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Sample records for major mobility disability

  1. Muscle strength and BMI as predictors of major mobility disability in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders pilot (LIFE-P)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle weakness and obesity are two significant threats to mobility facing the increasing number of older adults. To date, there are no studies that have examined the association of strength and body mass index (BMI) on event rates on a widely used performance measure of major mobility disability. T...

  2. Antihypertensive use and the effect of a physical activity intervention in the prevention of major mobility disability among older adults: The LIFE study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: This subgroup analysis of the Lifestyle Intervention and Independence for Elders trial evaluates the impact of a long-term physical activity (PA) intervention on rates of major mobility disability (MMD) among older adults according to their antihypertensive medication use. METHODS: Lifes...

  3. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  4. Disability, resources, role demands and mobility handicap.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P A; Badley, E M; Tennant, A

    1995-01-01

    Research on disablement highlights a wide variability in the impact of disabling conditions on individuals' lives. However, in most of this work, the relationships between impairment/disability and features of individuals' social and physical environments are not specified conceptually. Recent conceptual work in the context of the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH) suggests that the impact of impairment/disability on individuals' lives is contingent on levels of resources and other aspects of social context. The research question addressed in this paper is whether selected social factors affect the impact of impairment/disability on mobility handicap, defined as 'the individual's ability to move about effectively in his/her surroundings'. Two types of social factors are considered: resources such as help from others or having a car available; and social role obligations such as having a job or visiting relatives. Data are derived from a 1986 probability sample of 570 individuals with disabilities living in communities in Calderdale, Yorkshire, England. Multiple-regression models indicate that the impact of walking disability on mobility handicap was reduced by availability of a car in the household and school or job obligations. Other impairments/disabilities, resources and social role demands examined did not act on mobility outcomes in this manner. Implications for conceptualizing and testing relationships between impairment, disability, handicap and social and physical environments are discussed. A critical task for future research is the investigation of personal and social resources and barriers that may moderate the impact of disability on individuals' lives.

  5. Mobility disability and life satisfaction in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Mollaoğlu, Mukadder; Tuncay, Fatma Özkan; Fertelli, Tülay Kars

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this descriptive and analytical study is to examine mobility disability and life satisfaction in elderly people living in nursing home residences and analyze the relationship between them. The study was conducted over 78 elderly people in two nursing home residences. The data of this study were obtained through a personal information form (PIF), the Rivermead mobility index (RMI) and the life satisfaction scale (LSS). It was detected that life satisfaction levels of elderly people were average, a great majority of them went through mobility disability and there was a significant correlation between mobility and life satisfaction. It was established that in elderly people mobility was affected by the age, gender and chronic diseases while life satisfaction was related to age, education level and health perception level. Disability is a factor that has a significant effect on the life satisfaction of elderly people. The findings of this study will be useful for planning interventions to improve mobility and satisfaction with life among nursing home elders in Turkey.

  6. Mobility disability among elderly men and women in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lundgren-Lindquist, B; Jette, A M

    1990-01-01

    This paper draws on a unique longitudinal study, '70-year-old people in Gothenburg, Sweden', to augment available knowledge of the incidence of physical disability in an ageing cohort. Among women the incidence of mobility disability was 0.12 between age 70 and 75 years, and 0.19 from age 75 to 79 years. One in 10 males became mobility disabled from age 70 to 75 years while the risk increased to 0.18 between age 75 and 79 years. Cohort members disabled at age 70 years were at significantly increased risk of dying by age 79 years compared with their non-disabled counterparts. The data were consistent with other research revealing a substantial annual risk of disability or death for people in their eighth decade of life.

  7. Mobility disability and the pattern of accelerometer-derived sedentary and physical activity behaviors in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ezeugwu, Victor; Klaren, Rachel E.; A. Hubbard, Elizabeth; Manns, Patricia (Trish); Motl, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity and high sedentary behavior levels are major concerns in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and these differ depending on the level of mobility disability. However, the manner in which daily activity is accumulated is currently unknown in this population. Methods A secondary analysis was performed on a combined data set of persons with MS from two previous investigations of physical activity and symptomatic or quality of life outcomes in the United States over a two year period (2007–2009). Mobility disability status was determined using the Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) while activity behavior was objectively monitored using an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 days. Results Persons with MS who have mobility disability were involved in sedentary behavior, light and moderate intensity activity for 65%, 34% and 1% of the day, respectively compared to 60%, 37%, and 3%, respectively in those without mobility disability (p < 0.05). Breaks in sedentary time did not differ by mobility disability status. Compared to those without mobility disability, the average number of sedentary bouts longer than 30 min was greater in those with mobility disability (p = 0.016). Conclusion Persons with MS with mobility disability are less active, engage in more sedentary behavior and accumulate prolonged sedentary bouts. PMID:26844077

  8. Actigraphy features for predicting mobility disability in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kheirkhahan, Matin; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Axtell, Robert; Buman, Matthew P; Fielding, Roger A; Glynn, Nancy W; Guralnik, Jack M; King, Abby C; White, Daniel K; Miller, Michael E; Siddique, Juned; Brubaker, Peter; Rejeski, W Jack; Ranshous, Stephen; Pahor, Marco; Ranka, Sanjay; Manini, Todd M

    2016-09-21

    Actigraphy has attracted much attention for assessing physical activity in the past decade. Many algorithms have been developed to automate the analysis process, but none has targeted a general model to discover related features for detecting or predicting mobility function, or more specifically, mobility impairment and major mobility disability (MMD). Men (N  =  357) and women (N  =  778) aged 70-89 years wore a tri-axial accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X) on the right hip during free-living conditions for 8.4  ±  3.0 d. One-second epoch data were summarized into 67 features. Several machine learning techniques were used to select features from the free-living condition to predict mobility impairment, defined as 400 m walking speed  <0.80 m s(-1). Selected features were also included in a model to predict the first occurrence of MMD-defined as the loss in the ability to walk 400 m. Each method yielded a similar estimate of 400 m walking speed with a root mean square error of ~0.07 m s(-1) and an R-squared values ranging from 0.37-0.41. Sensitivity and specificity of identifying slow walkers was approximately 70% and 80% for all methods, respectively. The top five features, which were related to movement pace and amount (activity counts and steps), length in activity engagement (bout length), accumulation patterns of activity, and movement variability significantly improved the prediction of MMD beyond that found with common covariates (age, diseases, anthropometry, etc). This study identified a subset of actigraphy features collected in free-living conditions that are moderately accurate in identifying persons with clinically-assessed mobility impaired and significantly improve the prediction of MMD. These findings suggest that the combination of features as opposed to a specific feature is important to consider when choosing features and/or combinations of features for prediction of mobility phenotypes in older adults.

  9. Cost effectiveness of the LIFE physical activity intervention for older adults at increased risk for mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Losing the ability to walk safely and independently is a major concern for many older adults. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study recently demonstrated that a physical activity (PA) intervention can delay the onset of major mobility disability. Our objective is ...

  10. Restricting Back Pain and Subsequent Mobility Disability in Community-Living Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Una E.; Fraenkel, Liana; Han, Ling; Leo-Summers, Linda; Gill, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationship between back pain severe enough to restrict activity (restricting back pain) and subsequent mobility disabilityin community-living older persons. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Greater New Haven, Connecticut. Participants 709community-living men and women, aged ≥70 years. Measurements Restricting back pain and mobility disability (defined as needing help with/unable to: walk 1/4 mile, climb flight of stairs, or lift/carry 10lb) were assessed during monthly telephone interviews for up to 159 months. The association betweenrestricting back painandsubsequent mobility disabilitywasevaluated using a recurrent events Cox model. These analyses were repeated among participants without baseline mobility disability. Additional secondary analyses evaluated the association between restricting back pain and mobility disability for ≥2 consecutive months (persistent mobility disability). Results Theevent rate (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) for mobility disability was 7.26 per 100-person months (95% CI, 6.89, 7.64). Mobility disability episodes lasted for a median of 2 months (interquartile Range (IQR )=1-4). In a recurrent event Coxregression analysis, after adjusting for 11 covariates,restricting back pain was strongly associated with mobility disability (hazard ratio (HR), 95% CI=3.23; 2.87, 3.64). The association was maintained when participants with baseline mobility disability were omitted (adjusted HR, 95% CI=3.71; 3.22, 4.28) and when the outcome was defined as persistent mobility disability (adjusted HR, 95% CI=3.63; 3.15, 4.20). Conclusion In this prospective study, restricting back pain was strongly associated with the occurrence of mobility disability. Interventions that prevent or ameliorate restricting back pain may prove to be effective for reducing the burden of mobility disability in older persons. PMID:25366926

  11. Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... it isn't a sickness. Most people with disabilities can - and do - work, play, learn, and enjoy full, healthy lives. Mobility aids and assistive devices can make daily tasks easier. About one in every five people in the United States has a disability. Some people are born with one. Others have ...

  12. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a…

  13. The Experiences of Students with Mobility Disabilities in Cypriot Higher Education Institutions: Listening to Their Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjikakou, Kika; Polycarpou, Vaso; Hadjilia, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of students with mobility disabilities in Cypriot higher education institutions. In order to obtain relevant information, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 Cypriot students with different forms of mobility disabilities, who attended different Cypriot higher education institutions and a…

  14. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed Central

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two compiled physiotherapy programs: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (±SD) age for all participants was 59 ± 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score ≥20 points or ≥50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0–100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7–16) over 5–12 weeks and 20 (18–24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (≥20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  15. Calf circumference predicts mobility disability: A secondary analysis of the Mexican health and ageing study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Zepeda, M.U.; Gutiérrez-Robledo, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calf circumference is a surrogate measurement of muscle mass. However, there is scarce evidence on its validity in predicting adverse outcomes such as mobility disability. The aim of this report is to determine if calf circumference could predict incident mobility disability in Mexican 60-year or older adults. Methods This is a secondary analysis of the Mexican Health and Aging Study and in particular of its two first waves. Sixty-year or older adults without mobility disability in the first assessment were included and followed-up for two years. Calf circumference quartile groups were compared to test the difference of incident mobility disability. Logistic regression models were fitted to test the independent association when including confounding variables. Results A total of 745 older adults were assessed, from which 24.4% of the older adults developed mobility disability at follow-up. A calf circumference > 38 cm was associated with a higher risk of developing mobility disability, even after adjustment in the multivariate model, with an odds ratio 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31–0.99, P = 0.049). Conclusions High calf circumference in Mexican older adults is independently associated with incident mobility disability. This could reflect the impact of adverse health conditions such as obesity (with high fat tissue) or edema. Further research should aim at testing these results in different populations. PMID:27656259

  16. Physical Mobility Limitations in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, S.; Hunter, D.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mobility limitations increase with age in the general population. Despite a growing population of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), mobility is rarely studied in the ID literature. The specific aim of this study was to identify and summarise primary literature investigating mobility limitations in adults with ID.…

  17. Assessment of mobility status and risk of mobility disability in older persons.

    PubMed

    Savino, Elisabetta; Volpato, Stefano; Zuliani, Giovanni; Guralnik, Jack M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to remain mobile is an essential aspect of quality of life and is critical for the preservation of independence in old age. One of the cornerstones of comprehensive geriatric assessment is the evaluation of functional and mobility status, because it provides clinicians pivotal information on overall health status, quality of life, needs for formal and informal care, and short and long term prognosis. As a consequence, many assessment tools have been developed and proposed for clinical use, including simple self-report measures assessing basic abilities and more complex and challenging performance-based objective tools. Both self-report and objective measures might be used to investigate specific steps of the age-related disablement process. In general, self-report and performance based instruments should not be used interchangeably, since they provide different and complementary information. Selection of the more appropriate tool strongly depends on clinical setting, patient characteristics, and clinical or research objective.

  18. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barberà, Ricard; Durá-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, José; Muñoz, Eva María; Serrano, Manuel; Marqués, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas.

  19. The Prevalence of Intellectual Disability in a Major UK Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Susan; Shackell, Phil; Mottram, Pat; Lancaster, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Over-representation of people with learning disability in prisons has been demonstrated in many Western jurisdictions. This was the first comprehensive research in a UK prison. The research used a random 10% sample of a prison population (n = 140). A semi-structured interview, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (UK version) and the Vineland…

  20. Physical Accessibility of Routine Prenatal Care for Women with Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Routine prenatal care includes physical examinations and weight measurement. Little is known about whether access barriers to medical diagnostic equipment, such as examination tables and weight scales, affect prenatal care among pregnant women with physical disabilities. Methods: We conducted 2-hour, in-depth telephone interviews with 22 women using a semistructured, open-ended interview protocol. All women had significant mobility difficulties before pregnancy and had delivered babies within the prior 10 years. We recruited most participants through social networks. We sorted interview transcript texts using used NVivo software and conducted conventional content analyses to identify major themes. Results: Interviewee's mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years. Most were white, well-educated, and higher income; 8 women had spinal cord injuries, 4 cerebral palsy, and 10 had other conditions; 18 used wheeled mobility aids. Some women's obstetricians had height adjustable examination tables, which facilitated transfers for physical examinations. Other women had difficulty transferring onto fixed height examination tables and were examined while sitting in their wheelchairs. Family members and/or clinical staff sometimes assisted with transfers; some women reported concerns about transfer safety. No women reported being routinely weighed on an accessible weight scale by their prenatal care clinicians. A few were never weighed during their pregnancies. Conclusions: Inaccessible examination tables and weight scales impede some pregnant women with physical disabilities from getting routine prenatal physical examinations and weight measurement. This represents substandard care. Adjustable height examination tables and wheelchair accessible weight scales could significantly improve care and comfort for pregnant women with physical disabilities. PMID:26484689

  1. Guidelines for Teaching Orientation and Mobility to Children with Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perla, Fabiana; Ducret, Walter D.

    1999-01-01

    Guidelines for teaching orientation and mobility skills to visually impaired children with additional disabilities focus on basic needs including the need to feel safe, the need for control, the need to be in contact with the physical environment, the need for some type of independent movement, and the need for meaningful mobility. (DB)

  2. Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Belza, Basia

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. PMID:21748010

  3. Clothing-related barriers experienced by people with mobility disabilities and impairments.

    PubMed

    Kabel, Allison; Dimka, Jessica; McBee-Black, Kerri

    2017-03-01

    Clothing-related issues can create barriers to social participation and other desired activities for people living with disabilities and their families. The purpose of this study was to identify clothing-related barriers people living with disabilities and their families are facing. An online survey was administered to people living with disabilities and parents/caregivers, resulting in a sample of 113 participants indicating mobility impairments. Survey results indicated that the clothing needs of people living with disabilities and impairments are not being met, the lack of appropriate clothing prevented individuals from fully engaging in social activities and relationships, employment or everyday life events. The design fields and apparel industry could play a vital role in helping people with mobility disabilities navigate these barriers.

  4. Socioeconomics and Major Disabilities: Characteristics of Working-Age Adults in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Kiregu, Joshua; Murindahabi, Nathalie K.; Tumusiime, David; Thomson, Dana R.; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L.; Ahayo, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Background Disability affects approximately 15% of the world’s population, and has adverse socio-economic effects, especially for the poor. In Rwanda, there are a number of government compensation programs that support the poor, but not specifically persons with disability (PWDs). This study investigates the relationship between poverty and government compensation on disability among working-age adults in Rwanda. Methods This was a secondary analysis of 35,114 adults aged 16 to 65 interviewed in the 2010/2011 Rwanda Household Wealth and Living Conditions survey, a national cross-sectional two-stage cluster survey, stratified by district. This study estimated self-reported major disability, and used chi-square tests to estimate associations (p<0.1) with income, government compensation, occupation type, participation in public works programs, and household poverty status. Non-collinear economic variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression, along with socio-demographic confounders that modified the relationship between any economic predictor and the outcome by 10% or more. All analyses adjusted for sampling weights, stratification, and clustering of households. Results Over 4% of working-age adults reported having a major disability and the most prevalent types of disability in order were physical, mental, and then sensory disability. In bivariate analysis, annual income, occupation type, and poverty status were associated with major disability (p<0.001 for all). Occupation type was dropped because it was collinear with income. Age, education, and urban/rural residence were confounders. In the multivariate analysis, adults in all income groups had about half the odds of disability compared to adults with no income (Rwf1-120,000 OR = 0.57; Rwf120,000–250,000 OR = 0.61; Rwf250,000–1,000,000 OR = 0.59; Rwf1,000,000+ OR = 0.66; p<0.05 for all), and non-poor adults had 0.77 the odds of disability compared to poor adults (p = 0.001). Conclusion Given

  5. Physical Education Majors' Judgments about Inclusion and Teaching Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Elliott, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the beliefs about inclusion and teaching students with disabilities of physical education (PE) majors from universities in North Carolina (NC). The participants were PE majors (n = 147) and other enrolled students (n = 30) at colleges and universities in NC. The research method was descriptive survey…

  6. Factors Predictive of Type of Powered Mobility Received by Veterans with Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.; Vincent, Andrea S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this observational study was to determine factors predictive of the type of powered mobility prescribed to veterans with disability. Material/Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all veterans (n=170) who received powered mobility from a designated power mobility clinic. Logistic regression analysis was used to determined factors predictive of the type of powered mobility provided. Results Sixty-four (38%) veterans were provided powered wheelchairs and 106 (62%) were provided powered scooters. Of the variables examined, only primary medical conditions for referral and disability severity (as measured by the 2-minute timed walk test; 2-MWT) were predictive of the types of powered mobility prescribed. Veterans who were able to walk longer distances were more likely to be prescribed powered scooters. Age, gender, race, level of education, marital and employment status, number of chronic medical conditions, and upper and lower limb muscle strength were not significant predictors. Conclusions This study suggests that the primary medical conditions for referral and 2-MWT can assist clinicians in the determination of the type of powered mobility to prescribe to veterans with disability. PMID:25955214

  7. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  8. School Mobility, Dropout, and Graduation Rates across Student Disability Categories in Utah. REL 2015-055

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrat, Vanessa X.; Berliner, BethAnn; Voight, Adam; Tran, Loan; Huang, Chun-Wei; Yu, Airong; Chen-Gaddini, Min

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6-12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results…

  9. Obstacle Course Training Can Improve Mobility and Prevent Falls in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hanegem, E.; Enkelaar, L.; Smulders, E.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) constitute a special-needs population at high risk of falling. This is the first study to evaluate whether obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in this population. Methods: The intervention was implemented as part of an institution-wide health care improvement plan…

  10. Effects of Disability on Pregnancy Experiences Among Women with Impaired Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about how functional impairments might affect the pregnancies of women with mobility disability. We aimed to explore complications that arise during pregnancy specifically related to physical functional impairments of women with significant mobility disabilities. Design Qualitative descriptive analysis Setting Telephone interviews with women from 17 USA states Sample 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years; most participants were recruited through social networks. Methods We conducted 2-hour, in-depth telephone interviews using a semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol. We used NVivo software to sort interview transcript texts for conventional content analyses. Main outcome measures Functional impairment-related complications during pregnancy. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years. Most were white, well-educated, and higher income; 8 women had spinal cord injuries, 4 cerebral palsy, and 10 had other conditions; 18 used wheeled mobility aids; and 14 had cesarean deliveries (8 elective). Impairment-related complications during pregnancy included: falls; urinary tract and bladder problems; wheelchair fit and stability problems that reduced mobility and compromised safety; significant shortness of breath, sometimes requiring respiratory support; increased spasticity; bowel management difficulties; and skin integrity problems (this was rare, but multiple women greatly increased skin monitoring during pregnancy to prevent pressure ulcers). Conclusions In addition to other pregnancy-associated health risks, women with mobility disabilities appear to experience problems relating to their functional impairments. Pre-conception planning and in-depth discussions during early pregnancy could potentially assist women with mobility disabilities to anticipate and address these difficulties. PMID:25417861

  11. The pathway from musculoskeletal pain to mobility difficulty in older disabled women.

    PubMed

    Leveille, Suzanne G; Bean, Jonathan; Ngo, Long; McMullen, William; Guralnik, Jack M

    2007-03-01

    Little is known about the pathway from musculoskeletal pain to mobility difficulty among older persons. We examined potential physical and psychological mediators of the pain-disability relationship in the Women's Health and Aging Study (WHAS), a cohort of women aged 65 who had at least mild disability at baseline. Pain was classified according to location and severity (widespread pain; lower extremity pain; other pain; none or mild pain in only one site). Among women without a lot of difficulty in stair climbing (n=676) or walking (n=510) at baseline, those who reported widespread pain were more likely than those with none or mild pain to develop a lot of difficulty with mobility during the 3 year follow-up. The likelihood for mobility difficulty was unchanged after adjusting for physical impairments and symptoms of depression and anxiety (walking aOR=1.85, 95%CI, 1.08-3.17; stair climbing, aOR=2.68, 95%CI, 1.56-4.62). Lower extremity pain was associated with increased likelihood for difficulty with climbing stairs but not with walking. However, this association was attenuated after adjusting for physical impairments and psychological symptoms (aOR=1.66, 95%CI, 0.99-2.77). Pain was not associated with increased risk for becoming unable to walk or climb stairs. The findings suggest that pain is a unique domain as a cause of disablement, independent of the usual pathway to disability via physical impairments. Research is needed to better understand the development of pain-related disability in order to determine optimum approaches to prevent and treat mobility disability in older persons with persistent pain.

  12. Neuroprostheses for increasing disabled patients' mobility and control.

    PubMed

    Mikołajewska, Emilia; Mikołajewski, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprostheses are electronic devices using electrophysiological signals to stimulate muscles, electronic/ mechanical devices such as substitutes for limbs or parts of limbs, or computers. The development of neuroprostheses was possible thanks to advances in understanding of the physiology of the human brain and in the capabilities of hardware and software. Recent progress in the area of neuroprosthetics may offer important breakthroughs in therapy and rehabilitation. New dedicated solutions for disabled people can lead to their increased participation in social, educational and professional areas. It is worth focussing particular attention on new solutions for people with paralysis, people with communication disorders and amputees. This article aims at investigating the extent to which the available opportunities are being exploited, including current and potential future applications of brain-computer interfaces.

  13. Disability levels and correlates among older mobile home dwellers, an NHATS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rousan, Tala M.; Rubenstein, Linda M.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although remarkably understudied, manufactured or mobile homes are the housing choice for nearly 20 million Americans and little is known about the health of older persons living in mobile homes. Objective We sought to investigate disability levels and other health correlates among older adults living in mobile or manufactured homes compared to their counterparts living in other types of homes. Methods We sampled non-institutional adults aged 65 years or older (n = 7609), of whom 344 lived in mobile homes, from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). Results Respondents living in mobile homes (average age = 75.1 years; SD = 0.5) had lower education and income and medical insurance than older adults living in other types of community residence (average age = 77.5 years; SD = 0.2). They were more likely to smoke, have lung and heart disease, and report fair or poor general health status. Mobile home dwellers reported more difficulty or inability in performing the following activities of daily living when compared to their counterparts: stooping and kneeling (64.9% vs 60.8%, p = 0.007), walking 6 blocks (46.5% vs 41.5%, p = 0.001), walking 3 blocks (37.7% vs 33.5%, p = 0.002), and climbing up to 20 stairs (39.2% vs 34.8%, p = 0.02). Among those reporting disability, mobile home dwellers had fewer bathroom safety modifications. Conclusion There is higher prevalence of chronic conditions, functional and cognitive impairment in older mobile home dwellers compared to older adults living in other types of housing. PMID:25766655

  14. Mobility disability in midlife: a longitudinal study of the role of anticipated instrumental support and social class.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, C J; Avlund, K; Lund, R

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of the evidence of a protective effect of social support on the functional ability of older people and social inequalities in mobility the present study aims to (1) study if onset of mobility disability in a middle-aged cohort is associated with social class and (2) study if anticipation of instrumental support has a protective effect on mobility at 6-year follow-up, and whether this effect is modified by social class. Data on 3549 40- and 50-year-old men and women were obtained from The Danish Longitudinal Study on Work, Unemployment and Health in 2000 and 2006. Ten percent of the study participants experienced onset of mobility disability at follow-up. Significantly more individuals in the lower social classes experienced onset of mobility disability and never anticipated instrumental support, compared to the higher social classes. In this middle-aged population the anticipation of instrumental support had no significant effect on mobility disability at 6-year follow-up. Social class did not modify the association between anticipated instrumental support and mobility, but was the most important confounder. Further research on the effect of social support on mobility in midlife is needed in order to identify individuals at risk of disability at an early stage.

  15. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and…

  16. Gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability in old age: a cross-sectional study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Onadja, Yentéma; Atchessi, Nicole; Soura, Bassiahi Abdramane; Rossier, Clémentine; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability between older men and women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and to assess the extent to which these differences could be attributable to gender inequalities in life course social and health conditions. Data were collected on 981 men and women aged 50 and older in a 2010 cross-sectional health survey conducted in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Leganés cognitive test. Mobility disability was self-reported as having any difficulty walking 400 m without assistance. We used logistic regression to assess gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability. Prevalence of cognitive impairment was 27.6% in women and 7.7% in men, and mobility disability was present in 51.7% of women and 26.5% of men. The women to men odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for cognitive impairment and mobility disability was 3.52 (1.98-6.28) and 3.79 (2.47-5.85), respectively, after adjusting for the observed life course social and health conditions. The female excess was only partially explained by gender inequalities in nutritional status, marital status and, to a lesser extent, education. Among men and women, age, childhood hunger, lack of education, absence of a partner and being underweight were independent risk factors for cognitive impairment, while age, childhood poor health, food insecurity and being overweight were risk factors for mobility disability. Enhancing nutritional status and education opportunities throughout life span could prevent cognitive impairment and mobility disability and partly reduce the female excess in these disabilities.

  17. The design of mobile robot control system for the aged and the disabled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wang; Lei, Shi; Xiang, Gao; Jin, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    This paper designs a control system of mobile robot for the aged and the disabled, which consists of two main parts: human-computer interaction and drive control module. The data of the two parts is transferred via universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter. In the former part, the speed and direction information of the mobile robot is obtained by hall joystick. In the latter part, the electronic differential algorithm is developed to implement the robot mobile function by driving two-wheel motors. In order to improve the comfort of the robot when speed or direction is changed, the least squares algorithm is used to optimize the speed characteristic curves of the two motors. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness of the designed system.

  18. Perspectives of a mobile application for people with communication disabilities in the community.

    PubMed

    Crook, Alice; Kenny, Julie; Johnson, Hilary; Davidson, Bronwyn

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To determine the perceptions of people with complex communication needs (CCN) and business staff regarding the uses and functionality of a mobile application to aid communication access. Method A qualitative study using thematic analysis of transcripts and field notes from focus groups and interviews of 19 people with CCN and nine business staff. Results Four themes and 10 subthemes were drawn from the data. Themes highlighted the desire for: increased communication strategies to support customer interactions, increased access to information, functionality of a mobile application to increase its utility, and preferred technical and visual features of mobile applications. Conclusion People with CCN and business staff perceived a mobile application as a useful tool to aid communication access. This research highlighted the importance of facilitating strategies to communicative interactions and information in the community as the fundamental goal of a mobile application developed to support communication access. Implications for Rehabilitation Mobile applications are widely accepted and used in modern customer service industries and have been identified as tools to increase communication access for people with complex communication needs (CCN). People with CCN identified accessibility, presentation, and customisation as important features of mobile applications for communication access. The diversity of user preferences and needs, and the rapid development of new technologies limit the applicability of a single design for mobile applications for people with CCN. People with CCN should be involved in application design and development. A mobile application for communication access would support customer-business interactions as well as enable more accessible information sharing about disability needs and services.

  19. Delaying Mobility Disability in People With Parkinson Disease Using a Sensorimotor Agility Exercise Program

    PubMed Central

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a new framework for therapists to develop an exercise program to delay mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Mobility, or the ability to efficiently navigate and function in a variety of environments, requires balance, agility, and flexibility, all of which are affected by PD. This article summarizes recent research identifying how constraints on mobility specific to PD, such as rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing, poor sensory integration, inflexible program selection, and impaired cognitive processing, limit mobility in people with PD. Based on these constraints, a conceptual framework for exercises to maintain and improve mobility is presented. An example of a constraint-focused agility exercise program, incorporating movement principles from tai chi, kayaking, boxing, lunges, agility training, and Pilates exercises, is presented. This new constraint-focused agility exercise program is based on a strong scientific framework and includes progressive levels of sensorimotor, resistance, and coordination challenges that can be customized for each patient while maintaining fidelity. Principles for improving mobility presented here can be incorporated into an ongoing or long-term exercise program for people with PD. PMID:19228832

  20. Delaying mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease using a sensorimotor agility exercise program.

    PubMed

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2009-04-01

    This article introduces a new framework for therapists to develop an exercise program to delay mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Mobility, or the ability to efficiently navigate and function in a variety of environments, requires balance, agility, and flexibility, all of which are affected by PD. This article summarizes recent research identifying how constraints on mobility specific to PD, such as rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing, poor sensory integration, inflexible program selection, and impaired cognitive processing, limit mobility in people with PD. Based on these constraints, a conceptual framework for exercises to maintain and improve mobility is presented. An example of a constraint-focused agility exercise program, incorporating movement principles from tai chi, kayaking, boxing, lunges, agility training, and Pilates exercises, is presented. This new constraint-focused agility exercise program is based on a strong scientific framework and includes progressive levels of sensorimotor, resistance, and coordination challenges that can be customized for each patient while maintaining fidelity. Principles for improving mobility presented here can be incorporated into an ongoing or long-term exercise program for people with PD.

  1. Developmental Disabilities: A Summary of Major Classifications and Glossary of Terms. Parent Awareness Program, 1982-1983. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudstrup, Katherine; And Others

    Designed for use in adult education courses for parents of developmentally disabled children, this manual provides basic information about major categories of disabilities and a glossary of commonly encountered terms. After an introductory overview, the manual provides information about the characteristics and etiology of five disabling…

  2. Reunion Is in Hand: Princeton Enhances a Major Alumni Event with Mobile Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Mobile technology is an effective way of conveying information to alumni, especially during a major event. Alumni appreciate not only access to information in a convenient medium, but also efforts to engage with them through new technology. Like so many of the best ideas at Princeton University, the creation of Reunions Mobile emerged from…

  3. Exploring Mobility Options for Children with Physical Disabilities: A Focus on Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The study by Tefft et al. (2011, in this issue) is one of the few studies that have explored the impact of pediatric powered mobility on families. The parents who participated in their study reported increased satisfaction with their children's social and play skills, ability to move independently, sleeping patterns, and public perception of their…

  4. Evaluation of quality of life in individuals with severe chronic motor disability: A major challenge.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Marie-Christine; Baumstarck, Karine; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Auquier, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Diverse conditions causing a very heavy and chronic motor disability, such as an advanced amyotrophic lateral, advanced form of multiple sclerosis, high spinal cord injury or a locked-in syndrom, are now getting better medical care and benefit of life support technology with consequent prolonged survival. Quality of life (QoL) assessment is being considered increasingly important to globally apprehend their general well-being. However, the motor disability that affects them appears as a substantial limitation for the assessment of their QoL and consequently a major challenge for all the community that carries an interest for them. This review discussed several avenues to provide to patients and caregivers, clinicians and researchers, and health decision making authority: i) elements to determine the most appropriate QoL measure with regard to the interest of patient's point of view, the QoL instruments suitable for this category of patients and their acceptability, ii) some arguments of the clinical relevance and accuracy of QoL assessment: interpretations of the questionnaires, QoL determinants, particularity of QoL evaluation for individuals with cognitive impairment and the caregivers perceptions of patients QoL. In conclusion, evaluation of QoL in patients with severe chronic motor handicap is a challenge of major interest, with major ethical issues. It needs to use adapted QoL scales and longitudinal following because of adaptive phenomena to the degree of handicap.

