti, Silvia Milrad; Tigier, Horacio; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2000-01-01

    The last step in the synthesis of lignin and suberin has been proposed to be catalyzed by peroxidases, although other proteins may also be involved. To determine which peroxidases are involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin, five peroxidases from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) roots, representing the majority of the peroxidase activity in this organ, have been partially purified and characterized kinetically. The purified peroxidases with isoelectric point (pI) values of 3.6 and 9.6 showed the highest catalytic efficiency when the substrate used was syringaldazine, an analog of lignin monomer. Using a combination of transgenic expression and antibody recognition, we now show that the peroxidase pI 9.6 is probably encoded by TPX1, a tomato peroxidase gene we have previously isolated. In situ RNA hybridization revealed that TPX1 expression is restricted to cells undergoing synthesis of lignin and suberin. Salt stress has been reported to induce the synthesis of lignin and/or suberin. This stress applied to tomato caused changes in the expression pattern of TPX1 and induced the TPX1 protein. We propose that the TPX1 product is involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin. PMID:10759507

  4. ZnCl 2 induced catalytic conversion of softwood lignin to aromatics and hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongliang; Zhang, Libing; Deng, Tiansheng; Ruan, Hao; Hou, Xianglin; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Selective cleavage of C-O-C bonds in lignin without disrupting C-C linkages can result in releasing aromatic monomers and dimers that can be subsequently converted into chemicals and fuels. Results showed that both biomass-derived lignin and lignin model compounds were depolymerized in a highly concentrated ZnCl2 solution. Zn2+ ions in highly concentrated ZnCl2 solutions appeared to selectively coordinate with C-O-C bonds to cause key linkages of lignin much easier to cleave. In 63 wt.% ZnCl2 solution at 200 °C for 6 h, nearly half of the softwood technical lignin was converted to liquid products, of which the majority was alkylphenols. Results indicated that most β-O-4 and Cmethyl-OAr bonds of model compounds were cleaved undersame conditions, providing a foundation towards understanding lignin depolymerization in a concentrated ZnCl2 solution. The phenolic products were further converted into cyclic hydrocarbons via hydrodeoxygenation and coupling reactions by co-catalyst Ru/C.

  5. Extraction and characterization of original lignin and hemicelluloses from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Sun, RunCang; Fowler, Paul; Baird, Mark S

    2005-02-23

    Original lignin and hemicelluloses were sequentially extracted with high yield/purity, using acidic dioxane/water solution and dimethyl sulfoxide, from ball-milled wheat straw. The acidic dioxane lignin fraction is distinguished by high beta-O-4' structures and by low amounts of condensed units (beta-5', 5-5', and beta-1'). Hemicelluloses contain arabinoxylans as the major polysaccharides, which are substituted by alpha-l-arabinofuranose, 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, acetyl group (DS = 0.1), and xylose at O-3 and/or O-2 of xylans. It was found that arabinoxylans form cross-links with lignins through ferulates via ether bonds, glucuronic acid via ester bonds, and arbinose/xylose via both ether and glycosidic bonds, respectively, in the cell walls of wheat straw. Diferulates are also incorporated into cross-links between lignin and hemicelluloses as well as lignification of wheat straw cell walls. The guaiacyl unit is considered to be a significant condensed structural constructor in extracted lignin and a connector between lignin and carbohydrates.

  6. Structural characterization of lignin: a potential source of antioxidants guaiacol and 4-vinylguaiacol.

    PubMed

    Azadfar, Mohammadali; Gao, Allan Haiming; Bule, Mahesh V; Chen, Shulin

    2015-04-01

    The structure of lignin obtained from the ozone and soaking aqueous ammonia pretreatment of wheat straw has been characterized utilizing chemical analytical methods in order to reveal its antioxidant characteristics, including attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), pyrolysis/tetramethylammonium hydroxide-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py/TMAH-GC/MS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), ultra violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) antioxidant evaluation assay. The results demonstrated that the isolated lignin is a ρ-hydroxyphenyl- guaiacyl-syringyl (H-G-S) lignin, with S/G ratio of 0.35 and significant amounts of phenol 2-methoxy (guaiacol) and phenol 2-methoxy-4-vinyl (4-vinylguaiacol). The Py-GC/MS and Py/TMAH-GC/MS pyrograms indicated that the major units in this lignin are derived from hydroxycinnamic acids. The GPC results revealed the molecular weight of the lignin was considerably low and also the FTIR analysis showed that the lignin possessed hydroxyl and methoxy functional groups; the factors led to the extracted lignin having a comparable antioxidant activity to that of currently used commercial antioxidants. The UV-vis and DPPH antioxidant assay results suggested a percentage of inhibition of the DPPH radicals in the following order: guaiacol (103.6 ± 1.36)>butylated hydroxytoluene (103.3 ± 1)>ferulic acid (102.6 ± 0.79)>pretreated lignin (86.9 ± 0.34).

  7. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43N/mm(2) and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A DFT investigation on interactions between lignin and ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ju; Shi, Xiaoqin; Du, Xihua; Cao, Weiliang

    2017-08-01

    The interactions of the lignin model, the lignin oligomer with degree of polymerization n = 2, with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid were investigated through DFT calculations in detail. Computational results revealed that lignin dissolution in ionic liquids should be a result of the joint interactions of lignin with anion and cation of ionic liquid, and the formation of ion pair weakens the interactions between lignin and ionic liquid components. Unlike the dominant H-bonds within the lignin-anion interactions, the lignin-cation interactions involve a combination of hydrogen bond and π-stacking. These results would provide mechanistic insights and suggestions for lignocellulosic dissolution in ionic liquids.

  9. Chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane clones selected for varied lignin content

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic materials is a major limitation for their conversion into fermentable sugars. Lignin depletion in new cultivars or transgenic plants has been identified as a way to diminish this recalcitrance. In this study, we assessed the success of a sugarcane breeding program in selecting sugarcane plants with low lignin content, and report the chemical composition and agronomic characteristics of eleven experimental hybrids and two reference samples. The enzymatic digestion of untreated and chemically delignified samples was evaluated to advance the performance of the sugarcane residue (bagasse) in cellulosic-ethanol production processes. Results The ranges for the percentages of glucan, hemicellulose, lignin, and extractive (based on oven-dry biomass) of the experimental hybrids and reference samples were 38% to 43%, 25% to 32%, 17% to 24%, and 1.6% to 7.5%, respectively. The samples with the smallest amounts of lignin did not produce the largest amounts of total polysaccharides. Instead, a variable increase in the mass of a number of components, including extractives, seemed to compensate for the reduction in lignin content. Hydroxycinnamic acids accounted for a significant part of the aromatic compounds in the samples, with p-coumaric acid predominating, whereas ferulic acid was present only in low amounts. Hydroxycinnamic acids with ester linkage to the hemicelluloses varied from 2.3% to 3.6%. The percentage of total hydroxycinnamic acids (including the fraction linked to lignin through ether linkages) varied from 5.0% to 9.2%, and correlated to some extent with the lignin content. These clones released up to 31% of glucose after 72 hours of digestion with commercial cellulases, whereas chemically delignified samples led to cellulose conversion values of more than 80%. However, plants with lower lignin content required less delignification to reach higher efficiencies of cellulose conversion during the enzymatic treatment

