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Sample records for malaria oocysts increases

  1. A Class of Tricyclic Compounds Blocking Malaria Parasite Oocyst Development and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Richard T.; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Raj, Dipak K.; Dixit, Saurabh; Deng, Bingbing; Miura, Kazutoyo; Yuan, Jing; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Johnson, Ronald L.; Jiang, Hongying; Huang, Ruili; Williamson, Kim C.; Lambert, Lynn E.; Long, Carole; Austin, Christopher P.; Wu, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a deadly infectious disease in many tropical and subtropical countries. Previous efforts to eradicate malaria have failed, largely due to the emergence of drug-resistant parasites, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and, in particular, the lack of drugs or vaccines to block parasite transmission. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are known to play a role in drug transport, metabolism, and resistance in many organisms, including malaria parasites. To investigate whether a Plasmodium falciparum ABC transporter (Pf14_0244 or PfABCG2) modulates parasite susceptibility to chemical compounds or plays a role in drug resistance, we disrupted the gene encoding PfABCG2, screened the recombinant and the wild-type 3D7 parasites against a library containing 2,816 drugs approved for human or animal use, and identified an antihistamine (ketotifen) that became less active against the PfABCG2-disrupted parasite in culture. In addition to some activity against asexual stages and gametocytes, ketotifen was highly potent in blocking oocyst development of P. falciparum and the rodent parasite Plasmodium yoelii in mosquitoes. Tests of structurally related tricyclic compounds identified additional compounds with similar activities in inhibiting transmission. Additionally, ketotifen appeared to have some activity against relapse of Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in rhesus monkeys. Further clinical evaluation of ketotifen and related compounds, including synthetic new derivatives, in blocking malaria transmission may provide new weapons for the current effort of malaria eradication. PMID:23129054

  2. Insecticide resistance and malaria transmission: infection rate and oocyst burden in Culex pipiens mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium relictum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The control of most vectors of malaria is threatened by the spread of insecticide resistance. One factor that has been hitherto largely overlooked is the potential effects of insecticide resistance on the ability of mosquitoes to transmit malaria: are insecticide-resistant mosquitoes as good vectors of Plasmodium as susceptible ones? The drastic physiological changes that accompany the evolution of insecticide resistance may indeed alter the ability of vectors to transmit diseases, a possibility that, if confirmed, could have major epidemiological consequences. Methods Using a novel experimental system consisting of the avian malaria parasite (Plasmodium relictum) and its natural vector (the mosquito Culex pipiens), two of the most common mechanisms of insecticide resistance (esterase overproduction and acetylcholinesterase modification) were investigated for their effect on mosquito infection rate and parasite burden. For this purpose two types of experiments were carried out using (i) insecticide-resistant and susceptible laboratory isogenic lines of Cx. pipiens and (ii) wild Cx. pipiens collected from a population where insecticide resistant and susceptible mosquitoes coexist in sympatry. Results The isogenic line and wild-caught mosquito experiments were highly consistent in showing no effect of either esterase overproduction or of acetylcholinesterase modification on either the infection rate or on the oocyst burden of mosquitoes. The only determinant of these traits was blood meal size, which was similar across the different insecticide resistant categories in both experiments. Conclusions Insecticide resistance was found to have no effect on Plasmodium development within the mosquito. This is the first time this question has been addressed using a natural mosquito-Plasmodium combination, while taking care to standardize the genetic background against which the insecticide resistance genes operate. Infection rate and oocyst burden are but two of

  3. Climatic warming and increased malaria incidence in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Loevinsohn, M E

    1994-03-19

    Global climatic change is expected to increase the incidence of vector-borne diseases, especially malaria. This study assessed the contribution of climate to a malaria epidemic in Rwanda, focusing on the catchment area of one health centre where diagnosis was consistent and non-climatic variables well monitored. In late 1987 malaria incidence in the area increased by 337% over the 3 previous years. The increase was greatest in groups with little acquired immunity--children under 2 years (564%) and people in high-altitude areas (501%). Case-fatality rose significantly (relative risk = 4.85, p < 0.001). 1987 also saw record high temperatures and rainfall. An autoregressive equation including lagged effects of these two variables explained 80% of the variance in monthly malaria incidence. Temperature (especially mean minimum) predicted incidence best at higher altitudes where malaria had increased most. Empirically derived relations were consistent with the estimated generation time of the disease and with the known sensitivity of the plasmodium parasite to temperature. The patterns of climatic warming between day and night and among seasons will be critical to the effect on malaria. These findings are most relevant to regions near the altitude or latitude limits of the disease, where several epidemics have lately been reported.

  4. Malaria

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Malaria Overview What is malaria? Malaria is an infection of a part of the blood called the red blood cells. It is ... by mosquitoes that carry a parasite that causes malaria. If a mosquito carrying this parasite bites you, ...

  5. The increase of imported malaria acquired in Haiti among US travelers in 2010.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aarti; McMorrow, Meredith; Arguin, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    From 2004 to 2009, the number of malaria cases reported in Haiti increased nearly fivefold. The effect of the 2010 earthquake and its aftermath on malaria transmission in Haiti is not known. Imported malaria cases in the United States acquired in Haiti tripled from 2009 to 2010, likely reflecting both the increased number of travelers arriving from Haiti and the increased risk of acquiring malaria infection in Haiti. The demographics of travelers and the proportion of severe cases are similar to those statistics reported in previous years. Non-adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis remains a nearly universal modifiable risk factor among these cases.

  6. Malaria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  7. Malaria.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lynne S

    2010-03-01

    Malaria has had a greater impact on world history than any other infectious disease. More than 300 to 500 million individuals worldwide are infected with Plasmodium spp, and 1.5 to 2.7 million people a year, most of whom are children, die from the infection. Malaria is endemic in over 90 countries in which 2400 million people live; this represents 40% of the world's population. Approximately 90% of malaria deaths occur in Africa. Despite continuing efforts in vaccine development, malaria prevention is difficult, and no drug is universally effective. This article examines malaria caused by the 4 most common Plasmodium spp that infect humans, P vivax, P ovale, P malariae, and P falciparum, as well as mixed infections and the simian parasite P knowlesi. A comprehensive review of the microbiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of these forms of malaria is given.

  8. [Malaria].

    PubMed

    Burchard, G D

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is the most important infectious disease imported by travelers and migrants from tropical and subtropical areas. It is imported quite frequently. It is a life-threatening disease. Symptoms are nonspecific and cannot easily be distinguished from a wide range of other febrile conditions. Therefore, travel history must be taken in all patients with fever of unknown origin and malaria diagnostics must be performed immediately on suspicion of malaria. Uncomplicated falciparum malaria should be treated in the hospital with either atovaquone-proguanil or with an artemisinin-based combination preparation. If there is evidence of severe malaria, the patient must be moved to an intensive care unit. The antiparasitic agent of choice is then artesunate.

  9. Malaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malaria can be carried by mosquitoes in temperate climates, but the parasite disappears over the winter. The ... a major disease hazard for travelers to warm climates. In some areas of the world, mosquitoes that ...

  10. Malaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... a parasite. You get it when an infected mosquito bites you. Malaria is a major cause of ... insect repellent with DEET Cover up Sleep under mosquito netting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  11. Increased carboxyhemoglobin in adult falciparum malaria is associated with disease severity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2013-09-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 expression is increased in pediatric patients with malaria. The carboxyhemoglobin level (a measure of heme oxygenase 1 activity) has not been assessed in adult patients with malaria. Results of pulse co-oximetry revealed that the mean carboxyhemoglobin level was elevated in 29 Indonesian adults with severe falciparum malaria (10%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8%-13%) and in 20 with severe sepsis (8%; 95% CI, 5%-12%), compared with the mean levels in 32 patients with moderately severe malaria (7%; 95% CI, 5%-8%) and 36 controls (3.6%; 95% CI, 3%-5%; P < .001). An increased carboxyhemoglobin level was associated with an increased odds of death among patients with severe malaria (odds ratio, 1.2 per percentage point increase; 95% CI, 1.02-1.5). While also associated with severity and fatality, methemoglobin was only modestly increased in patients with severe malaria. Increased carboxyhemoglobin levels during severe malaria and sepsis may exacerbate organ dysfunction by reducing oxygen carriage and cautions against the use of adjunctive CO therapy, which was proposed on the basis of mouse models.

  12. Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability, Impaired Microvascular Function, and Increased Tissue Oxygen Consumption in Children with Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Granger, Donald L.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24879801

  13. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired microvascular function, and increased tissue oxygen consumption in children with falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J Brice; Granger, Donald L; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2014-11-15

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  14. INCREASED PULMONARY PRESSURES AND MYOCARDIAL WALL STRESS IN CHILDREN WITH SEVERE MALARIA*

    PubMed Central

    Janka, Jacqueline J.; Koita, Ousmane A.; Traoré, Broulaye; Traoré, Josépha M.; Mzayek, Fawaz; Sachdev, Vandana; Wang, Xunde; Sanogo, Kassoum; Sangaré, Lansana; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Masur, Henry; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Krogstad, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic intravascular hemolysis leads to nitric oxide (NO) depletion and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease. To test whether this pathophysiology occurs in malaria, we examined 53 children admitted to hospital with severe malaria (excluding cerebral malaria) and 31 age-matched controls in Mali. Methods Severity of hemolysis was assessed from plasma free hemoglobin (Hb) and arginase-1 levels. NO metabolism was assessed by whole blood nitrite levels and plasma NO consumption. Effects on the cardiovascular system and endothelial function were assessed by using echocardiography to measure peak tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) and from plasma levels of N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). Results Children with severe malaria had higher plasma Hb and arginase-1 levels, reduced whole blood nitrite levels and increased NO consumption relative to controls. They also had increased pulmonary arterial pressures (p < 0.05) with elevated levels of NT-proBNP and sVCAM-1 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Children with severe malaria have increased pulmonary pressures and myocardial wall stress. These complications are consistent with NO depletion from intravascular hemolysis, and indicate that the pathophysiologic cascade from intravascular hemolysis to NO depletion and its cardiopulmonary effects is activated in children with severe malaria. PMID:20662718

  15. Geographical distribution and dramatic increases in incidences of malaria: consequences of the resettlement scheme in Gambela, SW Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Woube, M

    1997-09-01

    The spatial distribution of malaria results from the interaction between vector, parasite, host, physical and human environments. This basic geographical approach provides an illustration of the geographical distribution of malaria in the world, particularly in the tropical regions. Due to the global climate change and population movements, it is predicted that malaria could have a greater impact on the non-immune or unprepared populations in the Northern Hemisphere in the coming decades. Presently, Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is the most adversely affected region in the world. Like any other SSA country, Ethiopia suffers from both epidemic (unstable) and endemic (stable) malaria in the high and lowland regions, respectively. Gambela is one of the areas with stable malaria in the humid tropical region of the country. This study is based on observations, unpublished data, interviews and discussions with settlers and officials in Gambela. It is found that a degree of diverse malaria prevalence is associated with altitudinal, temperature and rainfall variations. Owing to the settlement and land-use changes, unexpected rainfall patterns, temperature increase, unstable political system and poverty, malaria has gone beyond its geographical limits. As a result, the number of malaria affected people has increased in the last 12 years. It is suggested that proper physical and social planning, understanding the geography, entomology, epidemiology, behaviour and life-cycle of malaria parasite, cooperation between the policy-makers, malaria specialists, neighbouring countries and international communities are urgent, if malaria has to be controlled and eradicated.

  16. Is Global Warming likely to cause an increased incidence of Malaria?

    PubMed

    Nabi, Sa; Qader, Ss

    2009-03-01

    The rise in the average temperature of earth has been described as global warming which is mainly attributed to the increasing phenomenon of the greenhouse effect. It is believed that global warming can have several harmful effects on human health, both directly and indirectly. Since malaria is greatly influenced by climatic conditions because of its direct relationship with the mosquito population, it is widely assumed that its incidence is likely to increase in a future warmer world.This review article discusses the two contradictory views regarding the association of global warming with an increased incidence of malaria. On one hand, there are many who believe that there is a strong association between the recent increase in malaria incidence and global warming. They predict that as global warming continues, malaria is set to spread in locations where previously it was limited, due to cooler climate. On the other hand, several theories have been put forward which are quite contrary to this prediction. There are multiple other factors which are accountable for the recent upsurge of malaria: for example drug resistance, mosquito control programs, public health facilities, and living standards.