  5. Evaluation of quality of life in individuals with severe chronic motor disability: A major challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Marie-Christine; Baumstarck, Karine; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Auquier, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse conditions causing a very heavy and chronic motor disability, such as an advanced amyotrophic lateral, advanced form of multiple sclerosis, high spinal cord injury or a locked-in syndrom, are now getting better medical care and benefit of life support technology with consequent prolonged survival. Quality of life (QoL) assessment is being considered increasingly important to globally apprehend their general well-being. However, the motor disability that affects them appears as a substantial limitation for the assessment of their QoL and consequently a major challenge for all the community that carries an interest for them. This review discussed several avenues to provide to patients and caregivers, clinicians and researchers, and health decision making authority: i) elements to determine the most appropriate QoL measure with regard to the interest of patient's point of view, the QoL instruments suitable for this category of patients and their acceptability, ii) some arguments of the clinical relevance and accuracy of QoL assessment: interpretations of the questionnaires, QoL determinants, particularity of QoL evaluation for individuals with cognitive impairment and the caregivers perceptions of patients QoL. In conclusion, evaluation of QoL in patients with severe chronic motor handicap is a challenge of major interest, with major ethical issues. It needs to use adapted QoL scales and longitudinal following because of adaptive phenomena to the degree of handicap. PMID:27195190

  6. Mobile social network services for families with children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Der; Lai, Nien-Hwa; Chen, Yen-Wen; Chang, Yao-Jen; Yang, Jyun-Yan; Huang, Lien-Fu; Chiang, Wen-Ling; Chiu, Hung-Yi; Shin, Haw-Yun

    2011-07-01

    As Internet technologies evolve, their applications have changed various aspects of human life. Here, we attempt to examine their potential impact on services for families with developmentally delayed children. Our research is thus designed to utilize wireless mobile communication technologies, location services, and search technology in an effort to match families of specific needs with potential care providers. Based on the investigation conducted by our counselors, this paper describes a platform for smooth communication between professional communities and families with children with developmental disabilities (CDD). This research also looks into the impact of management of mobile social network services and training on the operation of these services. Interaction opportunities, care, and support to families with CDD are introduced.

  7. Health Status and Health Risks of the "Hidden Majority" of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the health status of and health risks faced by adults with intellectual disability who do not use intellectual disability services. Self-report data collected from 1,022 people with mild intellectual disability in England indicated that people who do not use intellectual disability services are more likely to smoke tobacco…

  8. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 50–86) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  9. Using Mobile Technology in an Urban High School to Decrease Adult Prompting during in School Transitions for Students Identified with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the application of video modeling on mobile technology to increase efficiency in the classroom for students identified with intellectual disabilities. Specially, this study sought to identify if video modeling on mobile technology could decrease adult prompting for students with intellectual disabilities during…

  10. Density and mobility effects of the majority carriers in organic semiconductors under light excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vagenas, N.; Giannopoulou, A.; Kounavis, P.

    2015-01-21

    This study demonstrates that the effect of light excitation on the density and the mobility of the majority carriers can be explored in organic semiconductors by modulated photocurrent spectroscopy. The spectra of phase and amplitude of the modulated photocurrent of pentacene films indicate a significant increase in the density of the photogenerated mobile holes (majority carriers). This increase is accompanied by a comparatively much smaller increase of the steady state photocurrent response which can be reconciled with a decrease in the mobility (μ) of holes. The decrease of μ is supported from an unusual increase of the Y/μ ratio of the out-of-phase modulated photocurrent (Y) signal to the mobility under light excitation. It is proposed that the mobile holes, which are generated from the dissociation of the light-created excitons more likely near the pentacene-substrate interface by electron trapping, populate grain boundaries charging them and producing a downward band bending. As a result, potential energy barriers are build up which limit the transport of holes interacting through trapping-detrapping with deep partially occupied traps in the charged grain boundaries. On the other hand, the transport of holes interacting through trapping-detrapping with empty traps is found unaffected.

  11. “How did that happen?” Public responses to women with mobility disability during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about current societal attitudes toward women with significant mobility disability who are visibly pregnant. Objective To use qualitative descriptive analysis methods to examine perceptions of women with significant mobility disability about how strangers reacted to their visible pregnancies. Methods In late 2013, we conducted 2-h telephone interviews with 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years. The semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol addressed wide-ranging pregnancy-related topics, including statements from strangers. Most participants were recruited through social networks, coming from 17 states nationwide. We used NVivo to sort the texts for content analysis. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years; most were white, well-educated, and higher income, although half had Medicaid during their pregnancies; and 18 used wheeled mobility aids. Eighteen women described memorable interactions with strangers relating to their pregnancies or newborn babies. Strangers’ statements fell into six categories: (1) curious; (2) intrusively and persistently curious; (3) hostile, including concerns that taxpayers would end up supporting the mother and child; (4) questioning woman’s competence as a potential parent; (5) oblivious, not recognizing visible pregnancy or motherhood; and (6) positive. Many women reported strangers asking how their pregnancy had happened. The women doubted that visibly pregnant women without disabilities evoke the same reactions from strangers. Conclusions Women with mobility disability who are visibly pregnant may perceive reactions from strangers that appear intrusive. Planning ahead for handling such encounters could reduce the stresses of these interactions. PMID:25944504

  12. Are mainstream mobile technologies bringing about new opportunities for people with disabilities? Insights from three case studies.

    PubMed

    Gower, Valerio; Salatino, Claudia; Pigini, Lucia; Caracciolo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The market of mobile technologies has considerably increased in the past few years and the costs have consequently decreased. This rapid technological evolution can be seen in two different ways from the perspective of people with disability: on the one side it represents a great opportunity to create new solutions for improving independence; on the other it may represent a source of social exclusion if appropriate assistive solutions are not available to make technology usable by people with disability. This paper describe three case studies of persons with disabilities that have undergone an Assistive Technology assessment at the DAT service of Fondazione Don Gnocchi (Milan, Italy) involving the use of mobile ICT based Assistive Technologies. In all the three cases the appropriate solution for performing the desired activities is represented by a combination of mainstream products and assistive products. The three use cases described support the idea that mobile technologies can be powerful and versatile instruments to create assistive solutions for improving independence in daily life.

  13. "It's been a long journey": Exploring educationally mobile students' transition into STEM majors at a university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreygue, Aimee

    Today, one third of all college students are considered educationally "mobile," which means they will change institutions during their undergraduate careers. The concept of educational mobility challenges the traditional idea of students moving through an educational pipeline in a linear fashion, and recognizes that many of today's students, including those in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), will have multiple transition points. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the transitional experiences of educationally mobile students moving into and through the STEM disciplines at a public university. Students who move from one educational environment to another undergo a significant transition process, and understanding this process for individual students and the institution's role in supporting transition has implications for educational policy. Grounded in the conceptual framework guided by Schlossberg's Transition Theory, and Swail, Redd, and Perna's Geometric Model for Student Persistence and Achievement, this study explores the following research question: How do students who are educationally mobile experience academic, social, and institutional support while transitioning into and through STEM disciplines at a four-year public university? Eighteen science and mathematics majors participated in this study, all of whom attended at least one institution of higher education prior to their current attendance at Mountain View University, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in Southern California. Participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol and completed a demographic questionnaire as well. Trustworthiness measures included member checking and peer debriefing. The findings of this study show that educationally mobile students are savvy agents of their education, and make personal and professional sacrifices in their pursuit of a STEM degree. They want to connect to like

  14. Students with Disabilities Choosing Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Majors in Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ahlam

    2014-01-01

    Many science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) studies have focused on issues related to underrepresented groups' participation in STEM disciplines. Most of these studies have targeted women and individuals from racial minorities as the underrepresented groups of interest, while little attention has been paid to people with disabilities.…

  15. 6q22.33 microdeletion in a family with intellectual disability, variable major anomalies, and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Beyer, Anke; Schallner, Jens; Novotna, Barbara; Klink, Barbara; Schröck, Evelin; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome six have been described for several regions including 6q16, 6q22.1, and 6q21q22.1, and with variable phenotypes such as intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, major and minor facial anomalies. However, an isolated microdeletion of the sub-band 6q22.33 has not been reported so far and thus, no information about the specific phenotype associated with such a copy number variant is available. Here, we define the clinical picture of an isolated 6q22.33 microdeletion based on the phenotype of six members of one family with loss of approximately 1 Mb in this region. Main clinical features include mild intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities as well as microcephaly, heart defect, and cleft lip and palate.

  16. Battlefield Orthopaedic Injuries Cause the Majority of Long-Term Disabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    battlefield-injured service members, the documentation includes details on the injuries, the recovery process, and residual im- pairments from the wounds...al1 (%) Present Cohort (%) Explosion 79 75 Gunshot wound 19 20 Motor vehicle collision, helicop- ter crash, fall 2 5 Table 5 Ranking of Unfitting...that psychiatric condi- tions make up 16% of permanent disability. We also demonstrated that the residual conditions from abdomi- nal and chest

  17. Mobilizing Disability Experience to Inform Architectural Practice: Lessons Learned from a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, Peter-Willem; Heylighen, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through their bodily interaction with the designed environment, disabled people can detect obstacles and appreciate spatial qualities architects may not be attuned to. While designers in several disciplines acknowledge disabled people as lead or critical users, in architectural practice their embodied experience is hardly recognized as a valuable…

  18. Implementing Applied Behavior Analysis for Effective Orientation and Mobility Instruction of Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mea, Melanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Working with children who have multiple disabilities that include visual impairments can be especially challenging. Many disabling conditions manifest into behavioral difficulties that may take away from learning. Acting out may be a student's way of expressing a lack of healthy coping mechanisms in relation to his or her environment. Implementing…

  19. Visual disability and major causes of blindness in NSW: a study of people aged 50 and over attending the Royal Blind Society 1984 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Billson, F A

    1991-11-01

    Visual disability in individuals aged 50 years and over seeking services of the Royal Blind Society in the years 1984 to 1989, was studied with respect to changes in frequency of major causes together with age and sex of those affected. The results mirror statistics in the UK. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for an increasing proportion of visual disability (34% in 1984 to 43% in 1989). Of particular interest was the frequency of disability attributed to cataract. While decreasing (24% in 1984 to 19% in 1989), cataract still represents a significant cause of potentially treatable disability. The authors conclude that there is a changing prevalence of visual disability caused mainly by an increase in AMD and a subgroup of patients attending for services who appear to have a potentially remediable disability. These conclusions affirm the need for close liaison between ophthalmological practitioners and agencies for the blind.

  20. Major mishaps among mobile offshore drilling units, 1955-1981: time trends and fatalities.

    PubMed

    Clemmer, D I; Diem, J E

    1985-03-01

    Major mishaps among mobile offshore drilling units worldwide from 1955-1981 were identified from industry and government sources. Based on annual numbers of rigs in service and typical staffing patterns, annual mishap rates and fatality rates for rig types and mishap categories were computed. While the frequency of major mishaps has increased in recent years, the mishap rate per 100 rig-years of service has remained stable. The overall stability obscures the fact that jack-up rigs have had an increasing mishap rate while the rate for other rig types combined has gradually declined. Although the fatal mishap rate has also remained constant, the annual fatality rate per 100 000 full time equivalent (FTE) workers has risen sharply. This can be attributed to increasing numbers of lives lost in environmental mishaps while deaths from operational mishaps have declined. There were 344 fatalities during the 27-year period. Although an average of some 13 deaths per year worldwide appears minimal, the relatively small size of the workforce gives this number significance particularly when it is noted that 'occupational' fatalities, those occurring in the course of routine operations, are not included. The overall fatality rate secondary to major mishaps was 84.3 per 100 000 FTE worker-years.

  1. Trial Development of a Mobile Feeding Assistive Robotic Arm for People with Physical Disabilities of the Extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Hideyuki; Higa, Hiroki; Soken, Takashi; Namihira, Yoshinori

    A mobile feeding assistive robotic arm for people with physical disabilities of the extremities has been developed in this paper. This system is composed of a robotic arm, microcontroller, and its interface. The main unit of the robotic arm can be contained in a laptop computer's briefcase. Its weight is 5kg, including two 12-V lead acid rechargeable batteries. This robotic arm can be also mounted on a wheelchair. To verify performance of the mobile robotic arm system, drinking tea task was experimentally performed by two able-bodied subjects as well as three persons suffering from muscular dystrophy. From the experimental results, it was clear that they could smoothly carry out the drinking task, and that the robotic arm could firmly grasp a commercially available 500-ml plastic bottle. The eating task was also performed by the two able-bodied subjects. The experimental results showed that they could eat porridge by using a spoon without any difficulty.

  2. Built environment attributes related to GPS measured active trips in mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Nancy M.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Carlson, Jordan; Kerr, Jacqueline; Belza, Basia

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding factors which may promote walking in mid-life and older adults with mobility impairments is key given the association between physical activity and positive health outcomes. Objective To examine the relationship between active trips and objective measures of the home neighborhood built environment. Methods Global positioning systems (GPS) data collected on 28 adults age 50+ with mobility disabilities were analyzed for active trips from home. Objective and geographic information systems (GIS) derived measures included Walk Score, population density, street connectivity, crime rates, and slope within the home neighborhood. For this cross-sectional observational study, we conducted mean comparisons between participants who took active trips from home and those who did not for the objective measures. Effect sizes were calculated to assess the magnitude of group differences. Results Nine participants (32%) took active trips from home. Walking in the home neighborhood was significantly associated with GIS derived measures (Walk Score, population density, and street density; effect sizes .9-1.2). Participants who used the home neighborhood for active trips had less slope within 1 km of home but the difference was not significant (73.5 meters±22 vs. 100.8 meters ±38.1, p=.06, d=0.8). There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for crime rates between those with active trips from home and those without. Conclusions The findings provide preliminary evidence that more walkable environments promote active mobility among mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities. The data suggest that this population can and does use active transportation modes when the built environment is supportive. PMID:25637503

  3. Relationship between mobility, violence and major depression among female sex workers: a cross-sectional study in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sangram Kishor; Ganju, Deepika; Prabhakar, Parimi; Adhikary, Rajatashuvra

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between mobility, violence and mental health has largely been unexplored in developing countries. This study screens for signs of major depression, and assesses its association with mobility and violence among female sex workers (FSWs) in southern India. Methods Data (N=2400) for this study were used from a cross-sectional Behavioral Tracking Survey (BTS-2014) conducted among FSWs from a southern state of India as part of the Avahan programme. Major depression of FSWs was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 depression scale. Descriptive statistics, frequency, bivariate, interaction effect and multivariate logistic regression techniques were used for the analysis. Results More than one-fourth of FSWs (29%) screened positive for major depression. The likelihood of screening positive for major depression was 6 times higher among FSWs who were both mobile for sex work outside their district of residence and had experienced any violence (combined association) during the past 1 year (62% vs 19%, adjusted OR 6.1, 95% CI 4.4 to 8.6) compared with those who reported neither. The individual association results show that FSWs who reported being mobile outside the district, and FSWs who were beaten or raped in the past 1 year, were 3 times more likely to screen positive for major depression. Conclusions The findings indicate that violence and mobility are independently associated with major depression among FSWs. The combined association of mobility and violence poses a greater risk to the mental health of FSWs than their independent association. These results point to the need for creating an enabling environment for FSWs to enhance existing efforts to reduce the spread of HIV and mental health problems. The study highlights that HIV prevention efforts among FSWs in India require evidence-based research and integrated programme approaches to address mental health issues. PMID:27612536

  4. Mobilization of major inorganic ions during experimental diagenesis of characterized peats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, A.M.; Cohen, A.D.; Orem, W.H.; Blackson, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to study changes in concentrations of major inorganic ions during simulated burial of peats to about 1.5 km. Cladium, Rhizophora, and Cyrilla peats were first analyzed to determine cation distributions among fractions of the initial materials and minerals in residues from wet oxidation. Subsamples of the peats (80 g) were then subjected to increasing temperatures and pressures in steps of 5??C and 300 psi at 2-day intervals and produced solutions collected. After six steps, starting from 30??C and 300 psi, a final temperature of 60??C and a final pressure of 2100 psi were achieved. The system was then allowed to stand for an additional 2 weeks at 60??C and 2100 psi. Treatments resulted in highly altered organic solids resembling lignite and expelled solutions of systematically varying compositions. Solutions from each step were analyzed for Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, total dissolved Si (Si(T)), Cl-, SO42-, and organic acids and anions (OAAs). Some data on total dissolved Al (Al(T)) were also collected. Mobilization of major ions from peats during these experiments is controlled by at least three processes: (1) loss of dissolved ions in original porewater expelled during compaction, (2) loss of adsorbed cations as adsorption sites are lost during modification of organic solids, and (3) increased dissolution of inorganic phases at later steps due to increased temperatures (Si(T)) and increased complexing by OAAs (Al(T)). In general, results provide insight into early post-burial inorganic changes occurring during maturation of terrestrial organic matter. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Erin A.; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G.; Simpson, Christopher D.

    2014-12-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/h) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 m of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <1 μm (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 μm), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences.

  6. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Erin A.; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G.; Simpson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/hr) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 meters of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 1 μm (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 μm), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences. PMID:25364294

  7. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway.

    PubMed

    Riley, Erin A; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G; Simpson, Christopher D

    2014-12-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/hr) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 meters of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 1 μm (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 μm), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences.

  8. Core Self-Evaluations as a Mediator between Functional Disability and Life Satisfaction in College Students with Disabilities Majoring in Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph S.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Weaver, Hayley; da Silva Cardoso, Elizabeth; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the mediational effect of core self-evaluations (CSE) on the relationship between functional disability and life satisfaction. Methods: A quantitative descriptive design using multiple regression analysis. The participants were 97 college students with disabilities receiving services through Hunter College's Minority-Disability…

  9. Students with Disabilities Experience in Higher Education Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Self-Efficacy, Use of Assistive Technologies and Mobile Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Chandinie Devi Parasram

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this mixed methods study was to explore the online experiences of students with disabilities, with particular focus on students' use of assistive technologies, mobile media and self-efficacy. Using a multifaceted an integrative approach, this study considered a framework of universal design, Scherer's Matching Person and…

  10. Downward social mobility and major depressive episodes among Latino and Asian-American immigrants to the United States.

    PubMed

    Nicklett, Emily J; Burgard, Sarah A

    2009-09-15

    The authors analyzed the association between downward social mobility in subjective social status among 3,056 immigrants to the United States and the odds of a major depressive episode. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (2002-2003), the authors examined downward mobility by comparing immigrants' subjective social status in their country of origin with their subjective social status in the United States. The dependent variable was the occurrence of a past-year episode of major depression defined according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria. Logistic regression models were used to control for a variety of sociodemographic and immigration-related characteristics. Analyses suggested that a loss of at least 3 steps in subjective social status is associated with increased risk of a depressive episode (odds ratio = 3.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 6.6). Other factors independently associated with greater odds of depression included Latino ethnicity, female sex, having resided for a longer time in the United States, and being a US citizen. The findings suggest that immigrants who experience downward social mobility are at elevated risk of major depression. Policies or interventions focused only on immigrants of low social status may miss another group at risk: those who experience downward mobility from a higher social status.

  11. Overlapping Chat's Accessibility Requirements between Students with and without Disabilities Due to the Mobile Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Rocío; Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The use of Chats has been extended to mobile-learning (m-learning) environments in the last decade. Students and teachers can communicate in real time and they do not need waiting till their next tutoring date to solve their problems and doubts. However, Chats have many accessibility barriers and many students cannot use this collaborative tool.…

  12. Mobilization of major and trace constituents of highway runoff in groundwater potentially caused by deicing chemical migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Church, Peter E.; Stone, Victoria J.

    1995-01-01

    The quality of water in unsaturated zones and groundwater is affected by the major ions in deicing chemicals applied to roads and highways. The assessment of the environmental effects of highway runoff requires investigations to determine whether other major and trace constituents are mobilized during deicing chemical migration through the unsaturated zone and groundwater. In this regard, groundwater samples were analyzed in February and August 1991, and March, August, and November 1993 at a test site along Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts. Analyses indicated that concentrations of major and trace chemical constituents of highway runoff in groundwater are substantially higher downgradient than upgradient from the highway.

  13. Employing mobile technology to improve language skills of young students with language-based disabilities.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cathi Draper; Cumming, Therese M

    2016-04-11

    This exploratory study investigated the effects of a language building iPad application on the language skills (i.e., receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary, and sentence formation) of young students with language-based disabilities. The study utilized a pre-test-post-test control group design. Students in the treatment group used the iPad language building application, Language Builder, for 30 minutes a day. Participants were 31 first-grade to third-grade students with identified language-based disabilities. Students were assigned to two groups for the 8-week intervention. Data indicated that students in the treatment group made significantly greater gains in the area of sentence formation than the control group. Results revealed no significant difference between the two groups in the areas of expressive and receptive vocabulary. A short intervention of using Language Builder via the iPad may increase the sentence formation skills of young students with language delays. Additionally, discussion regarding the usefulness of iPad applications in education is presented.

  14. Functional disability and compromised mobility among older women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Hanissian, Paul D.; Strohbehn, Kris; Bynum, Julie P.W.; Fried, Terri R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the prevalence of functional disability among older women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2005-06 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP). Daily UI was defined as answering “daily” to the question, “How frequently...have you had difficulty controlling your bladder, including leaking small amounts of urine, leaking when you cough or sneeze, or not being able to make it to the bathroom on time?” We then explored functional status. Women were asked about seven basic activities of daily living (ADLs). Statistical analyses with percentage estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. Logistic regression was performed to assess the association between functional status and daily UI. Results In total, 1,412 women were included in our analysis. Daily UI was reported by 177 (12.5%) women. Functional dependence or disability with any ADLs was reported in 62.1% (95% CI 54.2%, 70.1%) of women with daily UI. Among women with daily UI, 23.6% (95% CI 16.8%, 30.5%) reported specific difficulty or dependence with using the toilet signifying functional limitations which may contribute to urine leakage. After adjusting for age category, race/ethnicity, education level, and parity, women with daily UI had 3.31 increased odds of functional difficulty or dependence compared with continent older women. Conclusion Over 60% of older women with daily UI reported functional difficulty or dependence and 1/4 of women with daily UI specifically reported difficulty or dependence with using the toilet. PMID:25185600

  15. Contribution of Personality to Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectations in Selecting a High School Major among Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dikla; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2016-01-01

    The current study focuses on the contribution of five personality traits to the development of self-efficacy and outcome expectations regarding selecting a high school major among adolescents with learning disabilities (LD). Social cognitive career theory and the Big Five personality traits model served as the theoretical framework. Participants…

  16. Perspectives of Family Members of People with an Intellectual Disability to a Major Reconfiguration of Living Arrangements for People with Intellectual Disability in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Doherty, Siobhain; Linehan, Christine; Tatlow-Golden, Mimi; Craig, Sarah; Kerr, Mike; Lynch, Christy; Staines, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To document the views of family members of people with an intellectual disability regarding implementation of a personalized model of social support in Ireland. Method: Forty family members participated in six focus groups. Data were thematically analysed. Results: Family members' preference for particular types of living arrangements were…

  17. Work disability remains a major problem in rheumatoid arthritis in the 2000s: data from 32 countries in the QUEST-RA Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Work disability is a major consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), associated not only with traditional disease activity variables, but also more significantly with demographic, functional, occupational, and societal variables. Recent reports suggest that the use of biologic agents offers potential for reduced work disability rates, but the conclusions are based on surrogate disease activity measures derived from studies primarily from Western countries. Methods The Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA) multinational database of 8,039 patients in 86 sites in 32 countries, 16 with high gross domestic product (GDP) (>24K US dollars (USD) per capita) and 16 low-GDP countries (<11K USD), was analyzed for work and disability status at onset and over the course of RA and clinical status of patients who continued working or had stopped working in high-GDP versus low-GDP countries according to all RA Core Data Set measures. Associations of work disability status with RA Core Data Set variables and indices were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analyses. Results At the time of first symptoms, 86% of men (range 57%-100% among countries) and 64% (19%-87%) of women <65 years were working. More than one third (37%) of these patients reported subsequent work disability because of RA. Among 1,756 patients whose symptoms had begun during the 2000s, the probabilities of continuing to work were 80% (95% confidence interval (CI) 78%-82%) at 2 years and 68% (95% CI 65%-71%) at 5 years, with similar patterns in high-GDP and low-GDP countries. Patients who continued working versus stopped working had significantly better clinical status for all clinical status measures and patient self-report scores, with similar patterns in high-GDP and low-GDP countries. However, patients who had stopped working in high-GDP countries had better clinical status than patients who continued working in low-GDP countries. The most significant

  18. [Artificial intelligence in medicine: project of a mobile platform in an intelligent environment for the care of disabled and elderly people].

    PubMed

    Cortés, Ulises; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Campana, Fabio; Vázquez-Salceda, Javier; Urdiales, Cristina; Canãmero, Lola; López, Maite; Sánchez-Marrè, Miquel; Di Vincenzo, Sarah; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2004-04-01

    A project based on the integration of new technologies and artificial intelligence to develop a device--e-tool--for disabled patients and elderly people is presented. A mobile platform in intelligent environments (skilled-care facilities and home-care), controlled and managed by a multi-level architecture, is proposed to support patients and caregivers to increase self-dependency in activities of daily living.

  19. A community-based aquatic exercise program to improve endurance and mobility in adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Renée M.; Ross, Michael D.; Runco, Wendy; Kane, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a community-based aquatic exercise program on physical performance among adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID). Twenty-two community-dwelling adults with mild to moderate ID volunteered to participate in this study. Participants completed an 8-week aquatic exercise program (2 days/wk, 1 hr/session). Measures of physical performance, which were assessed prior to and following the completion of the aquatic exercise program, included the timed-up-and-go test, 6-min walk test, 30-sec chair stand test, 10-m timed walk test, hand grip strength, and the static plank test. When comparing participants’ measures of physical performance prior to and following the 8-week aquatic exercise program, improvements were seen in all measures, but the change in scores for the 6-min walk test, 30-sec chair stand test, and the static plank test achieved statistical significance (P<0.05). An 8-week group aquatic exercise program for adults with ID may promote improvements in endurance and balance/mobility. PMID:28349039

  20. Mobility and Mobility Aids for Visually Handicapped Individuals. Bibliography, No. 84-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    The bibliography lists approximately 150 references (1973-1983) on orientation and mobility for visually impaired individuals. Citations are organized alphabetically by author's name within five major topic areas: general works, manuals and curriculum guides, research literature, mobility for special populations (multiple disabilities, children…

  1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled, clinical trial investigating a comprehensive exercise stimulus for improving mobility disability outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Pilutti, Lara A; Sandroff, Brian M; Klaren, Rachel; Balantrapu, Swathi; McAuley, Edward; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-05-01

    This randomized controlled trial (RCT) examines the effect of a comprehensive exercise training stimulus on physiological function and mobility disability (i.e., problems walking) in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have walking impairment. This trial will recruit 30 persons with MS across central Illinois who have an Expanded Disability Status Scale score between 4.0 and 6.0, and those persons will be randomized into either the intervention or control arm of the study; the participants will not be blinded regarding group assignment. The intervention will incorporate equal amounts of aerobic, resistance, and balance modes of training delivered 3 times/week with a gradual progression of duration and intensity across a 6-month period. The control will involve stretching along with minimal muscle strengthening stimuli and will be delivered on the same frequency and duration. The primary outcomes will be clinical, kinematic, patient-rated, and physiological measures of mobility disability. The secondary outcomes will be measures of physiological function including aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and balance. This study will lay the foundation for the design of a subsequent Phase II or Phase III RCT by (a) providing effect sizes that can be included in a power analysis for sample size estimation and (b) investigating whether aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and balance are possible factors associated with the beneficial effect of exercise training on walking outcomes. Taken as a whole, the proposed study and our subsequent research agenda has the potential for advancing the management of mobility disability using exercise training in the 2nd stage of MS.

  2. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  3. Immediate Effects of Angular Joint Mobilization (a New Concept of Joint Mobilization) on Pain, Range of Motion, and Disability in a Patient with Shoulder Adhesive Capsulitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Lee, GyuChang

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 53 Final Diagnosis: Adhesive capsulitis Symptoms: Pain • limited range of motion Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Manual therapy (joint mobilization) Specialty: Physical Therapy Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Adhesive capsulitis is a common disabling condition, with reviews reporting up to 5.3% of the population being affected, the burden placed upon individuals and healthcare services may therefore be considered substantial. For recovering the normal extensibility of the capsule in individuals with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, passive stretching of the capsule through end-range mobilization has been suggested. Recently, the concept of joint mobilization into angular joint mobilization (AJM), which is rotational joint mobilization with joint axis shift, was proposed. This case report aimed to investigate the immediate effect of AJM on pain, range of motion (ROM), and disability in a patient with shoulder adhesive capsulitis. Case Report: The patient was a 53-year-old woman who was diagnosed with left shoulder adhesive capsulitis. Her left shoulder gradually stiffened, affecting functional activity. The patient attended 12 joint mobilization sessions over a period of six weeks (two times per week). The intervention consisted of rotary oscillations of the left shoulder, which were applied with overpressure and stops before the end of the pathological limit. After intervention, the patient reported 3/100 pain intensity on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (before versus after: 58 versus 3). Active ROM improved by 51° in flexion, 76.4° in abduction, 38.7° in external rotation, and 51.4° in active internal rotation. Passive ROM improved by 49° in flexion, 74.6° in abduction, 39.4° in external rotation, 51.4° in internal rotation. The total shoulder, pain and disability index (SPADI) score improved by 53.9%. Conclusions: The patient reacted positively to AJM, resulting in improved shoulder pain, ROM

  4. Association among measures of mobility-related disability and self-perceived fatigue among older people: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Wuber J. S.; Lima, Camila A.; Bilton, Tereza L.; Ferrioli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosângela C.; Perracini, Monica R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between self-perceived fatigue with different physical functioning tests and functional performance scales used for evaluating mobility-related disability among community-dwelling older persons. Method: This is a cross-sectional, population-based study. The sample was composed of older persons with 65 years of age or more living in Cuiabá, MT, and Barueri, SP, Brazil. The data for this study is from the FIBRA Network Study. The presence of self-perceived fatigue was assessed using self-reports based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. The Lawton instrumental activities of daily living scale (IADL) and the advanced activities of daily living scale (AADL) were used to assess performance and participation restriction. The following physical functioning tests were used: five-step test (FST), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and usual gait speed (UGS). Three models of logistic regression analysis were conducted, and a significance level of α<0.05 was adopted. Results: The sample was composed of 776 older adults with a mean age (SD) of 71.9 (5.9) years, of whom the majority were women (74%). The prevalence of self-perceived fatigue within the participants was 20%. After adjusting for covariates, SPPB, UGS, IADL, and AADL remained associated with self-perceived fatigue in the final multivariate regression model. Conclusion: Our results suggest that there is an association between self-perceived fatigue and lower extremity function, usual gait speed and activity limitation and participation restriction in older adults. Further cohort studies are needed to investigate which physical performance measure may be able to predict the negative impact of fatigue in older adults. PMID:26039035

  5. Mobility of major and trace elements in the eclogite-fluid system and element fluxes upon slab dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, Alexandra; Zajacz, Zoltan; Ulmer, Peter; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The equilibrium between aqueous fluids and allanite-bearing eclogite has been investigated to constrain the effect of temperature (T) and fluid composition on the stability of allanite and on the mobility of major and trace elements during the dehydration of eclogites. The experiments were performed at 590-800 °C and 2.4-2.6 GPa, and fluids were sampled as synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz using an improved entrapment technique. The concentrations and bulk partition coefficients were determined for a range of major (Mg, Ca, Na, Fe, Al, Ti) and 16 trace elements as a function of T and fluid composition. The results reveal a significant effect of T on element partitioning between the fluids and the solid mineral assemblage. The partition coefficients increase by more than an order of magnitude for most of the major and trace elements, and several orders of magnitude for light rare-earth elements (LREE) from 590 to 800 °C. The addition of various ligand species into the fluid at 700 °C results in distinctive trends on element partitioning. The concentrations and corresponding partition coefficients of most of the elements are enhanced upon addition of NaF to the fluid. In contrast, NaCl displays a nearly opposite effect by suppressing the solubilities of major elements and consequently affecting the mobility of trace elements that form stable complexes with alkali-(alumino)-silicate clusters in the fluid, e.g. high field strength elements (HFSE). The results further suggest that fluids in equilibrium with orthopyroxene and/or diopsidic clinopyroxene are peralkaline (ASI ∼0.1-0.7), whereas fluids in equilibrium with omphacitic pyroxene are more peraluminous (ASI ∼1.15). Therefore, natural aqueous fluids in equilibrium with eclogite at about 90 km depth will be slightly peraluminous in composition. Another important finding of this study is the relatively high capacity of aqueous fluids to mobilize LREE, which may be even higher than that of hydrous melts.

  6. Wheeled mobility: factors influencing mobility and assistive technology in veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss from Vietnam war and OIF/OEF conflicts.