  10. Challenging/interesting lignin times

    DOE PAGES

    Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-31

    Anyone who is working in the fuels industry knows that we are living in challenging times. On a personal note, I recall that ~5 years ago, some of my children's friends headed out into the petroleum industry to start their careers and several have now returned because of the retrenching work force. Despite these challenging times, the cellulosic ethanol industry continues to develop commercial operations, but with today's cost structure, biofuels production facilities have certainly slowed their pace of development and roll-out. Furthermore, the biological technology platform for biorefining plant polysaccharides to biofuels has been reported to have an intrinsicmore » advantage, if it can convert its waste lignin stream to value-added components.[1]« less

  11. Challenging/interesting lignin times

    SciTech Connect

    Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-31

    Anyone who is working in the fuels industry knows that we are living in challenging times. On a personal note, I recall that ~5 years ago, some of my children's friends headed out into the petroleum industry to start their careers and several have now returned because of the retrenching work force. Despite these challenging times, the cellulosic ethanol industry continues to develop commercial operations, but with today's cost structure, biofuels production facilities have certainly slowed their pace of development and roll-out. Furthermore, the biological technology platform for biorefining plant polysaccharides to biofuels has been reported to have an intrinsic advantage, if it can convert its waste lignin stream to value-added components.[1

  12. Challenging/interesting lignin times

    SciTech Connect

    Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-31

    Anyone who is working in the fuels industry knows that we are living in challenging times. On a personal note, I recall that ~5 years ago, some of my children's friends headed out into the petroleum industry to start their careers and several have now returned because of the retrenching work force. Despite these challenging times, the cellulosic ethanol industry continues to develop commercial operations, but with today's cost structure, biofuels production facilities have certainly slowed their pace of development and roll-out. Furthermore, the biological technology platform for biorefining plant polysaccharides to biofuels has been reported to have an intrinsic advantage, if it can convert its waste lignin stream to value-added components.[1

  13. Pseudo-lignin formation and its impact on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fan; Jung, Seokwon; Ragauskas, Arthur

    2012-08-01

    Pseudo-lignin, which can be broadly defined as aromatic material that yields a positive Klason lignin value and is not derived from native lignin, has been recently reported to form during the dilute acid pretreatment of poplar holocellulose. To investigate the chemistry of pseudo-lignin formation, GPC, FT-IR and 13C NMR were utilized to characterize pseudo-lignin extracted from dilute-acid pretreated α-cellulose and holocellulose. The results showed that pseudo-lignin consisting of carbonyl, carboxylic, aromatic and aliphatic structures was produced from dilute acid pretreated cellulose and hemicellulose. Pseudo-lignin extracted from holocellulose pretreated at different conditions had similar molecular weights (Mn∼1000 g/mol; Mw∼5000 g/mol) and structural features (carbonyl, carboxylic, aromatic and methoxy structures). These characterizations have provided the pseudo-lignin formation mechanisms during pretreatment. The presence and structure of pseudo-lignin is important since pseudo-lignin decreases the enzymatic conversion.

  14. Novel multienzyme oxidative biocatalyst for lignin bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Crestini, Claudia; Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele

    2011-08-15

    A novel multienzyme biocatalyst, based on coimmobilization of the laccase and horseradish peroxidase by cross linking and layer-by-layer coating with polyelectrolyte, was designed, synthesized and applied at the development of an oxidative cascade process on lignin. The efficiency and specificity of the new LbL-multienzyme system, the occurrence of a synergy of the co-immobilized enzymes, the lignin oxidation pathway and the nature of the structural modifications occurred in treated lignins have been investigated in the present effort by means of GPC analysis and quantitative (31)P NMR techniques.

  15. FT-Raman investigation of milled-wood lignins : softwood, hardwood, and chemically modified black spruce lignins

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; James D. McSweeny; Sally A. Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being increasingly applied to study wood and other lignin-containing biomass/biomaterials. Lignin’s contribution to the Raman spectra of such materials needs to be understood in the context of various lignin structures, substructures, and functional groups so that lignin-specific features could be identified and the spectral information could be...

  16. Lignin Sensor Based On Flash-Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwack, Eug Y.; Lawson, Daniel D.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy

    1990-01-01

    New lignin sensor takes only few minutes to measure lignin content of specimen of wood, pulp, paper, or similar material. Includes flash pyrolizer and ion-trap detector that acts as mass spectrometer. Apparatus measures amount of molecular fragments of lignin in pyrolysis products of samples. Helpful in controlling digestors in paper mills to maintain required lignin content, and also in bleaching plants, where good control of bleaching becomes possible if quick determination of lignin content made.

  17. Lignin Sensor Based On Flash-Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwack, Eug Y.; Lawson, Daniel D.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy

    1990-01-01

    New lignin sensor takes only few minutes to measure lignin content of specimen of wood, pulp, paper, or similar material. Includes flash pyrolizer and ion-trap detector that acts as mass spectrometer. Apparatus measures amount of molecular fragments of lignin in pyrolysis products of samples. Helpful in controlling digestors in paper mills to maintain required lignin content, and also in bleaching plants, where good control of bleaching becomes possible if quick determination of lignin content made.

  18. Extensive genomic characterization of a set of near-isogenic lines for heterotic QTL in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the crucial role that heterosis has played in crop improvement, its genetic and molecular bases are still elusive. Several types of structured populations were used to discover the genetic architecture underlying complex phenotypes, and several QTL related to heterosis were detected. However, such analyses generally lacked the statistical power required for the detailed characterization of individual QTL. Currently, QTL introgression into near-isogenic materials is considered the most effective strategy to this end, despite such materials inevitably contain a variable, unknown and undesired proportion of non-isogenic genome. An introgression program based on residual heterozygous lines allowed us to develop five pairs of maize (Zea mays L.) near-isogenic lines (NILs) suitable for the fine characterization of three major heterotic QTL previously detected. Here we describe the results of the detailed genomic characterization of these NILs that we undertook to establish their genotypic structure, to verify the presence of the expected genotypes within target QTL regions, and to determine the extent and location of residual non-isogenic genomic regions. Results The SNP genotyping approach allowed us to determine the parent-of-origin allele for 14,937 polymorphic SNPs and to describe in detail the genotypic structure of all NILs. The correct introgression was confirmed for all target QTL in the respective NIL and several non-isogenic regions were detected genome-wide. Possible linkage drag effects associated to the specific introgressed regions were observed. The extent and position of other non-isogenic regions varied among NIL pairs, probably deriving from random segregating sections still present at the separation of lineages within pairs. Conclusions The results of this work strongly suggest that the actual isogenicity and the genotypic architecture of near-isogenic materials should be monitored both during the introgression procedure and on the

  19. Genome-Wide Association Mapping in the Global Diversity Set Reveals New QTL Controlling Root System and Related Shoot Variation in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Stephan; Kortz, Annika; Léon, Jens; Naz, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    The fibrous root system is a visible sign of ecological adaptation among barley natural populations. In the present study, we utilized rich barley diversity to dissect the genetic basis of root system variation and its link with shoot attributes under well-water and drought conditions. Genome-wide association mapping of phenotype data using a dense genetic map (5892 SNP markers) revealed 17 putative QTL for root and shoot traits. Among these, at 14 loci the preeminence of exotic QTL alleles resulted in trait improvements. The most promising QTL were quantified using haplotype analysis at local and global genome levels. The strongest QTL was found on chromosome 1H which accounted for root dry weight and tiller number simultaneously. Candidate gene analysis across the targeted region detected a crucial amino acid substitution mutation in the conserved domain of a WRKY29 transcription factor among genotypes bearing major and minor QTL alleles. Similarly, the drought inducible QTL QRdw.5H (5H, 95.0 cM) seems to underlie 37 amino acid deletion and substitution mutations in the conserved domain of two related genes CBF10B and CBF10A, respectively. The identification and further characterization of these candidate genes will be essential to decipher genetics behind developmental and natural adaptation mechanisms of barley. PMID:27486472

