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Sample records for major seed plant

  1. The Impact of Outgroup Choice and Missing Data on Major Seed Plant Phylogenetics Using Genome-Wide EST Data

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre-Bárcena, Jose Eduardo; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Lee, Ernest K.; Stevenson, Dennis Wm.; Brenner, Eric D.; Katari, Manpreet S.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.; DeSalle, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome level analyses have enhanced our view of phylogenetics in many areas of the tree of life. With the production of whole genome DNA sequences of hundreds of organisms and large-scale EST databases a large number of candidate genes for inclusion into phylogenetic analysis have become available. In this work, we exploit the burgeoning genomic data being generated for plant genomes to address one of the more important plant phylogenetic questions concerning the hierarchical relationships of the several major seed plant lineages (angiosperms, Cycadales, Gingkoales, Gnetales, and Coniferales), which continues to be a work in progress, despite numerous studies using single, few or several genes and morphology datasets. Although most recent studies support the notion that gymnosperms and angiosperms are monophyletic and sister groups, they differ on the topological arrangements within each major group. Methodology We exploited the EST database to construct a supermatrix of DNA sequences (over 1,200 concatenated orthologous gene partitions for 17 taxa) to examine non-flowering seed plant relationships. This analysis employed programs that offer rapid and robust orthology determination of novel, short sequences from plant ESTs based on reference seed plant genomes. Our phylogenetic analysis retrieved an unbiased (with respect to gene choice), well-resolved and highly supported phylogenetic hypothesis that was robust to various outgroup combinations. Conclusions We evaluated character support and the relative contribution of numerous variables (e.g. gene number, missing data, partitioning schemes, taxon sampling and outgroup choice) on tree topology, stability and support metrics. Our results indicate that while missing characters and order of addition of genes to an analysis do not influence branch support, inadequate taxon sampling and limited choice of outgroup(s) can lead to spurious inference of phylogeny when dealing with phylogenomic scale data sets

  2. Altered starch turnover in the maternal plant has major effects on Arabidopsis fruit growth and seed composition.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Pike, Marilyn J; Schwarz, Sabine L; Rawsthorne, Stephen; Wang, Trevor L; Smith, Alison M

    2012-11-01

    Mature seeds of both the high-starch starch-excess1 (sex1) mutant and the almost starchless phosphoglucomutase1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have 30% to 40% less lipid than seeds of wild-type plants. We show that this is a maternal effect and is not attributable to the defects in starch metabolism in the embryo itself. Low lipid contents and consequent slow postgerminative growth are seen only in mutant embryos that develop on maternal plants with mutant phenotypes. Mutant embryos that develop on plants with wild-type starch metabolism have wild-type lipid contents and postgerminative growth. The maternal effect on seed lipid content is attributable to carbohydrate starvation in the mutant fruit at night. Fruits on sex1 plants grow more slowly than those on wild-type plants, particularly at night, and have low sugars and elevated expression of starvation genes at night. Transcript levels of the transcription factor WRINKLED1, implicated in lipid synthesis, are reduced at night in sex1 but not in wild-type seeds, and so are transcript levels of key enzymes of glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis. sex1 embryos develop more slowly than wild-type embryos. We conclude that the reduced capacity of mutant plants to convert starch to sugars in leaves at night results in low nighttime carbohydrate availability in the developing fruit. This in turn reduces the rate of development and expression of genes encoding enzymes of storage product accumulation in the embryo. Thus, the supply of carbohydrate from the maternal plant to the developing fruit at night can have an important influence on oilseed composition and on postgerminative growth.

  3. Seeding and planting birch

    Treesearch

    John C. Bjorkbom

    1969-01-01

    Artificial regeneration of hardwoods does not have a very good reputation. Many of the early attempts to establish these species by seeding or planting resulted in failure. Then too, natural regeneration is usually adequate on cut over areas, so that there is little need for artificial regeneration on such areas. Nevertheless there are situations where artificial...

  4. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    Seeds are secured in plant pillows for the Veggie plant growth system inside a laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The plant pillows, containing Outredgeous lettuce, Mizuna Mustard and Waldmann's green lettuce seeds, were packed for delivery to Veggie on SpaceX's 12th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station.

  5. Seeding and planting upland oaks

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Johnson

    1989-01-01

    Oaks can be planted or seeded in uplands to: (1) afforest old fields, strip-mined areas, or other areas devoid of trees, and (2) supplement natural reproduction within existing forests. Planting is usually more successful than direct seeding. But even under good conditions survival and growth of planted oak has been considerably poorer than with conifers and other...

  6. Automated seed manipulation and planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ray; Herrera, Javier; Holcomb, Scott; Kelly, Paul; Myers, Scott; Rosendo, Manny; Sivitz, Herbert; Wolsefer, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Division fabricated three seed separators utilizing pressure gradients to move and separate wheat seeds. These separators are called minnow buckets and use air, water, or a combination of both to generate the pressure gradient. Electrostatic fields were employed in the seed separator constructed by the Electrical Division. This separator operates by forcing a temporary electric dipole on the wheat seeds and using charged electrodes to attract and move the seeds. Seed delivery to the hydroponic growth tray is accomplished by the seed cassette. The cassette is compatible with all the seed separators, and it consists of a plastic tube threaded with millipore filter paper. During planting operations, the seeds are placed in an empty cassette. The loaded cassette is then placed in the growth tray and nutrient solution provided. The solution wets the filter paper and capillary action draws the nutrients up to feed the seeds. These seeding systems were tested and showed encouraging results. Seeds were effectively separated and the cassette can support the growth of wheat plants. Problems remaining to be investigated include improving the success of delivering the seeds to the cassette and providing adequate spacing between seeds for the electric separator.

  7. The Woody Plant Seed Manual

    Treesearch

    Franklin T. Bonner; Robert P. Karrfalt

    2008-01-01

    The first comprehensive handbook on the seeds of trees and shrubs produced by the USDA Forest Service was USDA Misc. Pub. 654, Woody-Plant Seed Manual. The manuscript was ready for publication in 1941, but World War II delayed publication until 1948. The boom in tree planting in the 1950s and 1960s created a large demand for seeds and exposed the gaps in our knowledge...

  8. Seeding and planting upland oaks

    Treesearch

    T. E. Russell

    1971-01-01

    Upland oaks can be established by seeding or planting, but additional experience is needed before these methods become economical alternatives to natural regeneration. Recently forested sites are generally more favorable than abandoned fields. Lack of repellents to protect acorns from animals severely limits direct seeding, but oaks can be planted readily by...

  9. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    Matt Romeyn, a NASA biologist, secures seeds in plant pillows for the Veggie plant growth system inside a laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The plant pillows, containing Outredgeous lettuce, Mizuna Mustard and Waldmann's green lettuce seeds, were packed for delivery to Veggie on SpaceX's 12th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station.

  10. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    Seeds are secured in plant pillows for the Veggie plant growth system inside a laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The plant pillows, containing Outredgeous lettuce, Mizuna Mustard and Waldmann's green lettuce, were packed for delivery to Veggie on SpaceX's 12th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station.

  11. Automated seed manipulation and planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ray; Herrera, Javier; Holcomb, Scott; Kelly, Paul; Myers, Scott; Rosendo, Manny; Sivitz, Herbert; Wolsefer, Dave

    1988-01-01

    Activities for the Fall Semester, 1987 focused on investigating the mechanical/electrical properties of wheat seeds and forming various Seed Planting System (SPS) concepts based on those properties. The Electrical Division of the design group was formed to devise an SPS using electrostatic charge fields for seeding operations. Experiments concerning seed separation using electrical induction (rearranging of the charges within the seed) were conducted with promising results. The seeds, when exposed to the high voltage and low current field produced by a Van de Graff generator, were observed to move back and forth between two electrodes. An SPS concept has been developed based on this phenomena, and will be developed throughout the Spring Semester, 1988. The Mechanical Division centered on SPS concepts involving valves, pumps, and fluids to separate and deliver seeds. An SPS idea utilizing the pressure difference caused by air as it rushes out of holes drilled in the wall of a closed container has been formulated and will be considered for future development. Also, a system of seed separation and delivery employing a combination of centrifugal force, friction, and air flow was considered.

  12. Seed longevity and germination characteristics of six fen plant species.

    PubMed

    Tatár, S

    2010-01-01

    Fens are among the most threatened habitats in Europe as their area has decreased considerably in the last centuries. For successful management and restoration conservationists need detailed knowledge about seed bank formation and seed longevity of plants, as these features are closely related to successional and vegetation dynamical processes. I analysed seed longevity and the germination characteristics of six fen plant species by seed burial experiments. Based on seed weight, seed bank was expected for long-term persistent for the light-seeded Schoenus nigricans, Carex appropinquata, C. pseudocyperus, C. davalliana and Peucedanum palustre and also that for the medium-seeded Cicuta virosa. It was proved that, the latter two species have short-term persistent seed banks, while Carex pseudocyperus has a transient seed bank, therefore these species may only have a limited role in restoration from seed banks. It was found that Schoenus nigricans, Carex appropinquata and C. davalliana have persistent seed banks, because some of their four-year-old seeds have emerged. Fresh seeds had low germination rate in all studied species and majority of seeds emerged after winter, except for Carex pseudocyperus. After the germination peak in spring, the majority of the ungerminated seeds of Schoenus nigricans, Peucedanum palustre, Carex appropinquata, C. davalliana and Cicuta virosa entered a secondary dormancy phase that was broken in autumn. I found the seasonal emergence of the latter three species highly similar.

  13. Altered Starch Turnover in the Maternal Plant Has Major Effects on Arabidopsis Fruit Growth and Seed Composition1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, Vasilios M.E.; Pike, Marilyn J.; Schwarz, Sabine L.; Rawsthorne, Stephen; Wang, Trevor L.; Smith, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Mature seeds of both the high-starch starch-excess1 (sex1) mutant and the almost starchless phosphoglucomutase1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have 30% to 40% less lipid than seeds of wild-type plants. We show that this is a maternal effect and is not attributable to the defects in starch metabolism in the embryo itself. Low lipid contents and consequent slow postgerminative growth are seen only in mutant embryos that develop on maternal plants with mutant phenotypes. Mutant embryos that develop on plants with wild-type starch metabolism have wild-type lipid contents and postgerminative growth. The maternal effect on seed lipid content is attributable to carbohydrate starvation in the mutant fruit at night. Fruits on sex1 plants grow more slowly than those on wild-type plants, particularly at night, and have low sugars and elevated expression of starvation genes at night. Transcript levels of the transcription factor WRINKLED1, implicated in lipid synthesis, are reduced at night in sex1 but not in wild-type seeds, and so are transcript levels of key enzymes of glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis. sex1 embryos develop more slowly than wild-type embryos. We conclude that the reduced capacity of mutant plants to convert starch to sugars in leaves at night results in low nighttime carbohydrate availability in the developing fruit. This in turn reduces the rate of development and expression of genes encoding enzymes of storage product accumulation in the embryo. Thus, the supply of carbohydrate from the maternal plant to the developing fruit at night can have an important influence on oilseed composition and on postgerminative growth. PMID:22942388

  14. Analysis of glabrous canary seeds by ELISA, mass spectrometry, and Western blotting for the absence of cross-reactivity with major plant food allergens.

    PubMed

    Boye, Joyce Irene; Achouri, Allaoua; Raymond, Nancy; Cleroux, Chantal; Weber, Dorcas; Koerner, Terence B; Hucl, Pierre; Patterson, Carol Ann

    2013-06-26

    Glabrous (hairless) canary seed belongs to the Poaceae (Gramineae) family and could serve as an alternative source of gluten-free cereal grain. In this study, allergenic cross-reactivities between hairless, dehulled canary seeds (Phalaris canariensis) and major allergenic proteins from gluten, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, and mustard were studied using commercial enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) kits specific for these target allergens. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunoblotting were further used to assess for the presence of gluten-specific protein fragments. MS results revealed the likely presence of proteins homologous with rice, oat, corn, carrot, tomato, radish, beet, and chickpea. However, no presence of celiac-related gluten fragments from wheat, rye, barley, or their derivatives was found. Immunoblotting studies yielded negative results, further confirming the absence of gluten in the canary seed samples tested. No cross-reactivities were detected between canary seeds and almond, hazelnut, mustard, peanut, sesame, soy, walnut, and gluten using ELISA.

  15. Ancestral polyploidy in seed plants and angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuannian; Wickett, Norman J; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Chanderbali, André S; Landherr, Lena; Ralph, Paula E; Tomsho, Lynn P; Hu, Yi; Liang, Haiying; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Clifton, Sandra W; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ma, Hong; Leebens-Mack, Jim; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2011-05-05

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, followed by gene loss and diploidization has long been recognized as an important evolutionary force in animals, fungi and other organisms, especially plants. The success of angiosperms has been attributed, in part, to innovations associated with gene or whole-genome duplications, but evidence for proposed ancient genome duplications pre-dating the divergence of monocots and eudicots remains equivocal in analyses of conserved gene order. Here we use comprehensive phylogenomic analyses of sequenced plant genomes and more than 12.6 million new expressed-sequence-tag sequences from phylogenetically pivotal lineages to elucidate two groups of ancient gene duplications-one in the common ancestor of extant seed plants and the other in the common ancestor of extant angiosperms. Gene duplication events were intensely concentrated around 319 and 192 million years ago, implicating two WGDs in ancestral lineages shortly before the diversification of extant seed plants and extant angiosperms, respectively. Significantly, these ancestral WGDs resulted in the diversification of regulatory genes important to seed and flower development, suggesting that they were involved in major innovations that ultimately contributed to the rise and eventual dominance of seed plants and angiosperms.

  16. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, scientists prepare Apogee wheat seeds for the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH). A growing substrate called arcillite was packed down in the base and coverings were secured on top of the base. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  17. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a scientist inserts Apogee wheat seeds into the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH). A growing substrate called arcillite was packed down in the base and coverings were secured on top of the base. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  18. Generalized provisional seed zones for native plants

    Treesearch

    Andrew D. Bower; J. Bradley St.Clair; Vicky. Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Deploying well-adapted and ecologically appropriate plant materials is a core component of successful restoration projects. We have developed generalized provisional seed zones that can be applied to any plant species in the United States to help guide seed movement. These seed zones are based on the intersection of high-resolution climatic data for winter minimum...

  19. Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a book review of "Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants", by Nicholas Harberd. The book is a diary of ruminations/introspections about plant development and about the main research topic of Nick Harberd’s laboratory. His intended audience is initially nonscientists; many of the explanation...

  20. Genetic comparisons between seed bank and Stipa krylovii plant populations.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Zhao, M

    2011-09-01

    The soil seed bank represents the potential plant population since it is the source for population replacement. The genetic structure of a Stipa krylovii (Roshev.) plant population and its soil seed bank was investigated in the Xilinguole Steppe of Inner Mongolia using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. The population was sampled at two sites that were in close proximity to each other (0.5 km apart). Thirty plants and 18 seed bank samples were taken from each site to determine the genetic diversity between sites and between sources (plant or seed). The material was analyzed using 13 primers to produce 92 loci. Eighty-six were multi-loci, of which 23 loci (26.74%) of allele frequencies showed significant differences (P < or = 0.05). The genetic similarity between two seed bank sites was 0.9843 while the genetic similarity between two plant sites was 0.9619. Their similarities were all greater than that between the seed bank and plant populations. An analysis of their genetic structure showed that 87.86% of total variation was derived by two-loci. Genetic structures between plant and soil seed bank populations in S. krylovii were different due to the variance of mean gametic disequilibria and mean gene diversity. AMOVA results showed that the majority of variance (88.62%) occurred within sites, 12.75% was from between-groups. Further research is needed to investigate the selective function in maintaining the genetic diversity of Stipa krylovii plant populations.

  1. Propagation of major plant-virus hosts.

    PubMed

    Hull, Roger

    2009-08-01

    Plant viruses are propagated in host plants, which are usually grown in glasshouses, screen houses, or growth cabinets. In most cases, the plants are grown from seed; in some cases, they are propagated as cuttings. This unit describes the basic techniques of growing suitable plants from seed and cuttings.

  2. Generalized provisional seed zones for native plants.

    PubMed

    Bower, Andrew D; St Clair, J Bradley; Erickson, Vicky

    2014-07-01

    Deploying well-adapted and ecologically appropriate plant materials is a core component of successful restoration projects. We have developed generalized provisional seed zones that can be applied to any plant species in the United States to help guide seed movement. These seed zones are based on the intersection of high-resolution climatic data for winter minimum temperature and aridity (as measured by annual heat : moisture index), each classified into discrete bands. This results in the delineation of 64 provisional seed zones for the continental United States. These zones represent areas of relative climatic similarity, and movement of seed within these zones should help to minimize maladaptation. Superimposing Omernik's level III ecoregions over these seed zones distinguishes areas that are similar climatically yet different ecologically. A quantitative comparison of provisional seed zones with level III ecoregions and provisional seed zones within ecoregions for three species showed that provisional seed zone within ecoregion often explained the greatest proportion of variation in a suite of traits potentially related to plant fitness. These provisional seed zones can be considered a starting point for guidelines for seed transfer, and should be utilized in conjunction with appropriate species-specific information as well as local knowledge of microsite differences.

  3. ``From seed-to-seed'' experiment with wheat plants under space-flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinsky, A.; Ivanova, I.; Derendyaeva, T.; Nechitailo, G.; Salisbury, F.

    1994-11-01

    An important goal with plant experiments in microgravity is to achieve a complete life cycle, the ``seed-to-seed experiment''. Some Soviet attempts to reach this goal are described, notably an experiment with the tiny mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana, in the Phyton 3 device on Salyut 7. Normal seeds were produced although yields were reduced and development was delayed. Several other experiments have shown abnormalities in plants grown in space. In recent work, plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum) were studied on the ground and then in a preliminary experiment in space. Biometric indices of vegetative space plants were 2 to 2.5 times lower than those of controls, levels of chlorophyll a and b were reduced (no change in the ratio of the two pigments), carotenoids were reduced, there was a serious imbalance in major minerals, and membrane lipids were reduced (no obvious change in lipid patterns). Following the preliminary studies, an attempt was made with the Svetoblock-M growth unit to grow a super-dwarf wheat cultivar through a life cycle. The experiment lasted 167 d on Mir. Growth halted from about day 40 to day 100, when new shoots appeared. Three heads had appeared in the boot (surrounded by leaves) when plants were returned to earth. One head was sterile, but 28 seeds matured on earth, and most of these have since produced normal plants and seeds. In principle, a seed-to-seed experiment with wheat should be successful in microgravity.

  4. "From seed-to-seed" experiment with wheat plants under space-flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Mashinsky, A; Ivanova, I; Derendyaeva, T; Nechitailo, G; Salisbury, F

    1994-11-01

    An important goal with plant experiments in microgravity is to achieve a complete life cycle, the "seed-to-seed experiment." Some Soviet attempts to reach this goal are described, notably an experiment with the tiny mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana, in the Phyton 3 device on Salyut 7. Normal seeds were produced although yields were reduced and development was delayed. Several other experiments have shown abnormalities in plants grown in space. In recent work, plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum) were studied on the ground and then in a preliminary experiment in space. Biometric indices of vegetative space plants were 2 to 2.5 times lower than those of controls, levels of chlorophyll a and b were reduced (no change in the ratio of the two pigments), carotenoids were reduced, there was a serious imbalance in major minerals, and membrane lipids were reduced (no obvious change in lipid patterns). Following the preliminary studies, an attempt was made with the Svetoblock-M growth unit to grow a super-dwarf wheat cultivar through a life cycle. The experiment lasted 167 d on Mir. Growth halted from about day 40 to day 100, when new shoots appeared. Three heads had appeared in the boot (surrounded by leaves) when plants were returned to earth. One head was sterile, but 28 seeds matured on earth, and most of these have since produced normal plants and seeds. In principle, a seed-to-seed experiment with wheat should be successful in microgravity.

  5. A study of autorotating plant seeds.

    PubMed

    Sunada, S; Ide, A; Hoshino, Y; Okamoto, M

    2015-12-07

    A leading edge vortex exists on the upper surface of an autorotating plant seed. The vortex enhances the vertical aerodynamic force acting on the seed and decreases the rate of descent. We analyzed the flight data of rotary seeds and revealed that the lift-drag ratio affects the descent factor more strongly than the vertical force coefficient. This has also been confirmed by falling tests of model rotors, which have various aspect ratios, airfoil shapes and total masses.

  6. Seed zones for maintaining adapted plant populations

    Treesearch

    J. Bradley St. Clair; G. Randy Johnson; Vicky J. Erickson; Richard C. Johnson; Nancy L. Shaw

    2007-01-01

    Seed zones delineate areas within which plant materials can be transferred with little risk that they will be poorly adapted to their new location. They ensure successful restoration and revegetation, and help maintain the integrity of natural genetic structure. The value of seed zones is recognized in numerous policy statements from federal and state agencies. Results...

  7. Emergence of native plant seeds in response to seed pelleting, planting depth, scarification, and soil anti-crusting treatment, 2009

    Treesearch

    Clint Shock; Erik Feibert; Lamont Saunders; Nancy Shaw

    2010-01-01

    Seed of native plants is needed to restore rangelands of the Intermountain West. Reliable commercial seed production is desirable to provide the quantity of seed needed for restoration efforts. Establishment of native seed crops has been difficult, because fall-planted seed is susceptible to bird damage, soil crusting, and soil erosion. Fall planting is important for...

  8. Scatter hoarding of seeds confers survival advantages and disadvantages to large-seeded tropical plants at different life stages.

    PubMed

    Kuprewicz, Erin K

    2015-01-01

    Scatter hoarding of seeds by animals contributes significantly to forest-level processes, including plant recruitment and forest community composition. However, the potential positive and negative effects of caching on seed survival, germination success, and seedling survival have rarely been assessed through experimental studies. Here, I tested the hypothesis that seed burial mimicking caches made by scatter hoarding Central American agoutis (Dasyprocta punctate) enhances seed survival, germination, and growth by protecting seeds from seed predators and providing favorable microhabitats for germination. In a series of experiments, I used simulated agouti seed caches to assess how hoarding affects seed predation by ground-dwelling invertebrates and vertebrates for four plant species. I tracked germination and seedling growth of intact and beetle-infested seeds and, using exclosures, monitored the effects of mammals on seedling survival through time. All experiments were conducted over three years in a lowland wet forest in Costa Rica. The majority of hoarded palm seeds escaped predation by both invertebrates and vertebrates while exposed seeds suffered high levels of infestation and removal. Hoarding had no effect on infestation rates of D. panamensis, but burial negatively affected germination success by preventing endocarp dehiscence. Non-infested palm seeds had higher germination success and produced larger seedlings than infested seeds. Seedlings of A. alatum and I. deltoidea suffered high mortality by seed-eating mammals. Hoarding protected most seeds from predators and enhanced germination success (except for D. panamensis) and seedling growth, although mammals killed many seedlings of two plant species; all seedling deaths were due to seed removal from the plant base. Using experimental caches, this study shows that scatter hoarding is beneficial to most seeds and may positively affect plant propagation in tropical forests, although tradeoffs in seed

  9. Scatter Hoarding of Seeds Confers Survival Advantages and Disadvantages to Large-Seeded Tropical Plants at Different Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    Kuprewicz, Erin K.

    2015-01-01

    Scatter hoarding of seeds by animals contributes significantly to forest-level processes, including plant recruitment and forest community composition. However, the potential positive and negative effects of caching on seed survival, germination success, and seedling survival have rarely been assessed through experimental studies. Here, I tested the hypothesis that seed burial mimicking caches made by scatter hoarding Central American agoutis (Dasyprocta punctate) enhances seed survival, germination, and growth by protecting seeds from seed predators and providing favorable microhabitats for germination. In a series of experiments, I used simulated agouti seed caches to assess how hoarding affects seed predation by ground-dwelling invertebrates and vertebrates for four plant species. I tracked germination and seedling growth of intact and beetle-infested seeds and, using exclosures, monitored the effects of mammals on seedling survival through time. All experiments were conducted over three years in a lowland wet forest in Costa Rica. The majority of hoarded palm seeds escaped predation by both invertebrates and vertebrates while exposed seeds suffered high levels of infestation and removal. Hoarding had no effect on infestation rates of D. panamensis, but burial negatively affected germination success by preventing endocarp dehiscence. Non-infested palm seeds had higher germination success and produced larger seedlings than infested seeds. Seedlings of A. alatum and I. deltoidea suffered high mortality by seed-eating mammals. Hoarding protected most seeds from predators and enhanced germination success (except for D. panamensis) and seedling growth, although mammals killed many seedlings of two plant species; all seedling deaths were due to seed removal from the plant base. Using experimental caches, this study shows that scatter hoarding is beneficial to most seeds and may positively affect plant propagation in tropical forests, although tradeoffs in seed

  10. Effect of pre-planting irrigation, maize planting pattern and nitrogen on weed seed bank population.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, E; Vazan, S; Oveisi, M

    2011-01-01

    Pre-planting irrigation and planting patterns are important factors in weed management that effect on seed bank. Additionally, the nitrogen is the most important factor in plant growth that affects weed-crop competition and ultimately, seed rain into the soil. A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of nitrogen application rates, pre-planting irrigation and maize planting patterns on weed seed bank population. Experimental factors were nitrogen rates at 4 levels (200, 300, 400 and 500 kg per hectare) as main plot; and pre-planting irrigation at 2 levels (irrigation before planting plus weeding emerged seedlings and, irrigation after sowing), and maize planting patterns (one-row and two-row planting of maize with same density per square of row length) that were assigned in a factorial arrangement to the sub plots. Soil samples were taken at the beginning of the season (before planting of maize) and at the end of the season (after harvest) at depth of 0-5 cm in the fixed quadrates (60 cm x 60 cm). The weed seeds were extracted from the soil samples and were identified using standard methods. The majority of weed seed bank populations included 6 weed species: Portulaca oleracea, Chenopodium album, Amaranthus retroflexus, Sorghum halepense, Daturea stramonium, Xanthium strumarium. Results showed that population of weed seed bank increased significantly with increasing nitrogen rate. The increasing rate was different between one-row and two-row planting patterns. The parameters indicated that seed bank population was much higher in a one row planting pattern of maize. With two-row planting, seed bank was decreased by 34, 26, 20 and 5% at 200, 300, 400 and 500 kg N/ha, respectively. Pre-planting irrigation was also found an effective implement to reduce the weed seed bank. When pre-planting irrigation was applied, seed bank was decreased by 57, 43, 34 and 9% at 200, 300, 400 and 500 kg N/ha. Increasing nitrogen because of weed's better growth and higher seed

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis in plants during seed germination.

    PubMed

    Law, Simon R; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria occupy a central role in the eukaryotic cell. In addition to being major sources of cellular energy, mitochondria are also involved in a diverse range of functions including signalling, the synthesis of many essential organic compounds and a role in programmed cell death. The active proliferation and differentiation of mitochondria is termed mitochondrial biogenesis and necessitates the coordinated communication of mitochondrial status within an integrated cellular network. Two models of mitochondrial biogenesis have been defined previously, the growth and division model and the maturation model. The former describes the growth and division of pre-existing mature organelles through a form of binary fission, while the latter describes the propagation of mitochondria from structurally and biochemically simple promitochondrial structures that upon appropriate stimuli, mature into fully functional mitochondria. In the last decade, a number of studies have utilised seed germination in plants as a platform for the examination of the processes occurring during mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies have revealed many new aspects of the tightly regulated procession of events that define mitochondrial biogenesis during this period of rapid development. A model for mitochondrial biogenesis that supports the maturation of mitochondria from promitochondrial structures has emerged, where mitochondrial signalling plays a crucial role in the early steps of seed germination.

  12. Plant the Seeds of Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Both indoor and outdoor garden plants can cause problems. For example, the foliage of the bird-of-paradise and philodendron plants is toxic. A poinsettia leaf can kill a young child. Outdoor plants such as castor beans are highly dangerous. All parts of the potato and tomato plant are poisonous, except the potato and tomato themselves. Large…

  13. Plant the Seeds of Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Both indoor and outdoor garden plants can cause problems. For example, the foliage of the bird-of-paradise and philodendron plants is toxic. A poinsettia leaf can kill a young child. Outdoor plants such as castor beans are highly dangerous. All parts of the potato and tomato plant are poisonous, except the potato and tomato themselves. Large…

  14. Pollen and seed dispersal among dispersed plants.

    PubMed

    Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2005-08-01

    The ecological significance of spacing among plants in contributing to the maintenance of species richness, particularly in tropical forests, has received considerable attention that has largely focussed on distance- and density-dependent seed and seedling mortality. More recently it has become apparent that plant spacing is also relevant to pollination, which often constrains seed production. While seed and seedling survival is reduced at high conspecific densities, pollination success, by contrast, is positively correlated to local conspecific density. Distance-dependent mechanisms acting on pollination and seed production have now been described for a variety of plants, with relatively isolated plants or fragmented populations generally suffering reduced fecundity due to pollen limitation. Yet there is considerable variability in the vulnerability of plant species to pollination failure, which may be a function of breeding system, life history, the pollination vector, the degree of specialisation among plants and their pollinators, and other indirect effects of habitat change acting on plants or pollinators. As reduced tree densities and population fragmentation are common outcomes of anthropogenically altered landscapes, understanding how pollination processes are affected in such degraded landscapes can inform effective conservation and management of remaining natural areas.

  15. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    Water and nutrients are being added to plants in the Veggie hardware in NASA Kennedy Space Center's ISS environment simulator chamber. Mizuna mustard, Outredgeous lettuce and Waldmann's green lettuce are growing in Veggie. Growth in the chamber mimics the growth of plant experiments in the Veggie plant growth system on the International Space Station.

  16. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    NASA interns Jessica Scotten, left, and Ayla Grandpre water plants in the Veggie hardware in NASA Kennedy Space Center's ISS environment simulator chamber. Mizuna mustard, Outredgeous lettuce and Waldmann's green lettuce are growing in Veggie. Growth in the chamber mimics the growth of plant experiments in the Veggie plant growth system on the International Space Station.

  17. Direct seeding trials of three major timber species in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Gerald A. Waiters; Craig D. Whitesell

    1971-01-01

    Trials are underway to detemine the feasibility of direct seeding timber species to specific sites. Three major timber species were direct seeded on a moist, cindery, low-elevation site on the island of Hawaii. After 1 year, West Indies mahogany and monkey-god had acceptable stocking; stocking of lemon-gum eucalyptus was considered poor. All thee species made rapid...

  18. Molecular insights into seed dispersal mutualisms driving plant population recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Cristina; Grivet, Delphine

    2011-11-01

    Most plant species require mutualistic interactions with animals to fulfil their demographic cycle. In this regard frugivory (i.e., the intake of fruits by animals) enhances natural regeneration by mobilizing a large amount of seeds from source trees to deposition sites across the landscape. By doing so, frugivores move propagules, and the genotypes they harbour creating the spatial, ecological, and genetic environment under which subsequent recruitment proceeds. Recruitment patterns can be envisioned as the result of two density- and distance-dependent processes: seed dispersal and seed/seedling survival (the Janzen-Connell model). Population genetic studies add another layer of complexity for understanding the fate of dispersed propagules: the genetic relatedness among neighbouring seeds within a seed clump, a major outcome of frugivore activity, modifies their chances of germinating and surviving. Yet, we virtually ignore how the spatial distribution of maternal progenies and recruitment patterns relate with each other in frugivore-generated seed rains. Here we focus on the critical role of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal in shaping the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in the seed rain. We first examine which genetic mechanisms underlying recruitment are influenced by the spatial distribution of maternal progenies. Next, we examine those studies depicting the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in a frugivore-generated seed rain. In doing so, we briefly review the most suitable analytical approaches applied to track the contribution of fruiting trees to the seed rain based on molecular data. Then we look more specifically at the role of distinct frugivore guilds in determining maternal genetic correlations and their expected consequences for recruitment patterns. Finally we posit some general conclusions and suggest future research directions that would provide a more comprehensive understanding of the ecological and evolutionary consequences

  19. Seed development and genomic imprinting in plants.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Claudia; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to an epigenetic phenomenon where the activity of an allele depends on its parental origin. Imprinting at individual genes has only been described in mammals and seed plants. We will discuss the role imprinted genes play in seed development and compare the situation in plants with that in mammals. Interestingly, many imprinted genes appear to control cell proliferation and growth in both groups of organisms although imprinting in plants may also be involved in the cellular differentiation of the two pairs of gametes involved in double fertilization. DNA methylation plays some role in the control of parent-of-origin-specific expression in both mammals and plants. Thus, although imprinting evolved independently in mammals and plants, there are striking similarities at the phenotypic and possibly also mechanistic level.

  20. Identification of a major gene and RAPD markers for yellow seed coat colour in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Somers, D J; Rakow, G; Prabhu, V K; Friesen, K R

    2001-12-01

    The development of yellow-seeded Brassica napus for improving the canola-meal quality characteristics of lower fibre content and higher protein content has been restricted because no yellow-seeded forms of B. napus exist, and their conventional development requires interspecific introgression of yellow seed coat colour genes from related species. A doubled-haploid (DH) population derived from the F1 generation of the cross 'Apollo' (black-seeded) x YN90-1016 (yellow-seeded) B. napus was analysed via bulked segregant analysis to identify molecular markers associated with the yellow-seed trait in B. napus for future implementation in marker-assisted breeding. A single major gene (pigment 1) flanked by eight RAPD markers was identified co-segregating with the yellow seed coat colour trait in the population. This gene explained over 72% of the phenotypic variation in seed coat colour. Further analysis of the yellow-seeded portion of this DH population revealed two additional genes favouring 'Apollo' alleles, explaining 11 and 8.5%, respectively, of the yellow seed coat colour variation. The data suggested that there is a dominant, epistatic interaction between the pigment I locus and the two additional genes. The potential of the markers to be implemented in plant breeding for the yellow-seed trait in B. napus is discussed.

  1. Plants grow better if seeds see green.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Andrei P; Franke, Ralf-Peter

    2006-07-01

    We report on the response of dry plant seeds to their irradiation with intense green light applied at biostimulatory doses. Red and near-infrared light delivered by lasers or arrays of light emitting diodes applied at such doses have been shown previously by us to have effects on mammalian cells. Effects include cell proliferation and elevation of cell vitality, and have practical applications in various biomedical fields. Growth processes induced by photoreceptor stimulation (phytochromes and cryptochromes) in plant seeds with green light were described so far only for imbibed seeds. In this paper, we show that irradiation of dry cress, radish and carrot seeds with intense green light (laser or arrays of light emitting diodes), applied at biostimulatory doses, resulted in a significant increase in biomass--14, 26, and 71 days after seeding, respectively. In the case of radish and carrot, the irradiation led to important changes in the root-to-foliage surface ratio. Seeds with a potential to grant growth acceleration could be of special interest in agricultural applications, and could even compensate for shorter growth seasons caused by climate change.

  2. Plants grow better if seeds see green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Andrei P.; Franke, Ralf-Peter

    2006-07-01

    We report on the response of dry plant seeds to their irradiation with intense green light applied at biostimulatory doses. Red and near-infrared light delivered by lasers or arrays of light emitting diodes applied at such doses have been shown previously by us to have effects on mammalian cells. Effects include cell proliferation and elevation of cell vitality, and have practical applications in various biomedical fields. Growth processes induced by photoreceptor stimulation (phytochromes and cryptochromes) in plant seeds with green light were described so far only for imbibed seeds. In this paper, we show that irradiation of dry cress, radish and carrot seeds with intense green light (laser or arrays of light emitting diodes), applied at biostimulatory doses, resulted in a significant increase in biomass—14, 26, and 71 days after seeding, respectively. In the case of radish and carrot, the irradiation led to important changes in the root-to-foliage surface ratio. Seeds with a potential to grant growth acceleration could be of special interest in agricultural applications, and could even compensate for shorter growth seasons caused by climate change.

  3. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    Outredgeous red leaf lettuce, Mizuna mustard and Waldmann's green lettuce are growing in the Veggie control system in the ISS environment simulator chamber in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Growth in the chamber mimics the growth of plant experiments in the Veggie plant growth system on the International Space Station.

  4. Methods and systems for seed planting management and control

    DOEpatents

    Svoboda, John M.; Hess, J. Richard; Hoskinson, Reed L.; Harker, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A seed planting system providing optimal seed spacing in an agricultural field. The seed planting system includes a mobile seed planter having one or more planting shoes, or members being adapted for towing by a farm vehicle or being self-propelled. Sensors, disposed proximate to respective planting shoes, detect seed planting events and send corresponding signals to a computer. Contemporaneously, a geospatial locator acquires, and transmits to the computer, the geospatial location of each planted seed. The computer correlates the geospatial location data with the seed deposition data and generates a seed distribution profile indicating the location of each seed planted in a zone of interest to enable the control of speed spacing.

  5. Variation in seed size is structured by dispersal syndrome and cone morphology in conifers and other nonflowering seed plants.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Mathews, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    Seed size varies tremendously in plants and its evolution is influenced by multiple ecological and biological factors that are difficult to disentangle. In this study, we focus on understanding the role of seed dispersal by animals in the evolution of seed size in conifers, the most diverse extant nonflowering seed plant group. Relationships among seed size, dispersal syndrome, climate and cone morphology were analyzed across conifers using quantitative models of character evolution and phylogenetic regression techniques. Dispersal syndrome is a more consistent predictor of seed size within major extant conifer clades than climate. Seeds are generally larger in animal-dispersed than wind-dispersed species, and particular cone morphologies are consistently associated with specific ranges in seed size. Seed size and cone morphology evolve in a correlated manner in many animal-dispersed conifers, following a trade-off that minimizes the total size of the dispersal unit. These relationships are also present in other nonflowering seed plant groups, and have been important in the evolution of seeds and cones at least over the Cenozoic and perhaps over much of the later Mesozoic. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, scientists are preparing the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH). A growing substrate called arcillite has been packed down in the base and coverings are being secured to seal the base. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  7. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, scientists prepared the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH). A growing substrate called arcillite was packed down in the base and coverings were secured on top of the base. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  8. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, a research scientist, pours a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  9. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, a research scientist, packs a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  10. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, a research scientist, packs a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Seated at right is Susan Manning-Roach, a quality assurance specialist on the Engineering Services Contract. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  11. Seeding and Planting Southern Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Franklin T. Bonner

    1965-01-01

    I would like to start by giving a complete prescription for planting any hardwood species by a cheap and simple method that will insure excellent survival and good growth. Unfortunately, this is impossible, for we at the Southern Hardwoods Laboratory are still several years away from such prescriptions with nearly all of our important hardwoods. With most species,...

  12. Advanced Plant Habitat - Packing and Planting Seeds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Dr. Oscar Monje, (far right) a research scientist, packs a growing substrate called arcillite in the science carrier, or base, of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) inside a laboratory at the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Assisting him is Jeffrey Richards, project science coordinator with SGT on the Engineering Services Contract (ESC). Seated in the foreground is Susan Manning-Roach, a quality assurance specialist, also with ESC. Developed by NASA and ORBITEC of Madison, Wisconsin, the APH is the largest plant chamber built for the agency. It is a fully automated plant growth facility that will be used to conduct bioscience research on the International Space Station. The APH will be delivered to the space station aboard future Commercial Resupply Services missions.

  13. Plant seeds in biological research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    Data of 15 years of space flight and laboratory tests of plant seeds of 20 species, mainly on the combined and separate effects of launch vibration, ionizing radiation and weightlessness, are surveyed. It is concluded that plants do not show a pronounced response to space flight factors. Conditions of return to Earth, the number of heavy cosmic ray particles striking biological targets and effects of change in magnetic an electromagnetic fields have been little studied, and that more study of growing plants in space is needed.

  14. Evolutionary Analysis of the LAFL Genes Involved in the Land Plant Seed Maturation Program

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing-Dan; Li, Xia; Jiang, Chen-Kun; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Rothfels, Carl J.; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Seeds are one of the most significant innovations in the land plant lineage, critical to the diversification and adaptation of plants to terrestrial environments. From perspective of seed evo-devo, the most crucial developmental stage in this innovation is seed maturation, which includes accumulation of storage reserves, acquisition of desiccation tolerance, and induction of dormancy. Based on previous studies of seed development in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, seed maturation is mainly controlled by the LAFL regulatory network, which includes LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) and LEC1-LIKE (L1L) of the NF-YB gene family, and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), FUSCA3 (FUS3), and LEC2 (LEAFY COTYLEDON2) of the B3-AFL gene family. In the present study, molecular evolution of these LAFL genes was analyzed, using representative species from across the major plant lineages. Additionally, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the seed maturation program, co-expression pattern analyses of LAFL genes were conducted across vascular plants. The results show that the origin of AFL gene family dates back to a common ancestor of bryophytes and vascular plants, while LEC1-type genes are only found in vascular plants. LAFL genes of vascular plants likely specify their co-expression in two different developmental phrases, spore and seed maturation, respectively, and expression patterns vary slightly across the major vascular plants lineages. All the information presented in this study will provide insights into the origin and diversification of seed plants. PMID:28421087

  15. Seed rain and seed bank reveal that seed limitation strongly influences plant community assembly in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Marteinsdóttir, Bryndís

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal is an important factor in plant community assembly, but assembly studies seldom include information on actual dispersal into communities, i.e. the local propagule pool. The aim of this study was to determine which factors influence plant community assembly by focusing on two phases of the assembly process: the dispersal phase and the establishment phase. At 12 study sites in grazed ex-arable fields in Sweden the local plant community was determined and in a 100-m radius around the centre of each site, the regional species pool was measured. The local seed bank and the seed rain was explored to estimate the local propagule pool. Trait-based models were then applied to investigate if species traits (height, seed mass, clonal abilities, specific leaf area and dispersal method) and regional abundance influenced which species from the regional species pool, dispersed to the local community (dispersal phase) and which established (establishment phase). Filtering of species during the dispersal phase indicates the effect of seed limitation while filtering during the establishment phase indicates microsite limitation. On average 36% of the regional species pool dispersed to the local sites and of those 78% did establish. Species with enhanced dispersal abilities, e.g. higher regional abundance, smaller seeds and dispersed by cattle, were more likely to disperse to the sites than other species. At half the sites, dispersal was influenced by species height. Species establishment was however mainly unlinked to the traits included in this study. This study underlines the importance of seed limitation in local plant community assembly. It also suggests that without information on species dispersal into a site, it is difficult to distinguish between the influence of dispersal and establishment abilities, and thus seed and microsite limitation, as both can be linked to the same trait.

  16. Seed Rain and Seed Bank Reveal that Seed Limitation Strongly Influences Plant Community Assembly in Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Marteinsdóttir, Bryndís

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal is an important factor in plant community assembly, but assembly studies seldom include information on actual dispersal into communities, i.e. the local propagule pool. The aim of this study was to determine which factors influence plant community assembly by focusing on two phases of the assembly process: the dispersal phase and the establishment phase. At 12 study sites in grazed ex-arable fields in Sweden the local plant community was determined and in a 100-m radius around the centre of each site, the regional species pool was measured. The local seed bank and the seed rain was explored to estimate the local propagule pool. Trait-based models were then applied to investigate if species traits (height, seed mass, clonal abilities, specific leaf area and dispersal method) and regional abundance influenced which species from the regional species pool, dispersed to the local community (dispersal phase) and which established (establishment phase). Filtering of species during the dispersal phase indicates the effect of seed limitation while filtering during the establishment phase indicates microsite limitation. On average 36% of the regional species pool dispersed to the local sites and of those 78% did establish. Species with enhanced dispersal abilities, e.g. higher regional abundance, smaller seeds and dispersed by cattle, were more likely to disperse to the sites than other species. At half the sites, dispersal was influenced by species height. Species establishment was however mainly unlinked to the traits included in this study. This study underlines the importance of seed limitation in local plant community assembly. It also suggests that without information on species dispersal into a site, it is difficult to distinguish between the influence of dispersal and establishment abilities, and thus seed and microsite limitation, as both can be linked to the same trait. PMID:25057815

  17. Systematic Error in Seed Plant Phylogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Bojian; Deusch, Oliver; Goremykin, Vadim V.; Penny, David; Biggs, Patrick J.; Atherton, Robin A.; Nikiforova, Svetlana V.; Lockhart, Peter James

    2011-01-01

    Resolving the closest relatives of Gnetales has been an enigmatic problem in seed plant phylogeny. The problem is known to be difficult because of the extent of divergence between this diverse group of gymnosperms and their closest phylogenetic relatives. Here, we investigate the evolutionary properties of conifer chloroplast DNA sequences. To improve taxon sampling of Cupressophyta (non-Pinaceae conifers), we report sequences from three new chloroplast (cp) genomes of Southern Hemisphere conifers. We have applied a site pattern sorting criterion to study compositional heterogeneity, heterotachy, and the fit of conifer chloroplast genome sequences to a general time reversible + G substitution model. We show that non-time reversible properties of aligned sequence positions in the chloroplast genomes of Gnetales mislead phylogenetic reconstruction of these seed plants. When 2,250 of the most varied sites in our concatenated alignment are excluded, phylogenetic analyses favor a close evolutionary relationship between the Gnetales and Pinaceae—the Gnepine hypothesis. Our analytical protocol provides a useful approach for evaluating the robustness of phylogenomic inferences. Our findings highlight the importance of goodness of fit between substitution model and data for understanding seed plant phylogeny. PMID:22016337

  18. A Functional Phylogenomic View of the Seed Plants

    PubMed Central

    Katari, Manpreet S.; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Ott, Michael; Chiu, Joanna C.; Little, Damon P.; Stevenson, Dennis Wm.; McCombie, W. Richard; Martienssen, Robert A.; Coruzzi, Gloria; DeSalle, Rob

    2011-01-01

    A novel result of the current research is the development and implementation of a unique functional phylogenomic approach that explores the genomic origins of seed plant diversification. We first use 22,833 sets of orthologs from the nuclear genomes of 101 genera across land plants to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships. One of the more salient results is the resolution of some enigmatic relationships in seed plant phylogeny, such as the placement of Gnetales as sister to the rest of the gymnosperms. In using this novel phylogenomic approach, we were also able to identify overrepresented functional gene ontology categories in genes that provide positive branch support for major nodes prompting new hypotheses for genes associated with the diversification of angiosperms. For example, RNA interference (RNAi) has played a significant role in the divergence of monocots from other angiosperms, which has experimental support in Arabidopsis and rice. This analysis also implied that the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV and V (NRPD2) played a prominent role in the divergence of gymnosperms. This hypothesis is supported by the lack of 24nt siRNA in conifers, the maternal control of small RNA in the seeds of flowering plants, and the emergence of double fertilization in angiosperms. Our approach takes advantage of genomic data to define orthologs, reconstruct relationships, and narrow down candidate genes involved in plant evolution within a phylogenomic view of species' diversification. PMID:22194700

  19. A functional phylogenomic view of the seed plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ernest K; Cibrian-Jaramillo, Angelica; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Katari, Manpreet S; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Ott, Michael; Chiu, Joanna C; Little, Damon P; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; McCombie, W Richard; Martienssen, Robert A; Coruzzi, Gloria; Desalle, Rob

    2011-12-01

    A novel result of the current research is the development and implementation of a unique functional phylogenomic approach that explores the genomic origins of seed plant diversification. We first use 22,833 sets of orthologs from the nuclear genomes of 101 genera across land plants to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships. One of the more salient results is the resolution of some enigmatic relationships in seed plant phylogeny, such as the placement of Gnetales as sister to the rest of the gymnosperms. In using this novel phylogenomic approach, we were also able to identify overrepresented functional gene ontology categories in genes that provide positive branch support for major nodes prompting new hypotheses for genes associated with the diversification of angiosperms. For example, RNA interference (RNAi) has played a significant role in the divergence of monocots from other angiosperms, which has experimental support in Arabidopsis and rice. This analysis also implied that the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV and V (NRPD2) played a prominent role in the divergence of gymnosperms. This hypothesis is supported by the lack of 24nt siRNA in conifers, the maternal control of small RNA in the seeds of flowering plants, and the emergence of double fertilization in angiosperms. Our approach takes advantage of genomic data to define orthologs, reconstruct relationships, and narrow down candidate genes involved in plant evolution within a phylogenomic view of species' diversification.

  20. Assessing ant seed predation in threatened plants: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, María José; Escudero, Adrián; Iriondo, José María

    2005-11-01

    Erodium paularense is a threatened plant species that is subject to seed predation by the granivorous ant Messor capitatus. In this paper we assessed the intensity and pattern of ant seed predation and looked for possible adaptive strategies at the seed and plant levels to cope with this predation. Seed predation was estimated in 1997 and 1998 at the population level by comparing total seed production and ant consumption, assessed by counting seed hulls in refuse piles. According to this method, ant seed predation ranged between 18% and 28%. A more detailed and direct assessment conducted in 1997 raised this estimate to 43%. In this assessment spatial and temporal patterns of seed predation by ants were studied by mapping all nest entrances in the studied area and marking the mature fruits of 109 reproductive plants with a specific colour code throughout the seed dispersal period. Intact fruit coats were later recovered from the refuse piles, and their mother plants and time of dispersal were identified. Seeds dispersed at the end of the dispersal period had a greater probability of escaping from ant seed predation. Similarly, in plants with late dispersal a greater percentage of seeds escaped from ant predation. Optimum dispersal time coincided with the maximum activity of granivorous ants because, at this time, ants focused their harvest on other plant species of the community. It was also observed that within-individual seed dispersal asynchrony minimised seed predation. From a conservation perspective, results show that the granivorous ant-plant interaction cannot be assessed in isolation and that the intensity of its effects basically depends on the seed dispersal pattern of the other members of the plant community. Furthermore, this threat must be assessed by considering the overall situation of the target population. Thus, in E. paularense, the strong limitation of safe-sites for seedling establishment reduces the importance of seed predation.

  1. Seed odor mediates an obligate ant-plant mutualism in Amazonian rainforests.

    PubMed

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Nojima, Satoshi; Häberlein, Christopher; Schulz, Stefan; Schal, Coby

    2008-03-25

    Seed dispersal mutualisms are essential for the survival of diverse plant species and communities worldwide. Among invertebrates, only ants have a major role in seed dispersal, and thousands of plant species produce seeds specialized for ant dispersal in "diffuse" multispecies interactions. An outstanding but poorly understood ant-seed mutualism occurs in the Amazonian rainforest, where arboreal ants collect seeds of several epiphyte species and cultivate them in nutrient-rich nests, forming abundant and conspicuous hanging gardens known as ant-gardens (AGs). AG ants and plants are dominant members of lowland Amazonian ecosystems, and their interaction is both specific and obligate, but the means by which ants locate, recognize, and accept their mutualist seeds while rejecting other seeds is unknown. Here we address the chemical and behavioral basis of the AG interaction. We show that workers of the AG ant Camponotus femoratus are attracted to odorants emanating from seeds of the AG plant Peperomia macrostachya, and that chemical cues also elicit seed-carrying behavior. We identify five compounds from P. macrostachya seeds that, as a blend, attract C. femoratus workers. This report of attractive odorants from ant-dispersed seeds illustrates the intimacy and complexity of the AG mutualism and begins to illuminate the chemical basis of this important and enigmatic interaction.

  2. Seed odor mediates an obligate ant–plant mutualism in Amazonian rainforests

    PubMed Central

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Nojima, Satoshi; Häberlein, Christopher; Schulz, Stefan; Schal, Coby

    2008-01-01

    Seed dispersal mutualisms are essential for the survival of diverse plant species and communities worldwide. Among invertebrates, only ants have a major role in seed dispersal, and thousands of plant species produce seeds specialized for ant dispersal in “diffuse” multispecies interactions. An outstanding but poorly understood ant–seed mutualism occurs in the Amazonian rainforest, where arboreal ants collect seeds of several epiphyte species and cultivate them in nutrient-rich nests, forming abundant and conspicuous hanging gardens known as ant-gardens (AGs). AG ants and plants are dominant members of lowland Amazonian ecosystems, and their interaction is both specific and obligate, but the means by which ants locate, recognize, and accept their mutualist seeds while rejecting other seeds is unknown. Here we address the chemical and behavioral basis of the AG interaction. We show that workers of the AG ant Camponotus femoratus are attracted to odorants emanating from seeds of the AG plant Peperomia macrostachya, and that chemical cues also elicit seed-carrying behavior. We identify five compounds from P. macrostachya seeds that, as a blend, attract C. femoratus workers. This report of attractive odorants from ant-dispersed seeds illustrates the intimacy and complexity of the AG mutualism and begins to illuminate the chemical basis of this important and enigmatic interaction. PMID:18212122

  3. Resistance to phomopsis seed decay identified in maturity group V soybean plant introductions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean is the major cause of poor seed quality in most soybean-growing countries. This disease is primarily caused by the fungus Phomopsis longicolla. Few soybean cultivars currently available for planting in the U.S. have resistance to PSD. To identify soybean lines w...

  4. Importance of earthworm-seed interactions for the composition and structure of plant communities: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forey, Estelle; Barot, Sébastien; Decaëns, Thibaud; Langlois, Estelle; Laossi, Kam-Rigne; Margerie, Pierre; Scheu, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2011-11-01

    Soil seed bank composition and dynamics are crucial elements for the understanding of plant population and community ecology. Earthworms are increasingly recognized as important dispersers and predators of seeds. Through direct and indirect effects they influence either positively or negatively the establishment and survival of seeds and seedlings. Seedling establishment is affected by a variety of earthworm-mediated mechanisms, such as selective seed ingestion and digestion, acceleration or deceleration of germination, and seed transport. Earthworm casts deposited on the soil surface and the entrance of earthworm burrows often contain viable seeds and constitute important regeneration niches for plant seedlings and therefore likely favour specific seed traits. However, the role of earthworms as seed dispersers, mediators of seed bank dynamics and seed predators has not been considered in concert. The overall effect of earthworms on plant communities remains little understood. Most knowledge is based on laboratory studies on temperate species and future work has to explore the biological significance of earthworm-seed interactions under more natural conditions. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on earthworm-seed interactions and discuss factors determining these interactions. We highlight that this interaction may be an underappreciated, yet major driving force for the dynamics of soil seed banks and plant communities which most likely have experienced co-evolutionary processes. Despite the experimental bias, we hypothesize that the knowledge gathered in the present review is of crucial relevance for restoration and conservation ecology. For instance, as earthworms emerge as successful and ubiquitous invaders in various ecosystems, the summarized information might serve as a basis for realistic estimations and modelling of consequences on native plant communities. We depict promising directions of future research and point to the need to consider

  5. Global asymptotic stability of plant-seed bank models.

    PubMed

    Eager, Eric Alan; Rebarber, Richard; Tenhumberg, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    Many plant populations have persistent seed banks, which consist of viable seeds that remain dormant in the soil for many years. Seed banks are important for plant population dynamics because they buffer against environmental perturbations and reduce the probability of extinction. Viability of the seeds in the seed bank can depend on the seed's age, hence it is important to keep track of the age distribution of seeds in the seed bank. In this paper we construct a general density-dependent plant-seed bank model where the seed bank is age-structured. We consider density dependence in both seedling establishment and seed production, since previous work has highlighted that overcrowding can suppress both of these processes. Under certain assumptions on the density dependence, we prove that there is a globally stable equilibrium population vector which is independent of the initial state. We derive an analytical formula for the equilibrium population using methods from feedback control theory. We apply these results to a model for the plant species Cirsium palustre and its seed bank.

  6. Oil content of Arabidopsis seeds: the influence of seed anatomy, light and plant-to-plant variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John

    2006-05-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is frequently used as a model for the study of oilseed biology and metabolism. However, the very small seeds of Arabidopsis can complicate analysis of their oil content and influence the application of results to larger-seeded plants. Here, we describe how seed anatomy, light, and plant-to-plant variation influence the content and measurement of oil in Arabidopsis seeds. The anatomy of Arabidopsis and Brassica napus seeds were compared and the distribution of mass, oil and the fatty acid composition of different seed parts were determined. In Brassica, 90% of the seed oil resides in the cotyledons that contribute 74% of seed mass. By contrast, the values for Arabidopsis are 60% and 45%, respectively, with a higher fraction of the oil deposited in the radicle, hypocotyl, endosperm and seed coat. Growth of Arabidopsis plants with 600 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light resulted in a two-fold higher seed yield, a 40% increase in mass per seed and a 60% increase in oil per seed compared to growth at 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1). Factors that influence the analysis of oil content were evaluated. Intact-seed transmethylation followed by gas chromatography (GC) analysis provided reproducible analysis of Arabidopsis seed oil. However, plant-to-plant variation in oil content is large and we analyzed how this influences the ability to detect statistically valid changes in oil between different genotypes. These observations establish a reference data set on the fatty acid composition and distribution of mass and oil between tissues of Arabidopsis seeds that should help to predict the applicability of results obtained with Arabidopsis to other oilseeds.

  7. Both host-plant phylogeny and chemistry have shaped the African seed-beetle radiation.

    PubMed

    Kergoat, Gaël J; Delobel, Alex; Fédière, Gilles; Rü, Bruno Le; Silvain, Jean-François

    2005-06-01

    For the last 40 years, many authors have attempted to characterize the main patterns of plant-insect evolutionary interactions and understand their causes. In the present work on African seed-beetles (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), we have performed a 10-year field work to sample seeds of more than 300 species of potential host-plants (from the family Fabaceae), to obtain bruchids by rearing. This seed sampling in the field was followed by the monitoring of adult emergences which gave us the opportunity to identify host-plant use accurately. Then, by using molecular phylogenetics (on a combined data set of four genes), we have investigated the relationships between host-plant preferences and insect phylogeny. Our objectives were to investigate the level of taxonomic conservatism in host-plant fidelity and host-plant chemistry. Our results indicate that phylogenetically related insects are associated with phylogenetically related host-plants but the phylogeny of the latter cannot alone explain the observed patterns. Major host shifts from Papilionoideae to Mimosoideae subfamilies have happened twice independently suggesting that feeding specialization on a given host-plant group is not always a dead end in seed-beetles. If host-plant taxonomy and chemistry in legumes generally provide consistent data, it appears that the nature of the seed secondary compounds may be the major factor driving the diversification of a large clade specializing on the subfamily Mimosoideae in which host-plant taxonomy is not consistent with chemical similarity.

  8. Epigenetic reprogramming during plant reproduction and seed development.

    PubMed

    Wollmann, Heike; Berger, Frédéric

    2012-02-01

    Epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation are crucial for the development of flowering plants, and for protection of genome integrity via silencing of transposable elements (TEs). Recent advances in genome-wide profiling suggest that during reproduction DNA methylation patterns are at least partially transmitted or even enhanced in the next generation to ensure stable silencing of TEs. At the same time, parent-of-origin specific removal of DNA methylation in the accompanying tissue allows imprinted expression of genes. Here we summarize the dynamics of DNA methylation as a major epigenetic regulatory pathway during reproduction and seed development.

  9. Spatial dynamics of specialist seed predators on synchronized and intermittent seed production of host plants.

    PubMed

    Satake, Akiko; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2004-04-01

    Masting, the synchronized and intermittent seed production by plant populations, provides highly variable food resources for specialist seed predators. Such a reproductive mode helps minimize seed losses through predator satiation and extinction of seed predator populations. The seed predators can buffer the resource variation through dispersal or extended diapause. We developed a spatially explicit resource-consumer model to understand the effect of masting on specialist seed predators. The masting dynamics were assumed to follow a resource-based model for plant reproduction, and the population dynamics of the predator were represented by a spatially extended Nicholson-Bailey model. The resultant model demonstrated that when host plants reproduce intermittently, seed predator populations go locally extinct, but global persistence of the predator is facilitated by dispersal or extended diapause. Global extinction of the predator resulted when the intermittent reproduction is highly synchronized among plants. An approximate invasion criterion for the predators showed that negative lag-1 autocorrelation in seeding reduces invasibility, and positive lag-1 cross-correlation enhances invasibility. Spatial synchronization in seeding at local scale caused by pollen coupling (or climate forcing) further prevented invasion of the predators. If the predators employed extended diapause, extremely high temporal variability in reproduction was required for plants to evade the predators.