    PubMed

    Laferrier, Justin Z; McFarland, Lynne V; Boninger, Michael L; Cooper, Rory A; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Returning wounded veterans and servicemembers to their highest level of function following traumatic injury is a priority of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. We surveyed 245 veterans from the Vietnam war and 226 servicemembers and veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) conflicts with at least one major traumatic lower-limb loss to determine their use of mobility assistive technology (AT) and patterns of limb abandonment. Prosthetic device use without wheelchair use is found in 50.5% of Vietnam and 42.8% of OIF/OEF groups. Prostheses and supplementary wheelchairs are used by Vietnam (32%) and OIF/OEF (53%) groups (p < 0.01). Exclusive wheelchair use is more frequent in the Vietnam group (18%) than in the OIF/OEF group (4.0%, p < 0.01). In Vietnam participants, multivariate analysis found that multiple-limb loss (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.5-38.5), bilateral lower-limb loss (AOR = 12.7; 95% CI 6.2-26.1), and number of comorbidities (AOR = 1.3; 95% CI 1.2-1.5) are associated with increased likelihood of wheelchair use. In OIF/OEF participants, bilateral lower-limb loss (AOR = 29.8; 95% CI 11.0-80.7), multiple-limb loss (AOR = 16.3; 95% CI 3.1-85.3), cumulative trauma disorder (AOR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.9), and number of combat injuries (AOR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7) are associated with wheelchair use. Combined use of different types of mobility ATs promotes improved rehabilitation and ability to function.

  7. Major and Trace Element Geochemistry of the Mafic Magmatic Rocks from the Betul Mobile Belt, Central Indian Tectonic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A.; Ghatak, A.

    2015-12-01

    Peninsular shield of India is composed of several Archaean cratons bordered by Proterozoic mobile belts which amalgamated the Archaean cratons and helped in the growth of the Indian subcontinent. The ENE-WSW trending Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is one such important mobile belt which sutures the Bundelkhand and the Aravalli craton in the north and Bastar, Singhbhum and Dharwar cratons in the south. The CITZ is a collection of lithotectonic terranes ranging in age from Archaean to recent and comprises supracrustal belts, granulite belts, shear zones and felsic-mafic magmatic rocks. The Betul belt is characterized by a litho-package of plutonic magmatic rocks, volcano-sedimentary rocks, bimodal volcanics and associated base metal sulphide mineralization. The petrological, geochemical and geochronological evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks has significance in our understanding of Proterozoic crustal evolution in central India. Here we report major and trace element concentrations of 14 mafic samples (basaslts, gabbors, pyroxenites and dolerites) in an attempt to classify, characterise and suggest a spatial and temporal evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks of the Betul mobile belt vis-à-vis CITZ. Traditionally these rocks have been classified as being calc-alkaline rocks, related to arc volcanism and rift tectonics. We have divided these rocks into those have a positive Europium anomaly and those having a negative Europium anomaly to better understand the source and the contaminant for these rocks. We find characterisitic difference specifically in the trace element ratios and concentrations of the rocks with +Eu anomaly [La=10.69ppm; LaN/YbN=3.65] and those with -Eu anomaly [La=27.59; LaN/YbN=8.86]. Based on these data we propose that the Betul mafic rocks may have been derived from an enriched mantle source that experienced contamination from the lower continental crust or sub-continental lithosphere prior to eruption.

  8. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  9. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  10. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  11. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  12. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  13. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  14. Mobile applications for participation at the shopping mall: content analysis and usability for persons with physical disabilities and communication or cognitive limitations.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team's and users' comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs.

  15. Mobile Applications for Participation at the Shopping Mall: Content Analysis and Usability for Persons with Physical Disabilities and Communication or Cognitive Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team’s and users’ comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  16. Inhibitory synapse dynamics: coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic mobility and the major contribution of recycled vesicles to new synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dobie, Frederick A; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-07-20

    Dynamics of GABAergic synaptic components have been studied previously over milliseconds to minutes, revealing mobility of postsynaptic scaffolds and receptors. Here we image inhibitory synapses containing fluorescently tagged postsynaptic scaffold Gephyrin, together with presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) or postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor γ2 subunit (GABA(A)Rγ2), over seconds to days in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, revealing modes of inhibitory synapse formation and remodeling. Entire synapses were mobile, translocating rapidly within a confined region and exhibiting greater nonstochastic motion over multihour periods. Presynaptic and postsynaptic components moved in unison, maintaining close apposition while translocating distances of several micrometers. An observed flux in the density of synaptic puncta partially resulted from the apparent merging and splitting of preexisting clusters. De novo formation of inhibitory synapses was observed, marked by the appearance of stably apposed Gephyrin and VGAT clusters at sites previously lacking either component. Coclustering of GABA(A)Rγ2 supports the identification of such new clusters as synapses. Nascent synapse formation occurred by gradual accumulation of components over several hours, with VGAT clustering preceding that of Gephyrin and GABA(A)Rγ2. Comparing VGAT labeling by active uptake of a luminal domain antibody with post hoc immunocytochemistry indicated that recycling vesicles from preexisting boutons significantly contribute to vesicle pools at the majority of new inhibitory synapses. Although new synapses formed primarily on dendrite shafts, some also formed on dendritic protrusions, without apparent interconversion. Altogether, the long-term imaging of GABAergic presynaptic and postsynaptic components reveals complex dynamics and perpetual remodeling with implications for mechanisms of assembly and synaptic integration.

  17. HEALTHCARE EXPERIENCES AND PERCEPTIONS AMONG PEOPLE WITH AND WITHOUT DISABILITIES

    PubMed Central

    de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Barg, Frances K.; Katz, Sam P.; Stineman, Margaret G.; Krueger, Alice; Colletti, Patrice M.; Boellstorff, Tom; Bogner, Hillary R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about healthcare experiences among people with and without disabilities. OBJECTIVE We sought to explore perceptions of people with and without disabilities related to their healthcare experiences. METHODS Nineteen persons with and without disabilities participated in one of four focus groups. Focus groups were conducted in the physical world in Milwaukee, WI and in the virtual world in Second Life® with Virtual Ability, a well-established community designed by and for people with a wide range of disabilities. A grounded theory methodology was employed to analyze focus group data. Inclusion of physical and virtual world focus groups enabled people with a wide range of disabilities to participate. RESULTS While some participants described instances of receiving good care, many discussed numerous barriers. The main themes that emerged in focus groups among both persons with and without disabilities related to their healthcare experiences including poor coordination among providers; difficulties with insurance, finances, transportation and facilities; short duration of visits with physicians; inadequate information provision; feelings of being diminished and deflated; and self-advocacy as a tool. Transportation was a major concern for persons with disabilities influencing mobility. Persons with disabilities described particularly poignant experiences wherein they felt invisible or were viewed as incompetent. CONCLUSIONS Both persons with and without disabilities experienced challenges in obtaining high quality healthcare. However, persons with disabilities experienced specific challenges often related to their type of disability. Participants stressed the need for improving healthcare coordination and the importance of self-advocacy. PMID:26482010

  18. Learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on

  19. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Particulate Emissions on Major Highways in Southern California: Lagrangian Approach Using Mobile Monitoring System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Grady, M.; Pham, L.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010 CARB reported 9,000 people in California die prematurely each year as a result of exposure to particulate emissions. Public's exposure to particulate emissions is known to be highest on highway during daily commute. Total particle concentrations vary temporarily and spatially due to many reasons including particle nucleation, traffic, and meteorological conditions. The stationary ambient monitoring sites are too sparsely located to measure these variations on highway. Also, emissions from highways can be included in the emission inventory which can improve modeler capability to predict at much finer scale. Emissions from highways are vary temporally and spatially. This study used a mobile platform to measure total particle number, total particle surface area and average particle diameter in Lagrangian approach. The study will report occurrence and frequency of hot spots for particle nucleation on highway and temporal/ spatial variations of particle concentrations on highway. This will enable better assessment of public's exposure to particulate emissions on highway by transportation and propose a methodology how to obtain emission inventory for major highways.

  20. Do disabled elderly Medicare beneficiaries with major depression make less use of a consumer-directed home care voucher benefit?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with major depression may underutilize consumer-directed long-term care. Systematic underutilization would create disparities in outcomes, undermining program effectiveness. The Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration included a consumer-directed indemnity benefit that paid for goods and services not financed by traditional Medicare. Overall and for most categories of goods and services there was little difference in use and expenditures between those with and without major depression. However, among those using the benefit to hire in-home workers, arguably the most important consumer-directed purchase, average spending for workers was about 30% lower for depressed persons. While our findings are generally reassuring for public policy, future research is needed to verify that major depression is associated with less spending on in-home workers.

  1. Democratizing Neurorehabilitation: How Accessible are Low-Cost Mobile-Gaming Technologies for Self-Rehabilitation of Arm Disability in Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Rinne, Paul; Mace, Michael; Nakornchai, Tagore; Zimmerman, Karl; Fayer, Susannah; Sharma, Pankaj; Liardon, Jean-Luc; Burdet, Etienne; Bentley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Motor-training software on tablets or smartphones (Apps) offer a low-cost, widely-available solution to supplement arm physiotherapy after stroke. We assessed the proportions of hemiplegic stroke patients who, with their plegic hand, could meaningfully engage with mobile-gaming devices using a range of standard control-methods, as well as by using a novel wireless grip-controller, adapted for neurodisability. We screened all newly-diagnosed hemiplegic stroke patients presenting to a stroke centre over 6 months. Subjects were compared on their ability to control a tablet or smartphone cursor using: finger-swipe, tap, joystick, screen-tilt, and an adapted handgrip. Cursor control was graded as: no movement (0); less than full-range movement (1); full-range movement (2); directed movement (3). In total, we screened 345 patients, of which 87 satisfied recruitment criteria and completed testing. The commonest reason for exclusion was cognitive impairment. Using conventional controls, the proportion of patients able to direct cursor movement was 38–48%; and to move it full-range was 55–67% (controller comparison: p>0.1). By comparison, handgrip enabled directed control in 75%, and full-range movement in 93% (controller comparison: p<0.001). This difference between controllers was most apparent amongst severely-disabled subjects, with 0% achieving directed or full-range control with conventional controls, compared to 58% and 83% achieving these two levels of movement, respectively, with handgrip. In conclusion, hand, or arm, training Apps played on conventional mobile devices are likely to be accessible only to mildly-disabled stroke patients. Technological adaptations such as grip-control can enable more severely affected subjects to engage with self-training software. PMID:27706248

  2. Democratizing Neurorehabilitation: How Accessible are Low-Cost Mobile-Gaming Technologies for Self-Rehabilitation of Arm Disability in Stroke?

    PubMed

    Rinne, Paul; Mace, Michael; Nakornchai, Tagore; Zimmerman, Karl; Fayer, Susannah; Sharma, Pankaj; Liardon, Jean-Luc; Burdet, Etienne; Bentley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Motor-training software on tablets or smartphones (Apps) offer a low-cost, widely-available solution to supplement arm physiotherapy after stroke. We assessed the proportions of hemiplegic stroke patients who, with their plegic hand, could meaningfully engage with mobile-gaming devices using a range of standard control-methods, as well as by using a novel wireless grip-controller, adapted for neurodisability. We screened all newly-diagnosed hemiplegic stroke patients presenting to a stroke centre over 6 months. Subjects were compared on their ability to control a tablet or smartphone cursor using: finger-swipe, tap, joystick, screen-tilt, and an adapted handgrip. Cursor control was graded as: no movement (0); less than full-range movement (1); full-range movement (2); directed movement (3). In total, we screened 345 patients, of which 87 satisfied recruitment criteria and completed testing. The commonest reason for exclusion was cognitive impairment. Using conventional controls, the proportion of patients able to direct cursor movement was 38-48%; and to move it full-range was 55-67% (controller comparison: p>0.1). By comparison, handgrip enabled directed control in 75%, and full-range movement in 93% (controller comparison: p<0.001). This difference between controllers was most apparent amongst severely-disabled subjects, with 0% achieving directed or full-range control with conventional controls, compared to 58% and 83% achieving these two levels of movement, respectively, with handgrip. In conclusion, hand, or arm, training Apps played on conventional mobile devices are likely to be accessible only to mildly-disabled stroke patients. Technological adaptations such as grip-control can enable more severely affected subjects to engage with self-training software.

  3. Ubiquitous Yet Unique: Perspectives of People With Disabilities on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Mactavish, Jennifer B.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study was grounded in a qualitative framework and used a focus group method to examine the meanings that individuals with disabilities (e.g., permanent mobility impairments, sensory impairments) attach to their experiences of stress, as well as major sources or causes of stress in these individuals' lives. Overall, the data showed…

  4. Effects of two different mobilization techniques on pain, range of motion and functional disability in patients with adhesive capsulitis: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Surabhi; Raza, Shahid; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad H.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the effects of two different mobilization techniques in the management of patients with adhesive capsulitis. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty non-diabetic men and women with adhesive capsulitis were randomly allocated to the reverse distraction group (n=15) or Kaltenborn group (n=15). The reverse distraction technique and Kaltenborn’s caudal and posterior glides (grades III and IV) were applied 10–15 times along with conventional physical therapy for 18 treatment sessions in 6 weeks. Pain was measured with a visual analog scale, abduction and external rotation range of motion with goniometry, hand behind back reach with inch tape, and functional disability with the Flexilevel scale of shoulder function before and after the treatment. [Results] Although all the variables improved significantly in both groups after 18 intervention sessions, reverse distraction was significantly better than Kaltenborn’s caudal and posterior glides in decreasing pain and improving abduction range of motion and functional scores. [Conclusion] This study supports the clinical use of reverse distraction as an alternative to conventional mobilization techniques to decrease pain and improve range of motion and functional scores in patients with adhesive capsulitis. PMID:28174448

  5. Work disability in ankylosing spondylitis: differences among working and work-disabled patients.

    PubMed

    Cakar, Engin; Taskaynatan, Mehmet Ali; Dincer, Umit; Kiralp, Mehmet Zeki; Durmus, Oguz; Ozgül, Ahmet

    2009-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease primarily affecting the axial skeleton. Work disability can be one of the major consequences of AS, and the knowledge about the burden of AS to the patient and society is not well-established yet. The objective of this study was to investigate work disability among patients with AS in the national service and to put forward the related factors and differences among disabled and nondisabled groups. A total of 121 male AS patients were included in the study. Patient demographics and duration of disease were noted, and employment status and disability were questioned. Measures of functionality, axial mobility, health-related quality of life, and depression were used. It was found that 38 patients (31.4%) continued their work lives with no change, 54 patients (44.6%) changed to a lighter job, and 29 patients (24%) were retired due to AS. Differences in age at onset of the disease, time since the diagnosis, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and hip involvement were statistically significant. The mean retirement age of the patients was 36 +/- 4.2 years. Frequency of hip involvement was higher in the work-disabled group. Spine was evidently affected more seriously, and CRP values were higher in the work-disabled group. Older age at onset, longer time since the diagnosis, longer diagnosis delay, and some physical impairments like decrease in spinal mobility and hip involvement may preclude AS patients from leading a productive work life.

  6. A Secure Operational Model for Mobile Payments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  7. A secure operational model for mobile payments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tao-Ku

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service.

  8. School problems and solutions for students with disabilities: a qualitative examination.

    PubMed

    Sorani-Villanueva, Sandra; McMahon, Susan D; Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities is a process that requires collaboration among multiple individuals, with teachers, aides, parents, students, and school systems playing important roles in resolving student problems. In the current study, we examined data from 75 teachers concerning 126 students about problems that students with disabilities had following a transition from a school primarily serving students with disabilities to more inclusive schools. Reported problems were reviewed and five major themes emerged: academic, behavioral, mobility/accessibility, social, and transportation issues. Teachers typically resolved academic problems by working directly with the student or collaborating with school staff. Social problems were resolved through student and teacher initiatives. Behavioral, transportation, and mobility/accessibility problems were resolved through collaboration among many key school figures and family members. Implications for theory, research, and inclusive school practices related to academic curricula, resources, services, and architectural accommodations for students with disabilities are discussed.

  9. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  10. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 × 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides — in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  11. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  12. Weathering of primary minerals and mobility of major elements in soils affected by an accidental spill of pyrite tailing.

    PubMed

    Martín, Francisco; Diez, María; García, Inés; Simón, Mariano; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Iriarte, Angel; Aguilar, José

    2007-05-25

    In the present work, soil profiles were sampled 40 days and three years after an accidental pyrite tailing spill from the Aznalcóllar mine (S Spain) in order to figure out the effects of the acidic solution draining from the tailing. The composition of the acidic solution, the mineralogy, and the total and soluble content of the major elements were analysed at varying depths. The results show a weathering process of carbonates and of primary silicates. Calcium released is leached or reacts with the sulphate ions to form gypsum. Magnesium, aluminium and potassium tend to leach from the uppermost millimetres of the soil, accumulating where the pH>/=5.0; also the iron, probably forming more or less complex hydroxysulphates, precipitate in the upper 5 cm. The strong releasing of soluble salts increases the electrical conductivity, while the soluble potassium tends to decrease in the uppermost part of the soil due to the neoformation of jarosite. Iron is soluble only where the pH

  13. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  14. Studies on deaf mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    The deaf normally considered to be disabled that do not need any mobile technology due to the inabilities of hearing and talking. However, many deaf are using mobile phone in their daily life for various purposes such as communication and learning. Many studies have attempted to identify the need of deaf people in mobile application and level of usage of the applications. This study aims in studying the recent research conducted on deaf mobile application to understand the level of importance of mobile technology for this disabled community. This paper enable identification of studies conducted are limited and the need of more research done of this disabled people to ensure their privilege of using mobile technology and its application, which leads to the identification of deaf user requirement for mobile application as future study.

  15. Freestyle race pacing strategies (400 m) of elite able-bodied swimmers and swimmers with disability at major international championships.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joseph B; Santi, Giampaolo; Mellalieu, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Freestyle race pacing strategies (400 m) were compared between elite able-bodied swimmers and those with minimal physical (International Paralympic Committee S10 classification) and visual disabilities (International Paralympic Committee S13 classification). Data comprised 50-m lap splits and overall race times from 1176 400-m freestyle swims from World Championships, European Championships and Olympic/Paralympic Games between 2006 and 2012. Five pacing strategies were identified across groups (even, fast start, negative, parabolic and parabolic fast start), with negative and even strategies the most commonly adopted. The negative pacing strategy produced the fastest race times for all groups except for female S13 swimmers where an even strategy was most effective. Able-bodied groups swam faster than their S10 and S13 counterparts, with no differences between S10 and S13 groups. The results suggest adoption of multiple pacing strategies across groups, and even where impairments are considered minimal they are still associated with performance detriments in comparison to their able-bodied counterparts. The findings have implications for the planning and implementation of training related to pacing strategies to ensure optimal swimmer preparation for competition. Analogous performance levels in S10 and S13 swimmers also suggest a case for integrated competition of these classifications in 400-m freestyle swimming.

  16. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  17. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... be able to go to college and study engineering as he'd hoped? What Are Learning Disabilities? ... some theories as to why they develop, including: Genetic influences. Experts have noticed that learning disabilities tend ...

  18. Comparison of King Vision and Truview Laryngoscope for Postextubation Visualization of Vocal Cord Mobility in Patients Undergoing Thyroid and Major Neck Surgeries: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, Anto Sahaya; Nag, Kusha; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Singh, Dewan Roshan; Kumar, Senthil; Sivashanmugam, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Visualization of vocal cords following extubation after thyroid and major neck surgeries is highly desirable for the surgeon as well as the anaesthesiologist to rule out vocal cord palsy or oedema. As the patient is emerging from general anaesthesia, it may be challenging for the anaesthesiologist to optimally visualise and grade vocal cord movement following extubation. Setting: Randomized clinical trial at a tertiary care centre. Methodology: After obtaining institutional ethics committee approval, 60 patients posted for thyroid and major neck surgeries under American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I and II were recruited for the study. Written informed consent was obtained. Pre-operatively indirect laryngoscopy was performed in all the patients to assess baseline vocal cord function. All patients were premedicated and induced and maintained as per standardized anaesthesia protocol. Patients were randomized using a sealed envelope technique to either Group K where intubation was performed using Kings vision laryngoscope or Group T where intubation was performed using True view laryngoscope. Glottis visualization was graded in all patients and intubated. Ten minutes prior to extubation injection. dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was administered. Once patients satisfied extubation criteria, laryngoscopy was performed using respective video-laryngoscope in each group, patient extubated under vision and assessed for vocal cord visualization and mobility grade (VMG) and patient reactivity score (PRS). Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure was also noted. Total intraoperative morphine consumption was recorded. Vocal cord function was assessed again before the day of discharge by indirect laryngoscopy. Results: Age (P = 0.27), sex (P = 0.08), body mass index (P = 0.70), ASA (P = 0.39), mallampati class (P = 0.72) and morphine used (P = 0.39) were comparable in both groups. There was no statistically

  19. Reassessment of the Listeria monocytogenes pan-genome reveals dynamic integration hotspots and mobile genetic elements as major components of the accessory genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    differential distribution of trans-encoded RNA, hinting at a diverse range of adaptations and regulatory impact. Conclusions This study determined commonly occurring hyper variable hotspots and mobile elements as primary effectors of quantitative gene-scale evolution of species L. monocytogenes, while gene decay and SNPs seem to represent major factors influencing long-term evolution. The discovery of common and disparately distributed genes considering lineages, serogroups, serotypes and strains of species L. monocytogenes will assist in diagnostic, phylogenetic and functional research, supported by the comparative genomic GECO-LisDB analysis server (http://bioinfo.mikrobio.med.uni-giessen.de/geco2lisdb). PMID:23339658

  20. Physical Disability and Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Prosen, Harry

    1965-01-01

    Motivating the physically handicapped individual to assist in his own rehabilitation is a complex problem. Difficulties in motivation are often based on disturbances in body image, which in turn are related both to the premorbid personality and the handicap. Treatment must be directed at the body image as well as the physical disability. Emotional disturbance following body injury should be expected and its absence is abnormal. Adequate rehabilitation entails a consideration of the effect of the rehabilitation process on the disabled person. The patient's basic abilities must be used to improve motivation. Rehabilitation procedures must focus on practical ways of coping with everyday life. Physical disability can mobilize underlying inferiority feelings and increase the need for dependency. Judicious use must be made of success and frustration in the rehabilitation program. PMID:14296008

  1. Stigma of mental and physical illness and the use of mobile technology.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Robin Marie; Morgan, Megan; Taylor, Katlyn

    2016-11-14

    Research has shown the stigma attached to mental disabilities, yet little research has directly compared the experiences of people with physical disabilities and those with mental disabilities. Not only are both conditions likely perceived as stigmatizing, but the pervasive use of mobile technology may be one means by which people with disabilities can manage and understand their disability. Four hundred and eighty-seven individuals with physical and/or psychological disabilities completed a survey examining whether they would be willing to use mobile technology to manage their disability and how stigmatizing they perceived their disability to be. Willingness to use mobile technology was related to the age of the sample as well as the type of disability. Individuals with psychological disabilities were more likely to use certain forms of mobile technology relative to those with physical disabilities. Observed differences between physical and psychological disabilities are discussed in terms of the symbolic interaction stigma model.

  2. Trajectories of disability among older persons before and after a hospitalization leading to a skilled nursing facility admission

    PubMed Central

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Han, Ling; Murphy, Terrence E.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Leo-Summers, Linda; Allore, Heather G.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify distinct sets of disability trajectories in the year before and after a Q-SNF admission, evaluate the associations between the pre- and post-Q-SNF disability trajectories, and determine short-term outcomes (readmission, mortality). Design, setting and participants Prospective cohort study including 754 community-dwelling older persons, 70+ years, and initially nondisabled in their basic activities of daily living. The analytic sample included 394 persons, with a first hospitalization followed by a Q-SNF admission between 1998–2012. Main outcomes and measures Disability in the year before and after a Q-SNF admission using 13 basic, instrumental and mobility activities. Secondary outcomes included 30-day readmission and 12-month mortality. Results The mean (SD) age of the sample was 84.9(5.5) years. We identified three disability trajectories in the year before a Q-SNF admission: minimal disability (37.3% of participants) mild disability (44.6%), and moderate disability (18.2%). In the year after a Q-SNF admission, all participants started with moderate to severe disability scores. Three disability trajectories were identified: substantial improvement (26.0% of participants), minimal improvement (36.5%), and no improvement (37.5%). Among participants with minimal disability pre-Q-SNF, 52% demonstrated substantial improvement; the other 48% demonstrated minimal improvement (32%) or no improvement (16%) and remained moderately to severely disabled in the year post-Q-SNF. Among participants with mild disability pre-Q-SNF, 5% showed substantial improvement, whereas 95% showed little to no improvement. Of participants with moderate disability pre-Q-SNF, 15% remained moderately disabled showing little improvement, whereas 85% showed no improvement. Participants who transitioned from minimal disability pre-Q-SNF to no improvement post-Q-SNF had the highest rates of 30-day readmission and 12-month mortality (rate/100 person days 1.3 [95% CI 0.6–2

  3. Disability pornography: the fetishization of women's vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Elman, R A

    1997-06-01

    This paper offers a critical exploration of a form of pornography consisting in sexual abuse and exploitation of women and girls with disabilities. This practice allows men to create and maintain their sexual dominance over the female gender. Disability pornography, like all other forms of pornography, but in its own way, contributes to the second-class status of all women, particularly those who are suffering from limitations in mobility and other disabilities. By promoting the castrating, dominant, violent image of women, pornography allows men to justify their abusive behaviors toward women. This form of pornography preys on the vulnerability of disabled women and increases the possibility that they will be abused. The sexually explicit lack of physical mobility is as celebrated in disability pornography as the political mobility of women is condemned in all genres of pornography. Amputee pornography is just one example of this brutal practice.

  4. Technology for Persons with Disabilities. An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IBM, Atlanta, GA. National Support Center for Persons with Disabilities.

    This paper contains an overview of technology, national support organizations, and IBM support available to persons with disabilities related to impairments affecting hearing, learning, mobility, speech or language, and vision. The information was obtained from the IBM National Support Center for Persons with Disabilities, which was created to…

  5. Readiness of Teachers and Pupils for Use of Mobile Devices as Support for Effective Pedagogy in Nigeria: Could Location Be a Major Determinant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharehu, Aminu Ladan; Emmanuel, Achor Edoja

    2015-01-01

    How prepared are teachers and pupils in Basic 6 (that is, 6th grade) to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) such as mobile devices to aid teaching and learning in urban and rural schools at that level is a matter of concern and therefore formed the focus of this paper. The study is a survey of some urban and rural Primary schools in…

  6. The Progression of Disability among Older Adults in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Venegas, Carlos; Reistetter, Timothy A.; Wang, Ching-Yi; Wong, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper seeks to document the progression of disability in a developing country and to examine gender differences in this process. Methods The data come from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS), a nationally representative sample of older adults. An ordinal logistic regression (n = 3,283) is used to measure the progression of disability that considers: 1) no disability, 2) mobility problems, 3) mobility problems with IADLs limitations, 4) mobility problems plus ADLs limitations, 5) combinations of the latter three, and 6) death. Results Approximately 43% of the sample remained in the same level of disability after 2 years. The patterns of progression with two disabilities differ for men and women. Conclusions Our model reflects the importance of separating ADLs and IADLs in the study of disability progression in Mexico. Varying risk profiles and cultural differences might influence the divergent disability paths followed by each gender. PMID:26729017

  7. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  8. Multiple Disabilities. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The term "multiple disabilities" is general and broad. From the term, you cannot tell how many disabilities a child has; which disabilities are involved; or how severe each disability is. Many combinations of disabilities are possible. The different disabilities will also have a combined impact. That is why it is also important to ask:…

  9. Patients living with disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lofters, Aisha; Guilcher, Sara; Maulkhan, Niraj; Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the potential risk factors for lower-quality primary care, the potential markers of unmet needs in primary care, and the willingness to participate in future research among primary care patients with versus without physical disabilities. Design A waiting room survey using a convenience sample. Setting A family health team (FHT) in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, with a designated Mobility Clinic. Participants A total of 40 patients seen at the FHT Mobility Clinic and 80 patients from the general patient population of the same FHT. Main outcome measures Socioeconomic status and social capital, number of self-reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations in the preceding year, and willingness of the patients in the 2 groups to participate in future research studies. Results Patients from the Mobility Clinic were more than twice as likely to be receiving benefits or social assistance (75.0% vs 32.1%, P < .001), were twice as likely to report an annual household income of less than $40000 (58.6% vs 29.2%, P = .006), and were more likely to report their health status to be fair or poor (42.5% vs 16.2%, P = .002). Half of Mobility Clinic patients had visited the emergency department at least once in the preceding year, compared with 29.7% in the general patient population (P = .027). When asked if they would be willing to provide their health card number in the future so that it could be linked to health care data for research, 82.5% of Mobility Clinic patients agreed versus 55.0% of those in the general patient population (P = .004). Conclusion In this study, patients with disabilities were at a social disadvantage compared with their peers without disabilities and were more likely to use the emergency department, suggesting that they had unmet health needs. Future research should continue to explore this patient population and to investigate if an interprofessional primary health care team approach focused on patients with disabilities can

  10. Mobile Computer Application for Promoting Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Siobhan; Vankipuram, Mithra; Fleury, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of falls and other causes of disability and death, the majority of older adults do not engage in physical activity on a regular basis. Mobile technology applications have emerged as potential resources for promoting physical activity behavior. This article describes features of a new application, Ready~Steady, highlighting approaches used in its design and development, and implications for clinical practice. Iterative processes enabled the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the application consistent with the wellness motivation theory, as well as established user-specific strategies and theoretical design principles. Implications in terms of potential benefits and constraints are discussed. Integrating technology that promotes health and wellness in the form of mobile computer applications is a promising adjunct to nursing practice. PMID:23463915

  11. Mobile computer application for promoting physical activity.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Siobhan; Vankipuram, Mithra; Fleury, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Despite evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of falls and other causes of disability and death, the majority of older adults do not engage in physical activity on a regular basis. Mobile technology applications have emerged as potential resources for promoting physical activity behavior. This article describes features of a new application, Ready∼Steady, highlighting approaches used in its design and development, and implications for clinical practice. Iterative processes enabled the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the application consistent with the wellness motivation theory, as well as established user-specific strategies and theoretical design principles. Implications in terms of potential benefits and constraints are discussed. Integrating technology that promotes health and wellness in the form of mobile computer applications is a promising adjunct to nursing practice.

  12. Mathematics and Metacognition in Adolescents and Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desoete, Annemie

    2009-01-01

    A majority of studies on learning disabilities have focused on elementary grades. Although problems with learning disabilities are life-affecting only a few studies focus on deficits in adults. In this study adults with isolated mathematical disabilities (n = 101) and adults with combined mathematical and reading disabilities (n = 130) solved…

  13. Shakespeare on old age and disability.

    PubMed

    Covey, H

    2000-01-01

    The plays of William Shakespeare were reviewed for references to disabilities, aging and disability, and older characters with disabilities. Shakespeare's references draw from traditional cultural notions about older people with disabilities. These traditional notions include people with physical disabilities being evil, the entertainment value of disabilty, and those who were mentally ill being wild and animal-like. He viewed the aging process as disabling and old age as a time when individuals lost some abilities to function, particularly when it came to mental capacity and physical mobility. His writings show that he used disability as a literary tool to add dimension to characters and set them apart. Contemporary literature continues to share some of Shakespeare's view on aging and disability but also departs from them in important ways. For example, contemporary treatment of disabilities and aging places more emphasis on the human side of the affects of aging and disabilities. Disabilities and aging are not cast in the same negative terms as Shakespeare used.

  14. Siblings of People with Disabilities' Explicit and Implicit Disability Attitude Divergence.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carli

    2017-01-01

    Siblings of people with disabilities have more exposure to people with disabilities than most nondisabled people, uniquely positioning them toward disability, yet less is known about how this might impact their attitudes. This study examined siblings' disability attitudes by determining siblings' explicit and implicit disability bias, mapping their 2-dimensional prejudice, and examining theoretical variables that might be relevant to their attitudes. To do so, the Disability Attitudes Implicit Association Test, the Symbolic Ableism Scale, and survey questions were administered to 48 siblings. Findings revealed the majority of the siblings implicitly preferred nondisabled people, despite reporting low levels of explicit attitudes.

  15. Intellectual disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Failure to grow intellectually or continued infant-like behavior Lack of curiosity Problems keeping up in school Failure to adapt (adjust to new situations) Difficulty understanding and following social rules Signs of intellectual disability can range from ...