  17. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    PubMed

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  18. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    PubMed

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  19. Increased asymmetric dimethylarginine in severe falciparum malaria: association with impaired nitric oxide bioavailability and fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Tjitra, Emiliana; Gitawati, Retno; Darcy, Christabelle J; Jones, Catherine; Kenangalem, Enny; McNeil, Yvette R; Granger, Donald L; Lopansri, Bert K; Weinberg, J Brice; Price, Ric N; Duffull, Stephen B; Celermajer, David S; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2010-04-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is a predictor of mortality in critical illness. Severe malaria (SM) is associated with decreased NO bioavailability, but the contribution of ADMA to the pathogenesis of impaired NO bioavailability and adverse outcomes in malaria is unknown. In adults with and without falciparum malaria, we tested the hypotheses that plasma ADMA would be: 1) increased in proportion to disease severity, 2) associated with impaired vascular and pulmonary NO bioavailability and 3) independently associated with increased mortality. We assessed plasma dimethylarginines, exhaled NO concentrations and endothelial function in 49 patients with SM, 78 with moderately severe malaria (MSM) and 19 healthy controls (HC). Repeat ADMA and endothelial function measurements were performed in patients with SM. Multivariable regression was used to assess the effect of ADMA on mortality and NO bioavailability. Plasma ADMA was increased in SM patients (0.85 microM; 95% CI 0.74-0.96) compared to those with MSM (0.54 microM; 95%CI 0.5-0.56) and HCs (0.64 microM; 95%CI 0.58-0.70; p<0.001). ADMA was an independent predictor of mortality in SM patients with each micromolar elevation increasing the odds of death 18 fold (95% CI 2.0-181; p = 0.01). ADMA was independently associated with decreased exhaled NO (r(s) = -0.31) and endothelial function (r(s) = -0.32) in all malaria patients, and with reduced exhaled NO (r(s) = -0.72) in those with SM. ADMA is increased in SM and associated with decreased vascular and pulmonary NO bioavailability. Inhibition of NOS by ADMA may contribute to increased mortality in severe malaria.

  20. Impaired systemic tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability and increased oxidized biopterins in pediatric falciparum malaria: association with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Matthew P; Mukemba, Jackson; Florence, Salvatore; Lopansri, Bert K; Hyland, Keith; Volkheimer, Alicia D; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M; Weinberg, J Brice; Mwaikambo, Esther D; Granger, Donald L

    2015-03-01

    Decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is a major contributor to the pathophysiology of severe falciparum malaria. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an enzyme cofactor required for NO synthesis from L-arginine. We hypothesized that systemic levels of BH₄ would be decreased in children with cerebral malaria, contributing to low NO bioavailability. In an observational study in Tanzania, we measured urine levels of biopterin in its various redox states (fully reduced [BH₄] and the oxidized metabolites, dihydrobiopterin [BH₂] and biopterin [B₀]) in children with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 55), cerebral malaria (CM, n = 45), non-malaria central nervous system conditions (NMC, n = 48), and in 111 healthy controls (HC). Median urine BH4 concentration in CM (1.10 [IQR:0.55-2.18] μmol/mmol creatinine) was significantly lower compared to each of the other three groups - UM (2.10 [IQR:1.32-3.14];p<0.001), NMC (1.52 [IQR:1.01-2.71];p = 0.002), and HC (1.60 [IQR:1.15-2.23];p = 0.005). Oxidized biopterins were increased, and the BH4:BH2 ratio markedly decreased in CM. In a multivariate logistic regression model, each Log10-unit decrease in urine BH4 was independently associated with a 3.85-fold (95% CI:1.89-7.61) increase in odds of CM (p<0.001). Low systemic BH4 levels and increased oxidized biopterins contribute to the low NO bioavailability observed in CM. Adjunctive therapy to regenerate BH4 may have a role in improving NO bioavailability and microvascular perfusion in severe falciparum malaria.

  1. Increasing Plasmodium falciparum malaria in southwest London: a 25 year observational study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J; Chitre, M; Sharland, M

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To identify changes in the presenting number and species of imported malaria in children in southwest London. Methods: A prospective single observer study over 25 years (1975–99) of all cases of paediatric malaria seen at St George's Hospital. Results: A confirmed diagnosis was made in 249 children (56% boys; 44% girls; median age 8.0 years). Of these, 53% were UK residents and 44% were children travelling to the UK. A significant increase was noted in the number of cases over the 25 years (1975–79: mean 4.8 cases/year; 1990–99: mean 13.7 cases/year). Over the 25 years Plasmodium falciparum was seen in 77%, P vivax in 14%, P ovale in 6%, and P malariae in 3% of cases. P falciparum had increased in frequency (1975–79: P falciparum 50%, P vivax 50%; 1990–99: P falciparum 82%, P vivax 6%), associated with an increase in the proportion of children acquiring their infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Median time between arrival in the UK to the onset of fever was: P falciparum, 5 days; P ovale, 25 days; P malariae, 37 days; and P vivax, 62 days. Median time interval between the onset of fever to commencement of treatment was 4 days. This had not improved over the 25 year period. Only 41% of UK resident children presenting to hospital had taken prophylaxis and the overall number of symptomatic children taking no prophylaxis was increasing. Conclusion: Imported childhood P falciparum malaria is increasing in southwest London associated with increasing travel from sub-Saharan Africa. Over the 25 year period there has been no improvement in chemoprophylaxis rates or time to diagnosis. PMID:12023177

  2. Increase in cases of malaria in Mozambique, 2014: epidemic or new endemic pattern?

    PubMed Central

    Arroz, Jorge Alexandre Harrison

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the increase in cases of malaria in Mozambique. METHODS Cross-sectional study conducted in 2014, in Mozambique with national weekly epidemiological bulletin data. I analyzed the number of recorded cases in the 2009-2013 period, which led to the creation of an endemic channel using the quartile and C-Sum methods. Monthly incidence rates were calculated for the first half of 2014, making it possible to determine the pattern of endemicity. Months in which the incidence rates exceeded the third quartile or line C-sum were declared as epidemic months. RESULTS The provinces of Nampula, Zambezia, Sofala, and Inhambane accounted for 52.7% of all cases in the first half of 2014. Also during this period, the provinces of Nampula, Sofala and Tete were responsible for 54.9% of the deaths from malaria. The incidence rates of malaria in children, and in all ages, have showed patterns in the epidemic zone. For all ages, the incidence rate has peaked in April (2,573 cases/100,000 inhabitants). CONCLUSIONS The results suggest the occurrence of an epidemic pattern of malaria in the first half of 2014 in Mozambique. It is strategic to have a more accurate surveillance at all levels (central, provincial and district) to target prevention and control interventions in a timely manner. PMID:26982961

  3. Transport, fate, and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts released from manure and leached through macroporous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Douglas G.; Kuczynska, Ewa; Fayer, Ron

    2009-09-01

    A major mode of transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum, a widespread waterborne pathogen, is via contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Oocyst transport to surface water can occur by deposition of manure directly in the water or by wash off in surface runoff. Oocyst transport to groundwater is less straightforward and requires that the oocysts move through soil and bedrock to reach the water table. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative concentration and infectivity of C. parvum oocysts released from manure and leached through columns of undisturbed, macroporous karst soil. Modeling the fate of oocysts in this system over time can provide baseline data for evaluating real world events. Substantially more oocysts leached from undisturbed soil columns than disturbed soil columns. Oocyst survival studies using BALB/c neonatal suckling mice showed that about 85% of oocysts were infective at the beginning of leaching experiments. The oocyst infectivity decreased to about 20% after 12 weeks of leaching from soil columns maintained at 10°C. Cool (10°C) temperatures appear to increase survivability and maintain infectivity of many oocysts for 3 months or longer. Cool temperatures also appear to increase rates of release of oocysts from manure and leaching through soil. This study demonstrated that leaching is an important mechanism of oocyst transport in karst soils where infiltration capacities are high and long, continuous macropores exist. Karst groundwater systems might be especially vulnerable to contamination by leached oocysts, because of the prevalence of shallow soils and rapid groundwater movement. Oocysts leaching from soils into the epikarst could accumulate and remain viable for months until hydrological conditions are right for flushing the oocysts into the conduit flow system.

  4. Survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in the presence of hydrated lime.

    PubMed

    Zintl, A; Keogh, B; Ezzaty-Mirhashemi, M; De Waal, T; Scholz, D; Mulcahy, G

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of hydrated lime on the survival of Cryptosporidium oocysts, the percentage viability of oocysts was assessed using fluorescent in situ hybridisation. In the absence of lime and with lime at a concentration of 1 per cent, there was a gradual decline in oocyst viability during the 10-day trial. Although the addition of 5 or 10 per cent lime caused the total number of oocysts to decrease, there appeared to be an increase in the proportion of potentially viable oocysts. PMID:20208077

  5. Increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol following survival of cerebral malaria in mice.

    PubMed

    Grauncke, Ana C B; Souza, Thaíze L; Ribeiro, Leandro R; Brant, Fátima; Machado, Fabiana S; Oliveira, Mauro S

    2016-07-01

    Malaria is considered a neglected disease and public health problem, affecting >200 million people worldwide. In the present study we used the Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) model of experimental cerebral malaria (CM) in C57BL/6 mice. After rescue from CM and parasite clearance, animals were submitted to a seizure susceptibility test (45 days after infection) using a low dose of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 30 mg/kg) and monitored with use of behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) methods. Mice rescued from CM presented a reduced latency to myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizures and an increased duration of tonic-clonic seizures. In addition, quantitative analysis of EEG revealed a decrease in relative power at beta frequency band in PbA-infected animals after PTZ injection. Our results suggest that CM may lead to increased susceptibility to seizures in mice.

  6. The relevance and applicability of oocyst prevalence as a read-out for mosquito feeding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Will J. R.; Eldering, Maarten; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Lanke, Kjerstin H. W.; Grignard, Lynn; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga G.; Siebelink-Stoter, Rianne; Graumans, Wouter; Roeffen, Will F. G.; Drakeley, Chris J.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Bousema, Teun

    2013-12-01

    Mosquito feeding assays are important in evaluations of malaria transmission-reducing interventions. The proportion of mosquitoes with midgut oocysts is commonly used as an outcome measure, but in natural low intensity infections the effect of oocyst non-rupture on mosquito infectivity is unclear. By identifying ruptured as well as intact oocysts, we show that in low intensity P. falciparum infections i) 66.7-96.7% of infected mosquitoes experienced oocyst rupture between 11-21 days post-infection, ii) oocyst rupture led invariably to sporozoite release, iii) oocyst rupture led to salivary gland infections in 97.8% of mosquitoes, and iv) 1250 (IQR 313-2400) salivary gland sporozoites were found per ruptured oocyst. These data show that infectivity can be predicted with reasonable certainty from oocyst prevalence in low intensity infections. High throughput methods for detecting infection in whole mosquitoes showed that 18s PCR but not circumsporozoite ELISA gave a reliable approximation of mosquito infection rates on day 7 post-infection.

  7. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F; Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  8. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  9. Human-to-mosquito transmission efficiency increases as malaria is controlled.

    PubMed

    Churcher, Thomas S; Trape, Jean-François; Cohuet, Anna

    2015-01-19

    The efficiency of malaria transmission between human and mosquito has been shown to be influenced by many factors in the laboratory, although their impact in the field and how this changes with disease endemicity are unknown. Here we estimate how human-mosquito transmission changed as malaria was controlled in Dielmo, Senegal. Mathematical models were fit to data collected between 1990 and the start of vector control in 2008. Results show that asexual parasite slide prevalence in humans has reduced from 70 to 20%, but that the proportion of infectious mosquitoes has remained roughly constant. Evidence suggests that this is due to an increase in transmission efficiency caused by a rise in gametocyte densities, although the uneven distribution of mosquito bites between hosts could also contribute. The resilience of mosquito infection to changes in endemicity will have important implications for planning disease control, and the development and deployment of transmission-reducing interventions.