  10. Single-Copy Genes as Molecular Markers for Phylogenomic Studies in Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; De La Torre, Amanda R; Sterck, Lieven; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción; Merino, Irene; Cabezas, José Antonio; Cervera, María Teresa; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Van de Peer, Yves

    2017-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among seed plant taxa, especially within the gymnosperms, remain contested. In contrast to angiosperms, for which several genomic, transcriptomic and phylogenetic resources are available, there are few, if any, molecular markers that allow broad comparisons among gymnosperm species. With few gymnosperm genomes available, recently obtained transcriptomes in gymnosperms are a great addition to identifying single-copy gene families as molecular markers for phylogenomic analysis in seed plants. Taking advantage of an increasing number of available genomes and transcriptomes, we identified single-copy genes in a broad collection of seed plants and used these to infer phylogenetic relationships between major seed plant taxa. This study aims at extending the current phylogenetic toolkit for seed plants, assessing its ability for resolving seed plant phylogeny, and discussing potential factors affecting phylogenetic reconstruction. In total, we identified 3,072 single-copy genes in 31 gymnosperms and 2,156 single-copy genes in 34 angiosperms. All studied seed plants shared 1,469 single-copy genes, which are generally involved in functions like DNA metabolism, cell cycle, and photosynthesis. A selected set of 106 single-copy genes provided good resolution for the seed plant phylogeny except for gnetophytes. Although some of our analyses support a sister relationship between gnetophytes and other gymnosperms, phylogenetic trees from concatenated alignments without 3rd codon positions and amino acid alignments under the CAT + GTR model, support gnetophytes as a sister group to Pinaceae. Our phylogenomic analyses demonstrate that, in general, single-copy genes can uncover both recent and deep divergences of seed plant phylogeny. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Uncoupling the effects of seed predation and seed dispersal by granivorous ants on plant population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Arnan, Xavier; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Rodrigo, Anselm; Retana, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Secondary seed dispersal is an important plant-animal interaction, which is central to understanding plant population and community dynamics. Very little information is still available on the effects of dispersal on plant demography and, particularly, for ant-seed dispersal interactions. As many other interactions, seed dispersal by animals involves costs (seed predation) and benefits (seed dispersal), the balance of which determines the outcome of the interaction. Separate quantification of each of them is essential in order to understand the effects of this interaction. To address this issue, we have successfully separated and analyzed the costs and benefits of seed dispersal by seed-harvesting ants on the plant population dynamics of three shrub species with different traits. To that aim a stochastic, spatially-explicit individually-based simulation model has been implemented based on actual data sets. The results from our simulation model agree with theoretical models of plant response dependent on seed dispersal, for one plant species, and ant-mediated seed predation, for another one. In these cases, model predictions were close to the observed values at field. Nonetheless, these ecological processes did not affect in anyway a third species, for which the model predictions were far from the observed values. This indicates that the balance between costs and benefits associated to secondary seed dispersal is clearly related to specific traits. This study is one of the first works that analyze tradeoffs of secondary seed dispersal on plant population dynamics, by disentangling the effects of related costs and benefits. We suggest analyzing the effects of interactions on population dynamics as opposed to merely analyzing the partners and their interaction strength.

  12. Uncoupling the Effects of Seed Predation and Seed Dispersal by Granivorous Ants on Plant Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Arnan, Xavier; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Rodrigo, Anselm; Retana, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Secondary seed dispersal is an important plant-animal interaction, which is central to understanding plant population and community dynamics. Very little information is still available on the effects of dispersal on plant demography and, particularly, for ant-seed dispersal interactions. As many other interactions, seed dispersal by animals involves costs (seed predation) and benefits (seed dispersal), the balance of which determines the outcome of the interaction. Separate quantification of each of them is essential in order to understand the effects of this interaction. To address this issue, we have successfully separated and analyzed the costs and benefits of seed dispersal by seed-harvesting ants on the plant population dynamics of three shrub species with different traits. To that aim a stochastic, spatially-explicit individually-based simulation model has been implemented based on actual data sets. The results from our simulation model agree with theoretical models of plant response dependent on seed dispersal, for one plant species, and ant-mediated seed predation, for another one. In these cases, model predictions were close to the observed values at field. Nonetheless, these ecological processes did not affect in anyway a third species, for which the model predictions were far from the observed values. This indicates that the balance between costs and benefits associated to secondary seed dispersal is clearly related to specific traits. This study is one of the first works that analyze tradeoffs of secondary seed dispersal on plant population dynamics, by disentangling the effects of related costs and benefits. We suggest analyzing the effects of interactions on population dynamics as opposed to merely analyzing the partners and their interaction strength. PMID:22880125

  13. Tips for Improving Seed Planting Efficiency

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; David L. Wenny; Susan J. Morrison

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of a precision seeder was improved by adding a mirror so employees could monitor seed levels and by marking seeds with brightly colored talc to quickly verify the accuracy of the machine.

  14. Reproductive cross-talk: seed development in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Moritz K; Ungru, Alexander; Bjerkan, Katrine N; Grini, Paul E; Schnittger, Arp

    2010-04-01

    Flowering plants have evolved to be a predominant life form on earth. A common principle of flowering plants and probably one of the main reasons for their evolutionary success is the rapid development of an embryo next to a supporting tissue called the endosperm. The embryo and the endosperm are protected by surrounding maternal tissues, the integuments, and the trinity of integuments, embryo and endosperm comprise the plant seed. For proper seed development, these three structures have to develop in a highly controlled and co-ordinated manner, representing a paradigm for cell-cell communication during development. Communication pathways between the endosperm and the seed coat are now beginning to be unravelled. Moreover, recently isolated mutants affecting plant reproduction have allowed a genetic dissection of seed development, and revealed that the embryo plays a previously unrecognized yet important role in co-ordinating seed development.

  15. [Research advance in seed germination of desert woody plants].

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei; Wu, Jian-guo; Liu, Yan-hong

    2007-02-01

    This paper reviewed the research methods of desert woody plants seed germination, and the effects of internal and external ecological factors on it. Most researchers use incubator and artificial climate chamber to dispose the seeds, while field investigation was few involved. Seed dormancy is the important physiological factor affecting germination, while seed size, mass and color are closely correlated with its maturity and vigor. The poor permeability of seed capsule is a barrier that restrains the germination, which can be weakened or eliminated by shaving, cutting, treating with low temperature, and dipping in chemical reagent, etc. Seed water content has a close correlation with its storage life and water-absorbing capability. Suitable temperature is the prerequisite of seed germination, while changing temperature can accelerate the germination. Soil moisture content is a limiting factor, while illumination is not so essential to the seed germination of most desert woody plants. Sand-burying plays an important role in the seed germination through regulating illumination, temperature, and soil moisture content. Salinity stress restrains the seed germination of desert woody plants observably. In further studies, the effects of multi-factors and the eco-physiological and molecular biological mechanisms of germination should be more concerned.

  16. Seed biopriming with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria: a review.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ahmad; Turgay, Oğuz Can; Farooq, Muhammad; Hayat, Rifat

    2016-08-01

    Beneficial microbes are applied to the soil and plant tissues directly or through seed inoculation, whereas soil application is preferred when there is risk of inhibitors or antagonistic microbes on the plant tissues. Insufficient survival of the microorganisms, hindrance in application of fungicides to the seeds and exposure to heat and sunlight in subsequent seed storage in conventional inoculation methods force to explore appropriate and efficient bacterial application method. Seed priming, where seeds are hydrated to activate metabolism without actual germination followed by drying, increases the germination, stand establishment and stress tolerance in different crops. Seed priming with living bacterial inoculum is termed as biopriming that involves the application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. It increases speed and uniformity of germination; also ensures rapid, uniform and high establishment of crops; and hence improves harvest quality and yield. Seed biopriming allows the bacteria to enter/adhere the seeds and also acclimatization of bacteria in the prevalent conditions. This review focuses on methods used for biopriming, and also the role in improving crop productivity and stress tolerance along with prospects of this technology. The comparison of methods being followed is also reviewed proposing biopriming as a promising technique for application of beneficial microbes to the seeds.

  17. Grazing impact on desert plants and soil seed banks: Implications for seed-eating animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Rodrigo G.; Sagario, M. Cecilia; Marone, Luis

    2014-02-01

    We assess whether the knowledge of livestock diet helps to link grazing effects with changes in plant cover and soil seed bank size, aiming at inferring the consequences of grazing on seed-eating animals. Specifically, we test whether continuous and heavy grazing reduce the cover, number of reproductive structures and seed reserves of the same grass species whose seeds are selected and preferred by granivorous animals in the central Monte desert, Argentina. Grass cover and the number of grass spikes usually diminished under grazing conditions in the two localities studied (Telteca and Ñacuñán), and soil seed bank was consistently reduced in all three years evaluated owing to a decline of perennial grass and forb seeds. In particular, the abundance of those seeds selected and preferred by birds and ants (in all cases grass species) declined 70-92% in Ñacuñán, and 52-72% in Telteca. Reduction of perennial grass cover and spike number in grazed sites reinforced the causal link between livestock grazing and the decline of grass soil seed reserves throughout failed plant reproduction. Grass seed bank depletion suggests that grazing may trigger a "cascade" of mechanisms that affect the abundance and persistence of valuable fodder species as well as the availability of seed resources for granivorous animals.

  18. Billet-planted sugarcane responds positively to chemical seed treatments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Louisiana’s 2015 sugarcane crop was worth over $750 million and generated $2 billion in direct economic impact to the state. One of the biggest variable expenses was planting. Seed cane is costly to grow because it occupies land that could produce cane destined for a mill. Whole stalk seeding rates ...

  19. Seed Borne Endophyte Microbiomes are Associated with Vascular Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant microbiomes include numerous seed associated microbes which are vertically transferred to progeny. These complex microbial communities have not been heavily reported in scientific literature, possibly because they are difficult to detect and monitor. Yet potential for seed borne microbes to in...

  20. The evolution of seed dormancy: environmental cues, evolutionary hubs, and diversification of the seed plants.

    PubMed

    Willis, Charles G; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M; Auld, Josh R; Venable, D Lawrence; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Donohue, Kathleen; Rubio de Casas, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Seed dormancy, by controlling the timing of germination, can strongly affect plant survival. The kind of seed dormancy, therefore, can influence both population and species-level processes such as colonization, adaptation, speciation, and extinction. We used a dataset comprising over 14,000 taxa in 318 families across the seed plants to test hypotheses on the evolution of different kinds of seed dormancy and their association with lineage diversification. We found morphophysiological dormancy to be the most likely ancestral state of seed plants, suggesting that physiologically regulated dormancy in response to environmental cues was present at the origin of seed plants. Additionally, we found that physiological dormancy (PD), once disassociated from morphological dormancy, acted as an 'evolutionary hub' from which other dormancy classes evolved, and that it was associated with higher rates of lineage diversification via higher speciation rates. The environmental sensitivity provided by dormancy in general, and by PD in particular, appears to be a key trait in the diversification of seed plants.

  1. Postfire seeding and plant community recovery in the Great Basin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As wildland fire frequency increases around the globe, increased understanding of plant community recovery in burned landscapes is needed to improve effectiveness of rehabilitation efforts. We measured establishment of seeded species, colonization of Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass), and recovery of ...

  2. Native Plants and Seeds, Oh My! Fifth Graders Explore an Unfamiliar Subject While Learning Plant Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauley, Lauren; Weege, Kendra; Koomen, Michele Hollingsworth

    2016-01-01

    Native plants are not typically the kinds of plants that are used in elementary classroom studies of plant biology. More commonly, students sprout beans or investigate with fast plants. At the time the authors started their plant unit (November), the school-yard garden had an abundance of native plants that had just started seeding, including…

  3. Native Plants and Seeds, Oh My! Fifth Graders Explore an Unfamiliar Subject While Learning Plant Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauley, Lauren; Weege, Kendra; Koomen, Michele Hollingsworth

    2016-01-01

    Native plants are not typically the kinds of plants that are used in elementary classroom studies of plant biology. More commonly, students sprout beans or investigate with fast plants. At the time the authors started their plant unit (November), the school-yard garden had an abundance of native plants that had just started seeding, including…

  4. Endozoochorous dispersal of aquatic plants: does seed gut passage affect plant performance?

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Jordi; Santamaría, Luis; Green, Andy J; Luque, Isabel; Alvarez, Raquel; Charalambidou, Iris

    2005-04-01

    The ingestion of seeds by vertebrates can affect the germinability and/or germination rate of seeds. It is, however, unclear if an earlier germination as a result of ingestion affects later plant performance. For sago pondweed, Potamogeton pectinatus, the effects of seed ingestion by ducks on both germinability and germination rate have been previously reported from laboratory experiments. We performed an experiment to determine the effects of seed ingestion by ducks on germination, seedling survival, plant growth and asexual multiplication. Both at the start and end of the winter, seeds were fed to three captive shovelers (Anas clypeata) and planted outdoors in water-filled containers. Plant biomass and its allocation to vegetative parts (shoot and roots), tubers, and seeds were determined in autumn. More duck-ingested seeds than control (uningested) seeds germinated in early winter, but this difference disappeared for seeds planted in late winter, when the treatments were first stratified for 3 mo. None of the variables for measuring seedling survival and plant performance varied between treatments. Under our experimental conditions (no herbivory or competition), ingestion by ducks in early winter resulted in increased performance for seeds surviving gut passage due to enhanced seed germinability, without other costs or benefits for the seedlings.

  5. An allometric model for mapping seed development in plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongwen; Tong, Chunfa; Bo, Wenhao; Pang, Xiaoming; Wang, Zhong; Xu, Jichen; Gai, Junyi; Wu, Rongling

    2014-07-01

    Despite a tremendous effort to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for agriculturally and biologically important traits in plants, our understanding of how a QTL governs the developmental process of plant seeds remains elusive. In this article, we address this issue by describing a model for functional mapping of seed development through the incorporation of the relationship between vegetative and reproductive growth. The time difference of reproductive from vegetative growth is described by Reeve and Huxley’s allometric equation. Thus, the implementation of this equation into the framework of functional mapping allows dynamic QTLs for seed development to be identified more precisely. By estimating and testing mathematical parameters that define Reeve and Huxley’s allometric equations of seed growth, the dynamic pattern of the genetic effects of the QTLs identified can be analyzed. We used the model to analyze a soybean data, leading to the detection of QTLs that control the growth of seed dry weight. Three dynamic QTLs, located in two different linkage groups, were detected to affect growth curves of seed dry weight. The QTLs detected may be used to improve seed yield with marker-assisted selection by altering the pattern of seed development in a hope to achieve a maximum size of seeds at a harvest time.

  6. A New Approach to Modify Plant Microbiomes and Traits by Introducing Beneficial Bacteria at Flowering into Progeny Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Birgit; Pfaffenbichler, Nikolaus; Flavell, Richard; Compant, Stéphane; Antonielli, Livio; Petric, Alexandra; Berninger, Teresa; Naveed, Muhammad; Sheibani-Tezerji, Raheleh; von Maltzahn, Geoffrey; Sessitsch, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The microbial component of healthy seeds – the seed microbiome – appears to be inherited between plant generations and can dynamically influence germination, plant performance, and survival. As such, methods to optimize the seed microbiomes of major crops could have far-reaching implications for plant breeding and crop improvement to enhance agricultural food, feed, and fiber production. Here, we describe a new approach to modulate seed microbiomes of elite crop seed embryos and concomitantly design the traits to be mediated by seed microbiomes. Specifically, we discovered that by introducing the endophyte Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN to the flowers of parent plants we could drive its inclusion in progeny seed microbiomes, thereby inducing vertical inheritance to the offspring generation. We demonstrated the introduction of PsJN to seeds of monocot and dicot plant species and the consequential modifications to seed microbiome composition and growth traits in wheat, illustrating the potential role of novel seed-based microbiomes in determining plant traits. PMID:28167932

  7. Purification of the Major Soybean Leaf Acid Phosphatase That Is Increased by Seed-Pod Removal.

    PubMed Central

    Staswick, P. E.; Papa, C.; Huang, J. F.; Rhee, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Fruit removal for 5 weeks after flowering increased acid phosphatase activity 10-fold in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. Var Hobbit) leaves compared with normal seed-pod-bearing plants. The major acid phosphatase activity in leaves was purified over 2700-fold, yielding a single polypeptide of 51 kD with a specific activity of 1353 units/mg protein using p-nitrophenylphosphate as the substrate. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the purified protein co-migrated with a majority of the activity that increased in leaves following seed-pod removal. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that at least part of the increased activity was due to an increased abundance of the phosphatase protein. In situ enzyme activity staining localized most of the total phosphatase activity to vascular tissues, the leaf paraveinal mesophyll cell layer, and the lower epidermis. This distribution and the response to seed-pod removal paralleled previous results for soybean vegetative storage protein (VSP) [alpha] and [beta]. However, in a native polyacrylamide gel the VSP detected by immunological staining of electrophoretically transferred protein did not migrate with the majority of the phosphatase activity. Fractionation of crude leaf protein on concanavalin A-Sepharose yielded a fraction containing 97% of the total VSP but only 0.1% of the total acid phosphatase activity. PMID:12232060

  8. Stomatal innovation and the rise of seed plants.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Stomatal valves on the leaves of vascular plants not only prevent desiccation but also dynamically regulate water loss to maintain efficient daytime water use. This latter process involves sophisticated active control of stomatal aperture that may be absent from early-branching plant clades. To test this hypothesis, we compare the stomatal response to light intensity in 13 species of ferns and lycophytes with a diverse sample of seed plants to determine whether the capacity to optimise water use is an ancestral or derived feature of stomatal physiology. We found that in seed plants, the ratio of photosynthesis to water use remained high and constant at different light intensities, but fern and lycophyte stomata were incapable of sustaining homeostatic water use efficiency. We conclude that efficient water use in early seed plants provided them with a competitive advantage that contributed to the decline of fern and lycophyte dominated-ecosystems in the late Paleozoic.

  9. Why we need more non-seed plant models.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Stefan A

    2017-02-13

    Contents I. II. III. IV. V. VI. References SUMMARY: Out of a hundred sequenced and published land plant genomes, four are not of flowering plants. This severely skewed taxonomic sampling hinders our comprehension of land plant evolution at large. Moreover, most genetically accessible model species are flowering plants as well. If we are to gain a deeper understanding of how plants evolved and still evolve, and which of their developmental patterns are ancestral or derived, we need to study a more diverse set of plants. Here, I thus argue that we need to sequence genomes of so far neglected lineages, and that we need to develop more non-seed plant model species.

  10. Dynamics of Seed-Borne Rice Endophytes on Early Plant Growth Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hardoim, Pablo R.; Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; van Overbeek, Leonard S.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial endophytes are ubiquitous to virtually all terrestrial plants. With the increasing appreciation of studies that unravel the mutualistic interactions between plant and microbes, we increasingly value the beneficial functions of endophytes that improve plant growth and development. However, still little is known on the source of established endophytes as well as on how plants select specific microbial communities to establish associations. Here, we used cultivation-dependent and -independent approaches to assess the endophytic bacterrial community of surface-sterilized rice seeds, encompassing two consecutive rice generations. We isolated members of nine bacterial genera. In particular, organisms affiliated with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Ochrobactrum spp. were isolated from both seed generations. PCR-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of seed-extracted DNA revealed that approximately 45% of the bacterial community from the first seed generation was found in the second generation as well. In addition, we set up a greenhouse experiment to investigate abiotic and biotic factors influencing the endophytic bacterial community structure. PCR-DGGE profiles performed with DNA extracted from different plant parts showed that soil type is a major effector of the bacterial endophytes. Rice plants cultivated in neutral-pH soil favoured the growth of seed-borne Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Rhizobium radiobacter, whereas Enterobacter-like and Dyella ginsengisoli were dominant in plants cultivated in low-pH soil. The seed-borne Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was the only conspicuous bacterial endophyte found in plants cultivated in both soils. Several members of the endophytic community originating from seeds were observed in the rhizosphere and surrounding soils. Their impact on the soil community is further discussed. PMID:22363438

  11. Postfire drill-seeding of Great Basin plants: Effects of contrasting drills on seeded and nonseeded species

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey E. Ott; Robert D. Cox; Nancy L. Shaw; Beth A. Newingham; Amy C. Ganguli; Mike Pellant; Bruce A. Roundy; Dennis L. Eggett

    2016-01-01

    Objectives of postfire seeding in the Great Basin include reestablishment of perennial cover, suppression of exotic annual weeds, and restoration of diverse plant communities. Nonconventional seeding techniques may be required when seeding mixes of grasses, forbs, and shrubs containing seeds of different sizes. We conducted an operational-scale experiment to...

  12. The hydroxyl radical in plants: from seed to seed.

    PubMed

    Richards, Siân L; Wilkins, Katie A; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Anderson, Alexander A; Habib, Noman; Smith, Alison G; McAinsh, Martin; Davies, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) is the most potent yet short-lived of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) radicals. Just as hydrogen peroxide was once considered to be simply a deleterious by-product of oxidative metabolism but is now acknowledged to have signalling roles in plant cells, so evidence is mounting for the hydroxyl radical as being more than merely an agent of destruction. Its oxidative power is harnessed to facilitate germination, growth, stomatal closure, reproduction, the immune response, and adaptation to stress. It features in plant cell death and is a key tool in microbial degradation of plant matter for recycling. Production of the hydroxyl radical in the wall, at the plasma membrane, and intracellularly is facilitated by a range of peroxidases, superoxide dismutases, NADPH oxidases, and transition metal catalysts. The spatio-temporal activity of these must be tightly regulated to target substrates precisely to the site of radical production, both to prevent damage and to accommodate the short half life and diffusive capacity of the hydroxyl radical. Whilst research has focussed mainly on the hydroxyl radical's mode of action in wall loosening, studies now extend to elucidating which proteins are targets in signalling systems. Despite the difficulties in detecting and manipulating this ROS, there is sufficient evidence now to acknowledge the hydroxyl radical as a potent regulator in plant cell biology.

  13. Comparing methods of artificially regenerating loblolly and slash pines: container planting, bareroot planting, and spot seeding

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; James P Barnett

    1994-01-01

    In central Louisiana, loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and slash (P. elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii,) pines were artificially regenerated by three methods: (1)planting 14-week-old container stock, (2)planting 1+0 bareroot stock, and (3)spot seeding. A common seed source was use for each species for all regeneration...

  14. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E; Sessa, Emily B; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W; Rieseberg, Loren H; Barker, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity.

  15. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E.; Sessa, Emily B.; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Barker, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity. PMID:26702445

  16. [Traightened on Chinese endemic seed plant species of medicine plants used in Tibetan medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua-rong; Mu, Ze-jing; Du, Xiao-lang; He, Jun-wei; Cao, Lan; Zhong, Guo-yue

    2015-09-01

    This paper is in order to discussion with the composition and characteristics of Tibetan medicine plant resources, and promote the reasonable protection and utilization of the resources of Tibetan materia medica. Statistical analysis of species, distributions, and others of Chinese endemic seed plant from Tibetan medicine plants and usually used in the clinic of Tibetan medicine. The results showed that there are 523 species (25%) of Chinese endemic seed plant, belonging to 65 families and 162 genera, in about 2 000 varieties of Tibetan medicine plants recorded in relevant literatures. There are 180 Chinese endemic seed plant species (28%) belonging to 42 families and 72 genera from 625 medicine plants usually used in the clinic of Tibetan medicine. Specifically, the most of these Chinese endemic seed plant species are characteristic crude drug used in Tibetan medicine, and mainly or only distributed in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. And a few species of them were intersected with traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) and other ethnic medicines. In addition, about 10% are listed in China Species Red List. The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is the most abundant areas of Areal-types of the Chinese endemic seed plant. This is the biological and ecological reason formation the characteristics of Tibetan medicine plant resources. Therefore, strengthen the research of Chinese endemic seed plants used in Tibetan medicine is great significance for the reasonable protection and utilization of Tibetan medicine plant resources.

  17. Impact of accelerated plant growth on seed variety development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophersen, Eric

    1998-01-01

    The commercial lives of agricultural seed products have steadily declined in recent years. The introduction of genetically engineered crop seeds in 1966 has accentuated that trend. Widespread grower demand for genetically engineered seed requires competitive response by industry followers in order to avert market share losses to the industry leaders. Limitations on plant transformation technology, regulatory requirements and patent impediments require companies to rapidly convert transformed lines into elite commercial products. Massive multigenerational backcrossing efforts are required to distribute genetically engineered traits into a broad product mix. Significant incidents of expression failures, or ``gene silencing,'' have occurred unexpectedly, requiring product substitution strategies. First-to-market strategies, competitive response, broad germplasm conversion and rescue of product failures all share the element of urgency. Technologies which reliably accelerate product development rates can expect favorable reception by commercial seed developers. A growth chamber which dramatically accelerates the rate of plant growth is described.

  18. Widespread seed limitation affects plant density but not population trajectory in the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis.

    PubMed

    Swope, Sarah M; Parker, Ingrid M

    2010-09-01

    In some plant populations, the availability of seeds strongly regulates recruitment. However, a scarcity of germination microsites, granivory or density-dependent mortality can reduce the number of plants that germinate or survive to flower. The relative strengths of these controls are unknown for most plant populations and for exotic invaders in particular. We conducted a seed addition experiment with a granivore exclusion treatment in a field setting to explore how these factors interact to regulate populations of the widespread invader Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle) at three study sites across the plant's range in California. We coupled the experimental approach with observational studies within established C. solstitialis populations to estimate seed rain, recruitment and mortality at natural densities. Seed limitation occurred in both experimental and observational plots in all populations. Although vertebrate granivores were active at each site, they had no effect on C. solstitialis recruitment. Density increased mortality, but the effect was variable and weak relative to its effect on fecundity. The seed limitation that was evident at the seedling stage persisted to flowering. Seed-limited populations such as these ought to be highly sensitive to losses to seed predators, and many biological control agents, including those established for C. solstitialis, are seed predators. However, flowering plant density was decoupled from seed production by a strong compensatory response in the surviving plants; seed production was nearly constant in plots across all seed addition levels. Thus, flowering plant density is reduced by the established biocontrol agents, but seed production compensates to replace the population every generation, and no long-term decline is predicted.

  19. Evolution of the YABBY gene family in seed plants.

    PubMed

    Finet, Cédric; Floyd, Sandra K; Conway, Stephanie J; Zhong, Bojian; Scutt, Charles P; Bowman, John L

    2016-01-01

    Members of the YABBY gene family of transcription factors in angiosperms have been shown to be involved in the initiation of outgrowth of the lamina, the maintenance of polarity, and establishment of the leaf margin. Although most of the dorsal-ventral polarity genes in seed plants have homologs in non-spermatophyte lineages, the presence of YABBY genes is restricted to seed plants. To gain insight into the origin and diversification of this gene family, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of YABBY gene lineages in seed plants. Our findings suggest that either one or two YABBY genes were present in the last common ancestor of extant seed plants. We also examined the expression of YABBY genes in the gymnosperms Ephedra distachya (Gnetales), Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoales), and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Coniferales). Our data indicate that some YABBY genes are expressed in a polar (abaxial) manner in leaves and female cones in gymnosperms. We propose that YABBY genes already acted as polarity genes in the last common ancestor of extant seed plants.

  20. Effects of Autumn and Spring Heat Waves on Seed Germination of High Mountain Plants

    PubMed Central

    Orsenigo, Simone; Abeli, Thomas; Rossi, Graziano; Bonasoni, Paolo; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Gandini, Maurizia; Mondoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of these species and will play a key role in their future adaptation to climate change. In this study, we assessed the impacts of heat waves on the seed germination of 53 high mountain plants from the Northern Apennines (Italy). The seeds were exposed to laboratory simulations of three seasonal temperature treatments, derived from real data recorded at a meteorological station near the species growing site, which included two heat wave episodes that occurred both in spring 2003 and in autumn 2011. Moreover, to consider the effect of increasing drought conditions related to heat waves, seed germination was also investigated under four different water potentials. In the absence of heat waves, seed germination mainly occurred in spring, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, heat waves resulted in a significant increase of spring germination in c. 30% of the species and elicited autumn germination in 50%. When heat waves were coupled with drought, seed germination decreased in all species, but did not stop completely. Our results suggest that in the future, heat waves will affect the germination phenology of alpine plants, especially conditionally dormant and strictly cold-adapted chorotypes, by shifting the emergence time from spring to autumn and by increasing the proportion of emerged seedlings. The detrimental effects of heat waves on recruitment success is less likely to be due to the inhibition of seed germination per se, but rather due to seedling survival in seasons, and temperature and water conditions that they are not used to experiencing. Changes in the proportion and timing of emergence

  1. Effects of Autumn and Spring Heat Waves on Seed Germination of High Mountain Plants.

    PubMed

    Orsenigo, Simone; Abeli, Thomas; Rossi, Graziano; Bonasoni, Paolo; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Gandini, Maurizia; Mondoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of these species and will play a key role in their future adaptation to climate change. In this study, we assessed the impacts of heat waves on the seed germination of 53 high mountain plants from the Northern Apennines (Italy). The seeds were exposed to laboratory simulations of three seasonal temperature treatments, derived from real data recorded at a meteorological station near the species growing site, which included two heat wave episodes that occurred both in spring 2003 and in autumn 2011. Moreover, to consider the effect of increasing drought conditions related to heat waves, seed germination was also investigated under four different water potentials. In the absence of heat waves, seed germination mainly occurred in spring, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, heat waves resulted in a significant increase of spring germination in c. 30% of the species and elicited autumn germination in 50%. When heat waves were coupled with drought, seed germination decreased in all species, but did not stop completely. Our results suggest that in the future, heat waves will affect the germination phenology of alpine plants, especially conditionally dormant and strictly cold-adapted chorotypes, by shifting the emergence time from spring to autumn and by increasing the proportion of emerged seedlings. The detrimental effects of heat waves on recruitment success is less likely to be due to the inhibition of seed germination per se, but rather due to seedling survival in seasons, and temperature and water conditions that they are not used to experiencing. Changes in the proportion and timing of emergence

  2. The proteins of the grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seed endosperm: fractionation and identification of the major components.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Diana; Vincenzi, Simone; Gastaldon, Luca; Tolin, Serena; Pasini, Gabriella; Curioni, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    In the present study, grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seed endosperm proteins were characterized after sequential fractionation, according to a modified Osborne procedure. The salt-soluble fraction (albumins and globulins) comprised the majority (58.4%) of the total extracted protein. The protein fractions analysed by SDS-PAGE showed similar bands, indicating different solubility of the same protein components. SDS-PAGE in non-reducing and reducing conditions revealed the polypeptide composition of the protein bands. The main polypeptides, which were similar in all the grape varieties analysed, were identified by LC-MS/MS as homologous to the 11S globulin-like seed storage proteins of other plant species, while a monomeric 43 kDa protein presented high homology with the 7S globulins of legume seeds. The results provide new insights about the identity, structure and polypeptide composition of the grape seed storage proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Anikeeva, I. D.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied. The seeds were located inside the satellite in an open space, protected with aluminum foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminum foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival rate and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can thus be regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  4. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  5. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Anikeeva, I D; Akatov YuA; Vaulina, E N; Kostina, L N; Marenny, A M; Portman, A I; Rusin, S V; Benton, E V

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  6. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  7. A polymer of caffeyl alcohol in plant seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Dixon, Richard A.; Ralph, John

    2012-01-01

    Lignins are complex phenylpropanoid polymers mostly associated with plant secondary cell walls. Lignins arise primarily via oxidative polymerization of the three monolignols, p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols. Of the two hydroxycinnamyl alcohols that represent incompletely methylated biosynthetic products (and are not usually considered to be monolignols), 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol is now well established as incorporating into angiosperm lignins, but incorporation of caffeyl alcohol has not been shown. We report here the presence of a homopolymer of caffeyl alcohol in the seed coats of both monocot and dicot plants. This polymer (C-lignin) is deposited to high concentrations in the seed coat during the early stages of seed development in the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), and in several members of the Cactaceae. The lignin in other parts of the Vanilla plant is conventionally biosynthesized from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Some species of cacti contain only C-lignin in their seeds, whereas others contain only classical guaiacyl/syringyl lignin (derived from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols). NMR spectroscopic analysis revealed that the Vanilla seed-coat polymer was massively comprised of benzodioxane units and was structurally similar to the polymer synthesized in vitro by peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of caffeyl alcohol. CD spectroscopy did not detect any optical activity in the seed polymer. These data support the contention that the C-lignin polymer is produced in vivo via combinatorial oxidative radical coupling that is under simple chemical control, a mechanism analogous to that theorized for classical lignin biosynthesis. PMID:22307645

  8. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Anikeeva, I.D.; Akatov, Yu.A.; Vaulina, E.N.; Kostina, L.N.; Marenny, A.; Portman, A.I.; Rusin, S.V. ||

    1995-03-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied. The seeds were located inside the satellite in an open space, protected with aluminum foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminum foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds` viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival rate and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can thus be regarded as an integral biological `dosimeter` which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  9. Geographic variations in seed dispersal by ants: are plant and seed traits decisive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulay, R.; Coll-Toledano, J.; Manzaneda, A. J.; Cerdá, X.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of local ant species on the dispersal success of a myrmecochorous plant, Helleborus foetidus, was analyzed in two populations of the Iberian Peninsula (Caurel and Cazorla, respectively). The contribution of the various local ant species to dispersal was very unequal. While 5 and 19 ant taxa visited the plants of Caurel and Cazorla, respectively, most removal activity (67 and 80%) was performed by two species only (Formica lugubris and Camponotus cruentatus, respectively). Visits by dispersers were also unequally distributed between neighboring plants. While some plants were always visited during the period of seed release, others were never visited. A regression model indicated that this pattern might be explained by two plant traits: ants preferred to visit plants that released more seeds and whose elaiosomes were richer in oleic acid. Although it has long been known that this compound triggers removal by ants, it is the first demonstration that quantitative variations in elaiosome traits contribute to variation in dispersal success. Finally, other variables being equal, morphological traits (seed size, elaiosome size, and elaiosome/seed size ratio) did not affect ant behavior. Although myrmecochory has long been considered a diffuse interaction, our results support the idea that, at local scale, a limited number of ant species may be decisive to its evolution.

  10. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  11. Experimental Evaluation of Seed Limitation in Alpine Snowbed Plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The distribution and abundance of plants is controlled by the availability of seeds and of sites suitable for establishment. The relative importance of these two constraints is still contentious and possibly varies among species and ecosystems. In alpine landscapes, the role of seed limitation has traditionally been neglected, and the role of abiotic gradients emphasized. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the importance of seed limitation for the incidence of four alpine snowbed species (Achillea atrata L., Achillea clusiana Tausch, Arabis caerulea L., Gnaphalium hoppeanum W. D. J. Koch) in local plant communities by comparing seedling emergence, seedling, juvenile and adult survival, juvenile and adult growth, flowering frequency as well as population growth rates λ of experimental plants transplanted into snowbed patches which were either occupied or unoccupied by the focal species. In addition, we accounted for possible effects of competition or facilitation on these rates by including a measure of neighbourhood biomass into the analysis. We found that only A. caerulea had significantly lower seedling and adult survival as well as a lower population growth rate in unoccupied sites whereas the vital rates of the other three species did not differ among occupied and unoccupied sites. By contrast, all species were sensitive to competitive effects of the surrounding vegetation in terms of at least one of the studied rates. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that seed and site limitation jointly determine the species composition of these snowbed plant communities and that constraining site factors include both abiotic conditions and biotic interactions. The traditional focus on abiotic gradients for explaining alpine plant distribution hence appears lopsided. The influence of seed limitation on the current distribution of these plants casts doubt on their ability to readily track shifting habitats under climate change unless seed production is

  12. Major flavonoids in grape seeds and skins: antioxidant capacity of catechin, epicatechin, and gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yusuf; Toledo, Romeo T

    2004-01-28

    Grape seeds and skins are good sources of phytochemicals such as gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin and are suitable raw materials for the production of antioxidative dietary supplements. The differences in levels of the major monomeric flavanols and phenolic acids in seeds and skins from grapes of Vitis vinifera varieties Merlot and Chardonnay and in seeds from grapes of Vitis rotundifolia variety Muscadine were determined, and the antioxidant activities of these components were assessed. The contribution of the major monomeric flavonols and phenolic acid to the total antioxidant capacity of grape seeds and skins was also determined. Gallic acid, monomeric catechin, and epicatechin concentrations were 99, 12, and 96 mg/100 g of dry matter (dm) in Muscadine seeds, 15, 358, and 421 mg/100 g of dm in Chardonnay seeds, and 10, 127, and 115 mg/100 g of dm in Merlot seeds, respectively. Concentrations of these three compounds were lower in winery byproduct grape skins than in seeds. These three major phenolic constituents of grape seeds contributed <26% to the antioxidant capacity measured as ORAC on the basis of the corrected concentrations of gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin in grape byproducts. Peroxyl radical scavenging activities of phenolics present in grape seeds or skins in decreasing order were resveratrol > catechin > epicatechin = gallocatechin > gallic acid = ellagic acid. The results indicated that dimeric, trimeric, oligomeric, or polymeric procyanidins account for most of the superior antioxidant capacity of grape seeds.

  13. Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape-level abundance of an early-successional plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.; Douglas J. Levey; Brent J. Danielson; Ellen I Damschen.

    2006-01-01

    Plants may not occur in a given area if there are no suitable sites for seeds to establish (microsite limitation), if seeds fail to arrive in suitable microsites (dispersal limitation) or if seeds in suitable microsites are destroyed by predators (predator limitation). When dispersal and microsites are not limiting, the role of local seed predators can be important for generating emergent, large-scale patterns of plant abundance across landscapes. Moreover, because predators may generate large-scale patterns that resemble other forms of limitation and predators may target specific species, predator impacts should be more frequently incorporated into experiments on the role of seed limitation and plant community composition.

  14. Phytotracker, an information management system for easy recording and tracking of plants, seeds and plasmids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A large number of different plant lines are produced and maintained in a typical plant research laboratory, both as seed stocks and in active growth. These collections need careful and consistent management to track and maintain them properly, and this is a particularly pressing issue in laboratories undertaking research involving genetic manipulation due to regulatory requirements. Researchers and PIs need to access these data and collections, and therefore an easy-to-use plant-oriented laboratory information management system that implements, maintains and displays the information in a simple and visual format would be of great help in both the daily work in the lab and in ensuring regulatory compliance. Results Here, we introduce ‘Phytotracker’, a laboratory management system designed specifically to organise and track plasmids, seeds and growing plants that can be used in mixed platform environments. Phytotracker is designed with simplicity of user operation and ease of installation and management as the major factor, whilst providing tracking tools that cover the full range of activities in molecular genetics labs. It utilises the cross-platform Filemaker relational database, which allows it to be run as a stand-alone or as a server-based networked solution available across all workstations in a lab that can be internet accessible if desired. It can also be readily modified or customised further. Phytotracker provides cataloguing and search functions for plasmids, seed batches, seed stocks and plants growing in pots or trays, and allows tracking of each plant from seed sowing, through harvest to the new seed batch and can print appropriate labels at each stage. The system enters seed information as it is transferred from the previous harvest data, and allows both selfing and hybridization (crossing) to be defined and tracked. Transgenic lines can be linked to their plasmid DNA source. This ease of use and flexibility helps users to reduce their

  15. Estimating seed production of common plants in seasonally flooded wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, Murray K.; Fredrickson, Leigh H.

    1992-01-01

    We developed a technique to quickly estimate seed production of common moist-soil plants because previously reported methods were too time consuming to be of value to waterfowl resource managers. Eleven regression equations were developed for 13 plant species in the upper Mississippi Alluvial Valley and the Rio Grande Valley, New Mexico. Estimated time to collect a sample was 1.5 minutes. Easily measured vegetation characteristics such as inflorescence number, inflorescence length, and plant height were used as independent variables to estimate seed mass of known mass samples. Coefficients of determination (R2) ranged from 0.79 for rice flatsedge (Cyperus iria) to 0.96 for smartweeds (Polygonum spp.). The accuracy and precision of equations tested using independent data indicate that the technique can be used to detect changes in seed mass of moist-soil plants in seasonally flooded impoundments. Because of the small sample area per plot used (0.0625 m2) and changes in the density of plants within an impoundment, we recommend that as many samples as economically feasible be collected to reliably estimate seed production.

  16. Programming desiccation-tolerance: from plants to seeds to resurrection plants.

    PubMed

    Farrant, Jill M; Moore, John P

    2011-06-01

    Desiccation-tolerance (DT) evolved as the key solution to survival on land by the early algal ancestors of terrestrial plants. This 'first' DT involved utilizing rapidly mobilisable repair mechanisms and is still found today in mosses, such as Tortula ruralis, and ferns, such as Mohria caffrorum. The first seed plants lost vegetative DT while investing their seeds with tolerance mechanisms improving their survival in unfavourable environments. The mechanisms of DT in seeds are strongly connected to their developmentally regulated maturation programs. We propose that angiosperm resurrection plants acquired tolerance by re-activating their innate DT mechanisms in their vegetative tissues. Here we review the current hypotheses regarding the genetic evidence for the evolution of DT in resurrection plants. We also present strong evidence showing the activation of seed specific genetic elements in the vegetative tissues of resurrection plants. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Native grass seeding and forb planting establishment

    Treesearch

    I Nan Vance; Andrew Neill; Frank Morton

    2006-01-01

    After a dense stand of conifers encroaching on an oak savanna/meadow was removed, exotic forbs and grasses quickly populated the newly disturbed area. Establishing desirable native grasses and forbs that contribute to native plant diversity and compete with exotic species could aid in restoring this oak savanna plant community. Two experiments were conducted over time...

  18. Germination and Seed Bank Studies of Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae), a Federally Theatened Plant

    Treesearch

    Dana Madsen Schulze; John L. Walker; Timothy P. Spira

    2002-01-01

    Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae) is a Federally threatened plant endemic to Florida. Seedlings are rarely observed in natural populations, but seed production has been documented. We assessed the germinability of dry-stored seeds and of experimentally buried seeds, and sampled soil to detect a persistent seed bank.More than 20% of recorded seeds...

  19. Genetic Modification for Improving Seed Vigor Is Transitioning from Model Plants to Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolin; Ning, Fen; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although seed vigor is a complex physiological trait controlled by quantitative trait loci, technological advances in the laboratory are being translated into applications for enhancing seed vigor in crop plants. In this article, we summarize and discuss pioneering work in the genetic modification of seed vigor, especially through the over-expression of protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT, EC 2.1.1.77) in seeds. The impressive success in improving rice seed vigor through the over-expression of PIMT provides a valuable reference for engineering high-vigor seeds for crop production. In recent decades, numerous genes/proteins associated with seed vigor have been identified. It is hoped that such potential candidates may be used in the development of genetically edited crops for a high and stable yield potential in crop production. This possibility is very valuable in the context of a changing climate and increasing world population. PMID:28149305

  20. Genetic Modification for Improving Seed Vigor Is Transitioning from Model Plants to Crop Plants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Ning, Fen; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although seed vigor is a complex physiological trait controlled by quantitative trait loci, technological advances in the laboratory are being translated into applications for enhancing seed vigor in crop plants. In this article, we summarize and discuss pioneering work in the genetic modification of seed vigor, especially through the over-expression of protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT, EC 2.1.1.77) in seeds. The impressive success in improving rice seed vigor through the over-expression of PIMT provides a valuable reference for engineering high-vigor seeds for crop production. In recent decades, numerous genes/proteins associated with seed vigor have been identified. It is hoped that such potential candidates may be used in the development of genetically edited crops for a high and stable yield potential in crop production. This possibility is very valuable in the context of a changing climate and increasing world population.

  1. Biogenic synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles by seed plants.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R Indira; Panda, Tapobrata

    2014-02-01

    Nanoparticles have an enormous range of biomedical and environmental applications and can be used for development of various nanodevices for diagnostics and drug delivery. Biogenic production of nanoparticles, that is of silver and gold, by seed plants, especially flowering plants, has evoked considerable interest in the last decade. Different organs of plants as well as callus cultures have been used for the production of these metal nanoparticles. It is possible to regulate the geometry of the nanoparticles by modifying the experimental parameters. In many cases the phytosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be potentially useful for treatment of various diseases. The production of gold and silver nanoparticles by diverse species of seed plants and their biological activity are discussed in this article.

  2. The DigitalSeed: An Interactive Toy for Investigating Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherubini, Mauro; Gash, Hugh; McCloughlin, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Plant growth, development and reproduction are fundamental concepts in biology; yet there is a recorded lack of motivation for young people to grapple with these concepts. Here we present the "DigitalSeed" toy for making investigations around these concepts more accessible to children through hands-on digital interaction. This is part of an…

  3. Nuclear DNA content analysis of plant seeds by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska, Elwira

    2006-02-01

    Procedures describing the utilization of seeds or their parts for flow cytometric determination of plant ploidy and endopolyploidy, genome size, and cell cycle activity are presented. The methods have been developed for a single-fluorescence-parameter flow cytometer, equipped with light sources for 488-nm and UV-light illumination. The procedures presented in this unit utilize the two most widely used fluorochromes for plant DNA content analysis, propidium iodide (PI) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). These methods provide an alternative to estimation of DNA content based on the fluorescence of DNA in cell nuclei isolated from plant leaves. In some instances seeds are more suitable for analysis than leaves, e.g., when plant material must be transported for a long distances or stored for prolonged periods before flow cytometric analysis, or when leaves contain fluorochrome-staining inhibitors. In addition, flow cytometric determination of nuclear replication stages in seeds gives information about their physiological status (e.g., maturity, advancement of germination), which is valuable to seed producers and technologists.

  4. Colonization of Bacillus spp. on seeds and in plant rhizoplane.

    PubMed

    Ugoji, E O; Laing, M D; Hunter, C H

    2005-07-01

    Seed coating, dipping and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were employed to study bacterial and fungal colonization of the seeds and rhizoplane of maize (Zea mays L.) during the early stages of growth. Isolation of Bacillus spp. entailed screening soil bacteria with potential growth stimulation and plant pathogen suppressive abilities isolated from the rhizospheres and rhizoplanes of vegetable crops. The bacterial colonization of the spermosphere was 90%. When the coated seeds were fully germinated, bacteria moved to the emerging radicle. Virtually no bacteria occurred on the root tip both for the treated and untreated. However, colonization was 20% in the basal portion of the roots close to the seed-root junction. SEM observations showed that the bacterial cells were arranged linearly and laterally on the growing root axis. This phenomenon was more noticeable in the seedlings dipped in the bacterial culture on the 3rd day after germination. The results indicate that attachment to the seed coat and the rhizoplane by the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) is an important factor in the successful colonization of the rhizoplane. The significance of the work is to ascertain that the inoculated Bacillus spp. adhered to and established in the rhizoplane of maize. It can therefore be used as a PGPR and as a biocontrol agent.

  5. Seed dispersal by specialist versus generalist foragers: the plant's perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    I examined the seed dispersal ecology of the stem parasitic plant, desert mistletoe (Phoradendron californicum, Viscaceae), with the objectives of (1) determining the relative effectiveness of specialist and generalist foragers for seed dispersal, (2) determining the extent to which desert mistletoe fruiting characteristics correspond to those predicted for plants attracting specialist versus generalist foragers, and (3) examining the potential consequences of the observed dispersal strategy for mistletoe reproduction. Three species of birds, phainopepla, Gila woodpecker, and northern mockingbird, fed on desert mistletoe at my study site. The specialist, phainopepla, was the most abundant and the most likely to perch in host species, where defecated seeds had a greater probability of lodging in a site suitable for establishment. Gila woodpeckers, although abundant, spent little time in host plants, thus dooming most of the seeds they consumed. Mockingbirds may disperse a small number of seeds, but were abundant enough to consume only a small portion of the available fruits. As expected for plants attracting specialist frugivores, mistletoes produced fruits throughout the 6-month season in which phainopeplas reside in the Sonoran desert. Contrary to expectation, numbers of fruits produced far exceeded the amount that could be consumed by the frugivores at my study site. Fruit crop size was positively related to absolute fruit removal, but not to proportional removal at the scale of the entire study site. However, crop size was positively related to proportional removal within the neighborhood of mistletoes occupying an individual host tree. Frugivores were attracted to infected hosts, host attractiveness increased, although proportional removal of fruit declined, with number of female mistletoes. The observed dispersal ecology of desert mistletoe suggests the likelihood of increasingly clumped distributions of mistletoe plants, as more and more seeds are deposited

  6. Effect of aluminum treatment on proteomes of radicles of seeds derived from Al-treated tomato plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint to plant growth and crop yield in acid soils. Tomato cultivars are especially susceptible to excessive A1 3+ accumulated in the root zone. In this study, tomato plants were grown in a hydroponic culture system supplemented with 50 uM AlK(SO4)2. Seeds harv...

  7. Seed Selection by the Harvester Ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Coastal Sage Scrub: Interactions With Invasive Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Briggs, C M; Redak, R A

    2016-08-01

    Harvester ants can be the dominant seed predators on plants by collecting and eating seeds and are known to influence plant communities. Harvester ants are abundant in coastal sage scrub (CSS), and CSS is frequently invaded by several exotic plant species. This study used observations of foraging and cafeteria-style experiments to test for seed species selection by the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus Emery (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in CSS. Analysis of foraging behavior showed that P. rugosus carried seeds of exotic Erodium cicutarium (L.) and exotic Brassica tournefortii (Gouan) on 85 and 15% of return trips to the nest (respectively), and only a very few ants carried the native seeds found within the study areas. When compared with the availability of seeds in the field, P. rugosus selected exotic E. cicutarium and avoided both native Encelia farinosa (Torrey & A. Gray) and exotic B. tournefortii. Foraging by P. rugosus had no major effect on the seed bank in the field. Cafeteria-style experiments confirmed that P. rugosus selected E. cicutarium over other available seeds. Native Eriogonum fasciculatum (Bentham) seeds were even less selected than E. farinosa and B. tournefortii.

  8. Sowing seed, planting trees, producing power

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S.

    1997-07-01

    With three crops-to-power projects, the US DOE and US DOA have their biomass power for rural development initiative in high gear. Farmers can produce abundant supplies of fast-growing energy crops on marginal or underutilized acreage to feed power plants. This article summarizes the three projects in Minnesota, Iowa, and New York, and discusses the importance of the necessity for cooperation.

  9. Seed and Root Endophytic Fungi in a Range Expanding and a Related Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Stefan; Kostenko, Olga; Cnossen, Mark C; Ten Hooven, Freddy C; Vreš, Branko; van der Putten, Wim H

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is accelerating the spread of plants and their associated species to new ranges. The differences in range shift capacity of the various types of species may disrupt long-term co-evolved relationships especially those belowground, however, this may be less so for seed-borne endophytic microbes. We collected seeds and soil of the range-expanding Centaurea stoebe and the congeneric Centaurea jacea from three populations growing in Slovenia (native range of both Centaurea species) and the Netherlands (expanded range of C. stoebe, native range of C. jacea). We isolated and identified endophytic fungi directly from seeds, as well as from roots of the plants grown in Slovenian, Dutch or sterilized soil to compare fungal endophyte composition. Furthermore, we investigated whether C. stoebe hosts a reduced community composition of endophytes in the expanded range due to release from plant-species specific fungi while endophyte communities in C. jacea in both ranges are similar. We cultivated 46 unique and phylogenetically diverse endophytes. A majority of the seed endophytes resembled potential pathogens, while most root endophytes were not likely to be pathogenic. Only one endophyte was found in both roots and seeds, but was isolated from different plant species. Unexpectedly, seed endophyte diversity of southern C. stoebe populations was lower than of populations from the north, while the seed endophyte community composition of northern C. stoebe populations was significantly different southern C. stoebe as well as northern and southern C. jacea populations. Root endophyte diversity was considerably lower in C. stoebe than in C. jacea independent of plant and soil origin, but this difference disappeared when plants were grown in sterile soils. We conclude that the community composition of fungal endophytes not only differs between related plant species but also between populations of plants that expand their range compared to their native habitat. Our

  10. Planting seeds for the future of food.

    PubMed

    Green, Hilary; Broun, Pierre; Cakmak, Ismail; Condon, Liam; Fedoroff, Nina; Gonzalez-Valero, Juan; Graham, Ian; Lewis, Josette; Moloney, Maurice; Oniang'o, Ruth K; Sanginga, Nteranya; Shewry, Peter; Roulin, Anne

    2016-03-30

    The health and wellbeing of future generations will depend on humankind's ability to deliver sufficient nutritious food to a world population in excess of 9 billion. Feeding this many people by 2050 will require science-based solutions that address sustainable agricultural productivity and enable healthful dietary patterns in a more globally equitable way. This topic was the focus of a multi-disciplinary international conference hosted by Nestlé in June 2015, and provides the inspiration for the present article. The conference brought together a diverse range of expertise and organisations from the developing and industrialised world, all with a common interest in safeguarding the future of food. This article provides a snapshot of three of the recurring topics that were discussed during this conference: soil health, plant science and the future of farming practice. Crop plants and their cultivation are the fundamental building blocks for a food secure world. Whether these are grown for food or feed for livestock, they are the foundation of food and nutrient security. Many of the challenges for the future of food will be faced where the crops are grown: on the farm. Farmers need to plant the right crops and create the right conditions to maximise productivity (yield) and quality (e.g. nutritional content), whilst maintaining the environment, and earning a living. New advances in science and technology can provide the tools and know-how that will, together with a more entrepreneurial approach, help farmers to meet the inexorable demand for the sustainable production of nutritious foods for future generations. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Planting seeds for the future of food

    PubMed Central

    Broun, Pierre; Cakmak, Ismail; Condon, Liam; Fedoroff, Nina; Gonzalez‐Valero, Juan; Graham, Ian; Lewis, Josette; Moloney, Maurice; Oniang'o, Ruth K; Sanginga, Nteranya; Shewry, Peter; Roulin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The health and wellbeing of future generations will depend on humankind's ability to deliver sufficient nutritious food to a world population in excess of 9 billion. Feeding this many people by 2050 will require science‐based solutions that address sustainable agricultural productivity and enable healthful dietary patterns in a more globally equitable way. This topic was the focus of a multi‐disciplinary international conference hosted by Nestlé in June 2015, and provides the inspiration for the present article. The conference brought together a diverse range of expertise and organisations from the developing and industrialised world, all with a common interest in safeguarding the future of food. This article provides a snapshot of three of the recurring topics that were discussed during this conference: soil health, plant science and the future of farming practice. Crop plants and their cultivation are the fundamental building blocks for a food secure world. Whether these are grown for food or feed for livestock, they are the foundation of food and nutrient security. Many of the challenges for the future of food will be faced where the crops are grown: on the farm. Farmers need to plant the right crops and create the right conditions to maximise productivity (yield) and quality (e.g. nutritional content), whilst maintaining the environment, and earning a living. New advances in science and technology can provide the tools and know‐how that will, together with a more entrepreneurial approach, help farmers to meet the inexorable demand for the sustainable production of nutritious foods for future generations. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26619956

  12. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration on seed production in C3 annual plants.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Kouki; Kinugasa, Toshihiko; Oikawa, Shimpei; Onoda, Yusuke; Hirose, Tadaki

    2011-02-01

    The response of seed production to CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) is known to vary considerably among C(3) annual species. Here we analyse the interspecific variation in CO(2) responses of seed production per plant with particular attention to nitrogen use. Provided that seed production is limited by nitrogen availability, an increase in seed mass per plant results from increase in seed nitrogen per plant and/or from decrease in seed nitrogen concentration ([N]). Meta-analysis reveals that the increase in seed mass per plant under elevated [CO(2)] is mainly due to increase in seed nitrogen per plant rather than seed [N] dilution. Nitrogen-fixing legumes enhanced nitrogen acquisition more than non-nitrogen-fixers, resulting in a large increase in seed mass per plant. In Poaceae, an increase in seed mass per plant was also caused by a decrease in seed [N]. Greater carbon allocation to albumen (endosperm and/or perisperm) than the embryo may account for [N] reduction in grass seeds. These differences in CO(2) response of seed production among functional groups may affect their fitness, leading to changes in species composition in the future high-[CO(2)] ecosystem.

  13. Characteristics of seed-slag fouling in MHD steam plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.S.H.; Dunn, P.F.; Johnson, T.R.; Reed, C.B.; Schlenger, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    At the Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL), five tests have been carried out to investigate the depositiono of seed-ash deposits that form on tubes in the convective sections of the MHD/steam bottoming plant. The effect of these deposits on heat transfer, their tenacity, and their composition were determined. In these tests, combustion gas containig ash particles and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ was passed through a bank of 15 vertical, cooled tubes, which simulated a steam superheater or reheater. The tube wall temperatures were between 580 and 860 K. Over the gas temperature range of 1230 to 1820 K, the seed material in the gas stream was present as vapor, liquid droplets, or solid particles. The deposits that formed on the tubes were mostly K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ with 10 to 40 mass % ash. The slag phase contained about 10 mass % water-insoluble potassium. The seed-ash deposits were of two distinct types. Effective thermal conductivities of deposits formed at gas temperatures above the seed melting point ranged from 0.33 to 0.4 W/m.K and tended to increase with temperature. From these conductivities, fouling factors can be estimated for a wide range of gas condtions and tube bank configurations. The tests completed to date support the premise that the convective sections of the NHD/steam bottoming plant can be designed to perate efficiently and reliably. (WHK)

  14. Effects of moist cold stratification on germination, plant growth regulators, metabolites and embryo ultrastructure in seeds of Acer morrisonense (Sapindaceae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun-Ying; Chou, Shih-Han; Tsai, Ching-Chu; Hsu, Wen-Yu; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M; Chien, Ching-Te; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long

    2015-09-01

    Breaking of seed dormancy by moist cold stratification involves complex interactions in cells. To assess the effect of moist cold stratification on dormancy break in seeds of Acer morrisonense, we monitored percentages and rates of germination and changes in plant growth regulators, sugars, amino acids and embryo ultrastructure after various periods of cold stratification. Fresh seeds incubated at 25/15 °C for 24 weeks germinated to 61%, while those cold stratified at 5 °C for 12 weeks germinated to 87% in 1 week. Neither exogenous GA3 nor GA4 pretreatment significantly increased final seed germination percentage. Total ABA content of seeds cold stratified for 12 weeks was reduced about 3.3-fold, to a concentration similar to that in germinated seeds (radicle emergence). Endogenous GA3 and GA7 were detected in 8-week and 12-week cold stratified seeds but not in fresh seeds. Numerous protein and lipid bodies were present in the plumule, first true leaves and cotyledons of fresh seeds. Protein and lipid bodies decreased greatly during cold stratification, and concentrations of total soluble sugars and amino acids increased. The major non-polar sugars in fresh seeds were sucrose and fructose, but sucrose increased and fructose decreased significantly during cold stratification. The major free amino acids were proline and tryptophan in fresh seeds, and proline increased and tryptophan decreased during cold stratification. Thus, as dormancy break occurs during cold stratification seeds of A. morrisonense undergo changes in plant growth regulators, proteins, lipids, sugars, amino acids and cell ultrastructure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A herbivory-induced increase in the proportion of floating seeds in an invasive plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukano, Yuya; Hirayama, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    It is important to determine the factors prompting seed dispersal because for plant species seed dispersal is the only opportunity to disperse into a new habitat. Previous studies showed that the maternal stress, such as high density and low nutrient levels, induces the adaptive plastic increase of the dispersal ability in seed heteromorphic plants. In this study, we examined whether herbivory can change the relative proportion of dispersal-related seed heteromorphism (floating or non floating seeds) in an invasive weed Ambrosia artemisiifolia. Because A. artemisiifolia often distributes in the riparian habitat, floating seeds might contribute to the long distance dispersal by hydrochory. Floating ability and seed weight were compared between plants damaged by a specialist herbivore Ophraella communa and undamaged plants. The damaged plants produced lighter and more likely floating seeds than the undamaged plants. However, multi-regression analysis revealed that the probability of floating was affected by seed weight but was not affected by herbivore treatment (damaged vs. undamaged plants). These results suggest that the increased proportion of floating seeds was not a direct response to the herbivore signal but an indirect response through the herbivore's effect on the reduction of seed weight. Plants damaged by herbivores might not only decrease seed production and quality but also increase the dispersal ability. These responses in dispersal ability against the herbivores might contribute to the spread of invasive plants.