  16. Prevalence and features of ICF-disability in Spain as captured by the 2008 National Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since 1986, the study of disability in Spain has been mainly addressed by National Disability Surveys (NDSs). While international attempts to frame NDS designs within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) have progressed, in general, the ICF has hardly been used in either the NDS or epidemiological studies. This study sought to identify ICF Activity- and Participation-related content in the most recent Spanish NDS, the 2008 Survey on Disabilities, Independence and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre discapacidades, autonomía personal y situaciones de Dependencia - EDAD 2008), and estimate the prevalence of such ICF-framed disability. Methods EDAD 2008 methods and questions were perused. Of the 51 EDAD items analysed, 29 were backcoded to specific d2-d7 domains of the ICF Checklist and, by rating the recorded difficulty to perform specific tasks with or without help, these were then taken as performance and capacity respectively. A global ICF score was also derived, albeit lacking data for d1, "Learning and applying knowledge", d8, "Major Life Areas" and d9, "Community, Social and Civic Life". Data were grouped by sex, age, residence and initial positive screening, and prevalence figures were calculated by disability level both for the general population, using the originally designed weights, and for the population that had screened positive to disability. Data for institutionalised persons were processed separately. Results Crude prevalence of ICF severe/complete and moderate disability among the community-dwelling population aged ≥6 years was 0.9%-2.2% respectively, and that of severe/complete disability among persons living in sheltered accommodation was 0.3%. Prevalence of severe/complete disability was: higher in women than in men, 0.8% vs. 0.4%; increased with age; and was particularly high in domains such as "Domestic Life", 3.4%, "Mobility", 1.8%, and "Self-care", 1.9%, in which prevalence decreased

  17. Growing up in a Mainstream World: A Retrospective Enquiry into the Childhood Experiences of Young Adults with a Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsdaine, Sally; Thurston, Mhairi

    2017-01-01

    Children with disabilities are at greater risk of developing mental health problems than their peers, yet the emotional well-being of this group is largely overlooked and there is scant literature about children with a mobility disability. This study examined the retrospective experiences of growing up with mobility disability. The sample…

  18. Disability Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Elliot A.

    1985-01-01

    A disability insurance policy provides specified income benefits when the insured person becomes unable to work because of illness or accident. With an individual policy, the insured person is generally the policy holder. With a group plan, the employer is the policy holder. An individual policy can provide several optional benefits in addition to disability benefits, which are not available in a group plan. In assessing risk, the insurer uses the application, the agent's report, a physical examination, the attending physician's report, and sometimes a consumer investigation company's inspection report. Records from the Medical Information Bureau, an association of American and Canadian life insurance companies, may also be used. The process of claims adjudication is described, as are differences between short-term and long-term disability claims. Many group policies have a rehabilitation provision; payments may continue while the claimant undergoes rehabilitation or retraining. Imagesp1928-a PMID:21274206

  19. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  20. Understanding Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwell, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    A language arts teacher at a California middle school describes an exercise he developed to help students understand disabilities through virtual, firsthand experience. As students simulate being blind, unable to walk, they learn how to adjust, innovate, compensate, cooperate, and empathize with one another. (MLH)

  1. with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Sparks, Shannon L.; Aldridge, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Parents from culturally diverse backgrounds need to feel that they play a vital role in the future success of their sons or daughters with disabilities. Differences in culture and ethnicity can affect families' involvement in transition planning and the goals that they emphasize for their children. Families of diverse backgrounds were surveyed and…

  2. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  3. New opportunities for Americans with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Allen, A

    1992-12-01

    Historically, individuals with disabilities have been isolated and segregated. Physical and psychological barriers left them significantly disadvantaged, politically powerless, and without legal recourse in matters of discrimination. The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 is opening doors and promising new opportunities for individuals with disabilities to contribute and participate fully in our society. The author offers an overview of the purpose and major provisions of the act, which compares in scope to the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

  4. Impact, distress and HRQoL among Malaysian men and women with a mobility impairment

    PubMed Central

    Misajon, RoseAnne; Manderson, Lenore; Pallant, Julie F; Omar, Zaliha; Bennett, Elizabeth; Rahim, Rameezan Begam Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Background Although non-communicable and chronic disease now accounts for 47% of the global burden of disease, little is known of the everyday experiences and social aspects of disability and disablement in middle and low income countries. This article aims to address this gap by exploring the subjective experience of mobility impairment in Malaysia. Specifically, it examines health-related quality of life and the impact and distress related to impaired mobility, and investigates any gender differences in relation to the experience of disability. Methods The data were collected as part of an interdisciplinary, multi-country study known as RESILIENCE (Research into Social Inclusion, Locomotive Impairment and Empowerment through Networking, Collaboration and Education). Cluster sampling was used to administer the EQ-5D and the Perceived Impact of Problems Profile (PIPP) to 210 adults from Selangor state, west coast Peninsular Malaysia. Results The participants consisted of 94 males and 116 females, aged between 18–90 years (mean 60 years), with the majority being Malay. The majority of participants were also married, from rural areas and had primary education only. Very few participants lived alone. In addition, males were more likely to attribute their impaired mobility to an accident. The majority of participants with mobility impairment experienced a moderate to high level of pain/discomfort (79%) and anxiety/depression (72%), and at least some problems with performing usual activities (71%), as measured by the EQ-5D. In addition, using the Perceived Impact of Problems Profile (PIPP), participants also reported high levels of impact and distress related to participation in community life. In general, males reported higher impact and distress across several items, most significantly in regard to participation in community activities, moving around the neighbourhood, ability to live independently, and ability to assist their family members. Conclusion This paper

  5. Assessment of demographic and clinical characteristics on functional status and disability of patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Memis, Derya; Kozanoglu, Erkan; Kelle, Bayram; Goncu, Mustafa K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of demographic and clinical characteristics on mobility, disability, and activities of daily life of patients with stroke. Methods: This cross-sectional clinical study was performed in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine in Adana, Turkey, between February 2011 and December 2011. The study included 126 patients with stroke. The Brunnstrom recovery scale (BRS), functional ambulation classification scale (FACS), modified Barthel index (MBI), modified Rankin scale (MRS), and Rivermead mobility index (RMI) were used in the evaluation of the functional status of stroke patients. Correlations between each scale and parameters including age, etiology, and duration of hemiplegia were assessed. Results: The major etiology of stroke was found as ischemic (77%). Hypertension was a major risk factor in both genders (72% for males, 85% for females). Statistically significant differences were found between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients regarding the RMI, MBI, BRS, and the FACS (p<0.001). Age had a poor negative correlation with the FACS and RMI. Conclusion: It is suggested that age is an important risk factor for the development of stroke, but it has no strong effect on functional status and disability in patients with stroke. The BRS, FACS, MBI, MRS, and RMI scales can be used in stroke patients whether they are under or over 65 years old in order to evaluate functional status and disability. PMID:27744465

  6. The Electronic Patient Reported Outcome Tool: Testing Usability and Feasibility of a Mobile App and Portal to Support Care for Patients With Complex Chronic Disease and Disability in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ashlinder; Khan, Anum Irfan; Hans, Parminder Kaur; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background People experiencing complex chronic disease and disability (CCDD) face some of the greatest challenges of any patient population. Primary care providers find it difficult to manage multiple discordant conditions and symptoms and often complex social challenges experienced by these patients. The electronic Patient Reported Outcome (ePRO) tool is designed to overcome some of these challenges by supporting goal-oriented primary care delivery. Using the tool, patients and providers collaboratively develop health care goals on a portal linked to a mobile device to help patients and providers track progress between visits. Objectives This study tested the usability and feasibility of adopting the ePRO tool into a single interdisciplinary primary health care practice in Toronto, Canada. The Fit between Individuals, Fask, and Technology (FITT) framework was used to guide our assessment and explore whether the ePRO tool is: (1) feasible for adoption in interdisciplinary primary health care practices and (2) usable from both the patient and provider perspectives. This usability pilot is part of a broader user-centered design development strategy. Methods A 4-week pilot study was conducted in which patients and providers used the ePRO tool to develop health-related goals, which patients then monitored using a mobile device. Patients and providers collaboratively set goals using the system during an initial visit and had at least 1 follow-up visit at the end of the pilot to discuss progress. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with patients and providers to capture usability and feasibility measures. Data from the ePRO system were extracted to provide information regarding tool usage. Results Six providers and 11 patients participated in the study; 3 patients dropped out mainly owing to health issues. The remaining 8 patients completed 210 monitoring protocols, equal to over 1300 questions, with patients often answering questions daily. Providers and patients

  7. Disability Experience and Measurement.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Lois M

    2016-10-01

    Top themes of international research on disability in the past three decades are discussed: disability dynamics, buffers and barriers for disability, disability trends, and disability among very old persons. Each theme is highlighted by research examples. Turning to measurement, I discuss traditional measures of disability, new longer and shorter ones, and composites like disability-free life expectancy, noting their merits. Contemporary models of disability are presented, ranging from visual images to formal theories. The article ends on how scientists can facilitate movement of disability science into health care practice and policy.

  8. Learning Disabilities In-Service Training Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bickley

    Included in the training kit for teachers in the area of learning disabilities are materials developed by Project Lighthouse for experimental field usage to test the materials. The problem of educating children with learning disabilities is summarized, as is Piaget's model of logical activity. The major divisions of the text then deal with the…

  9. Prevention of Disabilities: Topic Paper D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper describes the major components of a comprehensive program to prevent disabilities, including programs to maximize health care, programs to maximize educational growth and sound psychological development, and programs for public…

  10. Teaching (with) Disability: Pedagogies of Lived Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    Serious consideration of disability in the major social theories is a relatively new development. Feminism, critical race, and queer studies have rigorously grappled with issues of embodiment and social justice. These perspectives greatly enhance pedagogy and learning. However, the embodied experience of disability has not been a traditional topic…

  11. Reading Disability and the Elementary School Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, David H.; Phelps, R. Neal

    1980-01-01

    Provides the elementary school counselor with a knowledge base in the reading and reading disability areas. The discussion on reading highlights four major areas with which the elementary school counselor should be familiar: definition of reading, proliferation of terms, reading skills assessment, and reading disability. (Author)

  12. [From care to consideration of disabled people].

    PubMed

    Chossy, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    The law of 11th February 2005 relating to the equality of the rights and opportunities, participation and citizenship of disabled people was a major step forward. Nevertheless, more progress is needed to ensure more consideration is given to disabled people.

  13. Update on the Americans with Disabilities Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Osborne, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    In 1990, Congress enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act as a comprehensive mandate to eliminate discrimination against individuals with disabilities. The ADA's primary intent was to extend the protection of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The major difference between the two laws is that Section 504 applies to programs that…

  14. Women with Disabilities: Issues, Resources, Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traustadottir, Rannveig

    This four-part information package serves as an introduction to the lives of women and girls with disabilities and the social issues they specifically face. Part I comprises a paper which reviews the literature and major issues, titled "Obstacles to Equality: The Double Discrimination of Women with Disabilities." The paper examines three major…

  15. 28 CFR 35.137 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mobility devices. 35.137 Section 35.137 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES General Requirements § 35.137 Mobility devices. (a) Use of wheelchairs...

  16. The learning-disabled medical student.

    PubMed

    Accardo, P; Haake, C; Whitman, B

    1989-10-01

    Developmental pediatricians are being consulted by medical school promotion committees with regard to the course of action to be taken with learning-disabled medical students experiencing academic difficulties. Faculty attitude, a difficulty understanding the nature of learning disabilities, appears to be a major contributor to poor medical school performance on the part of learning-disabled adults. Utilizing the sequential-simultaneous information processing model as a simplified introduction to learning disability patterns, the authors argue that recommending intensive remediation of rote spelling and writing skills in students engaged in graduate education represents both a waste of time and a further emotional trauma to these young professionals.

  17. Non-Disabled Children's Ideas about Disability and Disabled People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Angharad E.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses findings from an Economic and Social Research Council-funded study exploring non-disabled children's ideas about disability. This represents the first in-depth sociological investigation of children's ideas about disabled people as members of wider society. Data are presented from focus group discussions with children aged…

  18. A Manual on the Primary Prevention of Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Elizabeth B.; Skiles, Laura Lopater

    This manual presents information about major causes of developmental disabilities, discusses strategies to prevent development disabilities, and identifies relevant resources and reference material. Introductory information defines developmental disabilities and prevention (under Virginia statutes). The first section considers causes prior to and…

  19. Does disability matter? Disability in sexual and reproductive health policies and research in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mprah, Wisdom Kwadwo; Anafi, Patricia; Sekyere, Frank Owusu

    2014-01-01

    Gaps in national Ghanaian sexual and reproductive health (SRH) policies and research in terms of attention given to persons with disabilities are identified and ways to redirect policies to include them suggested. Policies and research in seven major documents from government sources and non-governmental organizations were reviewed for policy and practice statements relevant to disability to determine if and how they addressed SRH concerns of persons with disabilities. The findings indicated attention given to persons with disabilities has been cursory. There is need for more attention on disability issues in SRH research and policies to make the needs of persons with disabilities visible and to guide and provide disability-friendly services and information.

  20. On a bioethical challenge to disability rights.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Ron; Tresky, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Tensions exist between the disability rights movement and the work of many bioethicists. These reveal themselves in a major recent book on bioethics and genetics, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. This book defends certain genetic policies against criticisms from disability rights advocates, in part by arguing that it is possible to accept both the genetic policies and the rights of people with impairments. However, a close reading of the book reveals a series of direct moral criticisms of the disability rights movement. The criticisms go beyond a defense of genetic policies from the criticisms of disability rights advocates. The disability rights movement is said not to have the same moral legitimacy as other civil rights movements, such as those for women or "racial" minorities. This paper documents, and in some cases shows the flaws within, these challenges to the disability rights movement.

  1. Research gaps in the demography of aging with disability.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Vicki A

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base regarding the demography of aging with disabilities in the US is growing yet substantial gaps remain. This paper summarizes seven major research gaps identified during a conference held in May 2012: how many adults are aging with disabilities; has survival improved for individuals aging with disabilities; can the notion of active life expectancy help inform understanding of aging with disability; what is the pattern of onset of secondary conditions for individuals aging with disabilities and how might such conditions be prevented and/or their debilitating effects ameliorated; what role has obesity had in shaping the population of individuals aging with disability; how do individuals aging with disability differ from those who develop disability later in life; and what are the long-term consequences of developing disability before late life for subsequent health, functioning, and socioeconomic outcomes. Bridging these gaps is crucial for enhancing understanding of this understudied population.

  2. Learning Disabilities in Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peniston, Lorraine C.

    1999-01-01

    Notes that camp directors and counselors should be familiar with learning disabilities. Defines learning disabilities and explains accommodations of materials, procedures, and equipment; modification of activities; individuals' learned compensation strategies; and communication issues. Sidebar defines types of learning disabilities. (SAS)

  3. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  4. Hoarding behaviors in children with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Testa, Renée; Pantelis, Christos; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2011-05-01

    Our objective was to describe the prevalence, comorbidity, and neuropsychological profiles of children with hoarding and learning disabilities. From 61 children with learning disabilities, 16.4% exhibited hoarding as a major clinical issue. Although children with learning disabilities and hoarding displayed greater rates of obsessive-compulsive disorder (30%) as compared to those with learning disabilities without hoarding (5.9%), the majority of patients belonging to the former group did not display obsessive-compulsive disorder diagnosis. When learning disability patients with hoarding were compared to age-, sex-, and IQ-matched learning disability subjects without hoarding, hoarders exhibited a slower learning curve on word list-learning task. In conclusion, salient hoarding behaviors were found to be relatively common in a sample of children with learning disabilities and not necessarily associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder, supporting its nosological independence. It is unclear whether underlying cognitive features may play a major role in the development of hoarding behaviors in children with learning disabilities.

  5. Pediatric Disability and Caregiver Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoyd, Judith L. M.; Akincigil, Ayse; Paek, Eun Kwang

    2010-01-01

    The evidence that the birth of a child with a disability leads to divorce or separation is equivocal, with the majority of recent research suggesting that such a birth and childrearing may be stressful, but not necessarily toxic, to the caregiver relationship. Such research has been limited by small sample sizes and nonrepresentative samples and…

  6. The transformation of disabilities organizations.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Robert L; Verdugo, Miguel-Angel

    2013-08-01

    This article summarizes the five major characteristics of the transformation era and describes how intellectual and closely related developmental disabilities organizations can apply specific transformation strategies associated with each characteristic. Collectively, the characteristics and strategies provide a framework for transformation thinking, learning, and acting. Specific application examples are given.

  7. Care needs of children with disabilities - Use of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Fernanda Moreira; Resegue, Rosa; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the care needs reported by caregivers of children with disabilities going through the school inclusion process using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 181 children aged 7-10 years with physical or mental disabilities, undergoing the inclusion process in elementary school in 2007. Location: 31 schools of the Regional Education Board-District of Penha, East Side the city of São Paulo. The children's care needs according to the caregivers were assessed in three areas-self-care, mobility and social function, using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, according to the following score: 5, Independent; 4, Supervision; 3, Minimum Assistance; 2, Moderate Assistance; 1, Maximum Assistance and 0, Total Assistance. For statistical analysis, we used Student's t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA), with p<0.05 being statistically significant. Results: The lower means, with statistically significant differences, were observed for the items related to social function (55.8-72.0), followed by self-care functions (56.0-96.5); for all types of disabilities, except for children with physical disabilities, who had lower means for self-care (56.0) and mobility (63.8). Conclusions: Social function was the area referred to as the one that needed a higher degree of assistance from the caregiver and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory is a tool that can help identify these needs and develop a more targeted intervention. PMID:27080218

  8. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... providers do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  9. Health, function and disability in stroke patients in the community

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Pinto, Bárbara P. B.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Stroke patients commonly have impairments associated with reduction in functionality. Among these impairments, the motor impairments are the most prevalent. The functional profile of these patients living in the community who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil has not yet been established Objective To describe the functional profile of stroke patients who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil, looking at one health-care unit in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Method From medical records and home visits, data were collected regarding health status, assistance received following the stroke, personal and environmental contextual factors, function and disability, organized according to the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Test and instruments commonly applied in the assessment of stroke patients were used. Results Demographic data from all stroke patients who were users of the health-care unit (n=44, age: 69.23±13.12 years and 67±66.52 months since the stroke) participated of this study. Most subjects presented with disabilities, as changes in emotional function, muscle strength, and mobility, risks of falling during functional activities, negative self-perception of quality of life, and perception of the environment factors were perceived as obstacles. The majority of the patients used the health-care unit to renew drug prescriptions, and did not receive any information on stroke from health professionals, even though patients believed it was important for patients to receive information and to provide clarifications. Conclusion Stroke patients who used primary health-care services in Brazil have chronic disabilities and health needs that require continuous health attention from rehabilitation professionals. All of these health needs should be considered by health professionals to provide better management as part of the integral care

  10. DISABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH ALCOHOL ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V.; Popova, Svetlana; Room, Robin; Ramonas, Milita; Rehm, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alcohol use disorders (AUD), i.e., alcohol dependence and abuse are major contributors to burden of disease. A large part of this burden is due to disability. However, there is still controversy about the best disability weighting for alcohol use disorders. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of alcohol-related disabilities. METHODS Systematic literature review and expert interviews. RESULTS There is heterogeneity in experts’ descriptions of disabilities related to AUD. The major core attributes of disability related to AUD are changes of emotional state, social relationships, memory and thinking. The most important supplementary attributes are anxiety, impairments of speech and hearing. CONCLUSIONS This review identified the main patterns of disability associated with alcohol use disorders. However, there was considerable variability, and data on less prominent patterns were fragmented. Further and systematic research is required for increasing the knowledge on disability related to alcohol use disorders and for application of interventions for reducing the associated burden. OBJECTIVE To provide an overview of disabilities associated with AUD. PMID:20662803

  11. Challenging the Structural Discrimination of Psychiatric Disabilities: Lessons Learned from the American Disability Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Lam, Chow

    2007-01-01

    Stigma is a major barrier to the life opportunities of people with disabilities, including those with psychiatric disabilities. Structural discrimination is stigma that results from social forces that develop over many years to diminish a group's resources and support needed to be successful. Affirmative action is a legal and political remedy to…

  12. The disablement process.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, L M; Jette, A M

    1994-01-01

    Building on prior conceptual schemes, this article presents a sociomedical model of disability, called The Disablement Process, that is especially useful for epidemiological and clinical research. The Disablement Process: (1) describes how chronic and acute conditions affect functioning in specific body systems, generic physical and mental actions, and activities of daily life, and (2) describes the personal and environmental factors that speed or slow disablement, namely, risk factors, interventions, and exacerbators. A main pathway that links Pathology, Impairments, Functional Limitations, and Disability is explicated. Disability is defined as difficulty doing activities in any domain of life (from hygiene to hobbies, errands to sleep) due to a health or physical problem. Feedback effects are included in the model to cover dysfunction spirals (pernicious loops of dysfunction) and secondary conditions (new pathology launched by a given disablement process). We distinguish intrinsic disability (without personal or equipment assistance) and actual disability (with such assistance), noting the scientific and political importance of measuring both. Disability is not a personal characteristic, but is instead a gap between personal capability and environmental demand. Survey researchers and clinicians tend to focus on personal capability, overlooking the efforts people commonly make to reduce demand by activity accommodations, environmental modifications, psychological coping, and external supports. We compare the disablement experiences of people who acquire chronic conditions early in life (lifelong disability) and those who acquire them in mid or late life (late-life disability). The Disablement Process can help inform research (the epidemiology of disability) and public health (prevention of disability) activities.

  13. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  14. Effect of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on pain, mobility, strength, and disability of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kim, Won-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on the muscle strength and endurance, range of motion, and the disability index of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-six patients with chronic neck pain participated. They received an intervention for 35 minutes a day, three times a week for 10 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one control and two experimental groups: group A (thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training, n=16), group B (deep craniocervical flexor training, n=15), and group C (active self-exercise as a control group, n=15). Muscle strength and endurance, pain, neck disability index, and range of motion of the cervical and thoracic spine were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Group A showed significant increases in muscle strength, endurance, and cervical and thoracic range of motion, and significant decreases in the pain and neck disability index, compared with groups B and C. [Conclusion] Although deep craniocervical flexor training is effective at improving neck function, thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training was a more effective intervention for pain relief and improving the range of motion, muscle function, and neck disability of patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain. PMID:26957752

  15. Body image among eating disorder patients with disabilities: a review of published case studies.

    PubMed

    Cicmil, Nela; Eli, Karin

    2014-06-01

    While individual cases of eating disorder (ED) patients with disabilities have been reported, there has been little synthesis of their experiences of body image and thin idealization. This study reviews 19 published clinical reports of ED patients with sensory, mobility-related, or intellectual disabilities and evaluates the extent to which their experiences align with or challenge current conceptions of body image in ED. ED patients with visual impairment reported a profound disturbance of body image, perceived intersubjectively and through tactile sensations. Reducing dependence in mobility was an important motivation to control body size for ED patients with mobility-related disabilities. ED as a way of coping with and compensating for the psychosocial consequences of disability was a recurrent theme for patients across a range of disabilities. These experiential accounts of ED patients with disabilities broaden current understandings of body image to include touch and kinaesthetic awareness, intersubjective dynamics, and perceptions of normalcy.

  16. Harm avoidance and disability in old age.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Buchman, Aron S; Arnold, Steven E; Shah, Raj C; Tang, Yuxiao; Bennett, David A

    2006-01-01

    The relation of personality to disability in old age is not well understood. The authors examined the relation of harm avoidance, a trait indicating a tendency to worry, fear uncertainty, be shy, and tire easily, to disability in a group of 474 older persons without dementia. Participants completed the 35-item Harm Avoidance scale. Disability was assessed with the Rosow-Breslau scale, a self-report measure of physical mobility. Performance-based tests of lower limb functions were also administered from which composite measures of gait, balance, and strength were derived. In a logistic regression model controlled for age, sex, education, and lower limb function, persons with high levels of harm avoidance were nearly three times as likely to report mobility limitations as persons with low levels, and these effects largely reflected fatigability and fear of uncertainty. The association of harm avoidance with disability was not explained or modified by frailty, physical activity, depressive symptoms, neuroticism, extraversion, or cognition. The results suggest that harm avoidance is associated with disability in old age.

  17. All-cause mortality risk in elderly individuals with disabilities: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Chiang, Sheng-Ta; Yang, Hui-Fang; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chan, James Yi-Hsin; Kao, Tung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Disability is considered an important issue that affects the elderly population. This study aimed to explore the relationship between disability and all-cause mortality in US elderly individuals. Design Retrospective and longitudinal designs. Setting Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2002) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Participants A total of 1834 participants in the age range 60–84 years from NHANES 1999–2002. Main outcome measures We acquired five major domains of disability (activities of daily living (ADL), general physical activities (GPA), instrumental ADL (IADL), lower extremity mobility (LEM) and leisure and social activities (LSA)) through self-reporting. We applied an extended-model approach with Cox (proportional hazards) regression analysis to investigate the relationship between different features of disability and all-cause mortality risk in the study population. Results During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 77 deaths occurred. An increased risk of all-cause mortality was identified in elderly individuals with disability after adjustment for potential confounders (HR 2.23; 95% CI 1.29 to 3.85; p=0.004). Participants with more than one domain of disability were associated with a higher risk of mortality (ptrend=0.047). Adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for each domain of disability were 2.53 (1.49 to 4.31), 1.99 (0.93 to 4.29), 1.74 (0.72 to 4.16), 1.57 (0.76 to 3.27) and 1.52 (0.93 to 2.48) for LEM, LSA, ADL, IADL and GPA, respectively. Conclusions The results of this study support an increased association between disability and all-cause mortality in the elderly in the USA. Disability in LEM may be a good predictor of high risk of all-cause mortality in elderly subjects. PMID:27625055

  18. Peace, justice and disabled women's advocacy: Tamil women with disabilities in rural post-conflict Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Niro; Soldatic, Karen; Samararatne, Dinesha

    2016-10-13

    This article draws on grounded qualitative research with rural Tamil women who acquired a disability during the civil war in Sri Lanka and conceptualizes an intersectionality-peace framework. Three main themes were developed from the interviews: narratives of conflict, survival outcomes of social assistance and mobilization of cross-ethnic relationships. With the support of a local women's disability advocacy organization, Tamil women with disabilities were enabled to overcome social stigma and claim a positive identity as women with disabilities. The organization's focus on realizing disability rights created new opportunities for these highly marginalized rural women. The women were also supported to form cross-ethnic relationships with women who similarly faced multiple oppressions. These relationships transformed the women into 'agents of peace', using their newfound disability identity to foster cross-ethnic dialogue and create safe spaces in the post-conflict context.

  19. Americans With Disabilities Act.

    PubMed

    Walk, E E; Ahn, H C; Lampkin, P M; Nabizadeh, S A; Edlich, R F

    1993-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act gives all Americans with disabilities a chance to achieve the same quality of life that individuals without disabilities enjoy. This act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disabilities in employment, public services, privately operated public accommodations, services, and telecommunications. The Americans with Disabilities Act is divided into five titles. Title I of the act pertains to discrimination against the disabled in the workplace. Title II prevents discrimination against persons with a disability in state and local government services. Title III prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in places of public accommodations and commercial facilities. Title IV ensures that companies offering telephone services to the general public provide special services for individuals with hearing and speech impairments. Under the enforcement provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, stringent penalties will be implemented for failure to comply with its provisions.

  20. Mobile App to Assess Universal Access Compliance.

    PubMed

    Fransolet, Colette

    2016-01-01

    In terms of local legislation, South Africa has a handful of regulations that indirectly require Universal Access, which is then in itself largely described as facilities for people with disabilities. The most predominant set of regulations is the South African National Building Regulations, with a specific code which is deemed to satisfy standard titled South African National Standard (SANS) 10400 Part S: Facilities for Persons with Disabilities. Revised in 2011, this building regulation offers some technical guidelines specific to built infrastructure, and largely for people with functional mobility limitations. The description of the term "functional mobility limitations" in the context of this paper refers to people who make use of mobility aids to assist with their functionality in an environment, for example people who use walking aids (sticks, canes or walkers) and people who use wheelchairs. Albeit lacking in specifics around the requirements for other areas of functional limitations, including people who are blind, people who are deaf, and people with cognitive limitations, the SANS 10400 Part S is, to date, the most effective regulatory requirement in the country to assist with making facilities more accessible. With only a few experts in South Africa working in the field, the ability to offer clients Universal Access Reviews in terms of basic compliance with the SANS 10400 Part S is limited by two major factors. Firstly, the costs associated with employing experts in the field to review infrastructure is mostly too exorbitant for clients to carry. Secondly, the amount of time taken to perform reviews onsite and then collate the information into a coherent report for the client is far too long. These aspects result in a gap between clients wanting to meet the requirements, and being able to have the work completed in a reasonable amount of time. To overcome the challenge of larger institutions and organizations wanting to have their facilities reviewed in

  1. National Council on Disability Annual Report Volume 19, Fiscal Year 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    The annual report of the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes major activities of 1998 to promote policies, programs, practices, and procedures that guarantee equal opportunity for all individuals with disabilities, regardless of the nature or severity of the disability. NCD's major activities for 1998 are grouped into four areas: (1)…

  2. The violence of disablism.

    PubMed

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2011-05-01

    This article addresses the multi-faceted nature of violence in the lives of disabled people, with a specific focus on the accounts of disabled children and their families. Traditionally, when violence and disability have been considered together, this has emphasised the disabled subject whom inevitably exhibits violent challenging behaviour. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to violence experienced by disabled people, most notably in relation to hate crime. This article embraces theories that do not put the problems of disablism or violence back onto disabled people but magnify and expose processes of disablism that are produced in the relationships between people, which sometimes involve violence. This, we argue, means taking seriously the role of social relationships, institutions and culture in the constitution of violence. Disabled children, we argue, are enculturated by the violence of disablism. We follow Žižek's advice to step back from the obvious signals of violence to 'perceive the contours of the background which generates such outbursts', and identify four elements of the violence of disablism which we define as real, psychoemotional, systemic and cultural. We come to the conclusion that violence experienced by disabled children and their families says more about the dominant culture of disablism than it does of the acts of a few seemingly irrational, unreasonable, mean or violent individuals. We conclude that there is a need for extensive cultural deconstruction and reformation.

  3. Social Support and Intellectual Disabilities: A Comparison between Social Networks of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Those with Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippold, T.; Burns, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Social support has been identified as a major protective factor in preventing mental health problems and also as a major contributor to quality of life. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have been identified as having limited social support structures. Interventions have been focused on promoting their social presence and…

  4. Individual Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frostig, Marianne; And Others

    The following workshop presentations consider learning disabilities: "Educational Goals of the Perceptually Handicapped" by Marianne Frostig, "Remediation of Reading Problems" by Gilbert Schiffman, "Early Identification of Learning Disabilities" by Katrina de Hirsch, and "What Are Some Speech and Hearing…

  5. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This National Council on Disability (NCD) annual progress report to the President and Congress covers the period December 2005 through December 2006. The report is divided into 13 chapters, each dealing with a major area of public policy. These subject-specific chapters are preceded by an introductory Major Trends section that identifies…

  6. Disability training in the genetic counseling curricula: bridging the gap between genetic counselors and the disability community.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Erica; Patterson, Annette R

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, disability activists, ethicists, and genetic counselors have examined the moral complexities inherent in prenatal genetic counseling and considered whether and in what ways genetic counseling may negatively affect individuals in the disability community. Many have expressed concerns about defining disability in the context of prenatal decision-making, as the definition presented may influence prenatal choices. In the past few years, publications have begun to explore the responsibility of counselors in presenting a balanced view of disability and have questioned the preparedness of counselors for this duty. Currently, the Accreditation Council for Genetic Counseling (ACGC) only minimally includes disability training in their competencies for genetic counselors, and in their accreditation requirements for training programs. In an attempt to describe current practice, this article details two studies that assess disability training in ABGC-accredited genetic counseling programs. Results from these studies demonstrate that experience with disability is not required by the majority of programs prior to matriculation. Though most program directors agree on the importance of including disability training in the curriculum, there is wide variability in the amount and types of training students receive. Hours dedicated to disability exposure among programs ranged from 10 to 600 hours. Eighty-five percent of program directors surveyed agree that skills for addressing disability should be added to the core competencies. Establishing a set of disability competencies would help to ensure that all graduates have the skills necessary to provide patients with an accurate understanding of disability that facilitates informed decision-making.

  7. Disability Accommodation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick-Hruska, Connie, Comp.; Blythe, Gretchen, Comp.