  10. Immunization with Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae-live attenuated oocysts protect goat kids from clinical coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Antonio; Muñoz, María Carmen; Molina, José Manuel; Hermosilla, Carlos; Andrada, Marisa; Lara, Pedro; Bordón, Elisa; Pérez, Davinia; López, Adassa María; Matos, Lorena; Guedes, Aránzazu Carmen; Falcón, Soraya; Falcón, Yaiza; Martín, Sergio; Taubert, Anja

    2014-01-17

    Caprine coccidiosis, affecting mainly young goat kids around the weaning period, is worldwide the most important disease in the goat industry. Control of caprine coccidiosis is increasingly hampered by resistances developed against coccidiostatic drugs leading to an enhanced need for anticoccidial vaccines. In the current study we conducted an oral immunization trial with live attenuated sporulated Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae oocysts. Sporulated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts were attenuated by X-irradiation technique. The experimental design included a total of 18 goat kids divided into the following groups: (i) animals immunized with attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 5 weeks of age and challenged 3 weeks later with non-irradiated homologous oocysts (group 1); (ii) animals infected with non-attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 5 weeks of age and challenged 3 weeks later with non-attenuated homologous oocysts (group 2); (iii) animals primary-infected with untreated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 8 weeks of age (control of the challenge infection, group 3); (iv) non-infected control animals (group 4). Goat kids immunized with live attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts (group 1) excreted significantly less oocysts in the faeces (95.3% reduction) than kids infected with non-attenuated ones (group 2). Furthermore, immunization with live but attenuated oocysts resulted in ameliorated clinical coccidiosis compared to goat kids infected with untreated oocysts (group 2) and resulted in equally reduced signs of coccidiosis after challenge infection compared to acquired immunity driven by non-attenuated oocysts. Overall, the present study demonstrates for the first time that live attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts orally administered showed almost no pathogenicity but enough immunogenicity in terms of immunoprotection. Importantly, vaccinated animals still shed low amounts of oocysts, guaranteeing environmental contamination and consecutive booster

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection Increases Placental Parasite Density and Transplacental Malaria Transmission in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hajek, Jan; Zhong, Kathleen; Owino, Simon O.; Sichangi, Moses; Smith, Geoffrey; Shi, Ya Ping; Moore, Julie M.; Kain, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 adversely interact in the context of pregnancy, however little is known regarding the influence of co-infection on the risk of congenital malaria. We aimed to determine the prevalence of placental and congenital malaria and impact of HIV co-infection on transplacental malaria transmission in 157 parturient women and their infants by microscopy and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in western Kenya. The prevalence of placental and cord blood infections were 17.2% and 0% by microscopy, and 33.1% and 10.8% by PCR. HIV co-infection w as associated with a significant increase in placental parasite density (P < 0.05). Cord blood malaria prevalence was increased in co-infected women (odds ratio [OR] = 5.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.90–15.47) and correlated with placental parasite density (OR = 2.57; 95% CI = 1.80–3.67). A 1-log increase in placental monocyte count was associated with increased risk of congenital infection (P = 0.001) (OR = 48.15; 95% CI = 4.59–505.50). The HIV co-infected women have a significantly increased burden of placental malaria that increases the risk of congenital infection. PMID:19141849

  12. Critical processes affecting Cryptosporidium oocyst survival in the environment.

    PubMed

    King, B J; Monis, P T

    2007-03-01

    Cryptosporidium are parasitic protozoans that cause gastrointestinal disease and represent a significant risk to public health. Cryptosporidium oocysts are prevalent in surface waters as a result of human, livestock and native animal faecal contamination. The resistance of oocysts to the concentrations of chlorine and monochloramine used to disinfect potable water increases the risk of waterborne transmission via drinking water. In addition to being resistant to commonly used disinfectants, it is thought that oocysts can persist in the environment and be readily mobilized by precipitation events. This paper will review the critical processes involved in the inactivation or removal of oocysts in the terrestrial and aquatic environments and consider how these processes will respond in the context of climate change. PMID:17096874

  13. Gut microbes influence fitness and malaria transmission potential of Asian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anil; Dhayal, Devender; Singh, O P; Adak, T; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2013-10-01

    The midgut of parasite transmitting vector, Anopheles stephensi is a physiologically dynamic ecological niche of resident microbes. The gut resident microbes of anisomorphic and physiologically variable male and female A. stephensi mosquitoes were different (Rani et al., 2009). To understand the possible interaction of gut microbes and mosquito host, we examined the contribution of the microbe community on the fitness of the adult mosquitoes and their ability to permit development of the malaria parasite. A. stephensi mosquitoes were fed with antibiotic to sterilize their gut to study longevity, blood meal digestion, egg laying and maturation capacity, and consequently ability to support malaria parasite development. The sterilization of gut imparted reduction in longevity by a median of 5 days in male and 2 days in female mosquitoes. Similarly, the sterilization also diminished the reproductive potential probably due to increased rate of the resorption of follicles in ovaries coupled with abated blood meal digestion in gut-sterilized females. Additionally, gut sterilization also led to increased susceptibility to oocyst development upon feeding on malaria infected blood. The susceptibility to malaria parasite introduced upon gut sterilization of A. stephensi was restored completely upon re-colonization of gut by native microbes. The information provided in the study provides insights into the role of the gut-resident microbial community in various life events of the mosquito that may be used to develop alternate malaria control strategies, such as paratransgenesis.

  14. Differentiation between Viable and Dead Cryptosporidium Oocysts Using Fluorochrome Staining.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Tatsuya; Rai, Shiba Kumar; Uga, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    The use of nucleic acid staining with a fluorochrome dye to differentiate viable and dead (heat-killed) Cryptosporidium oocysts was assessed. The specificities (percentage of unstained viable oocysts) and sensitivities (percentage of stained dead oocysts) of the seven tested dyes (SYTO-17® and SYTO-59® to 64®) ranged from 65 to 76% (average 71%) and 83 to 95% (average 91%), respectively. SYTO-59 and SYTO-17 imparted greater color (4+) intensity than the other dyes (2+ or less). Of these two dyes, SYTO-17 exhibited more brightness and slower discoloration and was selected for use in further experiments. The optimum staining time for SYTO-17 at 37℃ was one hour or more (sensitivity of 96%). Dye concentrations of 20 and 30 µM resulted in maximal color intensity, and no further improvement was observed with further increases in dye concentration. Staining a mixture of viable and dead oocysts (1:1 ratio) with 20 µM dye at 37℃ for one hour yielded the expected results (approximately 50%), but no remarkable increase in the percent staining with time (up to 8 hours) was observed. In this study, no ghost oocysts were observed. The present study indicated that the fluorogenic nucleic acid dye SYTO-17 could be used to discriminate between live and dead Cryptosporidium oocysts. PMID:27363397

  15. Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts after storage of experimentally contaminated apples.

    PubMed

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Santín, Mónica; Bauchan, Gary; Fayer, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Irrigation water and washing water have been inferred to be associated with contamination of fresh fruits and vegetables with pathogenic microorganisms infectious for humans. The objective of the present study was to determine whether apples experimentally contaminated with Cryptosporidium oocysts represent a food safety concern. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed no morphological changes in Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts attached to apples after 6 weeks of cold storage, suggesting that oocysts might remain viable and possibly infectious during prolonged storage. Mice were fed apple peels from experimentally contaminated apples to determine whether oocysts had remained infectious on apples stored for 4 weeks. All mice developed cryptosporidiosis. To evaluate the strength of oocyst attachment to apples, washing methods that have been reported to be helpful for recovery of oocysts from various foodstuffs were evaluated, except that the intensity of washing was increased in the present study. None of the tested washing methods succeeded in completely removing oocysts from the apple peel. The most efficient removal (37.5%) was achieved by rigorous manual washing in water with a detergent and by agitation in an orbital shaker with Tris-sodium dodecyl sulfate buffer. Glycine and phosphate-buffered saline buffers had no effect on oocyst removal. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that some oocysts were attached in deep natural crevices in the apple exocarp and others were attached to the smooth surface of the peel. Some oocysts were closely associated with what appeared to be an amorphous substance with which they might have been attached to the apple surface.

  16. The effect of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst in vitro attachment to host cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Barry; Stover, Larry; Gillem, Ashley; Winters, Katherine; Leet, John H; Chauret, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The influence of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst agglutination and on attachment to both fixed Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and fixed HCT-8 (human colorectal epithelial) cells was examined. Oocyst cell wall characteristics were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Lectin-free oocysts were shown to adhere equally to both MDCK cells and HCT-8 cells. In MDCK cells, the addition of 1-25 microg/ml Codium fragile lectin, 10 microg/ml Maclura pomifera lectin, 10 microg/ml Helix pomatia lectin, and 10-200 microg/ml Artocarpus integrifolia lectin significantly increased attachment to at least 1 of the cell cultures as compared to oocysts incubated without any lectin. The lectin-enhanced attachment was reversed by co-incubation of lectin treated-oocysts with 250 mM of each specific sugar (for a given lectin). In agglutination assays, concentrations as low as 0.5 microg/ml of C. fragile, M. pomifera, and A. integrifolia lectin agglutinated oocysts within 60 min. Finally, in TEM samples, colloidal gold conjugated-lectins from A. integrifolia, C. fragile, H. pomatia, and M. pomifera attached to oocysts, and this could be competitively inhibited by a lectin-specific sugar. This suggests that C. parvum oocysts are highly reactive to N-acetyl galactosamine-binding lectins and that the presence of N-acetyl-galactosamine containing molecules on oocysts can potentially help in oocyst attachment to host cells.

  17. Alterations in Plasmodium falciparum Genetic Structure Two Years after Increased Malaria Control Efforts in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Vardo-Zalik, Anne M.; Zhou, Guofa; Zhong, Daibin; Afrane, Yaw A.; Githeko, Andrew K.; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    The impact of malaria intervention measures (insecticide-treated net use and artemisinin combination therapy) on malaria genetics was investigated at two sites in western Kenya: an endemic lowland and an epidemic highland. The genetic structure of the parasite population was assessed by using microsatellites, and the prevalence of drug-resistant mutations was examined by using the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Two years after intervention, genetic diversity remained high in both populations. A significant decrease in the prevalence of quintuple mutations conferring resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was detected in both populations, but the mutation prevalence at codon 1246 of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene had increased in the highland population. The decrease in sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine–resistant mutants is encouraging, but the increase in P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene mutations is worrisome because these mutations are linked to resistance to other antimalarial drugs. In addition, the high level of genetic diversity observed after intervention suggests transmission is still high in each population. PMID:23166196

  18. Toxoplasma oocysts as a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Torrey, E Fuller; Yolken, Robert H

    2013-08-01

    Waterborne outbreaks of Toxoplasma gondii have focused attention on the importance of oocysts shed in the feces of infected cats. Cat feces deposited annually into the environment in the United States total approximately 1.2 million metric tons. The annual oocyst burden measured in community surveys is 3 to 434 oocysts per square foot and is greater in areas where cats selectively defecate. Because a single oocyst can possibly cause infection, this oocyst burden represents a major potential public health problem. The proper disposal of cat litter, keeping cats indoors, reducing the feral cat population, and protecting the play areas of children might potentially reduce the oocyst burden. PMID:23849140

  19. Rotifers ingest oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fayer, R.; Trout, J.M.; Walsh, E.; Cole, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Six genera of rotifers including Philodina, Monostyla, Epiphanes, Euchlanis, Brachionus, and Asplanchna were exposed to oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum cleaned of fecal debris. Unstained oocysts and those stained with fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody were added to suspensions of viable rotifers and were examined by phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. Rotifers of all six genera were observed ingesting oocysts. A maximum of 25 oocysts was observed in the stomachs of Euchlanis and Brachionus. Euchlanis and Epiphanes were observed excreting boluses containing up to eight oocysts. It was not determined whether rotifers digested or otherwise rendered oocysts nonviable.

  20. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the advent and recognition of waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis great effort has been expended on development of methods for detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Oocysts recovery rates using a method originally developed for detecting Giardia cysts ranged fr...