  16. Using Soil Seed Banks to Bring Plant Communities into the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascoe, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Describes an alternative to studying plant community composition and dynamics. Suggests that teachers and students collect soil samples containing buried seeds (the seed bank), germinate the seeds in the laboratory, and analyze community dynamics through the composition of the seed bank. (ZWH)

  17. Using Soil Seed Banks to Bring Plant Communities into the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascoe, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Describes an alternative to studying plant community composition and dynamics. Suggests that teachers and students collect soil samples containing buried seeds (the seed bank), germinate the seeds in the laboratory, and analyze community dynamics through the composition of the seed bank. (ZWH)

  18. Universality of phloem transport in seed plants.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Liesche, Johannes; Bohr, Tomas; Schulz, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Since Münch in the 1920s proposed that sugar transport in the phloem vascular system is driven by osmotic pressure gradients, his hypothesis has been strongly supported by evidence from herbaceous angiosperms. Experimental constraints made it difficult to test this proposal in large trees, where the distance between source and sink might prove incompatible with the hypothesis. Recently, the theoretical optimization of the Münch mechanism was shown to lead to surprisingly simple predictions for the dimensions of the phloem sieve elements in relation to that of fast growing angiosperms. These results can be obtained in a very transparent way using a simple coupled resistor model. To test the universality of the Münch mechanism, we compiled anatomical data for 32 angiosperm and 38 gymnosperm trees with heights spanning 0.1-50 m. The species studied showed a remarkable correlation with the scaling predictions. The compiled data allowed calculating stem sieve element conductivity and predicting phloem sap flow velocity. The central finding of this work is that all vascular plants seem to have evolved efficient osmotic pumping units, despite their huge disparity in size and morphology. This contribution extends the physical understanding of phloem transport, and will facilitate detailed comparison between theory and field experiments. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G; Lawson, David M; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  20. Eliminating Anti-Nutritional Plant Food Proteins: The Case of Seed Protease Inhibitors in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C.; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G.; Lawson, David M.; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  1. Evolution of the APETALA2 Gene Lineage in Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Zumajo-Cardona, Cecilia; Pabón-Mora, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Gene duplication is a fundamental source of functional evolutionary change and has been associated with organismal diversification and the acquisition of novel features. The APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR (AP2/ERF) genes are exclusive to vascular plants and have been classified into the AP2-like and ERF-like clades. The AP2-like clade includes the AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and the euAPETALA2 (euAP2) genes, both regulated by miR172 Arabidopsis has two paralogs in the euAP2 clade, namely APETALA2 (AP2) and TARGET OF EAT3 (TOE3) that control flowering time, meristem determinacy, sepal and petal identity and fruit development. euAP2 genes are likely functionally divergent outside Brassicaceae, as they control fruit development in tomato, and regulate inflorescence meristematic activity in maize. We studied the evolution and expression patterns of euAP2/TOE3 genes to assess large scale and local duplications and evaluate protein motifs likely related with functional changes across seed plants. We sampled euAP2/TOE3 genes from vascular plants and have found three major duplications and a few taxon-specific duplications. Here, we report conserved and new motifs across euAP2/TOE3 proteins and conclude that proteins predating the Brassicaceae duplication are more similar to AP2 than TOE3. Expression data show a shift from restricted expression in leaves, carpels, and fruits in non-core eudicots and asterids to a broader expression of euAP2 genes in leaves, all floral organs and fruits in rosids. Altogether, our data show a functional trend where the canonical A-function (sepal and petal identity) is exclusive to Brassicaceae and it is likely not maintained outside of rosids. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The genetics and ecology of seed size variation in a biennial plant, Hydrophyllum appendiculatum (Hydrophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lorne M

    1995-03-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the sources of seed size variation in Hydrophyllum appendiculatum, an outcrossing, biennial plant. The genetic basis of seed size variation was examined with a diallel breeding design. The analysis did not reveal any evidence for additive genetic variance, suggesting that seed size could not evolve in response to natural selection. A series of greenhouse experiments was conducted to determine the sensitivity of seed weight to a number of ecological variables. Seed weight was affected by inbreeding depression: seeds produced by self-pollinations were significantly lighter that outcrossed seeds. Maternal plants did not differentially provision seeds that were the result of crosses between subpopulations (separated by 300 m) or between populations (separated by 1.7 km). Mean seed size was independent of the number of outcrossed pollen donors (one vs. many) that sired seeds on an inflorescence; however, the variance was greater on inflorescences pollinated by multiple donors. Direct manipulations of the abiotic environment showed that seed size was greater on plants growing under full sunlight compared to shaded plants. Seed size was unaffected by soil type, fertilizer addition, or defoliation. Finally, I determined the effect of varying pollination intensity at the level of a single inflorescence, and at the whole plant level. Seed weight was greatest on plants that had only 1 and 5 inflorescences pollinated, and least on those that had 10 and 20 pollinated. At the inflorescence level, seed weights were greatest on those where all flowers were pollinated, compared to inflorescences where only half of the flowers were pollinated. Perhaps the greatest contributor to variance in seed size in this species was the temporal decline within plants through the flowering season. These results indicate that maternal plants are not capable of producing uniform seed crops. Rather, the final distribution of seed size produced by plants within

  3. Climate warming could shift the timing of seed germination in alpine plants.

    PubMed

    Mondoni, Andrea; Rossi, Graziano; Orsenigo, Simone; Probert, Robin J

    2012-07-01

    Despite the considerable number of studies on the impacts of climate change on alpine plants, there have been few attempts to investigate its effect on regeneration. Recruitment from seeds is a key event in the life-history of plants, affecting their spread and evolution and seasonal changes in climate will inevitably affect recruitment success. Here, an investigation was made of how climate change will affect the timing and the level of germination in eight alpine species of the glacier foreland. Using a novel approach which considered the altitudinal variation of temperature as a surrogate for future climate scenarios, seeds were exposed to 12 different cycles of simulated seasonal temperatures in the laboratory, derived from measurements at the soil surface at the study site. Under present climatic conditions, germination occurred in spring, in all but one species, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, autumn warming resulted in a significant increase in germination in all but two species. In contrast, seed germination was less sensitive to changes in spring and/or winter temperatures, which affected only three species. Climate warming will lead to a shift from spring to autumn emergence but the extent of this change across species will be driven by seed dormancy status. Ungerminated seeds at the end of autumn will be exposed to shorter winter seasons and lower spring temperatures in a future, warmer climate, but these changes will only have a minor impact on germination. The extent to which climate change will be detrimental to regeneration from seed is less likely to be due to a significant negative effect on germination per se, but rather to seedling emergence in seasons that the species are not adapted to experience. Emergence in autumn could have major implications for species currently adapted to emerge in spring.

  4. A plant DNA ligase is an important determinant of seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Masnavi, Ghzaleh; Bhardwaj, Rajni M; Jiang, Qing; Bray, Clifford M; West, Christopher E

    2010-09-01

    DNA repair is important for maintaining genome integrity. In plants, DNA damage accumulated in the embryo of seeds is repaired early in imbibition, and is important for germination performance and seed longevity. An essential step in most repair pathways is the DNA ligase-mediated rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Here, we report the characterization of DNA LIGASE VI, which is only found in plant species. The primary structure of this ligase shows a unique N-terminal region that contains a β-CASP motif, which is found in a number of repair proteins, including the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor Artemis. Phenotypic analysis revealed a delay in the germination of atlig6 mutants compared with wild-type lines, and this delay becomes markedly exacerbated in the presence of the genotoxin menadione. Arabidopsis atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display significant hypersensitivity to controlled seed ageing, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seed viability relative to wild-type lines. In addition, atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display increased sensitivity to low-temperature stress, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seedling vigour upon transfer to standard growth conditions. Seeds display a rapid transcriptional DNA DSB response, which is activated in the earliest stages of water imbibition, providing evidence for the accumulation of cytotoxic DSBs in the quiescent seed. These results implicate AtLIG6 and AtLIG4 as major determinants of Arabidopsis seed quality and longevity.

  5. An effective seed protection method for planting Zostera marina (eelgrass) seeds: Implications for their large-scale restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei-Dong; Fang, Chao; Liu, Jie; Xu, Qiang; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Yan-Shan

    2015-06-15

    We describe an innovative method of planting Zostera marina (eelgrass) seeds in which hessian bags filled with high-silted sediments are used as a seed protecting device. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of the method through a field seed-sowing experiment over a three year period. The suitable seed planting density required by the seeds of Z. marina in this method was also investigated. In the spring following seed distribution, seedling establishment rate of Z. marina subjected to different seed densities of 200-500seedsbag(-1) ranged from 16% to 26%. New eelgrass patches from seed were fully developed and well maintained after 2-3years following distribution. The seed planting density of 400seedsbag(-1) may be the most suitable for the establishment of new eelgrass patches. Our results demonstrate that seed-based restoration can be an effective restoration tool and the technique presented should be considered for future large-scale Z. marina restoration projects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 78 FR 13776 - National Organic Program: Notice of Policies Addressing Kelp, Seeds and Planting Stock, Livestock...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... Results from Pesticide Residue Testing (NOP 2613)''; ``Seeds, Annual Seedlings, and Planting Stock in... results from pesticide residue testing, requirements for procurement and use of seed, seedlings and... Livestock Feed; ``NOP 5029-- Seeds, Annual Seedlings, and Planting Stock in Organic Crop Production''; and...

  7. 7 CFR 205.204 - Seeds and planting stock practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... seeds, annual seedlings, and planting stock: Except, That, (1) Nonorganically produced, untreated seeds... variety is not commercially available; (3) Nonorganically produced annual seedlings may be used to produce... organic management for a period of no less than 1 year; and (5) Seeds, annual seedlings, and planting...

  8. 7 CFR 205.204 - Seeds and planting stock practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... seeds, annual seedlings, and planting stock: Except, That, (1) Nonorganically produced, untreated seeds... variety is not commercially available; (3) Nonorganically produced annual seedlings may be used to produce... organic management for a period of no less than 1 year; and (5) Seeds, annual seedlings, and planting...

  9. 7 CFR 205.204 - Seeds and planting stock practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... seeds, annual seedlings, and planting stock: Except, That, (1) Nonorganically produced, untreated seeds... variety is not commercially available; (3) Nonorganically produced annual seedlings may be used to produce... organic management for a period of no less than 1 year; and (5) Seeds, annual seedlings, and planting...

  10. 7 CFR 205.204 - Seeds and planting stock practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... seeds, annual seedlings, and planting stock: Except, That, (1) Nonorganically produced, untreated seeds... variety is not commercially available; (3) Nonorganically produced annual seedlings may be used to produce... organic management for a period of no less than 1 year; and (5) Seeds, annual seedlings, and planting...

  11. 7 CFR 205.204 - Seeds and planting stock practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... seeds, annual seedlings, and planting stock: Except, That, (1) Nonorganically produced, untreated seeds... variety is not commercially available; (3) Nonorganically produced annual seedlings may be used to produce... organic management for a period of no less than 1 year; and (5) Seeds, annual seedlings, and planting...

  12. Pathways of invasive plant spread to Alaska: III. contaminants in crop and grass seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive plants disperse to new areas via numerous pathways. Study of these pathways helps to focus limited budgets for prevention and early detection. This study examined seed contaminants in imported crop and grass seed as pathway for plant dispersal to Alaska. Crop and grass seed were purchased f...

  13. Germination and field survival of white-topped pitcher plant seeds

    Treesearch

    Kristina Connor; Hilliard Gibbs

    2012-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine longevity of white-topped pitcher plant (Sarracenia leucophylla, Raf.) seeds in the field and in cold storage. Thirty seed pods were harvested in August 2009 from plants located in Alabama 38 miles from the Gulf Coast. Of the 10,000+ seeds extracted from the pods, some were buried outside in screen-wire bags and...

  14. Limitations to postfire seedling establishment: The role of seeding technology, water availability, and invasive plant abundance

    Treesearch

    Jeremy J. James; Tony. Svejcar

    2010-01-01

    Seeding rangeland following wildfire is a central tool managers use to stabilize soils and inhibit the spread of invasive plants. Rates of successful seeding on arid rangeland, however, are low. The objective of this study was to determine the degree to which water availability, invasive plant abundance, and seeding technology influence postfire seedling establishment...

  15. Cotyledon damage affects seed number through final plant size in the annual grassland species Medicago lupulina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiting; Zhao, Chuan; Lamb, Eric G

    2011-03-01

    The effects of cotyledon damage on seedling growth and survival are relatively well established, but little is known about the effects on aspects of plant fitness such as seed number and size. Here the direct and indirect mechanisms linking cotyledon damage and plant fitness in the annual species Medicago lupulina are examined. Growth and reproductive traits, including mature plant size, time to first flowering, flower number, seed number and individual seed mass were monitored in M. lupulina plants when zero, one or two cotyledons were removed at 7 d old. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to examine the mechanisms linking cotyledon damage to seed number and seed mass. Cotyledon damage reduced seed number but not individual seed mass. The primary mechanism was a reduction in plant biomass with cotyledon damage that in turn reduced seed number primarily through a reduction in flower numbers. Although cotyledon damage delayed flower initiation, it had little effect on seed number. Individual seed mass was not affected by cotyledon removal, but there was a trade-off between seed number and seed mass. It is shown how a network of indirect mechanisms link damage to cotyledons and fitness in M. lupulina. Cotyledon damage had strong direct effects on both plant size and flowering phenology, but an analysis of the causal relationships among plant traits and fitness components showed that a reduction in plant size associated with cotyledon damage was an important mechanism influencing fitness.

  16. Effect of Seed Position on Parental Plant on Proportion of Seeds Produced with Nondeep and Intermediate Physiological Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Juan J.; Tan, Dun Y.; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    The position in which seeds develop on the parental plant can have an effect on dormancy-break and germination. We tested the hypothesis that the proportion of seeds with intermediate physiological dormancy (PD) produced in the proximal position on a raceme of Isatis violascens plants is higher than that produced in the distal position, and further that this difference is related to temperature during seed development. Plants were watered at 3-day intervals, and silicles and seeds from the proximal (early) and distal (late) positions of racemes on the same plants were collected separately and tested for germination. After 0 and 6 months dry storage at room temperature (afterripening), silicles and seeds were cold stratified for 0–16 weeks and tested for germination. Mean daily maximum and minimum temperatures during development/maturation of the two groups of seeds did not differ. A higher proportion of seeds with the intermediate level than with the nondeep level of PD was produced by silicles in the proximal position than by those in the distal position, while the proportion of seeds with nondeep PD was higher in the distal than in the proximal position of the raceme. The differences were not due only to seed mass. Since temperature and soil moisture conditions were the same during development of the seeds in the raceme, differences in proportion of seeds with intermediate and nondeep PD are attributed to position on parental plant. The ecological consequence of this phenomenon is that it ensures diversity in dormancy-breaking and germination characteristics within a seed cohort, a probable bet-hedging strategy. This is the first demonstration of position effects on level of PD in the offspring. PMID:28232842

  17. Effect of Seed Position on Parental Plant on Proportion of Seeds Produced with Nondeep and Intermediate Physiological Dormancy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Juan J; Tan, Dun Y; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M

    2017-01-01

    The position in which seeds develop on the parental plant can have an effect on dormancy-break and germination. We tested the hypothesis that the proportion of seeds with intermediate physiological dormancy (PD) produced in the proximal position on a raceme of Isatis violascens plants is higher than that produced in the distal position, and further that this difference is related to temperature during seed development. Plants were watered at 3-day intervals, and silicles and seeds from the proximal (early) and distal (late) positions of racemes on the same plants were collected separately and tested for germination. After 0 and 6 months dry storage at room temperature (afterripening), silicles and seeds were cold stratified for 0-16 weeks and tested for germination. Mean daily maximum and minimum temperatures during development/maturation of the two groups of seeds did not differ. A higher proportion of seeds with the intermediate level than with the nondeep level of PD was produced by silicles in the proximal position than by those in the distal position, while the proportion of seeds with nondeep PD was higher in the distal than in the proximal position of the raceme. The differences were not due only to seed mass. Since temperature and soil moisture conditions were the same during development of the seeds in the raceme, differences in proportion of seeds with intermediate and nondeep PD are attributed to position on parental plant. The ecological consequence of this phenomenon is that it ensures diversity in dormancy-breaking and germination characteristics within a seed cohort, a probable bet-hedging strategy. This is the first demonstration of position effects on level of PD in the offspring.

  18. Ants Sow the Seeds of Global Diversification in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, Szabolcs; Gove, Aaron D.; Latimer, Andrew M.; Majer, Jonathan D.; Dunn, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Background The extraordinary diversification of angiosperm plants in the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods has produced an estimated 250,000–300,000 living angiosperm species and has fundamentally altered terrestrial ecosystems. Interactions with animals as pollinators or seed dispersers have long been suspected as drivers of angiosperm diversification, yet empirical examples remain sparse or inconclusive. Seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory) may drive diversification as it can reduce extinction by providing selective advantages to plants and can increase speciation by enhancing geographical isolation by extremely limited dispersal distances. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the most comprehensive sister-group comparison to date, we tested the hypothesis that myrmecochory leads to higher diversification rates in angiosperm plants. As predicted, diversification rates were substantially higher in ant-dispersed plants than in their non-myrmecochorous relatives. Data from 101 angiosperm lineages in 241 genera from all continents except Antarctica revealed that ant-dispersed lineages contained on average more than twice as many species as did their non-myrmecochorous sister groups. Contrasts in species diversity between sister groups demonstrated that diversification rates did not depend on seed dispersal mode in the sister group and were higher in myrmecochorous lineages in most biogeographic regions. Conclusions/Significance Myrmecochory, which has evolved independently at least 100 times in angiosperms and is estimated to be present in at least 77 families and 11 000 species, is a key evolutionary innovation and a globally important driver of plant diversity. Myrmecochory provides the best example to date for a consistent effect of any mutualism on large-scale diversification. PMID:19436714

  19. Seed Development and Germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed is the fertilized and matured ovule of angiosperms and gymnosperms and represents a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants. Seeds of diverse plant species may display differences in size, shape and color. Despite apparent morphological variations, most mature seeds consist of three major com...

  20. Greenhouse (III): Gas-Exchange and Seed-to-Seed Experiments on the Russian Space Station MIR and Earth-grown, Ethylene-Treated Wheat Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William F.; Bingham, Gail; Carman, John; Bubenheim, David; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sytchev, Vladimir N.; Podolsky, Igor B.; Chernova, Lola; Nefodova, Yelena

    2001-01-01

    The Mir Space Station provided an outstanding opportunity to study long-term plant responses when exposed to a microgravity environment. Furthermore, if plants can be grown to maturity in a microgravity environment, they might be used in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). The primary objective of the Greenhouse experiment onboard Mir was to grow Super Dwarf and Apogee wheat through complete life cycles in microgravity; i.e., from seed-to-seed-to-seed. Additional objectives were to study chemical, biochemical, and structural changes in plant tissues as well as photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration (evaporation of water from plants). Another major objective was to evaluate the suitability clothe facilities on Mir for advanced research with plants. The Greenhouse experiment was conducted in the Russian/Bulgarian plant growth chamber, the Svet, to which the United States added instrumentation systems to monitor changes in CO2 and water vapor caused by the plants (with four infrared gas analyzers monitoring air entering and leaving two small plastic chambers). In addition, the US instrumentation also monitored O2; air, leaf (IR), cabin pressure; photon flux; and substrate temperature and substrate moisture (16 probes in the root module). Facility modifications were first performed during the summer of 1995 during Mir 19, which began after STS-72 left Mir. Plant development was monitored by daily observations and some photographs.

  1. Importance of seed-borne fungi of sorghum and pearl millet in Burkina Faso and their control using plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Zida, Pawindé Elisabeth; Sérémé, Paco; Leth, Vibeke; Sankara, Philippe; Somda, Irénée; Néya, Adama

    2008-02-01

    Seed-borne fungi of sorghum and pearl millet in Burkina Faso were surveyed. A total of 188 seed samples from various locations, collected in 1989 (42) and 2002 (146), were tested, using the blotter, dry inspection and washing methods. Infection experiments were carried out with the major fungi recorded on each crop by the blotter test. Six essential oils of plants were investigated for their inhibitory activity against eight pathogenic fungi. Thirty four and 27 fungal species were found in seed samples of sorghum and pearl millet, respectively. Phoma sp. and Fusarium moniliforme infected 95 to 100% of the seed samples of both sorghum and pearl millet. Sphacelotheca sorghi and Tolyposporium ehrenbergii were encountered in respectively, 75 and 33% of seed samples of sorghum. T. penicillariae, Sclerospora graminicola and Claviceps fusiformis were present in 88, 41 and 32% of seed samples of pearl millet, respectively. Seeds inoculated with Acremonium strictum, Curvularia oryzae, F. equiseti, F. moniliforme and F. subglutinans and sown in sterilized soil, showed considerable mortality of the seedlings. Three essential oils inhibited in vitro the mycelial growth of all the fungi used by 85 to 100% and reduced significantly sorghum and pearl millet seed infection rates of Phoma sp., Fusarium sp., Curvularia sp., Colletotrichum graminicola and Exserohilum sp. Presence of many pathogenic fungi in considerable number of seed samples indicates the need of field surveys for these and other pathogens. Development of plant extracts for the control of seed-borne pathogens and public awareness on seed-borne diseases management measures for maintaining quality seed should be increased.

  2. Analysis of plant soil seed banks and seed dispersal vectors: Its potential and limits for forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Šumberová, Kateřina; Ducháček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Plant seeds exhibit many species-specific traits, thus potentially being especially helpful for forensic investigations. Seeds of a broad range of plant species occur in soil seed banks of various habitats and may become attached in large quantities to moving objects. Although plant seeds are now routinely used as trace evidence in forensic practice, only scant information has been published on this topic in the scientific literature. Thus, the standard methods remain unknown to specialists in such botanical subjects as plant ecology and plant geography. These specialists, if made aware of the forensic uses of seeds, could help in development of new, more sophisticated approaches. We aim to bridge the gap between forensic analysts and botanists. Therefore, we explore the available literature and compare it with our own experiences to reveal both the potential and limits of soil seed bank and seed dispersal analysis in forensic investigations. We demonstrate that habitat-specific and thus relatively rare species are of the greatest forensic value. Overall species composition, in terms of species presence/absence and relative abundance can also provide important information. In particular, the ecological profiles of seeds found on any moving object can help us identify the types of environments through which the object had travelled. We discuss the applicability of this approach to various European environments, with the ability to compare seed samples with georeferenced vegetation databases being particularly promising for forensic investigations. We also explore the forensic limitations of soil seed bank and seed dispersal vector analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seed consumption and dispersal of ant-dispersed plants by slugs.

    PubMed

    Türke, Manfred; Heinze, Eric; Andreas, Kerstin; Svendsen, Sarah M; Gossner, Martin M; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2010-07-01

    In beech-dominated forests in Central Europe, many spring geophytes show adaptations to seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory). Ants, however, can be rare in such moist forests. Motivated by observations of slug feeding on seeds we investigated the seed consumption of two plant species, Anemone nemorosa and Asarum europaeum, by slugs, in a series of experiments. In a seed predation experiment in a beech forest, we found that seed removal was strongly reduced when gastropods were excluded from the seed depots. The contribution of insects, including ants, and rodents to seed removal was relatively less but differed between May and July. In the laboratory, slug species, in particular Arion sp., consumed seeds of both plant species. Slugs either consumed the elaiosomes of seeds or swallowed seeds intact. Swallowed seeds were defecated undamaged and germinated as well as control seeds when buried overwinter, indicating the potential for seed dispersal by slugs. We also recovered seeds of myrmecochores in the faeces of several slugs caught in forests. In a slug release experiment in the forest, slugs moved up to 14.6 m (mean 4.4 m) in 15 h, which is the median gut passage time of seeds based on measurements made in the laboratory. We also found that when slug-defecated seeds were offered to rodents, these were less attractive than control seeds, suggesting that passage through the slug gut reduces seed predation risk. Our results demonstrate that slugs are significant consumers of elaiosomes or entire seeds of ant-dispersed plants and that they can function as seed dispersers of these plants.

  4. A Late Devonian Fertile Organ with Seed Plant Affinities from China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deming; Liu, Le; Guo, Yun; Xue, Jinzhuang; Meng, Meicen

    2015-01-01

    Seed plants underwent first major evolutionary radiation in the Late Devonian (Famennian), as evidenced by the numerous ovules described to date. However, the early pollen organs are underrepresented, so that their structure and evolution remain poorly known. Here we report a new taxon of pollen organ Placotheca minuta from the Late Devonian. The synangium consists of many basally and more or less laterally fused microsporangia borne on the margin of a pad. The prepollen is spherical and trilete. The appearance of Famennian synangia especially in Placotheca does not support the current understanding that the earliest pollen organs closely resembled the fructifications of the ancestral progymnosperms. Placotheca indicates earlier diversification of pollen organs than previously expected and is highly derived among the early pollen organs with trilete prepollen. It is suggested that, immediately after the origination of seed plants, pollen organs had evolved at a rapid rate, whereas their prepollen remained primitively spore-like. PMID:26022973

  5. Restoring Eelgrass (Zostera marina) from Seed: A Comparison of Planting Methods for Large-Scale Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    A. V. Lombana, K. A. Moore, J. M. Rhode, and H. E. Woods. 2000. A review of issues in seagrass seed dormancy and germination : Implications for...temperatures and salinity. Seed plant- ing occurred in September 2005, prior to the initiation of seed germination in the late fall (Orth and Moore... germination was complete) by sieving the sediment and retrieving all Figure 6. Pumping seeds to the deployed planting sled. 4 ERDC/TN SAV-08-1 March 2008

  6. Seed maturation: Simplification of control networks in plants.

    PubMed

    Devic, Martine; Roscoe, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Networks controlling developmental or metabolic processes in plants are often complex as a consequence of the duplication and specialisation of the regulatory genes as well as the numerous levels of transcriptional and post-transcriptional controls added during evolution. Networks serve to accommodate multicellular complexity and increase robustness to environmental changes. Mathematical simplification by regrouping genes or pathways in a limited number of hubs has facilitated the construction of models for complex traits. In a complementary approach, a biological simplification can be achieved by using genetic modification to understand the core and singular ancestral function of the network, which is likely to be more prevalent within the plant kingdom rather than specific to a species. With this viewpoint, we review examples of simplification successfully undertaken in yeast and other organisms. A strategy of progressive complementation of single, double and triple mutants of seed maturation confirmed the fundamental role of the AFL sub-family of B3 transcription factors as master regulators of seed maturation, illustrating that biological simplification of complex networks could be more widely applied in plants. Defining minimal control networks will facilitate evolutionary comparisons of regulatory processes and the identification of an essential gene set for synthetic biology.

  7. Splash-cup plants accelerate raindrops to disperse seeds

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Guillermo J.; Yamada, Yasukuni; McCurley, Matthew; Hu, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The conical flowers of splash-cup plants Chrysosplenium and Mazus catch raindrops opportunistically, exploiting the subsequent splash to disperse their seeds. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we elucidate their mechanism for maximizing dispersal distance. We fabricate conical plant mimics using three-dimensional printing, and use high-speed video to visualize splash profiles and seed travel distance. Drop impacts that strike the cup off-centre achieve the largest dispersal distances of up to 1 m. Such distances are achieved because splash speeds are three to five times faster than incoming drop speeds, and so faster than the traditionally studied splashes occurring upon horizontal surfaces. This anomalous splash speed is because of the superposition of two components of momentum, one associated with a component of the drop's motion parallel to the splash-cup surface, and the other associated with film spreading induced by impact with the splash-cup. Our model incorporating these effects predicts the observed dispersal distance within 6–18% error. According to our experiments, the optimal cone angle for the splash-cup is 40°, a value consistent with the average of five species of splash-cup plants. This optimal angle arises from the competing effects of velocity amplification and projectile launching angle. PMID:23235266

  8. Splash-cup plants accelerate raindrops to disperse seeds.

    PubMed

    Amador, Guillermo J; Yamada, Yasukuni; McCurley, Matthew; Hu, David L

    2013-02-01

    The conical flowers of splash-cup plants Chrysosplenium and Mazus catch raindrops opportunistically, exploiting the subsequent splash to disperse their seeds. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we elucidate their mechanism for maximizing dispersal distance. We fabricate conical plant mimics using three-dimensional printing, and use high-speed video to visualize splash profiles and seed travel distance. Drop impacts that strike the cup off-centre achieve the largest dispersal distances of up to 1 m. Such distances are achieved because splash speeds are three to five times faster than incoming drop speeds, and so faster than the traditionally studied splashes occurring upon horizontal surfaces. This anomalous splash speed is because of the superposition of two components of momentum, one associated with a component of the drop's motion parallel to the splash-cup surface, and the other associated with film spreading induced by impact with the splash-cup. Our model incorporating these effects predicts the observed dispersal distance within 6-18% error. According to our experiments, the optimal cone angle for the splash-cup is 40°, a value consistent with the average of five species of splash-cup plants. This optimal angle arises from the competing effects of velocity amplification and projectile launching angle.

  9. Effects of Aflatoxin on Seeding Growth and Ultrastructure in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Eli V.

    1973-01-01

    Nineteen plants belonging to 11 species of the cruciferae were studied to determine the effects of aflatoxin B1 on seed germination and seedling development. Germination was not inhibited in any test organism at a concentration of 100 μg of aflatoxin per ml of agar substrate. Inhibition of elongation of the hypocotyls and roots in the species studied varied from 29 to 93% and from 22 to 91% in the respective tissues. Lepidium sativum was the most susceptible plant studied and exhibited the maximal inhibitory response noted above at concentrations of 8 μg of aflatoxin per ml. The ultrastructure of Lepidium root cells treated with crystalline aflatoxin B1 exhibited morphological changes characteristic of those found in aflatoxin-treated animal cells. In addition to changes in the cytoplasmic organelles, numerous ring-shaped nucleoli with prominent nucleolar caps were produced. The effect of aflatoxin on plant cells is compared with similar effects induced by actinomycin D. Seed germination and seedling development is discussed in relation to the effects of both compounds on deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid biosynthesis. Images PMID:4767301

  10. Effect of soybean ureases on seed germination and plant development.

    PubMed

    Rechenmacher, Ciliana; Wiebke-Strohm, Beatriz; Oliveira-Busatto, Luisa A de; Polacco, Joseph C; Carlini, Célia R; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria H

    2017-03-02

    Urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. The ammonia (nitrogen (N) product of urease activity) is incorporated into organic compounds. Thus, urease is involved in N remobilization, as well as in primary N assimilation. Two urease isoforms have been described for soybean: the embryo-specific, encoded by the Eu1 gene, and the ubiquitous urease, encoded by Eu4. A third urease-encoding gene was recently identified, designated Eu5, which encodes the putative protein product SBU-III. The present study aimed to evaluate the contribution of soybean ureases to seed germination and plant development. Analyses were performed using Eu1/Eu4/Eu5-co-suppressed transgenic plants and mutants of the Eu1 and Eu4 urease structural genes, as well as a urease-null mutant (eu3-a) that activates neither the ubiquitous nor embryo-specific ureases. The co-suppressed plants presented a developmental delay during the first month after germination; shoots and roots were significantly smaller and lighter. Slower development was observed for the double eu1-a/eu4-a mutant and the eu3-a single mutant. The N content in transgenic plants was significantly lower than in non-transgenic plants. Among the mutants, eu3-a presented the lowest and eu1-a the highest N content. Altogether, these results indicate that increased ureolytic activity plays an important role in plant development.

  11. Preliminary experimentation in mechanically planting large seeded tree species

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, T.W.; Graves, D.H.

    1980-12-01

    Present methods of reforestation are very limiting to the mining industry in its attempts to reclaim large areas to commercially important tree species. A possible solution to some of the limitations would be the use of a mechanical planter that can plant and fertilize tree seed on steep mine slopes. This paper is a report on the preliminary work being done in the development of such a planter. A commercially available planter is being modified for this purpose and initial success is encouraging further development.

  12. Plant abundance: the measurement and relationship with seed size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2003-01-01

    There are many inconsistencies in early reports describing the relationships between plant abundance and other biotic (e.g., seed size) or abiotic variables (e.g., precipitation). It has been difficult to generalize such relationships when abundance is measured differently (e.g., density, biomass, cover). This article suggests using abundance in two broad categories: numerical abundance (e.g., number of individuals, density) and mass abundance (e.g., biomass, cover). Collective evidence indicates that when abundance is measured the same way, the observed patterns may actually be more consistent.

  13. Fungicidal seed coatings exert minor effects on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant nutrient content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: Determine if contemporary, seed-applied fungicidal formulations inhibit colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, plant development, or plant nutrient content during early vegetative stages of several commodity crops. Methods: We evaluated seed-applied commercial fungic...

  14. Sex and pollen: the role of males in stabilising a plant-seed eater pollinating mutualism.

    PubMed

    Després, Laurence

    2003-03-01

    Some plants are exclusively pollinated by an insect whose larvae feed on their seeds. The net outcome of a single visit for the plant depends on the number of ovules fertilised by the visitor, the number of eggs laid, and the number of seeds eaten by each larva. Unlike other known plant-seed eater pollinating mutualisms, the globeflower-globeflower fly mutualism (Trollius europaeus-Chiastocheta spp.) is unique in that not only females but also males visit flowers, and both sexes are potential pollinators. I analysed the relative efficiency of Chiastocheta males versus females in transporting pollen and fertilising globeflower ovules. I show that there is no sex-specific morphological adaptation or behaviour to enhance pollen collection and transportation in Chiastocheta flies, and that males contribute to pollination. However, because of their smaller body size, males transport significantly less pollen than females. Less seeds are produced after a visit from a male than after a visit from a female. A single female visit contributes to about 12% of total seed production, and a single male visit to only 5.4%. Females tend to spend more time inside the flower than males, and the number of ovules fertilised is significantly correlated with the time insects spent inside the closed corolla. The lower efficiency of ovule fertilisation by a male's single visit is compensated for by the higher rate of flower visitation by males: a flower receives about twice as many visits from males as from females during a time unit. The contribution of males to pollination is of major importance with respect to understanding the evolutionary stability of the globeflower-globeflower fly mutualism, as males satiate pollen requirement of flowers, masking the antagonistic effect of ovipositing females.

  15. Film coating of seeds with Bacillus cereus RS87 spores for early plant growth enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jetiyanon, Kanchalee; Wittaya-Areekul, Sakchai; Plianbangchang, Pinyupa

    2008-10-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus cereus RS87 was previously reported to promote plant growth in various crops in both greenhouse and field trials. To apply as a plant growth promoting agent with practical use, it is essential to ease the burden of routine preparation of a fresh suspension of strain RS87 in laboratory. The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of film-coating seeds with B. cereus RS87 spores for early plant growth enhancement and to reveal the indoleacetic acid (IAA) production released from strain RS87. The experiment consisted of the following 5 treatments: nontreated seeds, water-soaked seeds, film-coated seeds, seeds soaked with vegetative cells of strain RS87, and film-coated seeds with strain RS87 spores. Three experiments were conducted separately to assess seed emergence, root length, and plant height. Results showed that both vegetative cells and spores of strain RS87 significantly promoted (P < or = 0.05) seed emergence, root length and plant height over the control treatments. The strain RS87 also produced IAA. In conclusion, the film coating of seeds with spores of B. cereus RS87 demonstrated early plant growth enhancement as well as seeds using their vegetative cells. IAA released from strain RS87 would be one of the mechanisms for plant growth enhancement.

  16. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Simone N M; Salazar, Marcela M; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2-6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4-8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol.

  17. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Simone N.M.; Salazar, Marcela M.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2–6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4–8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol. PMID:26150956

  18. Characterization and viscosity parameters of seed oils from wild plants.

    PubMed

    Eromosele, C O; Paschal, N H

    2003-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of Spondias mombin seed oil and the viscosity-temperature profiles of six seed oils from other plants which grow in the wild: Balanites aegytiaca, Lophira lanceolata, Sterculia setigera, Khaya senegalensis, Ximenia americana and Sclereocarya birrea, were investigated. The oil content of S. mombin seed was significant at 31.5% (w/w). The oil appeared stable as deduced from its low peroxide and acid values of 6.0 mEq kg(-1) and 1.68 mg KOH, respectively. The X. americana oil was denser than the other ones, with a value of 0.9625 g cm(-3) at 30 degrees C. The kinematic viscosities of the oils and their temperature dependence in the range 30-70 degrees C suggested a potential industrial application of the oils as lubricating base stock. Specifically, the kinematic viscosities of the oils were in the range 59.8-938.2 cst at 30 degrees C with X. americana having the highest value. At 70 degrees C, the reduction in viscosities of the oils was marked: reduction by over 70% of their values at 30 degrees C for S. setigera, K. senegalensis, X. americana and S. birrea oils.

  19. Seeds of a Soldier: The True Story of Edgar Allan Poe - The Sergeant Major

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Seeds of a Soldier. The true story of Edgar Allan Poe - the...Std Z39-18 Army Space Journal Fall 200360 By Michael L. Howard Seeds of a Soldier The true story of Edgar Allan Poe — the Sergeant Major...the Managing Editor via email to richard.burks@arspace.army.mil dgar Allan Poe wore U.S. Army sergeant major stripes. Using the name Edgar A. Perry

  20. Handling Arabidopsis plants: growth, preservation of seeds, transformation, and genetic crosses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz; Scholl, Randy; Holomuzki, Nicholas; Crist, Deborah; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Growing healthy plants is essential for the advancement of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) research. Over the last 20 years, the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) has collected and developed a series of best-practice protocols, some of which are presented in this chapter. Arabidopsis can be grown in a variety of locations, growth media, and environmental conditions. Most laboratory accessions and their mutant or transgenic derivatives flower after 4-5 weeks and set seeds after 7-8 weeks, under standard growth conditions (soil, long day, 23 ºC). Some mutant genotypes, natural accessions, and Arabidopsis relatives require strict control of growth conditions best provided by growth rooms, chambers, or incubators. Other lines can be grown in less-controlled greenhouse settings. Although the majority of lines can be grown in soil, certain experimental purposes require utilization of sterile solid or liquid growth media. These include the selection of primary transformants, identification of homozygous lethal individuals in a segregating population, or bulking of a large amount of plant material. The importance of controlling, observing, and recording growth conditions is emphasized and appropriate equipment required to perform monitoring of these conditions is listed. Proper conditions for seed harvesting and preservation, as well as seed quality control, are also described. Plant transformation and genetic crosses, two of the methods that revolutionized Arabidopsis genetics, are introduced as well.

  1. Phylogenomics and coalescent analyses resolve extant seed plant relationships.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    The extant seed plants include more than 260,000 species that belong to five main lineages: angiosperms, conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes. Despite tremendous effort using molecular data, phylogenetic relationships among these five lineages remain uncertain. Here, we provide the first broad coalescent-based species tree estimation of seed plants using genome-scale nuclear and plastid data By incorporating 305 nuclear genes and 47 plastid genes from 14 species, we identify that i) extant gymnosperms (i.e., conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes) are monophyletic, ii) gnetophytes exhibit discordant placements within conifers between their nuclear and plastid genomes, and iii) cycads plus Ginkgo form a clade that is sister to all remaining extant gymnosperms. We additionally observe that the placement of Ginkgo inferred from coalescent analyses is congruent across different nucleotide rate partitions. In contrast, the standard concatenation method produces strongly supported, but incongruent placements of Ginkgo between slow- and fast-evolving sites. Specifically, fast-evolving sites yield relationships in conflict with coalescent analyses. We hypothesize that this incongruence may be related to the way in which concatenation methods treat sites with elevated nucleotide substitution rates. More empirical and simulation investigations are needed to understand this potential weakness of concatenation methods.

  2. Interaction between parental environment and genotype affects plant and seed performance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    He, Hanzi; de Souza Vidigal, Deborah; Snoek, L Basten; Schnabel, Sabine; Nijveen, Harm; Hilhorst, Henk; Bentsink, Leónie

    2014-12-01

    Seed performance after dispersal is highly dependent on parental environmental cues, especially during seed formation and maturation. Here we examine which environmental factors are the most dominant in this respect and whether their effects are dependent on the genotypes under investigation. We studied the influence of light intensity, photoperiod, temperature, nitrate, and phosphate during seed development on five plant attributes and thirteen seed attributes, using 12 Arabidopsis genotypes that have been reported to be affected in seed traits. As expected, the various environments during seed development resulted in changed plant and/or seed performances. Comparative analysis clearly indicated that, overall, temperature plays the most dominant role in both plant and seed performance, whereas light has a prominent impact on plant traits. In comparison to temperature and light, nitrate mildly affected some of the plant and seed traits while phosphate had even less influence on those traits. Moreover, clear genotype-by-environment interactions were identified. This was shown by the fact that individual genotypes responded differentially to the environmental conditions. Low temperature significantly increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG1 and cyp707a1-1, whereas low light intensity increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG3 and NILDOG6. This also indicates that different genetic and molecular pathways are involved in the plant and seed responses. By identifying environmental conditions that affect the dormancy vs longevity correlation in the same way as previously identified naturally occurring loci, we have identified selective forces that probably shaped evolution for these important seed traits.

  3. Interaction between parental environment and genotype affects plant and seed performance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    He, Hanzi; de Souza Vidigal, Deborah; Snoek, L. Basten; Schnabel, Sabine; Nijveen, Harm; Hilhorst, Henk; Bentsink, Leónie

    2014-01-01

    Seed performance after dispersal is highly dependent on parental environmental cues, especially during seed formation and maturation. Here we examine which environmental factors are the most dominant in this respect and whether their effects are dependent on the genotypes under investigation. We studied the influence of light intensity, photoperiod, temperature, nitrate, and phosphate during seed development on five plant attributes and thirteen seed attributes, using 12 Arabidopsis genotypes that have been reported to be affected in seed traits. As expected, the various environments during seed development resulted in changed plant and/or seed performances. Comparative analysis clearly indicated that, overall, temperature plays the most dominant role in both plant and seed performance, whereas light has a prominent impact on plant traits. In comparison to temperature and light, nitrate mildly affected some of the plant and seed traits while phosphate had even less influence on those traits. Moreover, clear genotype-by-environment interactions were identified. This was shown by the fact that individual genotypes responded differentially to the environmental conditions. Low temperature significantly increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG1 and cyp707a1-1, whereas low light intensity increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG3 and NILDOG6. This also indicates that different genetic and molecular pathways are involved in the plant and seed responses. By identifying environmental conditions that affect the dormancy vs longevity correlation in the same way as previously identified naturally occurring loci, we have identified selective forces that probably shaped evolution for these important seed traits. PMID:25240065

  4. Plant recruitment and soil microbial characteristics of rehabilitation seedings following wildfire in northern Utah

    Treesearch

    Megan M. Taylor; Ann L. Hild; Nancy L. Shaw; Urszula Norton; Timothy R. Collier

    2014-01-01

    One goal of post-fire native species seeding is to increase plant community resistance to exotic weed invasions, yet few studies address the impacts of seeding on exotic annual establishment and persistence. In 2010 and 2011, we investigated the influence of seedings on exotic annuals and the underlying microbial communities. The wildfire site in northern Utah was...

  5. All about Plant Pollination: Fruit, Flowers & Seeds. Plant Life for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Flowers are not only pretty, they are also one of the key elements in the process of plant pollination and reproduction that goes from flowers to fruits to seeds! In All About Plant Pollination: Fruit, Flowers & Seeds, young scientists learn about the different parts of a flower through the use of microscopic photography and detailed diagrams.…

  6. All about Plant Pollination: Fruit, Flowers & Seeds. Plant Life for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Flowers are not only pretty, they are also one of the key elements in the process of plant pollination and reproduction that goes from flowers to fruits to seeds! In All About Plant Pollination: Fruit, Flowers & Seeds, young scientists learn about the different parts of a flower through the use of microscopic photography and detailed diagrams.…

  7. The spectrum of major seed storage genes and proteins in oats (Avena sativa).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Olin D

    2014-01-01

    The oat seed storage proteins are mainly composed of two classes: the globulins and avenins. Among the major cereals, the globulins are the major seed protein class in rice and oats, and along with the higher protein content of oats is the basis for the relative higher nutrition content in oats compared to the other cereals. The second major class of oat seed proteins is the avenins; also classified as prolamins - seed proteins high in proline and glutamine amino acids. The prolamins are associated with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In spite of their importance, neither the oat globulins nor the avenins have been completely analyzed and described for any single germplasm. Using available EST resources for a single hexaploid oat cultivar, the spectrum of avenin and globulin sequences are described for the gene coding regions and the derived protein sequences. The nine unique avenin sequences are suggested to be divided into 3-4 distinct subclasses distributed in the hexaploid genome. The globulins from the same germplasm include 24 distinct sequences. Variation in globulin size results mainly from a glutamine-rich domain, similar to as in the avenins, and to variation in the C-terminal sequence domain. Two globulin genes have premature stop codons that shorten the resulting polypeptides by 9 and 17 amino acids, and eight of the globulin sequences form a branch of the globulins not previously reported. A more complete description of the major oat seed proteins should allow a more thorough analysis of their contributions to those oat seed characteristics related to nutritional value, evolutionary history, and celiac disease association.

  8. The Spectrum of Major Seed Storage Genes and Proteins in Oats (Avena sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Olin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The oat seed storage proteins are mainly composed of two classes: the globulins and avenins. Among the major cereals, the globulins are the major seed protein class in rice and oats, and along with the higher protein content of oats is the basis for the relative higher nutrition content in oats compared to the other cereals. The second major class of oat seed proteins is the avenins; also classified as prolamins – seed proteins high in proline and glutamine amino acids. The prolamins are associated with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In spite of their importance, neither the oat globulins nor the avenins have been completely analyzed and described for any single germplasm. Results Using available EST resources for a single hexaploid oat cultivar, the spectrum of avenin and globulin sequences are described for the gene coding regions and the derived protein sequences. The nine unique avenin sequences are suggested to be divided into 3–4 distinct subclasses distributed in the hexaploid genome. The globulins from the same germplasm include 24 distinct sequences. Variation in globulin size results mainly from a glutamine-rich domain, similar to as in the avenins, and to variation in the C-terminal sequence domain. Two globulin genes have premature stop codons that shorten the resulting polypeptides by 9 and 17 amino acids, and eight of the globulin sequences form a branch of the globulins not previously reported. Conclusions A more complete description of the major oat seed proteins should allow a more thorough analysis of their contributions to those oat seed characteristics related to nutritional value, evolutionary history, and celiac disease association. PMID:25054628

  9. Overexpression of patatin-related phospholipase AIIIδ altered plant growth and increased seed oil content in camelina.

    PubMed

    Li, Maoyin; Wei, Fang; Tawfall, Amanda; Tang, Michelle; Saettele, Allison; Wang, Xuemin

    2015-08-01

    Camelina sativa is a Brassicaceae oilseed species being explored as a biofuel and industrial oil crop. A growing number of studies have indicated that the turnover of phosphatidylcholine plays an important role in the synthesis and modification of triacylglycerols. This study manipulated the expression of a patatin-related phospholipase AIIIδ (pPLAIIIδ) in camelina to determine its effect on seed oil content and plant growth. Constitutive overexpression of pPLAIIIδ under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic 35S promoter resulted in a significant increase in seed oil content and a decrease in cellulose content. In addition, the content of major membrane phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, in 35S::pPLAIIIδ plants was increased. However, these changes in 35S::pPLAIIIδ camelina were associated with shorter cell length, leaves, stems, and seed pods and a decrease in overall seed production. When pPLAIIIδ was expressed under the control of the seed specific, β-conglycinin promoter, the seed oil content was increased without compromising plant growth. The results suggest that pPLAIIIδ alters the carbon partitioning by decreasing cellulose content and increasing oil content in camelina. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Production of active human glucocerebrosidase in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana complex-glycan-deficient (cgl) plants.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; Galpin, Jason D; Tropak, Michael B; Mahuran, Don; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H; Miao, Yansong; Jiang, Liwen; Grabowski, Gregory A; Clarke, Lorne A; Kermode, Allison R

    2012-04-01

    There is a clear need for efficient methods to produce protein therapeutics requiring mannose-termination for therapeutic efficacy. Here we report on a unique system for production of active human lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase, EC 3.2.1.45) using seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana complex-glycan-deficient (cgl) mutant, which are deficient in the activity of N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase I (EC 2.4.1.101). Gaucher disease is a prevalent lysosomal storage disease in which affected individuals inherit mutations in the gene (GBA1) encoding GCase. A gene cassette optimized for seed expression was used to generate the human enzyme in seeds of the cgl (C5) mutant, and the recombinant GCase was mainly accumulated in the apoplast. Importantly, the enzymatic properties including kinetic parameters, half-maximal inhibitory concentration of isofagomine and thermal stability of the cgl-derived GCase were comparable with those of imiglucerase, a commercially available recombinant human GCase used for enzyme replacement therapy in Gaucher patients. N-glycan structural analyses of recombinant cgl-GCase showed that the majority of the N-glycans (97%) were mannose terminated. Additional purification was required to remove ∼15% of the plant-derived recombinant GCase that possessed potentially immunogenic (xylose- and/or fucose-containing) N-glycans. Uptake of cgl-derived GCase by mouse macrophages was similar to that of imiglucerase. The cgl seed system requires no addition of foreign (non-native) amino acids to the mature recombinant GCase protein, and the dry transgenic seeds represent a stable repository of the therapeutic protein. Other strategies that may completely prevent plant-like complex N-glycans are discussed, including the use of a null cgl mutant.

  11. Species-abundance--seed-size patterns within a plant community affected by grazing disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gao-lin; Shang, Zhan-huan; Zhu, Yuan-jun; Ding, Lu-ming; Wang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Seed size has been advanced as a key factor that influences the dynamics of plant communities, but there are few empirical or theoretical predictions of how community dynamics progress based on seed size patterns. Information on the abundance of adults, seedlings, soil seed banks, seed rains, and the seed mass of 96 species was collected in alpine meadows of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (China), which had different levels of grazing disturbance. The relationships between seed-mass-abundance patterns for adults, seedlings, the soil seed bank, and seed rain in the plant community were evaluated using regression models. Results showed that grazing levels affected the relationship between seed size and abundance properties of adult species, seedlings, and the soil seed bank, suggesting that there is a shift in seed-size--species-abundance relationships as a response to the grazing gradient. Grazing had no effect on the pattern of seed-size-seed-rain-abundance at four grazing levels. Grazing also had little effect on the pattern of seed-size--species-abundance and pattern of seed-size--soil-seed-bank-abundance in meadows with no grazing, light grazing, and moderate grazing), but there was a significant negative effect in meadows with heavy grazing. Grazing had little effect on the pattern of seed-size--seedling-abundance with no grazing, but had significant negative effects with light, moderate, and heavy grazing, and the |r| values increased with grazing levels. This indicated that increasing grazing pressure enhanced the advantage of smaller-seeded species in terms of the abundances of adult species, seedlings, and soil seed banks, whereas only the light grazing level promoted the seed rain abundance of larger-seeded species in the plant communities. This study suggests that grazing disturbances are favorable for increasing the species abundance for smaller-seeded species but not for the larger-seeded species in an alpine meadow community. Hence, there is a clear

  12. Effect of essential oil of Origanum rotundifolium on some plant pathogenic bacteria, seed germination and plant growth of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Kotan, Recep; Karagöz, Kenan; Dikbaş, Neslihan; Ćakmakçi, Ramazan; Ćakir, Ahmet; Kordali, Şaban; Özer, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine effect of Origanum rotundifolium's essential oil on some plant pathogenic bacterias, seed germination and plant growth of tomato. Xanthomonas axanopodis pv. vesicatoria strain (Xcv-761) and Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. michiganensis strain (Cmm) inoculated to tomato seed. The seeds were tested for germination in vitro and disease severity and some plant growth parameters in vivo. In vitro assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil treatment in seeds inoculated with Xcv-761 and at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil and streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. The least infected cotiledon number was observed at 500 µg/ml streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. In vivo assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 250 µl/ml essential oil teratment in tomato inoculated with Cmm. Lowest disease severity, is seen in the CMM infected seeds with 250 µl/ml essential oil application these results were statistically significant when compared with pathogen infected seeds. Similarly, in application conducted with XCV-761 infected seed, the lowest disease severity was observed for seeds as a result of 250 µl/ml essential oil application. Also according to the results obtained from essential oil application of CMM infected seeds conducted with 62,5 µl/ml dose; while disease severity was found statistically insignificant compared to 250 µl/ml to essential oil application, ıt was found statistically significant compared to pathogen infected seeds. The results showed that essential oil of O. rotundifolium has a potential for some suppressed plant disease when it is used in appropriate dose.

  13. Floristic characteristics of alien invasive seed plant species in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Hongguang; Zhou, Jiawei; DU, Daolin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the floristic characteristics of alien invasive seed plant species (AISPS) in China. There are a total of five hundred and thirteen AISPS, belonging to seventy families and two hundred and eighty-three genera. Seventy families were classified into nine areal types at the family level, and "Cosmopolitan" and "Pantropic" are the two main types. Two hundred and eighty-three genera were classified into twelve areal types at the genus level, and "Pantropic", "Trop. Asia & Amer. disjuncted", and "Cosmopolitan" are the three main types. These results reveal a certain degree of diversity among AISPS in China. The floristic characteristics at the family level exhibit strong pantropic characteristics. Two possible reasons for this are as follows. Firstly, southeastern China is heavily invaded by alien invasive plant species and this region has a mild climate. Secondly, southeastern China is more disturbed by human activities than other regions in China. The floristic characteristics at the genus level display strong pantropic but with abundant temperate characteristics. This may be due to that China across five climatic zones and the ecosystems in which the most alien invasive plant species occur have the same or similar climate with their natural habitat.

  14. Can the fatty acid selectivity of plant lipases be predicted from the composition of the seed triglyceride?

    PubMed

    Hellyer, S A; Chandler, I C; Bosley, J A

    1999-09-22

    To address the question can the fatty acid selectivity of plant lipases be predicted from the composition of the seed triglyceride, we have characterised the selectivity of lipases from a wide range of oilseeds with diverse fatty acid compositions. For this study, a novel hydrolysis assay using a fully randomised oil, was developed. From some seed sources (e.g. Cinnamomum camphora), lipases show high preference for particular fatty acids, whilst from others (e.g. Brassica napus, Theobroma cacao80% saturated or 'unusual' fatty acids may contain lipases which exhibit selectivity. It therefore follows that since the majority of seeds are composed of unsaturated fatty acids, that highly selective lipases will be unusual in nature. However lipases from some species of the Cuphea genera show exceptionally high preference for particular fatty acids. For example, lipase from seeds of Cuphea procumbans has over 20-fold selectivity for C10:0.

  15. Comparative plant sphingolipidomic reveals specific lipids in seeds and oil.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Frédérique; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2014-07-01

    Plant sphingolipids are a highly diverse family of structural and signal lipids. Owing to their chemical diversity and complexity, a powerful analytical method was required to identify and quantify a large number of individual molecules with a high degree of structural accuracy. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with a single elution system coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in the positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, detailed sphingolipid composition was analyzed in various tissues of two Brassicaceae species Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. A total of 300 molecular species were identified defining nine classes of sphingolipids, including Cers, hCers, Glcs and GIPCs. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified sphingolipids including amino- and N-acylated-GIPCs. The comparative analysis of seedling, seed and oil sphingolipids showed tissue specific distribution suggesting metabolic channeling and compartmentalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pollination and seed dispersal are the most threatened processes of plant regeneration.

    PubMed

    Neuschulz, Eike Lena; Mueller, Thomas; Schleuning, Matthias; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2016-07-20

    Plant regeneration is essential for maintaining forest biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, which are globally threatened by human disturbance. Here we present the first integrative meta-analysis on how forest disturbance affects multiple ecological processes of plant regeneration including pollination, seed dispersal, seed predation, recruitment and herbivory. We analysed 408 pairwise comparisons of these processes between near-natural and disturbed forests. Human impacts overall reduced plant regeneration. Importantly, only processes early in the regeneration cycle that often depend on plant-animal interactions, i.e. pollination and seed dispersal, were negatively affected. Later processes, i.e. seed predation, recruitment and herbivory, showed overall no significant response to human disturbance. Conserving pollination and seed dispersal, including the animals that provide these services to plants, should become a priority in forest conservation efforts globally.

  17. Pollination and seed dispersal are the most threatened processes of plant regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuschulz, Eike Lena; Mueller, Thomas; Schleuning, Matthias; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2016-07-01

    Plant regeneration is essential for maintaining forest biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, which are globally threatened by human disturbance. Here we present the first integrative meta-analysis on how forest disturbance affects multiple ecological processes of plant regeneration including pollination, seed dispersal, seed predation, recruitment and herbivory. We analysed 408 pairwise comparisons of these processes between near-natural and disturbed forests. Human impacts overall reduced plant regeneration. Importantly, only processes early in the regeneration cycle that often depend on plant-animal interactions, i.e. pollination and seed dispersal, were negatively affected. Later processes, i.e. seed predation, recruitment and herbivory, showed overall no significant response to human disturbance. Conserving pollination and seed dispersal, including the animals that provide these services to plants, should become a priority in forest conservation efforts globally.

  18. Pollination and seed dispersal are the most threatened processes of plant regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neuschulz, Eike Lena; Mueller, Thomas; Schleuning, Matthias; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Plant regeneration is essential for maintaining forest biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, which are globally threatened by human disturbance. Here we present the first integrative meta-analysis on how forest disturbance affects multiple ecological processes of plant regeneration including pollination, seed dispersal, seed predation, recruitment and herbivory. We analysed 408 pairwise comparisons of these processes between near-natural and disturbed forests. Human impacts overall reduced plant regeneration. Importantly, only processes early in the regeneration cycle that often depend on plant-animal interactions, i.e. pollination and seed dispersal, were negatively affected. Later processes, i.e. seed predation, recruitment and herbivory, showed overall no significant response to human disturbance. Conserving pollination and seed dispersal, including the animals that provide these services to plants, should become a priority in forest conservation efforts globally. PMID:27435026

  19. Survival of plant seeds, their UV screens, and nptII DNA for 18 months outside the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, David; Zalar, Andreja; Leach, Sydney

    2012-05-01

    The plausibility that life was imported to Earth from elsewhere can be tested by subjecting life-forms to space travel. Ultraviolet light is the major liability in short-term exposures (Horneck et al., 2001 ), and plant seeds, tardigrades, and lichens-but not microorganisms and their spores-are candidates for long-term survival (Anikeeva et al., 1990 ; Sancho et al., 2007 ; Jönsson et al., 2008 ; de la Torre et al., 2010 ). In the present study, plant seeds germinated after 1.5 years of exposure to solar UV, solar and galactic cosmic radiation, temperature fluctuations, and space vacuum outside the International Space Station. Of the 2100 exposed wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) seeds, 23% produced viable plants after return to Earth. Survival was lower in the Arabidopsis Wassilewskija ecotype and in mutants (tt4-8 and fah1-2) lacking UV screens. The highest survival occurred in tobacco (44%). Germination was delayed in seeds shielded from solar light, yet full survival was attained, which indicates that longer space travel would be possible for seeds embedded in an opaque matrix. We conclude that a naked, seed-like entity could have survived exposure to solar UV radiation during a hypothetical transfer from Mars to Earth. Chemical samples of seed flavonoid UV screens were degraded by UV, but their overall capacity to absorb UV was retained. Naked DNA encoding the nptII gene (kanamycin resistance) was also degraded by UV. A fragment, however, was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, and the gene survived in space when protected from UV. Even if seeds do not survive, components (e.g., their DNA) might survive transfer over cosmic distances.