  20. GWAS analysis of QTL for enteric septicemia of catfish and their involved genes suggest evolutionary conservation of a molecular mechanism of disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Liu, Shikai; Geng, Xin; Jin, Yulin; Jiang, Chen; Bao, Lisui; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jiaren; Sun, Luyang; Wang, Xiaozhu; Li, Ning; Tan, Suxu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-02-01

    Disease problems cause major economic losses for the aquaculture industries. In catfish, enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the leading disease problem, causing tens of millions of dollars of annual economic losses. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study to determine quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance against ESC using an interspecific hybrid system. Five hundred fish were used in the analysis and 192 phenotypic extremes were used for genotyping with the catfish 250K SNP arrays. A genomic region on linkage group (LG) 1 was found significantly associated with ESC disease resistance. In addition, two suggestively associated QTL for ESC resistance were identified on LG 12 and LG 16. The nlrc3 duplicates were identified within all the three QTL, suggesting their importance in association with the QTL. Within the significant QTL on LG 1, 16 genes with known functions in immunity were identified. Of particular interest is the nck1 gene nearby the most significantly associated SNP. Nck1 was known to function as an adaptor to facilitating the pathogenesis of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in humans. E. ictaluri and EPEC pathogens belong to the same bacterial family and share many common characteristics. The fact that nck1 is mapped in the QTL and that it was significantly upregulated in channel catfish intestine after ESC challenge suggested its candidacy of being involved in resistance/susceptibility of ESC.

  1. QTL mapping for a trade-off between leaf and bud production in a recombinant inbred population of Microseris douglasii and M. bigelovii (Asteraceae, Lactuceae): a potential preadaptation for the colonization of serpentine soils.

    PubMed

    Gailing, O; Macnair, M R; Bachmann, K

    2004-07-01

    The different response to growth on serpentine soil is a major autecological difference between the annual asteracean species Microseris douglasii and M. bigelovii, with nearly non-overlapping distribution ranges in California. Early flowering and seed set is regarded as a crucial character contributing to escape drought and thus is strongly correlated with survival and reproductive success on serpentine as naturally toxic soil. M. bigelovii (strain C94) from non-serpentine soil produces more leaves at the expense of bud production in the first growing phase than M. douglasii (B14) from serpentine soil. A QTL mapping study for this trade-off and for other growth-related traits was performed after six generations of inbreeding (F7) from a single interspecific hybrid between B14 and C94 on plants that were grown on serpentine and alternatively on normal potting soil. The trade-off is mainly correlated with markers on one map region on linkage group 03a (lg03a) with major phenotypic effects (phenotypic variance explained [PVE] = 18.8 - 31.7 %). Plants with the M. douglasii allele in QTL-B1 (QTL-NL1) produce more buds but fewer leaves in the first 119 days on both soil types. Three modifier QTL could be mapped for bud and leaf production. In one modifier (QTL-B2 = QTL-NL4) the M. douglasii allele is again associated with more buds but fewer leaves. QTL mapped for bud set in the F6 co-localize with QTL-B1 (major QTL) and QTL-B3. Two additional QTL for leaf length and red coloration of leaves could be mapped to one map region on lg03a. Co-localization of the two QTL loci with major phenotypic effects on bud and leaf production strongly suggests that a major genetic locus controls the trade-off between the two adaptive traits. The importance of mutational changes in major genes for the adaptation to stressful environments is discussed.

  2. Genetic linkage map construction and QTL mapping of cadmium accumulation in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Liangju; Gong, Yiqin; Dai, Wenhao; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wen, Tiancai; Liu, Liwang

    2012-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread soil pollutant and poses a significant threat to human health via the food chain. Large phenotypic variations in Cd concentration of radish roots and shoots have been observed. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of Cd accumulation in radish remain to be elucidated. In this study, a genetic linkage map was constructed using an F(2) mapping population derived from a cross between a high Cd-accumulating cultivar NAU-Dysx and a low Cd-accumulating cultivar NAU-Yh. The linkage map consisted of 523 SRAP, RAPD, SSR, ISSR, RAMP, and RGA markers and had a total length of 1,678.2 cM with a mean distance of 3.4 cM between two markers. All mapped markers distributed on nine linkage groups (LGs) having sizes between 134.7 and 236.8 cM. Four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root Cd accumulation were mapped on LGs 1, 4, 6, and 9, which accounted for 9.86 to 48.64 % of all phenotypic variance. Two QTLs associated with shoot Cd accumulation were detected on LG1 and 3, which accounted for 17.08 and 29.53 % of phenotypic variance, respectively. A major-effect QTL, qRCd9 (QTL for root Cd accumulation on LG9), was identified on LG 9 flanked by NAUrp011_754 and EM5me6_286 markers with a high LOD value of 23.6, which accounted for 48.64 % of the total phenotypic variance in Cd accumulation of F(2) lines. The results indicated that qRCd9 is a novel QTL responsible for controlling root Cd accumulation in radish, and the identification of specific molecular markers tightly linked to the major QTL could be further applied for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in low-Cd content radish breeding program.

  3. seeQTL: a searchable database for human eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Shabalin, Andrey A; Huang, Shunping; Madar, Vered; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wang, Wei; Zou, Fei; Sun, Wei; Sullivan, Patrick F; Wright, Fred A

    2012-02-01

    seeQTL is a comprehensive and versatile eQTL database, including various eQTL studies and a meta-analysis of HapMap eQTL information. The database presents eQTL association results in a convenient browser, using both segmented local-association plots and genome-wide Manhattan plots. seeQTL is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.bios.unc.edu/research/genomic_software/seeQTL/. fred_wright@unc.edu; kxia@bios.unc.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. seeQTL: a searchable database for human eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kai; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Huang, Shunping; Madar, Vered; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wang, Wei; Zou, Fei; Sun, Wei; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Wright, Fred A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: seeQTL is a comprehensive and versatile eQTL database, including various eQTL studies and a meta-analysis of HapMap eQTL information. The database presents eQTL association results in a convenient browser, using both segmented local-association plots and genome-wide Manhattan plots. Availability and implementation: seeQTL is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.bios.unc.edu/research/genomic_software/seeQTL/. Contact: fred_wright@unc.edu; kxia@bios.unc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22171328

  5. Sequestration and Transport of Lignin Monomeric Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.J.; Miao, Y.-C.; Zhang, K.-W.