  1. Impaired systemic tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability and increased dihydrobiopterin in adult falciparum malaria: association with disease severity, impaired microvascular function and increased endothelial activation.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N; Weinberg, J Brice; Hyland, Keith; Granger, Donald L; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2015-03-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄) is a co-factor required for catalytic activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and amino acid-monooxygenases, including phenylalanine hydroxylase. BH4 is unstable: during oxidative stress it is non-enzymatically oxidized to dihydrobiopterin (BH₂), which inhibits NOS. Depending on BH₄ availability, NOS oscillates between NO synthase and NADPH oxidase: as the BH₄/BH₂ ratio decreases, NO production falls and is replaced by superoxide. In African children and Asian adults with severe malaria, NO bioavailability decreases and plasma phenylalanine increases, together suggesting possible BH₄ deficiency. The primary three biopterin metabolites (BH₄, BH₂ and B₀ [biopterin]) and their association with disease severity have not been assessed in falciparum malaria. We measured pterin metabolites in urine of adults with severe falciparum malaria (SM; n=12), moderately-severe malaria (MSM, n=17), severe sepsis (SS; n=5) and healthy subjects (HC; n=20) as controls. In SM, urinary BH₄ was decreased (median 0.16 ¼mol/mmol creatinine) compared to MSM (median 0.27), SS (median 0.54), and HC (median 0.34)]; p<0.001. Conversely, BH₂ was increased in SM (median 0.91 ¼mol/mmol creatinine), compared to MSM (median 0.67), SS (median 0.39), and HC (median 0.52); p<0.001, suggesting increased oxidative stress and insufficient recycling of BH2 back to BH4 in severe malaria. Overall, the median BH₄/BH₂ ratio was lowest in SM [0.18 (IQR: 0.04-0.32)] compared to MSM (0.45, IQR 0.27-61), SS (1.03; IQR 0.54-2.38) and controls (0.66; IQR 0.43-1.07); p<0.001. In malaria, a lower BH₄/BH₂ ratio correlated with decreased microvascular reactivity (r=0.41; p=0.03) and increased ICAM-1 (r=-0.52; p=0.005). Decreased BH4 and increased BH₂ in severe malaria (but not in severe sepsis) uncouples NOS, leading to impaired NO bioavailability and potentially increased oxidative stress. Adjunctive therapy to regenerate BH4 may have a role in improving NO

  2. Localisation of laminin within Plasmodium berghei oocysts and the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Walker, Karen; Hurd, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Background Oocysts of the malaria parasite form and develop in close proximity to the mosquito midgut basal lamina and it has been proposed that components of this structure play a crucial role in the development and maturation of oocysts that produce infective sporozoites. It is further suggested that oocysts incorporate basal lamina proteins into their capsule and that this provides them with a means to evade recognition by the mosquito's immune system. The site of production of basal lamina proteins in insects is controversial and it is still unclear whether haemocytes or midgut epithelial cells are the main source of components of the mosquito midgut basal lamina. Of the multiple molecules that compose the basal lamina, laminin is known to interact with a number of Plasmodium proteins. In this study, the localisation of mosquito laminin within the capsule and cytoplasm of Plasmodium berghei oocysts and in the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi was investigated. Results An ultrastructural examination of midgut sections from infected and uninfected An. stephensi was performed. Post-embedded immunogold labelling demonstrated the presence of laminin within the mosquito basal lamina. Laminin was also detected on the outer surface of the oocyst capsule, incorporated within the capsule and associated with sporozoites forming within the oocysts. Laminin was also found within cells of the midgut epithelium, providing support for the hypothesis that these cells contribute towards the formation of the midgut basal lamina. Conclusion We suggest that ookinetes may become coated in laminin as they pass through the midgut epithelium. Thereafter, laminin secreted by midgut epithelial cells and/or haemocytes, binds to the outer surface of the oocyst capsule and that some passes through and is incorporated into the developing oocysts. The localisation of laminin on sporozoites was unexpected and the importance of this observation is less clear. PMID:18808667

  3. Evaluating the Transport of Bacillus subtilis Spores as a Potential Surrogate for Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Kim, Hyunjung; Headd, Brendan; Torkzaban, Saeed

    2016-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recommended the use of aerobic spores as an indicator for Cryptosporidium oocysts when determining groundwater under the direct influence of surface water. Surface properties, interaction energies, transport, retention, and release behavior of B. subtilis spores were measured over a range of physicochemical conditions, and compared with reported information for C. parvum oocysts. Interaction energy calculations predicted a much larger energy barrier and a shallower secondary minimum for spores than oocysts when the solution ionic strength (IS) equaled 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, and no energy barrier when the IS = 100 mM. Spores and oocysts exhibited similar trends of increasing retention with IS and decreasing Darcy water velocity (qw), and the predicted setback distance to achieve a six log removal was always larger for spores than oocysts. However, low levels of observed spore and oocyst release significantly influenced the predicted setback distance, especially when the fraction of reversibly retained microbes (Frev) was high. An estimate for Frev was obtained from large release pulses of spore and oocyst when the IS was reduced to deionized water. The value of Frev always increased with qw, whereas an opposition trend for Frev with IS was observed for spores (decreasing) and oocysts (increasing).

  4. Preferential Flow and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Through Vadose Zone: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Darnault, C. J.; Garnier, P.; Kim, Y.; Oveson, K.; Jenkins, M.; Ghiorse, W.; Baveye, P.; Parlange, J.; Steenhuis, T.

    2001-12-01

    long exponential tailing. The spatial distribution of oocysts suggest a close relationship between oocyst retention and the extent of gas-water interfaces; sharp increases in oocyst numbers are consistently observed in regions of the sand where the water content has steep gradients, and therefore where one expects capillary meniscii to have maximal extent. These observations imply that oocyst transport in the vadose zone is likely to be very limited in the absence of preferential flow. However, experimental results suggest that the transport of oocysts in the subsurface via preferential flow may create a significant risk of groundwater contamination in some situations.

  5. Poor housing construction associated with increased malaria incidence in a cohort of young Ugandan children.

    PubMed

    Snyman, Katherine; Mwangwa, Florence; Bigira, Victor; Kapisi, James; Clark, Tamara D; Osterbauer, Beth; Greenhouse, Bryan; Sturrock, Hugh; Gosling, Roly; Liu, Jenny; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-06-01

    Despite the use of accepted interventions to combat malaria, such as insecticide-treated bed nets and artemisinin-based combination therapy, malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda. We investigated associations between household factors and malaria incidence in a cohort of children living in a highly endemic region of Uganda. Living in a modern house, defined as the use of non-earth floors, non-thatched roofs, and non-mud walls, was associated with approximately half malaria incidence compared with living in a traditional home (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.54, P = 0.001). Other factors found to be associated with a lower incidence of malaria included living in town versus rural setting; sleeping in a room with openings to the outside (windows, eaves, and airbricks); and having an older and more educated primary caregiver. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that improved house construction may be associated with a lower risk of malaria.

  6. Poor Housing Construction Associated with Increased Malaria Incidence in a Cohort of Young Ugandan Children

    PubMed Central

    Snyman, Katherine; Mwangwa, Florence; Bigira, Victor; Kapisi, James; Clark, Tamara D.; Osterbauer, Beth; Greenhouse, Bryan; Sturrock, Hugh; Gosling, Roly; Liu, Jenny; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of accepted interventions to combat malaria, such as insecticide-treated bed nets and artemisinin-based combination therapy, malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda. We investigated associations between household factors and malaria incidence in a cohort of children living in a highly endemic region of Uganda. Living in a modern house, defined as the use of non-earth floors, non-thatched roofs, and non-mud walls, was associated with approximately half malaria incidence compared with living in a traditional home (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.54, P = 0.001). Other factors found to be associated with a lower incidence of malaria included living in town versus rural setting; sleeping in a room with openings to the outside (windows, eaves, and airbricks); and having an older and more educated primary caregiver. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that improved house construction may be associated with a lower risk of malaria. PMID:25870429

  7. Cannabidiol increases survival and promotes rescue of cognitive function in a murine model of cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Campos, A C; Brant, F; Miranda, A S; Machado, F S; Teixeira, A L

    2015-03-19

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication resulting from Plasmodium falciparum infection that might cause permanent neurological deficits. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotomimetic compound of Cannabis sativa with neuroprotective properties. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of CBD in a murine model of CM. Female mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) and treated with CBD (30mg/kg/day - 3 or 7days i.p.) or vehicle. On 5th day-post-infection (dpi), at the peak of the disease), animals were treated with single or repeated doses of Artesunate, an antimalarial drug. All groups were tested for memory impairment (Novel Object Recognition or Morris Water Maze) and anxiety-like behaviors (Open field or elevated plus maze test) in different stages of the disease (at the peak or after the complete clearance of the disease). Th1/Th2 cytokines and neurotrophins (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF)) were measured in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of experimental groups. PbA-infected mice displayed memory deficits and exhibited increase in anxiety-like behaviors on the 5dpi or after the clearance of the parasitemia, effects prevented by CBD treatment. On 5dpi, TNF-α and IL-6 increased in the hippocampus, while only IL-6 increased in the prefrontal cortex. CBD treatment resulted in an increase in BDNF expression in the hippocampus and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus (TNF-α) and prefrontal cortex (IL-6). Our results indicate that CBD exhibits neuroprotective effects in CM model and might be useful as an adjunctive therapy to prevent neurological symptoms following this disease.

  8. Transmission-blocking activity is determined by transmission-reducing activity and number of control oocysts in Plasmodium falciparum standard membrane-feeding assay.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Swihart, Bruce J; Deng, Bingbing; Zhou, Luwen; Pham, Thao P; Diouf, Ababacar; Burton, Timothy; Fay, Michael P; Long, Carole A

    2016-07-29

    Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) are potentially helpful tools for malaria eradication. The standard membrane-feeding assay (SMFA) is considered one of the "gold standard" assays for TBV development. However, lack of consensus in reporting results from SMFA has made it very challenging to compare results from different studies. Two main readouts, % inhibition in mean oocyst count per mosquito (TRA) and % inhibition in prevalence of infected mosquitoes (TBA), have been used widely. In this study, we statistically modeled the oocyst data in SMFA using data from 105 independent feeding experiments including 9804 mosquitoes. The model was validated using an independent data set that included 10,790 mosquitoes from 110 feeding studies. The model delineates a relationship between TRA, the mean oocyst count in the control mosquitoes (mo-contl), and TBA. While TRA was independent from mo-contl, TBA values changed depending on mo-contl. Regardless of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies tested, there were strong concordances between observed TBA and predicted TBA based on the model using mo-contl and observed TRA. Simulations showed that SMFA with lower true control means had increased uncertainty in TRA estimates. The strong linkage between TBA, TRA and mo-contl inspired creation of a standardized TBA, a model-based TBA standardized to a target control mean, which allows comparison across multiple feeds regardless of mo-contl. This is the first study showing that the observed TBA can be reasonably predicted by mo-contl and the TRA of the test antibody using independent experimental data. This study indicates that TRA should be used to compare results from multiple feeds with different levels of mo-contl. If a measure of TBA is desired, it is better to report standardized TBA rather than observed TBA. These recommendations support rational comparisons of results from different studies, thus benefiting future TBV development. PMID:27372156

  9. Increase of malaria attacks among children presenting concomitant infection by Schistosoma mansoni in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Sokhna, Cheikh; Le Hesran, Jean-Yves; Mbaye, Pape A; Akiana, Jean; Camara, Pape; Diop, Mamadou; Ly, Abdoulaye; Druilhe, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Helminthic infections concomitant with malaria are common in inter-tropical areas. A recent study showed that mice co-infected with Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium chabaudi develop higher P. chabaudi parasitaemia and had a higher mortality rate. This important observation deserved to be further investigated among human populations. Malaria attacks were recorded in 512 children aged 6–15 years living in Richard Toll (Northern Senegal) among whom 336 were infected by S. mansoni, and 175 were not. The incidence rate of malaria attacks was significantly higher among S. mansoni-infected individuals, particularly those carrying the highest worm loads, as compared to uninfected subjects (26.6% versus 16,4 %). In contrast, the rate of malaria attacks was lower, without reaching significance, in medium grade S. mansoni infections. Thus, infection by S. mansoni affects susceptibility to malaria, but this can vary according to the intensity of parasite load. The immunological mechanisms underlying this dual effect need to be further explored. PMID:15544703

  10. Prevalence and concentration of Cryptosporidium oocysts in beef cattle paddock soils and forage.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Douglas G; Kuczynska, Ewa

    2010-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is a parasitic protozoan of great interest because of its widespread occurrence in surface waters, high degree of infectivity, and difficulty of risk management associated with its presence and control. Information about environmental loading and seasonal prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts is important for development of watershed management plans to protect public health. Healthy adult beef cattle are known to shed oocysts into the environment, and Cryptosporidium oocysts are often present all year in streams and groundwater in livestock agriculture areas. Surface soil and forage samples from 12 Virginia, United States, paddocks were analyzed bimonthly over 3 years for the presence and concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Half of the paddocks were grazed by stocker beef from November to September. The other half were managed for hay, but were grazed for a few days by the same animals in late fall and early spring to clean up late fall forage regrowth. Annual mean oocyst prevalences in soil were 57.9% and 48.4% in pasture and hay paddocks, respectively. Mean annual oocyst prevalences on forage were 52.4% and 40.5% in pasture and hay paddocks, respectively. Prevalence and concentration of oocysts on hay forage was highest in summer. Oocyst concentrations increased with increasing prevalences in both management systems. Wild animals appeared to be efficient vectors for oocyst distribution among paddocks. Canopy management, short-cycle rotational grazing, and control of wildlife are potential strategies for reduction of Cryptosporidium oocysts in pasture and lessening risk of contamination of water supplies, but further studies are needed before recommendations can be made.

  11. ENHANCED PRODUCTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN IMMUNOSUPPRESSED MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently there has been an increase in the need for fresh C. parvum oocysts for engineering and biomedical research applications. In our laboratory the emphsis has shifted from the use of dairy calves to inbred C57BL/67n mice, primarily for reasons of ease of collection and proce...