  20. Influence of plant invasion on seed chemistry of winterfat, green rabbitbrush, freckled milkvetch, indian ricegrass and cheatgrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant invasions have proven detrimental to numerous ecosystem processes; however, limited information exists on how plant invasions affect seed nutrients. We quantified nutrients in seeds of Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides), green rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus), winterfat (Krasch...

  1. Natural variation of fecundity components in a widespread plant with dimorphic seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braza, Rita; Arroyo, J.; García, M. B.

    2010-09-01

    The number and size of seeds are the basis of the quantity and quality components of female reproductive fitness in plants, playing a central role in the evolutionary ecology of life history diversification. In this study we show and analyze the natural variability of several fecundity variables (fruit set, seed production per fruit, seed size, total seed production per plant, and proportion of small seeds) in Plantago coronopus, a widespread, short-lived herb with dimorphic seeds. The structure of such variability was examined at the individual, population (eight locations with different environments within the same region), and life history levels (annual vs perennial), and correlated to soil fertility. There was no divergence associated to the life history for any of the variables studied. Total seed production (the quantity component of female fitness) was correlated with maternal resources, while the size of the large mucilaginous, basal seeds, and the proportion of the small apical seeds (quality component) were more associated to environmental resources. Thus, internal and external resources shape different fitness components, maximizing seed production, and fitting the size and proportion of different kind of seeds to local conditions irrespective of life history. P. coronopus illustrates the versatility of short-lived widespread plants to combine fecundity traits in a flexible manner, in order to increase fitness at each of the many possible habitats they occupy over heterogeneous environments.

  2. Advances in seed conservation of wild plant species: a review of recent research.

    PubMed

    Hay, Fiona R; Probert, Robin J

    2013-01-01

    Seed banking is now widely used for the ex situ conservation of wild plant species. Many seed banks that conserve wild species broadly follow international genebank guidelines for seed collection, processing, storage, and management. However, over the last 10-20 years, problems and knowledge gaps have been identified, which have led to more focused seed conservation research on diverse species. For example, there is now greater ecogeographic understanding of seed storage behaviour and of the relative longevity of orthodox seeds, and we are therefore able to predict which species should be conserved using cryostorage techniques; seed development studies have identified when seeds should be harvested for maximal tolerance of desiccation and longevity in storage, as well as highlighting how seed development can vary between species; and there is now a wealth of literature on the dormancy-breaking and germination requirements of wild species which, as well as enabling better management of accessions, will also mean that their use in restoration, species reintroduction, or for evaluation for other applications is possible. Future research may be focused, for example, on nursery and plant production systems for wild plant species that maximize genetic diversity, so that introduced seeds and plant materials have the resilience to cope with future environmental stresses.

  3. Advances in seed conservation of wild plant species: a review of recent research

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Fiona R.; Probert, Robin J.

    2013-01-01

    Seed banking is now widely used for the ex situ conservation of wild plant species. Many seed banks that conserve wild species broadly follow international genebank guidelines for seed collection, processing, storage, and management. However, over the last 10–20 years, problems and knowledge gaps have been identified, which have led to more focused seed conservation research on diverse species. For example, there is now greater ecogeographic understanding of seed storage behaviour and of the relative longevity of orthodox seeds, and we are therefore able to predict which species should be conserved using cryostorage techniques; seed development studies have identified when seeds should be harvested for maximal tolerance of desiccation and longevity in storage, as well as highlighting how seed development can vary between species; and there is now a wealth of literature on the dormancy-breaking and germination requirements of wild species which, as well as enabling better management of accessions, will also mean that their use in restoration, species reintroduction, or for evaluation for other applications is possible. Future research may be focused, for example, on nursery and plant production systems for wild plant species that maximize genetic diversity, so that introduced seeds and plant materials have the resilience to cope with future environmental stresses. PMID:27293614

  4. Effects of hypobaria and hypoxia on seed germination of six plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongkang; Gao, Feng; Guo, Shuangsheng; Li, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Hypobaria (low pressure) is typically associated with hypoxia (low oxygen partial pressure). There are several advantages of growing higher plants under hypobaria in the moon or mars habitat. The objectives of this research were to investigate the seed germination of six plant species under hypobaric and ambient total pressure conditions. Seeds were sown and germinated under three levels of total atmospheric pressure (101, 30 and 10 kPa) and three levels of oxygen partial pressures (21, 6 and 2 kPa) in an 8-day study. Hypoxia (6 or 2 kPa) significantly inhibited all seed germination under three levels of total atmospheric pressure by increasing the electrical conductivity and the optical density, decreasing the seed germination percentage and seed dehydrogenase activity and inhibiting the growth of the shoots and roots. Hypobaria (30 or 10 kPa) markedly improved seed germination and root growth by enhancing the oxygen diffusion rate under hypoxic conditions (6 or 2 kPa). The seeds of three dicot plants (lettuce, Chinese cabbage and cucumber) were more sensitive to hypoxia caused by hypobaria than were those of three monocot plants (maize, wheat and rice); lettuce and cucumber seeds had the highest sensitivity, whereas rice seeds had the lowest sensitivity. This research demonstrates that six experimental seeds can germinate normally under hypobaria (30 kPa), but the oxygen partial pressure should not be less than 6 kPa.

  5. Plant chemical defence: a partner control mechanism stabilising plant - seed-eating pollinator mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Ibanez, Sébastien; Gallet, Christiane; Dommanget, Fanny; Després, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutualisms are inherently conflictual as one partner always benefits from reducing the costs imposed by the other. Despite the widespread recognition that mutualisms are essentially reciprocal exploitation, there are few documented examples of traits that limit the costs of mutualism. In plant/seed-eating pollinator interactions the only mechanisms reported so far are those specific to one particular system, such as the selective abortion of over-exploited fruits. Results This study shows that plant chemical defence against developing larvae constitutes another partner sanction mechanism in nursery mutualisms. It documents the chemical defence used by globeflower Trollius europaeus L. (Ranunculaceae) against the seed-eating larvae of six pollinating species of the genus Chiastocheta Pokorny (Anthomyiidae). The correlative field study carried out shows that the severity of damage caused by Chiastocheta larvae to globeflower fruits is linked to the accumulation in the carpel walls of a C-glycosyl-flavone (adonivernith), which reduces the larval seed predation ability per damaged carpel. The different Chiastocheta species do not exploit the fruit in the same way and their interaction with the plant chemical defence is variable, both in terms of induction intensity and larval sensitivity to adonivernith. Conclusion Adonivernith accumulation and larval predation intensity appear to be both the reciprocal cause and effect. Adonivernith not only constitutes an effective chemical means of partner control, but may also play a key role in the sympatric diversification of the Chiastocheta genus. PMID:19887006

  6. Carbon nanotubes are able to penetrate plant seed coat and dramatically affect seed germination and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Khodakovskaya, Mariya; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Mahmood, Meena; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhongrui; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru S

    2009-10-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were found to penetrate tomato seeds and affect their germination and growth rates. The germination was found to be dramatically higher for seeds that germinated on medium containing CNTs (10-40 mug/mL) compared to control. Analytical methods indicated that the CNTs are able to penetrate the thick seed coat and support water uptake inside seeds, a process which can affect seed germination and growth of tomato seedlings.

  7. Polyphenols: planting the seeds of treatment for the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cherniack, E Paul

    2011-06-01

    Greater understanding about the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and potential causes suggests that plant polyphenols might be useful as a treatment. Dietary excess energy can be stored in adipocytes, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines and adipose-related hormones that cause vascular injury. Plant polyphenols, organic compounds found in numerous plant species and their fruits, are being actively studied as potential treatments for components of the metabolic syndrome. Individual polyphenols that have been examined include resveratrol, quercetin, epigallocathechin-3-gallate, and curcumin. Resveratrol lowers weight, blood pressure, glucose, and insulin resistance in rodents, and a human trial is currently underway. Quercetin decreases lipid and glucose levels in obese rats, and in a human investigation of subjects with the metabolic syndrome has lowered blood pressure without significant alteration of lipids. Epigallocathechin-3-gallate-induced weight loss has attenuated glucose levels and insulin resistance in rodents and improved hemoglobin A(1c) and lipid in human studies. Plant extracts also can be used. Grape seed and chokeberry extracts have decreased blood pressure and lipid levels in small human trials. Other human investigations have shown the beneficial effects of cocoa, coffee, carob, and Momordica charantia. Thus far, most studies have involved a small number of subjects and have been of short duration. Future studies should be designed to account for a disease process in which the pathogenic factors may take place for years before disease manifestations take place, the possibly limited bioavailability of polyphenols, and the potential need to provide combinations or modifications of polyphenols. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Effect of Radiation on Seed Germinating Ability Ofwild-Growing and Cultivated Plants, Sources of Bioactive Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, Aleksandr; Tirranen, Lyalya; Zykova, Irina; Bondarenko, Gennadiy

    2016-07-01

    In the above-ground parts of common chickweed (Stellaria media) the content of vitamin C was experimentally quantified, which (in terms of dry matter) was 81.55 mg/100 g; 133 mg/100 g and 161.76 mg/100 g depending on the growing site. 52 components were detected in the essential oil of the above-ground parts of common chickweed (Stellaria media). Chamazulene, neophytodien and phytol are the major components of whole oil. A wide range of elements was identified in the plants and seeds of common chickweed (Stellaria media), and in the seeds of carrots, parsley and lettuce. It was established that UV irradiation (lamp with a wavelength of 254 nm and 283 nm) of chickweed seeds (Stellaria media) for 15 sec. and 100 sec. in a microbiological box on a table at a distance from the object didn't affect their germinating ability. The germinating ability of the experimental seeds was identical to the control (no irradiation) seeds. With the help of an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer Renger 2 (Germany) at a voltage of 1.6 kV during 15 sec. the effect of "soft" radiation on the seed germinating ability of chickweed, carrot, parsley and lettuce seeds was studied.Under the effect of "soft" radiation during 15 sec. all the experimental chickweed seeds sprouted, like in the control. The germinating ability of the exposed lettuce seeds was 100% after one day, while only 45% of the exposed parsley seeds grew after 21 days. The exposed carrot seeds (70%) grew after 18 days. The effect of "hard" radiation on the germinating ability of common chickweed seeds was investigated using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer S4 Pioneer (Germany) at a voltage of 60 kV for 15 sec and 100 sec. Under the effect of "hard" radiation and during 15 seconds of exposure, where the distance (L) from the focus of the X-ray tube to the seeds of chickweed was 20 mm, the germinating ability of the experimental chickweed seeds was 30 %. At a voltage of 60 kV and 100-second exposure the germinating ability of the

  9. Species-Specific Seed Dispersal in an Obligate Ant-Plant Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Baca, Jeniffer Alvarez; Osborne, Jason; Schal, Coby

    2009-01-01

    Throughout lowland Amazonia, arboreal ants collect seeds of specific plants and cultivate them in nutrient-rich nests, forming diverse yet obligate and species-specific symbioses called Neotropical ant-gardens (AGs). The ants depend on their symbiotic plants for nest stability, and the plants depend on AGs for substrate and nutrients. Although the AGs are limited to specific participants, it is unknown at what stage specificity arises, and seed fate pathways in AG epiphytes are undocumented. Here we examine the specificity of the ant-seed interaction by comparing the ant community observed at general food baits to ants attracted to and removing seeds of the AG plant Peperomia macrostachya. We also compare seed removal rates under treatments that excluded vertebrates, arthropods, or both. In the bait study, only three of 70 ant species collected P. macrostachya seeds, and 84% of observed seed removal by ants was attributed to the AG ant Camponotus femoratus. In the exclusion experiment, arthropod exclusion significantly reduced seed removal rates, but vertebrate exclusion did not. We provide the most extensive empirical evidence of species specificity in the AG mutualism and begin to quantify factors that affect seed fate in order to understand conditions that favor its departure from the typical diffuse model of plant-animal mutualism. PMID:19194502

  10. Species-specific seed dispersal in an obligate ant-plant mutualism.

    PubMed

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Baca, Jeniffer Alvarez; Osborne, Jason; Schal, Coby

    2009-01-01

    Throughout lowland Amazonia, arboreal ants collect seeds of specific plants and cultivate them in nutrient-rich nests, forming diverse yet obligate and species-specific symbioses called Neotropical ant-gardens (AGs). The ants depend on their symbiotic plants for nest stability, and the plants depend on AGs for substrate and nutrients. Although the AGs are limited to specific participants, it is unknown at what stage specificity arises, and seed fate pathways in AG epiphytes are undocumented. Here we examine the specificity of the ant-seed interaction by comparing the ant community observed at general food baits to ants attracted to and removing seeds of the AG plant Peperomia macrostachya. We also compare seed removal rates under treatments that excluded vertebrates, arthropods, or both. In the bait study, only three of 70 ant species collected P. macrostachya seeds, and 84% of observed seed removal by ants was attributed to the AG ant Camponotus femoratus. In the exclusion experiment, arthropod exclusion significantly reduced seed removal rates, but vertebrate exclusion did not. We provide the most extensive empirical evidence of species specificity in the AG mutualism and begin to quantify factors that affect seed fate in order to understand conditions that favor its departure from the typical diffuse model of plant-animal mutualism.

  11. Seed Density Significantly Affects Species Richness and Composition in Experimental Plant Communities

    PubMed Central

    Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the importance of seed arrival for community richness and composition have not considered the number of seeds arriving and its effect on species richness and composition of natural communities is thus unknown. A series of experimental dry grassland communities were established. All communities were composed of the same 44 species in exactly the same proportions on two substrates using three different seed densities. The results showed that seed density had an effect on species richness only at the beginning of the experiment. In contrast, the effects on species composition persisted across the entire study period. The results do not support the prediction that due to higher competition for light in nutrient-rich soil, species richness will be the highest in the treatment with the lowest seed density. However, the prevalence of small plants in the lowest seed density supported the expectation that low seed density guarantees low competition under high soil nutrients. In the nutrient-poor soil, species richness was the highest at the medium seed density, indicating that species richness reflects the balance between competition and limitations caused by the availability of propagules or their ability to establish themselves. This medium seed density treatment also contained the smallest plants. The results demonstrate that future seed addition experiments need to consider the amount of seed added so that it reflects the amount of seed that is naturally found in the field. Differences in seed density, mimicking different intensity of the seed rain may also explain differences in the composition of natural communities that cannot be attributed to habitat conditions. The results also have important implications for studies regarding the consequences of habitat fragmentation suggesting that increasing fragmentation may change species compositions not only due to different dispersal abilities but also due to differential response of plants to overall seed

  12. Nonseed plant Selaginella moellendorffii has both seed plant and microbial types of terpene synthases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanglin; Köllner, Tobias G.; Yin, Yanbin; Jiang, Yifan; Chen, Hao; Xu, Ying; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Pichersky, Eran; Chen, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Terpene synthases (TPSs) are pivotal enzymes for the biosynthesis of terpenoids, the largest class of secondary metabolites made by plants and other organisms. To understand the basis of the vast diversification of these enzymes in plants, we investigated Selaginella moellendorffii, a nonseed vascular plant. The genome of this species was found to contain two distinct types of TPS genes. The first type of genes, which was designated as S. moellendorffii TPS genes (SmTPSs), consists of 18 members. SmTPSs share common ancestry with typical seed plant TPSs. Selected members of the SmTPSs were shown to encode diterpene synthases. The second type of genes, designated as S. moellendorffii microbial TPS-like genes (SmMTPSLs), consists of 48 members. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SmMTPSLs are more closely related to microbial TPSs than other plant TPSs. Selected SmMTPSLs were determined to function as monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthases. Most of the products formed were typical monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes that have been previously shown to be synthesized by classical plant TPS enzymes. Some in vitro products of the characterized SmMTPSLs were detected in the headspace of S. moellendorffii plants treated with the fungal elicitor alamethicin, showing that they are also formed in the intact plant. The presence of two distinct types of TPSs in the genome of S. moellendorffii raises the possibility that the TPSs in other plant species may also have more than one evolutionary origin. PMID:22908266

  13. Nonseed plant Selaginella moellendorffi [corrected] has both seed plant and microbial types of terpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglin; Köllner, Tobias G; Yin, Yanbin; Jiang, Yifan; Chen, Hao; Xu, Ying; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Pichersky, Eran; Chen, Feng

    2012-09-04

    Terpene synthases (TPSs) are pivotal enzymes for the biosynthesis of terpenoids, the largest class of secondary metabolites made by plants and other organisms. To understand the basis of the vast diversification of these enzymes in plants, we investigated Selaginella moellendorffi, [corrected] a nonseed vascular plant. The genome of this species was found to contain two distinct types of TPS genes. The first type of genes, which was designated as S. moellendorffi [corrected] TPS genes (SmTPSs), consists of 18 members. SmTPSs share common ancestry with typical seed plant TPSs. Selected members of the SmTPSs were shown to encode diterpene synthases. The second type of genes, designated as S. moellendorffi [corrected] microbial TPS-like genes (SmMTPSLs), consists of 48 members. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SmMTPSLs are more closely related to microbial TPSs than other plant TPSs. Selected SmMTPSLs were determined to function as monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthases. Most of the products formed were typical monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes that have been previously shown to be synthesized by classical plant TPS enzymes. Some in vitro products of the characterized SmMTPSLs were detected in the headspace of S. moellendorffi [corrected] plants treated with the fungal elicitor alamethicin, showing that they are also formed in the intact plant. The presence of two distinct types of TPSs in the genome of S. moellendorffi [corrected] raises the possibility that the TPSs in other plant species may also have more than one evolutionary origin.

  14. Trait-mediated seed predation, dispersal and survival among frugivore-dispersed plants in a fragmented subtropical forest, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xin; Guo, Cong; Xiao, Zhishu

    2014-06-01

    By tracking the fate of individual seeds from 6 frugivore-dispersed plants with contrasting seed traits in a fragmented subtropical forest in Southwest China, we explored how rodent seed predation and hoarding were influenced by seed traits such as seed size, seed coat hardness and seed profitability. Post-dispersal seed fates varied significantly among the 6 seed species and 3 patterns were witnessed: large-seeded species with a hard seed coat (i.e. Choerospoadias axillaries and Diospyros kaki var. silvestris) had more seeds removed, cached and then surviving at caches, and they also had fewer seeds predated but a higher proportion of seeds surviving at the source; medium-sized species with higher profitability and thinner seed coat (i.e. Phoebe zhennan and Padus braohypoda) were first harvested and had the lowest probability of seeds surviving either at the source or at caches due to higher predation before or after removal; and small-seeded species with lower profitability (i.e. Elaeocarpus japonicas and Cornus controversa) had the highest probability of seeds surviving at the source but the lowest probability of seeds surviving at caches due to lower predation at the source and lower hoarding at caches. Our study indicates that patterns of seed predation, dispersal and survival among frugivore-dispersed plants are highly determined by seed traits such as seed size, seed defense and seed profitability due to selective predation and hoarding by seed-eating rodents. Therefore, trait-mediated seed predation, dispersal and survival via seed-eating rodents can largely affect population and community dynamics of frugivore-dispersed plants in fragmented forests. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Seed Dispersal and Germination Traits of 70 Plant Species Inhabiting the Gurbantunggut Desert in Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiliang; Zhang, Daoyuan; Yang, Xuejun; Huang, Zhenying; Duan, Shimin; Wang, Xiyong

    2014-01-01

    Seed dispersal and germination were examined for 70 species from the cold Gurbantunggut Desert in northwest China. Mean and range (3 orders of magnitude) of seed mass were smaller and narrower than those in other floras (5–8 orders of magnitude), which implies that selection favors relatively smaller seeds in this desert. We identified five dispersal syndromes (anemochory, zoochory, autochory, barochory, and ombrohydrochory), and anemochorous species were most abundant. Seed mass (F = 3.50, P = 0.01), seed size (F = 8.31, P < 0.01), and seed shape (F = 2.62, P = 0.04) differed significantly among the five dispersal syndromes and barochorous species were significantly smaller and rounder than the others. There were no significant correlations between seed mass (seed weight) (P = 0.15), seed size (P = 0.38), or seed shape (variance) (P = 0.95) and germination percentage. However, germination percentages differed significantly among the dispersal syndromes (F = 3.64, P = 0.01) and seeds of ombrohydrochorous species had higher germination percentages than those of the other species. In the Gurbantunggut Desert, the percentage of species with seed dormancy was about 80%. In general, our studies suggest that adaptive strategies in seed dispersal and germination of plants in this area are closely related to the environment in which they live and that they are influenced by natural selection forces. PMID:25485296

  16. Seed dispersal and germination traits of 70 plant species inhabiting the Gurbantunggut Desert in northwest China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiliang; Zhang, Daoyuan; Yang, Xuejun; Huang, Zhenying; Duan, Shimin; Wang, Xiyong

    2014-01-01

    Seed dispersal and germination were examined for 70 species from the cold Gurbantunggut Desert in northwest China. Mean and range (3 orders of magnitude) of seed mass were smaller and narrower than those in other floras (5-8 orders of magnitude), which implies that selection favors relatively smaller seeds in this desert. We identified five dispersal syndromes (anemochory, zoochory, autochory, barochory, and ombrohydrochory), and anemochorous species were most abundant. Seed mass (F = 3.50, P = 0.01), seed size (F = 8.31, P < 0.01), and seed shape (F = 2.62, P = 0.04) differed significantly among the five dispersal syndromes and barochorous species were significantly smaller and rounder than the others. There were no significant correlations between seed mass (seed weight) (P = 0.15), seed size (P = 0.38), or seed shape (variance) (P = 0.95) and germination percentage. However, germination percentages differed significantly among the dispersal syndromes (F = 3.64, P = 0.01) and seeds of ombrohydrochorous species had higher germination percentages than those of the other species. In the Gurbantunggut Desert, the percentage of species with seed dormancy was about 80%. In general, our studies suggest that adaptive strategies in seed dispersal and germination of plants in this area are closely related to the environment in which they live and that they are influenced by natural selection forces.

  17. Cholesterol-lowering activity of the major polyphenols in grape seed.

    PubMed

    Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Mäkynen, Kittana; Thilawech, Thavaree; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2011-06-17

    The major polyphenols in grape seed have been shown to have beneficial health effects in the prevention of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases. In this present study, we investigated the cholesterol-lowering activity of three major polyphenolic compounds found in grape seed. The results showed that gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin significantly inhibited pancreatic cholesterol esterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, they bound to taurocholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycodeoxycholic acid at levels ranging from 38.6% to 28.2%. At the concentration of 0.2 mg/mL, gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin reduced the formation of cholesterol micelles 27.26 ± 2.17%, 11.88 ± 0.75%, and 19.49 ± 3.71%, respectively. These findings clearly demonstrate that three major polyphenolic compounds present in a particular grape seed have cholesterol-lowering activity by inhibiting pancreatic cholesterol esterase, binding of bile acids, and reducing solubility of cholesterol in micelles which may result in delayed cholesterol absorption.

  18. Developing eco-friendly biofungicide for the management of major seed borne diseases of rice and assessing their physical stability and storage life.

    PubMed

    Naveenkumar, Ramasamy; Muthukumar, Arjunan; Sangeetha, Ganesan; Mohanapriya, Ramanathan

    2017-04-01

    Three plant oils (Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon martini, and Pelargonium graveolens) were developed as EC formulations and tested for their physical stabilities. EC formulations (10EC, 20EC and 30EC) of C. citratus, C. martini and P. graveolens had emulsion stability, spontaneity property, heat and cold stability. EC formulated plant oils were screened against the major seed borne fungi of rice such as Curvularia lunata, Fusarium moniliforme, Bipolaris oryzae, and Sarocladium oryzae. The level of inhibition varied among the concentrations of EC formulations. Among the three EC formulations, that of C. citratus oil 30EC recorded 100% inhibition on the mycelial growth of test pathogens. In the blotter paper method, rice seeds treated with a formulation of C. citratus oil 30EC controlled the infection of C. lunata, F. moniliforme, B. oryzae and S. oryzae in rice seed to the tune of 66.0%, 60.4%, 66.0% and 69.1%, respectively. Seed soaking with formulation of C. citratus oil 30EC showed the highest percentage of normal seedlings, the lowest number of abnormal seedling and fresh ungerminated seeds when tested with the roll-towel method. Seed soaking with 30EC formulation of C. citratus oil increased seed germination, shoot length, root length and vigour of rice seedlings when tested with the plastic tray method. Transmission of pathogens from seed to seedling was reduced significantly by the 30EC formulation of C. citratus oil when tested with the plastic pot method. The effect of the storage life of the 30EC formulation of C. citratus oil showed that it had retained their antifungal effect till the end of the incubation period (120 days), and is able to inhibit the mycelial growth of all test pathogens to the 100% level. Copyright © 2017 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment of plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustey, A.; Leighs, J. A.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Hazael, R.; McMillan, P. F.; Hazell, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds has been investigated antecedently, primarily driven by interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia, respectively. However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods ofapplying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in collected data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder setup and shock compression via employment of a 50 mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set. Data collected has shown that cress seeds are extremely resilient to static loading, whereas the difference in the two forms of loading is negligible for lettuce seeds. Germination time has been seen to extend dramatically following static loading of cress seeds to greater than 0.4 GPa. In addition, the cut-off pressure previously seen to cause 0% germination in dynamic experiments performed on cress seeds has now also been seen in lettuce seeds.

  20. The signature of seeds in resurrection plants: a molecular and physiological comparison of desiccation tolerance in seeds and vegetative tissues.

    PubMed

    Illing, Nicola; Denby, Katherine J; Collett, Helen; Shen, Arthur; Farrant, Jill M

    2005-11-01

    Desiccation-tolerance in vegetative tissues of angiosperms has a polyphyletic origin and could be due to 1) appropriation of the seed-specific program of gene expression that protects orthodox seeds against desiccation, and/or 2) a sustainable version of the abiotic stress response. We tested these hypotheses by comparing molecular and physiological data from the development of orthodox seeds, the response of desiccation-sensitive plants to abiotic stress, and the response of desiccation-tolerant plants to extreme water loss. Analysis of publicly-available gene expression data of 35 LEA proteins and 68 anti-oxidant enzymes in the desiccation-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana identified 13 LEAs and 4 anti-oxidants exclusively expressed in seeds. Two (a LEA6 and 1-cys-peroxiredoxin) are not expressed in vegetative tissues in A. thaliana, but have orthologues that are specifically activated in desiccating leaves of Xerophyta humilis. A comparison of antioxidant enzyme activity in two desiccation-sensitive species of Eragrostis with the desiccation-tolerant E. nindensis showed equivalent responses upon initial dehydration, but activity was retained at low water content in E. nindensis only. We propose that these antioxidants are housekeeping enzymes and that they are protected from damage in the desiccation-tolerant species. Sucrose is considered an important protectant against desiccation in orthodox seeds, and we show that sucrose accumulates in drying leaves of E. nindensis, but not in the desiccation-sensitive Eragrostis species. The activation of "seed-specific" desiccation protection mechanisms (sucrose accumulation and expression of LEA6 and 1-cys-peroxiredoxin genes) in the vegetative tissues of desiccation-tolerant plants points towards acquisition of desiccation tolerance from seeds.

  1. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2) promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Results Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Conclusions Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive. PMID:22472516

  2. Microbial-type terpene synthase genes occur widely in nonseed land plants, but not in seed plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qidong; Li, Guanglin; Köllner, Tobias G.; Fu, Jianyu; Chen, Xinlu; Xiong, Wangdan; Crandall-Stotler, Barbara J.; Bowman, John L.; Weston, David J.; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Li; Xie, Yinlong; Li, Fay -Wei; Rothfels, Carl J.; Larsson, Anders; Graham, Sean W.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Chen, Feng

    2016-10-10

    Here, the vast abundance of terpene natural products in nature is due to enzymes known as terpene synthases (TPSs) that convert acyclic prenyl diphosphate precursors into a multitude of cyclic and acyclic carbon skeletons. Yet the evolution of TPSs is not well understood at higher levels of classification. Microbial TPSs from bacteria and fungi are only distantly related to typical plant TPSs, whereas genes similar to microbial TPS genes have been recently identified in the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. The goal of this study was to investigate the distribution, evolution, and biochemical functions of microbial terpene synthase-like (MTPSL) genes in other plants. By analyzing the transcriptomes of 1,103 plant species ranging from green algae to flowering plants, putative MTPSL genes were identified predominantly from nonseed plants, including liverworts, mosses, hornworts, lycophytes, and monilophytes. Directed searching for MTPSL genes in the sequenced genomes of a wide range of seed plants confirmed their general absence in this group. Among themselves, MTPSL proteins from nonseed plants form four major groups, with two of these more closely related to bacterial TPSs and the other two to fungal TPSs. Two of the four groups contain a canonical aspartate-rich “DDxxD” motif. The third group has a “DDxxxD” motif, and the fourth group has only the first two “DD” conserved in this motif. Upon heterologous expression, representative members from each of the four groups displayed diverse catalytic functions as monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthases, suggesting these are important for terpene formation in nonseed plants.

  3. Microbial-type terpene synthase genes occur widely in nonseed land plants, but not in seed plants

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Qidong; Li, Guanglin; Köllner, Tobias G.; ...

    2016-10-10

    Here, the vast abundance of terpene natural products in nature is due to enzymes known as terpene synthases (TPSs) that convert acyclic prenyl diphosphate precursors into a multitude of cyclic and acyclic carbon skeletons. Yet the evolution of TPSs is not well understood at higher levels of classification. Microbial TPSs from bacteria and fungi are only distantly related to typical plant TPSs, whereas genes similar to microbial TPS genes have been recently identified in the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. The goal of this study was to investigate the distribution, evolution, and biochemical functions of microbial terpene synthase-like (MTPSL) genes in othermore » plants. By analyzing the transcriptomes of 1,103 plant species ranging from green algae to flowering plants, putative MTPSL genes were identified predominantly from nonseed plants, including liverworts, mosses, hornworts, lycophytes, and monilophytes. Directed searching for MTPSL genes in the sequenced genomes of a wide range of seed plants confirmed their general absence in this group. Among themselves, MTPSL proteins from nonseed plants form four major groups, with two of these more closely related to bacterial TPSs and the other two to fungal TPSs. Two of the four groups contain a canonical aspartate-rich “DDxxD” motif. The third group has a “DDxxxD” motif, and the fourth group has only the first two “DD” conserved in this motif. Upon heterologous expression, representative members from each of the four groups displayed diverse catalytic functions as monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthases, suggesting these are important for terpene formation in nonseed plants.« less

  4. Naturally occurring phenanthrene degrading bacteria associated with seeds of various plant species.

    PubMed

    Fernet, Jennifer L; Lawrence, John R; Germida, James J

    2016-01-01

    Seeds of 11 of 19 plant species tested yielded naturally occurring phenanthrene degrading bacteria when placed on phenanthrene impression plates. Seed associated phenanthrene degrading bacteria were mostly detected on caragana, Canada thistle, creeping red fescue, western wheatgrass, and tall wheat grass. Based on 16S rRNA analysis the most common bacteria isolated from these seeds were strains belonging to the genera Enterobacteria, Erwinia, Burkholderia, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas. These plants may provide an excellent source of pre-adapted bacterial-plant associations highly suitable for use in remediation of contaminated soil environments.

  5. Separation and identification of major plant sphingolipid classes from leaves.

    PubMed

    Markham, Jonathan E; Li, Jia; Cahoon, Edgar B; Jaworski, Jan G

    2006-08-11

    Sphingolipids are major components of the plasma membrane, tonoplast, and other endomembranes of plant cells. Previous compositional analyses have focused only on individual sphingolipid classes because of the widely differing polarities of plant sphingolipids. Consequently, the total content of sphingolipid classes in plants has yet to be quantified. In addition, the major polar sphingolipid class in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not been previously determined. In this report, we describe the separation and quantification of sphingolipid classes from A. thaliana leaves using hydrolysis of sphingolipids and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of o-phthaldialdehyde derivatives of the released long-chain bases to monitor the separation steps. An extraction solvent that contained substantial proportions of water was used to solubilized >95% of the sphingolipids from leaves. Neutral and charged sphingolipids were then partitioned by anion exchange solid phase extraction. HPLC analysis of the charged lipid fraction from A. thaliana revealed only one major anionic sphingolipid class, which was identified by mass spectrometry as hexose-hexuronic-inositolphosphoceramide. The neutral sphingolipids were predominantly composed of monohexosylceramide with lesser amounts of ceramides. Extraction and separation of sphingolipids from soybean and tomato showed that, like A. thaliana, the neutral sphingolipids consisted of ceramide and monohexosylceramides; however, the major polar sphingolipid was found to be N-acetyl-hexosamine-hexuronic-inositolphosphoceramide. In extracts from A. thaliana leaves, hexosehexuronic-inositolphosphoceramides, monohexosylceramides, and ceramides accounted for approximately 64, 34, and 2% of the total sphingolipids, respectively, suggesting an important role for the anionic sphingolipids in plant membranes.

  6. Generalist birds promote tropical forest regeneration and increase plant diversity via rare-biased seed dispersal.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Tomás A; Morales, Juan M

    2016-07-01

    Regenerated forests now compose over half of the world's tropical forest cover and are increasingly important as providers of ecosystem services, freshwater, and biodiversity conservation. Much of the value and functionality of regenerating forests depends on the plant diversity they contain. Tropical forest diversity is strongly shaped by mutualistic interactions between plants and fruit-eating animals (frugivores) that disperse seeds. Here we show how seed dispersal by birds can influence the speed and diversity of early successional forests in Puerto Rico. For two years, we monitored the monthly fruit production of bird-dispersed plants on a fragmented landscape, and measured seed dispersal activity of birds and plant establishment in experimental plots located in deforested areas. Two predominantly omnivorous bird species, the Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) and the Gray Kingbird (Tyrannus dominicensis), proved critical for speeding up the establishment of woody plants and increasing the species richness and diversity of the seed rain in deforested areas. Seed dispersal by these generalists increased the odds for rare plant species to disperse and establish in experimental forest-regeneration plots. Results indicate that birds that mix fruit and insects in their diets and actively forage across open and forested habitats can play keystone roles in the regeneration of mutualistic plant-animal communities. Furthermore, our analyses reveal that rare-biased (antiapostatic) frugivory and seed dispersal is the mechanism responsible for increasing plant diversity in the early-regenerating community. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Isolation and characterisation of plant defensins from seeds of Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Hippocastanaceae and Saxifragaceae.

    PubMed

    Osborn, R W; De Samblanx, G W; Thevissen, K; Goderis, I; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Attenborough, S; Rees, S B; Broekaert, W F

    1995-07-17

    From seeds of Aesculus hippocastanum, Clitoria ternatea, Dahlia merckii and Heuchera sanguinea five antifungal proteins were isolated and shown to be homologous to plant defensins previously characterised from radish seeds and gamma-thionins from Poaceae seeds. Based on the spectrum of their antimicrobial activity and the morphological distortions they induce on fungi the peptides can be divided into two classes. The peptides did not inhibit any of three different alpha-amylases.

  8. Seed bank and big sagebrush plant community composition in a range margin for big sagebrush

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martyn, Trace E.; Bradford, John B.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Burke, Ingrid C.; Laurenroth, William K.

    2016-01-01

    The potential influence of seed bank composition on range shifts of species due to climate change is unclear. Seed banks can provide a means of both species persistence in an area and local range expansion in the case of increasing habitat suitability, as may occur under future climate change. However, a mismatch between the seed bank and the established plant community may represent an obstacle to persistence and expansion. In big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plant communities in Montana, USA, we compared the seed bank to the established plant community. There was less than a 20% similarity in the relative abundance of species between the established plant community and the seed bank. This difference was primarily driven by an overrepresentation of native annual forbs and an underrepresentation of big sagebrush in the seed bank compared to the established plant community. Even though we expect an increase in habitat suitability for big sagebrush under future climate conditions at our sites, the current mismatch between the plant community and the seed bank could impede big sagebrush range expansion into increasingly suitable habitat in the future.

  9. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment on plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustey, Adrian; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Hazael, Rachael; McMillan, Paul; Hazell, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds have both been previously investigated (primarily driven by an interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia respectively). However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods of applying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in such data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder set-up and shock compression via employment of a 50-mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer-plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set.

  10. Fruitful factors: what limits seed production of flowering plants in the alpine?

    PubMed

    Straka, Jason R; Starzomski, Brian M

    2015-05-01

    Predicting demographic consequences of climate change for plant communities requires understanding which factors influence seed set, and how climate change may alter those factors. To determine the effects of pollen availability, temperature, and pollinators on seed production in the alpine, we combined pollen-manipulation experiments with measurements of variation in temperature, and abundance and diversity of potential pollinators along a 400-m elevation gradient. We did this for seven dominant species of flowering plants in the Coast Range Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. The number of viable seeds set by plants was influenced by pollen limitation (quantity of pollen received), mate limitation (quality of pollen), temperature, abundance of potential pollinators, seed predation, and combinations of these factors. Early flowering species (n = 3) had higher seed set at high elevation and late-flowering species (n = 4) had higher seed set at low elevation. Degree-days >15 °C were good predictors of seed set, particularly in bee-pollinated species, but had inconsistent effects among species. Seed production in one species, Arnica latifolia, was negatively affected by seed-predators (Tephritidae) at mid elevation, where there were fewer frost-hours during the flowering season. Anemone occidentalis, a fly-pollinated, self-compatible species had high seed set at all elevations, likely due to abundant potential pollinators. Simultaneously measuring multiple factors affecting reproductive success of flowering plants helped identify which factors were most important, providing focus for future studies. Our work suggests that responses of plant communities to climate change may be mediated by flowering time, pollination syndrome, and susceptibility to seed predators.

  11. Responses of herbivore and predatory mites to tomato plants exposed to jasmonic acid seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Smart, Lesley E; Martin, Janet L; Limpalaër, Marlène; Bruce, Toby J A; Pickett, John A

    2013-10-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling can influence plant defense and the production of plant volatiles that mediate interactions with insects. Here, we tested whether a JA seed treatment could alter direct and indirect defenses. First, oviposition levels of herbivorous mites, Tetranychus urticae, on JA seed-treated and control tomato plants were compared. They were not significantly different on tomato cv. 'Moneymaker', however, there was a significant reduction in oviposition on treated plants in additional experiments with cv. 'Carousel'. Second, responses of predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, were assessed in a Y-tube olfactometer. Volatiles from JA seed-treated tomato cv. 'Moneymaker' plants were significantly more attractive than volatiles from control plants. Volatiles collected from plants were analysed by GC/MS, and samples from JA seed-treated plants contained more methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene (TMTT) than samples from control plants. Our results indicate that JA seed treatment can make tomato plants more attractive to predatory mites, but that direct effects on herbivorous mites are variable and cultivar dependent.

  12. Pantoea allii sp. nov., isolated from onion plants and seed.

    PubMed

    Brady, Carrie L; Goszczynska, Teresa; Venter, Stephanus N; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Gitaitis, Ronald D; Coutinho, Teresa A

    2011-04-01

    Eight yellow-pigmented, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, oxidase-negative, motile, facultatively anaerobic bacteria were isolated from onion seed in South Africa and from an onion plant exhibiting centre rot symptoms in the USA. The isolates were assigned to the genus Pantoea on the basis of phenotypic and biochemical tests. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), based on gyrB, rpoB, infB and atpD sequences, confirmed the allocation of the isolates to the genus Pantoea. MLSA further indicated that the isolates represented a novel species, which was phylogenetically most closely related to Pantoea ananatis and Pantoea stewartii. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis also placed the isolates into a cluster separate from P. ananatis and P. stewartii. Compared with type strains of species of the genus Pantoea that showed >97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with strain BD 390(T), the isolates exhibited 11-55 % whole-genome DNA-DNA relatedness, which confirmed the classification of the isolates in a novel species. The most useful phenotypic characteristics for the differentiation of the isolates from their closest phylogenetic neighbours are production of acid from amygdalin and utilization of adonitol and sorbitol. A novel species, Pantoea allii sp. nov., is proposed, with type strain BD 390(T) ( = LMG 24248(T)).

  13. Resource Allocation and Seed Size Selection in Perennial Plants under Pollen Limitation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoqiao; Burd, Martin; Fan, Zhiwei

    2017-09-01

    Pollen limitation may affect resource allocation patterns in plants, but its role in the selection of seed size is not known. Using an evolutionarily stable strategy model of resource allocation in perennial iteroparous plants, we show that under density-independent population growth, pollen limitation (i.e., a reduction in ovule fertilization rate) should increase the optimal seed size. At any level of pollen limitation (including none), the optimal seed size maximizes the ratio of juvenile survival rate to the resource investment needed to produce one seed (including both ovule production and seed provisioning); that is, the optimum maximizes the fitness effect per unit cost. Seed investment may affect allocation to postbreeding adult survival. In our model, pollen limitation increases individual seed size but decreases overall reproductive allocation, so that pollen limitation should also increase the optimal allocation to postbreeding adult survival. Under density-dependent population growth, the optimal seed size is inversely proportional to ovule fertilization rate. However, pollen limitation does not affect the optimal allocation to postbreeding adult survival and ovule production. These results highlight the importance of allocation trade-offs in the effect pollen limitation has on the ecology and evolution of seed size and postbreeding adult survival in perennial plants.

  14. SeedUSoon: A New Software Program to Improve Seed Stock Management and Plant Line Exchanges between Research Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Charavay, Céline; Segard, Stéphane; Pochon, Nathalie; Nussaume, Laurent; Javot, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Plant research is supported by an ever-growing collection of mutant or transgenic lines. In the past, a typical basic research laboratory would focus on only a few plant lines that were carefully isolated from collections of lines containing random mutations. The subsequent technological breakthrough in high-throughput sequencing, combined with novel and highly efficient mutagenesis techniques (including site-directed mutagenesis), has led to a recent exponential growth in plant line collections used by individual researchers. Tracking the generation and genetic properties of these genetic resources is thus becoming increasingly challenging for researchers. Another difficulty for researchers is controlling the use of seeds protected by a Material Transfer Agreement, as often only the original recipient of the seeds is aware of the existence of such documents. This situation can thus lead to difficult legal situations. Simultaneously, various institutions and the general public now demand more information about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In response, researchers are seeking new database solutions to address the triple challenge of research competition, legal constraints, and institutional/public demands. To help plant biology laboratories organize, describe, store, trace, and distribute their seeds, we have developed the new program SeedUSoon, with simplicity in mind. This software contains data management functions that allow the separate tracking of distinct mutations, even in successive crossings or mutagenesis. SeedUSoon reflects the biotechnological diversity of mutations and transgenes contained in any specific line, and the history of their inheritance. It can facilitate GMO certification procedures by distinguishing mutations on the basis of the presence/absence of a transgene, and by recording the technology used for their generation. Its interface can be customized to match the context and rules of any laboratory. In addition, Seed

  15. SeedUSoon: A New Software Program to Improve Seed Stock Management and Plant Line Exchanges between Research Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Charavay, Céline; Segard, Stéphane; Pochon, Nathalie; Nussaume, Laurent; Javot, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Plant research is supported by an ever-growing collection of mutant or transgenic lines. In the past, a typical basic research laboratory would focus on only a few plant lines that were carefully isolated from collections of lines containing random mutations. The subsequent technological breakthrough in high-throughput sequencing, combined with novel and highly efficient mutagenesis techniques (including site-directed mutagenesis), has led to a recent exponential growth in plant line collections used by individual researchers. Tracking the generation and genetic properties of these genetic resources is thus becoming increasingly challenging for researchers. Another difficulty for researchers is controlling the use of seeds protected by a Material Transfer Agreement, as often only the original recipient of the seeds is aware of the existence of such documents. This situation can thus lead to difficult legal situations. Simultaneously, various institutions and the general public now demand more information about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In response, researchers are seeking new database solutions to address the triple challenge of research competition, legal constraints, and institutional/public demands. To help plant biology laboratories organize, describe, store, trace, and distribute their seeds, we have developed the new program SeedUSoon, with simplicity in mind. This software contains data management functions that allow the separate tracking of distinct mutations, even in successive crossings or mutagenesis. SeedUSoon reflects the biotechnological diversity of mutations and transgenes contained in any specific line, and the history of their inheritance. It can facilitate GMO certification procedures by distinguishing mutations on the basis of the presence/absence of a transgene, and by recording the technology used for their generation. Its interface can be customized to match the context and rules of any laboratory. In addition, Seed

  16. Antifungal activity in seed coat extracts of woodland plants.

    PubMed

    Warr, Susan J; Thompson, Ken; Kent, Martin

    1992-11-01

    Aqueous extracts from seeds of four woodland ground flora species (Hyacinthoides non-scripta, Allium ursinum, Digitalis purpurea and Hypericum pulchrum) were tested for antifungal activity using a petriplate technique. Four species of fungi were investigated. The growth of three of these (Trichoderma viride, Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium sp.) was not affected by any of the seed coat extracts. The growth of Botrytis cinerea was inhibited by the seed coat extracts of Digitalis purpurea and Hypericum pulchrum but not by those of Hyacinthoides non-scripta or Allium ursinum. The buried seeds of Digitalis purpurea and Hypericum pulchrum can survive in woodland soils for long periods, whereas those of Hyacinthoides non-scripta and Allium ursinum are short-lived. The presence of antifungal agents in the seed coats of persistent species and their possible role in protecting seeds against fungal pathogens is discussed.

  17. Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment.

    PubMed

    Razafindratsima, Onja H; Dunham, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Directed dispersal is defined as enhanced dispersal of seeds into suitable microhabitats, resulting in higher recruitment than if seeds were dispersed randomly. While this constitutes one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal, the generality of this advantage has received little study, particularly when multiple dispersers are involved. We used probability recruitment models of a long-lived rainforest tree in Madagascar to compare recruitment success under dispersal by multiple frugivores, no dispersal, and random dispersal. Models were parameterized using a three-year recruitment experiment and observational data of dispersal events by three frugivorous lemur species that commonly disperse its seeds. Frugivore-mediated seed dispersal was nonrandom with respect to canopy cover and increased modeled per-seed sapling recruitment fourfold compared to no dispersal. Seeds dispersed by one frugivore, Eulemur rubriventer, had higher modeled recruitment probability than seeds dispersed randomly. However, as a group, our models suggest that seeds dispersed by lemurs would have lower recruitment than if dispersal were random. Results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the contribution of multiple frugivores to plant recruitment for understanding plant population dynamics and the ecological and evolutionary significance of seed dispersal.

  18. High-throughput comparison, functional annotation, and metabolic modeling of plant genomes using the PlantSEED resource

    PubMed Central

    Seaver, Samuel M. D.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Frelin, Océane; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Bradbury, Louis M. T.; Zallot, Rémi; Hasnain, Ghulam; Niehaus, Thomas D.; El Yacoubi, Basma; Pasternak, Shiran; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon; Overbeek, Ross; Stevens, Rick; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Ware, Doreen; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of sequenced plant genomes is placing new demands on the methods applied to analyze, annotate, and model these genomes. Today’s annotation pipelines result in inconsistent gene assignments that complicate comparative analyses and prevent efficient construction of metabolic models. To overcome these problems, we have developed the PlantSEED, an integrated, metabolism-centric database to support subsystems-based annotation and metabolic model reconstruction for plant genomes. PlantSEED combines SEED subsystems technology, first developed for microbial genomes, with refined protein families and biochemical data to assign fully consistent functional annotations to orthologous genes, particularly those encoding primary metabolic pathways. Seamless integration with its parent, the prokaryotic SEED database, makes PlantSEED a unique environment for cross-kingdom comparative analysis of plant and bacterial genomes. The consistent annotations imposed by PlantSEED permit rapid reconstruction and modeling of primary metabolism for all plant genomes in the database. This feature opens the unique possibility of model-based assessment of the completeness and accuracy of gene annotation and thus allows computational identification of genes and pathways that are restricted to certain genomes or need better curation. We demonstrate the PlantSEED system by producing consistent annotations for 10 reference genomes. We also produce a functioning metabolic model for each genome, gapfilling to identify missing annotations and proposing gene candidates for missing annotations. Models are built around an extended biomass composition representing the most comprehensive published to date. To our knowledge, our models are the first to be published for seven of the genomes analyzed. PMID:24927599

  19. High-throughput comparison, functional annotation, and metabolic modeling of plant genomes using the PlantSEED resource.

    PubMed

    Seaver, Samuel M D; Gerdes, Svetlana; Frelin, Océane; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Bradbury, Louis M T; Zallot, Rémi; Hasnain, Ghulam; Niehaus, Thomas D; El Yacoubi, Basma; Pasternak, Shiran; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon; Overbeek, Ross; Stevens, Rick; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Ware, Doreen; Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S

    2014-07-01

    The increasing number of sequenced plant genomes is placing new demands on the methods applied to analyze, annotate, and model these genomes. Today's annotation pipelines result in inconsistent gene assignments that complicate comparative analyses and prevent efficient construction of metabolic models. To overcome these problems, we have developed the PlantSEED, an integrated, metabolism-centric database to support subsystems-based annotation and metabolic model reconstruction for plant genomes. PlantSEED combines SEED subsystems technology, first developed for microbial genomes, with refined protein families and biochemical data to assign fully consistent functional annotations to orthologous genes, particularly those encoding primary metabolic pathways. Seamless integration with its parent, the prokaryotic SEED database, makes PlantSEED a unique environment for cross-kingdom comparative analysis of plant and bacterial genomes. The consistent annotations imposed by PlantSEED permit rapid reconstruction and modeling of primary metabolism for all plant genomes in the database. This feature opens the unique possibility of model-based assessment of the completeness and accuracy of gene annotation and thus allows computational identification of genes and pathways that are restricted to certain genomes or need better curation. We demonstrate the PlantSEED system by producing consistent annotations for 10 reference genomes. We also produce a functioning metabolic model for each genome, gapfilling to identify missing annotations and proposing gene candidates for missing annotations. Models are built around an extended biomass composition representing the most comprehensive published to date. To our knowledge, our models are the first to be published for seven of the genomes analyzed.

  20. Development of White and Norway Spruce Trees from Several Seed Sources 29 Years After Planting

    Treesearch

    James P. King; Paul O. Rudolf

    1969-01-01

    A 29-year-old test of trees grown from seven white spruce and six Norway spruce seed sources and planted in Wisconsin and Minnesota demonstrates the importance of seed-source selection and indicates that trees from some Norway spruce sources equal or surpass the native white spruce.

  1. Fantasy Seed Company: A Role Playing Game for Plant Breeding Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hague, Steve S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding plant breeding as well as procedures and issues of seed companies are skills students studying agronomy need to acquire. Simulation games can be effective teaching tools in developing higher-order thinking skills of students. The "Fantasy Seed Company" game was developed to create motivated learners by allowing students to run a mock…

  2. How plants manipulate the scatter-hoarding behaviour of seed-dispersing animals

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wall, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Some plants that are dispersed by scatter-hoarding animals appear to have evolved the ability to manipulate the behaviour of those animals to increase the likelihood that seeds and nuts will be stored and that a portion of those items will not be recovered. Plants have achieved this in at least four ways. First, by producing large, nutritious seeds and nuts that are attractive to animals and that stimulate hoarding behaviour. Second, by imposing handling costs that cause animals to hoard rather than to eat items immediately. These handling costs can take one of two forms: physical barriers (e.g. hard seed coats) that take time to remove and secondary chemicals (e.g. tannins) that impose metabolic costs. Third, by masting, where a population of plants synchronizes reproductive effort, producing large nut crops at intervals of several years. Mast crops not only satiate seed predators, but also increase the amount of seed dispersal because scatter-hoarding animals are not easily satiated during caching (causing animals to store more food than they can consume) but are satiated during cache recovery. And fourth, by producing seeds that do not emit strong odours so that buried seeds are less likely to be discovered. These, and perhaps other, traits have increased the relative success of plant species with seeds dispersed by scatter-hoarding animals. PMID:20156821

  3. [Plant biomorphology and seed germination of pioneer species of the Kamchatka volcanoes].

    PubMed

    Voronkova, N M; Kholina, A B; Verkholat, V P

    2008-01-01

    Biomorphology, quantitative characters and seed germination of 17 pioneer plant species friable materials of volcanic eruptions (Kamchatka Peninsula) were studied. Adaptive trends in survival stress conditions are discussed. To evaluate a possibility of the cryogenic seed storage, their response to ultra low temperatures (-196 degrees C) was determine.

  4. Fantasy Seed Company: A Role Playing Game for Plant Breeding Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hague, Steve S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding plant breeding as well as procedures and issues of seed companies are skills students studying agronomy need to acquire. Simulation games can be effective teaching tools in developing higher-order thinking skills of students. The "Fantasy Seed Company" game was developed to create motivated learners by allowing students to run a mock…

  5. Seed dispersal by white-tailed deer: implications for long-distance dispersal, invasion, and migration of plants in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan A; Vellend, Mark; Gardescu, Sana; Marks, P L

    2004-03-01

    For many plant species in eastern North America, short observed seed dispersal distances (ranging up to a few tens of meters) fail to explain rapid rates of invasion and migration. This discrepancy points to a substantial gap in our knowledge of the mechanisms by which seeds are dispersed long distances. We investigated the potential for white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus Zimm.), the dominant large herbivore in much of eastern North America, to disperse seeds via endozoochory. This is the first comprehensive study of seed dispersal by white-tailed deer, despite a vast body of research on other aspects of their ecology. More than 70 plant species germinated from deer feces collected over a 1-year period in central New York State, USA. Viable seeds included native and alien herbs, shrubs, and trees, including several invasive introduced species, from the full range of habitat types in the local flora. A mean of >30 seeds germinated per fecal pellet group, and seeds were dispersed during all months of the year. A wide variety of presumed dispersal modes were represented (endo- and exozoochory, wind, ballistic, ant, and unassisted). The majority were species with small-seeded fruits having no obvious adaptations for dispersal, underscoring the difficulty of inferring dispersal ability from diaspore morphology. Due to their broad diet, wide-ranging movements, and relatively long gut retention times, white-tailed deer have tremendous potential for effecting long-distance seed dispersal via ingestion and defecation. We conclude that white-tailed deer represent a significant and previously unappreciated vector of seed dispersal across the North American landscape, probably contributing an important long-distance component to the seed shadows of hundreds of plant species, and providing a mechanism to help explain rapid rates of plant migration.

  6. Rodent seed predation as a biotic filter influencing exotic plant abundance and distribution

    Treesearch

    D. E. Pearson; J. L. Hierro; M. Chiuffo; D. Villarreal

    2014-01-01

    Biotic resistance is commonly invoked to explain why many exotic plants fail to thrive in introduced ranges, but the role of seed predation as an invasion filter is understudied. Abiotic conditions may also influence plant populations and can interact with consumers to determine plant distributions, but how these factors jointly influence invasions is poorly understood...

  7. Extensive variation in synonymous substitution rates in mitochondrial genes of seed plants.

    PubMed

    Mower, Jeffrey P; Touzet, Pascal; Gummow, Julie S; Delph, Lynda F; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2007-08-09

    It has long been known that rates of synonymous substitutions are unusually low in mitochondrial genes of flowering and other land plants. Although two dramatic exceptions to this pattern have recently been reported, it is unclear how often major increases in substitution rates occur during plant mitochondrial evolution and what the overall magnitude of substitution rate variation is across plants. A broad survey was undertaken to evaluate synonymous substitution rates in mitochondrial genes of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Although most taxa conform to the generality that plant mitochondrial sequences evolve slowly, additional cases of highly accelerated rates were found. We explore in detail one of these new cases, within the genus Silene. A roughly 100-fold increase in synonymous substitution rate is estimated to have taken place within the last 5 million years and involves only one of ten species of Silene sampled in this study. Examples of unusually slow sequence evolution were also identified. Comparison of the fastest and slowest lineages shows that synonymous substitution rates vary by four orders of magnitude across seed plants. In other words, some plant mitochondrial lineages accumulate more synonymous change in 10,000 years than do others in 100 million years. Several perplexing cases of gene-to-gene variation in sequence divergence within a plant were uncovered. Some of these probably reflect interesting biological phenomena, such as horizontal gene transfer, mitochondrial-to-nucleus transfer, and intragenomic variation in mitochondrial substitution rates, whereas others are likely the result of various kinds of errors. The extremes of synonymous substitution rates measured here constitute by far the largest known range of rate variation for any group of organisms. These results highlight the utility of examining absolute substitution rates in a phylogenetic context rather than by traditional pairwise methods. Why substitution rates are generally so low

  8. Distance-dependent pollen limitation of seed set in some insect-pollinated dioecious plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Tom J.; Batenburg, Judith C.; Klinkhamer, Peter G. L.

    2005-11-01

    By applying hand pollination, we studied pollen limitation of seed set of female plants in four dioecious plant species with insect-pollination. The effect of hand pollination increased with distance to the nearest male plant. Distances at which seed set was 50% of its maximal value (after hand pollination) were: 2.3 m for Valeriana dioica, 5.3 m for Salix repens, 8.5 m for Asparagus officinale and 10.6 m for Bryonia dioica. We discuss to what extent the reduced seed set was caused by either fewer visits or by visits of a lower quality. We argue that quantifying distance-dependent seed set in dioecious plants may be a good way of studying effects of habitat fragmentation on the breakdown of mutualistic pollination systems.

  9. Implications of nonrandom seed abscission and global stilling for migration of wind-dispersed plant species.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sally E; Katul, Gabriel G

    2013-06-01

    Migration of plant populations is a potential survival response to climate change that depends critically on seed dispersal. Biological and physical factors determine dispersal and migration of wind-dispersed species. Recent field and wind tunnel studies demonstrate biological adaptations that bias seed release toward conditions of higher wind velocity, promoting longer dispersal distances and faster migration. However, another suite of international studies also recently highlighted a global decrease in near-surface wind speeds, or 'global stilling'. This study assessed the implications of both factors on potential plant population migration rates, using a mechanistic modeling framework. Nonrandom abscission was investigated using models of three seed release mechanisms: (i) a simple drag model; (ii) a seed deflection model; and (iii) a 'wear and tear' model. The models generated a single functional relationship between the frequency of seed release and statistics of the near-surface wind environment, independent of the abscission mechanism. An Inertial-Particle, Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian Closure model (IP-CELC) was used to investigate abscission effects on seed dispersal kernels and plant population migration rates under contemporary and potential future wind conditions (based on reported global stilling trends). The results confirm that nonrandom seed abscission increased dispersal distances, particularly for light seeds. The increases were mitigated by two physical feedbacks: (i) although nonrandom abscission increased the initial acceleration of seeds from rest, the sensitivity of the seed dispersal to this initial condition declined as the wind speed increased; and (ii) while nonrandom abscission increased the mean dispersal length, it reduced the kurtosis of seasonal dispersal kernels, and thus the chance of long-distance dispersal. Wind stilling greatly reduced the modeled migration rates under biased seed release conditions. Thus, species that require

  10. Molecular analysis of genetic fidelity in Cannabis sativa L. plants grown from synthetic (encapsulated) seeds following in vitro storage.

    PubMed

    Lata, Hemant; Chandra, Suman; Techen, Natascha; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2011-12-01

    The increasing utilization of synthetic (encapsulated) seeds for germplasm conservation and propagation necessitates the assessment of genetic stability of conserved propagules following their plantlet conversion. We have assessed the genetic stability of synthetic seeds of Cannabis sativa L. during in vitro multiplication and storage for 6 months at different growth conditions using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) DNA fingerprinting. Molecular analysis of randomly selected plants from each batch was conducted using 14 ISSR markers. Of the 14 primers tested, nine produced 40 distinct and reproducible bands. All the ISSR profiles from in vitro stored plants were monomorphic and comparable to the mother plant which confirms the genetic stability among the clones. GC analysis of six major cannabinoids [Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, tetrahydrocannabivarin, cannabidiol, cannabichromene, cannabigerol and cannabinol] showed homogeneity in the re-grown clones and the mother plant with insignificant differences in cannabinoids content, thereby confirming the stability of plants derived from synthetic seeds following 6 months storage. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  11. Soil moisture and fungi affect seed survival in California grassland annual plants.