    Designed as a resource for two-year college faculty and staff working with students with disabilities, this handbook contains facts about various disabilities, practical suggestions for improving services, and resource points for further information. Following a brief introduction, legal implications regarding disabled students are discussed for…

  8. Science and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    1988-01-01

    Reactions to H. Lee Swanson's paper "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities" are outlined, and his arguments are applied to reading disabilities, focusing on the importance of the scientific attitude, the misuse of ecological validity, interpretation of Thomas Kuhn's work, modularity and reading disability, and scientific progress…

  9. Work Disability in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Judith

    This paper begins by examining the history of disability payments to disabled workers, specifically disability payments to coal workers. Efforts by the United Mine Workers of America made mine health and safety an issue in the 1960s, and continuing liberalization of the law continued through the 1970s. The identification of coal miners with…

  10. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  11. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  12. Evidence of nonverbal learning disability among learning disabled boys with sensory integrative dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Humphries, T; Krekewich, K; Snider, L

    1996-06-01

    The presumed sensorimotor basis of the nonverbal learning disability syndrome was investigated among 90 learning disabled boys (M age = 6 yr., 8 mo., SD = 12.2 mo.) with sensory integrative dysfunction. The majority of the boys were Caucasian, lower to middle socioeconomic status, and from urban, English-speaking families. 14% (n = 13) of the boys satisfied core discrepancy criteria for nonverbal learning disability, including both a significantly higher Wechsler Verbal than Performance IQ and a higher standard score in Reading than Arithmetic on the Wide Range Achievement Test. Compared with a control group of 19 boys from the same sample who had no significant discrepancies, boys with nonverbal learning disability had significantly greater weaknesses in space visualization and visuomotor coordination. As predicted, rote verbal memory and syntactical strengths were also exhibited by boys with nonverbal learning disability, but the two groups did not differ significantly.

  13. Beyond (Models of) Disability?

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Jonas-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of developing an ontology or models of disability as a prior step to settling ethical issues regarding disabilities is highly problematic for two reasons. First, key definitional aspects of disability are normative and cannot helpfully be made value-neutral. Second, if we accept that the contested concept of disability is value-laden, it is far from obvious that there are definitive reasons for choosing one interpretation of the concept over another. I conclude that the concept of disability is better left ethically open-ended or broad enough to encompass the examination of various ethical issues (such as oppression, minority rights, or physical discomfort). Alternatively, the concept of disability could be altogether abandoned in order to focus on specific issues without being hindered by debates about the nature of disability. Only political costs, rather than conceptual considerations internal to the models, could be weighed against such a conclusion. PMID:26892249

  14. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  15. 49 CFR 38.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.23 Section 38.23 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.23 Mobility aid accessibility....

  16. Conceptual foundation for measures of physical function and behavioral health function for Social Security work disability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Eisen, Susan V; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    Physical and mental impairments represent the 2 largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person's underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this article is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, 2 content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies 5 major domains: (1) behavior control, (2) basic interactions, (3) temperament and personality, (4) adaptability, and (5) workplace behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes 3 domains: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole-body mobility, and (3) carrying, moving, and handling objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development and measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work.

  17. Major Andre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henisch, B. A.; Henisch, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    If most Revolutionary era people seem two-dimensional their lives simpler to understand than ours, it may be only that history, with the benefit of hindsight, clarifies. Examines a profile of Major John Andre, the British liaison officer in Benedict Arnold's plan to surrender West Point, as both hero and villain to show the complexity of early…

  18. Analysis of Handoff Mechanisms in Mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, Maria Nadine Simonel; Issac, Biju; Haldar, Manas Kumar

    2011-06-01

    One of the most important challenges in mobile Internet Protocol (IP) is to provide service for a mobile node to maintain its connectivity to network when it moves from one domain to another. IP is responsible for routing packets across network. The first major version of IP is the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4). It is one of the dominant protocols relevant to wireless network. Later a newer version of IP called the IPv6 was proposed. Mobile IPv6 is mainly introduced for the purpose of mobility. Mobility management enables network to locate roaming nodes in order to deliver packets and maintain connections with them when moving into new domains. Handoff occurs when a mobile node moves from one network to another. It is a key factor of mobility because a mobile node can trigger several handoffs during a session. This paper briefly explains on mobile IP and its handoff issues, along with the drawbacks of mobile IP.

  19. Identifying the effects of education on the ability to cope with a disability among individuals with disabilities

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The literature on disability has suggested that an educated individual with a disability is more likely to better cope with her/his disability than those without education. However, few published studies explore whether the relationship between education and ability to cope with a disability is anything more than an association. Using data on disability and accommodation from a large Danish survey from 2012–13 and exploiting a major Danish schooling reform as a natural experiment, we identified a potential causal effect of education on both economic (holding a job) as well as social (cultural activities, visiting clubs/associations, etc.) dimensions of coping among individuals with a disability, controlling for background factors, functioning, and disability characteristics. We found that endogeneity bias was only present in the case of economic participation and more educated individuals with a disability indeed had higher levels of both economic and social coping. To some extent, having more knowledge of public support systems and higher motivation explained the better coping among the group of individuals with disabilities who were educated. Our results indicated, however, that a large part of the effect of education on the ability to cope with a disability among individuals with disabilities was suggestive of a causal relationship. PMID:28355237

  20. "So Much Potential in Reading!" Developing Meaningful Literacy Routines for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenlon, Amanda G.; McNabb, Jessica; Pidlypchak, Harmony

    2010-01-01

    Children with multiple disabilities, often experience challenges in communication, mobility, and learning. Despite these challenges, substantial research exists that documents successful educational methods and strategies for these students. Specifically, students with multiple disabilities have successfully been taught to use a voice output…

  1. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some…

  2. Initiation and Generalization of Self-Instructional Skills in Adolescents with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Katherine A.; Ayres, Kevin A.; Alexander, Jennifer; Ledford, Jennifer R.; Shepley, Collin; Shepley, Sally B.

    2016-01-01

    Self-instruction using videos or other supports on a mobile device is a pivotal skill and can increase independence for individuals with disabilities by decreasing a need for adult supports. This study evaluated the effects of progressive time delay (PTD) to teach four adolescents with autism and intellectual disability how to initiate…

  3. Gait Analysis in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in a Residential Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salb, Johannes; Lindemann, Ulrich; Woodward, Carol; Almutaseb, Sanaa; Becker, Clemens; Sieber, Cornel; Freiberger, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mobility limitations are of particular interest in people with intellectual disabilities. The aim of this study was to present feasibility and mean values of gait parameters in people with intellectual disability and it was hypothesized that several trials would be necessary to gain stable values for this cohort. Material and Methods:…

  4. Advocating in Schools for Children with Disabilities: What's New with IDEA?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Sandra J.; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Article provides information regarding amended Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the impact of those changes on children's education rights. Some changes and practice implications discussed include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and…

  5. Support for Students with Disabilities in Community Colleges. UCLA Community College Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarkesh, Maryam

    2004-01-01

    In discussing services for students with disabilities, it is important to emphasize that this term encompasses a variety of physical and cognitive challenges faced by individuals, including learning disabilities such as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), mobility impairment, hearing/visual…

  6. Effects of exercise on mobility in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, Nicolien M; King, Laurie A

    2013-09-15

    Parkinson's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment exists. Gait and balance disturbance is common in Parkinson's disease and is a major contributor to increased disability and decreased health-related quality of life and survival. Balance and gait deficits in Parkinson's disease are notoriously difficult to treat and are not significantly helped by pharmacological or surgical treatment. The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the research and clinical interest in using exercise as a treatment for mobility problems in people with Parkinson's disease. With exciting advances in basic science research suggesting neurochemical and neuroplastic changes after exercise, an increasing number of high-quality studies are documenting particular aspects of mobility improving after exercise. Exercise has the potential to help both motor (gait, balance, strength) and nonmotor (depression, apathy, fatigue, constipation) aspects of Parkinson's disease as well as secondary complications of immobility (cardiovascular, osteoporosis). This perspective article focuses primarily on recent evidence on the effects of exercise in improving mobility while highlighting the importance of targeted exercise intervention for maximizing the benefits of exercise. Suggestions for exercise guidelines, adherence issues, and directions for future research are provided.

  7. The Americans with Disabilities Act and Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardeck, John T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the major components of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 applicable to day care facilities. Offers guidelines for admitting disabled children, and for determining whether an accommodation is reasonable or an unreasonable burden. Considers an ADA case involving discrimination against a diabetic child for insights into the…

  8. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report, December 2001-December 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This annual report of the National Council on Disability surveys major legal and policy developments during the year 2002 and offers recommendations for legal/policy measures and for research. The first chapter identifies legal and policy issues that cross traditional areas, focusing on six themes: (1) the mainstreaming of disability issues; (2)…

  9. Overweight and Obesity in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major health problems associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, which is not sufficiently studied in people with intellectual disability yet. The present study was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study. The aim of this study was to establish (1) the prevalence of overweight,…

  10. Process Writing for High-Risk and Learning Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaragoza, Nina

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the major elements of writing process instruction and the positive influence they have on learning-disabled and inner-city high-risk students. Argues that such process-writing programs might serve as a preventative measure for children likely to be categorized as learning disabled in the future. (HTH)

  11. Injuries and Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with disabilities are at an increased risk of injury. Falls are the leading mechanism of injury regardless of the disability status and are even more common in those with moderate or severe disabilities. The setting for the injury differs with the disability status. Compared to individuals with moderate or no disabilities,…

  12. Shifting Patterns of Student Mobility in Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sheng-Ju

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, Asia--traditionally one of the largest exporters of mobile students--has experienced major changes in student mobility within higher education. As the worldwide competition for international students has escalated, many Asian countries have adopted a wide range of mechanisms and strategies in facilitating student mobility.…

  13. Trends in Mobile Application Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Adrian; Ondrus, Jan

    Major software companies, such as Apple and Google, are disturbing the relatively safe and established actors of the mobile application business. These newcomers have caused significant structural changes by imposing and enforcing their own rules for the future of mobile application development. The implications of these changes do not only concern the mobile network operators and mobile phone manufacturers. This changed environment also brings additional opportunities and constraints for current mobile application developers. Therefore, developers need to assess what their options are and how they can take advantages of these current trends. In this paper, we take a developer’s perspective in order to explore how the structural changes will influence the mobile application development markets. Moreover, we discuss what aspects developers need to take into account in order to position themselves within the current trends.

  14. Analysis of science textbook recommendations provided for students with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Parmar, R S; Cawley, J F

    1993-05-01

    Teachers' manuals from three major elementary science textbook series were analyzed. These textbooks provided specific instructional recommendations for students with disabilities in mainstream classes. Findings reveal that (a) the textbooks did not provide recommendations for all categories of disabilities as defined in Public Law 94-142; (b) many recommendations did not specifically address the learning needs of the students for whom they were intended; and (c) there were no consistency in the nature of recommendations provided for any given category of disability. Results indicate that special education and mainstream teachers should monitor the usefulness of published materials that claim to meet the needs of students with disabilities.

  15. Disability and global development.

    PubMed

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world.

  16. Helping Children Understand Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakariya, Sally Banks

    1978-01-01

    The program described uses simulation activities; exposure to aids and appliances; guest speakers; books, movies, slides, and videotapes; and class discussion to help elementary students understand disabilities. (IRT)

  17. The Matter of Disability.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David T; Snyder, Sharon L

    2016-12-01

    By ruling out questions of impairment from the social critique of disability, Disability Studies (DS) analyses establish a limit point in the field. Of course the setting of "limits" enables possibilities in multiple directions as well as fortifies boundaries of refusal. For instance, impairment (the biological conditions of an organism's inefficient attachment to the world) becomes in DS simultaneously a productive refusal to interpret disabled bodies as inferior to non-disabled bodies (i.e. pathologized) and a bar to thinking through more active engagements with disability as materiality. Disability materiality such as conditions produced by ecological toxicities serve as active switch-points for creative corporeal navigations of the interaction between bodies and environments.In fact in this paper we want to propose a more "lively" definition of disability materiality to existing definitions of impairment as limiting expressions of non-normative bodies. We have no useful ways of explaining disability as adaptation and it's time we begin the process of theorizing more active ideas of materiality that extend existing ideas of disability beyond simplistic conceptions of socially rejected biologies made available by social constructivist thought.

  18. Evaluation of stroke disability.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, J.; Keltz, E.; Stein, M. C.; White, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    The disabilities resulting from a stroke are not well understood from the epidemiologic or functional point of view. The stroke may impair mental status, perception, sensation, communication and motor ability; the total resulting disability is related to the extent of impairment in each of these areas. A complete evaluation in all these areas has to be done to determine the degree of disability before any rehabilitation program is planned. A comprehensive approach to evaluating stroke disability is presented that includes correlating the degree of impairment in each of the above-mentioned areas with the overall functional ability of the patient. PMID:1260603

  19. Culture and Disability Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Carroll M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantial amount of literature suggests that illness behavior in the United States is a product of a patient's core culture; equally credible findings do not support this contention. Most students and graduates in the health care professions believe that illness and disability behavior are affected by a patient's culture, but they are hard put to find convincing examples of that relationship. In experience with medical students studying the social and cultural bases of illness behavior, with patients who are disabled and with persons who claim disability in the absence of physical disease or disabling psychopathology, I observed no deviant disability behavior that was typical for the members of any cultural group, and no behavior was displayed by the members of one cultural group that was not seen in members of other cultural groups. No cultural stereotypes were upheld. I did find evidence that disability behavior is influenced by personality factors, social situations and the gains derived from the disability status. Evolving concepts of “entitlement,” which are closely related to socioeconomic status, also have a significant influence. The impact of feedback from others in a person's many social and medical subcultures is a more crucial determinant of illness and disability behavior, except in those for whom illness and disability behavior is determined by the limitations imposed by the disease or by a personality structure resistant to cultural expectations and social feedback. PMID:6666106

  20. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  1. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  2. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  3. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  4. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  5. A Westerner's Impression of the Place of People with a Disability in Asian Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmenter, Trevor R.

    2014-01-01

    From a Westerner's perspective of the place of people with a disability in Asian society, there are similarities and differences between the two societies. A major problem for the Asian countries is their lack of reliable disability prevalence data. The stigmatization of people with a disability remains an international problem and is not confined…

  6. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Eunsook; Park, HyunJu; Ha, Yeongmi; Hwang, Won Ju

    2012-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obesity in children with intellectual disabilities may be a major health threat. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Korean children with intellectual disabilities aged 7-18 years who did not have specific genetic syndromes or physical disabilities. Materials and methods:…

  7. Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities in the General Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Shernaz B.; Tyler, Brenda-Jean

    2010-01-01

    To be academically successful in general education classrooms, English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities (LD) need instruction that is simultaneously responsive to their disability, English language status, and culture. Because the majority of students with LD have reading disabilities, ESL and classroom teachers must be familiar…

  8. Video Self-Modeling: A Job Skills Intervention with Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in Employment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Ailsa E.

    2010-01-01

    A large majority of adults with intellectual disabilities are unemployed. Unemployment of adults with intellectual disabilities is a complex multidimensional issue. Some barriers to employment of individuals with intellectual disabilities are the lack of job experience and skills training. In recent years, video-based interventions, such as video…

  9. National Council on Disability. Annual Report. Volume 17, Fiscal Year 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This annual report of the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes major activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1996 in its role of advising the President and Congress on issues concerning people with disabilities. The NCD conducted the first-ever National Summit on Disability Policy which gathered 300 people to develop more than…

  10. Monitoring for Accessibility and University Websites: Meeting the Needs of People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solovieva, Tatiana I.; Bock, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people with disabilities are guaranteed access to all postsecondary programs and services. The purpose of this study, conducted by the Center for Excellence in Disabilities, was to evaluate the current status of a major university's web accessibility. The results indicated that in 2011 only 51% of…

  11. A Descriptive Study of Students with Disabilities at Montana State University Billings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Thomas Francis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze how the characteristics of age, major and type of disabilities for students who received services through Disability Support Services at Montana State University-Billings have changed from 1999 to 2011. Furthermore, this analysis contrasted local trends for types of disabilities with national…

  12. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  13. Inadequate cardiovascular disease prevention in women with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Theresa

    2006-01-01

    Health promotion and screening tests are important in persons with disability to avert secondary conditions that can lead to suboptimal functioning or premature death. Conversely, the existence of a primary disability can increase a person's susceptibility to secondary conditions. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in the United States, and its prevalence has been underinvestigated in persons with disability. This descriptive study used survey research to compare the risk of CVD in samples of 100 physically disabled women with 50 nondisabled women in the community. Participants, recruited from health fairs, completed questionnaires that explored the participants' knowledge of CVD risk factors, possession of specific CVD risk factors, and experience with CVD preventive screening procedures. Data revealed that compared with women without disability, women with disability were less knowledgeable about CVD risk factors and experienced marked deficiencies in CVD preventive screening. Body weight measurement, baseline electrocardiograms, family history, and smoking queries were performed less often in women with disabilities than in women without disabilities of similar age. Physical inactivity and postmenopausal status were specific CVD risk factors found to be more prevalent in the sample of women with disability. These findings suggest that risk of CVD is underrecognized and underassessed in women with a physical disability.

  14. Disability Divides in India: Evidence from the 2011 Census

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Nandita; Bora, Jayanta Kumar; Jasilionis, Domantas; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the socioeconomic and regional divides in disability prevalence in India has considerable relevance for designing public health policies and programs. Objectives The aim of the present study is to quantify the prevalence of disability by gender, region (rural and urban; states and districts), and caste. We also examine the association between disability prevalence and the major socio-demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the districts in India. Methods Age-standardized disability prevalence (ASDP) was calculated using 2011 census data and applying the WHO World Standard Population. A regression analysis was carried out to examine the association between disability prevalence and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics across districts of India. Results The study found that ASDP varies substantially across districts and is higher among women, rural dwellers, and members of scheduled tribes (STs) and scheduled castes (SCs). The regression model showed that the disability rate in districts rises with increasing proportions of the population who are urban dwellers, aged 65 or older, members of STs, and living in dilapidated housing; and that the disability prevalence decreases with increasing proportions of the female population who are literate, and of the general population who are working and have access to safe drinking water. Conclusion As the burden of disability falls disproportionately across geographic regions and socioeconomic groups, public health policies in India should take this variation into account. The definition of disability used in the census should be modified to generate internationally comparable estimates of disability prevalence. PMID:27490469

  15. Estimating the extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Minh, Hoang Van; Giang, Kim Bao; Liem, Nguyen Thanh; Palmer, Michael; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Duong, Le Bach

    2015-01-01

    Disability is shown to be both a cause and a consequence of poverty. However, relatively little research has investigated the economic cost of living with a disability. This study reports the results of a study on the extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam in 2011. The study was carried out in eight cities/provinces in Vietnam, including Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh cities (two major metropolitan in Vietnam) and six provinces from each of the six socio-economic regions in Vietnam. Costs are estimated using the standard of living approach whereby the difference in incomes between people with disability and those without disability for a given standard of living serves as a proxy for the cost of living with disability. The extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam accounted for about 8.8-9.5% of annual household income, or valued about US$200-218. Communication difficulty was shown to result in highest additional cost of living with disability and self-care difficulty was shown to lead to the lowest levels of extra of living cost. The extra cost of living with disability increased as people had more severe impairment. Interventions to promote the economic security of livelihood for people with disabilities are needed.

  16. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  17. Involving people with communication disability in research in Uganda: a response to the World Report on Disability.

    PubMed

    Jones, Isla; Marshall, Julie; Lawthom, Rebecca; Read, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    The World Report on Disability recommends more involvement of people with disabilities in research. However, the lead article by Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall (2013) has not addressed issues relating specifically to the involvement of people with communication disabilities in research. This deserves careful consideration. Involving people with communication difficulties in research forefronts discussion and collaboration, and requires researchers to focus on the priorities and needs of people with communication disabilities in their locality. Taking a participatory approach to research can develop a rich, context-specific understanding of communication disabilities. This paper uses the first author's experience preparing for a participatory research project in Uganda, to outline, particularly with reference to the Majority World, the benefits and challenges of engaging people with communication disabilities in research.

  18. Service dogs and people with physical disabilities partnerships: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Winkle, Melissa; Crowe, Terry K; Hendrix, Ingrid

    2012-03-01

    Occupational therapists have recognized the benefits that service dogs can provide people with disabilities. There are many anecdotal publications extolling the benefits of working with service dogs, but few rigorous studies exist to provide the evidence of the usefulness of this type of assistive technology option. This systematic review evaluates the published research that supports the use of service dogs for people with mobility-related physical disabilities. Articles were identified by computerized search of PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, OT Seeker, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, SportDiscus, Education Research Complete, Public Administration Abstracts, Web of Knowledge and Academic Search Premier databases with no date range specified. The keywords used in the search included disabled persons, assistance dogs or service dogs and mobility impairments. The reference lists of the research papers were checked as was the personal citation database of the lead author. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and whereas the findings are promising, they are inconclusive and limited because of the level of evidence, which included one Level I, six Level III, four Level IV and one Level V. All of the studies reviewed had research design quality concerns including small participant sizes, poor descriptions of the interventions, outcome measures with minimal psychometrics and lack of power calculations. Findings indicated three major themes including social/participation, functional and psychological outcomes; all of which are areas in the occupational therapy scope of practice. Occupational therapists may play a critical role in referral, assessment, assisting clients and consulting with training organizations before, during and after the service dog placement process. In order for health care professionals to have confidence in recommending this type of assistive technology, the evidence to support such decisions must be strengthened.

  19. Play Spaces to Accommodate Disabled Children. Research Project 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, James H.

    This report deals primarily with the design of an integrated free play environment for both able-bodied and disabled children. First, the different types of handicaps (and their debilitating effects) which affect children, and the different mobility aids which are used by these children are discussed. Then, a number of guidelines concerning…

  20. Disability Information & Awareness: Afghanistan. Version 2.2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, M.

    This report focuses on a project in Afghanistan that coordinates the efforts of several agencies to develop community-directed disability, rehabilitation, and education services. The program stresses community mobilization aided by skills transfer from expatriate specialists, and includes physical therapy, prosthetics, living skills and mobility…

  1. 77 FR 8234 - National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research... Disability and Rehabilitation Research-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability...

  2. In Jamaica, Community Aides for Disabled Pre-School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorburn, Marigold J.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major goals of the Jamaican Early Stimulation Project is to develop a low cost model for providing early identification of disability and intervention services. Journal availability: see EC 133 861. (Author)

  3. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  4. Embodying Justice: Supporting Teacher Candidates with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antilla-Garza, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Teacher Education Departments at most liberal arts colleges serve as professional certification programs as much as departments with academic majors. We train our students to work in P-12 education in an era of inclusion and require them to support their students with disabilities in preparation for college and career. The federal government…

  5. Legal Aspects of Educating the Developmentally Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

    A major legal development in the 1970s has been the extension of the principle of egalitarianism to the developmentally disabled, particularly the mentally retarded. The principle that all persons, however unequal they may be in terms of their development, should be treated equally in the sense of being granted equal opportunities has been…

  6. Newspaper Images and Messages: People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catlett, Susan M.; And Others

    This study reviewed, over 2 years, all newspaper articles related to persons with disabilities in two major city newspapers with circulations of more than 500,000 (the Houston Post and the Los Angeles Times). The newspapers were reviewed to uncover trends and themes in the articles which reflected subtleties of views toward persons with…

  7. Helping Students with Mathematical Disabilities to Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlington, Elizabeth; Wadlington, Patrick L.

    2008-01-01

    Teachers and parents are often perplexed when an intelligent student performs poorly in mathematics. Research tells us that this is often due to math disability, otherwise known as "dyscalculia". The authors define dyscalculia and describe its major subtypes. Also, the authors describe characteristics of dyscalculia and explain why dyscalculia is…

  8. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  9. Disabilities in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Regular education teachers may have received inadequate preparation to work with the variety of student disabilities encountered in the classroom, or they may have received limited training regarding the full range of learning disabilities and their effects on classroom performance. Along with problems in the area of math, students may also have…

  10. Dads and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Cindy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the relationship of fathers and their children with disabilities. It reports a study of 86 Kansas fathers of children (ages 5 to 8) with and without disabilities. The study was conducted in order to identify more options for fathers wishing to increase their involvement with their children. The study sent surveys of…

  11. Permanent Disability Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chovil, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is a review of the theory and practice of disability evaluation with emphasis on the distinction between medical impairment and disability. The requirements for making an accurate assessment of medical impairments are discussed. The author suggests three basic standards which can be used for establishing a simplified method of assessing physical impairment. PMID:20469213

  12. Learning Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Cheri; Gregg, Noel

    1986-01-01

    The emerging population of learning disabled college students is presenting a new challenge to college professionals: admission officers, counselors, financial aid personnel, academic advisors, and professors. Learning disablities interfere with the ability to perceive, process, sort, store, or retrieve information regardless of level of…

  13. Ghana: Disability and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, Betsy H.; Evans, William H.

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study explores the educational system and attitudes toward disability in the Volta Region of Ghana. Traditional, Christian, and Islamic beliefs toward disability are explored. Educators from Accra and three families from the Volta Region with children with special needs are interviewed in an effort to explore the connection…

  14. Disciplining Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Janieth

    2012-01-01

    Discipline in schools can be difficult, especially when dealing with students with disabilities. In fact, Clash (2006) reported that working with students with disabilities under stringent legal demands has become a source of stress for many principals. The typical principal has not received extensive preservice or inservice training in this area.…

  15. Analyzing Disability Accommodation Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, L.; Lan, W. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the willingness of faculty members to accommodate students with disabilities differs according to academic discipline and instructor gender. The authors examined the attitudes of faculty members toward students with disabilities as reflected in course syllabi to discern instructor willingness to accommodate these…

  16. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants a job can find a…

  17. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants to work can find…

  18. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the…

  19. Disabled Students of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Zelma Lloyd; Ball-Brown, Brenda

    1993-01-01

    Explores why few disabled students of color use student services. Details why some of these students were unnecessarily placed in special education programs and focuses on the experiences of this group. Addresses general cultural differences that can affect responses between people of color and disability services. Provides guidelines for service…

  20. Learning about Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Rita Ann

    1983-01-01

    The author describes lessons provided for regular class elementary students to help them understand disabilities and disabled persons. Objectives, materials needed, and activities are outlined for six lessons focusing on the following topics: individual differences, wheelchairs; devices that help people walk; amputation, artificial limbs, and…

  1. Assessment of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    The assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities (LD) in the school is problematic. How do educators determine who is learning disabled? What practices are recommended? The main focus of the paper is on specific, relatively technical points that influence the validity of assessment. Since technical concerns are only one of the factors…

  2. Transporting Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1998-01-01

    Under the 1973 Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, school districts must transport students with disabilities to a site providing a free, appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. This article discusses federal and state laws governing student transportation, including wheelchair…

  3. Beauty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in…

  4. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes:…

  5. Nonverbal learning disability: adult outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, A T

    2000-07-01

    There are few empirical studies of the adult outcomes of nonverbal learning disability (NLD). An overwhelming majority of NLD studies has been devoted to the nature of academic difficulties of school children, whereas the few follow-up studies have tended to be limited to college-age young adults. Herein, it is argued that the problems of adults with NLD do not fall solely in academic areas, and that early academic remediation programs might do well to include intervention in emotional and social skills enhancement.

  6. Injury prevention for children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Thornton, Lisa S

    2002-11-01

    Little injury data exists for children who have disabilities. There is an urgent need to address injury prevention and to improve safety standards for this group. Understanding the epidemiology of injuries will allow clinicians to accurately advise patients and their families on individual risks and counsel them in steps to take to reduce those risks. Safety information must be tailored to consider each child's functional impairments. All children who have disabilities are at risk for maltreatment. Open discussion of this problem is warranted given the immensity of the problem. Identifying parental concerns and supporting parents in the use of respite resources are appropriate. For children who have problems in mobility, falls are the number one concern. Collaboration with reliable vendors and therapists that adhere to standards for safe seating is essential for reducing the risk of wheelchair tips and falls. In addition, therapists should be directed to provide mobility training for activities from safe transfers to street crossing in a community setting. Parents should be counseled to approach their child's injury risk based on the child's cognitive and behavioral level rather than their chronological level. Knowledge of the child's developmental quotient or intelligence quotient will also allow the clinician to accurately formulate an injury prevention plan. Many children will always need supervision for tasks that put them in situations of injury risk (i.e., swimming, street crossing, bathing). Sensorineural deficits such as blindness or deafness create significant alterations in negotiating the environment and an increased risk of injury. Awareness of the special needs for fire risk reduction and street safety are critical in this population. The collection of injury data is critical to define the scope of the problem and to influence changes in policy and the development of technical standards. Educational efforts focused on safety should include

  7. Is test anxiety a peril for students with intellectual disabilities?

    PubMed

    Datta, Poulomee

    2013-06-01

    Test anxiety is one of the most confronting issues in modern times with the increase in the number of standardised and high-stakes testing. Research has established that there is a direct link between test anxiety and cognitive deficits. The aim of this study is to determine the test anxiety scores of the students with intellectual disabilities in South Australia. It also provided insights into the reasons for high-test anxiety in the participants under study. The Spielberger's Test Anxiety Questionnaire was administered on students with intellectual disabilities in stage 1. Interviews were conducted with participants with intellectual disabilities, parents and teachers in stage 2. Questionnaire findings revealed that the majority of the adolescent females and males and all adult females with intellectual disabilities had high test anxiety scores. However, the majority of adult males with intellectual disabilities obtained moderate test anxiety scores. In the worry and emotionality subscales, it was also found that the majority of adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities were found to score high. The high test anxiety scores have been justified by the interview responses obtained from the three groups of respondents. A number of factors have been identified to be the major predictors of test anxiety in students with intellectual disabilities.

  8. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  9. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodríguez, Cathi; Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as…

  10. Mobile healthcare.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  11. Disability and Health: Exploring the Disablement Experience of Young Adult African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to examine disablement as experienced by young adult African American men and women with permanent mobility impairment. Methods This study included a sample of 5 male and 5 female participants ranging in age from 22 to 39. An exploratory descriptive design and qualitative methods, including interviews and fieldnotes, were used. Interview data was analyzed using the process of inductive qualitative content analysis. Results Basic desires for independence, shared intimacy, and psychological and physical health were not diminished by physical limitations. The disablement experience of this group is reflected in the themes of “Cumulative Losses” and “Sustained Desires.” The findings of this study describe the high level of motivation that young adult African American men and women with disabilities have to improve levels of health and well-being within the context of their impairments. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the contextual factors and experiences that may contribute to the development of further disability and subsequent health-related problems over time. Increased knowledge of the disablement experience of these young men and women may assist health care entities and social service providers in improving health care and rehabilitation efforts targeting this group. PMID:23745770

  12. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of…

  13. Intellectual Disabilities. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Intellectual disability" is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and in skills such as communicating, taking care of him or herself, and social skills. These limitations will cause a child to learn and develop more slowly than a typical child. Following a brief story about a child with an intellectual…

  14. The epidemiology of developmental disabilities in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Maureen

    2002-01-01

    Although most of the world's children live in developing countries and may be at high risk for disability, very little is known about the prevalence and causes of developmental disabilities in these countries. This paper discusses methodological difficulties contributing to this lack of knowledge, and provides an overview of what is known about the epidemiology of developmental disabilities in low-income countries. At least some forms of developmental disability appear to be more common in low-income countries than in wealthier countries, despite the probability of higher mortality among children with disabilities in low-income countries. For example, most studies of severe mental retardation in low-income countries report prevalences greater than 5 per 1,000 children, while prevalence estimates from industrialized countries are consistently below this. Major risk factors for developmental disabilities in some low-income countries include specific genetic diseases, a higher frequency of births to older mothers, consanguinity, and specific micronutrient deficiencies and infections. Trauma and toxic exposures are also important risk factors, but their contributions to the etiology of developmental disabilities in low-income countries are not well documented. Though many of the causes of developmental disabilities are understood and preventable, proven methods of prevention are not being fully implemented in developing countries. Epidemiologic studies are needed to raise awareness of the public health impacts of developmental disabilities in low-income countries and to provide a basis for setting priorities and designing efficient interventions.

  15. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  16. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural…

  17. Disability Studies. NRC Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Perri

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several decades, what people now refer to as "disability studies" has been a powerful influence on policy and practice in regards to people with disabilities. Disability studies has evolved as a means of addressing how people with disabilities have been treated historically and how they continue to be treated. The field of disability…

  18. Specific Reading Comprehension Disability: Major Problem, Myth, or Misnomer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Mercedes; Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test three competing hypotheses about the nature of comprehension problems of students who are poor in reading comprehension. Participants in the study were first, second, and third graders, totaling nine cohorts and over 425,000 participants in all. The pattern of results was consistent across all cohorts:…

  19. Dickens and disability.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1996-12-01

    The novels of Charles Dickens include many vivid portraits of individuals with physical disabilities or deformities, and these conditions are often used symbolically to highlight some of the author's recurring themes. Disabled children are depicted as innocent victims, while their older counterparts are most often viewed as corrupt victimizers whose physical deformities are outward manifestations of their inner depravity. Punishment for moral failings in non-disabled characters frequently takes the form of paralysis and/or aphasia resulting from a cerebrovascular accident. In this context the wheelchair becomes a potent metaphor of imprisonment as a form of retributive justice.