    2011-01-18

    Lignin is the second most abundant terrestrial biopolymer after cellulose. It is essential for the viability of vascular plants. Lignin precursors, the monolignols, are synthesized within the cytosol of the cell. Thereafter, these monomeric precursors are exported into the cell wall, where they are polymerized and integrated into the wall matrix. Accordingly, transport of monolignols across cell membranes is a critical step affecting deposition of lignin in the secondarily thickened cell wall. While the biosynthesis of monolignols is relatively well understood, our knowledge of sequestration and transport of these monomers is sketchy. In this article, we review different hypotheses on monolignol transport and summarize the recent progresses toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying monolignol sequestration and transport across membranes. Deciphering molecular mechanisms for lignin precursor transport will support a better biotechnological solution to manipulate plant lignification for more efficient agricultural and industrial applications of cell wall biomass.

  6. Lignin degradation in wood-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Geib, Scott M; Filley, Timothy R; Hatcher, Patrick G; Hoover, Kelli; Carlson, John E; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria del Mar; Nakagawa-Izumi, Akiko; Sleighter, Rachel L; Tien, Ming

    2008-09-02

    The aromatic polymer lignin protects plants from most forms of microbial attack. Despite the fact that a significant fraction of all lignocellulose degraded passes through arthropod guts, the fate of lignin in these systems is not known. Using tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis, we show lignin degradation by two insect species, the Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) and the Pacific dampwood termite (Zootermopsis angusticollis). In both the beetle and termite, significant levels of propyl side-chain oxidation (depolymerization) and demethylation of ring methoxyl groups is detected; for the termite, ring hydroxylation is also observed. In addition, culture-independent fungal gut community analysis of A. glabripennis identified a single species of fungus in the Fusarium solani/Nectria haematococca species complex. This is a soft-rot fungus that may be contributing to wood degradation. These results transform our understanding of lignin degradation by wood-feeding insects.

  7. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, III, Anthony L.

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  8. Use of lignin extracted from different plant sources as standards in the spectrophotometric acetyl bromide lignin method.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Romualdo S; Kerley, Monty S

    2011-04-27

    A nongravimetric acetyl bromide lignin (ABL) method was evaluated to quantify lignin concentration in a variety of plant materials. The traditional approach to lignin quantification required extraction of lignin with acidic dioxane and its isolation from each plant sample to construct a standard curve via spectrophotometric analysis. Lignin concentration was then measured in pre-extracted plant cell walls. However, this presented a methodological complexity because extraction and isolation procedures are lengthy and tedious, particularly if there are many samples involved. This work was targeted to simplify lignin quantification. Our hypothesis was that any lignin, regardless of its botanical origin, could be used to construct a standard curve for the purpose of determining lignin concentration in a variety of plants. To test our hypothesis, lignins were isolated from a range of diverse plants and, along with three commercial lignins, standard curves were built and compared among them. Slopes and intercepts derived from these standard curves were close enough to allow utilization of a mean extinction coefficient in the regression equation to estimate lignin concentration in any plant, independent of its botanical origin. Lignin quantification by use of a common regression equation obviates the steps of lignin extraction, isolation, and standard curve construction, which substantially expedites the ABL method. Acetyl bromide lignin method is a fast, convenient analytical procedure that may routinely be used to quantify lignin.

  9. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Davison, Brian H; Standaert, Robert F; Davis, Dr. Mark F.; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S) and p- hydroxyphenyl (H). It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular-weight lignin polymers, and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di- and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p- electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages ( - or -5) react poorly and tend to cap the polymer. In general, -5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  10. Metagenomic scaffolds enable combinatorial lignin transformation

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Cameron R.; Singh, Rahul; VanInsberghe, David; Ievdokymenko, Kateryna; Budwill, Karen; Mohn, William W.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the microbial transformation of lignocellulosic biomass is essential to developing modern biorefining processes that alleviate reliance on petroleum-derived energy and chemicals. Many current bioprocess streams depend on the genetic tractability of Escherichia coli with a primary emphasis on engineering cellulose/hemicellulose catabolism, small molecule production, and resistance to product inhibition. Conversely, bioprocess streams for lignin transformation remain embryonic, with relatively few environmental strains or enzymes implicated. Here we develop a biosensor responsive to monoaromatic lignin transformation products compatible with functional screening in E. coli. We use this biosensor to retrieve metagenomic scaffolds sourced from coal bed bacterial communities conferring an array of lignin transformation phenotypes that synergize in combination. Transposon mutagenesis and comparative sequence analysis of active clones identified genes encoding six functional classes mediating lignin transformation phenotypes that appear to be rearrayed in nature via horizontal gene transfer. Lignin transformation activity was then demonstrated for one of the predicted gene products encoding a multicopper oxidase to validate the screen. These results illuminate cellular and community-wide networks acting on aromatic polymers and expand the toolkit for engineering recombinant lignin transformation based on ecological design principles. PMID:24982175

  11. Catalytic depolymerization of lignin in supercritical ethanol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoming; Korányi, Tamás I; Boot, Michael D; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2014-08-01

    One-step valorization of soda lignin in supercritical ethanol using a CuMgAlOx catalyst results in high monomer yield (23 wt%) without char formation. Aromatics are the main products. The catalyst combines excellent deoxygenation with low ring-hydrogenation activity. Almost half of the monomer fraction is free from oxygen. Elemental analysis of the THF-soluble lignin residue after 8 h reaction showed a 68% reduction in O/C and 24% increase in H/C atomic ratios as compared to the starting Protobind P1000 lignin. Prolonged reaction times enhanced lignin depolymerization and reduced the amount of repolymerized products. Phenolic hydroxyl groups were found to be the main actors in repolymerization and char formation. 2D HSQC NMR analysis evidenced that ethanol reacts by alkylation and esterification with lignin fragments. Alkylation was found to play an important role in suppressing repolymerization. Ethanol acts as a capping agent, stabilizing the highly reactive phenolic intermediates by O-alkylating the hydroxyl groups and by C-alkylating the aromatic rings. The use of ethanol is significantly more effective in producing monomers and avoiding char than the use of methanol. A possible reaction network of the reactions between the ethanol and lignin fragments is discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Multi-step biocatalytic depolymerization of lignin.

    PubMed

    Picart, Pere; Liu, Haifeng; Grande, Philipp M; Anders, Nico; Zhu, Leilei; Klankermayer, Jürgen; Leitner, Walter; Domínguez de María, Pablo; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Schallmey, Anett

    2017-08-01

    Lignin is a biomass-derived aromatic polymer that has been identified as a potential renewable source of aromatic chemicals and other valuable compounds. The valorization of lignin, however, represents a great challenge due to its high inherent functionalization, what compromises the identification of chemical routes for its selective depolymerization. In this work, an in vitro biocatalytic depolymerization process is presented, that was applied to lignin samples obtained from beech wood through OrganoCat pretreatment, resulting in a mixture of lignin-derived aromatic monomers. The reported biocracking route comprises first a laccase-mediator system to specifically oxidize the Cα hydroxyl group in the β-O-4 structure of lignin. Subsequently, selective β-O-4 ether cleavage of the oxidized β-O-4 linkages is achieved with β-etherases and a glutathione lyase. The combined enzymatic approach yielded an oily fraction of low-molecular-mass aromatic compounds, comprising coniferylaldehyde and other guaiacyl and syringyl units, as well as some larger (soluble) fractions. Upon further optimization, the reported biocatalytic route may open a valuable approach for lignin processing and valorization under mild reaction conditions.