    PubMed

    Mordecai, Erin A

    2012-01-01

    Survival of seeds in the seed bank is important for the population dynamics of many plant species, yet the environmental factors that control seed survival at a landscape level remain poorly understood. These factors may include soil moisture, vegetation cover, soil type, and soil pathogens. Because many soil fungi respond to moisture and host species, fungi may mediate environmental drivers of seed survival. Here, I measure patterns of seed survival in California annual grassland plants across 15 species in three experiments. First, I surveyed seed survival for eight species at 18 grasslands and coastal sage scrub sites ranging across coastal and inland Santa Barbara County, California. Species differed in seed survival, and soil moisture and geographic location had the strongest influence on survival. Grasslands had higher survival than coastal sage scrub sites for some species. Second, I used a fungicide addition and exotic grass thatch removal experiment in the field to tease apart the relative impact of fungi, thatch, and their interaction in an invaded grassland. Seed survival was lower in the winter (wet season) than in the summer (dry season), but fungicide improved winter survival. Seed survival varied between species but did not depend on thatch. Third, I manipulated water and fungicide in the laboratory to directly examine the relationship between water, fungi, and survival. Seed survival declined from dry to single watered to continuously watered treatments. Fungicide slightly improved seed survival when seeds were watered once but not continually. Together, these experiments demonstrate an important role of soil moisture, potentially mediated by fungal pathogens, in driving seed survival.

  12. Soil Moisture and Fungi Affect Seed Survival in California Grassland Annual Plants

    PubMed Central

    Mordecai, Erin A.

    2012-01-01

    Survival of seeds in the seed bank is important for the population dynamics of many plant species, yet the environmental factors that control seed survival at a landscape level remain poorly understood. These factors may include soil moisture, vegetation cover, soil type, and soil pathogens. Because many soil fungi respond to moisture and host species, fungi may mediate environmental drivers of seed survival. Here, I measure patterns of seed survival in California annual grassland plants across 15 species in three experiments. First, I surveyed seed survival for eight species at 18 grasslands and coastal sage scrub sites ranging across coastal and inland Santa Barbara County, California. Species differed in seed survival, and soil moisture and geographic location had the strongest influence on survival. Grasslands had higher survival than coastal sage scrub sites for some species. Second, I used a fungicide addition and exotic grass thatch removal experiment in the field to tease apart the relative impact of fungi, thatch, and their interaction in an invaded grassland. Seed survival was lower in the winter (wet season) than in the summer (dry season), but fungicide improved winter survival. Seed survival varied between species but did not depend on thatch. Third, I manipulated water and fungicide in the laboratory to directly examine the relationship between water, fungi, and survival. Seed survival declined from dry to single watered to continuously watered treatments. Fungicide slightly improved seed survival when seeds were watered once but not continually. Together, these experiments demonstrate an important role of soil moisture, potentially mediated by fungal pathogens, in driving seed survival. PMID:22720037

  13. Non-native earthworms promote plant invasion by ingesting seeds and modifying soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clause, Julia; Forey, Estelle; Lortie, Christopher J.; Lambert, Adam M.; Barot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms can have strong direct effects on plant communities through consumption and digestion of seeds, however it is unclear how earthworms may influence the relative abundance and composition of plant communities invaded by non-native species. In this study, earthworms, seed banks, and the standing vegetation were sampled in a grassland of central California. Our objectives were i) to examine whether the abundances of non-native, invasive earthworm species and non-native grassland plant species are correlated, and ii) to test whether seed ingestion by these worms alters the soil seed bank by evaluating the composition of seeds in casts relative to uningested soil. Sampling locations were selected based on historical land-use practices, including presence or absence of tilling, and revegetation by seed using Phalaris aquatica. Only non-native earthworm species were found, dominated by the invasive European species Aporrectodea trapezoides. Earthworm abundance was significantly higher in the grassland blocks dominated by non-native plant species, and these sites had higher carbon and moisture contents. Earthworm abundance was also positively related to increased emergence of non-native seedlings, but had no effect on that of native seedlings. Plant species richness and total seedling emergence were higher in casts than in uningested soils. This study suggests that there is a potential effect of non-native earthworms in promoting non-native and likely invasive plant species within grasslands, due to seed-plant-earthworm interactions via soil modification or to seed ingestion by earthworms and subsequent cast effects on grassland dynamics. This study supports a growing body of literature for earthworms as ecosystem engineers but highlights the relative importance of considering non-native-native interactions with the associated plant community.

  14. Hepatoprotective effects of raspberry (Rubus coreanus Miq.) seed oil and its major constituents.

    PubMed

    Teng, Hui; Lin, Qiyang; Li, Kang; Yuan, Benyao; Song, Hongbo; Yi, Lunzhao; Wei, Ming-Chi; Yang, Yu-Chiao; Battino, Maurizio; Cespedes Acuña, Carlos L; Chen, Lei; Xiao, Jianbo

    2017-09-09

    Raspberry seed is a massive byproduct of raspberry juice and wine but usually discarded. The present study employed a microwave-assisted method for extraction of raspberry seed oil (RSO). The results revealed that omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic acid and γ-linolenic acid) were the major constituents in RSO. Cellular antioxidant enzyme activity such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were investigated in HepG2 cells treated with RSO. Induction of the synthesis of several antioxidants in H2O2-exposed HepG2 cells was found. RSO increased the enzyme activity of SOD, CAT, and GPx in H2O2-exposed HepG2. Furthermore, RSO inhibited the phosphorylation of upstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (c-JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Taken together, the possible mechanisms to increase antioxidant enzyme activities in HepG2 may through the suppression of ERK and JNK phosphorylation. Raspberry seed oil exhibited good effects on the activities of the intracellular antioxidant enzymes and seems to protect the liver from oxidative stress through the inhibition of MAPKs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Calibrating the Truax Rough Rider seed drill for restoration plantings

    Treesearch

    Loren St. John; Brent Cornforth; Boyd Simonson; Dan Ogle; Derek Tilley

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to provide a step-by-step approach to calibrating the Truax Rough Rider range drill, a relatively new, state-of-the-art rangeland drill. To achieve the desired outcome of a seeding project, an important step following proper weed control and seedbed preparation is the calibration of the seeding equipment to ensure the recommended...

  16. How Does Your Garden Grow? Early Conceptualization of Seeds and Their Place in the Plant Growth Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickling, Anne K.; Gelman, Susan A.

    1995-01-01

    Examined young children's understanding of seed origins and growth preconditions and the stages of plant growth. Found that, by 4.5 years, children realized that natural causal mechanisms underlie plant growth and appreciated the relationship of seeds to plants. Results suggest that preschoolers hold theory-like understandings of plants similar to…

  17. How Does Your Garden Grow? Early Conceptualization of Seeds and Their Place in the Plant Growth Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickling, Anne K.; Gelman, Susan A.

    1995-01-01

    Examined young children's understanding of seed origins and growth preconditions and the stages of plant growth. Found that, by 4.5 years, children realized that natural causal mechanisms underlie plant growth and appreciated the relationship of seeds to plants. Results suggest that preschoolers hold theory-like understandings of plants similar to…

  18. Plant recruitment in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Testing seed- and leaf litter-limitation hypotheses (P-53)

    Treesearch

    Scott R. Abella

    2008-01-01

    Seed availability and leaf litter limit plant establishment in some ecosystems. To evaluate the hypothesis that these factors limit understory plant recruitment in Pinus ponderosa forests, I conducted a seeding and litter removal experiment at six thinned sites in the Fort Valley Experimental Forest, northern Arizona. Experimental seeding of four native species (...

  19. Plant recruitment in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Testing seed- and leaf litter-limitation hypotheses

    Treesearch

    Scott R. Abella

    2008-01-01

    Seed availability and leaf litter limit plant establishment in some ecosystems. To evaluate the hypothesis that these factors limit understory plant recruitment in Pinus ponderosa forests, I conducted a seeding and litter removal experiment at six thinned sites in the Fort Valley Experimental Forest, northern Arizona. Experimental seeding of four native species (

  20. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Ruben H; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-07

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles.

  1. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Olesen, Jens M.; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  2. The effect of shock loading on the survival of plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighs, J. A.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.

    2012-07-01

    Meteorite and asteroid impacts into planet Earth seem rare but over the lifetime of our planet have been relatively frequent. Such collisions (involving very large impactors) have been blamed for mass extinctions during Earth’s history. It has also been postulated that impactors could carry life with them throughout the universe and seed our planet. This is the basis of the theory of panspermia (‘life everywhere’) and suggests that life could be spread throughout the universe by ‘piggy-backing’ on inter-planetary bodies, e.g. asteroids, which then collide with other planets, thus seeding them with life. The shock behaviour of organic matter has an important role to play in helping to inform the feasibility of such theories. An example of a model carrier for life in seeding mechanisms is the plant seed. Here we present the development of an experimental technique in which plant seed samples are shock-loaded and their viability subsequently assessed post-shock. This technique was tested on Lepidium sativum (cress) seed samples. Experimentally, shocked seeds showed positive viability in all tests performed until shocked with a maximum peak shock pressure of ca. 0.8 GPa. These results suggest it is unlikely that the plant seeds tested would be able to survive the extreme conditions on an asteroid during impact, but may be able to survive shock waves that would be generated from such collisions when existing on a planetary body.

  3. Evidence for participation of the methionine sulfoxide reductase repair system in plant seed longevity

    PubMed Central

    Châtelain, Emilie; Satour, Pascale; Laugier, Edith; Ly Vu, Benoit; Payet, Nicole; Rey, Pascal; Montrichard, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are in a natural oxidative context leading to protein oxidation. Although inevitable for proper progression from maturation to germination, protein oxidation at high levels is detrimental and associated with seed aging. Oxidation of methionine to methionine sulfoxide is a common form of damage observed during aging in all organisms. This damage is reversible through the action of methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSRs), which play key roles in lifespan control in yeast and animal cells. To investigate the relationship between MSR capacity and longevity in plant seeds, we first used two Medicago truncatula genotypes with contrasting seed quality. After characterizing the MSR family in this species, we analyzed gene expression and enzymatic activity in immature and mature seeds exhibiting distinct quality levels. We found a very strong correlation between the initial MSR capacities in different lots of mature seeds of the two genotypes and the time to a drop in viability to 50% after controlled deterioration. We then analyzed seed longevity in Arabidopsis thaliana lines, in which MSR gene expression has been genetically altered, and observed a positive correlation between MSR capacity and longevity in these seeds as well. Based on our data, we propose that the MSR repair system plays a decisive role in the establishment and preservation of longevity in plant seeds. PMID:23401556

  4. Evidence for participation of the methionine sulfoxide reductase repair system in plant seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Châtelain, Emilie; Satour, Pascale; Laugier, Edith; Ly Vu, Benoit; Payet, Nicole; Rey, Pascal; Montrichard, Françoise

    2013-02-26

    Seeds are in a natural oxidative context leading to protein oxidation. Although inevitable for proper progression from maturation to germination, protein oxidation at high levels is detrimental and associated with seed aging. Oxidation of methionine to methionine sulfoxide is a common form of damage observed during aging in all organisms. This damage is reversible through the action of methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSRs), which play key roles in lifespan control in yeast and animal cells. To investigate the relationship between MSR capacity and longevity in plant seeds, we first used two Medicago truncatula genotypes with contrasting seed quality. After characterizing the MSR family in this species, we analyzed gene expression and enzymatic activity in immature and mature seeds exhibiting distinct quality levels. We found a very strong correlation between the initial MSR capacities in different lots of mature seeds of the two genotypes and the time to a drop in viability to 50% after controlled deterioration. We then analyzed seed longevity in Arabidopsis thaliana lines, in which MSR gene expression has been genetically altered, and observed a positive correlation between MSR capacity and longevity in these seeds as well. Based on our data, we propose that the MSR repair system plays a decisive role in the establishment and preservation of longevity in plant seeds.

  5. [Dehydration in the cryopreservation of moist plant tissues and in seed maturation].

    PubMed

    Chetverikova, E P

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of long-term cryopreservation of plant objects depends on their water content. In orthodox seeds, it decreases at the late stage of maturation and is accompanied by the synthesis of protectors--sugars and proteins. These seeds easily withstand cryopreservation. Organs with a high water content, meristems, and recalcitrant seeds are dried in presence of sucrose before plunging in liquid nitrogen. In orthodox seeds, artificially dried moist seeds, and meristems, the cellular content forms glass structures that are estimated in frozen materials by differential scanning calorimetry and electron paramagnetic resonance methods. It is proposed that the glass cellular content is connected with the duration of cryopreservation. Methodical approaches to successive cryopreservation of moist plant tissues are described.

  6. Soil seed banks confer resilience to savanna grass-layer plants during seasonal disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Kenneth; Setterfield, Samantha; Douglas, Michael; Andersen, Alan

    2010-03-01

    An understanding of soil seed bank processes is crucial for understanding vegetation dynamics, particularly in ecosystems experiencing frequent disturbance. This paper examines seed bank dynamics in a tropical savanna in northern Australia, an environment characterised by frequent fire and highly seasonal rainfall. In particular, we examine the contribution of seed bank processes to the high level of resilience shown by grass-layer vegetation in relation to fire. We assess the spatial congruence between seed bank composition and extant vegetation, document temporal variation in the germinable seed bank over the annual dry season, test the effects of laboratory-applied heat and smoke treatments on seed germinability, and determine the effect of experimental fires on seed bank composition. Although dominant species were shared, the composition of the germinable seed bank was significantly different to that of extant vegetation, with approximately half the extant species not being detected in the seed bank. The density and species richness of germinable seeds was significantly greater in the late dry season than the early dry season, with annual grasses showing particularly high levels of seed dormancy in the early dry season. The density and species richness of germinable seeds in the seed bank was significantly enhanced by laboratory-applied treatments of smoke and especially heat, driven by the response of legumes. However, fire had no significant effect on the density or species richness of germinable seeds in the field, indicating soil temperatures during fire were too low to overcome physical dormancy, or burial was too deep to experience adequate heating or smoke exposure. Our results provide a mechanistic understanding of the persistence of annual grasses and forbs in an environment subject to frequent fire and highly seasonal rainfall, and, together with the sprouting capacity of perennial grasses, explain the high resilience of savanna grass-layer plants in

  7. Patterns and Evolution of Nucleotide Landscapes in Seed Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Serres-Giardi, Laurana; Belkhir, Khalid; David, Jacques; Glémin, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide landscapes, which are the way base composition is distributed along a genome, strongly vary among species. The underlying causes of these variations have been much debated. Though mutational bias and selection were initially invoked, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a recombination-associated process favoring the G and C over A and T bases, is increasingly recognized as a major factor. As opposed to vertebrates, evolution of GC content is less well known in plants. Most studies have focused on the GC-poor and homogeneous Arabidopsis thaliana genome and the much more GC-rich and heterogeneous rice (Oryza sativa) genome and have often been generalized as a dicot/monocot dichotomy. This vision is clearly phylogenetically biased and does not allow understanding the mechanisms involved in GC content evolution in plants. To tackle these issues, we used EST data from more than 200 species and provided the most comprehensive description of gene GC content across the seed plant phylogeny so far available. As opposed to the classically assumed dicot/monocot dichotomy, we found continuous variations in GC content from the probably ancestral GC-poor and homogeneous genomes to the more derived GC-rich and highly heterogeneous ones, with several independent enrichment episodes. Our results suggest that gBGC could play a significant role in the evolution of GC content in plant genomes. PMID:22492812

  8. Increasing seed size and quality by manipulating BIG SEEDS 1 in legume species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant organs such as seeds are primary sources of food for both humans and animals. Seed size is one of the major agronomic traits that have been selected in crop plants during their domestication. Legume seeds are a major source of dietary proteins and oils. Here, we report a novel and conserved ro...

  9. Effects of foliar boron application on seed composition, cell wall boron, and seed δ15N and δ13C isotopes in water-stressed soybean plants

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Hu, Yanbo; Mengistu, Alemu; Kassem, My A.; Abel, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available on the effects of foliar boron (B) application on soybean seed composition. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of foliar B on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars). Our hypothesis was that since B is involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism, it may impact seed composition. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted where half of the soybean plants was exposed to water stress (WS) and the other half was well-watered. Foliar boron (FB) in the form of boric acid was applied twice at a rate of 1.1 kg ha−1. The first application was during flowering stage, and the second application was during seed-fill stage. Treatments were water stressed plants with no FB (WS–B); water stressed plants with FB (WS+B); watered plants without FB (W–B), and watered plants with FB (W+B). The treatment W–B was used as a control. Comparing with WS–B plants, B concentration was the highest in leaves and seed of W+B plants (84% increase in leaves and 73% in seed). Seeds of W+B plants had higher protein (11% increase), oleic acid (27% increase), sucrose (up to 40% increase), glucose, and fructose comparing with W–B. However, seed stachyose concentrations increased by 43% in WS–B plants seed compared with W–B plants. Cell wall (structural) B concentration in leaves was higher in all plants under water stress, especially in WS–B plants where the percentage of cell wall B reached up to 90%. Water stress changed seed δ15N and δ13C values in both B applied and non-B applied plants, indicating possible effects on nitrogen and carbon metabolism. This research demonstrated that FB increased B accumulation in leaves and seed, and altered seed composition of well-watered and water stressed plants, indicating a possible involvement of B in seed protein, and oleic and linolenic fatty acids. Further research is needed to explain mechanisms of B involvement in seed protein and fatty acids. PMID:23888163

  10. Using composting for control seed germination of invasive plant (water hyacinth) in Extremadura (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador, Juana; Gordillo, Judit; Ruiz, Trinidad; Albano, Eva; Moreno, Marta M.

    2016-04-01

    The biotransformation of the invasive water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) by composting has been showed as a viable alternative to offset the economic cost of eliminating an invasive plant giving a value to the by-product; however, as result of the propagative plant capacity, it was necessary to check if the composting process could eliminate the germination seed rate. Despite the high temperatures and the biochemical biotransformation processes of the composting components, in the case of seed water hyacinth, with a recovery rate of 100%, damage was observed in some parts of the seed anatomy such as in the outer teguments; however, other parts of the seed coat and the endosperm maintained their integrity. A microscopic analysis revealed that the embryo was noticeable and this was supported by the rate of seed germination observed (3.5 ± 0.96%). The results indicate that the use of water hyacinth for compost production is not completely safe from an environmental perspective. Keywords: Eichhornia crassipes, water hyacinth, invasive plant, seed anatomy, seed germination rate, compost. References: Ruiz T., Martín de Rodrigo E., Lorenzo G., Albano E., Morán R., Sánchez J.M. 2008. The Water Hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes: an invasive plant in the Guadiana River Basin (Spain). Aquatic Invasions Volume 3, Issue 1:42-53.

  11. The Importance of Seed Characteristics in the Dispersal of Splash-Cup Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklof, Joel; Pepper, Rachel Pepper; Echternach, Juliana

    2016-11-01

    Splash-cup plants disperse their seeds by exploiting the kinetic energy of raindrops. When raindrops impact the splash-cup, a 3-5 mm vessel that holds seeds, the seeds are projected up to 1 m away from the parent plant. It has been established, using 3D printed models, that a 40°cone angle maximizes dispersal distance when seeds are not present in the cup. We therefore use 40°cups with the addition of different types of seeds to determine the effect that seeds of varying characteristics have on the dispersal and splash dynamics of splash-cup plants. Splash characteristics and dispersal distances of seeds with differing characteristics such as size, shape, texture, density, and hydrophobicity were compared to one another, as well as to the case of having no seeds present. We found that the presence of seeds dramatically decreased dispersal distance and changed splash characteristics (are measured by the angle and velocity of the resulting splash). In addition, different types of seeds yielded splashes with differing dispersal distance and splash characteristics. Splash characteristics and dispersal distances of glass beads of differing hydrophobicity were compared to determine the effect hydrophobicity has on dispersal and splash dynamics. These beads yielded some differences in dispersal distance, but no notable difference in splash dynamics. Models of the conical fruit bodies of the splash-cups were 3D printed and high-speed video was used to find splash characteristics, and dispersal distance was calculated by measuring the distance from the model to the final resting position of the seeds and droplets.

  12. Isolation and characterization of ellagitannins as the major polyphenolic components of Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour) seeds.

    PubMed

    Sudjaroen, Yuttana; Hull, William E; Erben, Gerhard; Würtele, Gerd; Changbumrung, Supranee; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour, syn. Euphoria longan Lam.) represents an important fruit in Northern Thailand and has significant economic impact. The fruit is either consumed fresh or as commercially prepared dried and canned products. The canning industry in Thailand produces considerable quantities of waste products, in particular Longan seeds. Because these seeds may be an exploitable source of natural phenolic antioxidants, it was of interest to identify, purify and quantitate the major potential antioxidant phenolics contained therein. The polyphenolic fraction from ground Longan seeds was obtained by extraction with methanol after delipidation with hexane. The hexane extract contained predominantly long-chain fatty acids with major contributions from palmitic (35%) and oleic (28%) acids. The polyphenolic fraction (80.90 g/kg dry weight) was dominated by ellagic acid (25.84 g/kg) and the known ellagitannins corilagin (13.31 g/kg), chebulagic acid (13.06 g/kg), ellagic acid 4-O-α-l-arabinofuranoside (9.93 g/kg), isomallotinic acid (8.56 g/kg) and geraniin (5.79 g/kg). Structure elucidation was performed with mass spectrometry and complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR signals. The methanol extracts exhibited strong antioxidant capacities with an IC(50) of 154 μg/ml for reactive oxygen species attack on salicylic acid and 78 μg/ml for inhibition of xanthine oxidase in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase assay. The extracts were less effective in the 2-deoxyguanosine assay (IC(50)=2.46 mg/ml), indicating that gallates along with ellagic acid and its congeners exert their potential antioxidant effects predominantly by precipitation of proteins such as xanthine oxidase. This was confirmed for the pure compounds gallic acid, methyl gallate, ellagic acid and corilagin.

  13. Retarded Embryo Development 1 (RED1) regulates embryo development, seed maturation and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-07-20

    Plant seeds accumulate large amounts of protein and carbohydrate as storage reserves during maturation. Thus, understanding the genetic control of embryo and seed development may provide bioengineering tools for yield improvement. In this study, we report the identification of Retarded Embryo Development 1 (RED1) gene in Arabidopsis, whose two independent T-DNA insertion mutant lines, SALK_085642 (red1-1) and SALK_022583 (red1-2), show a retarded embryo development phenotype. The embryogenesis process ceases at the late heart stage in red1-1 and at the bent-cotyledon stage in red1-2, respectively, resulting in seed abortion in both lines. The retarded embryo development and seed abortion phenotypes reverted to normal when RED1 complementation constructs were introduced into mutant plants. Small red1-2 homozygous plants can be successfully rescued by culturing immature seeds, indicating that seed abortion likely results from compromised tolerance to the desiccation process associated with seed maturation. Consistent with this observation, red1-2 seeds accumulate less protein, and the expression of two late embryo development reporter transgenes, LEA::GUS and β-conglycinin::GUS, was significantly weak and started relatively late in the red1-2 mutant lines compared to the wild type. The RED1 gene encodes a plant specific novel protein that is localized in the nucleus. These results indicate that RED1 plays important roles in embryo development, seed maturation and plant growth. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Control of Seed Germination and Plant Development by Carbon and Nitrogen Availability.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Daniel; Prieto, Pilar; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular basis of the influence of external carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and other abiotic factors on phytohormones regulation during seed germination and plant developmental processes, and the identification of elements that participate in this response is essential to understand plant nutrient perception and signaling. Sugars (sucrose, glucose) and nitrate not only act as nutrients but also as signaling molecules in plant development. A connection between changes in auxin transport and nitrate signal transduction has been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana through the NRT1.1, a nitrate sensor and transporter that also functions as a repressor of lateral root growth under low concentrations of nitrate by promoting auxin transport. Nitrate inhibits the elongation of lateral roots, but this effect is significantly reduced in abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive mutants, what suggests that ABA might mediate the inhibition of lateral root elongation by nitrate. Gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis has been also related to nitrate level in seed germination and its requirement is determined by embryonic ABA. These mechanisms connect nutrients and hormones signaling during seed germination and plant development. Thus, the genetic identification of the molecular components involved in nutrients-dependent pathways would help to elucidate the potential crosstalk between nutrients, nitric oxide (NO) and phytohormones (ABA, auxins and GAs) in seed germination and plant development. In this review we focus on changes in C and N levels and how they control seed germination and plant developmental processes through the interaction with other plant growth regulators, such as phytohormones.

  15. When will plant morphology affect the shape of a seed dispersal "kernel"?

    PubMed

    Cousens, R D; Rawlinson, A A

    2001-08-07

    Most models of dispersal assume that plants are point sources. In reality, the scale in height over which seed sources are distributed is often of the same order as the scale in distance over which most individual seeds are dispersed. But is this sufficient to affect the fundamental shapes of dispersal frequency distributions? Most published conclusions about the effects of canopy structure on dispersal are subjective. A model is developed to explore the consequences of plant canopies for the shapes of whole-plant seed dispersal "kernels". The canopies were described by simple geometric shapes, while an empirical probability density function (PDF) was used for dispersal from a point source. It was found that the resulting whole-plant PDF for dispersal distance was almost invariably peaked, whereas the PDF for the density of seed rain (as would be measured by pitfall traps) could either be peaked or monotonic according to the canopy shape, position of seeds in the canopy, and mean dispersal distance. The shapes of kernels from whole plants (distributed seed sources) can be very different from those derived from a point source under certain circumstances. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Abu Dhabi plant on track for major expansion

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-17

    Expansion under way at the Habshan gas-processing plant, some 150 km southwest of Abu Dhabi City, Emirate of Abu Dhabi, will by the end of 1999 increase processing capacity to about 3 bcfd from current capacity of about 2 bcfd. Phase 1 of the project has just been completed and most of the major units are operating. This project was initiated to achieve four major objectives: (1) meet increased consumer demand for gas; (2) increase revenue by production of condensate, NGL, and sulfur; (3) process excess associated gas produced at the Bab oil separation plant; and (4) maintain oil reservoir pressure by gas injection. The paper describes the advanced features, condensate treatment, processes, control philosophy, safety, and the environment.

  17. Evolution of the PEBP gene family in plants: functional diversification in seed plant evolution.

    PubMed

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Sundström, Jens F; Moore, David; Lascoux, Martin; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2011-08-01

    The phosphatidyl ethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family is present in all eukaryote kingdoms, with three subfamilies identified in angiosperms (FLOWERING LOCUS T [FT], MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 [MFT], and TERMINAL FLOWER1 [TFL1] like). In angiosperms, PEBP genes have been shown to function both as promoters and suppressors of flowering and to control plant architecture. In this study, we focus on previously uncharacterized PEBP genes from gymnosperms. Extensive database searches suggest that gymnosperms possess only two types of PEBP genes, MFT-like and a group that occupies an intermediate phylogenetic position between the FT-like and TFL1-like (FT/TFL1-like). Overexpression of Picea abies PEBP genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) suggests that the FT/TFL1-like genes (PaFTL1 and PaFTL2) code for proteins with a TFL1-like function. However, PaFTL1 and PaFTL2 also show highly divergent expression patterns. While the expression of PaFTL2 is correlated with annual growth rhythm and mainly confined to needles and vegetative and reproductive buds, the expression of PaFTL1 is largely restricted to microsporophylls of male cones. The P. abies MFT-like genes (PaMFT1 and PaMFT2) show a predominant expression during embryo development, a pattern that is also found for many MFT-like genes from angiosperms. P. abies PEBP gene expression is primarily detected in tissues undergoing physiological changes related to growth arrest and dormancy. A first duplication event resulting in two families of plant PEBP genes (MFT-like and FT/TFL1-like) seems to coincide with the evolution of seed plants, in which independent control of bud and seed dormancy was required, and the second duplication resulting in the FT-like and TFL1-like clades probably coincided with the evolution of angiosperms.

  18. Survival and growth of planted and direct-seeded cherrybark oak in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Stanturf, J.A.; Kennedy, H.E.

    1996-11-04

    Five treatments were used to evaluate the survival and growth of planted 2-0 cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings and seedlings grown from direct-seeded acorns of cherrybark oak. The treatments included: (1) deep-planted, top-pruned, (2) deep-planted, not top-pruned, (3) shallow-planted, top-pruned, (4) shallow-planted, not top-pruned, and (5) acorns direct-seeded. Survival was not affected by treatments. Planting depth and pruning did not affect survival of planted seedlings. The root collar of seedlings was placed about 1 ft below the groundline in the deep-planted treatments; however, after 5 yr these seedlings had survived as well as those in the shallow-planting treatments where the root collar was set at or near the groundline. Seedlings from the direct-seeded acorns were significantly smaller after 5 yr than planted seedlings. There were no differences in the size of seedlings in the planting treatments. Seedlings were 1.0 to 1.5 ft shorter when pruned after planting than the unpruned seedlings and grew more in height during the 5 yr period than the unpruned seedlings.

  19. A technique for estimating seed production of common moist soil plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, Murray K.

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of native herbaceous vegetation adapted to germination in hydric soils (i.e., moist-soil plants) provide waterfowl with nutritional resources including essential amino acids, vitamins, and minerals that occur only in small amounts or are absent in other foods. These elements are essential for waterfowl to successfully complete aspects of the annual cycle such as molt and reproduction. Moist-soil vegetation also has the advantages of consistent production of foods across years with varying water availability, low management costs, high tolerance to diverse environmental conditions, and low deterioration rates of seeds after flooding. The amount of seed produced differs among plant species and varies annually depending on environmental conditions and management practices. Further, many moist-soil impoundments contain diverse vegetation, and seed production by a particular plant species usually is not uniform across an entire unit. Consequently, estimating total seed production within an impoundment is extremely difficult. The chemical composition of seeds also varies among plant species. For example, beggartick seeds contain high amounts of protein but only an intermediate amount of minerals. In contrast, barnyardgrass is a good source of minerals but is low in protein. Because of these differences, it is necessary to know the amount of seed produced by each plant species if the nutritional resources provided in an impoundment are to be estimated. The following technique for estimating seed production takes into account the variation resulting from different environmental conditions and management practices as well as differences in the amount of seed produced by various plant species. The technique was developed to provide resource managers with the ability to make quick and reliable estimates of seed production. Although on-site information must be collected, the amount of field time required is small (i.e., about 1 min per sample); sampling normally is

  20. Genome-wide network model capturing seed germination reveals coordinated regulation of plant cellular phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.; Lan, Hui; Glaab, Enrico; Gibbs, Daniel J.; Gerjets, Tanja; Krasnogor, Natalio; Bonner, Anthony J.; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Provart, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed germination is a complex trait of key ecological and agronomic significance. Few genetic factors regulating germination have been identified, and the means by which their concerted action controls this developmental process remains largely unknown. Using publicly available gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana, we generated a condition-dependent network model of global transcriptional interactions (SeedNet) that shows evidence of evolutionary conservation in flowering plants. The topology of the SeedNet graph reflects the biological process, including two state-dependent sets of interactions associated with dormancy or germination. SeedNet highlights interactions between known regulators of this process and predicts the germination-associated function of uncharacterized hub nodes connected to them with 50% accuracy. An intermediate transition region between the dormancy and germination subdomains is enriched with genes involved in cellular phase transitions. The phase transition regulators SERRATE and EARLY FLOWERING IN SHORT DAYS from this region affect seed germination, indicating that conserved mechanisms control transitions in cell identity in plants. The SeedNet dormancy region is strongly associated with vegetative abiotic stress response genes. These data suggest that seed dormancy, an adaptive trait that arose evolutionarily late, evolved by coopting existing genetic pathways regulating cellular phase transition and abiotic stress. SeedNet is available as a community resource (http://vseed.nottingham.ac.uk) to aid dissection of this complex trait and gene function in diverse processes. PMID:21593420

  1. Microgravity effects on different stages of higher plant life cycle and completion of the seed-to-seed cycle.

    PubMed

    De Micco, V; De Pascale, S; Paradiso, R; Aronne, G

    2014-01-01

    Human inhabitation of Space requires the efficient realisation of crop cultivation in bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). It is well known that plants can grow under Space conditions; however, perturbations of many biological phenomena have been highlighted due to the effect of altered gravity and its possible interactions with other factors. The mechanisms priming plant responses to Space factors, as well as the consequences of such alterations on crop productivity, have not been completely elucidated. These perturbations can occur at different stages of plant life and are potentially responsible for failure of the completion of the seed-to-seed cycle. After brief consideration of the main constraints found in the most recent experiments aiming to produce seeds in Space, we focus on two developmental phases in which the plant life cycle can be interrupted more easily than in others also on Earth. The first regards seedling development and establishment; we discuss reasons for slow development at the seedling stage that often occurs under microgravity conditions and can reduce successful establishment. The second stage comprises gametogenesis and pollination; we focus on male gamete formation, also identifying potential constraints to subsequent fertilisation. We finally highlight how similar alterations at cytological level can not only be common to different processes occurring at different life stages, but can be primed by different stress factors; such alterations can be interpreted within the model of 'stress-induced morphogenic response' (SIMR). We conclude by suggesting that a systematic analysis of all growth and reproductive phases during the plant life cycle is needed to optimise resource use in plant-based BLSS.

  2. Temporal dynamics of seed excretion by wild ungulates: implications for plant dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Mélanie; Papaïx, Julien; Gosselin, Frédéric; Picot, Denis; Bideau, Eric; Baltzinger, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal is a key process in metapopulation dynamics as it conditions species’ spatial responses to gradients of abiotic and biotic conditions and triggers individual and gene flows. In the numerous plants that are dispersed through seed consumption by herbivores (endozoochory), the distance and effectiveness of dispersal is determined by the combined effects of seed retention time in the vector’s digestive system, the spatial extent of its movements, and the ability of the seeds to germinate once released. Estimating these three parameters from experimental data is therefore crucial to calibrate mechanistic metacommunity models of plant–herbivore interactions. In this study, we jointly estimated the retention time and germination probability of six herbaceous plants transported by roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) through feeding experiments and a Bayesian dynamic model. Retention time was longer in the nonruminant wild boar (>36 h) than in the two ruminant species (roe deer: 18–36 h, red deer: 3–36 h). In the two ruminants, but not in wild boar, small and round seeds were excreted faster than large ones. Low germination probabilities of the excreted seeds reflected the high cost imposed by endozoochory on plant survival. Trait-mediated variations in retention time and germination probability among animal and plant species may impact plant dispersal distances and interact with biotic and abiotic conditions at the release site to shape the spatial patterns of dispersed plant species. PMID:26257875

  3. The presence of a below-ground neighbour alters within-plant seed size distribution in Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin J. W.; During, Heinjo J.; Vermeulen, Peter J.; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Considerable variation in seed size commonly exists within plants, and is believed to be favoured under natural selection. This study aims to examine the extent to which seed size distribution depends on the presence of competing neighbour plants. Methods Phaseolus vulgaris plants rooting with or without a conspecific neighbour were grown in soil with high or low nutrient availability. Seeds were harvested at the end of the growth cycle, the total nitrogen and phosphorus invested in seed production were measured and within-plant seed size distribution was quantified using a set of statistical descriptors. Key Results Exposure to neighbours' roots induced significant changes in seed size distribution. Plants produced proportionally more large seeds and fewer small ones, as reflected by significant increases in minimal seed size, mean seed size, skewness and Lorenz asymmetry coefficient. These effects were different from, and in several cases opposite to, the responses when the soil nutrient level was reduced, and were significant after correction for the amount of resources invested in seed production. Conclusions Below-ground neighbour presence affects within-plant seed size distribution in P. vulgaris. This effect appears to be non-resource-mediated, i.e. to be independent of neighbour-induced effects on resource availability. It implies that, based on current environmental cues, plants can make an anticipatory adjustment of their investment strategy in offspring as an adaptation to the local environment in the future. PMID:25100676

  4. Radiation exposure of barley seeds can modify the early stages of plants' development.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav; Churyukin, Roman; Volkova, Polina

    2017-10-01

    The reactions of barley seeds (Nur and Grace varieties) in terms of the root and sprout lengths, germination and root mass were studied after γ-irradiation with doses in the range of 2-50 Gy. The dose range in which plants' growth stimulation occurs (16-20 Gy) was identified. It was shown that increased size of seedlings after irradiation with stimulating doses was due to the enhancing pace of development rather than an earlier germination. The activity of the majority of the enzymes studied increased in the range of doses that cause stimulation of seedlings development. The influences of the dose rate, the quality of seeds, their moisture and time interval between irradiation and initiation of germination on the manifestation of the effects of radiation were investigated. The experimental data on the effect of γ-irradiation on seedlings development were significantly better explained by mathematical models that take into account the hormetic effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A new device to estimate abundance of moist-soil plant seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penny, E.J.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Methods to sample the abundance of moist-soil seeds efficiently and accurately are critical for evaluating management practices and determining food availability. We adapted a portable, gasoline-powered vacuum to estimate abundance of seeds on the surface of a moist-soil wetland in east-central Mississippi and evaluated the sampler by simulating conditions that researchers and managers may experience when sampling moist-soil areas for seeds. We measured the percent recovery of known masses of seeds by the vacuum sampler in relation to 4 experimentally controlled factors (i.e., seed-size class, sample mass, soil moisture class, and vacuum time) with 2-4 levels per factor. We also measured processing time of samples in the laboratory. Across all experimental factors, seed recovery averaged 88.4% and varied little (CV = 0.68%, n = 474). Overall, mean time to process a sample was 30.3 ? 2.5 min (SE, n = 417). Our estimate of seed recovery rate (88%) may be used to adjust estimates for incomplete seed recovery, or project-specific correction factors may be developed by investigators. Our device was effective for estimating surface abundance of moist-soil plant seeds after dehiscence and before habitats were flooded.

  6. Sunflower seed hulls as supplementary fuel to coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brudenell, W.N.; Holland, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of biomass as a supplementary fuel to fossil-fuel power plants is gaining increasing attention due to escalating energy costs. The design of a sunflower seed hulls combustion system for an existing lignite-fired power plant is presented in this paper. 5 refs.

  7. Evidence-based review of seeding in post-fire rehabilitation and native plant market feasibility

    Treesearch

    Donna L. Peppin

    2009-01-01

    A changing climate and fire regime shifts in the western United States have led to an increase in revegetation activities, in particular post-wildfire rehabilitation and the need for locally-adapted plant materials. Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments to minimize soil erosion, promote plant community recovery,...

  8. Plant volatile organic compounds associated with fungal endophyte seed treatment of cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungal endophytes are asymptomatic endosymbionts of plants that can confer benefits to the host plant such as drought tolerance and herbivore resistance. We isolated naturally occurring fungal endophytes from field-grown cotton, cultured them in lab, and used their prepared biomass in seed treatmen...

  9. Plant Response to TSWV and Seed Accumulation of Resveratrol in Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biotic and abiotic stress may induce peanut plants to produce a high amount of resveratrol. The relationship of plant response to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and seed accumulation of resveratrol was investigated. Twenty peanut accessions and six wild relatives were selected from the US peanut g...

  10. Effects of nitrogen and planting seed size on cotton growth, development, and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A standardized experiment was conducted during 2009 and 2010 at 20 location-years across U.S. cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)-producing states to compare the N use requirement of contemporary cotton cultivars based on their planting seed size. Treatments consisted of three cotton varieties with plant...

  11. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environmentally friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainable c...

  12. Are Local Filters Blind to Provenance? Ant Seed Predation Suppresses Exotic Plants More than Natives

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Dean E.; Icasatti, Nadia S.; Hierro, Jose L.; Bird, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    The question of whether species’ origins influence invasion outcomes has been a point of substantial debate in invasion ecology. Theoretically, colonization outcomes can be predicted based on how species’ traits interact with community filters, a process presumably blind to species’ origins. Yet, exotic plant introductions commonly result in monospecific plant densities not commonly seen in native assemblages, suggesting that exotic species may respond to community filters differently than natives. Here, we tested whether exotic and native species differed in their responses to a local community filter by examining how ant seed predation affected recruitment of eighteen native and exotic plant species in central Argentina. Ant seed predation proved to be an important local filter that strongly suppressed plant recruitment, but ants suppressed exotic recruitment far more than natives (89% of exotic species vs. 22% of natives). Seed size predicted ant impacts on recruitment independent of origins, with ant preference for smaller seeds resulting in smaller seeded plant species being heavily suppressed. The disproportionate effects of provenance arose because exotics had generally smaller seeds than natives. Exotics also exhibited greater emergence and earlier peak emergence than natives in the absence of ants. However, when ants had access to seeds, these potential advantages of exotics were negated due to the filtering bias against exotics. The differences in traits we observed between exotics and natives suggest that higher-order introduction filters or regional processes preselected for certain exotic traits that then interacted with the local seed predation filter. Our results suggest that the interactions between local filters and species traits can predict invasion outcomes, but understanding the role of provenance will require quantifying filtering processes at multiple hierarchical scales and evaluating interactions between filters. PMID:25099535

  13. Are local filters blind to provenance? Ant seed predation suppresses exotic plants more than natives.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Dean E; Icasatti, Nadia S; Hierro, Jose L; Bird, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    The question of whether species' origins influence invasion outcomes has been a point of substantial debate in invasion ecology. Theoretically, colonization outcomes can be predicted based on how species' traits interact with community filters, a process presumably blind to species' origins. Yet, exotic plant introductions commonly result in monospecific plant densities not commonly seen in native assemblages, suggesting that exotic species may respond to community filters differently than natives. Here, we tested whether exotic and native species differed in their responses to a local community filter by examining how ant seed predation affected recruitment of eighteen native and exotic plant species in central Argentina. Ant seed predation proved to be an important local filter that strongly suppressed plant recruitment, but ants suppressed exotic recruitment far more than natives (89% of exotic species vs. 22% of natives). Seed size predicted ant impacts on recruitment independent of origins, with ant preference for smaller seeds resulting in smaller seeded plant species being heavily suppressed. The disproportionate effects of provenance arose because exotics had generally smaller seeds than natives. Exotics also exhibited greater emergence and earlier peak emergence than natives in the absence of ants. However, when ants had access to seeds, these potential advantages of exotics were negated due to the filtering bias against exotics. The differences in traits we observed between exotics and natives suggest that higher-order introduction filters or regional processes preselected for certain exotic traits that then interacted with the local seed predation filter. Our results suggest that the interactions between local filters and species traits can predict invasion outcomes, but understanding the role of provenance will require quantifying filtering processes at multiple hierarchical scales and evaluating interactions between filters.

  14. Insights into the microstructures of hygroscopic movement in plant seed dispersal.

    PubMed

    Elbaum, Rivka; Abraham, Yael

    2014-06-01

    As non-motile organisms, plants develop means to spread their progenies. Hygroscopic movement is a very common mechanism employed in seed dispersal. This type of movement is created when the tissue desiccates and the cell walls dry and shrink. A contraction force develops, the direction and strength of which depends on the architecture of the tissue. This force may be utilized for a simple release of seeds, their catapultion, and for pushing seeds along the soil to a germination locus. We review the formation of a bend, a twist and a coil within various dispersal apparatuses as a reaction to the dehydration of the tissue. We compare the microscopic structures of hygroscopic devices supporting slow or fast movement, adaptations to dry or wet climates, and single use versus repeated movement. We discuss the development of the disconnecting tissues in relation to the development of a hygroscopic mechanism. As plant cultivation is dependent on seed dispersal control, we demonstrate that during the domestication of sesame and wheat, seed dispersal is avoided not due to a defective hygroscopic tissue, but rather a missing dehiscence tissue. Seed dispersal is a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants. Thus, hygroscopic movement plays a central part in plant ecology and agriculture.

  15. Responses of predatory invertebrates to seeding density and plant species richness in experimental tallgrass prairie restorations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemec, Kristine T.; Allen, Craig R.; Danielson, Stephen D.; Helzer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, agricultural producers and non-governmental organizations have restored thousands of hectares of former cropland in the central United States with native grasses and forbs. However, the ability of these grassland restorations to attract predatory invertebrates has not been well documented, even though predators provide an important ecosystem service to agricultural producers by naturally regulating herbivores. This study assessed the effects of plant richness and seeding density on the richness and abundance of surface-dwelling (ants, ground beetles, and spiders) and aboveground (ladybird beetles) predatory invertebrates. In the spring of 2006, twenty-four 55 m × 55 m-plots were planted to six replicates in each of four treatments: high richness (97 species typically planted by The Nature Conservancy), at low and high seeding densities, and low richness (15 species representing a typical Natural Resources Conservation Service Conservation Reserve Program mix, CP25), at low and high seeding densities. Ants, ground beetles, and spiders were sampled using pitfall traps and ladybird beetles were sampled using sweep netting in 2007–2009. The abundance of ants, ground beetles, and spiders showed no response to seed mix richness or seeding density but there was a significant positive effect of richness on ladybird beetle abundance. Seeding density had a significant positive effect on ground beetle and spider species richness and Shannon–Weaver diversity. These results may be related to differences in the plant species composition and relative amount of grass basal cover among the treatments rather than richness.

  16. A Seed-Based Plant Propagation Algorithm: The Feeding Station Model

    PubMed Central

    Salhi, Abdellah

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal production of fruit and seeds is akin to opening a feeding station, such as a restaurant. Agents coming to feed on the fruit are like customers attending the restaurant; they arrive at a certain rate and get served at a certain rate following some appropriate processes. The same applies to birds and animals visiting and feeding on ripe fruit produced by plants such as the strawberry plant. This phenomenon underpins the seed dispersion of the plants. Modelling it as a queuing process results in a seed-based search/optimisation algorithm. This variant of the Plant Propagation Algorithm is described, analysed, tested on nontrivial problems, and compared with well established algorithms. The results are included. PMID:25821858

  17. Chemometric Classification of Different Tree Peony Species Native to China Based on the Assessment of Major Fatty Acids of Seed Oil and Phenotypic Characteristics of the Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Yan-Long; Niu, Li-Xin; Sun, Jia-Yi; Li, Lin-Hao; Zhang, Jing; Li, Jian

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we quantitatively measured five major fatty acids (FA) in seed oil using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and examined four phenotypic characteristics of the seeds from 19 populations from nine wild tree peony species native to China. The results showed that the unsaturated FAs contents were dominant, of which α-linolenic acid (ALA), linoleic acid, and oleic acid (OA) contents ranged from 14.84 to 42.54 g/100 g, 7.33 to 19.66 g/100 g, and 15.07 - 35.31 g/100 g crude oil, respectively. The phenotypic seed characteristics, such as thousand seed weight (244.01 - 1772.91 g), seed volume (91.31 - 1000.79 mm(3) ), weight rate of kernel and coat (1.29 - 3.62) and oil extraction ratio (20.32 - 34.69%), dramatically varied. Based on the contents of the five FAs, the nine species were classified into two groups. The species belonging to subsection Vaginatae were arranged in cluster I and were characterized by high ALA content. Cluster II, consistent with subsection Delavayanae, had a high OA content. From horizontal and vertical perspectives, the natural distribution areas of these two groups were different, reflecting differences in the FA contents and phenotypic seed characteristics. In conclusion, the FAs composition could be used as a chemotaxonomic marker for tree peony species. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  18. Single-tube hydroponics as a novel idea for small-scale production of crop seed in a plant incubator.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Masaharu; Ikenaga, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel protocol for small-scale production of crop seed in a plant incubator termed "Single-tube hydroponics." Our protocol minimizes the materials and methods for cultivation whereby a large number of independent plants can be cultured in a limited space. This study may aid in the improvement of crop seed components, especially in the cultivation of transgenic plants.

  19. Uptake and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Vicia narbonensis plants with increased seed sink strength achieved by seed-specific expression of an amino acid permease.

    PubMed

    Götz, Klaus-Peter; Staroske, Nicole; Radchuk, Ruslana; Emery, R J Neil; Wutzke, Klaus-Dieter; Herzog, Helmut; Weber, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Over-expressing an amino acid permease in Vicia narbonensis seeds increases sink strength for N that is evident from the higher seed protein content and seed weight. Here, the effect of increased seed sink strength of line AAP-12 on growth, development, and on whole plant carbon and nitrogen uptake and partitioning is analysed. AAP-12 plants have a prolonged growth period. Accumulation and partitioning of dry matter and N in leaves, stems, and pods are higher whereas remobilization to the seeds is delayed, indicating that the switch from growth to reserve allocation and remobilization is delayed. Measuring uptake and allocation of (15)N-ammonia applied via the roots revealed a higher and longer label uptake period during maturation. Measuring whole plant carbon fixation and allocation after (13)C labelling shows higher levels at maturation, particularly in seeds, indicating higher seed sink strength for C and increased allocation into maturing seeds. Levels of cytokinins were dramatically increased in AAP-12 seeds indicating its role in nitrogen-mediated growth stimulation. AAP-12 seeds have higher natural abundances for (13)C indicating increased C fixation via PEP carboxylase in order to meet the higher demand of carbon acceptors for amino acid synthesis. In summary, increased seed sink strength for N in AAP-12 stimulates seed growth, but also that of vegetative organs, which finally leads to a higher ratio of vegetative to seed biomass at maturity and thus a lower harvest index. Therefore, the increased N uptake due to higher seed demand of AAP-12 is partly compensated by growth stimulation of vegetative organs.

  20. A simple method for primary screening of antibacterial peptides in plant seeds

    PubMed Central

    Aliahmadi, A; Roghanian, R; Emtiazi, G; Ghassempour, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Regarding the importance of finding new antibacterial drugs, screening of plants as a promising resource are now conducted worldwide. In this study, we report the application of a simple previously described method for screening of different plant seeds in order to find the best resources of plant antimicrobial peptides. Materials and Methods Total water soluble protein of 10 different plant seeds were extracted and subjected to SDS-PAGE and subsequent agar-overlay bioassays. Standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Escherichia coli were included in the bioassays. This method also was used for total proteins precipitated by Ammonium sulphate which ensure the protein nature of the test substances. Molecular size and the amounts of effective peptides were estimated using Tricin-SDS-PAGE and densitometry. Results Two different plant seeds showed noticeable antibacterial activities against tested Gram positive bacteria and a moderate inhibitory effect on Gram negative ones. Based on the results of Tricin-SDS-PAGE analysis which were carried out in parallel to bioassays, it was concluded that effective antibacterial substances are peptides with molecular weight of slightly larger than 5 kDa. Conclusion On the basis of results of agar-overlay experiments and by screening of 10 different herbal seeds, we could introduce seeds of M. sativa L. and Onobrychis sativa Lam., as great sources of putative plant antibacterial peptides. The proposed screening method can be used for screening of large number of different plant seeds and even other parts of the plant body, regarding some necessary modification in total water soluble protein extraction steps. PMID:22347591

  1. Cryopreservation of orthodox and recalcitrant seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter in Plant Cell Culture, Development and Biotechnology describes student laboratory exercises for cryopreservation of plant seeds in liquid nitrogen. It includes two exercises involving step by step protocols for use with the two major types of seeds. A standard technique for small seed...

  2. 3D Surface Reconstruction of Plant Seeds by Volume Carving: Performance and Accuracies

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Johanna; Geiger, Felix; Fischbach, Andreas; Jahnke, Siegfried; Scharr, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for 3D reconstruction of plant seed surfaces, focusing on small seeds with diameters as small as 200 μm. The method considers robotized systems allowing single seed handling in order to rotate a single seed in front of a camera. Even though such systems feature high position repeatability, at sub-millimeter object scales, camera pose variations have to be compensated. We do this by robustly estimating the tool center point from each acquired image. 3D reconstruction can then be performed by a simple shape-from-silhouette approach. In experiments we investigate runtimes, theoretically achievable accuracy, experimentally achieved accuracy, and show as a proof of principle that the proposed method is well sufficient for 3D seed phenotyping purposes. PMID:27375628

  3. Allelopathy of the invasive plant Bidens frondosa on the seed germination of Geum japonicum var. chinense.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Hassani, D; Cheng, Z W; Wang, C Y; Wu, J

    2014-12-12

    Five gradient concentrations (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 g/mL) of leaching liquors from the roots, stems, and leaves of the invasive plant Bidens frondosa were used as conditioning fluid to examine its influence on seed germination conditions of the native plant Geum japonicum var. chinense in Huangshan. All leaching liquors of organs suppressed the seed germination of Geum japonicum var. chinense and reduced the final germination percentage and rate, and increased the germination inhibition rate, with a bimodal dependence on concentration. The leaching liquor inhibited the seed germination significantly at the concentration of 0.02 g/mL respectively. The seed germination was also inhibited as the concentration reached to 0.04 g/mL and beyond. Hence the allelopathic effects of the organs were significantly enhanced respectively. This phenomenon represented the presence of allelopathy substances in the root, stem and leaf of Bidens frondosa.

  4. Identification of new gene expression regulators specifically expressed during plant seed maturation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Laurent; Conejero, Geneviève; Castelain, Mathieu; Guénin, Stéphanie; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Thomasset, Brigitte; Van Wuytswinkel, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA-AFLP approach on Linum usitatissimum (flax) was used to identify genes specifically expressed during the seed maturation process. Among the 20,000 cDNA-AFLP tags produced, 486 were selected for their seed-specific expression during maturation. When compared with the publicly available databases, half of them presented some significant similarity with known plant sequences. The results obtained confirmed the accuracy of the approach as numerous genes previously described as being expressed exclusively in plant seeds were identified in this screen. The focus was on sequences similar to plant regulators involved in the control of gene expression, either at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, or post-translational levels. Using a real-time RT-PCR approach, seed-specific expression kinetics were confirmed for 13 of these regulators that were never characterized for being expressed during seed maturation. Among these, a flax gene of the non-LEC1-like HAP3 family and a flax MYB factor were shown to be expressed in specialized tissues of flax embryo using an in situ hybridization approach. By expression kinetic comparison between these flax genes and their Arabidopsis counterparts, it was found that the new HAP3 gene should be related to a ubiquitous seed maturation mechanism, while a new MYB factor appears to be related to a more seed-specific maturation mechanism. These results demonstrate the utility of the flax database in not only identifying new genes expressed during seed maturation but also in being able to highlight the distinction between conserved and non-conserved seed maturation mechanisms.

  5. The role of nitric oxide in the germination of plant seeds and pollen.

    PubMed

    Šírová, Jana; Sedlářová, Michaela; Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Petřivalský, Marek

    2011-11-01

    Two complex physiological processes, with opposite positions in the plant's life-cycle, seed and pollen germination, are vital to the accomplishment of successful plant growth and reproduction. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the intersection of NO signalling with the signalling pathways of ABA, GA, and ethylene; plant hormones that control the release of plant seeds from dormancy and germination. The cross-talk of NO and ROS is involved in the light- and hormone-specific regulation of seeds' developmental processes during the initiation of plant ontogenesis. Similarly to seed germination, the mechanisms of plant pollen hydration, germination, tube growth, as well as pollen-stigma recognition are tightly linked to the proper adjustment of NO and ROS levels. The interaction of NO with ROS and secondary messengers such as Ca(2+), cAMP and cGMP discovered in pollen represent a common mechanism of NO signalling. The involvement of NO in both breakpoints of plant physiology, as well as in the germination of spores within fungi and oomycetes, points toward NO as a component of an evolutionary conserved signalling pathway.

  6. Soil warming increases plant species richness but decreases germination from the alpine soil seed bank.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gemma L; Venn, Susanna E; Steadman, Kathryn J; Good, Roger B; McAuliffe, Edward J; Williams, Emlyn R; Nicotra, Adrienne B

    2013-05-01

    Global warming is occurring more rapidly above the treeline than at lower elevations and alpine areas are predicted to experience above average warming in the future. Temperature is a primary factor in stimulating seed germination and regulating changes in seed dormancy status. Thus, plant regeneration from seed will be crucial to the persistence, migration and post disturbance recruitment of alpine plants in future climates. Here, we present the first assessment of the impact of soil warming on germination from the persistent alpine soil seed bank. Contrary to expectations, soil warming lead to reduced overall germination from the soil seed bank. However, germination response to soil temperature was species specific such that total species richness actually increased by nine with soil warming. We further explored the system by assessing the prevalence of seed dormancy and germination response to soil disturbance, the frequency of which is predicted to increase under climate change. Seeds of a significant proportion of species demonstrated physiological dormancy mechanisms and germination of several species appeared to be intrinsically linked to soil disturbance. In addition, we found no evidence of subalpine species and little evidence of exotic weed species in the soil, suggesting that the soil seed bank will not facilitate their invasion of the alpine zone. In conclusion, changes in recruitment via the alpine soil seed bank can be expected under climate change, as a result of altered dormancy alleviation and germination cues. Furthermore, the alpine soil seed bank, and the species richness therein, has the potential to help maintain local species diversity, support species range shift and moderate species dominance. Implications for alpine management and areas for further study are also discussed. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Seed origin and size of ponderosa pine planting stock grown at several California nurseries

    Treesearch

    Frank J. Baron; Gilbert H. Schubert

    1963-01-01

    Ponderosa pine planting stock (1-0 and 2-0) grown from five different seed collection zones in the California pine region differed noticeably in size. On the west side of the Sierra Nevada, seeds from zones above 4,000 feet yielded smaller seedlings than those from lower zones, but larger seedlings than those from east-side sources. Average dimensions (seedling weight...

  8. Generalist birds govern the seed dispersal of a parasitic plant with strong recruitment constraints.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Ana; Zamora, Regino

    2014-09-01

    Mistletoes constitute instructive study cases with which to address the role of generalist consumers in the study of plant-animal interactions. Their ranges of safe sites for recruitment are among the most restricted of any plant; therefore, frugivores specializing in mistletoe have been considered almost indispensable for the seed dispersal of these parasitic plants. However, the absence of such specialists in numerous regions inhabited by many mistletoe species raises the question of whether unspecialized vectors may successfully disperse mistletoe seeds to narrowly defined safe sites. Using the European mistletoe Viscum album subsp. austriacum as a study case, we recorded a broad range of 11 bird species that disperse mistletoe seeds. For these species, we studied the mistletoe-visitation rate and feeding behavior to estimate the quantity component of dispersal effectiveness, and the post-foraging microhabitat use, seed handling, and recruitment probabilities of different microhabitats as a measure of the quality component of effectiveness. Both endozoochory and ectozoochory are valid dispersal mechanisms, as the seeds do not need to be ingested to germinate, increasing seed-dispersal versatility. Thrushes were the most effective dispersers, although they were rather inefficient, whereas small birds (both frugivores and non-frugivores) offered low-quantity but high-quality services for depositing seeds directly upon safe sites. As birds behave similarly on parasitized and non-parasitized hosts, and vectors have broad home ranges, reinfection within patches and the colonization of new patches are ensured by an ample assemblage of generalist birds. Thus, a parasitic plant requiring precision in seed dispersal can rely on unspecialized dispersers.