  20. Sexual rights and disability.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2011-03-01

    This paper argues against Appel's recent proposal-in this journal-that there is a fundamental human right to sexual pleasure, and that therefore the sexual pleasure of severely disabled people should be publicly funded-by thereby partially legalising prostitution. An alternative is proposed that does not need to pose a new positive human right; does not need public funding; does not need the legalisation of prostitution; and that would offer a better experience to the severely disabled: charitable non-profit organisations whose members would voluntarily and freely provide sexual pleasure to the severely disabled.

  1. A global perspective on disability: a review of efforts to increase access and advance social integration for disabled persons.

    PubMed

    Chermak, G D

    1990-01-01

    Disability has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide, common to nations presenting disparate levels of socioeconomic development. Failure to integrate social welfare programmes within national development planning exacerbates difficulties arising from limited resources, with a disproportionate impact on disabled persons and other vulnerable groups. Such policy failure allows flagrant inequalities and social injustice to persist. Strategies are emerging, however, that are useful for solving common international problems. Community-based disability prevention and rehabilitation is one emerging solution that has attracted considerable attention worldwide, including in the United States. Following a review of global estimates of disability, which reveal the magnitude of the problem and provide background information for this report, I will summarize major international initiatives designed to prevent disability and ensure comprehensive rehabilitation for disabled persons. I will also analyse the relationships between health, socioeconomic development, and disability. Finally, I will describe community-based rehabilitation, an innovative approach evolving from the World Health Organization's Global Strategy for Health for All by the Year 2000, an approach with potential to eliminate barriers to equal opportunities and social integration for disabled persons.

  2. The benefits of mobile communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    The benefits offered by mobile communications facilities are compared to conventionally priced networks. Sweden, the UK and Eire were taken as examples of markets that are respectively leading, growing and restrictive. The three major benefits identified are higher profits for commercial organizations from cost savings and improved productivity, the prevention and minimization of damage to life and property, and better social contacts for people isolated from communities. Case studies provide examples of the benefits different occupational and social groups acquire from mobile communications in each country. The studies were also used to project future growth in the uptake and range of mobile communications facilities offered in each country.

  3. Mobility Demonstrator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-22

    Resilient Technologies (Polaris Defense) Technology: Non- Pneumatic Tire Description: Airless Tire/wheel with honeycombed shaped polymer supporting...self-adjusting track tensioners • The biggest advancement in these systems has been pneumatic external road-arm design (external suspensions...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 90 Payoff:  Enabler for silent mobility, hybridization , and export power capabilities

  4. Circulating nucleic acids: a new class of physiological mobile genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Indraneel

    2015-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements play a major role in shaping biotic genomes and bringing about evolutionary transformations. Herein, a new class of mobile genetic elements is proposed in the form of circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) derived from the billions of cells that die in the body every day due to normal physiology and that act intra-corporeally. A recent study shows that CNAs can freely enter into healthy cells, integrate into their genomes by a unique mechanism and cause damage to their DNA. Being ubiquitous and continuously arising, CNA-induced DNA damage may be the underlying cause of ageing, ageing-related disabilities and the ultimate demise of the organism. Thus, DNA seems to act in the paradoxical roles of both preserver and destroyer of life. This new class of mobile genetic element may be relevant not only to multi-cellular organisms with established circulatory systems, but also to other multi-cellular organisms in which intra-corporeal mobility of nucleic acids may be mediated via the medium of extra-cellular fluid.

  5. Circulating nucleic acids: a new class of physiological mobile genetic elements

    PubMed Central

    Mittra, Indraneel

    2015-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements play a major role in shaping biotic genomes and bringing about evolutionary transformations. Herein, a new class of mobile genetic elements is proposed in the form of circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) derived from the billions of cells that die in the body every day due to normal physiology and that act intra-corporeally. A recent study shows that CNAs can freely enter into healthy cells, integrate into their genomes by a unique mechanism and cause damage to their DNA. Being ubiquitous and continuously arising, CNA-induced DNA damage may be the underlying cause of ageing, ageing-related disabilities and the ultimate demise of the organism. Thus, DNA seems to act in the paradoxical roles of both preserver and destroyer of life. This new class of mobile genetic element may be relevant not only to multi-cellular organisms with established circulatory systems, but also to other multi-cellular organisms in which intra-corporeal mobility of nucleic acids may be mediated via the medium of extra-cellular fluid. PMID:26664710

  6. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have trouble generalizing and following multistep directions. 12 Visual perceptual/visual motor deficit. People with this condition mix up ... top] Learning Disabilities Association of America. (n.d.). Visual perceptual/visual motor deficit . Retrieved June 15, 2012, ...

  7. Rural People with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... more information, please see the U.S. Department of Justice's Commonly Asked Questions About Child Care Centers and ... land grant universities and various nonprofit disability services organizations. Assistance is available to people working on small ...

  8. Disabilities Act in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daynes, Kristine S.

    1990-01-01

    Eight true or false questions explore implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Topics include AIDS, drug abuse, undue hardship, reasonable accommodation, and company size affected by the law. (SK)

  9. Research into telecommunications options for people with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Toan; Garrett, Rob; Downing, Andrew; Walker, Lloyd; Hobbs, David

    2007-01-01

    People with a disability do not have equitable access to the modern telecommunication medium. Many experience difficulty typing, handling the phone, dialing, or answering calls. For those who are unable to speak, the only option is to type messages using whatever functional control site exists on their body. The provision of accessible mobile phones for people with disabilities can significantly improve their quality of life through an increased range of accessible activities, and mobile phones can improve their independence, safety, security and self-esteem. This research was aimed at providing practical ways for people with a disability to participate in the extensive community of home and mobile phone users. The outcomes of 10 participants taking part in the evaluation and trial of off-the-shelf telecommunication options are presented. Nine out of 10 participants showed high to very high results in terms of their overall performance and satisfaction with the use of the telecommunication equipment provided. With the processes and support covering equipment matching, education, training, and delivery, current off-the-shelf solutions can help people with disabilities to effectively communicate with other members of our society and to access the same range of information systems and services enjoyed by able-bodied members of the community.

  10. Sports and disability.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Pamela E; Clayton, Gerald H

    2010-03-01

    Participation in recreational and competitive sports at an early age has long been touted as a positive influence on growth and development, and for fostering lifelong healthy lifestyles. The benefits of an active lifestyle include not only fitness, but the promotion of a sense of inclusion and improved self-esteem. These benefits are well documented in all populations, and their importance has been summarized in the recent Healthy People 2010 guidelines. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently produced a summary statement on the benefits of activity for disabled children. They note that children with disabilities tend to have an overall lower level of fitness and an increased level of obesity. For this population, developing a lifelong desire to be active can be a simple means for limiting illness and much of the morbidity associated with sedentary lifestyles often associated with disability. For disabled youth, participation in disabled sports programs available nationally and internationally can be an effective means to promote such precepts. The goal of this focused review is to improve the learner's knowledge of the positive impact that active lifestyles can have on overall health in the disabled youth population and, as a result, modify their practice by incorporating recreational and competitive sport activities as part of improving overall patient care.

  11. Advocating in schools for children with disabilities: what's new with IDEA?

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Sandra J; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    All social workers who work with children and families, regardless of their practice setting, should be aware of the important educational rights to which children with disabilities and their families are entitled. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (P.L. 101-476), one of the most sweeping laws protecting children with disabilities, was substantially amended in 1997, and its regulatory provisions became legally effective in October 1999. This article provides information about the requirements of the law and the impact of those changes on children's educational rights. The changes discussed and their practice implications include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and participants in the individualized education program process; payment for private school placements for children with disabilities; discipline of children with disabilities; and provision of social work services in the schools.

  12. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  13. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  14. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  15. How to Find Good Apps: An Evaluation Rubric for Instructional Apps for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok, Min Wook; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Eun Young; Bryant, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Computers can be an effective teaching method for students with learning disabilities (LD). The use of mobile devices as education tools for students with disabilities has received considerable attention in special education recently. Parents, teachers, and professionals look for effective applications (i.e., apps) that meet the needs of their…

  16. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... passengers with a disability bring onto a passenger vessel? 39.93 Section 39.93 Transportation Office of the... individuals with mobility disabilities in any areas open to pedestrian use. (b)(1) As A PVO subject to Title... legitimate safety requirement. For example, if a device can be accommodated in some spaces of the vessel...

  17. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the…

  18. Disability shocks near retirement age and financial well-being.

    PubMed

    Dushi, Irena; Rupp, Kalman

    2013-01-01

    Using Health and Retirement Study data, we examine three groups of adults aged 51-56 in 1992 with different disability experiences over 8 years. Our analysis reveals three major findings. First, people who started and stayed nondisabled experienced stable financial security, with improvement in household wealth despite labor force withdrawal. Second, the newly disabled--people who started as nondisabled but suffered a disability shock--experienced increased poverty rates and decreased median incomes. Average earnings loss was the greatest for them, with public and private benefits replacing less than half of the loss, whereas increased public health insurance coverage alleviated reduced private health insurance coverage. The newly disabled experienced improvement in household wealth, although at a lower rate compared with those who stayed nondisabled. Third, people who started and stayed disabled were behind at the baseline and have fallen further behind on most measures, except for improvement in health insurance coverage.

  19. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  20. A natural-language interface to a mobile robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalowski, S.; Crangle, C.; Liang, L.

    1987-01-01

    The present work on robot instructability is based on an ongoing effort to apply modern manipulation technology to serve the needs of the handicapped. The Stanford/VA Robotic Aid is a mobile manipulation system that is being developed to assist severely disabled persons (quadriplegics) in performing simple activities of everyday living in a homelike, unstructured environment. It consists of two major components: a nine degree-of-freedom manipulator and a stationary control console. In the work presented here, only the motions of the Robotic Aid's omnidirectional motion base have been considered, i.e., the six degrees of freedom of the arm and gripper have been ignored. The goal has been to develop some basic software tools for commanding the robot's motions in an enclosed room containing a few objects such as tables, chairs, and rugs. In the present work, the environmental model takes the form of a two-dimensional map with objects represented by polygons. Admittedly, such a highly simplified scheme bears little resemblance to the elaborate cognitive models of reality that are used in normal human discourse. In particular, the polygonal model is given a priori and does not contain any perceptual elements: there is no polygon sensor on board the mobile robot.

  1. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  2. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  3. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  4. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  5. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  6. Mobile EEG in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative to these recordings, their use is still not introduced everywhere. We surveyed Dutch neurologists and patients and evaluated a novel mobile EEG device (Mobita, TMSi). Key specifications were compared with three other current mobile EEG devices. We shortly discuss algorithms to assist in the review process. Thirty percent (33 out of 109) of Dutch neurologists reported that home EEG recordings are used in their hospital. The majority of neurologists think that mobile EEG can have additional value in investigation of unclear paroxysms, but not in the initial diagnosis after a first seizure. Poor electrode contacts and signal quality, limited recording time and absence of software for reliable and effective assistance in the interpretation of EEGs have been important constraints for usage, but in recent devices discussed here, many of these problems have been solved. The majority of our patients were satisfied with the home EEG procedure and did not think that our EEG device was uncomfortable to wear, but they did feel uneasy wearing it in public.

  7. Mobility Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Abele, G.; Walker, D.A.; Brown, J .; Brewer, M.C.; Atwood, D.M. TI - Effects of low ground pressure vehicle traffic on tundra aL Lonely, Alaska SO...resistance, bulldozing resistance. NTIS ’ DT ’ . [ Acces. J "D-4 CONTENTS Chapter I Snow vehicles or snowmobiles Chapter II Rolling resistance Chapter III...Russian Swe Swedish Eng English Jap Japanese Ger German Pol Polish Czech Czechoslovakian Nor Norwegian P reface This mobility bibliography was

  8. [Quality of life of athletes with disability and some aspects of equal possibilities].

    PubMed

    Samsoniene, Laimute; Baubinas, Algirdas; Adomaitiene, Rūta; Jankauskiene, Konstancija; Korotkich, Igor; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2010-01-01

    The International Olympic and Paralympic Committees have decided that in 2012, the Olympic and Parolympic Games in London will take place at the same time. For this reason, the aim of our study was to determine whether athletes with disability in Lithuania have the same possibilities for sports - and thus for integration into the unified Lithuanian sports system - as those without disability. An anonymous inquiry of athletes with and without disability was performed in 2006. We analyzed 235 questionnaires filled in by the participants of the study; 159 subjects were with and 76 without disability. The Lithuanian Paralympic Committee approved the questionnaires and gave an agreement for the study. The inquiry was performed in Lithuanian sports clubs for the persons with disability and in the Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education. The obtained findings about the respondents' personality and environmental factors indicated that the indices of self-awareness in all athletes without disability were significantly higher than in athletes with disability (P<0.05). More than one-half (56.6%) of the respondents without disability indicated that their life was meaningful, whereas the respective percentage of athletes with disability was only 33.8% (P<0.05). As many as 59% of the respondents without disability were satisfied with their quality of life, compared to 36.2% of the respondents with disability. More than one-half (56.6%) of athletes without disability indicated that sports played an important role in their lives, whereas the respective percentage of athletes with disability was significantly lower - 33.2%. Only one-half (51.6%) of the participants with disability of the study had a permanent instructor (coach). The absolute majority of the respondents (irrespectively of the presence or absence of disability) indicated that sports helped them realize their potential. According to our findings, the majority of the respondents without disability (74.6%) and the

  9. The Americans with Disabilities Act: the impact on radiologic technologists and managers.

    PubMed

    Wedel, C S

    1993-01-01

    On July 26, 1990, President Bush signed the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. The act is being cited as one of the most extensive changes in personnel law since the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The law will impact hiring, promotion, and retention practices in the U.S. work force. Popular press reports have focused on the hiring of disabled workers, but the author argues that retaining healthy workers who become disabled will be the major impact for radiology managers. This article discusses the ADA with a specific emphasis on the retention of disabled radiologic technologists.

  10. It is not just muscle mass: a review of muscle quality, composition and metabolism during ageing as determinants of muscle function and mobility in later life.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Robin A; Cameron-Smith, David; Poppitt, Sally D

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide estimates predict 2 billion people will be aged over 65 years by 2050. A major current challenge is maintaining mobility and quality of life into old age. Impaired mobility is often a precursor of functional decline, disability and loss of independence. Sarcopenia which represents the age-related decline in muscle mass is a well-established factor associated with mobility limitations in older adults. However, there is now evidence that not only changes in muscle mass but other factors underpinning muscle quality including composition, metabolism, aerobic capacity, insulin resistance, fat infiltration, fibrosis and neural activation may also play a role in the decline in muscle function and impaired mobility associated with ageing. Importantly, changes in muscle quality may precede loss of muscle mass and therefore provide new opportunities for the assessment of muscle quality particularly in middle-aged adults who could benefit from interventions to improve muscle function. This review will discuss the accumulating evidence that in addition to muscle mass, factors underpinning muscle quality influence muscle function and mobility with age. Further development of tools to assess muscle quality in community settings is needed. Preventative diet, exercise or treatment interventions particularly in middle-aged adults at the low end of the spectrum of muscle function may help preserve mobility in later years and improve healthspan.

  11. Effects of Cognitive Strategy Interventions on Word Problem Solving and Working Memory in Children with Math Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Lussier, Catherine; Orosco, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although current categories of learning disabilities include as specific disabilities calculation and mathematical problem solving [see IDEA reauthorization, 2004, Sec. 300.8(c)(10)], the majority of research focuses on calculation disabilities. Previous studies have shown, however, that deficits in word problem solving difficulties are persistent…

  12. Description and performance of a digital mobile satellite terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, N.; Jedrey, T.; Parkyn, J.; Divsalar, D.

    1990-01-01

    A major goal of the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) program at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) is the development of an advanced digital terminal for use in land mobile satellite communication. The terminal has been developed to minimize the risk of applying advanced technologies to future commercial mobile satellite systems (MSS). Testing with existing L band satellites was performed in fixed, land mobile and aeronautical mobile environments. JPL's development and tests of its mobile terminal have demonstrated the viability of narrowband digital voice communications in a land mobile environment through geostationary satellites. This paper provides a consolidated description of the terminal architecture and the performance of its individual elements.

  13. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  14. Bridging the Gap between Disability Studies and Disability Services in Higher Education: A Model Center on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Alan L.; Sales, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The professional field of Disability Services in Higher Education and the academic discipline of Disability Studies share a perspective on disability that considers disability as a socially constructed phenomenon. Despite this common underpinning, there has been little effort or inquiry into the ways that disability services and Disability Studies…

  15. The Prevalence and Severity of Joint Problems and Disability in Patients with Poliomyelitis in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, S; Mcmillan, T; Sutherland, A; Sharan, D

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is caused by an enterovirus infection of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. Up to 40% of survivors recover full muscle strength, however 60–90% are left with varying degrees of residual paralysis, where the patient suffers from cramping myalgia and lower motor neuron pattern weakness. This study aimed to identify and quantify, in terms of prevalence and severity of the types of joint deformities encountered in polio sufferers. It also aimed to assess the disability caused by such problems. Finally we documented the provision and use of mobility aids, orthotics and surgery in the patient group. Impairment was confined to one lower limb, and this is consistent, as the majority of patients were infected in infancy. The study found that pes cavus, scoliosis, flexion deformity of the knee and true lower-limb shortening accounted for over half of the deformities found. The mean Barthel Disability score was 19 and over 80% of patients used at least one aid, usually in the form of a Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis (KAFO). Surgery also plays a large in role in the management of polio patients, however necessity needs to be assessed on an individual basis taking into account many aspects of the patient’s life. PMID:26161158

  16. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of…

  17. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  18. Dental fellowships in developmental disabilities help broaden care of disabled.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, F S; Kamen, P; Ratner, S; Rosenthal, R L

    1992-11-01

    Continuation of the national trend toward deinstitutionalization and community placement for persons with developmental disabilities, physical handicaps and other medical problems will mean increased demand for dentists trained to care for this segment of the population. The New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities now offers dental fellowships in developmental disabilities to help fill the learning gap.

  19. Math Disabilities and Reading Disabilities: Can They Be Separated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga; Zheng, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    This article synthesizes some of the published literature that selectively compares the cognitive functioning of children with math disabilities (MDs) with average-achieving children and poor readers (children with reading disabilities [RDs] or comorbid disabilities [RDs + MDs]). All studies in the synthesis report reading, IQ, and math scores for…

  20. Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, S. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice-oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism-as-culture movement.…

  1. Commentary on measuring disability.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Howard H

    2013-09-01

    This is a commentary on 5 articles in this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation that report on several related studies of new approaches to measuring disability. The project was grounded in theory, beginning with the development of a conceptual framework enhanced by a literature review and expert consultation within and outside of the Social Security Administration. The investigators then used item response theory to develop test items, which they organized into computer adaptive testing instruments and tested them for their psychometric properties. All in all, it is a groundbreaking set of studies and an enormously valuable contribution to the field. Hopefully it will also be tested as an alternative approach to assessing disability in the Social Security Administration disability benefits programs.

  2. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  3. Disability access. Open season.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brian

    2003-04-24

    A disability access audit carried out at a trust operating over 50 sites revealed that a 2.3m Pounds programme of work was needed. The audit took four months, with the team spending a day at each of the premises. The audit has been followed by a staff training programme in disability awareness. The trust's information systems now show if a patient did not attend an appointment because of difficulties with physical access. All letters to patients are produced in a minimum 12-point type.

  4. Mobile robot sense net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konolige, Kurt G.; Gutmann, Steffen; Guzzoni, Didier; Ficklin, Robert W.; Nicewarner, Keith E.

    1999-08-01

    Mobile robot hardware and software is developing to the point where interesting applications for groups of such robots can be contemplated. We envision a set of mobots acting to map and perform surveillance or other task within an indoor environment (the Sense Net). A typical application of the Sense Net would be to detect survivors in buildings damaged by earthquake or other disaster, where human searchers would be put a risk. As a team, the Sense Net could reconnoiter a set of buildings faster, more reliably, and more comprehensibly than an individual mobot. The team, for example, could dynamically form subteams to perform task that cannot be done by individual robots, such as measuring the range to a distant object by forming a long baseline stereo sensor form a pari of mobots. In addition, the team could automatically reconfigure itself to handle contingencies such as disabled mobots. This paper is a report of our current progress in developing the Sense Net, after the first year of a two-year project. In our approach, each mobot has sufficient autonomy to perform several tasks, such as mapping unknown areas, navigating to specific positions, and detecting, tracking, characterizing, and classifying human and vehicular activity. We detail how some of these tasks are accomplished, and how the mobot group is tasked.

  5. Disability search tips and resources.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Demographic projections for people living in the United States indicate a growing need for information on disabilities. This article discusses a limited number of concepts in disability, along with relevant thesaurus terms and suggested search techniques in four databases: PubMed, CINAHL, REHABDATA, and the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange's (CIRRIE) Database of International Research. The article closes with annotations of potentially useful websites that focus on concerns of persons with disabilities, their caregivers, and researchers in disability.

  6. Telecollaboration and Student Mobility for Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinginger, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews major findings from qualitative and quantitative research on language learning in student mobility in order to consider how telecollaboration might contribute to the success of student sojourns abroad. Evidence is available to demonstrate the effectiveness of student mobility in every domain of language development. As may be…

  7. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  8. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but…

  9. Experimental Disability: A Gestalt Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofaro, Gregory A.; James, Fleming, III

    1980-01-01

    Experimental disability offers rehabilitation counselor educators and trainers a vehicle for developing student-counselor awareness and sensitivity to psychosocial problems of disability. Gestalt counseling techniques, which emphasize the bipolarities of the disability experience, are used to explore the feelings, behaviors, and attitudes…

  10. Supporting Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebbeler, Kathleen; Spiker, Donna

    2016-01-01

    What do we know about young children with delays and disabilities, and how can we help them succeed in prekindergarten through third grade? To begin with, Kathleen Hebbeler and Donna Spiker write, identifying children with delays and disabilities to receive specialized services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act poses several…

  11. Employment and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue offers six articles on employment of people with disabilities. "Employment and People with Disabilities: Challenges for the Nineties" (Frank Bowe) discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act, issues in unemployment and under-education, earnings, and implications for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative…

  12. Disability Studies: Information and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven, Ed.; Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.; Walker, Pamela, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document reflects the diversity of the field of Disability Studies, including contributions representing different disability groups, perspectives, and disciplines. Resource information is presented in nine sections: (1) Books, Chapters, and Articles; (2) Films and Documentaries; (3) Academic Programs in Disability Studies in North America;…

  13. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  14. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and…

  15. Literary Characters Who Are Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Determines which specific disability categories appear most often in literature, when they appear, and which authors have contributed most to their appearance. Physical disabilities have been portrayed most often, followed by alcoholism and sensory disorders. Most portrayals of disabilities appeared between 1900 and 1949 and Charles Dickens wrote…

  16. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward…

  17. Prevalence of Cancer Screening Among Adults With Disabilities, United States, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Julie S.; Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A.; Young, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Many studies on cancer screening among adults with disabilities examined disability status only, which masks subgroup differences. We examined prevalence of receipt of cancer screening tests by disability status and type. Methods We used 2013 National Health Interview Survey data to assess prevalence of 1) guideline-concordant mammography, Papanicolaou (Pap) tests, and endoscopy and stool tests; 2) physicians’ recommendations for these tests; and 3) barriers to health-care access among adults with and without disabilities (defined as difficulty with cognition, hearing, vision, or mobility). Results Reported Pap test use ranged from 66.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 60.3%–71.4%) to 80.2% (95% CI, 72.4%–86.2%) among women with different types of disabilities compared with 81.4% (95% CI, 80.0%–82.7%) among women without disabilities. Prevalence of mammography among women with disabilities was also lower (range, 61.2% [95% CI, 50.5%–71.0%] to 67.5% [95% CI, 62.8%–71.9%]) compared with women without disabilities (72.8% [95% CI, 70.7%–74.9%]). Screening for colorectal cancer was 57.0% among persons without disabilities, and ranged from 48.6% (95% CI, 40.3%–57.0%) among those with vision limitations to 64.6% (95% CI, 58.5%–70.2%) among those with hearing limitations. Receiving recommendations for Pap tests and mammography increased all respondents’ likelihood of receiving these tests. The most frequently reported barrier to accessing health care reported by adults with disabilities was difficulty scheduling an appointment. Conclusion We observed disparities in receipt of cancer screening among adults with disabilities; however, disparities varied by disability type. Our findings may be used to refine interventions to close gaps in cancer screening among persons with disabilities. PMID:28125399

  18. Eliminating health and health care disparities among the growing population of people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Iezzoni, Lisa I

    2011-10-01

    Fifty-four million people in the United States are now living with disabilities. That number will grow substantially in the next thirty years, as the "baby-boom" generation ages and many of today's children and young adults mature and experience complications related to overweight and obesity. This reality poses a major challenge to the health care and policy communities. People with disabilities confront disadvantages from social and environmental determinants of health, including lower educational levels, lower incomes, and higher unemployment, than people without disabilities. Those with disabilities are also much more likely to report being in fair or poor health; to use tobacco; to forgo physical activity; and to be overweight or obese. People with disabilities also experience health care disparities, such as lower rates of screening and more difficulty accessing services, compared to people without disabilities. Eliminating these multifaceted disadvantages among people with disabilities should be a critical national priority.

  19. Environmental toxicants and developmental disabilities: a challenge for psychologists.

    PubMed

    Koger, Susan M; Schettler, Ted; Weiss, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Developmental, learning, and behavioral disabilities are a significant public health problem. Environmental chemicals can interfere with brain development during critical periods, thereby impacting sensory, motor, and cognitive function. Because regulation in the United States is based on limited testing protocols and essentially requires proof of harm rather than proof of lack of harm, some undefined fraction of these disabilities may reflect adverse impacts of this "vast toxicological experiment" (H. L. Needleman, as quoted in B. Weiss & P. J. Landrigan, 2000, p. 373). Yet the hazards of environmental pollutants are inherently preventable. Psychologists can help prevent developmental disabilities by mobilizing and affecting public policy, educating and informing consumers, contributing to interdisciplinary research efforts, and taking action within their own homes and communities to reduce the toxic threat to children.

  20. Gait Speed Predicts Incident Disability: A Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.; Rosano, Caterina; Rubin, Susan M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Harris, Tamara; Ensrud, Kristine; Orwoll, Eric; Lee, Christine G.; Chandler, Julie M.; Newman, Anne B.; Cauley, Jane A.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Functional independence with aging is an important goal for individuals and society. Simple prognostic indicators can inform health promotion and care planning, but evidence is limited by heterogeneity in measures of function. Methods. We performed a pooled analysis of data from seven studies of 27,220 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or older with baseline gait speed, followed for disability and mortality. Outcomes were incident inability or dependence on another person in bathing or dressing; and difficulty walking ¼ – ½ mile or climbing 10 steps within 3 years. Results. Participants with faster baseline gait had lower rates of incident disability. In subgroups (defined by 0.2 m/s-wide intervals from <0.4 to ≥1.4 m/s) with increasingly greater gait speed, 3-year rates of bathing or dressing dependence trended from 10% to 1% in men, and from 15% to 1% in women, while mobility difficulty trended from 47% to 4% in men and 40% to 6% in women. The age-adjusted relative risk ratio per 0.1 m/s greater speed for bathing or dressing dependence in men was 0.68 (0.57–0.81) and in women: 0.74 (0.66–0.82); for mobility difficulty, men: 0.75 (0.68–0.82), women: 0.73 (0.67–0.80). Results were similar for combined disability and mortality. Effects were largely consistent across subgroups based on age, gender, race, body mass index, prior hospitalization, and selected chronic conditions. In the presence of multiple other risk factors for disability, gait speed significantly increased the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve. Conclusion. In older adults, gait speed predicts 3 year incidence of bathing or dressing dependence, mobility difficulty, and a composite outcome of disability and mortality. PMID:26297942

  1. International trends in disability program growth.

    PubMed

    Copeland, L S

    1981-10-01

    The steep growth in the number of beneficiaries under the U.S. Social security Disability Insurance program during 1966-77 has aroused interest in learning whether programs abroad experienced similar expansion. This article presents the gross rate of disability incidence in five European programs and explores termination rates (for recovery and death) in three of those programs. Factors underlying growth patterns are also discussed. Findings show that the gross disability incidence rate increased in the Belgian and Finnish programs from the late 1960's and in the programs of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Netherlands, and France From the early 1970's, tapering off in all five countries studied by the mid-1970's. Gross recovery- and death-termination rates declined continuously in the Dutch and the Finnish programs. For all countries in this study, changes in the definition of statutory disability and changes in other program provisions, economic conditions, demographic patterns, and public awareness and attitudes were the major causes of expansion. Adequate explanations to account for the recent slackening off in program growth, however, are lacking.

  2. The Positive Effects of Early Powered Mobility on Children's Psychosocial and Play Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan; Tefft, Donita

    2013-01-01

    Powered mobility can have an important cognitive and psychosocial impact on young children who are unable to move independently. Twenty-three children with physical disabilities between the ages of 18 months and 6 years participated in this study. Data evaluating social skills, frequency of mobility play activities, frequency of interaction with…

  3. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics…

  4. Iowans with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    "The Goldfinch" is a magazine aimed at introducing young people to Iowa history. Each issue has a different topic which is discussed in detail throughout that issue. There are articles which describe different aspects of the topic. The topic for this particular issue is "Iowans with Disabilities." Featured articles from this…

  5. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  6. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  7. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,…

  8. Computers for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes adaptive technology for personal computers that accommodate disabled users and may require special equipment including hardware, memory, expansion slots, and ports. Highlights include vision aids, including speech synthesizers, magnification, braille, and optical character recognition (OCR); hearing adaptations; motor-impaired…

  9. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  10. Understanding Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walcot-Gayda, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Knowledgeable persons within the field frequently criticize definitions of "learning disabilities" for the choice of vocabulary, phrasing and implied ideas. Although there may never be a universally accepted definition, a definition that reflects current research is used in this article to make evident some of the cognitive and…

  11. Neverstreaming: Preventing Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    Schools can reduce special-education and remedial instruction costs by helping students succeed in early grades. This article profiles several prevention and early intervention programs, including Success for All, Reading Recovery, Prevention of Learning Disabilities, the Carolina Abecedarian Project, Comer's School Development Program, and…

  12. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  13. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  14. Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Use of Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley; Darrah, Johanna; Hollis, Vivien; Cook, Al; May, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapists and occupational therapists frequently assist parents with the exploration and use of powered wheelchairs for their children with physical disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore parents' experiences and perceptions of their children's experiences with the receipt and use of powered mobility. Qualitative methods…

  15. Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes several computing tools that have been effectively used by individuals with mobility impairments. Emphasis is on tasks to be completed and how the individuals abilities (not disabilities), with possible assistance from technology, can be used to accomplish them. Preliminary information addresses the importance of…

  16. Teaching Mobility to a Bilaterally Hand-Amputated Blind Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poss, D.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the methods used to teach mobility skills to a young man severely disabled (blind and bilaterally hand amputated) by an explosion. Stressed are the assistive devices developed and the therapist's and student's feelings during the training course. (DB)

  17. The Elimination of Mobility Barriers in Recreational Areas and Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servedio, William

    A discussion is presented on the essential need for removing mobility barriers in public recreational areas as well as other sites. It is pointed out that physical disability is not limited to those confined to wheelchairs, but includes persons with temporary or lesser physical handicaps such as limb casts, canes, poor vision, deafness, or the…

  18. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Rachel E; Fregly, Benjamin J; Boninger, Michael L; Chan, Leighton; Rodgers, Mary M; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2012-04-20

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments.

  19. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  20. Proceedings of the Mobile Satellite Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafferty, William

    1988-01-01

    A satellite-based mobile communications system provides voice and data communications to mobile users over a vast geographic area. The technical and service characteristics of mobile satellite systems (MSSs) are presented and form an in-depth view of the current MSS status at the system and subsystem levels. Major emphasis is placed on developments, current and future, in the following critical MSS technology areas: vehicle antennas, networking, modulation and coding, speech compression, channel characterization, space segment technology and MSS experiments. Also, the mobile satellite communications needs of government agencies are addressed, as is the MSS potential to fulfill them.