  13. Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) in Bayesian Multiple QTL Mapping.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Daniel; Yi, Nengjun

    2009-03-15

    Mapping multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) is commonly viewed as a problem of model selection. Various model selection criteria have been proposed, primarily in the non-Bayesian framework. The deviance information criterion (DIC) is the most popular criterion for Bayesian model selection and model comparison but has not been applied to Bayesian multiple QTL mapping. A derivation of the DIC is presented for multiple interacting QTL models and calculation of the DIC is demonstrated using posterior samples generated by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms. The DIC measures posterior predictive error by penalizing the fit of a model (deviance) by its complexity, determined by the effective number of parameters. The effective number of parameters simultaneously accounts for the sample size, the cross design, the number and lengths of chromosomes, covariates, the number of QTL, the type of QTL effects, and QTL effect sizes. The DIC provides a computationally efficient way to perform sensitivity analysis and can be used to quantitatively evaluate if including environmental effects, gene-gene interactions, and/or gene-environment interactions in the prior specification is worth the extra parameterization. The DIC has been implemented in the freely available package R/qtlbim, which greatly facilitates the general usage of Bayesian methodology for genome-wide interacting QTL analysis.

  14. Concordance analysis for QTL detection in dairy cattle: a case study of leg morphology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The present availability of sequence data gives new opportunities to narrow down from QTL (quantitative trait locus) regions to causative mutations. Our objective was to decrease the number of candidate causative mutations in a QTL region. For this, a concordance analysis was applied for a leg conformation trait in dairy cattle. Several QTL were detected for which the QTL status (homozygous or heterozygous for the QTL) was inferred for each individual. Subsequently, the inferred QTL status was used in a concordance analysis to reduce the number of candidate mutations. Methods Twenty QTL for rear leg set side view were mapped using Bayes C. Marker effects estimated during QTL mapping were used to infer the QTL status for each individual. Subsequently, polymorphisms present in the QTL regions were extracted from the whole-genome sequences of 71 Holstein bulls. Only polymorphisms for which the status was concordant with the QTL status were kept as candidate causative mutations. Results QTL status could be inferred for 15 of the 20 QTL. The number of concordant polymorphisms differed between QTL and depended on the number of QTL statuses that could be inferred and the linkage disequilibrium in the QTL region. For some QTL, the concordance analysis was efficient and narrowed down to a limited number of candidate mutations located in one or two genes, while for other QTL a large number of genes contained concordant polymorphisms. Conclusions For regions for which the concordance analysis could be performed, we were able to reduce the number of candidate mutations. For part of the QTL, the concordant analyses narrowed QTL regions down to a limited number of genes, of which some are known for their role in limb or skeletal development in humans and mice. Mutations in these genes are good candidates for QTN (quantitative trait nucleotides) influencing rear leg set side view. PMID:24884971

  15. Examination of the thermal decomposition of kraft pine lignin by Fourier transform infrared evolved gas analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, R.A.; Lephardt, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of kraft lignin was examined by Fourier-transform IR evolved-gas analysis, a technique designed for on-the-fly, simultaneous monitoring of multiple vapor-phase species. Initial degradation occurs at 120-300 degrees from bond fragmentation in the phenylpropane side chains as evidenced by the formation of HCO2H, HCHO, CO2, H2O and SO2. The presence of SO2 is supporting evidence that S from the kraft pulping process may be incorporated into the lignin structure in the form of sulfoxide and(or) sulfone linkages. Major decomposition initiates at approximately 300 degrees and extends to 480 degrees at which point half the intital weight has been lost. MeOH 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), and a 2-methoxy-4-alkyl- substituted phenol are the most apparent species evolving in this region and indicate fragmentation of the major chain linkages between the monomeric phenol units in the lignin structure.

  16. Fractionation-purification of an industrial kraft lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K.; Kirk, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of the by-product lignins from kraft pulping operations (kraft lignins) as renewable chemical resources has long been recognized. Research through several decades into the utilization of these modified lignins has resulted in a number of products, and, because of changes in the economics of petroleum-based chemicals, research is probably accelerating. Ready availability has caused kraft lignins also to be used widely as experimental lignins for studies of microbiological degradation and for other investigations. Unfortunately, kraft lignins have often been studied with little if any purification, even without freeing them of non-lignin-derived materials and low-molecular weight kraft degradation products of lignin. As a result, it is often difficult to interpret reported findings. The present paper describes the simple purification, by fractionation, of an industrial kraft lignin and some of the properties of the fractions.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Modified Soda Lignin with Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangda; Lin, Jian; Zhao, Guangjie

    2016-10-07

    Soda lignin does not have thermal flowing characteristics and it is impossible for it to be further thermally molded. To achieve the fusibility of soda lignin for fiber preparation by melt-spinning, an effective method for soda lignin modification was conducted by cooking it with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 at various ratios. The higher the ratio of PEG that was used, the more PEG molecular chains were grafted at the alpha carbon of the soda lignin through ether bonds, resulting in lower thermal transition temperatures and more excellent fusibility. The modified soda lignin with a weight ratio of lignin to PEG of 1:4 exhibited a relative thermal stability of molten viscosity at selected temperatures. Thereafter, the resultant fusible soda lignin was successfully melt-spun into filaments with an average diameter of 33 ± 5 μm, which is smaller than that of some industrial lignins. Accordingly, it is possible to utilize soda lignin to produce fibrous carbonaceous materials.

  18. The Acetyl Bromide Method Is Faster, Simpler and Presents Best Recovery of Lignin in Different Herbaceous Tissues than Klason and Thioglycolic Acid Methods

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Vilar, Flavia Carolina; Siqueira-Soares, Rita de Cássia; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; de Oliveira, Dyoni Matias; Ferro, Ana Paula; da Rocha, George Jackson; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes L.; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    We compared the amount of lignin as determined by the three most traditional methods for lignin measurement in three tissues (sugarcane bagasse, soybean roots and soybean seed coat) contrasting for lignin amount and composition. Although all methods presented high reproducibility, major inconsistencies among them were found. The amount of lignin determined by thioglycolic acid method was severely lower than that provided by the other methods (up to 95%) in all tissues analyzed. Klason method was quite similar to acetyl bromide in tissues containing higher amounts of lignin, but presented lower recovery of lignin in the less lignified tissue. To investigate the causes of the inconsistencies observed, we determined the monomer composition of all plant materials, but found no correlation. We found that the low recovery of lignin presented by the thioglycolic acid method were due losses of lignin in the residues disposed throughout the procedures. The production of furfurals by acetyl bromide method does not explain the differences observed. The acetyl bromide method is the simplest and fastest among the methods evaluated presenting similar or best recovery of lignin in all the tissues assessed. PMID:25330077

  19. The acetyl bromide method is faster, simpler and presents best recovery of lignin in different herbaceous tissues than Klason and thioglycolic acid methods.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Vilar, Flavia Carolina; Siqueira-Soares, Rita de Cássia; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; de Oliveira, Dyoni Matias; Ferro, Ana Paula; da Rocha, George Jackson; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes L; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    We compared the amount of lignin as determined by the three most traditional methods for lignin measurement in three tissues (sugarcane bagasse, soybean roots and soybean seed coat) contrasting for lignin amount and composition. Although all methods presented high reproducibility, major inconsistencies among them were found. The amount of lignin determined by thioglycolic acid method was severely lower than that provided by the other methods (up to 95%) in all tissues analyzed. Klason method was quite similar to acetyl bromide in tissues containing higher amounts of lignin, but presented lower recovery of lignin in the less lignified tissue. To investigate the causes of the inconsistencies observed, we determined the monomer composition of all plant materials, but found no correlation. We found that the low recovery of lignin presented by the thioglycolic acid method were due losses of lignin in the residues disposed throughout the procedures. The production of furfurals by acetyl bromide method does not explain the differences observed. The acetyl bromide method is the simplest and fastest among the methods evaluated presenting similar or best recovery of lignin in all the tissues assessed.