  9. Decreased seed oil production in FUSCA3 Brassica napus mutant plants.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Nosheen; Duncan, Robert W; Stasolla, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) oil is extensively utilized for human consumption and industrial applications. Among the genes regulating seed development and participating in oil accumulation is FUSCA3 (FUS3), a member of the plant-specific B3-domain family of transcription factors. To evaluate the role of this gene during seed storage deposition, three BnFUSCA3 (BnFUS3) TILLING mutants were generated. Mutations occurring downstream of the B3 domain reduced silique number and repressed seed oil level resulting in increased protein content in developing seeds. BnFUS3 mutant seeds also had increased levels of linoleic acid, possibly due to the reduced expression of ω-3 FA DESATURASE (FAD3). These observed phenotypic alterations were accompanied by the decreased expression of genes encoding transcription factors stimulating fatty acid (FA) synthesis: LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and 2 (LEC1 and 2) ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 3 (BnABI3) and WRINKLED1 (WRI1). Additionally, expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism, glycolysis, and FA modifications were down-regulated in developing seeds of the mutant plants. Collectively, these transcriptional changes support altered sucrose metabolism and reduced glycolytic activity, diminishing the carbon pool available for the synthesis of FA and ultimately seed oil production. Based on these observations, it is suggested that targeted manipulations of BnFUS3 can be used as a tool to influence oil accumulation in the economically important species B. napus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Plant regeneration from seeds responds to phylogenetic relatedness and local adaptation in Mediterranean Romulea (Iridaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Carta, Angelino; Hanson, Sarah; Müller, Jonas V

    2016-06-01

    Seed germination is the most important transitional event between early stages in the life cycle of spermatophytes and understanding it is crucial to understand plant adaptation and evolution. However, so far seed germination of phylogenetically closely related species has been poorly investigated. To test the hypothises that phylogenetically related plant species have similar seed ecophysiological traits thereby reflecting certain habitat conditions as a result of local adaptation, we studied seed dormancy and germination in seven Mediterranean species in the genus Romulea (Iridaceae). Both the across-species model and the model accounting for shared evolutionary history showed that cool temperatures (≤ 15°C) were the main factor that promoted seed germination. The absence of embryo growth before radicle emergence is consistent with a prompt germination response at cool temperatures. The range of temperature conditions for germination became wider after a period of warm stratification, denoting a weak primary dormancy. Altogether these results indicate that the studied species exhibit a Mediterranean germination syndrome, but with species-specific germination requirements clustered in a way that follows the phylogenetic relatedness among those species. In addition, species with heavier seeds from humid habitats showed a wider range of conditions for germination at dispersal time than species from dry habitats possessing lighter seeds. We conclude that while phylogenetically related species showed very similar germination requirements, there are subtle ecologically meaningful differences, confirming the onset of adaptation to local ecological factors mediated by species relatedness.

  11. Toxic effects of traditional Ethiopian fish poisoning plant Milletia ferruginea (Hochst) seed extract on aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the toxic effects of traditional Ethiopian fish poisoning plant Birbira [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Milletia ferruginea] seed extract on aquatic macroinvertebrates, Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant; Milletia ferruginea pulverized seeds have been used for fish poisoning since time immemorial. Macroinvertebrates are important biological indicators of alteration in the natural water sources. Milletia ferruginea seed extract was applied at concentrations of 125, 250, 500 1000 and 2000 ppm on Hydropsychididae whereas Baetidae were exposed at various concentrations viz., 31.25, 62.5, 125, 250 & 500 ppm. Milletia ferruginea seeds crude extract of lethal doses (LCso and LC90) required for Baetidae 49.29 mg/l and 172.52 mg/l were respectively and the respective doses (LC50 and LC90) against Hydropsychidae were 679.64 mg/l and 2383.93 mg/l. The present investigation end result demonstrated that Milletia ferruginea seed extracts were extremely toxic to Baetidae than Hydropsychididae. As a result, application of Milletia ferruginea seed extracts into the rivers/streams for fish poisoning possibly leads to contamination and disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, the concerned authorities should launch appropriate awareness campaign among the local inhabitants and fisherman about adverse effect of Birbira seed extracts. Furthermore, providing alternative ecofriendly techniques for fish harvesting may possibly bring constructive out come in the near future.

  12. Multi-component Erlang distribution of plant seed masses and sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, San-Hong; Wei, Hua-Rong

    2012-12-01

    The mass and the size distributions of plant seeds are very similar to the multi-component Erlang distribution of final-state particle multiplicities in high-energy collisions. We study the mass, length, width, and thickness distributions of pumpkin and marrow squash seeds in this paper. The corresponding distribution curves are obtained and fitted by using the multi-component Erlang distribution. In the comparison, the method of χ2-testing is used. The mass and the size distributions of the mentioned seeds are shown to obey approximately the multi-component Erlang distribution with the component number being 1.

  13. Biological effects of carbon ions with medium energy on plant seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Zengquan Wei; Yuyan Liu; Guiling Wang; Xuebing Chen; Huiling Li; Hanmin Yang; Lihong Wang; Qingxiang Gao; Chongying Wang; Yafu Wang

    1995-03-01

    The biological effects of 46.6 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions on four kinds of plant seeds were studied at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Academia Sinica. The results show that germination of the seeds is inhibited by exposure to ions. In root tip cells of irradiated seeds, a great variety of chromosomal aberrations were observed. Sensitivities in terms of inhibition of germination and induction of chromosomal aberrations in the four species are correlated. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Planting Seeds of Peace with Arab and Israeli Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Adam

    1999-01-01

    Reports on Seeds of Peace, a summer camp that brings together Arab and Israeli teenagers to embark on the process of making peace. Brings together teenagers from nations at war and allows them the physical, psychological, and emotional space to meet each other. Suggests that the concept of the camp works because real peace is made between people…

  15. Biodiesel from plant seed oils as an alternate fuel for compression ignition engines-a review.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, C; Ramesh, M; Murugesan, A; Panneerselvam, N; Subramaniam, D; Bharathiraja, M

    2016-12-01

    The modern scenario reveals that the world is facing energy crisis due to the dwindling sources of fossil fuels. Environment protection agencies are more concerned about the atmospheric pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel research is getting augmented because of the above reasons. Plant seed oils (vegetable oils) are cleaner, sustainable, and renewable. So, it can be the most suitable alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the availability of different types of plant seed oils, several methods for production of biodiesel from vegetable oils, and its properties. The different types of oils considered in this review are cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) oil, ginger oil, eucalyptus oil, rice bran oil, Calophyllum inophyllum, hazelnut oil, sesame oil, clove stem oil, sardine oil, honge oil, polanga oil, mahua oil, rubber seed oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, jatropha oil, egunsi melon oil, shea butter, linseed oil, Mohr oil, sea lemon oil, pumpkin oil, tobacco seed oil, jojoba oil, and mustard oil. Several methods for production of biodiesel are transesterification, pre-treatment, pyrolysis, and water emulsion are discussed. The various fuel properties considered for review such as specific gravity, viscosity, calorific value, flash point, and fire point are presented. The review also portrays advantages, limitations, performance, and emission characteristics of engine using plant seed oil biodiesel are discussed. Finally, the modeling and optimization of engine for various biofuels with different input and output parameters using artificial neural network, response surface methodology, and Taguchi are included.

  16. Reintroduction of rare arable plants by seed transfer. What are the optimal sowing rates?

    PubMed

    Lang, Marion; Prestele, Julia; Fischer, Christina; Kollmann, Johannes; Albrecht, Harald

    2016-08-01

    During the past decades, agro-biodiversity has markedly declined and some species are close to extinction in large parts of Europe. Reintroduction of rare arable plant species in suitable habitats could counteract this negative trend. The study investigates optimal sowing rates of three endangered species (Legousia speculum-veneris (L.) Chaix, Consolida regalis Gray, and Lithospermum arvense L.), in terms of establishment success, seed production, and crop yield losses.A field experiment with partial additive design was performed in an organically managed winter rye stand with study species added in ten sowing rates of 5-10,000 seeds m(-2). They were sown as a single species or as a three-species mixture (pure vs. mixed sowing) and with vs. without removal of spontaneous weeds. Winter rye was sown at a fixed rate of 350 grains m(-2). Performance of the study species was assessed as plant establishment and seed production. Crop response was determined as grain yield.Plant numbers and seed production were significantly affected by the sowing rate, but not by sowing type (pure vs. mixed sowing of the three study species), and weed removal. All rare arable plant species established and reproduced at sowing rates >25 seeds m(-2), with best performance of L. speculum-veneris. Negative density effects occurred to some extent for plant establishment and more markedly for seed production.The impact of the three study species on crop yield followed sigmoidal functions. Depending on the species, a yield loss of 10% occurred at >100 seeds m(-2). Synthesis and applications: The study shows that reintroduction of rare arable plants by seed transfer is a suitable method to establish them on extensively managed fields, for example, in organic farms with low nutrient level and without mechanical weed control. Sowing rates of 100 seeds m(-2) for C. regalis and L. arvense, and 50 seeds m(-2) for L. speculum-veneris are recommended, to achieve successful establishment

  17. Transport of Cd and Zn to seeds of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) during specific stages of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Renuka P; Ebbs, Stephen D

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation of excess Cd in the seeds of cereal and other crops compromises their commercial value and presents a potential risk to human health. Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.] is a moderate accumulator of heavy metals such as Cd and Zn, and the seeds are consumed throughout the world, particularly in the Indian subcontinent. The study here examined the transport of Cd into Indian mustard plants and to seeds as a function of external Cd and the stage of the life cycle (vegetative growth, flowering and seed set) to identify critical developmental windows where transport from roots to seeds was the greatest. Plants were also treated simultaneously with Zn to determine if Zn fertilization mitigated the transport of Cd to seeds. Plants treated with Cd during the seed set accumulated the highest concentrations of Cd, exceeding 8 mg kg(-1) dry weight in some instances. Cadmium accumulated during vegetative growth was not highly redistributed to seeds. No effects of Zn were observed with regard to Cd redistribution to seeds. This may be because of the relatively small Zn : Cd ratios tested. However, the results suggest that if Zn fertilization is to be used to reduce the Cd accumulation in seeds of this species, that plants should be treated during the seed set stage. As the seeds of Indian mustard consistently accumulated Cd to concentrations that exceed acceptable limits for food crops, additional study of Cd redistribution in this species is warranted.

  18. Post-fire seeding of great basin native plants using conventional and minimum-till rangeland drills

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives of post-fire seeding in the Great Basin include reestablishment of perennial cover, suppression of exotic annual weeds, and increasingly restoration of diverse plant communities. Non-conventional seeding techniques may be required when seeding mixes of grasses, forbs and shrubs containing...

  19. Seed coat mucilage cells of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for plant cell wall research.

    PubMed

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2010-07-01

    Plant cells are encased within a complex polysaccharide wall that strengthens the cell and has key roles in all aspects of plant cell growth, differentiation, and interaction with the environment. This dynamic structure is under continual modification during plant development, and its synthesis and modification require the activity of a myriad of enzymes. The mucilage secretory cells (MSCs) of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat provide a model for the discovery of novel genes involved in the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall components, particularly pectin. These cells synthesize copious amounts of pectinaceous mucilage during development and, upon hydration of the desiccated seed, the mucilage rapidly swells, bursts from the MSCs and surrounds the seed in a gelatinous capsule. Several genes affecting MSC differentiation, pectin synthesis, and mucilage release have been identified and additional genes involved in these and related processes including pectin secretion and the mechanical alteration of cell walls await to be discovered.

  20. Gene expression patterns in seed plant shoot meristems and leaves: homoplasy or homology?

    PubMed

    Floyd, Sandra K; Bowman, John L

    2010-01-01

    The fossil record reveals that seed plant leaves evolved from ancestral lateral branch systems. Over time, the lateral branch systems evolved to become determinate, planar and eventually laminar. Considering their evolutionary histories, it is instructive to compare the developmental genetics of shoot apical meristems (SAMs) and leaves in extant seed plants. Genetic experiments in model angiosperm species have assigned functions of meristem maintenance, specification of stem cell identity, boundary formation, polarity establishment and primordium initiation to specific genes. Investigation of roles of the same or homologous genes during leaf development has revealed strikingly similar functions in leaves compared to SAMs. Specifically, the marginal blastozone that characterizes many angiosperm leaves appears to function in a manner mechanistically similar to the SAM. We argue here that the similarities may be homologous due to descent from ancestral roles in an ancestral shoot system. Molecular aspects of SAM and leaf development in gymnosperms is largely neglected and could provide insight into seed plant leaf evolution.

  1. Hydroquinone; A novel bioactive compound from plant-derived smoke can cue seed germination of lettuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul L.; Ali, Liaqat; Hussain, Javid; Waqas, Muhammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Imran, Qari M.; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Kang, Sang-Mo; Yun, Byung-Wook; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-05-01

    Plant-derived smoke has been known to play an important role in distribution and growth of vegetation. Using a proficiently designed furnace, we extracted smoke from the leaves of four plant viz. Helianthus annuus, Aloe vera, Ginkgo biloba, and Cymbopogon jwarancusa. Smoke dilutions obtained from these plants were obtained in different concentrations to identify potential lettuce growth promoting smoke solution. Results revealed that smoke obtained from Ginkgo biloba significantly enhanced the lettuce seed germination. This solution was then partitioned into ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, n-hexane, chloroform and ether fractions. Ethyl acetate fraction was found to be potent to enhance seed germination. This fraction was subjected to column chromatography and spectroscopic techniques to obtain compound 1. This compound was identified as hydroquinone using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. At low concentrations (5, 10 and 20 ppm), compound 1 enhanced the lettuce seed germination; however, higher concentrations inhibited its growth as compared to control.

  2. Expressed sequence tag analysis in Cycas, the most primitive living seed plant

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eric D; Stevenson, Dennis W; McCombie, Richard W; Katari, Manpreet S; Rudd, Stephen A; Mayer, Klaus FX; Palenchar, Peter M; Runko, Suzan J; Twigg, Richard W; Dai, Guangwei; Martienssen, Rob A; Benfey, Phillip N; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2003-01-01

    Background Cycads are ancient seed plants (living fossils) with origins in the Paleozoic. Cycads are sometimes considered a 'missing link' as they exhibit characteristics intermediate between vascular non-seed plants and the more derived seed plants. Cycads have also been implicated as the source of 'Guam's dementia', possibly due to the production of S(+)-beta-methyl-alpha, beta-diaminopropionic acid (BMAA), which is an agonist of animal glutamate receptors. Results A total of 4,200 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were created from Cycas rumphii and clustered into 2,458 contigs, of which 1,764 had low-stringency BLAST similarity to other plant genes. Among those cycad contigs with similarity to plant genes, 1,718 cycad 'hits' are to angiosperms, 1,310 match genes in gymnosperms and 734 match lower (non-seed) plants. Forty-six contigs were found that matched only genes in lower plants and gymnosperms. Upon obtaining the complete sequence from the clones of 37/46 contigs, 14 still matched only gymnosperms. Among those cycad contigs common to higher plants, ESTs were discovered that correspond to those involved in development and signaling in present-day flowering plants. We purified a cycad EST for a glutamate receptor (GLR)-like gene, as well as ESTs potentially involved in the synthesis of the GLR agonist BMAA. Conclusions Analysis of cycad ESTs has uncovered conserved and potentially novel genes. Furthermore, the presence of a glutamate receptor agonist, as well as a glutamate receptor-like gene in cycads, supports the hypothesis that such neuroactive plant products are not merely herbivore deterrents but may also serve a role in plant signaling. PMID:14659015

  3. What seeds to plant in the Great Basin? Comparing traits prioritized in native plant cultivars and releases with those that promote survival in the field

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth A. Leger; Owen W. Baughman

    2015-01-01

    Restoration in the Great Basin is typically a large-scale enterprise, with aerial, drill, and broadcast seeding of perennial species common after wildfires. Arid conditions and invasive plants are significant barriers to overcome, but relatively simple changes to seeds used for restoration may improve success. Here we summarize: 1) the composition of seed...

  4. Effects of planting method and seed mix richness on the early stages of tallgrass prairie restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, D.L.; Bright, J.B.; Drobney, P.; Larson, J.L.; Palaia, N.; Rabie, P.A.; Vacek, S.; Wells, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tallgrass prairie restoration has been practiced for more than 75. years, yet few studies have systematically tested restoration methods over large geographic regions with the intent of refining methodology. In this study, we used three planting methods (dormant-season broadcast, growing-season broadcast and growing-season drill) fully crossed with three levels of seed species richness (10, 20, and 34 spp). We replicated the study on nine former agricultural fields located from east-central Iowa (Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge) to northwestern Minnesota (Litchfield, Fergus Falls and Morris Wetland Management Districts), USA, within the northern tallgrass prairie biome. Objectives were to evaluate the relative influences of planting method, seed mix richness, and their interactions, on (1) planted cover (both total and by guild) and richness, (2) exotic species cover, and (3) non-planted native species cover. Optimal techniques varied between the two study areas: the dormant broadcast method produced greater cover of planted species at the Minnesota sites and the growing-season drill method produced greater cover of planted species at Iowa sites. The dormant broadcast method strongly favored establishment of perennial forbs while the growing-season drill favored warm-season grasses. Although increasing richness of the seed mix produced greater planted species richness, this did not result in greater resistance to exotic invasion. We conclude that, if planting during the growing season, drilling seed is preferable to broadcasting, but if the choice is between broadcasting seed in the dormant or growing season, the dormant season is preferred. ?? 2011.

  5. Assessing the potential of candidate DNA barcodes for identifying non-flowering seed plants.

    PubMed

    Pang, X; Luo, H; Sun, C

    2012-09-01

    In plants, matK and rbcL have been selected as core barcodes by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) Plant Working Group (PWG), and ITS/ITS2 and psbA-trnH were suggested as supplementary loci. Yet, research on DNA barcoding of non-flowering seed plants has been less extensive, and the evaluation of DNA barcodes in this division has been limited thus far. Here, we evaluated seven markers (psbA-trnH, matK, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, ITS and ITS2) from non-flowering seed plants. The usefulness of each region was assessed using four criteria: the success rate of PCR amplification, the differential intra- and inter-specific divergences, the DNA barcoding gap and the ability to discriminate species. Among the seven loci tested, ITS2 produced the best results in the barcoding of non-flowering seed plants. In addition, we compared the abilities of the five most-recommended markers (psbA-trnH, matK, rbcL, ITS and ITS2) to identify additional species using a large database of gymnosperms from GenBank. ITS2 remained effective for species identification in a wide range of non-flowering seed plants: for the 1531 samples from 608 species of 80 diverse genera, ITS2 correctly authenticated 66% of them at the species level. In conclusion, the ITS2 region can serve as a useful barcode to discriminate non-flowering seed plants, and this study will contribute valuable information for the barcoding of plant species.

  6. Forest edges and fire ants alter the seed shadow of an ant-dispersed plant.

    PubMed

    Ness, J H

    2004-02-01

    Exotic species invade fragmented, edge-rich habitats readily, yet the distinct impacts of habitat edges and invaders on native biota are rarely distinguished. Both appear detrimental to ant-dispersed plants such as bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis. Working in northeastern Georgia (USA), an area characterized by a rich ant-dispersed flora, fragmented forests, and invasions by the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, I monitored the interactions between ants and S. canadensis seeds in uninvaded forest interiors, uninvaded forest edges, invaded forest interiors, and invaded forest edges. I observed 95% of the seed dispersal events that occurred within the 60-min observation intervals. Seed collection rates were similar among all four (habitat x invasion) groups. The presence of invasive ants had a strong effect on seed dispersal distance: S. invicta collected most seeds in invaded sites, but was a poorer disperser than four of five native ant taxa. Habitat type (interior versus edge) had no effect on seed dispersal distance, but it had a strong effect on seed dispersal direction. Dispersal towards the edge was disproportionately rare in uninvaded forest edges, and ants in those habitats moved the average dispersed seed approximately 70 cm away from that edge. Dispersal direction was also skewed away from the edge in uninvaded forest interiors and invaded forest edges, albeit non-significantly. This biased dispersal may help explain the rarity of myrmecochorous plants in younger forests and edges, and their poor ability to disperse between fragments. This is the first demonstration that forest edges and S. invicta invasion influence seed dispersal destination and distance, respectively. These forces act independently.

  7. In vivo monitoring of seeds and plant-tissue water absorption using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikova, Veronika V.; Kutis, Irina S.; Kutis, Sergey D.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.

    2004-07-01

    First experimental results on OCT imaging of internal structure of plant tissues and in situ OCT monitoring of plant tissue regeneration at different water supply are reported. Experiments for evaluating OCT capabilities were performed on Tradescantia. The investigation of seeds swelling was performed on wheat seeds (Triticum L.), barley seeds (Hordeum L.), long-fibred flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and cucumber seeds (Cucumis sativus L.). These OCT images correlate with standard microscopy data from the same tissue regions. Seeds were exposed to a low-intensity physical factor-the pulsed gradient magnetic field (GMF) with pulse duration 0.1 s and maximum amplitude 5 mT (4 successive pulses during 0.4 s). OCT and OCM enable effective monitoring of fast reactions in plants and seeds at different water supply.

  8. Horsetails and ferns are a monophyletic group and the closest living relatives to seed plants.

    PubMed

    Pryer, K M; Schneider, H; Smith, A R; Cranfill, R; Wolf, P G; Hunt, J S; Sipes, S D

    2001-02-01

    Most of the 470-million-year history of plants on land belongs to bryophytes, pteridophytes and gymnosperms, which eventually yielded to the ecological dominance by angiosperms 90 Myr ago. Our knowledge of angiosperm phylogeny, particularly the branching order of the earliest lineages, has recently been increased by the concurrence of multigene sequence analyses. However, reconstructing relationships for all the main lineages of vascular plants that diverged since the Devonian period has remained a challenge. Here we report phylogenetic analyses of combined data--from morphology and from four genes--for 35 representatives from all the main lineages of land plants. We show that there are three monophyletic groups of extant vascular plants: (1) lycophytes, (2) seed plants and (3) a clade including equisetophytes (horsetails), psilotophytes (whisk ferns) and all eusporangiate and leptosporangiate ferns. Our maximum-likelihood analysis shows unambiguously that horsetails and ferns together are the closest relatives to seed plants. This refutes the prevailing view that horsetails and ferns are transitional evolutionary grades between bryophytes and seed plants, and has important implications for our understanding of the development and evolution of plants.

  9. Soybean GmbZIP123 gene enhances lipid content in the seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Song, Qing-Xin; Li, Qing-Tian; Liu, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Feng-Xia; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Man, Wei-Qun; Du, Wei-Guang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2013-11-01

    Soybean is one of most important oil crops and a significant increase in lipid content in soybean seeds would facilitate vegetable oil production in the world. Although the pathways for lipid biosynthesis in higher plants have been uncovered, our understanding of regulatory mechanism controlling lipid accumulation is still limited. In this study, we identified 87 transcription factor genes with a higher abundance at the stage of lipid accumulation in soybean seeds. One of these genes, GmbZIP123, was selected to further study its function in regulation of lipid accumulation. Overexpression of GmbZIP123 enhanced lipid content in the seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The GmbZIP123 transgene promoted expression of two sucrose transporter genes (SUC1 and SUC5) and three cell-wall invertase genes (cwINV1, cwINV3, and cwINV6) by binding directly to the promoters of these genes. Consistently, the cell-wall invertase activity and sugar translocation were all enhanced in siliques of GmbZIP123 transgenic plants. Higher levels of glucose, fructose, and sucrose were also found in seeds of GmbZIP123 transgenic plants. These results suggest that GmbZIP123 may participate in regulation of lipid accumulation in soybean seeds by controlling sugar transport into seeds from photoautotrophic tissues. This study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanism for lipid accumulation in seeds and may facilitate improvements in oil production in soybean and other oil crops through genetic manipulation of the GmbZIP123 gene.

  10. Treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds with an HSP90 inhibitor increases plant resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Resistance of plants to unfavourable conditions is an important feature to use them as an autotrophic link of Life Support Systems in space exploration missions. It significantly depends on basic and stress-induced levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) in cells. It is known that HSP90 can bind and maintain heat shock transcription factors (HSF) as a monomer that lacks DNA binding activity and thereby regulate HSP expression. Modulation of activity of the HSP synthesis and resistance by HSP90 in plants is not well investigated. The objective of this study was to determine how treatment of seeds with an HSP90 inhibitor affects environmental responsiveness in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seed treatment with geldanamycin (GDA) was used to reduce HSP90 function. The affect of space flight stressors was simulated by gamma-irradiation and thermal upshift. Two series of experiments were carried out: 1) exposure of dry seeds to gamma-irradiation (1 kGy, ^{60}Co); 2) heat shock of seedlings. It was shown that GDA treatment of seeds stimulated the seedling growth after seed irradiation. It also increased both the basic thermotolerance (45°C for 45 min) and induced thermotolerance (45°C for 1,5-2,5 h after pretreatment at 37°C for 2 h) in seedlings. In addition, seed treatment with GDA had a prolonged effect on the HSP70 production in seedlings under normal and stressful conditions. It shows that the stimulatory effects of GDA may be caused by induction of HSP70 synthesis. The obtained data demonstrate that pre-treatment of seeds with GDA before planting allows inducing the stress resistance at least at early growth stages of plants.

  11. Phylogeny of seed plants based on all three genomic compartments: Extant gymnosperms are monophyletic and Gnetales' closest relatives are conifers

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, L. Michelle; Coat, Gwénaële; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts to resolve Darwin's “abominable mystery”—the origin of angiosperms—have led to the conclusion that Gnetales and various fossil groups are sister to angiosperms, forming the “anthophytes.” Morphological homologies, however, are difficult to interpret, and molecular data have not provided clear resolution of relationships among major groups of seed plants. We introduce two sequence data sets from slowly evolving mitochondrial genes, cox1 and atpA, which unambiguously reject the anthophyte hypothesis, favoring instead a close relationship between Gnetales and conifers. Parsimony- and likelihood-based analyses of plastid rbcL and nuclear 18S rDNA alone and with cox1 and atpA also strongly support a gnetophyte–conifer grouping. Surprisingly, three of four genes (all but nuclear rDNA) and combined three-genome analyses also suggest or strongly support Gnetales as derived conifers, sister to Pinaceae. Analyses with outgroups screened to avoid long branches consistently identify all gymnosperms as a monophyletic sister group to angiosperms. Combined three- and four-gene rooted analyses resolve the branching order for the remaining major groups—cycads separate from other gymnosperms first, followed by Ginkgo and then (Gnetales + Pinaceae) sister to a monophyletic group with all other conifer families. The molecular phylogeny strongly conflicts with current interpretations of seed plant morphology, and implies that many similarities between gnetophytes and angiosperms, such as “flower-like” reproductive structures and double fertilization, were independently derived, whereas other characters could emerge as synapomorphies for an expanded conifer group including Gnetales. An initial angiosperm–gymnosperm split implies a long stem lineage preceding the explosive Mesozoic radiation of flowering plants and suggests that angiosperm origins and homologies should be sought among extinct seed plant groups. PMID:10760278

  12. NSP-Dependent Simple Nitrile Formation Dominates upon Breakdown of Major Aliphatic Glucosinolates in Roots, Seeds, and Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0

    PubMed Central

    Wittstock, Ute; Meier, Kathrin; Dörr, Friederike; Ravindran, Beena M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the best-studied plant defense systems, the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicales, is composed of thioglucosides known as glucosinolates and their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases. Tissue disruption brings these components together, and bioactive products are formed as a consequence of myrosinase-catalyzed glucosinolate hydrolysis. Among these products, isothiocyanates have attracted most interest as chemical plant defenses against herbivores and pathogens and health-promoting compounds in the human diet. Previous research has identified specifier proteins whose presence results in the formation of alternative product types, e.g., nitriles, at the expense of isothiocyanates. The biological roles of specifier proteins and alternative breakdown products are poorly understood. Here, we assessed glucosinolate breakdown product profiles obtained upon maceration of roots, seedlings and seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0. We identified simple nitriles as the predominant breakdown products of the major endogenous aliphatic glucosinolates in root, seed, and seedling homogenates. In agreement with this finding, genes encoding nitrile-specifier proteins (NSPs) are expressed in roots, seeds, and seedlings. Analysis of glucosinolate breakdown in mutants with T-DNA insertions in any of the five NSP genes demonstrated, that simple nitrile formation upon tissue disruption depended almost entirely on NSP2 in seeds and mainly on NSP1 in seedlings. In roots, about 70–80% of the nitrile-forming activity was due to NSP1 and NSP3. Thus, glucosinolate breakdown product profiles are organ-specifically regulated in A. thaliana Col-0, and high proportions of simple nitriles are formed in some parts of the plant. This should be considered in future studies on biological roles of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. PMID:27990154

  13. NSP-Dependent Simple Nitrile Formation Dominates upon Breakdown of Major Aliphatic Glucosinolates in Roots, Seeds, and Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Ute; Meier, Kathrin; Dörr, Friederike; Ravindran, Beena M

    2016-01-01

    One of the best-studied plant defense systems, the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicales, is composed of thioglucosides known as glucosinolates and their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases. Tissue disruption brings these components together, and bioactive products are formed as a consequence of myrosinase-catalyzed glucosinolate hydrolysis. Among these products, isothiocyanates have attracted most interest as chemical plant defenses against herbivores and pathogens and health-promoting compounds in the human diet. Previous research has identified specifier proteins whose presence results in the formation of alternative product types, e.g., nitriles, at the expense of isothiocyanates. The biological roles of specifier proteins and alternative breakdown products are poorly understood. Here, we assessed glucosinolate breakdown product profiles obtained upon maceration of roots, seedlings and seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0. We identified simple nitriles as the predominant breakdown products of the major endogenous aliphatic glucosinolates in root, seed, and seedling homogenates. In agreement with this finding, genes encoding nitrile-specifier proteins (NSPs) are expressed in roots, seeds, and seedlings. Analysis of glucosinolate breakdown in mutants with T-DNA insertions in any of the five NSP genes demonstrated, that simple nitrile formation upon tissue disruption depended almost entirely on NSP2 in seeds and mainly on NSP1 in seedlings. In roots, about 70-80% of the nitrile-forming activity was due to NSP1 and NSP3. Thus, glucosinolate breakdown product profiles are organ-specifically regulated in A. thaliana Col-0, and high proportions of simple nitriles are formed in some parts of the plant. This should be considered in future studies on biological roles of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system.

  14. Increasing seed size and quality by manipulating BIG SEEDS1 in legume species

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liangfa; Yu, Jianbin; Wang, Hongliang; Luth, Diane; Bai, Guihua; Wang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Plant organs, such as seeds, are primary sources of food for both humans and animals. Seed size is one of the major agronomic traits that have been selected in crop plants during their domestication. Legume seeds are a major source of dietary proteins and oils. Here, we report a conserved role for the BIG SEEDS1 (BS1) gene in the control of seed size and weight in the model legume Medicago truncatula and the grain legume soybean (Glycine max). BS1 encodes a plant-specific transcription regulator and plays a key role in the control of the size of plant organs, including seeds, seed pods, and leaves, through a regulatory module that targets primary cell proliferation. Importantly, down-regulation of BS1 orthologs in soybean by an artificial microRNA significantly increased soybean seed size, weight, and amino acid content. Our results provide a strategy for the increase in yield and seed quality in legumes. PMID:27791139

  15. A photorespiratory bypass increases plant growth and seed yield in biofuel crop Camelina sativa.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Jyoti; Lopez, Harry; Vasani, Naresh B; Hu, Zhaohui; Swift, Jennifer E; Yalamanchili, Roopa; Dvora, Mia; Lin, Xiuli; Xie, Deyu; Qu, Rongda; Sederoff, Heike W

    2015-01-01

    Camelina sativa is an oilseed crop with great potential for biofuel production on marginal land. The seed oil from camelina has been converted to jet fuel and improved fuel efficiency in commercial and military test flights. Hydrogenation-derived renewable diesel from camelina is environmentally superior to that from canola due to lower agricultural inputs, and the seed meal is FDA approved for animal consumption. However, relatively low yield makes its farming less profitable. Our study is aimed at increasing camelina seed yield by reducing carbon loss from photorespiration via a photorespiratory bypass. Genes encoding three enzymes of the Escherichia coli glycolate catabolic pathway were introduced: glycolate dehydrogenase (GDH), glyoxylate carboxyligase (GCL) and tartronic semialdehyde reductase (TSR). These enzymes compete for the photorespiratory substrate, glycolate, convert it to glycerate within the chloroplasts, and reduce photorespiration. As a by-product of the reaction, CO2 is released in the chloroplast, which increases photosynthesis. Camelina plants were transformed with either partial bypass (GDH), or full bypass (GDH, GCL and TSR) genes. Transgenic plants were evaluated for physiological and metabolic traits. Expressing the photorespiratory bypass genes in camelina reduced photorespiration and increased photosynthesis in both partial and full bypass expressing lines. Expression of partial bypass increased seed yield by 50-57 %, while expression of full bypass increased seed yield by 57-73 %, with no loss in seed quality. The transgenic plants also showed increased vegetative biomass and faster development; they flowered, set seed and reached seed maturity about 1 week earlier than WT. At the transcriptional level, transgenic plants showed differential expression in categories such as respiration, amino acid biosynthesis and fatty acid metabolism. The increased growth of the bypass transgenics compared to WT was only observed in ambient or low CO

  16. [GENETIC VARIABILITY OF MATERNAL PLANTS AND SEED EMBRYOS OF KOCH PINE POPULATIONS (PINUS KOCHIANA KLOTZSCH EX KOCH) IN CRIMEA].

    PubMed

    Korshykov, I I; Kalafat, L O; Vynogradova, O M; Podgornyi, D Y

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies of genetic variability were undertaken for 12 allozyme loci selections of trees and embryos of seed, and also for the crossing systems in five populations of Koch pine of (Pinus kochiana Klotzsch ex Koch) in Crimea. It was shown that in seed embryos the allelic variety peculiar to the maternal plants was restored, however the level of the available (H₀) heterozygosity was considerably lower, 0.286 and 0.189 respectively. For the embryos unlike the trees, in the majority of the analyzed loci the considerable divergence was specific in the actual distribution of genotypes from the theoretically expected according to Hardy- Weinberg law. The proportion of cross pollination at the unilocal (t(s)) estimation varied from 0.384 to 0.673 in the populations, while at the multilocal ones (t(m)) it was 0.639-0.841.

  17. Seed Bank Contribution to Vascular Plant Richness on Temporary Floating Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    Fluctuating water levels create opportunities for recruitment of new individuals from wetland seed banks. In this study, floating island formation functioned similarly to drawdowns in water level by creating patches of sediment that were less inundated than the surrounding, undisturbed deep-water marsh. To examine if and how seed banks contributed to temporary formation of distinct plant assemblages on these islands, field surveys of plant percent cover on and off of islands were conducted over two years, along with a controlled greenhouse experiment in which inundation was manipulated. Plant assemblages differed significantly on and off of floating islands. Floating-leaved perennials dominated undisturbed deep-water marsh, while emergent species dominated floating islands. Moreover, species richness was greater on islands than in the undisturbed deep-water marsh. Plant assemblages in the greenhouse experiment also differed among inundation treatments in a manner consistent with differences observed in field surveys. These results demonstrate that floating island formation temporarily altered levels of inundation favoring the germination of a more species-rich, emergent plant assemblage. Because these islands persisted long enough for several species to set seed, their formation may contribute to the maintenance of the seed bank and help maintain populations of otherwise rare species within the deep-water marsh.

  18. Diversity distribution patterns of Chinese endemic seed plant species and their implications for conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jihong; Huang, Jianhua; Lu, Xinghui; Ma, Keping

    2016-09-23

    Endemism is an important concept in biogeography and biodiversity conservation. China is one of the richest countries in biodiversity, with very high levels of plant endemism. In this study, we analysed the distribution patterns of diversity, the degree of differentiation, and the endemicity of Chinese endemic seed plants using the floristic unit as a basic spatial analysis unit and 11 indices. The analysis was based on distribution data of 24,951 native seed plant species (excluding subspecies and varieties) and 12,980 Chinese endemic seed plant species, which were sourced from both specimen records and published references. The distribution patterns of Chinese endemic flora were generally consistent but disproportionate across China for diversity, degree of differentiation and endemicity. The South Hengduan Mountains Subregion had the highest values for all indices. At the regional level, both the Hengduan Mountains and the Central China regions were highest in diversity and degrees of differentiation. However, both the rate of local endemic to native species and the rate of local to Chinese endemic species were highest in the Taiwan Region and the South Taiwan Region. The Hengduan Mountains Region and the Central China Region are two key conservation priority areas for Chinese endemic seed plants.

  19. Diversity distribution patterns of Chinese endemic seed plant species and their implications for conservation planning

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jihong; Huang, Jianhua; Lu, Xinghui; Ma, Keping

    2016-01-01

    Endemism is an important concept in biogeography and biodiversity conservation. China is one of the richest countries in biodiversity, with very high levels of plant endemism. In this study, we analysed the distribution patterns of diversity, the degree of differentiation, and the endemicity of Chinese endemic seed plants using the floristic unit as a basic spatial analysis unit and 11 indices. The analysis was based on distribution data of 24,951 native seed plant species (excluding subspecies and varieties) and 12,980 Chinese endemic seed plant species, which were sourced from both specimen records and published references. The distribution patterns of Chinese endemic flora were generally consistent but disproportionate across China for diversity, degree of differentiation and endemicity. The South Hengduan Mountains Subregion had the highest values for all indices. At the regional level, both the Hengduan Mountains and the Central China regions were highest in diversity and degrees of differentiation. However, both the rate of local endemic to native species and the rate of local to Chinese endemic species were highest in the Taiwan Region and the South Taiwan Region. The Hengduan Mountains Region and the Central China Region are two key conservation priority areas for Chinese endemic seed plants. PMID:27658845

  20. Control of Seed Germination and Plant Development by Carbon and Nitrogen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Daniel; Prieto, Pilar; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular basis of the influence of external carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and other abiotic factors on phytohormones regulation during seed germination and plant developmental processes, and the identification of elements that participate in this response is essential to understand plant nutrient perception and signaling. Sugars (sucrose, glucose) and nitrate not only act as nutrients but also as signaling molecules in plant development. A connection between changes in auxin transport and nitrate signal transduction has been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana through the NRT1.1, a nitrate sensor and transporter that also functions as a repressor of lateral root growth under low concentrations of nitrate by promoting auxin transport. Nitrate inhibits the elongation of lateral roots, but this effect is significantly reduced in abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive mutants, what suggests that ABA might mediate the inhibition of lateral root elongation by nitrate. Gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis has been also related to nitrate level in seed germination and its requirement is determined by embryonic ABA. These mechanisms connect nutrients and hormones signaling during seed germination and plant development. Thus, the genetic identification of the molecular components involved in nutrients-dependent pathways would help to elucidate the potential crosstalk between nutrients, nitric oxide (NO) and phytohormones (ABA, auxins and GAs) in seed germination and plant development. In this review we focus on changes in C and N levels and how they control seed germination and plant developmental processes through the interaction with other plant growth regulators, such as phytohormones. PMID:26635847

  1. Morphological and molecular changes of maize plants after seeds been flown on recoverable satellite.

    PubMed

    Mei, M; Qiu, Y; Sun, Y; Huang, R; Yao, J; Zhang, Q; Hong, M; Ye, J

    1998-01-01

    Dry seeds of Zea mays, heterozygous for Lw1/lw1 alleles, sandwiched between nuclear track detectors aboard Chinese satellite for 15 days, were recovered and mutations in morphological characters on plants developed from these seeds, as well as their selected progenies, were investigated. The dosimetric results indicated that 85% of the seeds received at least 1 hit with Z > or = 20. About 10% of plants developed from flown seeds and 40% of observed selfed lines from the first generation plants showed some morphological changes, such as yellow stripes displayed on leaves, dwarf, anomogensis of floral organs and yellow-green seedlings, when compared with those from ground control. Using yellow stripes on leaves as the main endpoint for evaluating mutation induced in space environment, the frequency of stripe occurrence was 4.6% in the first generation plants, comparable with the results obtained from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission (Mei et al., 1994), but much lower than those from ground based 60 Co-gamma treatment at a dose of 100 Gy, which reached 35.5% in the selfed lines of the second generation. One hundred and ten random primers were screened in RAPD analysis to detect the variation on genomic DNA of plants with stripes on leaves. Of these primers, 10.9% were able to generate polymorphic bands between mutated plants and control, also, common band patterns in several progenies with the same mutation phenotype were observed. These results demonstrated that space radiation environment could induce inheritable mutagenic effects on plant seeds, and verified the change in genetic material in the mutants. Further study will be needed for a better understand of the nature and mechanism of this induction of mutation.

  2. Morphological and molecular changes of maize plants after seeds been flown on recoverable satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, M.; Qiu, Y.; Sun, Y.; Huang, R.; Yao, J.; Zhang, Q.; Hong, M.; Ye, J.

    1998-11-01

    Dry seeds of Zea mays, heterozygous for Lw1/lw1 alleles, sandwiched between nuclear track detectors aboard Chinese satellite for 15 days, were recovered and mutations in morphological characters on plants developed from these seeds, as well as their selected progenies, were investigated. The dosimetric results indicated that 85% of the seeds received at least 1 hit with Z>=20. About 10% of plants developed from flown seeds and 40% of observed selfed lines from the first generation plants showed some morphological changes, such as yellow stripes displayed on leaves, dwarf, anomogensis of floral organs and yellow-green seedlings, when compared with those from ground control. Using yellow stripes on leaves as the main endpoint for evaluating mutation induced in space environment, the frequency of stripe occurrence was 4.6% in the first generation plants, comparable with the results obtained from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission (Mei et al., 1994), but much lower than those from ground based60 Co-gamma treatment at a dose of 100 Gy, which reached 35.5% in the selfed lines of the second generation. One hundred and ten random primers were screened in RAPD analysis to detect the variation on genomic DNA of plants with stripes on leaves. Of these primers, 10.9% were able to generate polymorphic bands between mutated plants and control, also, common band patterns in several progenies with the same mutation phenotype were observed. These results demonstrated that space radiation environment could induce inheritable mutagenic effects on plant seeds, and verified the change in genetic material in the mutants. Further study will be needed for a better understand of the nature and mechanism of this induction of mutation.

  3. Automated small scale oil seed processing plant for production of fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.C.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    University of Idaho seed processing research is centered about a CeCoCo oil expeller. A seed preheater-auger, seed bin, meal auger, and oil pump have been constructed to complete the system, which is automated and instrumented. The press, preheater, cake removal auger, and oil transfer pump are tied into a central panel where energy use is measured and the process controlled. Extracted oil weight, meal weight, process temperature, and input energy are all recorded during operation. The oil is transferred to tanks where it settles for 48 hours or more. It is then pumped through a filtering system and stored ready to be used as an engine fuel. The plant has processed over 11,000 kg of seed with an average extraction efficiency of 78 percent. 5 tables.

  4. Traveling wave solutions in a plant population model with a seed bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingtuan

    2012-11-01

    We propose an integro-difference equation model to predict the spatial spread of a plant population with a seed bank. The formulation of the model consists of a nonmonotone convolution integral operator describing the recruitment and seed dispersal and a linear contraction operator addressing the effect of the seed bank. The recursion operator of the model is noncompact, which poses a challenge to establishing the existence of traveling wave solutions. We show that the model has a spreading speed, and prove that the spreading speed can be characterized as the slowest speed of a class of traveling wave solutions by using an asymptotic fixed point theorem. Our numerical simulations show that the seed bank has the stabilizing effect on the spatial patterns of traveling wave solutions.

  5. Effect of neem (Azardirachta indica A. Juss) seeds and leaves extract on some plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Moslem, M A; El-Kholie, E M

    2009-07-15

    In this study plant pathogenic fungi Alternaria solani, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were chosen to study the effect of ethanolic, hexane and methanolic extracts of neem seeds and leaves. Antifungal effects of neem leave and seed extracts obtained by ethanol, hexane and ptrolium ether were examined separately in vitro against Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Alternaria solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Results indicated that seeds and leaves extracts could cause growth inhibition of tested fungi, although the rate of inhibition of tested fungi varied with different extracts and concentrations. But all these extracts and concentrations of extract inhibited the growth of pathogenic fungi at a significant level. Azadirachtin, nimonol and expoxyazdirodione were detected from neem extract by using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). We can conclude that neem leave and seed extracts were effective as antifungal against all tested fungi but F. oxysporum and R. solani were the most sensitive fungi.

  6. Does seeding after severe forest fires in western USA mitigate negative impacts on soils and plant communities?

    Treesearch

    D. Peppin; P. Fule; J. Beyers; C. Sieg; M. Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments intended to reduce soil erosion, increase vegetative ground cover, and minimize establishment and spread of non-native plant species. However, seeding treatments can also have negative effects such as competition with recovering native plant communities and inadvertent...

  7. Electrostatic Levitation of Plant Seeds and Flower Buds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Hai-Peng; Li, Liu-Hui; Wei, Bing-Bo

    2012-06-01

    We report the electrostatic levitation of various kinds of seeds and flower buds. Coral berry and pepper near a spherical shape show a stable levitation state. The prolate ellipsoid soybean and flower buds are always “standing" in the free space with satisfactory levitation stability. For the irregular mushroom and wheat grain, the levitation state is characterized as a “top-heavy" posture. These special stable equilibrium states are proved by the analysis of surface charge distribution. The obtained saturation polarization charge of samples presents a good accordance with experimental data. The levitation ability is weighed by the factor m(inr+2)/(inrD2).

  8. Disentangling the role of seed bank and dispersal in plant metapopulation dynamics using patch occupancy surveys.

    PubMed

    Manna, F; Pradel, R; Choquet, R; Fréville, H; Cheptou, P-O

    2017-07-22

    In plants, the presence of a seed bank challenges the application of classical metapopulation models to aboveground presence surveys; ignoring seed bank leads to overestimated extinction and colonization rates. In this article, we explore the possibility to detect seed bank using hidden Markov models in the analysis of aboveground patch occupancy surveys of an annual plant with limited dispersal. Patch occupancy data were generated by simulation under two metapopulation sizes (N = 200 and N = 1,000 patches) and different metapopulation scenarios, each scenario being a combination of the presence/absence of a 1-yr seed bank and the presence/absence of limited dispersal in a circular 1-dimension configuration of patches. In addition, because local conditions often vary among patches in natural metapopulations, we simulated patch occupancy data with heterogeneous germination rate and patch disturbance. Seed bank is not observable from aboveground patch occupancy surveys, hence hidden Markov models were designed to account for uncertainty in patch occupancy. We explored their ability to retrieve the correct scenario. For 10 yr surveys and metapopulation sizes of N = 200 or 1,000 patches, the correct metapopulation scenario was detected at a rate close to 100%, whatever the underlying scenario considered. For smaller, more realistic, survey duration, the length for a reliable detection of the correct scenario depends on the metapopulation size: 3 yr for N = 1,000 and 6 yr for N = 200 are enough. Our method remained powerful to disentangle seed bank from dispersal in the presence of patch heterogeneity affecting either seed germination or patch extinction. Our work shows that seed bank and limited dispersal generate different signatures on aboveground patch occupancy surveys. Therefore, our method provides a powerful tool to infer metapopulation dynamics in a wide range of species with an undetectable life form. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Migration load in plants: role of pollen and seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lopez, S; Rousset, F; Shaw, F H; Shaw, R G; Ronce, O

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of local adaptation depends critically on the level of gene flow, which, in plants, can be due to either pollen or seed dispersal. Using analytical predictions and individual-centred simulations, we investigate the specific influence of seed and pollen dispersal on local adaptation in plant populations growing in patchy heterogeneous landscapes. We study the evolution of a polygenic trait subject to stabilizing selection within populations, but divergent selection between populations. Deviations from linkage equilibrium and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium make different contributions to genotypic variance depending on the dispersal mode. Local genotypic variance, differentiation between populations and genetic load vary with the rate of gene flow but are similar for seed and pollen dispersal, unless the landscape is very heterogeneous. In this case, genetic load is higher in the case of pollen dispersal, which appears to be due to differences in the distribution of genotypic values before selection.

  10. Effects of Ambient Humidity on Plant Growth Enhancement by Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation to Plant Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Humidity is an important factor for plasma-bio applications because composition of species generated by atmospheric pressure plasmas significantly depends on the humidity. Here we have examined effects of humidity on the growth enhancement to study the mechanism. Experiments were carried out with a scalable DBD device. 10 seeds of Raphanus sativus L. were set for x = 5 mm and y = 3 mm below the electrodes. The humidity Hair was 10 - 90 %Rh. The ratio of length of plants with plasma irradiation to that of control increases from 1.2 for Hair = 10 %Rh to 2.5 for Hair = 50 %Rh. The ratio is 2.5 for Hair = 50-90 %Rh. This humidity dependence is similar to the humidity dependence of O2+-H2O,H3O*, NO2--H2Oand NO3--H2Odensities, whereas it is different from that of other species such as O3, NO, and so on. The similarity gives information on key species for the growth enhancement.

  11. Fatty acid profile in the seeds and seed tissues of Paeonia L. species as new oil plant resources

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuiyan; Du, Shaobo; Yuan, Junhui; Hu, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Most common plant oils have little α-linolenic acid (C18:3Δ9,12,15, ALA) and an unhealthy ω6/ω3 ratio. Here, fatty acids (FAs) in the seeds of 11 species of Paeonia L., including 10 tree peony and one herbaceous species, were explored using gas chromatograph–mass spectrometer. Results indicated that all Paeonia had a ω6/ω3 ratio less than 1.0, and high amounts of ALA (26.7–50%), oleic acid (C18:1Δ9, OA) (20.8–46%) and linoleic acid (C18:2Δ9,12, LA) (10–38%). ALA was a dominant component in oils of seven subsection Vaginatae species, whereas OA was predominant in two subsection Delavayanae species. LA was a subdominant oil component in P. ostii and P. obovata. Moreover, the FA composition and distribution of embryo (22 FAs), endosperm (14 FAs) and seed coat (6 FAs) in P. ostii, P. rockii and P. ludlowii were first reported. Peony species, particularly P. decomposita and P. rockii, can be excellent plant resources for edible oil because they provide abundant ALA to balance the ω6/ω3 ratio. The differences in the ALA, LA and OA content proportion also make the peony species a good system for detailed investigation of FA biosynthesis pathway and ALA accumulation. PMID:27240678

  12. Reversal of height dimorphism promotes pollen and seed dispersal in a wind-pollinated dioecious plant

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, Melinda; Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the timing of reproductive functions in dioecious organisms may result in adaptive changes in the direction of sexual dimorphism during the breeding season. For plants in which both pollen and seeds are wind-dispersed, it may be advantageous for male plants to be taller when pollen is dispersed and female plants to be taller when seeds are dispersed. We examined the dynamics of height dimorphism in Rumex hastatulus, an annual, wind-pollinated, dioecious plant from the southern USA. A field survey of seven populations indicated that females were significantly taller than males at seed maturity. However, a glasshouse experiment revealed a more complex pattern of height growth during the life cycle. No dimorphism was evident prior to reproduction for six of seven populations, but at flowering, males were significantly taller than females in all populations. This pattern was reversed at reproductive maturity, consistent with field observations. Males flowered later than females and the degree of height dimorphism was greater in populations with a later onset of male flowering. We discuss the potential adaptive significance of temporal changes in height dimorphism for pollen and seed dispersal, and how this may be optimized for the contrasting reproductive functions of the sexes. PMID:22048889

  13. Developmental Peculiarities and Seed-Borne Endophytes in Quinoa: Omnipresent, Robust Bacilli Contribute to Plant Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Among potential climate change-adapted crops for future agriculture, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), a facultative halophyte plant with exceptional nutritional properties, stands out as a prime candidate. This work examined how quinoa deals with extreme situations during seed rehydration. Quinoa distinguishes itself from other plants in multiple ways. It germinates within minutes, even under extremely hostile conditions. Broken seeds/split embryos are able to regenerate. Furthermore, quinoa seedlings are resurrection-competent. These peculiarities became in part explainable upon discovery of seed-borne microorganisms. 100% of quinoa seeds, from different sources, are inhabited by diverse members of the genus Bacillus. These endophytes are motile and reside in all seedling organs, indicating vertical transmission. Owing to their high catalase activities and superoxide contents the bacteria potentially manipulate the host’s redox status. Superoxide-driven cell expansion enables quinoa to overcome a critical period in development, seedling establishment. Quinoa’s immediate confrontation with “foreign” reactive oxygen species and bacterial elicitors likely induces a naturally primed state, enabling plants to withstand extreme situations. The endophytic bacteria, which are cultivable and highly robust themselves, have high potential for application in agriculture, food (amylase) and cosmetics (catalase) industry. This work also discusses the potential of transferring quinoa’s microbiome to improve stress resistance in other plant species. PMID:26834724

  14. Enviromental Effects on Oleic Acid in Soybean Seed Oil of Plant Introductions with Elevated Oleic Concentration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil with oleic acid content >500 g per kg is desirable for a broader role in food and industrial uses. Seed oil in commercially grown soybean genotypes averages about 230 g per kg oleic acid (18:1). Some maturity group (MG) II to V plant introductions (PIs) have el...

  15. Appearance of Three Chloroplast Isoenzymes in Dark-grown Pea Plants and Pea Seeds 12

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Eun Yoon; Anderson, Louise E.

    1973-01-01

    Activity peaks characteristic of the chloroplastic Calvin cycle enzymes triose-phosphate isomerase, ribose 5-phosphate isomerase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase are found in isoelectric focusing patterns of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings and seeds. Apparently, in this higher plant these three chloroplastic isoenzymes can be formed in the absence of light and of chloroplast formation. PMID:16658311

  16. [Isolation of plant insulin from Momordica charantia seeds by gel filtration and RP-HPLC].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qingkai; Yao, Huiyuan; Xu, Huajun; Ling, Xiaoyun; He, Ting

    2004-06-01

    Hypoglycemic polypeptide (PA) was extracted from Momordica charantia seeds with organic acid and ethanol and purified with Sephadex G-50 gel filtration and RP-HPLC. PA was judged as plant insulin on the base of the analysis of its SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and amino acid composition.

  17. Planting the Seeds: Growth in Rural Education [Two]... A Series of Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Planting the Seeds: Growth in Rural Education [Two]... A Series of Choices" outlines nine effective practices in programming for small and rural schools. The nine projects are described and additional resources, contacts, and references are provided for each. The nine projects include an outreach school partnership, the use of a mobile…

  18. Effect of Seeding Rate and Planting Arrangement on Rye Cover Crop and Weed Growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed growth in winter cover crops in warm climates may contribute to weed management costs in subsequent crops. A two year experiment was conducted on an organic vegetable farm in Salinas, California, to determine the impact of seeding rate and planting arrangement on rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Merc...

  19. Root system structure in planted and seeded loblolly and shortleaf pine

    Treesearch

    Constance A. Harrington; John C. Brissette; William C. Carlson

    1989-01-01

    Differences in root system structure attributable to stand origin were examined by pairing seeded and planted stands of loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and shortleaf pine (P. echinata Mill.). The 17 paired stands were 3 to 9 years old and located in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas on similar soil and site conditions. Root systems from 12...

  20. Ice Damage in a Georgia Planting of Loblolly Pine from Different Seed Sources

    Treesearch

    Earle P. Jones; Osborn O. Wells

    1969-01-01

    After a severe ice storm in south-central Georgia, the degree of ice damage in a provenance test planting of 11-year-old loblolly pines varied considerably among the nine widely seperated seed sources represented. Damage was less among tress from the colder, more inland locations than among tress from coastal areas where the climate is more moderate. In terms of...

  1. Microelement trafficking in plants: A Multi-compartment Journey from the Rhizosphere to Seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Essential microelements, such as Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Ni, are required throughout plant growth. They are needed both to support metabolic processes in vegetative tissues and for eventual deposition in seeds to support the start of the next generation. Because these elements can be toxic in excess, ...

  2. Developmental Peculiarities and Seed-Borne Endophytes in Quinoa: Omnipresent, Robust Bacilli Contribute to Plant Fitness.

    PubMed

    Pitzschke, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Among potential climate change-adapted crops for future agriculture, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), a facultative halophyte plant with exceptional nutritional properties, stands out as a prime candidate. This work examined how quinoa deals with extreme situations during seed rehydration. Quinoa distinguishes itself from other plants in multiple ways. It germinates within minutes, even under extremely hostile conditions. Broken seeds/split embryos are able to regenerate. Furthermore, quinoa seedlings are resurrection-competent. These peculiarities became in part explainable upon discovery of seed-borne microorganisms. 100% of quinoa seeds, from different sources, are inhabited by diverse members of the genus Bacillus. These endophytes are motile and reside in all seedling organs, indicating vertical transmission. Owing to their high catalase activities and superoxide contents the bacteria potentially manipulate the host's redox status. Superoxide-driven cell expansion enables quinoa to overcome a critical period in development, seedling establishment. Quinoa's immediate confrontation with "foreign" reactive oxygen species and bacterial elicitors likely induces a naturally primed state, enabling plants to withstand extreme situations. The endophytic bacteria, which are cultivable and highly robust themselves, have high potential for application in agriculture, food (amylase) and cosmetics (catalase) industry. This work also discusses the potential of transferring quinoa's microbiome to improve stress resistance in other plant species.

  3. Growth phenology of coast Douglas-fir seed sources planted in diverse environments

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Gould; Constance A. Harrington; J. Bradley. St. Clair

    2012-01-01

    The timing of periodic life cycle events in plants (phenology) is an important factor determining how species and populations will react to climate change. We evaluated annual patterns of basal-area and height growth of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotusuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings from four seed sources...

  4. The plant secondary metabolite citral alters water status and prevents seed formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Graña, E; Díaz-Tielas, C; López-González, D; Martínez-Peñalver, A; Reigosa, M J; Sánchez-Moreiras, A M

    2016-05-01

    Based on previous results, which showed that the secondary metabolite citral causes disturbances to plant water status, the present study is focused on demonstrating and detailing these effects on the water-related parameters of Arabidopsis thaliana adult plants, and their impact on plant fitness. Clear evidence of effects on water status and fitness were observed: plants treated with 1200 and 2400 μm citral showed decreased RWC, reduced Ψs , increased Ψw and reduced stomatal opening, even 7 days after the beginning of the experiment. Plant protection signals, such as leaf rolling or increased anthocyanin content, were also detected in these plants. In contrast, 14 days after beginning the treatment, treated plants showed signs of citral-related damage. Moreover, the reproductive success of treated plants was critically compromised, with prematurely withered flowers and no silique or seed development. This effect of citral on fitness of adult plants suggests a promising application of this natural compound in weed management by reducing the weed seed bank in the soil.

  5. A knockout mutation in the lignin biosynthesis gene CCR1 explains a major QTL for acid detergent lignin content in Brassica napus seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liezhao; Stein, Anna; Wittkop, Benjamin; Sarvari, Pouya; Li, Jiana; Yan, Xingying; Dreyer, Felix; Frauen, Martin; Friedt, Wolfgang; Snowdon, Rod J

    2012-05-01

    Seed coat phenolic compounds represent important antinutritive fibre components that cause a considerable reduction in value of seed meals from oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The nutritionally most important fibre compound is acid detergent lignin (ADL), to which a significant contribution is made by phenylpropanoid-derived lignin precursors. In this study, we used bulked-segregant analysis in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross of the Chinese oilseed rape lines GH06 (yellow seed, low ADL) and P174 (black seed, high ADL) to identify markers with tight linkage to a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for seed ADL content. Fine mapping of the QTL was performed in a backcross population comprising 872 BC(1)F(2) plants from a cross of an F(7) RIL from the above-mentioned population, which was heterozygous for this major QTL and P174. A 3:1 phenotypic segregation for seed ADL content indicated that a single, dominant, major locus causes a substantial reduction in ADL. This locus was successively narrowed to 0.75 cM using in silico markers derived from a homologous Brassica rapa sequence contig spanning the QTL. Subsequently, we located a B. rapa orthologue of the key lignin biosynthesis gene CINNAMOYL CO-A REDUCTASE 1 (CCR1) only 600 kbp (0.75 cM) upstream of the nearest linked marker. Sequencing of PCR amplicons, covering the full-length coding sequences of Bna.CCR1 homologues, revealed a locus in P174 whose sequence corresponds to the Brassica oleracea wild-type allele from chromosome C8. In GH06, however, this allele is replaced by a homologue derived from chromosome A9 that contains a loss-of-function frameshift mutation in exon 1. Genetic and physical map data infer that this loss-of-function allele has replaced a functional Bna.CCR1 locus on chromosome C8 in GH06 by homoeologous non-reciprocal translocation.