  12. Identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in river water.

    PubMed Central

    Ongerth, J E; Stibbs, H H

    1987-01-01

    Water samples were collected from four rivers in Washington State and two rivers in California and examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Oocyst-sized particles were concentrated from 20-liter samples of water by membrane filtration, centrifugation, and differential sedimentation. The particle concentrate was then deposited on a 25-mm-diameter membrane filter for oocyst identification by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The identification procedure had a limit of detection of about five oocysts per liter. Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in each of 11 river water samples examined. Concentrations ranged from 2 to 112 oocysts per liter. The finding of Cryptosporidium oocysts in all samples examined from six western rivers is noteworthy in light of recent reports indicating that Cryptosporidium sp. is a significant agent of human and animal disease. This finding suggests that waterborne oocysts of this parasite are more important than was previously recognized. More detailed studies are needed to define geographical and temporal distribution, to assess the viability of waterborne oocysts, and to determine the importance of water as a means of transmission. Images PMID:3579275

  13. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Roques, Magali; Wall, Richard J; Douglass, Alexander P; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Ferguson, David J P; Kaindama, Mbinda L; Brusini, Lorenzo; Joshi, Nimitray; Rchiad, Zineb; Brady, Declan; Guttery, David S; Wheatley, Sally P; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Holder, Anthony A; Pain, Arnab; Wickstead, Bill; Tewari, Rita

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  14. RESEARCH NOTE: AUTOFLUORESCENCE OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the first report of a blue autofluorescence as a useful characteristic in the microscopic identification of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. This autofluorescence appears to be of high intensity. Similar to the autofluorescence of related coccidia, the oocysts glow pale blue ...

  15. Viability of preserved Cryptosporidium baileyi oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Surl, Chan-Gu; Kim, Se-Min

    2003-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the viability and infectivity of oocysts of Cryptosporidium baileyi that had been stored from 1 to 40 months at 4℃ preserved in 2.5% potassium dichromate solution. Oocysts of C. baileyi were purified from the feces of experimentally infected chickens using discontinuous sucrose gradients. Subsequently, the purified oocysts were suspended in 2.5% potassium dichromate solution at a concentration of 1 × 107 organism/ml, and their viabilities were assessed by nucleic acid staining, histologic examination, and infectivity to 2-day-old chickens. All chickens inoculated with oocysts that had been stored for 1-18 months developed patent infections, while chickens infected with older oocysts remained uninfected. Between 5.8% and 82.2% of the oocysts, stored at 4℃ in 2.5% potassium dichromate solution, were found to be viable, as determined by nucleic acid staining. Parasite colonization in the bursa of Fabricius was detected in the microvillus border of bursal epithelium. The finding that C. baileyi oocysts remain infective to chickens for at least 18 months offers important time-saving advantages to investigators who frequently require large numbers of oocysts. PMID:14699260

  16. The frequency of BDCA3-positive dendritic cells is increased in the peripheral circulation of Kenyan children with severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Urban, Britta C; Cordery, Damien; Shafi, Mohammed J; Bull, Peter C; Newbold, Christopher I; Williams, Thomas N; Marsh, Kevin

    2006-12-01

    The ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to adhere to host endothelial cells via receptor molecules such as ICAM-1 and CD36 is considered a hallmark for the development of severe malaria syndromes. These molecules are also expressed on leukocytes such as dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that are crucial for the initiation of adaptive immune responses. In many human diseases, their frequency and function is perturbed. We analyzed the frequency of peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets and the plasma concentrations of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 in Kenyan children with severe malaria and during convalescence and related these parameters to the adhesion phenotype of the acute parasite isolates. The frequency of CD1c(+) dendritic cells in children with acute malaria was comparable to that in healthy controls, but the frequency of BDCA3(+) dendritic cells was significantly increased. Analysis of the adhesion phenotypes of parasite isolates revealed that adhesion to ICAM-1 was associated with the frequency of peripheral blood CD1c(+) dendritic cells, whereas the adhesion of infected erythrocytes to CD36 correlated with high concentrations of IL-10 and low concentrations of IL-12 in plasma.

  17. Erythropoietin Levels Increase during Cerebral Malaria and Correlate with Heme, Interleukin-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in India.

    PubMed

    Dalko, Esther; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Pays, Laurent; Herbert, Fabien; Cazenave, Pierre-André; Ravindran, Balachandran; Sharma, Shobhona; Nataf, Serge; Das, Bidyut; Pied, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites often leads to the death of infected patients or to persisting neurological sequelae despite anti-parasitic treatments. Erythropoietin (EPO) was recently suggested as a potential adjunctive treatment for CM. However diverging results were obtained in patients from Sub-Saharan countries infected with P. falciparum. In this study, we measured EPO levels in the plasma of well-defined groups of P. falciparum-infected patients, from the state of Odisha in India, with mild malaria (MM), CM, or severe non-CM (NCM). EPO levels were then correlated with biological parameters, including parasite biomass, heme, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 plasma concentrations by Spearman's rank and multiple correlation analyses. We found a significant increase in EPO levels with malaria severity degree, and more specifically during fatal CM. In addition, EPO levels were also found correlated positively with heme, TNF-α, IL-10, IP-10 and MCP-1 during CM. We also found a significant multivariate correlation between EPO, TNF-α, IL-10, IP-10 MCP-1 and heme, suggesting an association of EPO with a network of immune factors in CM patients. The contradictory levels of circulating EPO reported in CM patients in India when compared to Africa highlights the need for the optimization of adjunctive treatments according to the targeted population. PMID:27441662

  18. Erythropoietin Levels Increase during Cerebral Malaria and Correlate with Heme, Interleukin-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in India

    PubMed Central

    Dalko, Esther; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Pays, Laurent; Herbert, Fabien; Cazenave, Pierre-André; Ravindran, Balachandran; Sharma, Shobhona; Nataf, Serge; Das, Bidyut; Pied, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites often leads to the death of infected patients or to persisting neurological sequelae despite anti-parasitic treatments. Erythropoietin (EPO) was recently suggested as a potential adjunctive treatment for CM. However diverging results were obtained in patients from Sub-Saharan countries infected with P. falciparum. In this study, we measured EPO levels in the plasma of well-defined groups of P. falciparum-infected patients, from the state of Odisha in India, with mild malaria (MM), CM, or severe non-CM (NCM). EPO levels were then correlated with biological parameters, including parasite biomass, heme, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 plasma concentrations by Spearman’s rank and multiple correlation analyses. We found a significant increase in EPO levels with malaria severity degree, and more specifically during fatal CM. In addition, EPO levels were also found correlated positively with heme, TNF-α, IL-10, IP-10 and MCP-1 during CM. We also found a significant multivariate correlation between EPO, TNF-α, IL-10, IP-10 MCP-1 and heme, suggesting an association of EPO with a network of immune factors in CM patients. The contradictory levels of circulating EPO reported in CM patients in India when compared to Africa highlights the need for the optimization of adjunctive treatments according to the targeted population. PMID:27441662

  19. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts using medium- and low-pressure ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Craik, S A; Weldon, D; Finch, G R; Bolton, J R; Belosevic, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation from low- and medium-pressure mercury arc lamps on Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was studied using a collimated beam apparatus. Experiments were conducted using parasites suspended in both filtered surface water and phosphate buffered laboratory water. Inactivation of oocysts was measured as reduction in infectivity using a CD-1 neonatal mouse model and was found to be a non-linear function of UV dose over the range of germicidal doses tested (0.8-119 mJ/cm2). Oocyst inactivation increased rapidly with UV dose at doses less than 25 mJ/cm2 with two and three log-units inactivation at approximately 10 and 25 mJ/cm2, respectively. The cause of significant leveling-off and tailing in the UV inactivation curve at higher doses was not determined. Maximum measured oocyst inactivation ranged from 3.4 to greater than 4.9 log-units and was dependent on different batches of parasites. Water type and temperature, the concentration of oocysts in the suspension, and the UV irradiance did not have significant impacts on oocyst inactivation. When compared on the basis of germicidal UV dose, the oocysts were equally sensitive to low- and medium-pressure UV radiation. With respect to Cryptosporidium, both low- and medium-pressure ultraviolet radiation are attractive alternatives to conventional chemical disinfection methods in drinking water treatment. PMID:11317885

  20. Biofilms Reduce Solar Disinfection of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Jellison, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Solar radiation reduces Cryptosporidium infectivity. Biofilms grown from stream microbial assemblages inoculated with oocysts were exposed to solar radiation. The infectivity of oocysts attached at the biofilm surface and oocysts suspended in water was about half that of oocysts attached at the base of a 32-μm biofilm. PMID:22467508

  1. Malaria Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malaria > Research Malaria Understanding Research NIAID Role Basic Biology Prevention and Control Strategies Strategic Partnerships and Research ... the malaria parasite. Related Links Global Research​ Vector Biology International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) ...

  2. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  3. Reduced erythrocyte susceptibility and increased host clearance of young parasites slows Plasmodium growth in a murine model of severe malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Sebina, Ismail; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-05-01

    The best correlate of malaria severity in human Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection is the total parasite load. Pf-infected humans could control parasite loads by two mechanisms, either decreasing parasite multiplication, or increasing parasite clearance. However, few studies have directly measured these two mechanisms in vivo. Here, we have directly quantified host clearance of parasites during Plasmodium infection in mice. We transferred labelled red blood cells (RBCs) from Plasmodium infected donors into uninfected and infected recipients, and tracked the fate of donor parasites by frequent blood sampling. We then applied age-based mathematical models to characterise parasite clearance in the recipient mice. Our analyses revealed an increased clearance of parasites in infected animals, particularly parasites of a younger developmental stage. However, the major decrease in parasite multiplication in infected mice was not mediated by increased clearance alone, but was accompanied by a significant reduction in the susceptibility of RBCs to parasitisation.

  4. Land use and soil contamination with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Hongbin; Wang, Huan; Qin, Hongyu; Xiao, Jianhua

    2016-10-15

    Because soil contaminated with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts is increasingly recognized as a major source of infection for humans, in this study, we investigated the spatial pattern of soil contamination with T. gondii oocysts in urban area of northeastern Mainland China. From April 2014 to May 2015, more than 9000 soil samples were collected. Detection of T. gondii oocysts was performed applying real-time quantitative PCR. Sensitivity was improved by analyzing four replicates for each sampling point. T. gondii was detected in 30.3% of all samples. Subsequently, a maximum entropy model was used to evaluate the effect of land use and intrinsic soil properties on the risk of contamination with oocysts. Jackknife analysis revealed that the likelihood for positive results is significantly enhanced in soil originating from foci of human habitation, wood land and grass land. Furthermore, soil temperature and humidity significantly influence the probability of contamination with T. gondii oocysts. Our findings indicate that land use may affect distribution of T. gondii oocysts in urban areas.

  5. Comparison of two methods for detection of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in water.

    PubMed Central

    Nieminski, E C; Schaefer, F W; Ongerth, J E

    1995-01-01

    The steps of two immunofluorescent-antibody-based detection methods were evaluated for their efficiencies in detecting Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. The two methods evaluated were the American Society for Testing and Materials proposed test method for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in low-turbidity water and a procedure employing sampling by membrane filtration, Percoll-Percoll step gradient, and immunofluorescent staining. The membrane filter sampling method was characterized by higher recovery rates in all three types of waters tested: raw surface water, partially treated water from a flocculation basin, and filtered water. Cyst and oocyst recovery efficiencies decreased with increasing water turbidity regardless of the method used. Recoveries of seeded Giardia cysts exceeded those of Cryptosporidium oocysts in all types of water sampled. The sampling step in both methods resulted in the highest loss of seeded cysts and oocysts. Furthermore, much higher recovery efficiencies were obtained when the flotation step was avoided. The membrane filter method, using smaller tubes for flotation, was less time-consuming and cheaper. A serious disadvantage of this method was the lack of confirmation of presumptive cysts and oocysts, leaving the potential for false-positive Giardia and Cryptosporidium counts when cross-reacting algae are present in water samples. PMID:7646008

  6. Comparison of two methods for detection of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Nieminski, E C; Schaefer, F W; Ongerth, J E

    1995-05-01

    The steps of two immunofluorescent-antibody-based detection methods were evaluated for their efficiencies in detecting Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. The two methods evaluated were the American Society for Testing and Materials proposed test method for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in low-turbidity water and a procedure employing sampling by membrane filtration, Percoll-Percoll step gradient, and immunofluorescent staining. The membrane filter sampling method was characterized by higher recovery rates in all three types of waters tested: raw surface water, partially treated water from a flocculation basin, and filtered water. Cyst and oocyst recovery efficiencies decreased with increasing water turbidity regardless of the method used. Recoveries of seeded Giardia cysts exceeded those of Cryptosporidium oocysts in all types of water sampled. The sampling step in both methods resulted in the highest loss of seeded cysts and oocysts. Furthermore, much higher recovery efficiencies were obtained when the flotation step was avoided. The membrane filter method, using smaller tubes for flotation, was less time-consuming and cheaper. A serious disadvantage of this method was the lack of confirmation of presumptive cysts and oocysts, leaving the potential for false-positive Giardia and Cryptosporidium counts when cross-reacting algae are present in water samples.