  20. Mapping of Novel QTL Regulating Grain Shattering Using Doubled Haploid Population in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyu-Ho; Kang, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The critical evolutionary step during domestication of major cereals was elimination of seed shattering because the easy-to-shatter trait in wild relatives results in a severe reduction in yield. In this study, we analyzed the QTLs associated with shattering employing a high-density genetic map in doubled haploid (DH) population of rice (Oryza sativa L.). A genetic linkage map was generated with 217 microsatellite markers spanning 2082.4 cM and covering 12 rice chromosomes with an average interval of 9.6 cM between markers based on 120 DHLs derived from a cross between Cheongcheong indica type cultivar and Nagdong japonica type cultivar. In the QTL analysis, five QTLs pertaining to the breaking tensile strength (BTS) were detected in 2013 and 2015. Two regions of the QTLs related to BTS on chromosome 1 and chromosome 6 were detected. Several important genes are distributed in 1 Mbp region of the QTL on chromosome 6 and they are related to the formation of abscission layer. We decide to name this QTL qSh6 and the candidate genes in the qSh6 region can be employed usefully in further research for cloning. PMID:27419124

  1. Genetic architecture of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri: the essential role of QTL x environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Frérot, Hélène; Faucon, Michel-Pierre; Willems, Glenda; Godé, Cécile; Courseaux, Adeline; Darracq, Aude; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to determine the main genomic regions that control zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri and to examine genotype x environment effects on phenotypic variance. To do so, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using an interspecific A. halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F(2) population. *The F(2) progeny as well as representatives of the parental populations were cultivated on soils at two different Zn concentrations. A linkage map was constructed using 70 markers. *In both low and high pollution treatments, zinc hyperaccumulation showed high broad-sense heritability (81.9 and 74.7%, respectively). Five significant QTLs were detected: two QTLs specific to the low pollution treatment (chromosomes 1 and 4), and three QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3, 6 and 7). These QTLs explained 50.1 and 36.5% of the phenotypic variance in low and high pollution treatments, respectively. Two QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3 and 6) showed significant QTL x environment interactions. *The QTL on chromosome 3 largely colocalized with a major QTL previously identified for Zn and cadmium (Cd) tolerance. This suggests that Zn tolerance and hyperaccumulation share, at least partially, a common genetic basis and may have simultaneously evolved on heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  2. Identification of candidate genes encoding an LDL-C QTL in baboons[S

    PubMed Central

    Karere, Genesio M.; Glenn, Jeremy P.; Birnbaum, Shifra; Hafizi, Sussan; Rainwater, David L.; Mahaney, Michael C.; VandeBerg, John L.; Cox, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries, and dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for CVD. We previously identified a cluster of quantitative trait loci (QTL) on baboon chromosome 11 for multiple, related quantitative traits for serum LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). Here we report differentially regulated hepatic genes encoding an LDL-C QTL that influences LDL-C levels in baboons. We performed hepatic whole-genome expression profiling for LDL-C-discordant baboons fed a high-cholesterol, high-fat (HCHF) diet for seven weeks. We detected expression of 117 genes within the QTL 2-LOD support interval. Three genes were differentially expressed in low LDL-C responders and 8 in high LDL-C responders in response to a HCHF diet. Seven genes (ACVR1B, CALCOCO1, DGKA, ERBB3, KRT73, MYL6B, TENC1) showed discordant expression between low and high LDL-C responders. To prioritize candidate genes, we integrated miRNA and mRNA expression profiles using network tools and found that four candidates (ACVR1B, DGKA, ERBB3, TENC1) were miRNA targets and that the miRNAs were inversely expressed to the target genes. Candidate gene expression was validated using QRT-PCR and Western blotting. This study reveals candidate genes that influence variation in LDL-C in baboons and potential genetic mechanisms for further investigation. PMID:23596326

  3. QTL affecting fitness of hybrids between wild and cultivated soybeans in experimental fields.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yosuke; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Yano, Hiroshi; Takada, Yoshitake; Kato, Shin; Vaughan, Duncan

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting fitness of hybrids between wild soybean (Glycine soja) and cultivated soybean (Glycine max). Seed dormancy and seed number, both of which are important for fitness, were evaluated by testing artificial hybrids of G. soja × G. max in a multiple-site field trial. Generally, the fitness of the F1 hybrids and hybrid derivatives from self-pollination was lower than that of G. soja due to loss of seed dormancy, whereas the fitness of hybrid derivatives with higher proportions of G. soja genetic background was comparable with that of G. soja. These differences were genetically dissected into QTL for each population. Three QTLs for seed dormancy and one QTL for total seed number were detected in the F2 progenies of two diverse cross combinations. At those four QTLs, the G. max alleles reduced seed number and severely reduced seed survival during the winter, suggesting that major genes acquired during soybean adaptation to cultivation have a selective disadvantage in natural habitats. In progenies with a higher proportion of G. soja genetic background, the genetic effects of the G. max alleles were not expressed as phenotypes because the G. soja alleles were dominant over the G. max alleles. Considering the highly inbreeding nature of these species, most hybrid derivatives would disappear quickly in early self-pollinating generations in natural habitats because of the low fitness of plants carrying G. max alleles.

  4. Strategy for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) by Using Human Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; Biloglav, Zrinka; Carothers, Andrew D.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry

    2006-01-01

    Aim To present a novel strategy for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL), using human metapopulations. The strategy is based on the expectation that in geographic clusters of small and distinct human isolates, a combination of founder effect and genetic drift can dramatically increase population frequency of rare QTL variants with large effect. In such cases, the distribution of QT measurements in an “affected” isolate is expected to deviate from that observed in neighboring isolates. Methods We tested this hypothesis in 9 villages from a larger Croatian isolate resource, where 7 Mendelian disorders have been previously reported. The values of 10 physiological and biochemical QTs were measured in a random sample of 1001 individuals (100 inhabitants of each of 9 villages and 101 immigrant controls). Results Significant over- or under- representation of individuals from specific villages in extreme ends of standardized QT measurement distribution was found 10 times more frequently than expected by chance. The large majority of such clusters of individuals with extreme QT values (34/36, 94.4%) originated from the 6 villages with the most pronounced geographic isolation and endogamy. Conclusion Early epidemiological assessment supports the feasibility of the proposed strategy. Clusters of individuals with extreme QT values responsible for over-representation of single villages can usually be linked to a larger pedigree and may be useful for further QTL mapping, using linkage analysis. PMID:16909450