  6. Using soil seed banks to assess temporal patterns of genetic variation in invasive plant populations

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Mark; Gallagher, Tommy; Vintro, Luis Leon; Osborne, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Most research on the genetics of invasive plant species has focused on analyzing spatial differences among existing populations. Using a long-established Gunnera tinctoria population from Ireland, we evaluated the potential of using plants derived from seeds associated with different soil layers to track genetic variation through time. This species and site were chosen because (1) G. tinctoria produces a large and persistent seed bank; (2) it has been present in this locality, Sraheens, for ∼90 years; (3) the soil is largely undisturbed; and (4) the soil's age can be reliably determined radiometrically at different depths. Amplified fragment length polymorphic markers (AFLPs) were used to assess differences in the genetic structure of 75 individuals sampled from both the standing population and from four soil layers, which spanned 18 cm (estimated at ∼90 years based on 210Pb and 137Cs dating). While there are difficulties in interpreting such data, including accounting for the effects of selection, seed loss, and seed migration, a clear pattern of lower total allele counts, percentage polymorphic loci, and genetic diversity was observed in deeper soils. The greatest percentage increase in the measured genetic variables occurred prior to the shift from the lag to the exponential range expansion phases and may be of adaptive significance. These findings highlight that seed banks in areas with long-established invasive populations can contain valuable genetic information relating to invasion processes and as such, should not be overlooked. PMID:24967082

  7. Environmental effects of nanosilver: impact on castor seed germination, seedling growth, and plant physiology.

    PubMed

    Yasur, Jyothsna; Rani, Pathipati Usha

    2013-12-01

    Increasing use of nanoparticles in daily products is of great concern today, especially when their positive and negative impact on environment is not known. Hence, in current research, we have studied the impact of silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) application on seed germination, root, and shoot length of castor bean, Ricinus communis L. plant. Silver nanoparticles had no significant effects on seedling growth even at higher concentration of 4,000 mg L(-1), while the silver in bulk form as AgNO3 applied on the castor bean seeds inhibited the seed germination. Silver uptake in seedlings of the castor seeds on treatment with both the forms of silver was confirmed through atomic absorption spectroscopy studies. The silver nanoparticle and silver nitrate application to castor seeds also caused an enhanced enzymatic activity of ROS enzymes and phenolic content in castor seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of individual phenols indicated enhanced content of parahydroxy benzoic acid. These kinds of studies are of great interest in order to unveil the movement and accumulation of nanoparticles in plant tissues for assessing future applications in the field or laboratory.

  8. Transport via xylem and accumulation of aflatoxin in seeds of groundnut plant.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, M; Hariprasad, P; Venkateswaran, G

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination in groundnut seeds in the absence of any aflatoxigenic fungi leads to a hypothesis that aflatoxins are present naturally in soil and is transferred to seeds through uptake by roots. A survey was conducted on the natural occurrence of aflatoxins in agricultural soils, among nine main groundnut-growing regions of Karnataka state, India. All 71 soil samples collected in this survey were contaminated with aflatoxins esp. AFB1. An in vitro xylem sap experiment proved the ability of groundnut plant roots to absorb AFB1, and transport to aerial plant parts via the xylem. Hydroponics experiment also proved the uptake of AFB1 by the roots and their translocation to shoot. Uptake was affected by the initial concentration of toxin and pH of the medium. Among the 14 varieties screened, GPBD4 and MLT.K.107 (III) recorded highest and least AFB1 uptake, respectively. The above results were validated using a greenhouse experiment. Here, the aflatoxin absorbed by root gradually transferred to shoot that was later found in seeds towards the end of experiment. Thus, the groundnut seeds can also get contaminated with aflatoxin by direct uptake of aflatoxin through conducting tissue in addition to fungal infection. The present study revealed the novel mode of aflatoxin contamination in groundnut seeds without fungal infection.

  9. Fatty acids and sterols composition, and antioxidant activity of oils extracted from plant seeds.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Gruczyńska, Eliza; Ścibisz, Iwona; Rudzińska, Magdalena

    2016-12-15

    This study determined and compared the contents of bioactive components in plant seed oils extracted with n-hexane (Soxhlet method) and chloroform/methanol (Folch method) from coriander, caraway, anise, nutmeg and white mustard seeds. Oleic acid dominated among unsaturated fatty acids in nutmeg and anise seed oils while petroselinic acid was present in coriander and caraway oils. Concerning sterols, β-sitosterol was the main component in seed oils extracted with both methods. The content of total phenolics in nutmeg, white mustard and coriander seed oils extracted with chloroform/methanol was higher than in their counterparts prepared with n-hexane. The seed oil samples extracted according to the Folch method exhibited a higher ability to scavenge DPPH radicals compared to the oil samples prepared with the Soxhlet method. DPPH values of the methanolic extracts derived from oils produced with the Folch method were also higher than in the oils extracted with n-hexane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seed germination of seven desert plants and implications for vegetation restoration

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Liming; Chen, Lijun; Jiang, Lianhe; Zhou, Jihua; Zheng, Yuanrun; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Germination cues reflect the conditions under which a species is likely to succeed in recruitment. Therefore, knowledge of the seed germination characteristics of key plant species in desertified areas is essential for restoration. The aims of this study were to evaluate the seed germination responses of seven native species, and to explore the implications for vegetation restoration. Seeds of seven desert species were sown in Petri dishes and subjected to various temperature and light conditions. The seeds germinated well at day/night temperatures of 25/15 °C and 30/20 °C but poorly at 35/25 °C. Seeds germinated best in the dark, and final germination percentages of all species were strongly inhibited at a photon irradiance of 1000 µmol m−2 s−1. Based on these results and the environmental conditions of their natural habitat, Agropyron cristatum and Artemisia halodendron are best adapted to shifting sand dunes: Elymus dahuricus, Caragana korshinskii and C. microphylla for semi-fixed sand dunes: and Medicago sativa and Melilotus suaveolen for fixed sand dunes. If seeds are sown in early May, they will likely be buried in sand, and the precipitation and temperature conditions will be suitable for seedling survival. PMID:27179541

  11. Effects of seed cryopreservation, stratification and scarification on germination for five rare species of pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sruti; Jenkins, Heather; Bucalo, Kylie; Determann, Ron O; Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Pullman, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Habitat loss and over collection have caused North American pitcher plants to become rare, including U.S. federally endangered Sarracenia alabamensis and S. oreophila, and S. leucophylla, S. psittacina and S. purpurea spp. venosa, endangered in several states. To develop reliable seed cryopreservation protocols for endangered Sarracenia species enabling similar germination percentages before and after storage in liquid nitrogen (LN) either in vivo or using in vitro tools. Seed germination pre- and post-cryopreservation were compared following seed drying with germination in soil, aseptic environment with wet filter paper or enriched medium, and using scarification or stratification for dormancy removal. After cryostorage, germination in vitro (1/6- or 1/3-strength MS medium) increased compared to germination on peat moss. Germination pre- and post-cryopreservation was similar for S. alabamensis and S. oreophila when seeds were stratified and grown in vitro. S. leucophylla and S. psittacina also showed high germination after cryopreservation when germinated on medium following stratification. Rapid liquid nitrogen exposure and rewarming induced seed coat cracking that damaged seeds, likely allowing internal damage during acid scarification and microbial entry during germination in non-sterile environments.

  12. Seed release by invasive thistles: the impact of plant and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Jongejans, Eelke; Pedatella, Nicholas M; Shea, Katriona; Skarpaas, Olav; Auhl, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Dispersal is a key process in biological studies of spatial dynamics, but the initiation of dispersal has often been neglected, despite strong indications that differential timing of dispersal can significantly affect dispersal distances. To investigate which plant and environmental factors determine the release of plumed seeds by the invasive thistles Carduus acanthoides and Carduus nutans, we exposed 192 flower heads of each species to increasing wind speeds in a full-factorial wind tunnel experiment with four air flow turbulence, three flower head wetness and two flower head temperature levels. The number of seed releases was highest under dry and turbulent conditions and from heads that had already lost a considerable number of seeds, but was not affected by flower head size, head angle or temperature. Inspection of the trials on video showed that higher wind speeds were needed to meet the seed release threshold in laminar flows and for C. acanthoides heads that had been wet for a longer time. Species differences were minimal, although seed release was more sensitive to lower levels of turbulence in the larger-headed and more open C. nutans heads. Knowledge of seed release biases towards weather conditions favourable for long-distance dispersal improves our understanding of the spread of invaders and allows managers to increase the efficiency of their containment strategies by applying them at crucial times. PMID:17666379

  13. Potential for seed-mediated gene flow in agroecosystems from transgenic safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) intended for plant molecular farming.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Marc A; Yang, Rong-Cai; Good, Allen G; Nielson, Ryan L; Hall, Linda M

    2009-04-01

    Safflower has been transformed for field scale molecular farming of high-value proteins including several pharmaceuticals. Viable safflower seed remaining in the soil seed bank after harvest could facilitate seed and pollen-mediated gene flow. Seeds may germinate in subsequent years and volunteer plants may flower and potentially outcross with commodity safflower and/or produce seed. Seeds from volunteers could become admixed with conventional crops at harvest, and/or replenish the seed bank. Seed in following crops could be transported locally and internationally and facilitate gene flow in locations where regulatory thresholds and public acceptance differ from Canada. Seed-mediated gene flow was examined in three studies. Safflower seed loss and viability following harvest of commercial fields of a non-transgenic cultivar were determined. We assessed seed longevity of transgenic and non-transgenic safflower, on the soil surface and buried at two depths. Finally, we surveyed commercial safflower fields at different sites and measured density and growth stage of safflower volunteers, in other crops the following year and documented volunteer survival and viable seed production. Total seed loss at harvest in commercial fields, ranged from 231 to 1,069 seeds m(-2) and the number of viable seeds ranged from 81 to 518 seeds m(-2). Safflower has a relatively short longevity in the seed bank and no viable seeds were found after 2 years. Based on the seed burial studies it is predicted that winter conditions would reduce safflower seed viability on the soil surface by >50%, leaving between 40 and 260 viable seeds m(-2). The density of safflower volunteers emerging in the early spring of the following year ranged from 3 to 11 seedlings m(-2). Safflower volunteers did not survive in fields under chemical fallow, but in some cereal fields small numbers of volunteers did survive and generate viable seed. Results will be used to make recommendations for best management

  14. Altered seed oil and glucosinolate levels in transgenic plants overexpressing the Brassica napus SHOOTMERISTEMLESS gene.

    PubMed

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Yang, Cunchun; Chan, Ainsley; Durnin, Douglas C; Belmonte, Mark F; Ayele, Belay T; Tahir, Muhammad; Stasolla, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) is a homeobox gene conserved among plant species which is required for the formation and maintenance of the shoot meristem by suppressing differentiation and maintaining an undetermined cell fate within the apical pole. To assess further the role of this gene during seed storage accumulation, transgenic Brassica napus (Bn) plants overexpressing or down-regulating BnSTM under the control of the 35S promoter were generated. Overexpression of BnSTM increased seed oil content without affecting the protein and sucrose level. These changes were accompanied by the induction of genes encoding several transcription factors promoting fatty acid (FA) synthesis: LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (BnLEC1), BnLEC2, and WRINKLE1 (BnWRI1). In addition, expression of key representative enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism, glycolysis, and FA biosynthesis was up-regulated in developing seeds ectopically expressing BnSTM. These distinctive expression patterns support the view of an increased carbon flux to the FA biosynthetic pathway in developing transformed seeds. The overexpression of BnSTM also resulted in a desirable reduction of seed glucosinolate (GLS) levels ascribed to a transcriptional repression of key enzymes participating in the GLS biosynthetic pathway, and possibly to the differential utilization of common precursors for GLS and indole-3-acetic acid synthesis. No changes in oil and GLS levels were observed in lines down-regulating BnSTM. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a novel function for BnSTM in promoting desirable changes in seed oil and GLS levels when overexpressed in B. napus plants, and demonstrate that this gene can be used as a target for genetic improvement of oilseed species.

  15. How do plants know when other plants are flowering? Resource depletion, pollen limitation and mast-seeding in a perennial wildflower.

    PubMed

    Crone, Elizabeth E; Miller, Elizabeth; Sala, Anna

    2009-11-01

    Mast-seeding is the synchronous and periodic reproduction by plant populations. This phenomenon has been widely studied from a community-level perspective, but we know extremely little about how plants are able to synchronize reproduction. Here, we present the first experimental test of proximate mechanisms of mast-seeding, by preventing reproduction in an iteroparous, mast-seeding wildflower. Through a series of experiments, we show that mobile carbohydrate stores (NSC) control alternate-year flowering by individual plants; seed set depletes NSC which prevents flowering the following year. Plants are synchronized by density-dependent pollen limitation; when plants flower asynchronously, they set fewer seeds, which prevents NSC depletion. Therefore, these individual plants flower in subsequent years and become synchronized. Because mast-seeding is a consequence of physiological controls of reproduction, differences in plant resource acquisition and allocation could dramatically change patterns of seed production, and changes in plant consumers and pollinators could change selection on physiological and developmental pathways.

  16. The presence of a below-ground neighbour alters within-plant seed size distribution in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin J W; During, Heinjo J; Vermeulen, Peter J; Anten, Niels P R

    2014-10-01

    Considerable variation in seed size commonly exists within plants, and is believed to be favoured under natural selection. This study aims to examine the extent to which seed size distribution depends on the presence of competing neighbour plants. Phaseolus vulgaris plants rooting with or without a conspecific neighbour were grown in soil with high or low nutrient availability. Seeds were harvested at the end of the growth cycle, the total nitrogen and phosphorus invested in seed production were measured and within-plant seed size distribution was quantified using a set of statistical descriptors. Exposure to neighbours' roots induced significant changes in seed size distribution. Plants produced proportionally more large seeds and fewer small ones, as reflected by significant increases in minimal seed size, mean seed size, skewness and Lorenz asymmetry coefficient. These effects were different from, and in several cases opposite to, the responses when the soil nutrient level was reduced, and were significant after correction for the amount of resources invested in seed production. Below-ground neighbour presence affects within-plant seed size distribution in P. vulgaris. This effect appears to be non-resource-mediated, i.e. to be independent of neighbour-induced effects on resource availability. It implies that, based on current environmental cues, plants can make an anticipatory adjustment of their investment strategy in offspring as an adaptation to the local environment in the future. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Gelatin Seed Treatment as a Biostimulant of Cucumber Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, H. T.; Xu, K.; Taylor, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of gelatin capsule seed treatment on enhanced plant growth and tolerance to abiotic stress have been reported in a number of crops, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects are poorly understood. Using mRNA sequencing based approach, transcriptomes of one- and two-week-old cucumber plants from gelatin capsule treated and nontreated seeds were characterized. The gelatin treated plants had greater total leaf area, fresh weight, frozen weight, and nitrogen content. Pairwise comparisons of the RNA-seq data identified 620 differentially expressed genes between treated and control two-week-old plants, consistent with the timing when the growth related measurements also showed the largest differences. Using weighted gene coexpression network analysis, significant coexpression gene network module of 208 of the 620 differentially expressed genes was identified, which included 16 hub genes in the blue module, a NAC transcription factor, a MYB transcription factor, an amino acid transporter, an ammonium transporter, a xenobiotic detoxifier-glutathione S-transferase, and others. Based on the putative functions of these genes, the identification of the significant WGCNA module and the hub genes provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms of gelatin seed treatment as a biostimulant to enhance plant growth. PMID:26558288

  18. Seed germination of medicinal plant, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill), as affected by different priming techniques.

    PubMed

    Tahaei, Amirreza; Soleymani, Ali; Shams, Majid

    2016-09-01

    Reduced seed germination is among the most important factors adversely affecting crop stand and subsequent plant growth. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill) is an important medicinal plant with poor seed germination rate, occasionally. It is accordingly pertinent to find methods which can enhance fennel seed germination and remove the barriers of dormancy breaking. The present experiments studied the effects of two different priming (cold moist stratification and osmopriming) and 14 dormancy breaking techniques (hormonal, osmopriming, biopriming, chemical priming, and hydropriming) on the seed germination and seedling growth of two different fennel genotypes under growth chamber conditions. In the first and second experiment, the priming techniques including the time lengths of cold moist stratification (0, 15, 30, and 45 days) and the concentrations of polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000, osmopriming at -0.99, -1.35, and -2.33 MPa) were used as the main plots. However, in both experiments, the dormancy breaking techniques and fennel genotypes were factorially combined and used as the subplots. Different seed- and seedling-related parameters including germination (%), plumule, radicle and seedling length, average germination time, rate and homogeneity of germination, and seed vigor index were determined. Both priming techniques were efficient on the enhancement of seed germination and seedling growth. Among the dormancy breaking techniques, Aminol Forte (biopriming), kadostim (biopriming), benzyl adenine + kinetin (biopriming), distilled water (hydropriming), gibberellin + kinetin (hormonal priming), and benzyl adenine + kinetin + gibberellin (biopriming) were the most effective ones. The related concentrations were equal to 100 mg/l, 10(-5) M, and 0.4 %. The fennel genotypes reacted significantly different under priming conditions. It is possible to enhance seed germination and seedling growth of fennel using priming and dormancy breaking

  19. Glycinebetaine enhances the tolerance of tomato plants to high temperature during germination of seeds and growth of seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufen; Li, Feng; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Wen; Meng, Qingwei; Chen, Tony H H; Murata, Norio; Yang, Xinghong

    2011-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. 'Moneymaker') was transformed with a codA gene, from Arthrobacter globiformis, for choline oxidase that had been modified to allow targeting to both chloroplasts and the cytosol. Glycinebetaine (GB) accumulated in seeds of transformed plants up to 1 µmol g(-1) dry weight (DW), while no detectable GB was found in wild-type (WT) seeds. The codA-transgenic seeds germinated faster and at higher frequency than WT seeds with high temperature treatment. After heat stress, levels of expression of a mitochondrial small heat-shock protein (MT-sHSP), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and heat-shock cognate 70 (HSC70) were higher in transgenic seeds than in WT seeds during heat stress, and the accumulation of HSP70 was more prominent in codA-transgenic seeds than in WT seeds. Addition of GB to the germination medium or imbibition of seeds in a solution of GB enhanced the tolerance of WT seeds to high temperatures. WT seeds treated with exogenous GB also expressed heat-shock genes at elevated levels and accumulated more HSP70 than controls. Our results suggest that GB, either applied exogenously or accumulated in vivo in codA-transgenic seeds, enhanced the expression of heat-shock genes in and improved the tolerance to high temperature of tomato seeds during germination. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Global biogeography of mating system variation in seed plants.

    PubMed

    Moeller, David A; Briscoe Runquist, Ryan D; Moe, Annika M; Geber, Monica A; Goodwillie, Carol; Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier; Eckert, Christopher G; Elle, Elizabeth; Johnston, Mark O; Kalisz, Susan; Ree, Richard H; Sargent, Risa D; Vallejo-Marin, Mario; Winn, Alice A

    2017-03-01

    Latitudinal gradients in biotic interactions have been suggested as causes of global patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation. Plant biologists have long speculated that outcrossing mating systems are more common at low than high latitudes owing to a greater predictability of plant-pollinator interactions in the tropics; however, these ideas have not previously been tested. Here, we present the first global biogeographic analysis of plant mating systems based on 624 published studies from 492 taxa. We found a weak decline in outcrossing rate towards higher latitudes and among some biomes, but no biogeographic patterns in the frequency of self-incompatibility. Incorporating life history and growth form into biogeographic analyses reduced or eliminated the importance of latitude and biome in predicting outcrossing or self-incompatibility. Our results suggest that biogeographic patterns in mating system are more likely a reflection of the frequency of life forms across latitudes rather than the strength of plant-pollinator interactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Honeycomb Actuators Inspired by the Unfolding of Ice Plant Seed Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Bertinetti, Luca; Turcaud, Sébastien; Rüggeberg, Markus; Weaver, James C.; Fratzl, Peter; Burgert, Ingo; Dunlop, John W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Plant hydro-actuated systems provide a rich source of inspiration for designing autonomously morphing devices. One such example, the pentagonal ice plant seed capsule, achieves complex mechanical actuation which is critically dependent on its hierarchical organization. The functional core of this actuation system involves the controlled expansion of a highly swellable cellulosic layer, which is surrounded by a non-swellable honeycomb framework. In this work, we extract the design principles behind the unfolding of the ice plant seed capsules, and use two different approaches to develop autonomously deforming honeycomb devices as a proof of concept. By combining swelling experiments with analytical and finite element modelling, we elucidate the role of each design parameter on the actuation of the prototypes. Through these approaches, we demonstrate potential pathways to design/develop/construct autonomously morphing systems by tailoring and amplifying the initial material’s response to external stimuli through simple geometric design of the system at two different length scales. PMID:27806052

  2. The evolution of reproductive structures in seed plants: a re-examination based on insights from developmental genetics.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Sarah; Kramer, Elena M

    2012-06-01

    The study of developmental genetics is providing insights into how plant morphology can and does evolve, and into the fundamental nature of specific organs. This new understanding has the potential to revise significantly the way we think about seed plant evolution, especially with regard to reproductive structures. Here, we have sought to take a step in bridging the divide between genetic data and critical fields such as paleobotany and systematics. We discuss the evidence for several evolutionarily important interpretations, including the possibility that ovules represent meristematic axes with their own type of lateral determinate organs (integuments) and a model that considers carpels as analogs of complex leaves. In addition, we highlight the aspects of reproductive development that are likely to be highly labile and homoplastic, factors that have major implications for the understanding of seed plant relationships. Although these hypotheses may suggest that some long-standing interpretations are misleading, they also open up whole new avenues for comparative study and suggest concrete best practices for evolutionary analyses of development.

  3. Endophytic fungal pre-treatments of seeds alleviates salinity stress effects in soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Khan, Abdul Latif; Lee, In-Jung

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, four endophytic fungi (GM-1, GM-2, GM-3, and GM-4) were tested for their ability to improve soybean plant growth under salinity stress conditions. The seed germination and plant growth were higher in seeds pretreated with endophytic fungal cultures than their controls. The positive influence of fungi on plant growth was supported by gibberellins analysis of culture filtrate (CF), which showed wide diversity and various concentrations of GAs. Specifically, GA4, GA7, GA8, GA9, GA12, and GA20 were found in fungal CFs. Under salinity stress conditions, GM-1 significantly enhanced the length and fresh weight of soybean plants relative to other fungal treatments. GM-1 effectively mitigated the adverse effects of salinity by limiting lipid peroxidation and accumulating protein content. GM-2, GM-3, and GM-4 also counteracted the salinity induced oxidative stress in soybean plants through reduction of lipid peroxidation and enhancement of protein content, maintaining the length and fresh weight of shoots. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were inhibited in salinity exposed plants, while GM-1 significantly enhanced these antioxidant enzyme activities in plants under salt stress. GM-1 treatment also showed lower levels of abscisic acid and elevated levels of salicylic acid in plants under salinity stress. Hence, GM-1 was identified as Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) isolate RK01 based on its DNA sequence homology. These results suggest that endophytic fungal (F. verticillioides) pre-treatment of soybean seeds would be an effective method to promote soybean plant growth under salinity stress conditions.

  4. Imprinting in plants as a mechanism to generate seed phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fang; Settles, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Normal plant development requires epigenetic regulation to enforce changes in developmental fate. Genomic imprinting is a type of epigenetic regulation in which identical alleles of genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Deep sequencing of transcriptomes has identified hundreds of imprinted genes with scarce evidence for the developmental importance of individual imprinted loci. Imprinting is regulated through global DNA demethylation in the central cell prior to fertilization and directed repression of individual loci with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). There is significant evidence for transposable elements and repeat sequences near genes acting as cis-elements to determine imprinting status of a gene, implying that imprinted gene expression patterns may evolve randomly and at high frequency. Detailed genetic analysis of a few imprinted loci suggests an imprinted pattern of gene expression is often dispensable for seed development. Few genes show conserved imprinted expression within or between plant species. These data are not fully explained by current models for the evolution of imprinting in plant seeds. We suggest that imprinting may have evolved to provide a mechanism for rapid neofunctionalization of genes during seed development to increase phenotypic diversity of seeds. PMID:25674092

  5. Seed sprout production: Consumables and a foundation for higher plant growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Michelle; Thomas, Terri; Johnson, Steve; Luttges, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Seed sprouts can be produced as a source of fresh vegetable materials and as higher plant seedlings in space. Sprout production was undertaken to evaluate the mass accumulations possible, the technologies needed, and the reliability of the overall process. Baseline experiments corroborated the utility of sprout production protocols for a variety of seed types. The automated delivery of saturated humidity effectively supplants labor intensive manual soaking techniques. Automated humidification also lend itself to modest centrifugal sprout growth environments. A small amount of ultraviolet radiation effectively suppressed bacterial and fungal contamination, and the sprouts were suitable for consumption.

  6. Bioluminescence Imaging of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis Infection of Tomato Seeds and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiulan; Miller, Sally A.; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2010-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes wilting and cankers, leading to severe economic losses in commercial tomato production worldwide. The disease is transmitted from infected seeds to seedlings and mechanically from plant to plant during seedling production, grafting, pruning, and harvesting. Because of the lack of tools for genetic manipulation, very little is known regarding the mechanisms of seed and seedling infection and movement of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in grafted plants, two focal points for application of bacterial canker control measures in tomato. To facilitate studies on the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis movement in tomato seed and grafted plants, we isolated a bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strain using the modified Tn1409 containing a promoterless lux reporter. A total of 19 bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis mutants were obtained. All mutants tested induced a hypersensitive response in Mirabilis jalapa and caused wilting of tomato plants. Real-time colonization studies of germinating seeds using a virulent, stable, constitutively bioluminescent strain, BL-Cmm17, showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis aggregated on hypocotyls and cotyledons at an early stage of germination. In grafted seedlings in which either the rootstock or scion was exposed to BL-Cmm17 via a contaminated grafting knife, bacteria were translocated in both directions from the graft union at higher inoculum doses. These results emphasize the use of bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to help better elucidate the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-tomato plant interactions. Further, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this tool by successful transformation of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis with Tn1409::lux. Thus, our approach would be highly useful to understand the pathogenesis of diseases caused by other subspecies of the

  7. Bioluminescence imaging of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection of tomato seeds and plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiulan; Miller, Sally A; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2010-06-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes wilting and cankers, leading to severe economic losses in commercial tomato production worldwide. The disease is transmitted from infected seeds to seedlings and mechanically from plant to plant during seedling production, grafting, pruning, and harvesting. Because of the lack of tools for genetic manipulation, very little is known regarding the mechanisms of seed and seedling infection and movement of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in grafted plants, two focal points for application of bacterial canker control measures in tomato. To facilitate studies on the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis movement in tomato seed and grafted plants, we isolated a bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strain using the modified Tn1409 containing a promoterless lux reporter. A total of 19 bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis mutants were obtained. All mutants tested induced a hypersensitive response in Mirabilis jalapa and caused wilting of tomato plants. Real-time colonization studies of germinating seeds using a virulent, stable, constitutively bioluminescent strain, BL-Cmm17, showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis aggregated on hypocotyls and cotyledons at an early stage of germination. In grafted seedlings in which either the rootstock or scion was exposed to BL-Cmm17 via a contaminated grafting knife, bacteria were translocated in both directions from the graft union at higher inoculum doses. These results emphasize the use of bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to help better elucidate the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-tomato plant interactions. Further, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this tool by successful transformation of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis with Tn1409::lux. Thus, our approach would be highly useful to understand the pathogenesis of diseases caused by other subspecies of the

  8. Evaluating the Interacting Influences of Pollination, Seed Predation, Invasive Species and Isolation on Reproductive Success in a Threatened Alpine Plant

    PubMed Central

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Reproduction in rare plants may be influenced and limited by a complex combination of factors. External threats such as invasive species and landscape characteristics such as isolation may impinge on both pollination and seed predation dynamics, which in turn can strongly affect reproduction. I assessed how patterns in floral visitation, seed predation, invasive ant presence, and plant isolation influenced one another and ultimately affected viable seed production in Haleakalā silverswords (Argyroxiphium sandwicense subsp. macrocephalum) of Hawai’i. Floral visitation was dominated by endemic Hylaeus bees, and patterns of visitation were influenced by floral display size and number of plants clustered together, but not by floral herbivory or nearest flowering neighbor distance. There was also some indication that Argentine ant presence impacted floral visitation, but contradictory evidence and limitations of the study design make this result uncertain. Degree of seed predation was associated only with plant isolation, with the two main herbivores partitioning resources such that one preferentially attacked isolated plants while the other attacked clumped plants; total seed predation was greater in more isolated plants. Net viable seed production was highly variable among individuals (0–55% seed set), and was affected mainly by nearest neighbor distance, apparently owing to low cross-pollination among plants separated by even short distances (>10–20 m). This isolation effect dominated net seed set, with no apparent influence from floral visitation rates, percent seed predation, or invasive ant presence. The measured steep decline in seed set with isolation distance may not be typical of the entire silversword range, and may indicate that pollinators in addition to Hylaeus bees could be important for greater gene flow. Management aimed at maintaining or maximizing silversword reproduction should focus on the spatial context of field populations and outplanting

  9. Evaluating the interacting influences of pollination, seed predation, invasive species and isolation on reproductive success in a threatened alpine plant.

    PubMed

    Krushelnycky, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Reproduction in rare plants may be influenced and limited by a complex combination of factors. External threats such as invasive species and landscape characteristics such as isolation may impinge on both pollination and seed predation dynamics, which in turn can strongly affect reproduction. I assessed how patterns in floral visitation, seed predation, invasive ant presence, and plant isolation influenced one another and ultimately affected viable seed production in Haleakalā silverswords (Argyroxiphium sandwicense subsp. macrocephalum) of Hawai'i. Floral visitation was dominated by endemic Hylaeus bees, and patterns of visitation were influenced by floral display size and number of plants clustered together, but not by floral herbivory or nearest flowering neighbor distance. There was also some indication that Argentine ant presence impacted floral visitation, but contradictory evidence and limitations of the study design make this result uncertain. Degree of seed predation was associated only with plant isolation, with the two main herbivores partitioning resources such that one preferentially attacked isolated plants while the other attacked clumped plants; total seed predation was greater in more isolated plants. Net viable seed production was highly variable among individuals (0-55% seed set), and was affected mainly by nearest neighbor distance, apparently owing to low cross-pollination among plants separated by even short distances (>10-20 m). This isolation effect dominated net seed set, with no apparent influence from floral visitation rates, percent seed predation, or invasive ant presence. The measured steep decline in seed set with isolation distance may not be typical of the entire silversword range, and may indicate that pollinators in addition to Hylaeus bees could be important for greater gene flow. Management aimed at maintaining or maximizing silversword reproduction should focus on the spatial context of field populations and outplanting

  10. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylases (XETs) from germinating nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) seeds: isolation and characterization of the major form.

    PubMed

    Stratilová, Eva; Ait-Mohand, Fairouz; Rehulka, Pavel; Garajová, Sona; Flodrová, Dana; Rehulková, Helena; Farkas, Vladimír

    2010-04-01

    Five forms of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) differing in their isoelectric points (pI) were detected in crude extracts from germinating nasturtium seeds. Without further fractionation, all five forms behaved as typical endotransglycosylases since they exhibited only transglycosylating (XET) activity and no xyloglucan-hydrolysing (XEH) activity. They all were glycoproteins with identical molecular mass, and deglycosylation led to a decrease in molecular mass from approximately 29 to 26.5 kDa. The major enzyme form having pI 6.3, temporarily designated as TmXET(6.3), was isolated and characterized. Molecular and biochemical properties of TmXET(6.3) confirmed its distinction from the XTHs described previously from nasturtium. The enzyme exhibited broad substrate specificity by transferring xyloglucan or hydroxyethylcellulose fragments not only to oligoxyloglucosides and cello-oligosaccharides but also to oligosaccharides derived from beta-(1,4)-d-glucuronoxylan, beta-(1,6)-d-glucan, mixed-linkage beta-(1,3; 1,4)-d-glucan and at a relatively low rate also to beta-(1,3)-gluco-oligosaccharides. The transglycosylating activity with xyloglucan as donor and cello-oligosaccharides as acceptors represented 4.6%, with laminarioligosaccharides 0.23%, with mixed-linkage beta-(1,3; 1,4)-d-gluco-oligosaccharides 2.06%, with beta-(1,4)-d-glucuronoxylo-oligosaccharides 0.31% and with beta-(1,6)-d-gluco-oligosaccharides 0.69% of that determined with xyloglucan oligosaccharides as acceptors. Based on the sequence homology of tryptic fragments with the sequences of known XTHs, the TmXET(6.3) was classified into group II of the XTH phylogeny of glycoside hydrolase family GH16. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  12. A Switch in Keystone Seed-Dispersing Ant Genera between Two Elevations for a Myrmecochorous Plant, Acacia terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Fiona J.; Auld, Tony D.; Ramp, Daniel; Kingsford, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersal capacity of plant species that rely on animals to disperse their seeds (biotic dispersal) can alter with changes to the populations of their keystone dispersal vectors. Knowledge on how biotic dispersal systems vary across landscapes allows better understanding of factors driving plant persistence. Myrmecochory, seed dispersal by ants, is a common method of biotic dispersal for many plant species throughout the world. We tested if the seed dispersal system of Acacia terminalis (Fabaceae), a known myrmecochore, differed between two elevations in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, in southeastern Australia. We compared ant assemblages, seed removal rates of ants and other vertebrates (bird and mammal) and the dominant seed-dispersing ant genera. At low elevations (c. 200 m a.s.l) seed removal was predominantly by ants, however, at high elevation sites (c. 700 m a.s.l) vertebrate seed dispersers or seed predators were present, removing over 60% of seeds from experimental depots when ants were excluded. We found a switch in the keystone seed-dispersing ant genera from Rhytidoponera at low elevations sites to Aphaenogaster at high elevation sites. This resulted in more seeds being removed faster at low elevation sites compared to high elevation sites, however long-term seed removal rates were equal between elevations. Differences in the keystone seed removalist, and the addition of an alternate dispersal vector or seed predator at high elevations, will result in different dispersal and establishment patterns for A. terminalis at different elevations. These differences in dispersal concur with other global studies that report myrmecochorous dispersal systems alter with elevation. PMID:27310262

  13. A Switch in Keystone Seed-Dispersing Ant Genera between Two Elevations for a Myrmecochorous Plant, Acacia terminalis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Fiona J; Auld, Tony D; Ramp, Daniel; Kingsford, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    The dispersal capacity of plant species that rely on animals to disperse their seeds (biotic dispersal) can alter with changes to the populations of their keystone dispersal vectors. Knowledge on how biotic dispersal systems vary across landscapes allows better understanding of factors driving plant persistence. Myrmecochory, seed dispersal by ants, is a common method of biotic dispersal for many plant species throughout the world. We tested if the seed dispersal system of Acacia terminalis (Fabaceae), a known myrmecochore, differed between two elevations in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, in southeastern Australia. We compared ant assemblages, seed removal rates of ants and other vertebrates (bird and mammal) and the dominant seed-dispersing ant genera. At low elevations (c. 200 m a.s.l) seed removal was predominantly by ants, however, at high elevation sites (c. 700 m a.s.l) vertebrate seed dispersers or seed predators were present, removing over 60% of seeds from experimental depots when ants were excluded. We found a switch in the keystone seed-dispersing ant genera from Rhytidoponera at low elevations sites to Aphaenogaster at high elevation sites. This resulted in more seeds being removed faster at low elevation sites compared to high elevation sites, however long-term seed removal rates were equal between elevations. Differences in the keystone seed removalist, and the addition of an alternate dispersal vector or seed predator at high elevations, will result in different dispersal and establishment patterns for A. terminalis at different elevations. These differences in dispersal concur with other global studies that report myrmecochorous dispersal systems alter with elevation.

  14. Effect of seed morph and light level on growth and reproduction of the amphicarpic plant Amphicarpaea edgeworthii (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keliang; Baskin, Jerry M.; Baskin, Carol C.; Yang, Xuejun; Huang, Zhenying

    2017-01-01

    Amphicarpic plants produce aerial and subterranean fruits on an individual plant, and these heteromorphic diaspores give rise to plants that differ in growth and ecology. Amphicarpaea edgeworthii is a summer annual amphicarpic species that grows over a range of light levels. We aimed to compare the response to shading intensity of plants of A. edgeworthii grown throughout their life cycle from aerial seeds (ASP) and from subterranean seeds (SSP). We hypothesized that vegetative and reproductive growth of plants from ASP and SSP respond differently to light. Plants were grown from ASP and SSP under 0, 46, 71 and 90% shading intensities. With plant height as a covariate, vegetative biomass of ASP and SSP did not differ. Leaf area and seed production of SSP were greater and internode length less than they were for ASP in all shading intensities. Aerial and subterranean seed yield, seed mass and number for both ASP and SSP were highest in full light. Aerial seed yield was affected more than subterranean seed yield by shading intensity. The growth and reproductive responses of ASP and SSP of A. edgeworthii may be adaptive to the range of low to high light environments in which this species grows. PMID:28071671

  15. Does the passage of seeds through frugivore gut affect their storage: A case study on the endangered plant Euryodendron excelsum

    PubMed Central

    Shikang, Shen; Fuqin, Wu; Yuehua, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Plant-frugivore mutualism serves an important function in multiple ecological processes. Although previous studies have highlighted the effect of frugivore gut passage on fresh seed germinability, no study has investigated the effect on seed storage after frugivore gut passage. We used the endangered plant, Euryodendron excelsum, to determine the combined effects of frugivore gut passage and storage conditions on the germination percentage and rate of seeds. In particular, three treatments that included storage periods, storage methods, and seed types were designed in the experiment. We hypothesized that seeds that passed through the gut will exhibit enhanced germination capacity and rate during storage. Results showed that the final germination percentage decreased in seeds that passed through the gut, whereas the germination rate increased during seed storage. Germination decreased in most types of seeds under both dry and wet storage after 6 months compared with storage after 1 and 3 months. The results suggest that after frugivore gut passage, E. excelsum seeds cannot form persistent soil seed bank in the field, and were not suitable for species germplasm storage. These finding underscore that seeds that passed through frugivore gut have long-term impact on their viability and germination performance. PMID:26109456

  16. Does the passage of seeds through frugivore gut affect their storage: A case study on the endangered plant Euryodendron excelsum.

    PubMed

    Shikang, Shen; Fuqin, Wu; Yuehua, Wang

    2015-06-25

    Plant-frugivore mutualism serves an important function in multiple ecological processes. Although previous studies have highlighted the effect of frugivore gut passage on fresh seed germinability, no study has investigated the effect on seed storage after frugivore gut passage. We used the endangered plant, Euryodendron excelsum, to determine the combined effects of frugivore gut passage and storage conditions on the germination percentage and rate of seeds. In particular, three treatments that included storage periods, storage methods, and seed types were designed in the experiment. We hypothesized that seeds that passed through the gut will exhibit enhanced germination capacity and rate during storage. Results showed that the final germination percentage decreased in seeds that passed through the gut, whereas the germination rate increased during seed storage. Germination decreased in most types of seeds under both dry and wet storage after 6 months compared with storage after 1 and 3 months. The results suggest that after frugivore gut passage, E. excelsum seeds cannot form persistent soil seed bank in the field, and were not suitable for species germplasm storage. These finding underscore that seeds that passed through frugivore gut have long-term impact on their viability and germination performance.

  17. Harnessing ant defence at fruits reduces bruchid seed predation in a symbiotic ant-plant mutualism.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-22

    In horizontally transmitted mutualisms, mutualists disperse separately and reassemble in each generation with partners genetically unrelated to those in the previous generation. Because of this, there should be no selection on either partner to enhance the other's reproductive output directly. In symbiotic ant-plant mutualisms, myrmecophytic plants host defensive ant colonies, and ants defend the plants from herbivores. Plants and ants disperse separately, and, although ant defence can indirectly increase plant reproduction by reducing folivory, it is unclear whether ants can also directly increase plant reproduction by defending seeds. The neotropical tree Cordia alliodora hosts colonies of Azteca pittieri ants. The trees produce domatia where ants nest at stem nodes and also at the node between the peduncle and the rachides of the infloresence. Unlike the stem domatia, these reproductive domatia senesce after the tree fruits each year. In this study, I show that the tree's resident ant colony moves into these ephemeral reproductive domatia, where they tend honeydew-producing scale insects and patrol the nearby developing fruits. The presence of ants significantly reduced pre-dispersal seed predation by Amblycerus bruchid beetles, thereby directly increasing plant reproductive output.

  18. Harnessing ant defence at fruits reduces bruchid seed predation in a symbiotic ant–plant mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    In horizontally transmitted mutualisms, mutualists disperse separately and reassemble in each generation with partners genetically unrelated to those in the previous generation. Because of this, there should be no selection on either partner to enhance the other's reproductive output directly. In symbiotic ant–plant mutualisms, myrmecophytic plants host defensive ant colonies, and ants defend the plants from herbivores. Plants and ants disperse separately, and, although ant defence can indirectly increase plant reproduction by reducing folivory, it is unclear whether ants can also directly increase plant reproduction by defending seeds. The neotropical tree Cordia alliodora hosts colonies of Azteca pittieri ants. The trees produce domatia where ants nest at stem nodes and also at the node between the peduncle and the rachides of the infloresence. Unlike the stem domatia, these reproductive domatia senesce after the tree fruits each year. In this study, I show that the tree's resident ant colony moves into these ephemeral reproductive domatia, where they tend honeydew-producing scale insects and patrol the nearby developing fruits. The presence of ants significantly reduced pre-dispersal seed predation by Amblycerus bruchid beetles, thereby directly increasing plant reproductive output. PMID:24807259

  19. Seed longevity: survival and maintenance of high germination ability of dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Rajjou, Loïc; Debeaujon, Isabelle

    2008-10-01

    The seed constitutes the main vector of plant propagation and it is a critical development stage with many specificities. Seed longevity is a major challenge for the conservation of plant biodiversity and for crop success. Seeds possess a wide range of systems (protection, detoxification, repair) allowing them to survive in the dry state and to preserve a high germination ability. Therefore, the seed system provides an appropriate model to study longevity and aging.

  20. Isolated and Community Contexts Produce Distinct Responses by Host Plants to the Presence of Ant-Aphid Interaction: Plant Productivity and Seed Viability

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Graziele Silva; Zurlo, Luana Fonseca; Ribas, Carla Rodrigues; Carvalho, Rafaela Pereira; Alves, Guilherme Pereira; Carvalho, Mariana Comanucci Silva; Souza, Brígida

    2017-01-01

    Ant-aphid interactions may affect host plants in several ways, however, most studies measure only the amount of fruit and seed produced, and do not test seed viability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the presence of ant-aphid interactions upon host plant productivity and seed viability in two different contexts: isolated and within an arthropod community. For this purpose we tested the hypothesis that in both isolated and community contexts, the presence of an ant-aphid interaction will have a positive effect on fruit and seed production, seed biomass and rate of seed germination, and a negative effect on abnormal seedling rates, in comparison to plants without ants. We performed a field mesocosm experiment containing five treatments: Ant-aphid, Aphid, Community, Ant-free community and Control. We counted fruits and seeds produced by each treatment, and conducted experiments for seed biomass and germinability. We found that in the community context the presence of an ant-aphid interaction negatively affected fruit and seed production. We think this may be because aphid attendance by tending-ants promotes aphid damage to the host plant, but without an affect on seed weight and viability. On the other hand, when isolated, the presence of an ant-aphid interaction positively affected fruit and seed production. These positive effects are related to the cleaning services offered to aphids by tending-ants, which prevent the development of saprophytic fungi on the surface of leaves, which would cause a decrease in photosynthetic rates. Our study is important because we evaluated some parameters of plant fitness that have not been addressed very well by other studies involving the effects of ant-aphid interactions mainly on plants with short life cycles. Lastly, our context dependent approach sheds new light on how ecological interactions can vary among different methods of crop management. PMID:28141849

  1. Isolated and Community Contexts Produce Distinct Responses by Host Plants to the Presence of Ant-Aphid Interaction: Plant Productivity and Seed Viability.

    PubMed

    Canedo-Júnior, Ernesto Oliveira; Santiago, Graziele Silva; Zurlo, Luana Fonseca; Ribas, Carla Rodrigues; Carvalho, Rafaela Pereira; Alves, Guilherme Pereira; Carvalho, Mariana Comanucci Silva; Souza, Brígida

    2017-01-01

    Ant-aphid interactions may affect host plants in several ways, however, most studies measure only the amount of fruit and seed produced, and do not test seed viability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the presence of ant-aphid interactions upon host plant productivity and seed viability in two different contexts: isolated and within an arthropod community. For this purpose we tested the hypothesis that in both isolated and community contexts, the presence of an ant-aphid interaction will have a positive effect on fruit and seed production, seed biomass and rate of seed germination, and a negative effect on abnormal seedling rates, in comparison to plants without ants. We performed a field mesocosm experiment containing five treatments: Ant-aphid, Aphid, Community, Ant-free community and Control. We counted fruits and seeds produced by each treatment, and conducted experiments for seed biomass and germinability. We found that in the community context the presence of an ant-aphid interaction negatively affected fruit and seed production. We think this may be because aphid attendance by tending-ants promotes aphid damage to the host plant, but without an affect on seed weight and viability. On the other hand, when isolated, the presence of an ant-aphid interaction positively affected fruit and seed production. These positive effects are related to the cleaning services offered to aphids by tending-ants, which prevent the development of saprophytic fungi on the surface of leaves, which would cause a decrease in photosynthetic rates. Our study is important because we evaluated some parameters of plant fitness that have not been addressed very well by other studies involving the effects of ant-aphid interactions mainly on plants with short life cycles. Lastly, our context dependent approach sheds new light on how ecological interactions can vary among different methods of crop management.

  2. Dynamics of Weeds in the Soil Seed Bank: A Hidden Markov Model to Estimate Life History Traits from Standing Plant Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Borgy, Benjamin; Reboud, Xavier; Peyrard, Nathalie; Sabbadin, Régis; Gaba, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the population dynamics of annual plants is a challenge due to their hidden seed banks in the field. However, such predictions are highly valuable for determining management strategies, specifically in agricultural landscapes. In agroecosystems, most weed seeds survive during unfavourable seasons and persist for several years in the seed bank. This causes difficulties in making accurate predictions of weed population dynamics and life history traits (LHT). Consequently, it is very difficult to identify management strategies that limit both weed populations and species diversity. In this article, we present a method of assessing weed population dynamics from both standing plant time series data and an unknown seed bank. We use a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain estimates of over 3,080 botanical records for three major LHT: seed survival in the soil, plant establishment (including post-emergence mortality), and seed production of 18 common weed species. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches were complementarily used to estimate LHT values. The results showed that the LHT provided by the HMM enabled fairly accurate estimates of weed populations in different crops. There was a positive correlation between estimated germination rates and an index of the specialisation to the crop type (IndVal). The relationships between estimated LHTs and that between the estimated LHTs and the ecological characteristics of weeds provided insights into weed strategies. For example, a common strategy to cope with agricultural practices in several weeds was to produce less seeds and increase germination rates. This knowledge, especially of LHT for each type of crop, should provide valuable information for developing sustainable weed management strategies. PMID:26427023

  3. Dynamics of Weeds in the Soil Seed Bank: A Hidden Markov Model to Estimate Life History Traits from Standing Plant Time Series.

    PubMed

    Borgy, Benjamin; Reboud, Xavier; Peyrard, Nathalie; Sabbadin, Régis; Gaba, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the population dynamics of annual plants is a challenge due to their hidden seed banks in the field. However, such predictions are highly valuable for determining management strategies, specifically in agricultural landscapes. In agroecosystems, most weed seeds survive during unfavourable seasons and persist for several years in the seed bank. This causes difficulties in making accurate predictions of weed population dynamics and life history traits (LHT). Consequently, it is very difficult to identify management strategies that limit both weed populations and species diversity. In this article, we present a method of assessing weed population dynamics from both standing plant time series data and an unknown seed bank. We use a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain estimates of over 3,080 botanical records for three major LHT: seed survival in the soil, plant establishment (including post-emergence mortality), and seed production of 18 common weed species. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches were complementarily used to estimate LHT values. The results showed that the LHT provided by the HMM enabled fairly accurate estimates of weed populations in different crops. There was a positive correlation between estimated germination rates and an index of the specialisation to the crop type (IndVal). The relationships between estimated LHTs and that between the estimated LHTs and the ecological characteristics of weeds provided insights into weed strategies. For example, a common strategy to cope with agricultural practices in several weeds was to produce less seeds and increase germination rates. This knowledge, especially of LHT for each type of crop, should provide valuable information for developing sustainable weed management strategies.

  4. The role of seed traits in determining the phylogenetic structure of temperate plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Vandelook,, Filip; Verdú, Miguel; Honnay, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Phylogenetic clustering of species within plant communities can be expected to result from environmental filtering acting on an evolutionary-conserved plant trait. One such a candidate trait is the embryo to seed-size ratio (E:S). A high E:S may allow faster germination immediately after imbibition, and is therefore assumed to be advantageous in dry habitats. In this study the hypothesis was tested that habitat filtering driven by soil moisture conditions and acting on seed germination and seedling establishment is an important ecological mechanism in structuring temperate plant communities. Methods Vegetation samplings were performed in three habitats located within 200 km of each other in western Europe: Ellenberg indicator values showed that the habitats selected differed substantially in terms of soil moisture and light availability. E.S ratio and seed mass data for all genera were obtained from literature. Data were analysed using recently developed phylogenetic methods. Key Results Genera with a similar E:S tend to co-occur, as low and high E:S genera dominate in moist and dry habitats, respectively. A phylogenetically clustered pattern of community structure was evident, and dispersion of E:S was positively related to phylogenetic dispersion. Conclusions The phenotypically and phylogenetically clustered pattern indicates that E:S-mediated habitat filtering is an important assembly process structuring the plant community of the temperate climate habitats studied. PMID:22684681

  5. Preparation and Testing of Plant Seed Meal-based Wood Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhongqi; Chapital, Dorselyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environment-friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainability concerns. This work demonstrates the preparation and testing of the plant seed-based wood adhesives using cottonseed and soy meal as raw materials. In addition to untreated meals, water washed meals and protein isolates are prepared and tested. Adhesive slurries are prepared by mixing a freeze-dried meal product with deionized water (3:25 w/w) for 2 hr. Each adhesive preparation is applied to one end of 2 wood veneer strips using a brush. The tacky adhesive coated areas of the wood veneer strips are lapped and glued by hot-pressing. Adhesive strength is reported as the shear strength of the bonded wood specimen at break. Water resistance of the adhesives is measured by the change in shear strength of the bonded wood specimens at break after water soaking. This protocol allows one to assess plant seed-based agricultural products as suitable candidates for substitution of synthetic-based wood adhesives. Adjustments to the adhesive formulation with or without additives and bonding conditions could optimize their adhesive properties for various practical applications. PMID:25867092

  6. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Chapital, Dorselyn C

    2015-03-05

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environment-friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainability concerns. This work demonstrates the preparation and testing of the plant seed-based wood adhesives using cottonseed and soy meal as raw materials. In addition to untreated meals, water washed meals and protein isolates are prepared and tested. Adhesive slurries are prepared by mixing a freeze-dried meal product with deionized water (3:25 w/w) for 2 hr. Each adhesive preparation is applied to one end of 2 wood veneer strips using a brush. The tacky adhesive coated areas of the wood veneer strips are lapped and glued by hot-pressing. Adhesive strength is reported as the shear strength of the bonded wood specimen at break. Water resistance of the adhesives is measured by the change in shear strength of the bonded wood specimens at break after water soaking. This protocol allows one to assess plant seed-based agricultural products as suitable candidates for substitution of synthetic-based wood adhesives. Adjustments to the adhesive formulation with or without additives and bonding conditions could optimize their adhesive properties for various practical applications.

  7. Linking plant specialization to dependence in interactions for seed set in pollination networks.

    PubMed

    Tur, Cristina; Castro-Urgal, Rocío; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pollination networks have provided valuable information on the number, frequency, distribution and identity of interactions between plants and pollinators. However, little is still known on the functional effect of these interactions on plant reproductive success. Information on the extent to which plants depend on such interactions will help to make more realistic predictions of the potential impacts of disturbances on plant-pollinator networks. Plant functional dependence on pollinators (all interactions pooled) can be estimated by comparing seed set with and without pollinators (i.e. bagging flowers to exclude them). Our main goal in this study was thus to determine whether plant dependence on current insect interactions is related to plant specialization in a pollination network. We studied two networks from different communities, one in a coastal dune and one in a mountain. For ca. 30% of plant species in each community, we obtained the following specialization measures: (i) linkage level (number of interactions), (ii) diversity of interactions, and (iii) closeness centrality (a measure of how much a species is connected to other plants via shared pollinators). Phylogenetically controlled regression analyses revealed that, for the largest and most diverse coastal community, plants highly dependent on pollinators were the most generalists showing the highest number and diversity of interactions as well as occupying central positions in the network. The mountain community, by contrast, did not show such functional relationship, what might be attributable to their lower flower-resource heterogeneity and diversity of interactions. We conclude that plants with a wide array of pollinator interactions tend to be those that are more strongly dependent upon them for seed production and thus might be those more functionally vulnerable to the loss of network interaction, although these outcomes might be context-dependent.

  8. Linking Plant Specialization to Dependence in Interactions for Seed Set in Pollination Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tur, Cristina; Castro-Urgal, Rocío; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pollination networks have provided valuable information on the number, frequency, distribution and identity of interactions between plants and pollinators. However, little is still known on the functional effect of these interactions on plant reproductive success. Information on the extent to which plants depend on such interactions will help to make more realistic predictions of the potential impacts of disturbances on plant-pollinator networks. Plant functional dependence on pollinators (all interactions pooled) can be estimated by comparing seed set with and without pollinators (i.e. bagging flowers to exclude them). Our main goal in this study was thus to determine whether plant dependence on current insect interactions is related to plant specialization in a pollination network. We studied two networks from different communities, one in a coastal dune and one in a mountain. For ca. 30% of plant species in each community, we obtained the following specialization measures: (i) linkage level (number of interactions), (ii) diversity of interactions, and (iii) closeness centrality (a measure of how much a species is connected to other plants via shared pollinators). Phylogenetically controlled regression analyses revealed that, for the largest and most diverse coastal community, plants highly dependent on pollinators were the most generalists showing the highest number and diversity of interactions as well as occupying central positions in the network. The mountain community, by contrast, did not show such functional relationship, what might be attributable to their lower flower-resource heterogeneity and diversity of interactions. We conclude that plants with a wide array of pollinator interactions tend to be those that are more strongly dependent upon them for seed production and thus might be those more functionally vulnerable to the loss of network interaction, although these outcomes might be context-dependent. PMID:24205187

  9. Growth phenology of coast Douglas-fir seed sources planted in diverse environments.

    PubMed

    Gould, Peter J; Harrington, Constance A; St Clair, J Bradley

    2012-12-01

    The timing of periodic life cycle events in plants (phenology) is an important factor determining how species and populations will react to climate change. We evaluated annual patterns of basal-area and height growth of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotusga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings from four seed sources that were planted in four diverse environments as part of the Douglas-fir Seed-Source Movement Trial. Stem diameters and heights were measured periodically during the 2010 growing season on 16 open-pollinated families at each study installation. Stem diameters were measured on a subset of trees with electronic dendrometers during the 2010 and 2011 growing seasons. Trees from the four seed sources differed in phenology metrics that described the timing of basal-area and height-growth initiation, growth cessation and growth rates. Differences in the height-growth metrics were generally larger than differences in the basal-area growth metrics and differences among installations were larger than differences among seed sources, highlighting the importance of environmental signals on growth phenology. Variations in the height- and basal-area growth metrics were correlated with different aspects of the seed-source environments: precipitation in the case of height growth and minimum temperature in the case of basal-area growth. The detailed dendrometer measurements revealed differences in growth patterns between seed sources during distinct periods in the growing season. Our results indicate that multiple aspects of growth phenology should be considered along with other traits when evaluating adaptation of populations to future climates.

  10. Protein and Carbohydrate Contents of Plant Seeds: An Introduction to Biochemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Egan, Todd P.; Meekins, J. Forrest; Siegel, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The first of two projects developed for an introductory biology course of science majors titled Biological Concepts I is described. Students were divided into groups and were asked to determine the total amount of protein and carbohydrate in different types of seeds that were provided to them.

  11. Protein and Carbohydrate Contents of Plant Seeds: An Introduction to Biochemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Egan, Todd P.; Meekins, J. Forrest; Siegel, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The first of two projects developed for an introductory biology course of science majors titled Biological Concepts I is described. Students were divided into groups and were asked to determine the total amount of protein and carbohydrate in different types of seeds that were provided to them.

  12. Evolution of 'smoke' induced seed germination in pyroendemic plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J. E.; Pausas, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Pyroendemics are plants in which seedling germination and successful seedling recruitment are restricted to immediate postfire environments. In many fire-prone ecosystems species cue their germination to immediate postfire conditions. Here we address how species have evolved one very specific mechanism, which is using the signal of combustion products from biomass. This is often termed ‘smoke’ stimulated germination although it was first discovered in studies of charred wood effects on germination of species strictly tied to postfire conditions (pyroendemics). Smoke stimulated germination has been reported from a huge diversity of plant species. The fact that the organic compound karrikin (a product of the degradation of cellulose) is a powerful germination cue in many species has led to the assumption that this compound is the only chemical responsible for smoke-stimulated germination. Here we show that smoke-stimulated germination is a complex trait with different compounds involved. We propose that convergent evolution is a more parsimonious model for smoke stimulated germination, suggesting that this trait evolved multiple times in response to a variety of organic and inorganic chemical triggers in smoke. The convergent model is congruent with the evolution of many other fire-related traits.

  13. Duplication and functional diversification of HAP3 genes leading to the origin of the seed-developmental regulatory gene, LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1), in nonseed plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zengyan; Li, Xia; Glover, Beverley J; Bai, Shunong; Rao, Guang-Yuan; Luo, Jingchu; Yang, Ji

    2008-08-01

    The HAP3 gene encodes a subunit of the CCAAT-box-binding factor (CBF), a highly conserved trimeric activator that recognizes and binds the ubiquitous CCAAT promoter element with high affinity. Two types of HAP3 gene have been identified in plant genomes. The LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1)-type HAP3 genes encode a functionally specialized subunit of CBF, which is expressed specifically in developing seeds. In contrast, most non-LEC1-type HAP3 genes are expressed in various tissues. It has been proposed that the LEC1-type HAP3 genes originated from the duplication and functional divergence of non-LEC1-type HAP3 genes. However, it is not yet known when this duplication event took place or whether the LEC1-type HAP3 genes appeared at the same time as the origin of seed plants. Here we describe a comprehensive comparison of the duplication patterns of HAP3 genes in different plant genomes. We recognize a major expansion of the HAP3 gene family accompanying the origin and early diversification of land plants and postulate that retrotransposition and other mechanisms of gene duplication have been involved in the expansion of the plant HAP3 gene family. We provide evidence that the LEC1-type HAP3 genes originated in nonseed vascular plant genomes and demonstrate that they are inductively expressed under drought stress in nonseed plants. These genes, however, were recruited to a novel regulatory network in the early stages of seed plant evolution and steadily expressed during seed development and maturation.

  14. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinar, J.L.; Garcia, L.V.; Clemente, L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three saltmarsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management.

  15. Change in protein content during seed germination of a high altitude plant Podophyllum hexandrum Royle.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vivek; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2013-01-14

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle (=Sinopodophyllum hexandrum) is a high-altitude medicinal plant exploited for its etoposides which are potential anticancer compounds. An effective, conventional propagation method is by seed. However, seed germination is erratic, and seedling survival is low. A marginal increase in Podophyllum seed germination was attained with organic solvents. In the present study an attempt was made to decipher the physiological and biochemical barriers in terms of change in proteins during seed germination of Podophyllum. Comparative 2-DE analysis between un-germinated (dormant) and germinating seeds revealed nearly 113 differentially expressed proteins, whereas Peptide Mass Fingerprint (PMF) analysis of 97 protein spots revealed appearance of 27 proteins, up-accumulation of 11 proteins, down-accumulation of 19 proteins and disappearance of 40 proteins with germination. Identified 59 proteins in the homology search were involved in metabolism (carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism; 20 proteins), ABA/GA signaling (17 proteins) and stress (15 proteins) related proteins. Seven proteins were with unknown function. Two-DE, and MS/MS analysis in conjunction with semi-quantitative RT-PCR data of cell wall hydrolyzing genes, revealed that in Podophyllum the radicle protrusion occurs might be because of the up-accumulation of cell wall hydrolases i.e. β-1, 3-glucanase and XET which weakens the thick walled micropylar endosperm.