  7. Transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts in porous media: Role of straining and physicochemical filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tufenkji, N.; Miller, G.F.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2004-01-01

    The transport and filtration behavior of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in columns packed with quartz sand was systematically examined under repulsive electrostatic conditions. An increase in solution ionic strength resulted in greater oocyst deposition rates despite theoretical predictions of a significant electrostatic energy barrier to deposition. Relatively high deposition rates obtained with both oocysts and polystyrene latex particles of comparable size at low ionic strength (1 mM) suggest that a physical mechanism may play a key role in oocyst removal. Supporting experiments conducted with latex particles of varying sizes, under very low ionic strength conditions where physicochemical filtration is negligible, clearly indicated that physical straining is an important capture mechanism. The results of this study indicate that irregularity of sand grain shape (verified by SEM imaging) contributes considerably to the straining potential of the porous medium. Hence, both straining and physicochemical filtration are expected to control the removal of C. parvum oocysts in settings typical of riverbank filtration, soil infiltration, and slow sand filtration. Because classic colloid filtration theory does not account for removal by straining, these observations have important implications with respect to predictions of oocyst transport.

  8. High dose of N-acetylcysteine increase H₂O₂ and MDA levels and decrease GSH level of HUVECs exposed with malaria serum.

    PubMed

    Fitri, L E; Sardjono, T W; Simamora, D; Sumarno, R P; Setyawati, S K

    2011-04-01

    Dysfunction of endothelial cells in severe malaria may result from excessive activation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α which leads to an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease of antioxidant level of endothelial cells. To investigate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels produced by endothelial cells exposed with serum of malaria falciparum patient, an in vitro model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) culture was used. Sample groups were normal HUVECs (group A), HUVECs that was exposed with malaria serum without any treatment (group B), HUVECs that were exposed with malaria serum and treated with NAC 2 μM (group C), HUVECs that were exposed with malaria serum and treated with NAC 4 μM (group D), and HUVECs that were exposed with malaria serum and treated with NAC 8 μM (group E). The level of MDA was measured by thio-barbituric acid reaction assay and H2O2 level was measured by NWLSS Hydrogen Peroxyde/Peroxydase Assay kit. The level of GSH was determined by using NWLSS Glutathione Assay kit. The level of H2O2 and MDA decreased after administration of low dose of NAC. Unfortunately, increased H2O2 and MDA levels were found on HUVECs treated with high dose of NAC (8 μM). There was a positive correlation between NAC dose and H2O2 level (r= 0,603) and between NAC dose and MDA level (r= 0,721). A significant decreased level of GSH was found on HUVECs treated with high dose of NAC (p = 0,023). It can be concluded that the use of high dose of NAC as supportive therapy in severe malaria infection must be taken carefully.

  9. Rapid response to selection, competitive release and increased transmission potential of artesunate-selected Plasmodium chabaudi malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Laura C; Huijben, Silvie; Sim, Derek G; Salathé, Rahel M; Jones, Matthew J; Read, Andrew F

    2014-04-01

    The evolution of drug resistance, a key challenge for our ability to treat and control infections, depends on two processes: de-novo resistance mutations, and the selection for and spread of resistant mutants within a population. Understanding the factors influencing the rates of these two processes is essential for maximizing the useful lifespan of drugs and, therefore, effective disease control. For malaria parasites, artemisinin-based drugs are the frontline weapons in the fight against disease, but reports from the field of slower parasite clearance rates during drug treatment are generating concern that the useful lifespan of these drugs may be limited. Whether slower clearance rates represent true resistance, and how this provides a selective advantage for parasites is uncertain. Here, we show that Plasmodium chabaudi malaria parasites selected for resistance to artesunate (an artemisinin derivative) through a step-wise increase in drug dose evolved slower clearance rates extremely rapidly. In single infections, these slower clearance rates, similar to those seen in the field, provided fitness advantages to the parasite through increased overall density, recrudescence after treatment and increased transmission potential. In mixed infections, removal of susceptible parasites by drug treatment led to substantial increases in the densities and transmission potential of resistant parasites (competitive release). Our results demonstrate the double-edged sword for resistance management: in our initial selection experiments, no parasites survived aggressive chemotherapy, but after selection, the fitness advantage for resistant parasites was greatest at high drug doses. Aggressive treatment of mixed infections resulted in resistant parasites dominating the pool of gametocytes, without providing additional health benefits to hosts. Slower clearance rates can evolve rapidly and can provide a strong fitness advantage during drug treatment in both single and mixed strain

  10. Rapid Response to Selection, Competitive Release and Increased Transmission Potential of Artesunate-Selected Plasmodium chabaudi Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Laura C.; Huijben, Silvie; Sim, Derek G.; Salathé, Rahel M.; Jones, Matthew J.; Read, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance, a key challenge for our ability to treat and control infections, depends on two processes: de-novo resistance mutations, and the selection for and spread of resistant mutants within a population. Understanding the factors influencing the rates of these two processes is essential for maximizing the useful lifespan of drugs and, therefore, effective disease control. For malaria parasites, artemisinin-based drugs are the frontline weapons in the fight against disease, but reports from the field of slower parasite clearance rates during drug treatment are generating concern that the useful lifespan of these drugs may be limited. Whether slower clearance rates represent true resistance, and how this provides a selective advantage for parasites is uncertain. Here, we show that Plasmodium chabaudi malaria parasites selected for resistance to artesunate (an artemisinin derivative) through a step-wise increase in drug dose evolved slower clearance rates extremely rapidly. In single infections, these slower clearance rates, similar to those seen in the field, provided fitness advantages to the parasite through increased overall density, recrudescence after treatment and increased transmission potential. In mixed infections, removal of susceptible parasites by drug treatment led to substantial increases in the densities and transmission potential of resistant parasites (competitive release). Our results demonstrate the double-edged sword for resistance management: in our initial selection experiments, no parasites survived aggressive chemotherapy, but after selection, the fitness advantage for resistant parasites was greatest at high drug doses. Aggressive treatment of mixed infections resulted in resistant parasites dominating the pool of gametocytes, without providing additional health benefits to hosts. Slower clearance rates can evolve rapidly and can provide a strong fitness advantage during drug treatment in both single and mixed strain

  11. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, David J. P.; Kaindama, Mbinda L.; Brusini, Lorenzo; Joshi, Nimitray; Rchiad, Zineb; Brady, Declan; Guttery, David S.; Wheatley, Sally P.; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Holder, Anthony A.; Pain, Arnab; Wickstead, Bill; Tewari, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei. PMID:26565797

  12. ISOLATION OF PURIFIED OOCYST WALLS AND SPOROCYSTS FROM TOXOPLASMA GONDII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxaplasma gondii is a parasitic protozoan that infects a wide range of vertebrates, including humans. This report describes methods that have been developed for separation of oocyst components starting with the mechanical fragmentation of oocysts. Use of iodixoanol gradients a...

  13. Use of a sentinel system for field measurements of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation in soil and animal waste.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M B; Walker, M J; Bowman, D D; Anthony, L C; Ghiorse, W C

    1999-05-01

    A small-volume sentinel chamber was developed to assess the effects of environmental stresses on survival of sucrose-Percoll-purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil and animal wastes. Chambers were tested for their ability to equilibrate with external chemical and moisture conditions. Sentinel oocysts were then exposed to stresses of the external environment that affected their viability (potential infectivity), as indicated by results of a dye permeability assay. Preliminary laboratory experiments indicated that temperatures between 35 and 50 degrees C and decreases in soil water potential (-0.003 to -3.20 MPa) increased oocyst inactivation rates. The effects of two common animal waste management practices on oocyst survival were investigated on three dairy farms in Delaware County, N.Y., within the New York City watershed: (i) piling wastes from dairy youngstock (including neonatal calves) and (ii) spreading wastes as a soil amendment on an agricultural field. Sentinel containers filled with air-dried and sieved (2-mm mesh) youngstock waste or field soil were wetted and inoculated with 2 million oocysts in an aqueous suspension and then placed in waste piles on two different farms and in soil within a cropped field on one farm. Controls consisted of purified oocysts in either phosphate-buffered saline or distilled water contained in sealed microcentrifuge tubes. Two microdata loggers recorded the ambient temperature at each field site. Sentinel experiments were conducted during the fall and winter (1996 to 1997) and winter (1998). Sentinel containers and controls were removed at 2- to 4-week intervals, and oocysts were extracted and tested by the dye permeability assay. The proportions of potentially infective oocysts exposed to the soil and waste pile material decreased more rapidly than their counterpart controls exposed to buffer or water, indicating that factors other than temperature affected oocyst inactivation in the waste piles and soil. The

  14. Use of a Sentinel System for Field Measurements of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Inactivation in Soil and Animal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M. B.; Walker, M. J.; Bowman, D. D.; Anthony, L. C.; Ghiorse, W. C.

    1999-01-01

    A small-volume sentinel chamber was developed to assess the effects of environmental stresses on survival of sucrose-Percoll-purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil and animal wastes. Chambers were tested for their ability to equilibrate with external chemical and moisture conditions. Sentinel oocysts were then exposed to stresses of the external environment that affected their viability (potential infectivity), as indicated by results of a dye permeability assay. Preliminary laboratory experiments indicated that temperatures between 35 and 50°C and decreases in soil water potential (−0.003 to −3.20 MPa) increased oocyst inactivation rates. The effects of two common animal waste management practices on oocyst survival were investigated on three dairy farms in Delaware County, N.Y., within the New York City watershed: (i) piling wastes from dairy youngstock (including neonatal calves) and (ii) spreading wastes as a soil amendment on an agricultural field. Sentinel containers filled with air-dried and sieved (2-mm mesh) youngstock waste or field soil were wetted and inoculated with 2 million oocysts in an aqueous suspension and then placed in waste piles on two different farms and in soil within a cropped field on one farm. Controls consisted of purified oocysts in either phosphate-buffered saline or distilled water contained in sealed microcentrifuge tubes. Two microdata loggers recorded the ambient temperature at each field site. Sentinel experiments were conducted during the fall and winter (1996 to 1997) and winter (1998). Sentinel containers and controls were removed at 2- to 4-week intervals, and oocysts were extracted and tested by the dye permeability assay. The proportions of potentially infective oocysts exposed to the soil and waste pile material decreased more rapidly than their counterpart controls exposed to buffer or water, indicating that factors other than temperature affected oocyst inactivation in the waste piles and soil. The effect

  15. Epidemiology of malaria and predictions of retransmission in Babylon Governorate, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghoury, A A; El-Hashimi, W K; Abul-Hab, J

    2006-01-01

    After the 1997-98 malaria epidemic in Babylon governorate, Iraq, malaria transmission in this area was successfully interrupted. A parasitological survey in 2002 identified no malaria cases but an entomological survey found both Anopheles stephensi and A. pulcherrimus in high densities. The highest density was recorded in September and the lowest in December and January. Despite the high density of Anopheles, no parasite sporozoites or oocysts were found in dissected mosquitoes. Nevertheless, malaria transmission could recur if A. stephensi indoor resting density exceeds the critical threshold and imported malaria cases are not monitored. PMID:17037694

  16. The endothelial protein C receptor rs867186-GG genotype is associated with increased soluble EPCR and could mediate protection against severe malaria

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Estela; Opoka, Robert O.; Bangirana, Paul; Park, Gregory S.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Guan, Weihua; Hodges, James S.; Lavstsen, Thomas; John, Chandy C.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) appears to play an important role in Plasmodium falciparum endothelial cell binding in severe malaria (SM). Despite consistent findings of elevated soluble EPCR (sEPCR) in other infectious diseases, field studies to date have provided conflicting data about the role of EPCR in SM. To better define this role, we performed genotyping for the rs867186-G variant, associated with increased sEPCR levels, and measured sEPCR levels in two prospective studies of Ugandan children designed to understand immunologic and genetic factors associated with neurocognitive deficits in SM including 551 SM children, 71 uncomplicated malaria (UM) and 172 healthy community children (CC). The rs867186-GG genotype was more frequent in CC (4.1%) than SM (0.6%, P = 0.002). The rs867186-G variant was associated with increased sEPCR levels and sEPCR was lower in children with SM than CC (P < 0.001). Among SM children, those who had a second SM episode showed a trend toward lower plasma sEPCR both at initial admission and at 6-month follow-up compared to those without repeated SM (P = 0.06 for both). The study findings support a role for sEPCR in severe malaria pathogenesis and emphasize a distinct role of sEPCR in malaria as compared to other infectious diseases. PMID:27255786

  17. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from...