  1. Explaining Disability Trends in the U.S. Elderly and Near-Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqun; Sloan, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine disability trends among U.S. near-elderly and elderly persons and explain observed trends. Data Source 1996–2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. Study Design We first examined trends in Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living limitations, and large muscle, mobility, gross motor, and fine motor indexes. Then we used decomposition analysis to estimate contributions of changes in sociodemographic composition, self-reported chronic disease prevalence and health behaviors, and changes in disabling effects of these factors to disability changes between 1996 and 2010. Principal Findings Disability generally increased or was unchanged. Increased trends were more apparent for near-elderly than elderly persons. Sociodemographic shifts tended to reduce disability, but their favorable effects were largely offset by increased self-reported chronic disease prevalence. Changes in smoking and heavy drinking prevalence had relatively minor effects on disability trends. Increased obesity rates generated sizable effects on lower-body functioning changes. Disabling effects of self-reported chronic diseases often declined, and educational attainment became a stronger influence in preventing disability. Conclusions Such unfavorable trends as increased chronic disease prevalence and higher obesity rates offset or outweighed the favorable effects with the result that disability remained unchanged or increased. PMID:25655273

  2. Time allocation of disabled individuals.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    Although some studies have analysed the disability phenomenon and its effect on, for example, labour force participation, wages, job satisfaction, or the use of disability pension, the empirical evidence on how disability steals time (e.g. hours of work) from individuals is very scarce. This article examines how disabled individuals allocate their time to daily activities as compared to their non-disabled counterparts. Using time diary information from the Spanish Time Use Survey (last quarter of 2002 and the first three quarters of 2003), we estimate the determinants of time (minutes per day) spent on four aggregate categories (market work, household production, tertiary activities and leisure) for a sample of 27,687 non-disabled and 5250 disabled individuals and decompose the observed time differential by using the Oaxaca-Blinder methodology. The results show that disabled individuals devote less time to market work (especially females), and more time to household production (e.g. cooking, cleaning, child care), tertiary activities (e.g., sleeping, personal care, medical treatment) and leisure activities. We also find a significant effect of age on the time spent on daily activities and important differences by gender and disability status. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that disability steals time, and reiterate the fact that more public policies are needed to balance working life and health concerns among disabled individuals.

  3. Clinical profile and functional disability of patients with migraine

    PubMed Central

    Renjith, Vishnu; Pai, Mamatha Shivananda; Castelino, Flavia; Pai, Aparna; George, Anice

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Globally, migraine was ranked as the seventh highest cause of disability. Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the clinical profile and functional disability of patients with migraine. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Using a consecutive sampling technique, 60 patients were recruited for the study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: Majority of the participants were in the age group of 18–40 years with a mean age 35.22 years. There was a female preponderance with 70% of study participants being females. The various symptoms experienced by patients include throbbing pain (90%), photophobia (93.3%), phonophobia (85%), nausea (76.7%), and vomiting (41.7%). Most of the subjects (73.3%) under the study belonged to moderate to severe levels of functional disability. About 53.3% of patients were in the category of episodic migraine and 46.7% were in the category of chronic migraine. Conclusion: Migraine is associated with moderate to severe functional disability. Frequency of migraine has a positive correlation with the levels of disability/migraine disability assessment scores of migraineurs. PMID:27114657

  4. Studying abroad inclusively: Reflections by college students with and without intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Prohn, Seb M; Kelley, Kelly R; Westling, David L

    2016-12-01

    Postsecondary education programs have increased opportunities for students with and without intellectual disabilities to study abroad as inclusive classes. Using open-coding qualitative techniques, the authors examined an inclusive study abroad group's daily reflective journals during a study abroad trip to London and Dublin. Three shared categories emerged from analysis: personal development, bonding/social inclusion, and learning from English and Irish adults with intellectual disabilities. Each group reported two distinct categories as well. Students with intellectual disabilities described the importance of mobility/transportation and fun, while their classmates without intellectual disabilities described the importance of inclusive learning and an increasing awareness of barriers to full participation for people with disabilities. Student-constructed categories are used to describe the benefits of inclusive study abroad and build future inclusive international opportunities.

  5. Experiences of violence across life course and its effects on mobility among participants in the International Mobility in Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Dimitri Taurino; Vafaei, Afshin; Alvarado, Beatriz Eugenia; Curcio, Carmen Lucia; Guralnik, Jack M; Zunzunegui, María Victoria; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Life course exposure to violence may lead to disability in old age. We examine associations and pathways between life course violence and mobility disability in older participants of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS). Methods A cross-sectional study using IMIAS 2012 baseline. Men and women aged 65–74 years were recruited at 5 cities (n=1995): Kingston and Saint-Hyacinthe (Canada), Tirana (Albania), Manizales (Colombia) and Natal (Brazil). Mobility was assessed by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and by 2 questions on difficulty in walking and climbing stairs. Childhood physical abuse history and the HITS instrument were used to gather information on childhood exposure to violence and violence by intimate partners or family members. Multivariate logistic regression and mediation analysis models were constructed to explore the significance of direct and indirect effects of violence on mobility. Interaction effects of gender on violence and on each of the mediators were tested. Results Experiences of physical violence at any point of life were associated with mobility disability (defined as SPPB<8 or limitation in walking/climbing stairs) while psychological violence was not. Chronic conditions, C reactive protein, physical activity and depression mediated the effect of childhood exposure to violence on both mobility outcomes. Chronic conditions and depression were pathways between family and partner violence and both mobility outcomes. Physical activity was a significant pathway linking family violence to mobility. Gender interactions were not significant. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for the detrimental effects of life course exposure to violence on mobility in later life. PMID:27737884

  6. [Living situation of mentally disabled people with dementia in institutions for the disabled: results of a questionnaire in Lower Saxony and Bremen].

    PubMed

    Wolff, C; Müller, S V

    2014-07-01

    No empirical data about the topic "Mental Disability and Dementia" in Germany exist. The aim of this survey was to obtain current data about mentally disabled people with dementia. Therefore, the following questions need to be clarified: how many mentally disabled people are affected with dementia, which difficulties occur regarding the diagnosis of dementia and what challenges have to be solved in upcoming years. In all, 45 organisations for the mentally disabled took part in the survey, showing that dementia amongst people with mental disabilities appeared largely starting at the age of 50. Standardized diagnostics are seldom used by these organisations. Instead, observation of behaviour by care attendants plays a central role, due to the fact that speaking and introspection are not possible for a majority of the patients. In general, institutions for people with mental disabilities do not have specific offers for people with dementia, occasionally there are offers regarding their living situation and free time activities.

  7. Health promotion for people with disabilities: development and evaluation of the Living Well with a Disability program.

    PubMed

    Ravesloot, C H; Seekins, T; Cahill, T; Lindgren, S; Nary, D E; White, G

    2007-08-01

    People with disabilities can benefit from health promotion opportunities to reduce the incidence and severity of secondary conditions that further limit their participation in society. This paper describes participatory action research (PAR) methods we used to develop, implement and evaluate the Living Well with a Disability program. Community-based agencies that provide information and referral services to people with disabilities (independent living centers funded under Title VII, Rehabilitation Act) recruited a convenience sample of 246 people with mobility impairments to participate in a randomly assigned, wait-list control health promotion intervention study. Paper-and-pencil outcome measures included the secondary conditions surveillance instrument, unhealthy days and health care utilization. Logistic regression on outcomes controlling for demographic variables and pre-test measures indicated reductions in all three outcome variables. People with mobility impairments who participated in the Living Well with a Disability program reported less limitation from secondary conditions, fewer unhealthy days and less health care utilization. PAR methods are particularly important to design useful interventions for this population.

  8. Volume 4 - Mobile Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mobile source reference material for activity data collection from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides complete methods for collecting key inputs to onroad mobile and nonroad mobile emissions models.

  9. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  10. Connecting the Demographic Dots: Geographic Mobility and Birth Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Having a child is a major determinant of geographic mobility. Little is known, however, about the opposite process--whether geographic mobility is a determinant of fertility. Drawing on social and human capital theories and research on fertility and migration to develop competing hypotheses, the author examines the effects of mobility on changes…

  11. Influential Factors for Mobile Learning Acceptance among Chinese Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Shuang; Dennen, Vanessa P.; Mei, Li

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the factors that influence mobile learning adoption among Chinese university students. China's higher education market is large and mobile device ownership is considered a status symbol. Combined, these two factors suggest mobile learning could have a big impact in China. From the literature, we identified three major areas…

  12. Security Measures to Protect Mobile Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, Piyanka; Govil, M. C.; Dutta, Kamlesh

    2010-11-01

    The security issues of mobile agent systems have embarrassed its widespread implementation. Mobile agents that move around the network are not safe because the remote hosts that accommodate the agents initiates all kinds of attacks. These hosts try to analyze the agent's decision logic and their accumulated data. So, mobile agent security is the most challenging unsolved problems. The paper analyzes various security measures deeply. Security especially the attacks performed by hosts to the visiting mobile agent (the malicious hosts problem) is a major obstacle that prevents mobile agent technology from being widely adopted. Being the running environment for mobile agent, the host has full control over them and could easily perform many kinds of attacks against them.

  13. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  14. Changes in Disability Levels Among Older Adults Experiencing Adverse Events in Postacute Rehabilitation Care

    PubMed Central

    Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the relationship between adverse events (AEs) and changes in the levels of disability from admission to discharge during inpatient rehabilitation programs. A prospective cohort study was conducted among a cohort of inpatients (216 older adults) admitted to a rehabilitation unit. The occurrences of any AE were reported. The level of disability regarding mobility activities was estimated using the disability qualifiers from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Changes in the levels of disability between admission and discharge were assessed. Baseline-measured covariates were also selected. Regarding all 4 disability levels (“no limitation,” “mild,” “moderate,” “severe,” and “complete disability”), a total of 159 participants experienced an improvement at discharge (126 participants progressed 1 level, whereas 33 improved 2 disability levels), 56 made no change, and no participants experienced a decline. The occurrence of fall-related events and the diagnostic group (musculoskeletal system) are specific predictive factors of change in the level of disability. The odds of undergoing a change in any disability level between admission and discharge decreases by 68% (1–0.32) when patients experience fall-related events (odds ratio [OR] = 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.97, P = 0.041) and increases for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.34–11.38, P = 0.012). Our findings suggest that increased efforts to prevent the occurrence of these AEs, together with early interventions suited to the diagnosis of the affected system, may have a positive influence on the improvement of disability. Further studies should evaluate disability over time after discharge to obtain a better sense of how transient or permanent the associated disability may be. PMID:25715255

  15. The Modification of Educational Equipment and Curriculum for Maximum Utilization by Physically Disabled Persons; Design of a School for Physically Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuker, Harold E.; And Others

    Elements of modified school design for the physically disabled are considered, including mobility, classrooms, science laboratories, applied skill areas, the library, the swimming pool, and sanitary facilities. Also discussed are the cafeteria (food service, seating, and other considerations), recreational areas (play grounds,…

  16. Disability and Depression.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovich, A; Wilkerson, A

    2016-12-01

    Here, Ann Cvetkovich, interviewed by Abby Wilkerson, brings Cvetkovich's influential cultural studies analysis of depression explicitly into conversation with disability studies. Cvetkovich understands "feeling bad" (a term she prefers to "depression") as a defining affective state under neoliberalism. Drawing on a distinctive historical/cultural archive, she challenges the atomism of the neoliberal medical model that frames depression and affective distress more generally as the result of faulty brain chemistry-individual organisms gone awry. Instead, she traces these common experiences to sociopolitical phenomena ranging from current neoliberal demands for productivity as exemplified in university life, to histories of colonization, slavery, and displacement. The conversation considers the value of disability frameworks for understanding mental health diagnoses and the intersections of social institutions, bodily practices, and everyday affective life.

  17. Adolescent sexuality and disability.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Jacob A; Klingbeil, Fred; Bryen, Diane Nelson; Silverman, Brett; Thomas, Anila

    2002-11-01

    Regardless of what our beliefs about sex and disability may be, as health care providers we can promote the health and well being of our patients with disabilities in several ways. First and perhaps foremost, physical and programmatic barriers to accessing general health care including routine gynecologic care must be dramatically reduced. The promise of Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act must be aggressively extended to our health care system to ensure equal access to routine health care for all. Second, knowledge of community resources that can support the healthy development and exercise of responsible and satisfying sexuality is critical. For example, health care providers should know about adaptive and assistive technologies as well as the use of personal care assistants to support the healthy although sometimes nontypical expression of one's sexuality. Centers for Independent Living are community resources that are often underutilized by the medical profession. These centers--run by and for people with disabilities--are likely resources and allies for providing education, role models, and peer mentoring around relationships, intimacy, sexuality, sexual expression, and parenting with a disability. Finally, sex education is a must and should include the following: Basic facts of life, reproduction, and sexual intercourse; Human growth and development Human reproduction and anatomy Self-pleasuring/masturbation and the use of sexual aids Intimacy and privacy Pregnancy and child birth Contraception and abortion Family life and parenthood Sexual response and consensual sex Sexual orientation Sexual abuse HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. The question should not be whether sex education is provided to persons with disabilities, but rather how it is most effectively provided. Health sex education must include the development of effective communication skills, decision-making skills, assertiveness, and the ability to say "no." It must

  18. [Disability, autism and neurodiversity].

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the emergence of the neurodiversity movement in the context of studies about disabilities and the political organization of disabled people. The neurodiversity movement is organized by the so-called high functioning autists, who believe that autism is not a disease to be treated and, if possible, cured. It is instead a human difference that has to be respected just like other differences (sexual, racial, among others). The activists of the neurodiversity movement oppose the groups of parents of autistic children and professionals seeking for a cure for autism. This article presents the arguments of the pro- and anti-cure groups and analyzes both positions as well as their impact upon the field of health and the development of public policies for autists.

  19. Occupational asthma in a national disability survey

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, P.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of workplace exposures to the prevalence of asthma in adults has been minimized in the epidemiology of this illness. Analysis of the 1978 Social Security Disability Survey provides a population-based assessment as a novel approach utilizing self-attributed, occupationally related asthma as a measure of disease. Of 6063 respondents, 468 (7.7 percent) identified asthma as a personal medical condition; 72 (1.2 percent (15.4 percent of all those with asthma)) attributed it to workplace exposures. These subjects were older and included more men and cigarette smokers than groups of both asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects. The relative risk for occupationally attributed asthma was elevated among industrial and agricultural workers as compared with white collar and service occupations. Analysis of disability benefit status did not indicate that this introduced major reporting bias in this survey. This study suggests that occupational factors may have a greater role in adult asthma than previously thought.

  20. Mobile health in China: current status and future development.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijun; Zhang, Tianhong; Chi, Hongmei; Chen, Yingmei; Li, Yue; Wang, Jijun

    2014-08-01

    Mobile health applications offer unique opportunities for monitoring patient progress, providing education materials to patients and family members, receiving personalized prompts and support, collecting ecologically valid data, and using self-management interventions when and where they are needed. Mobile health application services to mental illness have evidenced success in Western countries. However, they are still in the initial stage of development in China. The purpose of this paper is to identify needs for mobile health in China, present major mobile health products and technology in China, introduce mobile and digital psychiatric services, and discuss ethical issues and challenges in mobile health development in a country with the largest population in the world.

  1. Disability Does Not Discriminate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Amy Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the "it can't happen to me" mentality, which makes humans think they are physically invincible and have been guilty of thinking so. The author learned the danger of the "it can't happen to me" syndrome when she was disabled in a car accident in February 1994. The accident happened when she was 21 years old,…

  2. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  3. Unpacking intoxication, racialising disability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mel Y

    2015-06-01

    This article examines concepts whose strictly medical applications have only partly informed their widespread use and suggests that demonstrably shared logics motivate our thinking across domains in the interest of a politically just engagement. It considers exchanges between the culturally complex concepts of 'toxicity' and 'intoxication', assessing the racialised conditions of their animation in several geopolitically--and quite radically--distinct scenarios. First, the article sets the framework through considering the racial implications of impairment and disability language of 'non-toxic' finance capital in the contemporary US financial crisis. Shifting material foci from 'illiquid financial bodies' to opiates while insisting that neither is 'more' metaphorically toxic than the other, the article turns to address the role of opium and temporality in the interanimations of race and disability in two sites of 19th-century British empire: Langdon Down's clinic for idiocy, and China's retort on opium to Queen Victoria. The article concludes with a provocation that suggests yet another crossing of borders, that between researcher and researched: 'intoxicated method' is a hypothetical mode of approach that refuses idealised research positions by 'critically disabling' the idealised cognitive and conceptual lens of analysis.

  4. Nonverbal learning disability.

    PubMed

    Volden, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is described as a subtype of specific learning disability where the source of the disability is a difficulty in processing nonverbal information. The child with NLD presents with problems in visual, spatial, and tactile perception but with strengths in rote verbal skills. Traditionally, these children were recognized by their difficulties in arithmetic which presented a stark contrast with their strengths in spelling and decoding text. They also exhibited a split between their verbal IQ (VIQ) and performance IQ (PIQ) scores with the VIQ being significantly higher than PIQ. Over time, however, diagnostic criteria have evolved and the broadened definition of the NLD syndrome has led many to question the utility and uniqueness of the NLD diagnosis. In addition, shifting diagnostic standards have made research results difficult to replicate. In short, the research to date leaves many unanswered questions about (1) the definition of the NLD syndrome, (2) the pervasiveness of the academic, social and psychopathological difficulties, (3) the source of the NLD syndrome, and (4) the degree to which it overlaps with other conditions. This chapter outlines a brief history of the NLD syndrome, how it is currently conceptualized, and some of the current debate about the unanswered questions above.

  5. 75 FR 39429 - National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)-Disability and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)-- International Exchange of Knowledge and Experts in Disability and Rehabilitation Research Catalog of Federal...

  6. 78 FR 22783 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... CFR Chapter III Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research... announces a priority for a Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP) on Knowledge Translation...

  7. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 36 - Guidance on Revisions to ADA Regulation on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... businesses have refused to allow persons with disabilities to use EPAMDs. See, e.g., McElroy v. Simon... varying devices may provide increased access to individuals with mobility disabilities. While two business..., other business commenters expressed general and industry-specific concerns about permitting their...

  8. The Prevalence and Determinants of Obesity in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Cooper, S. -A.; Morrison, J.; Allan, L.; Smiley, E.; Williamson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major public health concern internationally and this study aimed to measure the prevalence of obesity in adults with intellectual disabilities in comparison with general population data, and examine the factors associated with obesity. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of all adults with intellectual disabilities,…

  9. The Nature and Treatment of Compulsions, Obsessions, and Rituals in People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Dempsey, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Developmental disabilities such as intellectual disability and autism are often accompanied by special sets of behaviors which are major challenges for the person and those in their community. Among the most worrisome of these are compulsions, rituals and obsessions. Often these behaviors are left untreated; however, when intervention does occur…

  10. Predictors of Obesity in a US Sample of High School Adolescents with and without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papas, Mia A.; Trabulsi, Jillian C.; Axe, Michelle; Rimmer, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is a major public health concern. Children with disabilities have a higher prevalence of obesity. Objective: We examined factors associated with obesity within a cross-sectional study of US adolescents with and without disabilities. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Logistic…

  11. Examination of Adaptive Behavior Differences in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Rivet, Tessa T.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Dempsey, Timothy; Boisjoli, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disabilities (ID) are high prevalence developmental disabilities that co-occur at high rates. Furthermore, Axis I psychopathology is known to occur more frequently in individuals with ID than the general population. The problems are lifelong and can be major impediments to independent living.…

  12. Responsiveness to Intervention: An Alternative Approach to the Identification of Learning Disabilities. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank

    This executive summary discusses the definition of learning disabilities (LD) and how students are identified as having a learning disability. It begins by outlining four major methods that are used to compute the discrepancy-based definition of LD and the flaws of the discrepancy-based model. It then describes an approach to defining LD that is…

  13. The Effect of Postsecondary Education on Employment and Income for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannicandro, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The low employment rates of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are a major concern. In 2011 only 34% of adults with ID were employed compared to 76% of adults without disabilities (Siperstein, Parker, & Drascher, 2013). Higher educational attainment is associated with higher employment rates for students with ID (Smith, Grigal,…

  14. Successful Transition of Students with Disabilities to 21st-Century College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothberg, June E.; Peterson, Lori Y.; Peak, Maria; Sedaghat, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    For many students, the transition from high school to adult independent life is one of the most exciting times in their lives. However, that same transition can be daunting, particularly for students with disabilities. Studies have shown the majority of high school students--including an increasing number of students with disabilities--indicate…

  15. Meeting the Unique Needs of Minorities with Disabilities. A Report to the President and the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tennyson J., Ed.; Leung, Paul, Ed.

    This report presents results of a 1992 conference on the unique needs of minorities with disabilities. Major recommendations include: increased coordination of government policies and programs for this population; authorization of targeted research on minorities with disabilities; outreach efforts to ensure participation by minorities with…

  16. Transitioning Youth with Intellectual and Other Developmental Disabilities: Predicting Community Employment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Monica L.; Neubert, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    Community employment outcomes were examined for 338 transitioning youth with intellectual and other developmental disabilities in one state 18 months after exiting public school. All transitioning youth received ongoing Developmental Disability agency funding. The majority of transitioning youth (57.1%) were engaged in sheltered or nonwork…

  17. Disability Research in Counseling Psychology Journals: A 20-Year Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Lee, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory content analysis of disability research in 5 major counseling psychology journals between 1990 and 2010. The goal was to review the counseling psychology literature to better understand the prevalence of disability research, identify research methods most often conducted, and elucidate the types of concerns most…

  18. National Council on Disability. Annual Report. Volume 16, Fiscal Year 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This annual report of the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes major activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1995 in its role of advising the President and Congress on issues concerning people with disabilities. The NCD gathered information about the implementation, effectiveness, and impact of the Individuals with Disabilities…

  19. National Council on Disability. Annual Report, Volume 15. Fiscal Year 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This annual report describes major activities of the National Council on Disability (NCD) for Fiscal Year 1994. Activities included: conducted a summit meeting on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); held health care reform town meetings; communicated with the Health Care Financing Administration concerning reimbursement of medical…

  20. A Resource Manual for Community College Faculty to Support Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Laura

    2013-01-01

    According to the 23rd Annual Report to Congress, U.S. Department of Education, one out of every five people in the United States has a learning disability (LD). The dropout rate among these students is high, and students with learning disabilities are also less likely to attend 4-year colleges and universities. Although a majority of students with…

  1. Prevalence of Sexual Abuse of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Shu-Man

    2007-01-01

    Although sexual abuse of people with intellectual disabilities has emerged as a major issue in the West over recent years, few researchers have examined this issue in Taiwan. The prevalence and current state of sexual abuse for people with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan were investigated here. Results of face-to-face interviews with 336…

  2. Identification of Disabilities and Service Receipt among Preschool Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Swanson, Mark E.; Carta, Judith J.; Luze, Gayle J.; Eshbaugh, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of indicators of disability or potential disability among preschool-aged children enrolled in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Longitudinal Follow-Up. Three categories of indicators were established: received Part B services, developmental risk, and biological risk. The majority of participating…

  3. Health Promotion for People with Physical, Cognitive, and Sensory Disabilities: An Emerging National Priority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Braddock, David

    2002-01-01

    Very little effort has been devoted to developing health promotion programs for people with physical, cognitive, and sensory disabilities. Such programs must be developed with full recognition of limitations caused by both the primary and secondary disabilities. The paper describes three major areas of health promotion and their relationship to…

  4. Exploring the Effects of Online Instruction on Reading Comprehension Achievement of Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Nancy Shuman

    2009-01-01

    Two major pieces of legislation, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004) and No Child Left Behind (NCLB) (2001) mandate that students with disabilities be placed in the Least Restrictive Environment and have access to the general education curriculum. To provide access to the general education curriculum, inclusion in general…

  5. Swiss Children's Moral and Psychological Judgments about Inclusion and Exclusion of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina; Buholzer, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Children's judgments about inclusion and exclusion of children with disabilities were investigated in a Swiss sample of 6-, 9-, and 12-year-old children from inclusive and noninclusive classrooms (N = 422). Overall, the majority of children judged it as morally wrong to exclude children with disabilities. Yet, participants were less likely to…

  6. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2015-01-01

    Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian…

  7. The Employment Situation of People with Disabilities in Lebanon: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehbi, Samantha; El-Lahib, Y.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study on the employment situation of people with disabilities in a rural region in Lebanon. The study was conducted as one of the activities of a community development project that saw the establishment of a job centre for people with disabilities. The majority of the study's 200 participants were…

  8. Mobility and Aging: New Directions for Public Health Action

    PubMed Central

    Guralnik, Jack M.; Jackson, Richard J.; Marottoli, Richard A.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Prohaska, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal mobility, defined as relative ease and freedom of movement in all of its forms, is central to healthy aging. Mobility is a significant consideration for research, practice, and policy in aging and public health. We examined the public health burdens of mobility disability, with a particular focus on leading public health interventions to enhance walking and driving, and the challenges and opportunities for public health action. We propose an integrated mobility agenda, which draws on the lived experience of older adults. New strategies for research, practice, and policy are needed to move beyond categorical promotion programs in walking and driving to establish a comprehensive program to enhance safe mobility in all its forms. PMID:22698013

  9. Moving Children, Distorting Data: Changes in Testing of Students with Disabilities in Connecticut from 2000-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotto, Robert, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Connecticut experienced two major changes in testing policy for children with disabilities that played a major role in conclusions about educational progress in the state. First, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 required that all students with disabilities participate in grade-level, standardized tests. This movement of students…

  10. Understanding Learning Disabilities and Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Nonnie; Shadoff, Sander

    This guide is designed to assist people with learning disabilities to recognize their disabilities and the connection between learning disabilities and substance abuse. It begins by defining learning disabilities and providing a self-test checklist for common signs and symptoms of learning disabilities. Difficulties with organization, memory,…

  11. Trajectories of Unhealthy Behaviors in Midlife and Risk of Disability at Older Ages in the Whitehall II Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabia, Séverine; Dugravot, Aline; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Elbaz, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most of the evidence on the association between unhealthy behaviors and disability comes from studies in the elderly, where reverse causation and selection bias may distort associations; thus, studies based on midlife trajectories of health behaviors are needed. We examined the association of trajectories of four health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, smoking, alcohol), starting in midlife and over 20 years, with subsequent disability risk in early old age (range = 54–84 years) in the Whitehall II cohort study. Methods: Disability was assessed three times over 3 years. A hierarchical disability indicator was constructed; participants were considered disabled if they reported difficulties with mobility and instrumental activities of daily living or with mobility and instrumental and basic activities of daily living. Behavior trajectories were defined using group-based trajectory models. Multivariable generalized estimating equations logistic models were used to examine their independent associations with disability. Results: Of 6,825 participants, 19.2% reported being disabled at least once. In mutually adjusted models, participants with persistent inactivity or declining physical activity, recent ex- or current smokers, and persistent/recent abstainers or persistent heavy drinkers had a higher disability risk, whereas fruit and vegetable consumption was not associated with disability. Disability risk increased progressively with the number of unhealthy behavior trajectories: the odds ratio of disability for 2–3 unhealthy trajectories was 2.69 (95% confidence interval = 2.26–3.19); these associations remained after adjustment for a wide range of covariates. Conclusions: Unhealthy behavior trajectories in midlife are associated with greater disability risk later in life. PMID:27034508

  12. Delinquency Among Adolescents with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Dennis P.

    2013-01-01

    This study expands upon previous research by utilizing nationally representative data and multivariate analyses to examine the relationship between an adolescent’s disability status and their likelihood of engaging in a spectrum of delinquent behaviors through age 16. Logistic regression models of 7,232 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 are used to investigate the association between the presence of a learning disability or emotional condition, chronic health condition, sensory condition, physical disability, or multiple conditions and ten delinquent acts, including violence-related delinquency, property crimes, drug offenses, and arrest. Additional analyses explore differences in delinquency prevalence by more specific types of limiting conditions. Results indicate that adolescents with learning disabilities or emotional conditions are particularly at risk of committing delinquent acts. Findings suggest that disability status is important to consider when examining adolescent delinquency; however, not all youth with disabilities have equal experiences. PMID:24273625

  13. [The disability associated with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease and a potentially disabling illness, whose prevalence has increased in recent years alongside the aging population. The disability associated with this condition generates a brutal impact on individuals who are limited in their basic daily living activities. The increase in life expectancy is not correlated with an increase in quality of life, since the years of life increase, but characterized for living with disabilities.

  14. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  15. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  16. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  17. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  18. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  19. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    MedlinePlus

    ... First Policy & Data Platform "Who I Am” Public Service Announcement Advisory Committee on Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities Policy Development & Technical ...

  20. COMPARISONS BETWEEN OLDER MEN AND WOMEN IN THE TRAJECTORY AND BURDEN OF DISABILITY OVER THE COURSE OF NEARLY 14 YEARS

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Thomas M.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Lin, Haiqun; Han, Ling; Allore, Heather G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Across the lifespan, women live longer than men but experience higher rates of disability. To more completely evaluate these gender differences, the current study set out to compare the trajectories and burden of disability over an extended period of time between older men and women. Design Prospective, longitudinal study with 13.5 years of follow-up. Setting Greater New Haven, Connecticut. Participants 754 persons, aged 70 years or older, who were initially community-living and nondisabled in their basic activities of daily living. Measurements Disability in 13 basic, instrumental and mobility activities was assessed during monthly interviews, while demographic and clinical covariates were measured during comprehensive assessments every 18 months. Results Five distinct trajectories were identified over successive 18-month intervals: independent, mild disability, mild to moderate disability, moderate disability, and severe disability. Women were more likely than men to experience the moderate and severe disability trajectories, but were less likely to transition from the independent trajectory to a worse disability trajectory during the subsequent 18-month interval. Women were also less likely to die after each of the five trajectories, and these differences were at least marginally significant for all but the independent trajectory. Over the entire duration of follow-up, women suffered from a greater burden of disability than men, but these differences were greatly attenuated after adjustment for the baseline levels of disability. Conclusions Gender differences in disability over an extended period of time can be explained, at least in part, by the higher mortality experienced by older men and the higher initial levels of disability among older women. These results suggest the need to take a life-course approach to better understand gender differences in disability. PMID:23294968

  1. Related factors and incidence risk of acute myocardial infarction among the people with disability: A national population-based study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Chiu, Li-Ting; Tsai, Wen-Chen

    2014-11-06

    Cardiovascular disease has always been a leading cause of death worldwide. Because the mobility of people with disability is relatively decreased, their risk of cardiovascular disease is increased. This study investigated the risks and relevant factors of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among people with disability. This is a retrospective cohort study based on secondary data analysis. This study focused on 798,328 people with disability who were aged 35 and above during 2002-2008 and were registered in the National Disability Registration Database; the relevant medical data from 2000 to 2011 were acquired from the National Health Insurance Research Database. A Cox proportional hazards model was adopted for analyzing the relative AMI risks among different disability types and finding latent risk factors. The results indicated that the AMI incidence rate (per 1000 patient-years) among people with disability was 2.48. Men had an AMI incidence rate of 2.68 per 1000 patient-years, which was significantly higher than that of women (2.21; p<.05). The AMI risk for people with mental disabilities was 0.76 times the risk for people with physical disabilities (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.71-0.82). The AMI risk for people with profound disabilities was 2.04 times (95% CI=1.93-2.16) the risk for people with mild disabilities. AMI risk increased with age. People with disability aged 65 and above had an AMI risk that was 5.01-6.03 times the risk for people with disability aged below 45. Disabled indigenous people had a relatively higher AMI risk (HR=1.35, 95% CI=1.19-1.52). The AMI risk for people with disability with a Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) of 4 and above was 5.89 times (95% CI=5.56-6.25) the risk for those with a CCI of 0. Compared with people with physical disabilities, people with visual impairment and people with dysfunctional primary organs had significantly higher AMI risks (HR=1.15; HR=1.66). This study found that people with disability who were male

  2. Poverty among adults with disabilities: barriers to promoting asset accumulation in individual development accounts.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Michal; McDonald, Katherine E; Blanck, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Adults with disabilities disproportionally experience poverty. We examine one novel strategy to promote economic well-being among adults with disabilities living in or near poverty, namely Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). IDAs are designed to help individuals save money and subsequently accumulate assets. Although adults with disabilities account for the majority of IDA participants, scant attention has been paid to their IDA saving performance. We describe the significance of accumulating assets, particularly as it relates to adults with disabilities. We then map the nature of IDA programs and analyze barriers to participation in IDAs and asset accumulation related to conflicting federal policies and a lack of sensitivity to disability-specific needs. We conclude by offering policy recommendations from our analysis, including the need to eliminate the means-tests used in welfare policies, de-linking participation in IDAs from employment status, and involving people with disabilities in designing and evaluating asset accumulation policies and programs.