  16. Treating seeds with activators of plant defence generates long-lasting priming of resistance to pests and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Dawn; Holroyd, Geoff H; Moore, Jason P; Glowacz, Marcin; Croft, Patricia; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Roberts, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    • Priming of defence is a strategy employed by plants exposed to stress to enhance resistance against future stress episodes with minimal associated costs on growth. Here, we test the hypothesis that application of priming agents to seeds can result in plants with primed defences. • We measured resistance to arthropod herbivores and disease in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants grown from seed treated with jasmonic acid (JA) and/or β-aminobutryric acid (BABA). • Plants grown from JA-treated seed showed increased resistance against herbivory by spider mites, caterpillars and aphids, and against the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. BABA seed treatment provided primed defence against powdery mildew disease caused by the biotrophic fungal pathogen, Oidium neolycopersici. Priming responses were long-lasting, with significant increases in resistance sustained in plants grown from treated seed for at least 8 wk, and were associated with enhanced defence gene expression during pathogen attack. There was no significant antagonism between different forms of defence in plants grown from seeds treated with a combination of JA and BABA. • Long-term defence priming by seed treatments was not accompanied by reductions in growth, and may therefore be suitable for commercial exploitation.

  17. Survival and DNA Damage in Plant Seeds Exposed for 558 and 682 Days outside the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, David; Leach, Sydney

    2017-03-01

    For life to survive outside the biosphere, it must be protected from UV light and other radiation by exterior shielding or through sufficient inherent resistance to survive without protection. We tested the plausibility of inherent resistance in plant seeds, reporting in a previous paper that Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seeds exposed for 558 days outside the International Space Station (ISS) germinated and developed into fertile plants after return to Earth. We have now measured structural genetic damage in tobacco seeds from this EXPOSE-E experiment by quantitatively amplifying a segment of an antibiotic resistance gene, nptII, inserted into the chloroplast genome. We also assessed the survival of the antibiotic resistance encoded by nptII, using marker rescue in a soil bacterium. Chloroplast DNA damage occurred, but morphological mutants were not detected among the survivors. In a second, longer mission (EXPOSE-R), a nearly lethal exposure was received by Arabidopsis seeds. Comparison between a ground simulation, lacking UV<200nm, and fully exposed seeds in space indicated severe damage from these short wavelengths and again suggested that DNA degradation was not limiting seed survival. To test UV resistance in long-lived, larger seeds, we exposed Arabidopsis, tobacco, and morning glory seeds in the laboratory to doses of UV254nm, ranging as high as 2420 MJ m(-2). Morning glory seeds resisted this maximum dose, which killed tobacco and Arabidopsis. We thus confirm that a naked plant seed could survive UV exposures during direct transfer from Mars to Earth and suggest that seeds with a more protective seed coat (e.g., morning glory) should survive much longer space travel. Key Words: UV light-Flavonoids-Sinapate-DNA degradation-Arabidopsis-Tobacco-Seeds-Space-International Space Station-EXPOSE-E-EXPOSE-R. Astrobiology 17, 205-215.

  18. TWS1, a Novel Small Protein, Regulates Various Aspects of Seed and Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Elisa; Guyon, Virginie; Remoué, Carine; Magnani, Enrico; Miquel, Martine; Grain, Damaris; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2016-11-01

    Small proteins have long been overlooked due to their poor annotation and the experimental challenges they pose. However, in recent years, their role in various processes has started to emerge, opening new research avenues. Here, we present the isolation and characterization of two allelic mutants, twisted seed1-1 (tws1-1) and tws1-2, which exhibit an array of developmental and biochemical phenotypes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. We have identified AT5G01075 as the subtending gene encoding a small protein of 81 amino acids localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. TWS1 is strongly expressed in seeds, where it regulates both embryo development and accumulation of storage compounds. TWS1 loss-of-function seeds exhibit increased starch, sucrose, and protein accumulation at the detriment of fatty acids. TWS1 is also expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues, where it is responsible for proper epidermal cell morphology and overall plant growth. At the cellular level, TWS1 is responsible for cuticle deposition on epidermal cells and organization of the endomembrane system. Finally, we show that TWS1 is a single-copy gene in Arabidopsis, and it is specifically conserved among angiosperms. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Seed Germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Initiation of seed germination is a critical decision for plants. It is important for seed populations under natural conditions to spread the timing of germination of individual seeds to maximize the probability of species survival. Therefore, seeds have evolved the multiple layers of mechanisms tha...

  20. Detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in artificially inoculated and naturally infected rice seeds and plants by molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, N; Mortensen, C N; Mathur, S B

    2001-08-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was developed for detecting the presence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial leaf blight (BLB) pathogen in rice seed and for studying the transmission of this bacterium from seed to plant. Primers TXT and TXT4R from an insertion sequence (IS1113) of the pathogen were used to amplify a 964-bp DNA fragment. A combined biological and enzymatic amplification (BIO-PCR) technique was used to detect the pathogen in naturally infected seed. The level of detection of TXT and TXT4R primers was 55 fg DNA of X. o. pv. oryzae, which is roughly the equivalent of seven cells (and four cells in pure culture suspension) of X. o. pv. oryzae. Hybridization of IS1113 with the amplified DNA fragment in Southern blot analysis confirmed that the 964-bp DNA fragment was amplified from X. o. pv. oryzae. The presence of the IS1113 element in strains of X. o. pv. oryzae from 16 rice-growing countries was confirmed by DNA dot blot analysis. X. o. pv. oryzae was detected from the seed washes and DNA extracted from the seed washes of naturally infected seeds of cvs Jaya and TN1. When stored at 4 degrees C, the pathogen was recovered up to 4 months and 9 months from naturally infected seeds of cvs Jaya and TN1, respectively. The BLB bacterium was also detected in seedlings, mature plants and seeds collected from plants raised from naturally infected seeds.

  1. Occurrence of diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserines and major phospholipids in some plants.

    PubMed

    Rozentsvet, O A; Dembitsky, V M; Saksonov, S V

    2000-06-01

    Over 40 higher plant species were examined for the contents of total lipids, phospholipids, diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by using micro-HPTLC. The results showed a wider range of plants containing betaine lipids. So, DGTS was found in some higher plant species, not studied earlier, belonging to Equisetophyta, Polypodiophyta; the lipid composition of many other species from Spermatophyta was also studied. It was demonstrated that more primitive plant species contained, as a rule, the betaine lipid DGTS. The quantitative data for the distribution of the main phospholipid classes PC, PE, and PG in various plant species and their tissues are given in this paper.

  2. Dye-sensitized solar cells with natural dyes extracted from plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghamri, Hatem S.; El-Agez, Taher M.; Taya, Sofyan A.; Abdel-Latif, Monzir S.; Batniji, Amal Y.

    2014-12-01

    The application of natural dyes extracted from plant seeds in the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been explored. Ten dyes were extracted from different plant seeds and used as sensitizers for DSSCs. The dyes were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. DSSCs were prepared using TiO2 and ZnO nanostructured mesoporous films. The highest conversion efficiency of 0.875 % was obtained with an allium cepa (onion) extract-sensitized TiO2 solar cell. The process of TiO2-film sintering was studied and it was found that the sintering procedure significantly affects the response of the cell. The short circuit current of the DSSC was found to be considerably enhanced when the TiO2 semiconducting layer was sintered gradually.

  3. Endangered plant-parrot mutualisms: seed tolerance to predation makes parrots pervasive dispersers of the Parana pine

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Dénes, Francisco V.; Zulian, Viviane; Prestes, Nêmora P.; Martínez, Jaime; Blanco, Guillermo; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Parrots are largely considered plant antagonists as they usually destroy the seeds they feed on. However, there is evidence that parrots may also act as seed dispersers. We evaluated the dual role of parrots as predators and dispersers of the Critically Endangered Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia). Eight of nine parrot species predated seeds from 48% of 526 Parana pines surveyed. Observations of the commonest parrot indicated that 22.5% of the picked seeds were dispersed by carrying them in their beaks. Another five parrot species dispersed seeds, at an estimated average distance of c. 250 m. Dispersal distances did not differ from those observed in jays, considered the main avian dispersers. Contrary to jays, parrots often dropped partially eaten seeds. Most of these seeds were handled by parrots, and the proportion of partially eaten seeds that germinated was higher than that of undamaged seeds. This may be explained by a predator satiation effect, suggesting that the large seeds of the Parana pine evolved to attract consumers for dispersal. This represents a thus far overlooked key plant-parrot mutualism, in which both components are threatened with extinction. The interaction is becoming locally extinct long before the global extinction of the species involved. PMID:27546381

  4. Endangered plant-parrot mutualisms: seed tolerance to predation makes parrots pervasive dispersers of the Parana pine.

    PubMed

    Tella, José L; Dénes, Francisco V; Zulian, Viviane; Prestes, Nêmora P; Martínez, Jaime; Blanco, Guillermo; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2016-08-22

    Parrots are largely considered plant antagonists as they usually destroy the seeds they feed on. However, there is evidence that parrots may also act as seed dispersers. We evaluated the dual role of parrots as predators and dispersers of the Critically Endangered Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia). Eight of nine parrot species predated seeds from 48% of 526 Parana pines surveyed. Observations of the commonest parrot indicated that 22.5% of the picked seeds were dispersed by carrying them in their beaks. Another five parrot species dispersed seeds, at an estimated average distance of c. 250 m. Dispersal distances did not differ from those observed in jays, considered the main avian dispersers. Contrary to jays, parrots often dropped partially eaten seeds. Most of these seeds were handled by parrots, and the proportion of partially eaten seeds that germinated was higher than that of undamaged seeds. This may be explained by a predator satiation effect, suggesting that the large seeds of the Parana pine evolved to attract consumers for dispersal. This represents a thus far overlooked key plant-parrot mutualism, in which both components are threatened with extinction. The interaction is becoming locally extinct long before the global extinction of the species involved.

  5. Do ungulates facilitate native and exotic plant spread? Seed dispersal by cattle, elk and deer in northeastern Oregon

    Treesearch

    Anne M. Bartuszevige; Bryan A. Endress

    2008-01-01

    Large domestic and native ungulates have the potential to disperse large quantities of seeds throughout the landscape. Many studies have found that ungulates are capable of dispersing seeds but few quantify the relative importance of ungulate dispersal across the landscape. We investigated the potential for cattle, elk, and deer to disperse native and exotic plants in...

  6. Preference of pen-reared northern bobwhite among native plant seeds of the sand sagebrush-mixed prairie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult northern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) are largely granivorous, eating primarily seeds produced from grasses and forbs. The objective of this research was to determine northern bobwhite quail preference among seeds of 45 plant species associated with the sand sagebrush-mixed prairie. ...

  7. Can biochar be used as a seed coating to improve native plant germination and growth in arid conditions?

    Treesearch

    Mary I. Williams; R. Kasten Dumroese; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Stuart P. Hardegree

    2016-01-01

    Direct seeding is a common large-scale restoration practice for revegetating arid and semi-arid lands, but success can be limited by moisture and temperature. Seed coating technologies that use biochar may have the potential to overcome moisture and temperature limitations on native plant germination and growth. Biochar is a popular agronomic tool for improving soil...

  8. Biological effects and biochemical studies of tomato plants grown from seeds exposed for a long time at the MIR station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, G.; Yurov, S.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kapitanov, A.

    Experiments at orbital space stations were carried out with seeds of various plants -- welsh onion arabidopsis wheat pea maize barley tomato etc The results of these experiments showed some discrepancy concerning germinating capacity presence of chromosome aberrations and other parameters After short-term space flights most of plants did not exhibit any irreversible changes But prolongation of space flights to over one year leads to practically complete loss of the germinating capacity in for example Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaries The level of recessive mutations increased more than 3-fold as compared to the control variants after exposure of seeds during 840 days The objects studied in the experiments described here are tomato plants obtained from seeds carried for 6 years at the station MIR According to the results of the experiments the germinating capacity of the seeds was 32 versus 60 in the control The germination of the seeds began only on the 14-15 th days in the control -- on the 5 th day In the process of ontogenesis the level of mutations revealed in the experimental variants made up to 18 as compared to the 8 in the control After 6 years of exposure under space flight conditions practically all seeds lost their germinating capacity Most viable were seeds of wheat and tomato Biochemical analysis of tomato plants of the second generation produced from seeds exposed for a long time under space flight conditions was carried out The results of the analysis demonstrated an increased

  9. Yield and financial performance estimates of four elite loblolly pine seed sources planted in the Western Gulf Region

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Blazier; A. Gordon Holley

    2015-01-01

    Eastern seed sources of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) have been planted in the Western Gulf region for nearly three decades because they often have higher growth rates than local seed sources. However, productivity gains for eastern families are sometimes offset by poorer survival rates relative to local families.

  10. Mycorrhizal fungi of Vanilla: diversity, specificity and effects on seed germination and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Bayman, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the germination of orchid seeds. However, the specificity of orchids for their mycorrhizal fungi and the effects of the fungi on orchid growth are controversial. Mycorrhizal fungi have been studied in some temperate and tropical, epiphytic orchids, but the symbionts of tropical, terrestrial orchids are still unknown. Here we study diversity, specificity and function of mycorrhizal fungi in Vanilla, a pantropical genus that is both terrestrial and epiphytic. Mycorrhizal roots were collected from four Vanilla species in Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Cuba. Cultured and uncultured mycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear rDNA (nrITS) and part of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), and by counting number of nuclei in hyphae. Vanilla spp. were associated with a wide range of mycorrhizal fungi: Ceratobasidium, Thanatephorus and Tulasnella. Related fungi were found in different species of Vanilla, although at different relative frequencies. Ceratobasidium was more common in roots in soil and Tulasnella was more common in roots on tree bark, but several clades of fungi included strains from both substrates. Relative frequencies of genera of mycorrhizal fungi differed significantly between cultured fungi and those detected by direct amplification. Ceratobasidium and Tulasnella were tested for effects on seed germination of Vanilla and effects on growth of Vanilla and Dendrobium plants. We found significant differences among fungi in effects on seed germination and plant growth. Effects of mycorrhizal fungi on Vanilla and Dendrobium were similar: a clade of Ceratobasidium had a consistently positive effect on plant growth and seed germination. This clade has potential use in germination and propagation of orchids. Results confirmed that a single orchid species can be associated with several mycorrhizal fungi with different functional consequences for the plant.

  11. Identification of Major Quantitative Trait Loci for Seed Oil Content in Soybeans by Combining Linkage and Genome-Wide Association Mapping.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongce; Li, Shuguang; Wang, Zili; Chang, Fangguo; Kong, Jiejie; Gai, Junyi; Zhao, Tuanjie

    2017-01-01

    Soybean oil is the most widely produced vegetable oil in the world and its content in soybean seed is an important quality trait in breeding programs. More than 100 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for soybean oil content have been identified. However, most of them are genotype specific and/or environment sensitive. Here, we used both a linkage and association mapping methodology to dissect the genetic basis of seed oil content of Chinese soybean cultivars in various environments in the Jiang-Huai River Valley. One recombinant inbred line (RIL) population (NJMN-RIL), with 104 lines developed from a cross between M8108 and NN1138-2, was planted in five environments to investigate phenotypic data, and a new genetic map with 2,062 specific-locus amplified fragment markers was constructed to map oil content QTLs. A derived F2 population between MN-5 (a line of NJMN-RIL) and NN1138-2 was also developed to confirm one major QTL. A soybean breeding germplasm population (279 lines) was established to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using 59,845 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphism markers. In the NJMN-RIL population, 8 QTLs were found that explained a range of phenotypic variance from 6.3 to 26.3% in certain planting environments. Among them, qOil-5-1, qOil-10-1, and qOil-14-1 were detected in different environments, and qOil-5-1 was further confirmed using the secondary F2 population. Three loci located on chromosomes 5 and 20 were detected in a 2-year long GWAS, and one locus that overlapped with qOil-5-1 was found repeatedly and treated as the same locus. qOil-5-1 was further localized to a linkage disequilibrium block region of approximately 440 kb. These results will not only increase our understanding of the genetic control of seed oil content in soybean, but will also be helpful in marker-assisted selection for breeding high seed oil content soybean and gene cloning to elucidate the mechanisms of seed oil content.

  12. Phylogeny strongly drives seed dormancy and quality in a climatically buffered hotspot for plant endemism.

    PubMed

    Dayrell, Roberta L C; Garcia, Queila S; Negreiros, Daniel; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M; Silveira, Fernando A O

    2017-01-01

    Models of costs and benefits of dormancy (D) predict that the evolutionarily stable strategy in long-term stable environments is for non-dormancy (ND), but this prediction remains to be tested empirically. We reviewed seed traits of species in the climatically buffered, geologically stable and nutrient-impoverished campo rupestre grasslands in Brazil to test the hypothesis that ND is favoured over D. We examined the relative importance of life-history traits and phylogeny in driving the evolution of D and assessed seed viability at the community level. Germination and viability data were retrieved from 67 publications and ND/D was determined for 168 species in 25 angiosperm families. We also obtained the percentage of embryoless, viable and dormant seeds for 74 species. Frequencies of species with dormant and non-dormant seeds were compared with global databases of dormancy distribution. The majority of campo rupestre taxa (62·5 %) had non-dormant seeds, and the ND/D ratio was the highest for any vegetation type on Earth. Dormancy was unrelated to other species life-history traits, suggesting that contemporary factors are poor predictors of D. We found a significant phylogenetic structure in the dormancy categorical trait. Dormancy diversity was highly skewed towards the root of the phylogenetic tree and there was a strong phylogenetic signal in the data, suggesting a major role of phylogeny in determining the evolution of D versus ND and seed viability. Quantitative analysis of the data revealed that at least half of the seeds produced by 46 % of the surveyed populations were embryoless and/or otherwise non-viable. Our results support the view that long-term climatic and geological stability favour ND. Seed viability data show that campo rupestre species have a markedly low investment in regeneration from seeds, highlighting the need for specific in situ and ex situ conservation strategies to avoid loss of biodiversity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  13. [Nitric oxide is a major player in plant immune system].

    PubMed

    Koen, Emmanuel; Lamotte, Olivier; Besson-Bard, Angélique; Bourque, Stéphane; Nicolas-Francès, Valérie; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Wendehenne, David

    2013-03-01

    In animals, nitric oxide (NO) functions as a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in diverse physiological processes such as immunity. Recent studies provided evidence that plants challenged by pathogenic microorganisms also produce NO. The emerging picture is that NO functions as a signal in plant immunity and executes part of its effects through posttranslational protein modifications. Notably, the characterization of S-nitrosylated proteins provided insights into the molecular mechanisms by which NO exerts its activities. Based on these findings, it appears that NO is involved in both the activation and the negative control of the signaling pathways related to plant immunity.

  14. Are correlations among foliar traits in ferns consistent with those in the seed plants?

    PubMed

    Karst, Amanda L; Lechowicz, Martin J

    2007-01-01

    Broad-based studies of gymnosperms and angiosperms reveal consistent and functionally significant correlations among foliar traits such as leaf mass per area (LMA), maximum photosynthetic rate (A(area)), foliar nitrogen (N(area)), foliar chlorophyll (Chl) and leaf longevity. To assess the generality of these relationships, we studied 20 fern species growing in the understorey of a temperate deciduous forest. We found that foliar N(area) increases with LMA, and that foliar N(area) and A(area) are positively correlated with one another, as are foliar N(area) and Chl. The ferns in general have very low LMA compared with most seed plants; A(area), N(area) and Chl are below median values for seed plants but are not extreme. Species with overwintering fronds have significantly higher LMA than species with fronds that senesce at the end of the growing season, as well as a significantly higher C : N ratio in frond tissue and relatively high foliar N on an areal basis. Correlations among foliar traits associated with gas exchange in these forest understorey ferns are in accordance with patterns reported for seed plants, suggesting a high degree of functional constraint on the interrelationships among key elements in foliar design.

  15. A new selective medium for isolation of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis from tomato plants and seed.

    PubMed

    Ftayeh, Radwan M; von Tiedemann, Andreas; Rudolph, Klaus W E

    2011-11-01

    A new selective and highly sensitive medium was developed for isolation of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), the causal agent of bacterial canker of tomato, from seed and latently infected plants. The new medium (BCT) proved to be superior to all published semiselective media for Cmm and is denoted as selective medium because of (i) its mean plating efficiency, amounting to ≤89% within 7 days for all 30 Cmm strains from different sources tested; (ii) the high selectivity, because accompanying bacterial species occurring on tomato plants and seed or bacteria obtained from culture collections were inhibited to an extent of 98 to 100%; and (iii) the remarkable detection sensitivity. Thus, 8 CFU of Cmm in field plant homogenates containing 12,750 CFU of accompanying saprophytes were detected on BCT. Under these extreme conditions, all of the published semiselective media (D2, KBT, D2ANX, SCM, mSCM, CMM1, mCNS, and EPPO) gave false-negative results. Either some media were rather toxic and Cmm growth was also inhibited or the other, less toxic media allowed growth of high numbers of saprophytes, so that Cmm growth was suppressed. Exclusively, BCT also supported growth of the closely related C. michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, nebraskensis, and tessellarius. The new medium is recommended for Cmm detection in tomato seed, and in symptomless tomato plantlets, to improve disease control of bacterial canker of tomato.

  16. Biomechanical and leaf-climate relationships: a comparison of ferns and seed plants.

    PubMed

    Peppe, Daniel J; Lemons, Casee R; Royer, Dana L; Wing, Scott L; Wright, Ian J; Lusk, Christopher H; Rhoden, Chazelle H

    2014-02-01

    Relationships of leaf size and shape (physiognomy) with climate have been well characterized for woody non-monocotyledonous angiosperms (dicots), allowing the development of models for estimating paleoclimate from fossil leaves. More recently, petiole width of seed plants has been shown to scale closely with leaf mass. By measuring petiole width and leaf area in fossils, leaf mass per area (MA) can be estimated and an approximate leaf life span inferred. However, little is known about these relationships in ferns, a clade with a deep fossil record and with the potential to greatly expand the applicability of these proxies. We measured the petiole width, MA, and leaf physiognomic characters of 179 fern species from 188 locations across six continents. We applied biomechanical models and assessed the relationship between leaf physiognomy and climate using correlational approaches. The scaling relationship between area-normalized petiole width and MA differs between fern fronds and pinnae. The scaling relationship is best modeled as an end-loaded cantilevered beam, which is different from the best-fit biomechanical model for seed plants. Fern leaf physiognomy is not influenced by climatic conditions. The cantilever beam model can be applied to fossil ferns. The lack of sensitivity of leaf physiognomy to climate in ferns argues against their use to reconstruct paleoclimate. Differences in climate sensitivity and biomechanical relationships between ferns and seed plants may be driven by differences in their hydraulic conductivity and/or their differing evolutionary histories of vein architecture and leaf morphology.

  17. Interaction between ungulates and bruchid beetles and its effect on Acacia trees: modeling the costs and benefits of seed dispersal to plant demography.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Wiegand, Kerstin; Ward, David

    2011-09-01

    Integrative studies of plant-animal interactions that incorporate the multiple effects of interactions are important for discerning the importance of each factor within the population dynamics of a plant species. The low regeneration capacity of many Acacia species in arid savannas is a consequence of a combination of reduction in seed dispersal and high seed predation. Here we studied how ungulates (acting as both seed dispersers and herbivores) and bruchid beetles (post-dispersal seed predators) modulate the population dynamics of A. raddiana, a keystone species in the Middle East. We developed two simulation models of plant demography: the first included seed ingestion by ungulates and seed predation by bruchids, whereas the second model additionally incorporated herbivory by ungulates. We also included the interacting effects of seed removal and body mass, because larger ungulates destroy proportionally fewer seeds and enhance seed germination. Simulations showed that the negative effect of seed predation on acacia population size was compensated for by the positive effect of seed ingestion at 50 and 30% seed removal under scenarios with and without herbivory, respectively. Smaller ungulates (e.g., <35 kg) must necessarily remove tenfold more seeds than larger ungulates (e.g., >250 kg) to compensate for the negative effect of seed predation. Seedling proportion increased with seed removal in the model with herbivory. Managing and restoring acacia seed dispersers is key to conserving acacia populations, because low-to-medium seed removal could quickly restore their regeneration capacity.

  18. The effects of seeding sterile triticale on a native plant community after wildfire in a pinyon pinemountain mahogany woodland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitman, B.A.; Draper, T.M.; Esque, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Post-fire seeding with grasses is a common practice for emergency rehabilitation of burned woodlands. However, most post-seeding monitoring does not address consequences to native flora. In November 2004, the US Forest Service hand-seeded triticale (Triticosecale Wittm. ex A. Camus), a sterile wheatrye hybrid, on a small burned area in the Spring Mountains of southern Nevada, United States. A monitoring project using paired plots was designed to quantify the effects of seeding triticale on density and species richness of native annual and perennial plants, cover of perennial plants, and aboveground production of annual plants. We did not find any effects of triticale seeding on annual plant species or most responses of perennial plants. However, the density of woody perennial seedlings was significantly lower 2 years after triticale was added. Although we found a smaller impact from seeding with exotic grass than other studies, quantifiable costs to native vegetation were observed. We caution against the use of non-native grass for seeding in areas with naturally low perennial recruitment. ?? IAWF 2009.

  19. Seed sojourn and fast viability loss constrain seedling production of a prominent riparian protection plant Salix variegata Franch

    PubMed Central

    Ayi, Qiaoli; Zeng, Bo; Liu, Jianhui; Shi, Shaohua; Niu, Hangang; Lin, Feng; Zhang, Yeyi

    2016-01-01

    Salix variegata Franch, a prominent plant applied in riparian shelter vegetation in Three Gorges reservoir region of China, produces many seeds every year but generates only a few or no seedlings. Whether the low seedling production of S. variegata is caused by seed sterility or by rapid loss of seed viability remains unknown. We investigated the sojourn time of mature seeds in capsules produced in early, mid, and late reproductive season and the germinability of mature seeds fresh or stored after different period of time. The sojourn time of seeds in capsules was 2.89, 3.95, and 4.72 days in early, mid, and late reproductive season, respectively. The maximal germination percentage of non-stored fresh seeds produced in early, mid, and late reproductive season was 93.33%, 78.67%, and 40%, respectively, which indicates mature seeds were not sterile. The longest viability-retaining time of seeds produced in early, mid, and late reproductive season was only 8, 16, 16 days, respectively, indicating that mature seeds of S. variegata lost viability very rapidly. Mature seeds possessed good viability, but their rapid viability loss caused the low seedling production and hampered the population growth of S. variegata in the riparian area of Three Gorges reservoir region. PMID:27881868

  20. Seed sojourn and fast viability loss constrain seedling production of a prominent riparian protection plant Salix variegata Franch.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Qiaoli; Zeng, Bo; Liu, Jianhui; Shi, Shaohua; Niu, Hangang; Lin, Feng; Zhang, Yeyi

    2016-11-24

    Salix variegata Franch, a prominent plant applied in riparian shelter vegetation in Three Gorges reservoir region of China, produces many seeds every year but generates only a few or no seedlings. Whether the low seedling production of S. variegata is caused by seed sterility or by rapid loss of seed viability remains unknown. We investigated the sojourn time of mature seeds in capsules produced in early, mid, and late reproductive season and the germinability of mature seeds fresh or stored after different period of time. The sojourn time of seeds in capsules was 2.89, 3.95, and 4.72 days in early, mid, and late reproductive season, respectively. The maximal germination percentage of non-stored fresh seeds produced in early, mid, and late reproductive season was 93.33%, 78.67%, and 40%, respectively, which indicates mature seeds were not sterile. The longest viability-retaining time of seeds produced in early, mid, and late reproductive season was only 8, 16, 16 days, respectively, indicating that mature seeds of S. variegata lost viability very rapidly. Mature seeds possessed good viability, but their rapid viability loss caused the low seedling production and hampered the population growth of S. variegata in the riparian area of Three Gorges reservoir region.

  1. Using hyperspectral imaging to determine germination of native Australian plant seeds.

    PubMed

    Nansen, Christian; Zhao, Genpin; Dakin, Nicole; Zhao, Chunhui; Turner, Shane R

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the ability to accurately and non-destructively determine the germination of three native Australian tree species, Acacia cowleana Tate (Fabaceae), Banksia prionotes L.F. (Proteaceae), and Corymbia calophylla (Lindl.) K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson (Myrtaceae) based on hyperspectral imaging data. While similar studies have been conducted on agricultural and horticultural seeds, we are unaware of any published studies involving reflectance-based assessments of the germination of tree seeds. Hyperspectral imaging data (110 narrow spectral bands from 423.6nm to 878.9nm) were acquired of individual seeds after 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50days of standardized rapid ageing. At each time point, seeds were subjected to hyperspectral imaging to obtain reflectance profiles from individual seeds. A standard germination test was performed, and we predicted that loss of germination was associated with a significant change in seed coat reflectance profiles. Forward linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to select the 10 spectral bands with the highest contribution to classifications of the three species. In all species, germination decreased from over 90% to below 20% in about 10-30days of experimental ageing. P50 values (equal to 50% germination) for each species were 19.3 (A. cowleana), 7.0 (B. prionotes) and 22.9 (C. calophylla) days. Based on independent validation of classifications of hyperspectral imaging data, we found that germination of Acacia and Corymbia seeds could be classified with over 85% accuracy, while it was about 80% for Banksia seeds. The selected spectral bands in each LDA-based classification were located near known pigment peaks involved in photosynthesis and/or near spectral bands used in published indices to predict chlorophyll or nitrogen content in leaves. The results suggested that seed germination may be successfully classified (predicted) based on reflectance in narrow spectral bands associated with the primary metabolism

  2. Survival and DNA Damage in Plant Seeds Exposed for 558 and 682 Days outside the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Sydney

    2017-01-01

    Abstract For life to survive outside the biosphere, it must be protected from UV light and other radiation by exterior shielding or through sufficient inherent resistance to survive without protection. We tested the plausibility of inherent resistance in plant seeds, reporting in a previous paper that Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seeds exposed for 558 days outside the International Space Station (ISS) germinated and developed into fertile plants after return to Earth. We have now measured structural genetic damage in tobacco seeds from this EXPOSE-E experiment by quantitatively amplifying a segment of an antibiotic resistance gene, nptII, inserted into the chloroplast genome. We also assessed the survival of the antibiotic resistance encoded by nptII, using marker rescue in a soil bacterium. Chloroplast DNA damage occurred, but morphological mutants were not detected among the survivors. In a second, longer mission (EXPOSE-R), a nearly lethal exposure was received by Arabidopsis seeds. Comparison between a ground simulation, lacking UV<200nm, and fully exposed seeds in space indicated severe damage from these short wavelengths and again suggested that DNA degradation was not limiting seed survival. To test UV resistance in long-lived, larger seeds, we exposed Arabidopsis, tobacco, and morning glory seeds in the laboratory to doses of UV254nm, ranging as high as 2420 MJ m−2. Morning glory seeds resisted this maximum dose, which killed tobacco and Arabidopsis. We thus confirm that a naked plant seed could survive UV exposures during direct transfer from Mars to Earth and suggest that seeds with a more protective seed coat (e.g., morning glory) should survive much longer space travel. Key Words: UV light—Flavonoids—Sinapate—DNA degradation—Arabidopsis—Tobacco—Seeds—Space—International Space Station—EXPOSE-E—EXPOSE-R. Astrobiology 17, 205–215. PMID:28263676

  3. Survival and DNA Damage in Plant Seeds Exposed for 558 and 682 Days outside the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfer, David; Leach, Sydney

    2017-03-01

    For life to survive outside the biosphere, it must be protected from UV light and other radiation by exterior shielding or through sufficient inherent resistance to survive without protection. We tested the plausibility of inherent resistance in plant seeds, reporting in a previous paper that Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seeds exposed for 558 days outside the International Space Station (ISS) germinated and developed into fertile plants after return to Earth. We have now measured structural genetic damage in tobacco seeds from this EXPOSE-E experiment by quantitatively amplifying a segment of an antibiotic resistance gene, nptII, inserted into the chloroplast genome. We also assessed the survival of the antibiotic resistance encoded by nptII, using marker rescue in a soil bacterium. Chloroplast DNA damage occurred, but morphological mutants were not detected among the survivors. In a second, longer mission (EXPOSE-R), a nearly lethal exposure was received by Arabidopsis seeds. Comparison between a ground simulation, lacking UV<200nm, and fully exposed seeds in space indicated severe damage from these short wavelengths and again suggested that DNA degradation was not limiting seed survival. To test UV resistance in long-lived, larger seeds, we exposed Arabidopsis, tobacco, and morning glory seeds in the laboratory to doses of UV254nm, ranging as high as 2420 MJ m-2. Morning glory seeds resisted this maximum dose, which killed tobacco and Arabidopsis. We thus confirm that a naked plant seed could survive UV exposures during direct transfer from Mars to Earth and suggest that seeds with a more protective seed coat (e.g., morning glory) should survive much longer space travel.

  4. Organic dust toxic syndrome at a grass seed plant caused by exposure to high concentrations of bioaerosols

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Anne M.; Tendal, Kira; Schlünssen, Vivi; Heltberg, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of sudden health problems in workers at a Danish grass seed plant after exposure to a particularly dusty lot of grass seeds. The seeds are called problematic seeds. The association between development of organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS) and the handling of grass seeds causing exposure was assessed in a four-step model: (i) identification of exposure source, (ii) characterization of the emission of bioaerosols from the problematic and reference seeds, (iii) personal and stationary exposure measurement at the plant and (iv) repeated health examinations. The grass seeds were identified as the exposure source; the emissions of some bioaerosol components were up to 107 times higher from the problematic seeds than from reference seeds. Cleaning of the seeds was not enough to sufficiently reduce the high emission from the problematic seeds. Emission in terms of dust was 3.4 times as high from the problematic cleaned seeds as from cleaned reference seeds. The personal exposure reached 3 × 105 endotoxin units m−3, 1 × 106 colony-forming units (cfu) of thermophilic actinomycetes m−3, 8 × 105 cfu of Aspergillus fumigatus m−3 and 9 × 106 hyphal fragments m−3. Several workers working with the problematic seeds had symptoms consistent with ODTS. The most severe symptoms were found for the workers performing the tasks causing highest exposure. Respiratory airway protection proved efficient to avoid development of ODTS. Work with reference seeds did not cause workers to develop ODTS. Exposure was during work with the problematic seeds higher than suggested occupational exposure limits but lower than in studies where researchers for some minutes have repeated a single task expected to cause ODTS. In this study, many different bioaerosol components were measured during a whole working day. We cannot know, whether it is the combination of different bioaerosol components or a single component which is responsible for the development of ODTS. In

  5. Organic dust toxic syndrome at a grass seed plant caused by exposure to high concentrations of bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anne M; Tendal, Kira; Schlünssen, Vivi; Heltberg, Ivar

    2012-08-01

    We describe an outbreak of sudden health problems in workers at a Danish grass seed plant after exposure to a particularly dusty lot of grass seeds. The seeds are called problematic seeds. The association between development of organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS) and the handling of grass seeds causing exposure was assessed in a four-step model: (i) identification of exposure source, (ii) characterization of the emission of bioaerosols from the problematic and reference seeds, (iii) personal and stationary exposure measurement at the plant and (iv) repeated health examinations. The grass seeds were identified as the exposure source; the emissions of some bioaerosol components were up to 10(7) times higher from the problematic seeds than from reference seeds. Cleaning of the seeds was not enough to sufficiently reduce the high emission from the problematic seeds. Emission in terms of dust was 3.4 times as high from the problematic cleaned seeds as from cleaned reference seeds. The personal exposure reached 3 × 10(5) endotoxin units m(-3), 1 × 10(6) colony-forming units (cfu) of thermophilic actinomycetes m(-3), 8 × 10(5) cfu of Aspergillus fumigatus m(-3) and 9 × 10(6) hyphal fragments m(-3). Several workers working with the problematic seeds had symptoms consistent with ODTS. The most severe symptoms were found for the workers performing the tasks causing highest exposure. Respiratory airway protection proved efficient to avoid development of ODTS. Work with reference seeds did not cause workers to develop ODTS. Exposure was during work with the problematic seeds higher than suggested occupational exposure limits but lower than in studies where researchers for some minutes have repeated a single task expected to cause ODTS. In this study, many different bioaerosol components were measured during a whole working day. We cannot know, whether it is the combination of different bioaerosol components or a single component which is responsible for the development of

  6. Seed dispersal of the Australian cycad Macrozamia miquelii (Zamiaceae): are cycads megafauna-dispersed "grove forming" plants?

    PubMed

    Hall, John A; Walter, Gimme H

    2013-06-01

    Plants that invest in large, heavy seeds and colorful, fleshy fruits or analogous structures seem adapted for dispersal by large vertebrates. Some such plants, like Australian cycads in the genus Macrozamia, do not disperse well, which could be explained by seed-dispersal relationships with megafauna that are rare or extinct in contemporary ecosystems. Such plants provide an opportunity to investigate the ecological consequences of low seed-dispersal distances. • We investigated seed dispersal of Macrozamia miquelii in Central Queensland by tracking the fate of marked seeds, identifying the dispersal fauna and quantifying population demography and spatial structure. • We found that 70-100% of marked seeds remained within 1 m of maternal females (cycads are dioecious). Of the 812 seeds recovered (from 840 originally marked) only 24 dispersed >1 m from maternal females, the greatest observed dispersal being 5 m. We found an average of 2.2 seedlings and 0.7 juveniles within 1.5 m of mature females, which suggests that most seeds that remain in the vicinity of maternal females perish. Within-stand densities ranged between 1000 and 5000 plants/ha. The brushtail possum Trichosurus vulpecula was the only animal observed to move the seeds. • Macrozamia are adapted for dispersal by megafauna that are rare or absent in contemporary ecosystems. We argue that Macrozamia are "grove forming" plants that derive ecological benefit from existing as high-density, spatially discrete populations, the function of megafaunal dispersal adaptations being the infrequent dispersal of seeds en masse to establish new such groves in the landscape.

  7. Transmission of plant-pathogenic bacteria by nonhost seeds without induction of an associated defense reaction at emergence.

    PubMed

    Darrasse, Armelle; Darsonval, Arnaud; Boureau, Tristan; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle; Durand, Karine; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2010-10-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms involved in the different steps of bacterial disease epidemiology is essential to develop new control strategies. Seeds are the passive carriers of a diversified microbial cohort likely to affect seedling physiology. Among seed-borne plant-pathogenic bacteria, seed carriage in compatible situations is well evidenced. The aims of our work are to determine the efficiency of pathogen transmission to seeds of a nonhost plant and to evaluate bacterial and plant behaviors at emergence. Bacterial transmission from flowers to seeds and from seeds to seedlings was measured for Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in incompatible interactions with bean. Transmissions from seeds to seedlings were compared for X. campestris pv. campestris, for Xanthomonas citri pv. phaseoli var. fuscans in compatible interactions with bean, and for Escherichia coli, a human pathogen, in null interactions with bean. The induction of defense responses was monitored by using reverse transcription and quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of genes representing the main signaling pathways and assaying defense-related enzymatic activities. Flower inoculations resulted in a high level of bean seed contamination by X. campestris pv. campestris, which transmitted efficiently to seedlings. Whatever the type of interaction tested, dynamics of bacterial population sizes were similar on seedlings, and no defense responses were induced evidencing bacterial colonization of seedlings without any associated defense response induction. Bacteria associated with the spermosphere multiply in this rich environment, suggesting that the colonization of seedlings relies mostly on commensalism. The transmission of plant-pathogenic bacteria to and by nonhost seeds suggests a probable role of seeds of nonhost plants as an inoculum source.

  8. Seed ultrastructure and water absorption pathway of the root-parasitic plant Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanchaceae).

    PubMed

    Joel, Daniel M; Bar, Hilla; Mayer, Alfred M; Plakhine, Dina; Ziadne, Hammam; Westwood, James H; Welbaum, Gregory E

    2012-01-01

    Obligate root parasitic plants of the Orobanchaceae do not germinate unless they chemically detect a host plant nearby. Members of this family, like Orobanche, Phelipanche and Striga, are noxious weeds that cause heavy damage to agriculture. In spite of their economic impact, only a few light microscopical studies of their minute seeds have been published, and there is no knowledge of their ultrastructure and of the role each tissue plays during the steps preceding germination. This paper describes the ultrastructure of Phelipanche seeds and contributes to our understanding of seed tissue function. Seeds of P. aegyptiaca were examined under light, scanning electron, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy following various fixations and staining protocols. The results were interpreted with physiological data regarding mode of water absorption and germination stimulation. The endothelium, which is the inner layer of the testa, rapidly absorbs water. Its interconnected cells are filled with mucilage and contain labyrinthine walls, facilitating water accumulation for germination that starts after receiving germination stimuli. Swelling of the endothelium leads to opening of the micropyle. The perisperm cells underneath this opening mediate between the rhizosphere and the embryo and are likely to be the location for the receptors of germination stimuli. The other perisperm cells are loaded with lipids and protein bodies, as are the endosperm and parts of the embryo. In the endosperm, the oil bodies fuse with each other while they are intact in the embryo and perisperm. Plasmodesmata connect the perisperm cells to each other, and the cells near the micropyle tightly surround the emerging seedling. These perisperm cells, and also the proximal embryo cells, have dense cytoplasmic contents, and they seem to represent the two seed components that are actively involved in transfer of reserve nutrients to the developing seedling during germination.

  9. Seed ultrastructure and water absorption pathway of the root-parasitic plant Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanchaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Joel, Daniel M.; Bar, Hilla; Mayer, Alfred M.; Plakhine, Dina; Ziadne, Hammam; Westwood, James H.; Welbaum, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Obligate root parasitic plants of the Orobanchaceae do not germinate unless they chemically detect a host plant nearby. Members of this family, like Orobanche, Phelipanche and Striga, are noxious weeds that cause heavy damage to agriculture. In spite of their economic impact, only a few light microscopical studies of their minute seeds have been published, and there is no knowledge of their ultrastructure and of the role each tissue plays during the steps preceding germination. This paper describes the ultrastructure of Phelipanche seeds and contributes to our understanding of seed tissue function. Methods Seeds of P. aegyptiaca were examined under light, scanning electron, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy following various fixations and staining protocols. The results were interpreted with physiological data regarding mode of water absorption and germination stimulation. Key Results and Conclusions The endothelium, which is the inner layer of the testa, rapidly absorbs water. Its interconnected cells are filled with mucilage and contain labyrinthine walls, facilitating water accumulation for germination that starts after receiving germination stimuli. Swelling of the endothelium leads to opening of the micropyle. The perisperm cells underneath this opening mediate between the rhizosphere and the embryo and are likely to be the location for the receptors of germination stimuli. The other perisperm cells are loaded with lipids and protein bodies, as are the endosperm and parts of the embryo. In the endosperm, the oil bodies fuse with each other while they are intact in the embryo and perisperm. Plasmodesmata connect the perisperm cells to each other, and the cells near the micropyle tightly surround the emerging seedling. These perisperm cells, and also the proximal embryo cells, have dense cytoplasmic contents, and they seem to represent the two seed components that are actively involved in transfer of reserve nutrients to the

  10. Effect of Aluminum Treatment on Proteomes of Radicles of Seeds Derived from Al-Treated Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Okekeogbu, Ikenna; Ye, Zhujia; Sangireddy, Sasikiran Reddy; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Hui, Dafeng; Zhou, Suping; Howe, Kevin J.; Fish, Tara; Yang, Yong; Thannhauser, Theodore W.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint to plant growth and crop yield in acid soils. Tomato cultivars are especially susceptible to excessive Al3+ accumulated in the root zone. In this study, tomato plants were grown in a hydroponic culture system supplemented with 50 µM AlK(SO4)2. Seeds harvested from Al-treated plants contained a significantly higher Al content than those grown in the control hydroponic solution. In this study, these Al-enriched tomato seeds (harvested from Al-treated tomato plants) were germinated in 50 µM AlK(SO4)2 solution in a homopiperazine-1,4-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer (pH 4.0), and the control solution which contained the buffer only. Proteomes of radicles were analyzed quantitatively by mass spectrometry employing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ®). The proteins identified were assigned to molecular functional groups and cellular metabolic pathways using MapMan. Among the proteins whose abundance levels changed significantly were: a number of transcription factors; proteins regulating gene silencing and programmed cell death; proteins in primary and secondary signaling pathways, including phytohormone signaling and proteins for enhancing tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress. Among the metabolic pathways, enzymes in glycolysis and fermentation and sucrolytic pathways were repressed. Secondary metabolic pathways including the mevalonate pathway and lignin biosynthesis were induced. Biological reactions in mitochondria seem to be induced due to an increase in the abundance level of mitochondrial ribosomes and enzymes in the TCA cycle, electron transport chains and ATP synthesis. PMID:28250376

  11. Role of antioxidants in Cr tolerance of three crop plants: Metal accumulation in seeds.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sarita; Singh, Shraddha; Mallick, Shekhar; Sinam, Geetgovind

    2009-05-01

    Pot experiments were conducted on three crop plants (Vigna radiata cv. PDM54, V. radiata cv. NM1, Brassica juncea cv. vaibhav) which were grown on six different tannery sludge (TS) amendments. The translocation of Cr to the seeds was found to be higher in B. juncea than the two cultivars of V. radiata, and their levels were below detectable limits in all the three plants grown on lower amendments of tannery sludge (T10 and T25). There was a gradual increase in protein content and antioxidant levels in all the plants grown on lower sludge amendments. However, the levels of all the antioxidants were higher in B. juncea than the two cultivars of V. radiata. The increase in malondialdehyde content of B. juncea was lower than the two cultivars of V. radiata as compared to their respective controls. Overall, the plants of B. juncea have shown better tolerance than both the cultivars of V. radiata.

  12. Seed germination and vigor.

    PubMed

    Rajjou, Loïc; Duval, Manuel; Gallardo, Karine; Catusse, Julie; Bally, Julia; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Germination vigor is driven by the ability of the plant embryo, embedded within the seed, to resume its metabolic activity in a coordinated and sequential manner. Studies using "-omics" approaches support the finding that a main contributor of seed germination success is the quality of the messenger RNAs stored during embryo maturation on the mother plant. In addition, proteostasis and DNA integrity play a major role in the germination phenotype. Because of its pivotal role in cell metabolism and its close relationships with hormone signaling pathways regulating seed germination, the sulfur amino acid metabolism pathway represents a key biochemical determinant of the commitment of the seed to initiate its development toward germination. This review highlights that germination vigor depends on multiple biochemical and molecular variables. Their characterization is expected to deliver new markers of seed quality that can be used in breeding programs and/or in biotechnological approaches to improve crop yields.

  13. Heterologous expression of chloroplast-localized geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase confers fast plant growth, early flowering and increased seed yield.

    PubMed

    Tata, Sandeep Kumar; Jung, Jihye; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Choi, Jun Young; Jung, Ji-Yul; Lee, In-Jung; Shin, Jeong Sheop; Ryu, Stephen Beungtae

    2016-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GGPS) is a key enzyme for a structurally diverse class of isoprenoid biosynthetic metabolites including gibberellins, carotenoids, chlorophylls and rubber. We expressed a chloroplast-targeted GGPS isolated from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The resulting transgenic tobacco plants expressing heterologous GGPS showed remarkably enhanced growth (an increase in shoot and root biomass and height), early flowering, increased number of seed pods and greater seed yield compared with that of GUS-transgenic lines (control) or wild-type plants. The gibberellin levels in HaGGPS-transgenic plants were higher than those in control plants, indicating that the observed phenotype may result from increased gibberellin content. However, in HaGGPS-transformant tobacco plants, we did not observe the phenotypic defects such as reduced chlorophyll content and greater petiole and stalk length, which were previously reported for transgenic plants expressing gibberellin biosynthetic genes. Fast plant growth was also observed in HaGGPS-expressing Arabidopsis and dandelion plants. The results of this study suggest that GGPS expression in crop plants may yield desirable agronomic traits, including enhanced growth of shoots and roots, early flowering, greater numbers of seed pods and/or higher seed yield. This research has potential applications for fast production of plant biomass that provides commercially valuable biomaterials or bioenergy. © 2015 Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists.

  14. Anthropogenic Water Augmentation in Major American River Basins through Cloud Seeding to Enhance Snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D.; Brilly, M.

    2009-04-01

    Recent rapid depletions of glaciers and intense droughts throughout the world have created a need to reexamine modern water augmentation technologies for enhancing snowpack in mountainous regions. Today's reliance on clean efficient hydroelectric power in the Alps from France to Hungary poses a critical need for sustainable snow packs and high elevation water supplies through out the year. Hence, the need to make natural cloud systems more efficient precipitators during the cold season through anthropogenic weather modification techniques. The Bureau of Reclamation, US Department of the Interior, has spent over 39M in research from 1963 to 1990 to develop the scientific basis for snowpack augmentation in the headwaters of the Colorado, American, and Columbia River Basins in the western United States, and through USAID in Morocco. This paper presents a brief summary of the research findings and shows that even during drought conditions potential exists for significant, cost-effective enhancement of water supplies. Examples of ground based propane and AgI seeding generators, cloud physics studies of supercooled cloud droplets and ice crystal characteristics that indicate seeding potential will be shown. Hypothetical analyses of seeding potential in 17 western states from Montana to California will be presented based on observed SNOTEL snow water equivalent measurements, elevation and observed winter precipitation. Early studies indicated from 5 to 20% increases in snow pack were possible, if winter storm systems were seeded effectively. If this potential was realized in drought conditions observed in 2003, over 1.08 million acre feet (1.33 x 10x9 m3) of additional water could be captured by seeding efficiently and effectively in just 10 storms. Results from recent projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation, NOAA, and the States of Wyoming, Utah and Nevada, and conducted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research will be discussed briefly. Examples of

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. III - LIF spectral signatures of five major plant types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Newcomb, W. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1985-01-01

    A technique amenable to remote sensing use which utilizes laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) properties of plants has been successfully used in the laboratory to identify five major plant types. These included herbaceous dicots, herbaceous monocots, conifers, hardwoods, and algae. Each of these plant types exhibited a characteristic LIF spectra when excited by a pulsed N2 laser emitting at 337 nm. Although monocots and dicots possess common fluorescence maxima at 440, 685, and 740 nm, they could be differentiated from one another by using the ratio of the square of the fluorescence intensity at 440 nm to the nonsquared intensity at 685 nm, i.e., (440)-squared/685. In all cases, monocots yielded a significantly higher ratio. Conifers have fluorescence maxima at 440, 525, and 740 nm but none at 685 nm. Hardwoods exhibited fluorescence at 440, 525, 685, and 740 nm. Algae had very low fluorescence at 440 nm, no fluorescence at 525 nm, and fluorescence maxima at 685 and 740 nm. For algae, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 685 nm to that at 740 nm was much greater than that for monocots, dicots, and hardwoods. The potential use of the LIF technique for individual species identification is suggested.

  16. Seed size plasticity in response to embryonic lethality conferred by ectopic CYCD activation is dependent on plant architecture

    PubMed Central

    Sornay, E.; Dewitte, W.; Murray, J. A. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The size of seeds is the result of cell proliferation and growth in the three seed compartments: the embryo, endosperm and integuments. Targeting expression of the D-type cyclin CYCD7;1 to the central cell and early endosperm (FWA:CYCD7;1) triggered nuclear divisions and partial ovule abortion, reducing seed number in each silique and leading to increased seed size. A similar effect on seed size was observed with other segregating embryo lethal mutations, suggesting caution is needed in interpreting apparent seed size phenotypes. Here, we show that the positive effect of FWA:CYCD7;1 on Arabidopsis seed size is modulated by the architecture of the mother plant. Larger seeds were produced in FWA:CYCD7;1 lines with unmodified inflorescences, and also upon removal of side branches and axillary stems. This phenotype was absent from inflorescences with increased axillary floral stems produced by pruning of the main stem. Given this apparent confounding influence of resource allocation on transgenes effect, we conclude that plant architecture is a further important factor to consider in appraising seed phenotypes. PMID:27286190

  17. [Analysis of quantitative traits connected with seed weight and flowering terms in birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) plants].

    PubMed

    Nikolaĭchuk, V I

    2000-01-01

    The nature of inheritance of characters connected with the seed size (seed mass) and quality of the shoots (germination energy, seed viability, general shoot length, shoot mass, dry weight of shoots) in Lotus corniculatus L. was analyzed. The investigations were carried out on plants of three varieties: the wild form from the Krasnodar Region and local forms MF1 and MF3. The correlation analysis was carried out. The pattern of inheritance in the terms of plant flowering and length of shoots were studied.

  18. Pesticide seed dressings can affect the activity of various soil organisms and reduce decomposition of plant material.

    PubMed

    Zaller, Johann G; König, Nina; Tiefenbacher, Alexandra; Muraoka, Yoko; Querner, Pascal; Ratzenböck, Andreas; Bonkowski, Michael; Koller, Robert

    2016-08-17

    Seed dressing with pesticides is widely used to protect crop seeds from pest insects and fungal diseases. While there is mounting evidence that especially neonicotinoid seed dressings detrimentally affect insect pollinators, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on soil biota. We hypothesized that soil organisms would be particularly susceptible to pesticide seed dressings as they get in direct contact with these chemicals. Using microcosms with field soil we investigated, whether seeds treated either with neonicotinoid insecticides or fungicides influence the activity and interaction of earthworms, collembola, protozoa and microorganisms. The full-factorial design consisted of the factor Seed dressing (control vs. insecticide vs. fungicide), Earthworm (no earthworms vs. addition Lumbricus terrestris L.) and collembola (no collembola vs. addition Sinella curviseta Brook). We used commercially available wheat seed material (Triticum aesticum L. cf. Lukullus) at a recommended seeding density of 367 m(-2). Seed dressings (particularly fungicides) increased collembola surface activity, increased the number of protozoa and reduced plant decomposition rate but did not affect earthworm activity. Seed dressings had no influence on wheat growth. Earthworms interactively affected the influence of seed dressings on collembola activity, whereas collembola increased earthworm surface activity but reduced soil basal respiration. Earthworms also decreased wheat growth, reduced soil basal respiration and microbial biomass but increased soil water content and electrical conductivity. The reported non-target effects of seed dressings and their interactions with soil organisms are remarkable because they were observed after a one-time application of only 18 pesticide treated seeds per experimental pot. Because of the increasing use of seed dressing in agriculture and the fundamental role of soil organisms in agroecosystems these ecological interactions should

  19. Microsatellite amplification in plants: optimization procedure of major PCR components.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Sana; Hasnaoui, Nejib

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are the most informative and popular class of molecular markers used for diverse purposes, particularly in plants: genetic diversity study, marker assisted selection, breeding, mapping, phylogenetics and phylogeography, systematics, etc. They have become a routine technique practically in each laboratory for studying molecular plant genetics. Despite their wide utilization, however, setup and optimization of various conditions involved in PCR amplification is a prerequisite for reliable inference of results. In this chapter, we describe optimization of SSR-PCR conditions and give ranges of concentrations for different parameters. The protocol provided here is inspired from bench work on the use of microsatellite to study diversity of Vitis vinifera germplasm.

  20. Genome-wide analyses of four major histone modifications in Arabidopsis hybrids at the germinating seed stage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anyu; Greaves, Ian K; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Peacock, W James

    2017-02-07

    Hybrid vigour (heterosis) has been used for decades in cropping agriculture, especially in the production of maize and rice, because hybrid varieties exceed their parents in plant biomass and seed yield. The molecular basis of hybrid vigour is not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested that epigenetic systems could play a role in heterosis. In this project, we investigated genome-wide patterns of four histone modifications in Arabidopsis hybrids in germinating seeds. We found that although hybrids have similar histone modification patterns to the parents in most regions of the genome, they have altered patterns at specific loci. A small subset of genes show changes in histone modifications in the hybrids that correlate with changes in gene expression. Our results also show that genome-wide patterns of histone modifications in geminating seeds parallel those at later developmental stages of seedlings. Ler/C24 hybrids showed similar genome-wide patterns of histone modifications as the parents at an early germination stage. However, a small subset of genes, such as FLC, showed correlated changes in histone modification and in gene expression in the hybrids. The altered patterns of histone modifications for those genes in hybrids could be related to some heterotic traits in Arabidopsis, such as flowering time, and could play a role in hybrid vigour establishment.

  1. TWS1, a Novel Small Protein, Regulates Various Aspects of Seed and Plant Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, Virginie; Remoué, Carine; Magnani, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins have long been overlooked due to their poor annotation and the experimental challenges they pose. However, in recent years, their role in various processes has started to emerge, opening new research avenues. Here, we present the isolation and characterization of two allelic mutants, twisted seed1-1 (tws1-1) and tws1-2, which exhibit an array of developmental and biochemical phenotypes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. We have identified AT5G01075 as the subtending gene encoding a small protein of 81 amino acids localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. TWS1 is strongly expressed in seeds, where it regulates both embryo development and accumulation of storage compounds. TWS1 loss-of-function seeds exhibit increased starch, sucrose, and protein accumulation at the detriment of fatty acids. TWS1 is also expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues, where it is responsible for proper epidermal cell morphology and overall plant growth. At the cellular level, TWS1 is responsible for cuticle deposition on epidermal cells and organization of the endomembrane system. Finally, we show that TWS1 is a single-copy gene in Arabidopsis, and it is specifically conserved among angiosperms. PMID:27613850

  2. Abundance, reproduction, and seed predation of an alpine plant decrease from the center toward the range limit.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Andrea; Matthies, Diethart

    2012-10-01

    Biogeographic models predict that, because of increasingly unfavorable and stressful conditions, populations become less frequent, smaller, less dense, and less reproductive toward the range edges. These models have greatly influenced the thinking on geographical range limits and have broad implications for ecology, evolution, and conservation. However, empirical tests of the models have rarely investigated comprehensive sets of population properties. We studied population size and density and a broad set of fitness-related traits in 66 populations of the alpine thistle Carduus defloratus along a latitudinal (615 km) and altitudinal (342-2300 m) gradient from the European Alps in the south to the northern range limit in the low mountain ranges of central Germany. Regression analysis indicated that population size and plant density declined with decreasing altitude from the center to the range margin, but plant size increased. In spite of the larger size of plants, the number of seeds produced strongly declined toward the range margin, mainly due to an increase in seed abortion. The number of flowering plants in a population influenced all components of reproduction. Plants in large populations initiated more seeds, aborted fewer seeds, and produced more and larger seeds per plant. The probability that seeds were attacked by insect larvae and the proportion of seeds damaged decreased strongly from the center to the margin of the distribution. However, in spite of the much lower level of parasitization, plants at the range margin produced far fewer viable seeds. Fluctuating asymmetry of leaf width, an indicator of developmental instability, was similar across the range and not related to population size.

  3. The adaptive value of cued seed dispersal in desert plants: Seed retention and release in Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae), a small globose cactus.

    PubMed

    Peters, Edward M; Martorell, Carlos; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2009-02-01

    Serotiny, or delayed seed dispersal, is common in fluctuating environments because it hedges the risks of establishment. Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae) facultatively expels fruits in the year they are produced or retains them to disperse the seed over several years. We tested whether M. pectinifera increased fruit expulsion as a response to increased rainfall. While no fruit expulsion was observed in 1997, a dry year, in the wetter 1998 around 20% of all fruits formed were expelled from the maternal plant. A greenhouse experiment showed that high moisture results in the plants expelling all their fruits. Because in 1998 establishment was five times higher than in 1997, this response seems to be highly adaptive: Active fruit expulsion and consequent seed release increases the probability of establishment during pulses of high precipitation.

  4. Mechanistic models of plant seed dispersal by wind in heterogeneous landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtenbrot, A.; Katul, G. G.; Nathan, R.

    2010-12-01

    Seed dispersal, and especially long-distance dispersal (LDD), is a key process in plant population survival, colonization, and gene flow. Its importance is amplified by the man-induced habitat fragmentation, climate change and invasions of e