  5. QTL affecting fitness of hybrids between wild and cultivated soybeans in experimental fields

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yosuke; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Yano, Hiroshi; Takada, Yoshitake; Kato, Shin; Vaughan, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting fitness of hybrids between wild soybean (Glycine soja) and cultivated soybean (Glycine max). Seed dormancy and seed number, both of which are important for fitness, were evaluated by testing artificial hybrids of G. soja × G. max in a multiple-site field trial. Generally, the fitness of the F1 hybrids and hybrid derivatives from self-pollination was lower than that of G. soja due to loss of seed dormancy, whereas the fitness of hybrid derivatives with higher proportions of G. soja genetic background was comparable with that of G. soja. These differences were genetically dissected into QTL for each population. Three QTLs for seed dormancy and one QTL for total seed number were detected in the F2 progenies of two diverse cross combinations. At those four QTLs, the G. max alleles reduced seed number and severely reduced seed survival during the winter, suggesting that major genes acquired during soybean adaptation to cultivation have a selective disadvantage in natural habitats. In progenies with a higher proportion of G. soja genetic background, the genetic effects of the G. max alleles were not expressed as phenotypes because the G. soja alleles were dominant over the G. max alleles. Considering the highly inbreeding nature of these species, most hybrid derivatives would disappear quickly in early self-pollinating generations in natural habitats because of the low fitness of plants carrying G. max alleles. PMID:23919159

  6. Multiphase materials with lignin. IV. Blends of hydroxypropyl cellulose with lignin

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Wolfgang G. Glasser

    1989-01-01

    Polymer blends of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and organosolv lignin (OSL) were prepared by mixing in solutions of both pyridine and dioxane, and casting as films, and by mixing in the melt followed by extrusion. All preparations exhibited partial miscibility as evidenced by a single Tg up to a composition of 40 wt % lignin above which phase...

  7. Lignin degradation by a white-rot fungus lacking lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Eggert, C.B.; Eriksson, K.E.L.

    1996-10-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been the organism of choice for studies of lignin degradation and much of this work has focused on two phenol oxidases, lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), secreted by the fungus under ligninolytic conditions. However, many white-rot fungi, including a number of aggressive lignin degraders, seem to operate without expressing LiP activity. Laccase is another phenol oxidase that white-rot fungi often produce. However, the role played by laccase in lignin degradation has remained obscured since its low redox potential appeared to make it incapable of oxidizing non-phenolic lignin constituents. We have identified, Pychnoporus cinnabarinus lacking both LiP and MnP, but a high producer of laccase, to degrade lignin as efficiently as UP producing fungi. We have found that P. cinnabarinus, to overcome the redox potential barrier for laccase, produces a mediator for oxidation of non-phenolic lignin structures. This is the first description of how laccase may be used in a biological system for the degradation of lignin.

  8. Multiphase materials with lignin. VI. Effect of cellulose derivative structure on blend morphology with lignin

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Wolfgang G. Glasser

    1989-01-01

    Polymeric blends of lignin with ethyl cellulose (EC) and cellulose acetate/butyrate (CAB) prepared by solution casting from dioxane. Fracture surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy revealed phase separation when the lignin content exceeded 10% for blends with EC and 5% in the CAB system. While this phase behavior is as predicted for the EC blends, a greater...

  9. Recovering ultraclean lignins of controlled molecular weight from Kraft black-liquor lignins.

    PubMed

    Klett, A S; Chappell, P V; Thies, M C

    2015-08-18

    By operating in a region of liquid-liquid equilibrium, hot acetic acid-water mixtures can be used to simultaneously clean, fractionate, and solvate Kraft black-liquor lignins. Lignin-rich liquid phases of controlled molecular weight with key metals contents reduced to <50 ppm are obtained without a washing step.

  10. Added value of lignin as lignin-based hybrid polyurethane for a compatibilizing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilmiati, S.; Haris Mustafa, J.; Yaumal, A.; Hanum, F.; Chalid, M.

    2017-07-01

    As biomass-based material, lignin contains abundant hydroxyl groups promising to be used as chain extender in building hybrid polyurethanes. Consisting of polyehtylene glycol (PEG) content as hydrophobic part and lignin as hydrophilic part, the hybrid PU is expected to be as a novel compatibilizing agent in new materials production such as polyblends and composites. The hybrid PU was synthesized via two reaction stages, viz. pre-polyurethanization through reacting 4,4'-Methylenebis (Cyclohexyl Isocyanate) (HMDI) and PEG as polyol, and chain extention through adding lignin in the pre-polyurethanization system. The composition effect of lignin in hybrid PU syntehsis, to chemical structure corelated to hydrophobic to hydrophilic ratio, thermal and morphological properties, was evaluated by measuring NMR, FTIR, DSC, TGA and FE-SEM. The experiments showed that addition of lignin was able to extend the pre-polyurethane into hybrid polyurethane and to increase the lignin/polyol ratio in the hybrid polyurethanes, which were indicated by NMR and FTIR Analysis. And change of the ratio lead to increase the glass transition from 60.9 until 62.1°C and degradation temperature from 413.9 until 416.0°C. Observation of the morphology implied that addition of lignin gave more agglomerations. A Further investigation for this characterization study should be focused on a feasibility for this modified lignin as a novel compatibilizing agent.

  11. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin. PMID:26637355

  12. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    DOE PAGES

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; ...

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, wemore » present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.« less

  13. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  14. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-12-04

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50-70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  15. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin

    DOE PAGES

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; ...

    2015-12-04

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we presentmore » x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50-70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.« less

  16. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Kate E; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L; Heins, Richard A; McAndrew, Ryan P; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J; Adams, Paul D; Phillips, George N

    2016-03-04

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50-70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  17. Arabidopsis Seed Content QTL Mapping Using High-Throughput Phenotyping: The Assets of Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jasinski, Sophie; Lécureuil, Alain; Durandet, Monique; Bernard-Moulin, Patrick; Guerche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Seed storage compounds are of crucial importance for human diet, feed and industrial uses. In oleo-proteaginous species like rapeseed, seed oil and protein are the qualitative determinants that conferred economic value to the harvested seed. To date, although the biosynthesis pathways of oil and storage protein are rather well-known, the factors that determine how these types of reserves are partitioned in seeds have to be identified. With the aim of implementing a quantitative genetics approach, requiring phenotyping of 100s of plants, our first objective was to establish near-infrared reflectance spectroscopic (NIRS) predictive equations in order to estimate oil, protein, carbon, and nitrogen content in Arabidopsis seed with high-throughput level. Our results demonstrated that NIRS is a powerful non-destructive, high-throughput method to assess the content of these four major components studied in Arabidopsis seed. With this tool in hand, we analyzed Arabidopsis natural variation for these four components and illustrated that they all displayed a wide range of variation. Finally, NIRS was used in order to map QTL for these four traits using seeds from the Arabidopsis thaliana Ct-1 × Col-0 recombinant inbred line population. Some QTL co-localized with QTL previously identified, but others mapped to chromosomal regions never identified so far for such traits. This paper illustrates the usefulness of NIRS predictive equations to perform accurate high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis seed content, opening new perspectives in gene identification following QTL mapping and genome wide association studies. PMID:27891138

  18. Expression QTL-based analyses reveal candidate causal genes and loci across five tumor types.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyuan; Stram, Alexander; Chen, Constance; Kar, Siddhartha; Gayther, Simon; Pharoah, Paul; Haiman, Christopher; Stranger, Barbara; Kraft, Peter; Freedman, Matthew L