  18. Increased Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Independent of Body Adiposity in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Controls in falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Acquah, Samuel; Boampong, Johnson Nyarko; Eghan Jnr, Benjamin Ackon

    2016-01-01

    Information on the extent to which oxidative stress and inflammation occur in the presence of falciparum malaria and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the same individual is limited. This study sought to investigate the extent of inflammation and oxidative stress in adult uncomplicated malaria by measuring fasting levels of lipid peroxides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and total antioxidant power (TAP) before and during falciparum malaria, in 100 respondents with type 2 diabetes and 100 age-matched controls in the Cape Coast metropolis of Ghana. Also, body adiposity index, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio were computed. Before and during falciparum malaria, diabetes patients exhibited higher (P < 0.05) levels of CRP and peroxides than controls but TAP and BAI were comparable (P > 0.05) between the two groups. Baseline CRP correlated positively (r = 0.341, P = 0.002) with peroxide only in the diabetic group. During malaria, TAP level in both study groups declined (P < 0.05) by 80% of their baseline levels. CRP correlated negatively (r = −0.352, P = 0.011) with TAP in the control but not the diabetic group. Uncomplicated falciparum malaria elevated inflammation and peroxidation but decreased antioxidant power independent of adiposity. This finding may have implication on cardiovascular health. PMID:27298824

  19. Variation in susceptibility of African Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites to TEP1 mediated killing in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Eldering, Maarten; Morlais, Isabelle; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Graumans, Wouter; Siebelink-Stoter, Rianne; Vos, Martijn; Abate, Luc; Roeffen, Will; Bousema, Teun; Levashina, Elena A.; Sauerwein, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes are efficient vectors for Plasmodium falciparum, although variation exists in their susceptibility to infection. This variation depends partly on the thioester-containing protein 1 (TEP1) and TEP depletion results in significantly elevated numbers of oocysts in susceptible and resistant mosquitoes. Polymorphism in the Plasmodium gene coding for the surface protein Pfs47 modulates resistance of some parasite laboratory strains to TEP1-mediated killing. Here, we examined resistance of P. falciparum isolates of African origin (NF54, NF165 and NF166) to TEP1-mediated killing in a susceptible Ngousso and a refractory L3–5 strain of A. gambiae. All parasite clones successfully developed in susceptible mosquitoes with limited evidence for an impact of TEP1 on transmission efficiency. In contrast, NF166 and NF165 oocyst densities were strongly reduced in refractory mosquitoes and TEP1 silencing significantly increased oocyst densities. Our results reveal differences between African P. falciparum strains in their capacity to evade TEP1-mediated killing in resistant mosquitoes. There was no significant correlation between Pfs47 genotype and resistance of a given P. falciparum isolate for TEP1 killing. These data suggest that polymorphisms in this locus are not the sole mediators of immune evasion of African malaria parasites. PMID:26861587

  20. Improved Risk Analysis by Dual Direct Detection of Total and Infectious Cryptosporidium Oocysts on Cell Culture in Combination with Immunofluorescence Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Lalancette, Cindy; Di Giovanni, George D.; Prévost, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    The inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocysts is a main driver in the selection of water treatment disinfection strategies, and microbial risk analysis provides a sound basis for optimizing water treatment processes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 1622/23 provides an estimate of the total oocyst count; however, it cannot be used directly for risk assessment, as it does not determine the fraction of infectious oocysts. Improved assessment of the risk for designated sources or in treated water requires evaluation of the total number of oocysts and an estimate of their infectivity. We developed a dual direct detection method using differential immunofluorescent staining that allows detection of both oocysts and cell culture infection foci for each sample. Using Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, various pH levels, proteases, and gastroenteric compounds and substrates were assessed to determine their abilities to enhance the number of infection foci. The results showed that the key trigger for oocyst stimulation was acidification. Addition of a low concentration of d-glucose (50 mM) to the infection media increased rates of infectivity, while a higher dose (300 mM) was inhibitory. The total number of oocysts in each sample was determined by counting the oocysts remaining on a cell monolayer and the oocysts recovered from cell monolayer washes during processing using a simple filtration technique. With the dual direct detection on cell culture with immunofluorescence assay method, it is now possible to determine the numbers of total and infectious oocysts for a given sample in a single analysis. Direct percentages of infectivity are then calculated, which allows more accurate assessments of risk. PMID:19933339

  1. Improved production of Neospora caninum oocysts, cyclical oral transmission between dogs and cattle, and in vitro isolation from oocysts.

    PubMed

    Gondim, L F P; Gao, L; McAllister, M M

    2002-12-01

    Scarce information is available about Neospora caninum oocysts and sporozoites, in part because only small numbers of oocysts have typically been produced by experimentally infected dogs. We hypothesized that I reason for low experimental production of oocysts is that dogs have been fed tissues from experimentally infected mice instead of tissues from cattle (which are natural intermediate hosts of N. caninum). In this study, 9 dogs were fed tissues from N. caninum-infected calves, and oocyst production was compared with 6 dogs that were fed infected mouse carcasses. The number of oocysts produced by dogs that ingested infected calf tissues (mean = 160,700) was significantly greater (P = 0.03) than the number of oocysts shed by dogs that ingested infected mice (mean = 5,400). The second goal of our experiment was to demonstrate cyclical oral transmission of N. caninum between dogs and cattle. As few as 300 oocysts were used to successfully infect calves, and tissues from these calves induced patent infections in 2 of 3 dogs; oocysts from I of these dogs were administered to another calf, and tissues from this calf subsequently induced a third dog to shed oocysts. Oocysts were confirmed to be N. caninum using a species-specific polymerase chain reaction technique. In addition, sporulated oocysts were used to recover N. caninum in vitro after digestion in an acid-pepsin solution and inoculation of cell monolayers.

  2. Evaluation of two commercial disinfectants on the viability and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hermida, J A; Pors, I; Méndez-Hermida, F; Ares-Mazás, E; Chartier, C

    2006-03-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is mainly a problem in neonatal ruminants. Not only do Cryptosporidium spp. spread ubiquitously in our environment, but the protozoa are highly resistant to harsh environmental conditions and disinfectants, and a control measure is urgently required. This study investigated the potential biocidal activity on Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts of two commercial disinfectants developed originally to be used in farms and food-processing industries. The products, containing formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide respectively, both had some anticryptosporidial effects. The viability and infectivity of purified C. parvum oocysts exposed to both disinfectants at different concentrations and exposure times were evaluated by inclusion or exclusion of vital dye (propidium iodide), use of an excystation technique and infection of suckling mice. Viability assays showed a decrease in oocyst viability associated with an increase in exposure time for each of the concentrations used. The intensity of infection in neonatal mice was significantly lower (P<0.05) than in the control litters.

  3. Increasing coverage of insecticide-treated nets in rural Nigeria: implications of consumer knowledge, preferences and expenditures for malaria prevention

    PubMed Central

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Ezumah, Nkoli; Shu, Elvis

    2005-01-01

    Background The coverage of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) remains low despite existing distribution strategies, hence, it was important to assess consumers' preferences for distribution of ITNs, as well as their perceptions and expenditures for malaria prevention and to examine the implications for scaling-up ITNs in rural Nigeria. Methods Nine focus group discussions (FGDs) and questionnaires to 798 respondents from three malaria hyper-endemic villages from Enugu state, south-east Nigeria were the study tools. Results There was a broad spectrum of malaria preventive tools being used by people. The average monthly expenditure on malaria prevention per household was 55.55 Naira ($0.4). More than 80% of the respondent had never purchased any form of untreated mosquito net. People mostly preferred centralized community-based sales of the ITNS, with instalment payments. Conclusion People were knowledgeable about malaria and the beneficial effects of using nets to protect themselves from the disease. The mostly preferred community-based distribution of ITNs implies that the strategy is a potential untapped additional channel for scaling-up ITNs in Nigeria and possibly other parts of sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:16026623

  4. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in a Silicon Micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Changyong; Hilpert, Markus; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2012-02-01

    Effective removal of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by granular filtration requires the knowledge of oocyst transport and deposition mechanisms, which can be obtained based on real time microscopic observation of oocyst transport in porous media. Attachment of oocysts to silica surface in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) cell and in a micromodel, which has 2-dimensional (2-D) microscopic pore structures consisting of an array of cylindrical collectors, was studied and compared. Real time transport of oocysts in the micromodel was recorded to determine the attached oocyst distributions in transversal and longitudinal directions. In the micromodel, oocysts attached to the forward portion of clean collectors, where the flow velocity was lowest. After initial attachment, oocysts attached onto already attached oocysts. As a result, the collectors ripened and the region available for flow was reduced. Results of attachment and detachment experiments suggest that surface charge heterogeneity allowed for oocyst attachment. In addition to experiments, Lattice-Boltzmann simulations helped understanding the slightly non-uniform flow field and explained differences in the removal efficiency in the transversal direction. However, the hydrodynamic modeling could not explain differences in attachment in the longitudinal direction.

  5. Rapid Increase in Ownership and Use of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets and Decrease in Prevalence of Malaria in Three Regional States of Ethiopia (2006-2007)

    PubMed Central

    Shargie, Estifanos Biru; Ngondi, Jeremiah; Graves, Patricia M.; Getachew, Asefaw; Hwang, Jimee; Gebre, Teshome; Mosher, Aryc W.; Ceccato, Pietro; Endeshaw, Tekola; Jima, Daddi; Tadesse, Zerihun; Tenaw, Eskindir; Reithinger, Richard; Emerson, Paul M.; Richards, Frank O.; Ghebreyesus, Tedros Adhanom

    2010-01-01

    Following recent large scale-up of malaria control interventions in Ethiopia, this study aimed to compare ownership and use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), and the change in malaria prevalence using two population-based household surveys in three regions of the country. Each survey used multistage cluster random sampling with 25 households per cluster. Household net ownership tripled from 19.6% in 2006 to 68.4% in 2007, with mean LLIN per household increasing from 0.3 to 1.2. Net use overall more than doubled from 15.3% to 34.5%, but in households owning LLIN, use declined from 71.7% to 48.3%. Parasitemia declined from 4.1% to 0.4%. Large scale-up of net ownership over a short period of time was possible. However, a large increase in net ownership was not necessarily mirrored directly by increased net use. Better targeting of nets to malaria-risk areas and sustained behavioural change communication are needed to increase and maintain net use. PMID:20936103

  6. Fatal Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Is Associated with Intravascular Monocytes and Platelets That Are Increased with HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Sarah E; Madaline, Theresa F; Wassmer, Samuel C; Mbale, Emmie; Choi, Namjong; Seydel, Karl B; Whitten, Richard O; Varughese, Julie; Grau, Georges E R; Kamiza, Steve; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Taylor, Terrie E; Lee, Sunhee; Milner, Danny A; Kim, Kami

    2015-09-22

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a major contributor to malaria deaths, but its pathophysiology is not well understood. While sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes is thought to be critical, the roles of inflammation and coagulation are controversial. In a large series of Malawian children hospitalized with CM, HIV coinfection was more prevalent than in pediatric population estimates (15% versus 2%, P < 0.0001, chi-square test), with higher mortality than that seen in HIV-uninfected children (23% versus 17%, P = 0.0178, chi-square test). HIV-infected (HIV(+)) children with autopsy-confirmed CM were older than HIV-uninfected children (median age, 99 months versus 32 months, P = 0.0007, Mann-Whitney U test) and appeared to lack severe immunosuppression. Because HIV infection is associated with dysregulated inflammation and platelet activation, we performed immunohistochemistry analysis for monocytes, platelets, and neutrophils in brain tissue from HIV(+) and HIV-uninfected children with fatal CM. Children with autopsy-confirmed CM had significantly (>9 times) more accumulations of intravascular monocytes and platelets, but not neutrophils, than did children with nonmalarial causes of coma. The monocyte and platelet accumulations were significantly (>2-fold) greater in HIV(+) children than in HIV-uninfected children with autopsy-confirmed CM. Our findings indicate that HIV is a risk factor for CM and for death from CM, independent of traditional measures of HIV disease severity. Brain histopathology supports the hypotheses that inflammation and coagulation contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric CM and that immune dysregulation in HIV(+) children exacerbates the pathological features associated with CM. IMPORTANCE : There are nearly 1 million malaria deaths yearly, primarily in sub-Saharan African children. Cerebral malaria (CM), marked by coma and sequestered malaria parasites in brain blood vessels, causes half of these deaths, although the mechanisms causing