  3. Person-first and identity-first language: Developing psychologists' cultural competence using disability language.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Dana S; Andrews, Erin E

    2015-04-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) advocates the use of person-first language (e.g., people with disabilities) to refer to individuals with disabilities in daily discourse and to reduce bias in psychological writing. Disability culture advocates and disability studies scholars have challenged the rationale for and implications of exclusive person-first language use, promoting use of identity-first language (e.g., disabled people). We argue that psychologists should adopt identity-first language alongside person-first constructions to address the concerns of disability groups while promoting human dignity and maintaining scientific and professional rigor. We review the evolution of disability language and then discuss the major models used to characterize disability and people with disabilities. The rationale for person-first language and the emergence of identity-first language, respectively, are linked to particular models. We then discuss some language challenges posed by identity-first language and the current intent of person-first language, suggesting that psychologists make judicious use of the former when it is possible to do so. We conclude by offering five observations of ways that use of both person-first and identity-first language could enhance psychologists' cultural competence regarding disability issues in personal and scientific communications.

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Adults with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem More adults with disabilities need to get physical activity. Adults with disabilities who get no physical activity ... Adults with disabilities are more likely to get physical activity if doctors recommend it. Only 44% of adults ...

  5. Len Barton, Inclusion and Critical Disability Studies: Theorising Disabled Childhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Len Barton has pioneered the sociological study of education in the areas of disability studies and inclusive education. This paper addresses an argument developed by Len Barton that social exclusion, of which disablism is one element, (1) has many compounding forms of differing exclusions, (2) is not a natural but a socially constructed process,…

  6. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation…

  7. Writing Disabilities and Reading Disabilities in Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Lara-Jeane C.; Edwards, Crystal N.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study was conducted to determine (a) the rate of co-occurrence of reading disabilities (RDs) in a writing disability (WD) population of students followed from first grade to fourth grade and (b) the cognitive burden that is assumed by having a WD and a RD (WD + RD). The sample included 137 first-grade students from a single…

  8. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID…

  9. Disabilities Information Flow: A Disabilities Information Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Bin; Allison, Colin; Nicholl, J. Ross; Moodley, Luke; Roberts, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Disabilities Information Flow (DIF) project at the University of St Andrews has sought to provide a means of efficiently managing all student disabilities information within the institution and provide appropriate role-based service interfaces for all staff who need to routinely interact with this information. This paper describes the software…

  10. HIV/AIDS, Disability, and Employment. Disability Statistics Report 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebesta, Douglas S.; LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report on HIV/AIDS, disability, and employment analyzes data from the AIDS Cost and Services Utilization Survey of 1991-1992, a longitudinal study of 1,949 HIV-infected men and women. The report examines the diagnostic history of people living with HIV and its relation to function, disability, and labor force participation over time. Study…

  11. The organisational stressors encountered by athletes with a disability.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Rachel; Wagstaff, Christopher R D; Steadman, Lauren; Pratt, Yasmin

    2017-06-01

    Organisational stressors have been found to be prevalent and problematic for sport performers, with research identifying demographic differences in the stressors encountered. Nevertheless, extant sport psychology research on the topic of stress has generally focused on able-bodied athletes; whilst that which has been conducted on performers with a disability has typically recruited relatively small samples to explore a narrow selection of organisational stressors, or examined other components of the stress process. The purpose of the present study was to explore the various organisational stressors that athletes with a disability encounter. The sample comprised 18 elite athletes with a disability (10 male, 8 female) who had a classified disability and experience of competing at a major championships in their sport (e.g., Paralympic Games, World Championships). Participants took part in a semi-structured interview which was analysed by drawing from grounded theory procedures. A total of 316 organisational stressors were identified, which were abstracted into 31 concepts and four, previously conceptualised, exploratory schemes: leadership and personnel issues, cultural and team issues, logistical and environmental issues, and performance and personal issues. This study not only provides the first illustration of the prevalence of organisational stressors for athletes with a disability, but also significantly points to salient similarities and distinct differences between the stress experiences of performers with and without a disability.

  12. Sexual health care in persons with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Servais, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    In the past, preventive health concerning sexuality of people with intellectual disabilities was addressed through surgical sterilization as part of nationwide eugenic programs in many countries. For more than 30 years now, it has come progressively to light in the scientific literature that, besides major ethical and legal problems, these programs also failed to assess many of the individual's needs in sexual health. The fact that an increasing number of people with intellectual disabilities live in the community rather than in institutions has heightened public awareness that these individuals have sexual expectancies, desires, and needs that must be supported through both education and health services. The emergence of AIDS, including descriptions of cases among people with intellectual disabilities, has further demonstrated that surgical sterilization cannot be considered a global option to achieve preventive sexual health. The aim of this paper is to review scientific studies that have assessed the expectancies and support needs of persons with intellectual disabilities in terms of sexual health. These needs vary widely from one individual to another, according to life milieu, level of disability, and potential comorbidity. From this review, it appears that hygiene management, global gynecological care, and prevention of unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and abuse have been frequently identified as areas in which the presence of intellectual disability dictates specific support needs. Different approaches that have been evaluated to address these issues will also be discussed.

  13. The prevalence of pain in a disabled population.

    PubMed

    Astin, M; Lawton, D; Hirst, M

    1996-06-01

    An estimated 1.7 million disabled adults (95% CI +/- 74,000), living in private households in Great Britain, reported pain symptoms which severely affected their daily activities. That is, the pain they experienced is so severe, unrelieved and recurring as to limit or prevent their ability to perform ordinary, everyday, activities. They represent 30% of disabled adults suggesting that pain is a substantial cause of disability and a major public health problem. The prevalence of severely limiting pain increased with age declining beyond age 55 though younger disabled adults, and women generally, reported more severe pain symptoms. Pain was associated with disabilities which commonly have a physical origin and directly affect bodily movement, compounding the problems of daily living for this population. Three-quarters of those whose lives were limited by pain said the worst bouts of pain occurred at least once a week; half took analgesic medicine every day. More than nine out of ten disabled people suffering pain had recent contact with primary and community health or hospital services.

  14. A geostationary satellite system for mobile multimedia applications using portable, aeronautical and mobile terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losquadro, G.; Luglio, M.; Vatalaro, F.

    1997-01-01

    A geostationary satellite system for mobile multimedia services via portable, aeronautical and mobile terminals was developed within the framework of the Advanced Communications Technology Service (ACTS) programs. The architecture of the system developed under the 'satellite extremely high frequency communications for multimedia mobile services (SECOMS)/ACTS broadband aeronautical terminal experiment' (ABATE) project is presented. The system will be composed of a Ka band system component, and an extremely high frequency band component. The major characteristics of the space segment, the ground control station and the portable, aeronautical and mobile user terminals are outlined.

  15. It's Major! College Major Selection & Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Jenny; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Springall, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the College Board National Forum, October 26, 2011. Choosing a college major is challenging enough, without stopping to consider the impact it has on a student's college experience and career choice. To provide support during this major decision, participants in this session will develop strategies to facilitate students in making an…

  16. Just What Is the Disability Perspective on Disability?

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Tom

    2016-05-01

    In the helpful article "Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology," Joseph Stramondo adds to the critique of actually existing bioethics and explains why disability activists and scholars so often find fault with the arguments of bioethicists. He is careful not to stereotype either community-rightly, given that bioethicists endorse positions as disparate as utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics, among others. Although Stramondo never explicitly mentions utilitarians or liberals, it seems probable that these are the main targets of his discontent. The disability community, as he concedes, is also a broad church. Yet for this reason, I do not believe that you can read off positions on bioethics questions from either disability embodiment or disability organization affiliation.

  17. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  18. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Wilson, Andrew D; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A; Jensen, Troels S; Romero-Romo, Juan I; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the "timed-up & go task (TUG)" to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability.

  19. Evaluation of the JACO robotic arm: clinico-economic study for powered wheelchair users with upper-extremity disabilities.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Veronique; Frappier, Julie; Archambault, Philippe S; Routhier, François

    2011-01-01

    Many activities of daily living, such as picking up glasses, holding a fork or opening a door, which most people do without thinking, can become insurmountable for people who have upper extremity disabilities. The alternative to asking for human help is to use some assistive devices to compensate their loss of mobility; however, many of those devices are limited in terms of functionality. Robotics may provide a better approach for the development of assistive devices, by allowing greater functionality. In this paper, we present results of a study (n=31) which objectives were to evaluate the efficacy of a new joystick-controlled seven-degree of freedom robotic manipulator and assess its potential economic benefits. Results show that JACO is easy to use as the majority of the participants were able to accomplish the testing tasks on their first attempt. The economic model results inferred that the use of the JACO arm system could potentially reduce caregiving time by 41%. These study results are expected to provide valuable data for interested parties, such as individuals with disabilities, their family or caregivers.

  20. Disability Mediates the Impact of Common Conditions on Perceived Health

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; Vilagut, Gemma; Adroher, Núria D.; Chatterji, Somnath; He, Yanling; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Hu, Chiyi; Iwata, Noboru; Lee, Sing; Levinson, Daphna; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; O'Neill, Siobhan; Hormel, J.; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Ismet Taib, Nezar; Xavier, Miguel; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the extent to which disability mediates the observed associations of common mental and physical conditions with perceived health. Methods and Findings WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys carried out in 22 countries worldwide (n = 51,344 respondents, 72.0% response rate). We assessed nine common mental conditions with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and ten chronic physical with a checklist. A visual analog scale (VAS) score (0, worst to 100, best) measured perceived health in the previous 30 days. Disability was assessed using a modified WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), including: cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, role functioning (life activities), family burden, stigma, and discrimination. Path analysis was used to estimate total effects of conditions on perceived health VAS and their separate direct and indirect (through the WHODAS dimensions) effects. Twelve-month prevalence was 14.4% for any mental and 51.4% for any physical condition. 31.7% of respondents reported difficulties in role functioning, 11.4% in mobility, 8.3% in stigma, 8.1% in family burden and 6.9% in cognition. Other difficulties were much less common. Mean VAS score was 81.0 (SD = 0.1). Decrements in VAS scores were highest for neurological conditions (9.8), depression (8.2) and bipolar disorder (8.1). Across conditions, 36.8% (IQR: 31.2–51.5%) of the total decrement in perceived health associated with the condition were mediated by WHODAS disabilities (significant for 17 of 19 conditions). Role functioning was the dominant mediator for both mental and physical conditions. Stigma and family burden were also important mediators for mental conditions, and mobility for physical conditions. Conclusions More than a third of the decrement in perceived health associated with common conditions is mediated by disability. Although the decrement is similar for physical and mental conditions, the pattern of mediation

  1. Therapeutic Riding for a Student with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Jennifer; Ross, David B.

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old with multiple disabilities and visual impairments was the focus of a 10-week developmental therapeutic riding program incorporating hippotherapy. The program has led to increased mobility, an increase in visual attention span and fixation time, signs of greater verbal communication, and the acquisition of new functional signs.…

  2. 76 FR 17400 - Proposed Priorities: Interventions To Promote Community Living Among Individuals With Disabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... effects of the built and ] social environments on community participation (LaPlante & Kaye, 2010... and can engage in activities of their choice in their home environments. Interventions, policies, or... healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods....

  3. Variables Related to the Type of Postsecondary Education Experience Chosen by Young Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study found that the postsecondary education experience (junior college, community college, 4-year college/university, military, or private training) chosen by 225 young adults with learning disabilities was related to use of community resources; community mobility; participation in vocational education while in high school; autonomy; peer…

  4. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of…

  5. Examining Augmented Reality to Improve Navigation Skills in Postsecondary Students with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cate C.; Cihak, David F.; Kim, Byungkeon; McMahon, Don D.; Wright, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of using mobile technology to improve navigation skills in three students with intellectual disability (ID) in a postsecondary education program. Navigation skills included using an augmented reality iPhone app to make correct "waypoint" decisions when traveling by foot on a university…

  6. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  7. eWorkbooks for Mathematics: Mapping the Independent Learning Experiences of Elementary Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczorowski, Tara; Raimondi, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a small case study exploring how four elementary students with mathematics learning disabilities utilized mobile technology (the eWorkbook) during core math instruction in a general education setting. The lead author designed the eWorkbook intervention to provide a flexible learning experience optimized for diverse…

  8. (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Daily living skills are important to ageing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of these skills in older adults with ID and to investigate the influence of gender, age, level of ID and mobility on these skills. Daily living skills were measured with the Barthel Index (for Activities of…

  9. Aging, the Central Nervous System, and Mobility in Older Adults: Neural Mechanisms of Mobility Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Clark, David J.; Viswanathan, Anand; Scherzer, Clemens R.; De Jager, Philip; Csiszar, Anna; Laurienti, Paul J.; Hausdorff, Jeffery M.; Chen, Wen G.; Ferrucci, Luiggi; Rosano, Caterina; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Black, Sandra E.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mobility is crucial for successful aging and is impaired in many older adults. We know very little about the subtle, subclinical age-related changes in the central nervous system (CNS) that mediate mobility impairment. Methods. A conference series focused on aging, the CNS, and mobility was launched. The second conference addressed major age-associated mechanisms of CNS-mediated mobility impairment. Speakers and conference attendees recommended key areas for future research, identified barriers to progress, and proposed strategies to overcome them. Results. Priorities identified for future research include (a) studying interactions among different mechanisms; (b) examining effects of interventions targeting these mechanisms; (c) evaluating the effect of genetic polymorphisms on risks and course of age-related mobility impairment; and (d) examining the effect of age on CNS repair processes, neuroplasticity, and neuronal compensatory mechanisms. Key strategies to promote research include (a) establish standard measures of mobility across species; (b) evaluate the effect of aging in the absence of disease on CNS and mobility; and (c) use advanced computational methods to better evaluate the interactions between CNS and other systems involved in mobility. Conclusions. CNS is a major player in the process, leading to mobility decline with aging. Future research in this area has the potential to prolong independence in older persons. Better interactions among disciplines and shared research paradigms are needed to make progress. Research priorities include the development of innovative approaches to integrate research on aging, cognition, and movement with attention to neurovascular function, neuroplasticity, and neurophysiological reserve. PMID:26386013

  10. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  11. Educating Students with Mild Disabilities: Strategies and Methods. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; Vergason, Glenn A., Ed.; Whelan, Richard J., Ed.

    This book addresses inclusive environments and the shifting of instruction of children with disabilities to the general classroom teacher. The major themes are behavior management, curriculum, and instructional strategies. Individual chapters include: (1) "Discipline in Special Education and General Education Settings" (Deborah Deutsch…

  12. Reading and Learning-Disabled Children: Understanding the Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Carvalho, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors assess the evidence related to various instructional styles for teaching reading to children with learning disabilities. Results of the literature review indicate that whole language and direct instruction are the two major approaches to teaching reading. Whole language has proven successful for many students with…

  13. Perspectives on Health Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Susan L.; Moss, Kathryn; Richman, Erica L.

    2008-01-01

    A focus group study was conducted with individuals with developmental disabilities to understand their perspectives on their health status, health promotion behaviors, and health care services they receive. The majority of participants reported good to excellent health, and all had some form of medical insurance. However, participants reported…

  14. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  15. Using Student Learning Communities to Recruit STEM Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzo, Margaretha Vreeburg; Murray, Alexa; Priest, Sarah; McArrell, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Student Learning Communities (SLCs) for high school and college students with disabilities interested in pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees were piloted at a major Midwestern university from 2009 to 2011. Students participated in a series of weekly sessions and/or a residential campus experience as part of a…

  16. Perceptions of Self-Efficacy among STEM Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Ronda J.; Petri, Alexis N.; Day, Arden D.; Truman, Kevin Z.; Duffy, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies examine the relationship between self-efficacy and positive outcomes for postsecondary students. Collectively they echo that self-efficacy is an essential component to positive outcomes. Relatively few studies focused on students with disabilities majoring in STEM fields. Twenty postsecondary students with disabilities…

  17. Sexual Health Care in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servais, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    In the past, preventive health concerning sexuality of people with intellectual disabilities was addressed through surgical sterilization as part of nationwide eugenic programs in many countries. For more than 30 years now, it has come progressively to light in the scientific literature that, besides major ethical and legal problems, these…

  18. Influences on Mothers' Employment when Children Have Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Meg; Cuskelly, Monica; Rosenman, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Empirical research has highlighted the constraints on mothers' workforce participation when children have disabilities, but the policies and associated strategies needed to address these issues have received less attention. Greater attention to explanatory theory and associated research is needed. The authors' paper identifies major explanatory…

  19. Physical Disabilities: Education and Related Services, Fall 2002-Spring 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Barbara J., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Two issues of this journal on education and related services for students with physical disabilities contain the following major articles or reviews: "Environmental Effects on Education" (Harold F. Perla); "Using Touch Math for Students with Physical Impairments To Teach and Enhance Beginning Math Skills" (Adrienne L. Duris); "Traumatic Brain…

  20. Reflections: Returning as a Group Leader after a Severe Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Complicated issues arise when a group leader resumes practice after suffering a disability. The author, a nurse psychotherapist/researcher with a doctoral degree, director of nursing research at a veterans' hospital, and a psychodynamic practitioner in private practice, suffered a major stroke. The author felt extremely vulnerable and struggled as…

  1. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report, December 2004-December 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report's 13 chapters address disability statistics and research, major trends, statistics, civil rights, Education, health, and long-term services and supports, children and youth, employment and the workforce development system, welfare reform, housing, transportation, assistive technology and telecommunications, international affairs, and…

  2. Narrating Disability, Narrating Religious Practice: Reconciliation and Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michie, Marsha; Skinner, Debra

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the place of religion in the narratives of mothers of children with fragile X syndrome. In semistructured interviews, a majority of women combined narratives of religious practice with illness narratives, interpreting their children's disabilities within a religious framework. Informed by Arthur Frank's (1995) concept of…

  3. Americans with Disabilities Act as Amended: Principles and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the 2008 amendments to the act (ADAAA) as well as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The article describes the major sections of the ADA, addresses the changes brought about to the ADA and Section 504 as a result of the ADAAA, reviews the outcome of…

  4. A Career Development Program for Learning Disabled College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Irwin

    1985-01-01

    Describes a career development course for learning disabled college students which addresses five major cognitive, affective, and motivational considerations: (1) cognition and attention, (2) reality testing, (3) sense of self, (4) visual imagery, and (5) learned helplessness. Concludes that the course increases students' ability to make mature…

  5. Dynamic Assessment of Language Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a study of a narrative-based Dynamic Assessment (DA) procedure developed in the USA that is used in the UK with children with developmental language disabilities. Three monolingual English children with language disabilities are assessed by a speech/language pathologist/therapist who is learning to work with DA in collaboration…

  6. Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained from the center's six research projects are reviewed, including research on psychometric assessment of twins with reading disabilities, reading and language processes, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and executive functions, linkage analysis and physical mapping, computer-based remediation of reading disabilities, and…

  7. A Duty to the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    In "Cedar Rapids Community School District v. Garret F.," the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that severely disabled students have a right to health services supporting their education. The decision, which clarifies the extent of medical services required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, will prove expensive for school…

  8. The Source for Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Paula S.; Wadlington, Elizabeth M.

    This book is designed to help clinicians and teachers work more effectively with people with learning disabilities and their families. Chapter 1 provides an overview of learning disabilities. It presents commonly accepted medical and educational definitions, prevalence figures, and possible etiological explanations for various disorders. Chapter 2…

  9. Disability and the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aron, Laudan; Loprest, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Education is important for all children, but even more so for children with disabilities, whose social and economic opportunities may be limited. In this article, Laudan Aron and Pamela Loprest assess how well the nation's education system is serving students with disabilities. Aron and Loprest trace the evolution of the special education system…

  10. Collecting Disability Data from Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jill; Daniels, Harry; Feiler, Anthony; Georgeson, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and national trial of a methodology for collecting disability data directly from parents, enabling schools and local authorities to meet their obligations under the "Disability Discrimination Act" (DDA; 2005) to promote equality of opportunity for all children. It illustrates the complexities around…

  11. Dyslexia: Problems of Reading Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Herman K.; Schiffman, Gilbert B.

    The purpose of this book is to provide an understanding of both the educational and medical aspects of reading and to show how they are interrelated in reading disabilities. The various aspects of reading disabilities are presented in the following chapters: Introduction to the Reading Problem; Early Predictive Studies; Psychological Evaluation;…

  12. Disabled Superheroes in Comic Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokaska, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The author reviews the role of "superhero" in comic books, finding five prominent characters with disabilities. He suggests that sales of these comic books are due, in part, to unique gimmicks in the character, but may also reflect increased acceptance within the society of successful disabled role models. (Author/CL)

  13. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.…

  14. Disability and the Open City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleeson, Brendan

    2001-01-01

    Contributes to the social theorization of physical access for people with disabilities by critically exploring how Ulrich Beck's "reflexive modernisation" thesis might be applied to the geographical understanding of disability. Demonstrates how Beck's theoretical framework can be used to enrich people's understanding of the genesis and mediation…

  15. Cognitive Development and Adolescent Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1985-01-01

    The author offers clinical examples of ways in which the attainment of formal operations in adolescents both exacerbates chronic disabilities and contributes to the etiology of new disabilities (such as in teenage obesity, anorexia nervosa, and depression). He suggests treatment guidelines. (CL)

  16. Library Education and Disability Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koulikourdi, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting disability issues in library and information science education in general and in Greece in particular. It also examines whether issues such as people with disabilities, accessibility, alternative format material and assistive technologies are incorporated in the library schools' curricula. Furthermore, the results of…

  17. Hypermedia Interaction for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Special types of prosthetic devices have been designed to support the specific needs of disabled and handicapped computer users in retrieving information. Of particular importance are interfaces based on the use of sound, tactile operations, and gestures. Such interfaces may be used to provide disabled people with access to hypermedia information.…

  18. The measurement of vision disability.

    PubMed

    Massof, Robert W

    2002-08-01

    The American Medical Association's (AMA) visual efficiency scale, a vision disability metric based on visual impairment measurements, was adopted in 1925. That scale was based on a 30-year history of theoretical models in vision economics, a misinterpretation of Snellen notation for visual acuity, and an erroneous application of Weber's psychophysical law. The AMA visual efficiency scale survived uncontested for 75 years. In 2001, the AMA adopted a new vision disability scale based on logarithmic transformations of visual acuity and visual field diameter. Like the earlier visual efficiency scale, the new scale is theoretical-it is not supported by any data that speak to the relationship between vision disability and visual impairments. Attempts to measure vision disability date to the early 1980s with the development of self-assessment visual function rating scale questionnaires. Nearly all of the questionnaires developed over the last 20 years use Likert scales, but use them incorrectly. The development of a vision disability metric based on Likert scaling parallels the historical development of other forms of measurement. A tutorial review of psychometrics-classical test theory, item response theory, and Rasch analysis-shows how vision disability measurement scales can be estimated from Likert-type visual function rating scales. We conclude that preliminary data relating measures of vision disability to measures of visual acuity and visual fields support the new AMA vision disability scale.

  19. A Model Disability Awareness Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Emily Strauss

    1984-01-01

    Describes an all-day conciousness raising program designed to teach elementary school students about the disabled. The program described consisted of oral presentations and a theater performance by disabled individuals; it was presented to 270 students at Mary A. Hubbard School in Ramsey, New Jersey. (GC)

  20. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court cases in 1999 related to disability discrimination in higher education focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The "Garrett" case regarding Eleventh Amendment immunity is the case most likely to be significant in the development of the law of disability…

  1. Disability Law and Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, David

    2005-01-01

    Providing reasonable academic adjustments for students who qualify as disabled under the ADA should, of course, be a priority for all university professors. Eligible students with documented disabilities deserve conditions that make it possible for them to do their best work. A professor should not, however, have to accept a university official's…

  2. The World Report on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The World Report on Disability, a joint endeavor of the World Health Organization and the World Bank, launched in June 2011, is an astonishing achievement that will set the standard for disability studies research for evidence-informed policy for years to come. The product of collaborative and participatory work between organizations of persons…

  3. Disability Studies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    As a topic of study, disability is not new at institutions of higher education. Psychological and intellectual disabilities have been of interest in psychiatry and psychology at least since the late 1800s and early 1900s. The post-World War II era, in particular, witnessed the rapid expansion of academic programs in special education, vocational…

  4. Sex rights for the disabled?

    PubMed

    Appel, Jacob M

    2010-03-01

    The public discourse surrounding sex and severe disability over the past 40 years has largely focused on protecting vulnerable populations from abuse. However, health professionals and activists are increasingly recognising the inherent sexuality of disabled persons and attempting to find ways to accommodate their intimacy needs. This essay explores several ethical issues arising from such efforts.

  5. Visualising Disability in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank; Van Hove, Geert; Vanobbergen, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interdisciplinary work which has argued that disability is not an isolated, individual medical pathology but instead a key defining social category like "race", class and gender. Seen in this way disability provides researchers with another analytic tool for exploring the nature of power. Running almost…

  6. Supervising Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dale

    Intended for employers, supervisors, and coworkers, the booklet presents guidelines for accommodating learning disabled (LD) employees. An introductory section explains the condition, describing its nature and the range of impairments it includes. Five types of learning disabilities are identified: visual, auditory, motor, tactile, and academic.…

  7. Composing Disability: Diagnosis, Interrupted.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Abby; Fisher, Joseph; Fletcher, Wade

    2016-12-01

    Writing is central both to the medical diagnostic codification of disability and to disabled people's efforts to interrupt, complicate, or disrupt dominant medical narratives. This Symposium, like the George Washington University conference from which it takes its name, creates space for diverse modes and genres of claiming authority regarding diagnosis and its cultural and material effects. "Queer" and "crip" interrogations of diagnosis illuminate its status as a cultural phenomenon, embracing culturally disavowed embodiments and embodied experiences as tools for diagnosing inegalitarian social relations and opportunities for cultural interventions. This Symposium traces the workings of diagnostic normativity manifested in experiences such as "disruptive deafness," unstable bodily materialities, pathologized grief and other forms of affective distress, and "surgical assemblages." It presents a diverse array of compositions, articulated on each writer's own terms, addressing a range of embodied experiences through multiple genres and voices, ranging from conversation transcript to scholarly essay, poetry, graphic memoir, and personal essay. Here, laypersons interrupt monologic medical diagnosis, claiming space to compose themselves. Together, the authors trace instances of corporeal "correction" back to the noxious agents, both environmental and political, that consistently breach the boundaries of corporeality.

  8. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  9. Defining disability: metaphysical not political.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Christopher A

    2013-08-01

    Recent discussions surrounding the conceptualising of disability has resulted in a stalemate between British sociologists and philosophers. The stagnation of theorizing that has occurred threatens not only academic pursuits and the advancement of theoretical interpretations within the Disability Studies community, but also how we educate and advocate politically, legally, and socially. More pointedly, many activists and theorists in the UK appear to believe the British social model is the only effective means of understanding and advocating on behalf of people with disabilities. This model, largely reliant upon materialist research traditions, contends that disability is a form of social oppression and hence, is a phenomenon that should be conceptualised in social terms. Individual properties such as impairments are disregarded as they are viewed to be unimportant in the analysis of the social causes of disability. Concurrently, many bioethicists and philosophers have embraced what Tom Shakespeare has classified as an 'Interactional Approach' to disability--that "the experience of a disabled person results from the relationship between factors intrinsic to the individual, and the extrinsic factors arising from the wider context in which she finds herself". I intend to demonstrate that the benefits of the British social model are now outweighed by its burdens. I suggest, as Jerome Bickenbach has, that while it may be somewhat churlish to critique the social model in light of its political success, taken literally, it implies that people with disabilities require no additional health resources by virtue of their impairments. Despite the eloquent arguments that have preceded me by interactional theorists, none have been accepted as evidence of fallacious reasoning by British social model theorists. This article is an attempt to clarify why it is that the types of arguments British social model theorists have been offering are misguided. I suggest that the British

  10. The role of malnutrition in older persons with mobility limitations.

    PubMed

    Cederholm, T; Nouvenne, A; Ticinesi, A; Maggio, M; Lauretani, F; Ceda, G P; Borghi, L; Meschi, T

    2014-01-01

    Movement disability has a high prevalence in elderly population, either healthy or with chronic disease. Impaired nutritional status is a very common condition in geriatric patients too, especially if we consider elderly subjects admitted to hospital. There are growing evidences that nutrition and disability are strictly interconnected. On the one side, nutritional status is one of the multiple elements that influence the onset and the course of a functional disability; on the other side, disability itself may contribute to malnutrition onset and worsening. Nutrition may not be the sole factor involved in movement impairment in the elderly, but consciousness of its importance in frail elderly population is growing among clinicians and scientific community. In this paper we review the existing knowledge of these complex relationships, discussing the main observational and interventional studies that explored the role of nutrition in movement disability onset and recovery. We also point out how specific kinds of diet, such as Mediterranean diet or high-protein diet, are involved in disability prevention. Finally, we take a look at the existing evidence of the role of single nutrient dietary intake, such as carotenoids, selenium or vitamin D, in mobility impairment in the elderly population.

  11. Missions and Mobility Configurations for RED HORSE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    use in other research reports or educational pursuits contingent upon the following stipulations: - Reproduction rights do not extend to any copyrighted...MOBILITY CONFIGURATIONS FOR RED HORSE AUTHOR(S) MAJOR JAMES T. RYBURN, USAF FACULTY ADVISOR LT COL ROBERT L. PETERS, ACSC/3823 STUS SPONSOR COL ROBERT J...Classification) MISSIONS AND MOBILITY CONFIGURATIONS FOR RED HORSE 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Ryburn, James T., Maj or, USAF 13a. TYPE OF REPORT J13b. TIME

  12. Mobility, Emotion, and Universality in Future Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, Mark; Hosono, Naotsune; Fels, Deborah; Lottridge, Danielle; Waterworth, John

    The Graphical user interface has traditionally supported personal productivity, efficiency, and usability. With computer supported cooperative work, the focus has been on typical people, doing typical work in a highly rational model of interaction. Recent trends towards mobility, and emotional and universal design are extending the user interface paradigm beyond the routine. As computing moves into the hand and away from the desktop, there is a greater need for dealing with emotions and distractions. Busy and distracted people represent a new kind of disability, but one that will be increasingly prevalent. In this panel we examine the current state of the art, and prospects for future collaboration in non-normative computing requirements. This panel draws together researchers who are studying the problems of mobility, emotion and universality. The goal of the panel is to discuss how progress in these areas will change the nature of future collaboration.

  13. Comprehension of Humor in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, Reading Disabilities, and without Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Glass, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The normal development of humor in children has been well documented with a predictable course that is tied to social, cognitive, and linguistic development in children. This study explored humor comprehension in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD). Children with NVLD were compared with children with reading disabilities and a…

  14. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    SciTech Connect

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  15. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Anthony D.; Pfleger, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are a major burden on individuals, health systems, and social care systems, with indirect costs being predominant. This burden has been recognized by the United Nations and WHO, by endorsing the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010. This paper describes the burden of four major musculoskeletal conditions: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and low back pain. Osteoarthritis, which is characterized by loss of joint cartilage that leads to pain and loss of function primarily in the knees and hips, affects 9.6% of men and 18% of women aged > 60 years. Increases in life expectancy and ageing populations are expected to make osteoarthritis the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. Joint replacement surgery, where available, provides effective relief. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition that usually affects multiple joints. It affects 0.3-1.0% of the general population and is more prevalent among women and in developed countries. Persistent inflammation leads to joint destruction, but the disease can be controlled with drugs. The incidence may be on the decline, but the increase in the number of older people in some regions makes it difficult to estimate future prevalence. Osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration, is a major risk factor for fractures of the hip, vertebrae, and distal forearm. Hip fracture is the most detrimental fracture, being associated with 20% mortality and 50% permanent loss in function. Low back pain is the most prevalent of musculoskeletal conditions; it affects nearly everyone at some point in time and about 4-33% of the population at any given point. Cultural factors greatly influence the prevalence and prognosis of low back pain. PMID:14710506

  16. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  17. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  18. Transforming Disability Policy for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities. Disability Policy Research Brief. Number 09-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Day, Bonnie; Stapleton, David

    2009-01-01

    The transition to adulthood can be difficult for youth, particularly those who have disabilities severe enough that they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (DI), or other disability program benefits. Besides the issues facing all transition-age youth, young people with disabilities face a host of…

  19. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  20. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.