    2014-10-01

    The majority of trait-associated loci discovered through genome-wide association studies are located outside of known protein coding regions. Consequently, it is difficult to ascertain the mechanism underlying these variants and to pinpoint the causal alleles. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) provide an organizing principle to address both of these issues. eQTLs are genetic loci that correlate with RNA transcript levels. Large-scale data sets such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) provide an ideal opportunity to systematically evaluate eQTLs as they have generated multiple data types on hundreds of samples. We evaluated the determinants of gene expression (germline variants and somatic copy number and methylation) and performed cis-eQTL analyses for mRNA expression and miRNA expression in five tumor types (breast, colon, kidney, lung and prostate). We next tested 149 known cancer risk loci for eQTL effects, and observed that 42 (28.2%) were significantly associated with at least one transcript. Lastly, we described a fine-mapping strategy for these 42 eQTL target-gene associations based on an integrated strategy that combines the eQTL level of significance and the regulatory potential as measured by DNaseI hypersensitivity. For each of the risk loci, our analyses suggested 1 to 81 candidate causal variants that may be prioritized for downstream functional analysis. In summary, our study provided a comprehensive landscape of the genetic determinants of gene expression in different tumor types and ranked the genes and loci for further functional assessment of known cancer risk loci. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Expression QTL-based analyses reveal candidate causal genes and loci across five tumor types

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiyuan; Stram, Alexander; Chen, Constance; Kar, Siddhartha; Gayther, Simon; Pharoah, Paul; Haiman, Christopher; Stranger, Barbara; Kraft, Peter; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of trait-associated loci discovered through genome-wide association studies are located outside of known protein coding regions. Consequently, it is difficult to ascertain the mechanism underlying these variants and to pinpoint the causal alleles. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) provide an organizing principle to address both of these issues. eQTLs are genetic loci that correlate with RNA transcript levels. Large-scale data sets such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) provide an ideal opportunity to systematically evaluate eQTLs as they have generated multiple data types on hundreds of samples. We evaluated the determinants of gene expression (germline variants and somatic copy number and methylation) and performed cis-eQTL analyses for mRNA expression and miRNA expression in five tumor types (breast, colon, kidney, lung and prostate). We next tested 149 known cancer risk loci for eQTL effects, and observed that 42 (28.2%) were significantly associated with at least one transcript. Lastly, we described a fine-mapping strategy for these 42 eQTL target–gene associations based on an integrated strategy that combines the eQTL level of significance and the regulatory potential as measured by DNaseI hypersensitivity. For each of the risk loci, our analyses suggested 1 to 81 candidate causal variants that may be prioritized for downstream functional analysis. In summary, our study provided a comprehensive landscape of the genetic determinants of gene expression in different tumor types and ranked the genes and loci for further functional assessment of known cancer risk loci. PMID:24907074

  20. Genetic and QTL analysis of resistance to Xiphinema index in a grapevine cross.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Riaz, S; Roncoroni, N C; Jin, Y; Hu, R; Zhou, R; Walker, M A

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to the dagger nematode Xiphinema index has been an important objective in grape rootstock breeding programs. This nematode not only causes severe feeding damage to the root system, but it also vectors grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), the causal agent of fanleaf degeneration and one of the most severe viral diseases of grape. The established screening procedures for dagger nematode resistance are time consuming and can produce inconsistent results. A fast and reliable greenhouse-based system for screening resistance to X. index that is suitable for genetic studies and capable of evaluating breeding populations is needed. In this report, the dynamics of nematode numbers, gall formation, and root weight loss were investigated using a variety of soil mixes and pot sizes over a 52-week period. Results indicated that the number of galls formed was correlated with the size of the nematode population and with the degree of root weight loss. After inoculation with 100 nematodes, gall formation could be reliably evaluated in 4-8 weeks in most plant growth conditions and results were obtained 6 months more rapidly than past evaluation methods. This modified X. index resistance screening method was successfully applied to 185 of the 188 F(1) progeny from a cross of D8909-15 x F8909-17 (the 9621 population), which segregates for a form of X. index resistance originally derived from Vitis arizonica. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was carried out on both parental genetic maps of 255 markers using MapQTL 4.0. Results revealed that X. index resistance is controlled by a major QTL, designated Xiphinema index Resistance 1 (XiR1), near marker VMC5a10 on chromosome 19. The XiR1 QTL was supported by a LOD score of 36.9 and explained 59.9% of the resistance variance in the mapping population.

  1. Association of sugar content QTL and PQL with physiological traits relevant to frost damage resistance in pea under field and controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Estelle; Fontaine, Véronique; Vuylsteker, Christophe; Sellier, Hélène; Bodèle, Sylvie; Voedts, Najia; Devaux, Rosemonde; Frise, Marlène; Avia, Komlan; Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Bahrman, Nasser; Hanocq, Eric; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Delbreil, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    To increase yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.), autumn sowing would be preferable. Hence, frost tolerance of pea became a major trait of interest for breeders. In order to better understand the cold acclimation in pea, Champagne a frost tolerant line and Terese, a frost sensitive line, and their recombinant inbred lines (RIL) were studied. RIL frost tolerance was evaluated by a frost damage scale under field as well as controlled conditions. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach was used to identify chromosomal regions linked to frost tolerance. The detected QTL explained from 6.5 to 46.5% of the phenotypic variance. Amongst them, those located on linkage groups 5 and 6 were consistent with over all experiments, in field as well as in controlled environments. In order to improve the understanding of the frost tolerance mechanisms, several cold acclimation key characters such as concentration of sugars, electrolyte leakage, osmotic pressure, and activity of RuBisCO were assessed. Some of these physiological QTL colocalised with QTL for frost damage, in particular two raffinose QTL on LG5 and LG6 and one RuBisCO activity QTL on LG6, explaining 8.8 to 27.0% of the phenotypic variance. In addition, protein quantitative loci were mapped; some of them colocalised with frost damage and physiological QTL on LG5 and LG6, explaining 16.0-43.6% of the phenotypic variance. Raffinose metabolism and RuBisCO activity and its effect on photosynthesis might play a major role in cold acclimation of pea.

  2. Green Diesel from Kraft Lignin in Three Steps.

    PubMed

    Löfstedt, Joakim; Dahlstrand, Christian; Orebom, Alexander; Meuzelaar, Gerrit; Sawadjoon, Supaporn; Galkin, Maxim V; Agback, Peter; Wimby, Martin; Corresa, Elena; Mathieu, Yannick; Sauvanaud, Laurent; Eriksson, Sören; Corma, Avelino; Samec, Joseph S M

    2016-06-22

    Precipitated kraft lignin from black liquor was converted into green diesel in three steps. A mild Ni-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis using 2-propanol generated a lignin residue in which the ethers, carbonyls, and olefins were reduced. An organocatalyzed esterification of the lignin residue with an in situ prepared tall oil fatty acid anhydride gave an esterified lignin residue that was soluble in light gas oil. The esterified lignin residue was coprocessed with light gas oil in a continous hydrotreater to produce a green diesel. This approach will enable the development of new techniques to process commercial lignin in existing oil refinery infrastructures to standardized transportation fuels in the future.

  3. Carbon Fiber Production from a Kraft Hardwood Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Darren A; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2008-01-01

    Lignin is a renewable resource material that is being evaluated for the low cost production of carbon fiber for automotive and other applications. Solvent extraction of a comm