  7. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii

    PubMed Central

    Ekechukwu, Nkiru E.; Baeshen, Rowida; Traorè, Sékou F.; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diabate, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Tripet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The success of vector control strategies aiming to decrease disease transmission via the release of sterile or genetically-modified male mosquitoes critically depends on mating between laboratory-reared males and wild females. Unfortunately, mosquito colonization, laboratory rearing, and genetic manipulations can all negatively affect male competitiveness. Heterosis is commonly used to produce domestic animals with enhanced vigor and homogenous genetic background and could therefore potentially improve the mating performance of mass-reared male mosquitoes. Here, we produced enhanced hybrid males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles coluzzii by crossing two strains colonized >35 and 8 years ago. We compared the amount of sperm and mating plug proteins they transferred to females, as well as their insemination rate, reproductive success and longevity under various experimental conditions. Across experiments, widespread adaptations to laboratory mating were detected in the older strain. In large-group mating experiments, no overall hybrid advantage in insemination rates and the amount of sperm and accessory gland proteins transferred to females was detected. Despite higher sperm activity, hybrid males did not appear more fecund. However, individual-male mating and laboratory-swarm experiments revealed that hybrid males, while inseminating fewer females than older inbred males, were significantly more fertile, producing larger mating plugs and drastically increasing female fecundity. Heterotic males also showed increased longevity. These results validate the use of heterosis for creating hybrid males with improved fitness from long-established inbred laboratory strains. Therefore, this simple approach could facilitate disease control strategies based on male mosquito releases with important ultimate benefits to human health. PMID:26497140

  8. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii.

    PubMed

    Ekechukwu, Nkiru E; Baeshen, Rowida; Traorè, Sékou F; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diabate, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Tripet, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    The success of vector control strategies aiming to decrease disease transmission via the release of sterile or genetically-modified male mosquitoes critically depends on mating between laboratory-reared males and wild females. Unfortunately, mosquito colonization, laboratory rearing, and genetic manipulations can all negatively affect male competitiveness. Heterosis is commonly used to produce domestic animals with enhanced vigor and homogenous genetic background and could therefore potentially improve the mating performance of mass-reared male mosquitoes. Here, we produced enhanced hybrid males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles coluzzii by crossing two strains colonized >35 and 8 years ago. We compared the amount of sperm and mating plug proteins they transferred to females, as well as their insemination rate, reproductive success and longevity under various experimental conditions. Across experiments, widespread adaptations to laboratory mating were detected in the older strain. In large-group mating experiments, no overall hybrid advantage in insemination rates and the amount of sperm and accessory gland proteins transferred to females was detected. Despite higher sperm activity, hybrid males did not appear more fecund. However, individual-male mating and laboratory-swarm experiments revealed that hybrid males, while inseminating fewer females than older inbred males, were significantly more fertile, producing larger mating plugs and drastically increasing female fecundity. Heterotic males also showed increased longevity. These results validate the use of heterosis for creating hybrid males with improved fitness from long-established inbred laboratory strains. Therefore, this simple approach could facilitate disease control strategies based on male mosquito releases with important ultimate benefits to human health.

  9. Ambient temperature and dietary supplementation interact to shape mosquito vector competence for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Murdock, Courtney C.; Blanford, Simon; Luckhart, Shirley; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which environmental factors influence the ability of Anopheles mosquitoes to transmit malaria parasites remains poorly explored. Environmental variation, such as change in ambient temperature, will not necessarily influence the rates of host and parasite processes equivalently, potentially resulting in complex effects on infection outcomes. As proof of principle, we used Anopheles stephensi and the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, to examine the effects of a range of constant temperatures on one aspect of host defense (detected as alterations in expression of nitric oxide synthase gene – NOS) to parasite infection. We experimentally boosted mosquito midgut immunity to infection through dietary supplementation with the essential amino acid L-Arginine (L-Arg), which increases midgut NO levels by infection-induced NOS catalysis in A. stephensi. At intermediate temperatures, supplementation reduced oocyst prevalence, oocyst intensity, and sporozoite prevalence suggesting that the outcome of parasite infection was potentially dependent upon the rate of NOS-mediated midgut immunity. At low and high temperature extremes, however, infection was severely constrained irrespective of supplementation. The effects of L-Arg appeared to be mediated by NO-dependent negative feedback on NOS expression, as evidenced by depressed NOS expression in L-Arg treated groups at temperatures where supplementation decreased parasite infection. These results suggest the need to consider the direct (e.g. effects of mosquito body temperature on parasite physiology) and indirect effects (e.g. mediated through changes in mosquito physiology / immunity) of environmental factors on mosquito-malaria interactions in order to understand natural variation in vector competence. PMID:24911425

  10. Dispersion and Transport of Cryptosporidium Oocysts from Fecal Pats under Simulated Rainfall Events

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Cheryl M.; Ferguson, Christobel M.; Kaucner, Christine; Krogh, Martin; Altavilla, Nanda; Deere, Daniel A.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2004-01-01

    The dispersion and initial transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts from fecal pats were investigated during artificial rainfall events on intact soil blocks (1,500 by 900 by 300 mm). Rainfall events of 55 mm h−1 for 30 min and 25 mm h−1 for 180 min were applied to soil plots with artificial fecal pats seeded with approximately 107 oocysts. The soil plots were divided in two, with one side devoid of vegetation and the other left with natural vegetation cover. Each combination of event intensity and duration, vegetation status, and degree of slope (5° and 10°) was evaluated twice. Generally, a fivefold increase (P < 0.05) in runoff volume was generated on bare soil compared to vegetated soil, and significantly more infiltration, although highly variable, occurred through the vegetated soil blocks (P < 0.05). Runoff volume, event conditions (intensity and duration), vegetation status, degree of slope, and their interactions significantly affected the load of oocysts in the runoff. Surface runoff transported from 100.2 oocysts from vegetated loam soil (25-mm h−1, 180-min event on 10° slope) to up to 104.5 oocysts from unvegetated soil (55-mm h−1, 30-min event on 10° slope) over a 1-m distance. Surface soil samples downhill of the fecal pat contained significantly higher concentrations of oocysts on devegetated blocks than on vegetated blocks. Based on these results, there is a need to account for surface soil vegetation coverage as well as slope and rainfall runoff in future assessments of Cryptosporidium transport and when managing pathogen loads from stock grazing near streams within drinking water watersheds. PMID:14766600

  11. Malaria Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  12. Development of a sensitive method to extract and detect low numbers of Cryptosporidium oocysts from adult cattle faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Wells, B; Thomson, S; Ensor, H; Innes, E A; Katzer, F

    2016-08-30

    Cryptosporidium transmission studies to date have concluded that adult cattle are not a significant source of oocysts contributing to clinical cryptosporidiosis in calves on farm. However current methods of sample processing have been optimised for calf faecal samples and may be less sensitive when used on adult samples due to lower numbers of oocysts and larger size of samples. A modified and novel method of oocyst extraction and concentration was developed and applied in an experiment involving spiking adult cattle faecal samples with known concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts. The results showed an increased sensitivity of detection from 100oocysts/g of faecal sample using conventional protocols to 5oocysts/g using the newly developed method. As it is important to be able to accurately assess the contribution of adult ruminants to the transmission of Cryptosporidium, both on farm and in the environment, the development of the techniques described here is likely to make an important contribution to Cryptosporidium transmission studies in future and in subsequent control strategies aimed at the reduction of Cryptosporidium infection in calves on farm. PMID:27523933

  13. Development of a sensitive method to extract and detect low numbers of Cryptosporidium oocysts from adult cattle faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Wells, B; Thomson, S; Ensor, H; Innes, E A; Katzer, F

    2016-08-30

    Cryptosporidium transmission studies to date have concluded that adult cattle are not a significant source of oocysts contributing to clinical cryptosporidiosis in calves on farm. However current methods of sample processing have been optimised for calf faecal samples and may be less sensitive when used on adult samples due to lower numbers of oocysts and larger size of samples. A modified and novel method of oocyst extraction and concentration was developed and applied in an experiment involving spiking adult cattle faecal samples with known concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts. The results showed an increased sensitivity of detection from 100oocysts/g of faecal sample using conventional protocols to 5oocysts/g using the newly developed method. As it is important to be able to accurately assess the contribution of adult ruminants to the transmission of Cryptosporidium, both on farm and in the environment, the development of the techniques described here is likely to make an important contribution to Cryptosporidium transmission studies in future and in subsequent control strategies aimed at the reduction of Cryptosporidium infection in calves on farm.

  14. Sporulation and survival of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsay, D.S.; Collins, M.V.; Mitchell, S.M.; Cole, R.A.; Flick, G.J.; Wetch, C.N.; Lindquist, A.; Dubey, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    We have been collaborating since 1992 in studies on southern sea otters (Enhdyra lutris nereis) as part of a program to define factors, which may be responsible for limiting the growth of the southern sea otter population. We previously demonstrated Toxoplasma gondii in sea otters. We postulated that cat feces containing oocysts could be entering the marine environment through storm run-off or through municipal sewage since cat feces are often disposed down toilets by cat owners. The present study examined the sporulation of T. gondii oocysts in seawater and the survival of sporulated oocysts in seawater. Unsporulated oocysts were placed in 15 ppt artificial seawater, 32 ppt artificial seawater or 2% sulfuric acid (positive control) at 24 C in an incubator. Samples were examined daily for 3 days and development monitored by counting 100 oocysts from each sample. From 75 to 80% of the oocysts were sporulated by 3 days post-inoculation under all treatment conditions. Groups of 2 mice were fed 10,000 oocysts each from each of the 3 treatment groups. All inoculated mice developed toxoplasmosis indicating that oocysts were capable of sporulating in seawater. Survival of sporulated oocysts was examined by placing sporulated T. gondii oocysts in 15 ppt seawater at room temperature 22a??24 C (RT) or in a refrigerator kept at 4 C. Mice fed oocysts that had been stored at 4C or RT for 6 months became infected. These results indicate that T. gondii oocysts can sporulate and remain viable in seawater for several months.

  15. Comparative susceptibility of introduced forest-dwelling mosquitoes in Hawai'i to avian malaria, Plasmodium relictum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapointe, D.A.; Goff, M.L.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    To identify potential vectors of avian malaria in Hawaiian native forests, the innate susceptibility of Aedes albopictus, Wyeomyia mitchellii, and Culex quinquefasciatus from 3 geographical sites along an altitudinal gradient was evaluated using local isolates of Plasmodium relictum. Mosquitoes were dissected 5-8 and 9-13 days postinfective blood meal and microscopically examined for oocysts and salivary-gland sporozoites. Sporogony was completed in all 3 species, but prevalence between species varied significantly. Oocysts were detected in 1-2% and sporozoites in 1-7% of Aedes albopictus that fed on infected ducklings. Wyeomyia mitchellii was slightly more susceptible, with 7-19% and 7% infected with oocysts and sporozoites, respectively. In both species, the median oocyst number was 5 or below. This is only the second Wyeomyia species reported to support development of a malarial parasite. Conversely, Culex quinquefasciatus from all 3 sites proved very susceptible. Prevalence of oocysts and sporozoites consistently exceeded 70%, regardless of gametocytemia or origin of the P. relictum isolate. In trials for which a maximum 200 oocysts were recorded, the median number of oocysts ranged from 144 to 200. It was concluded that Culex quinquefasciatus is the primary vector of avian malaria in Hawai'i. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2005.

  16. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  17. Increased CD40 Expression Enhances Early STING-Mediated Type I Interferon Response and Host Survival in a Rodent Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiangyu; Wu, Jian; Lin, Meng; Sun, Wenxiang; He, Xiao; Gowda, Channe; Bolland, Silvia; Long, Carole A.; Wang, Rongfu; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Both type I interferon (IFN-I) and CD40 play a significant role in various infectious diseases, including malaria and autoimmune disorders. CD40 is mostly known to function in adaptive immunity, but previous observations of elevated CD40 levels early after malaria infection of mice led us to investigate its roles in innate IFN-I responses and disease control. Using a Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis N67 and C57BL/6 mouse model, we showed that infected CD40-/- mice had reduced STING and serum IFN-β levels day-2 post infection, higher day-4 parasitemia, and earlier deaths. CD40 could greatly enhance STING-stimulated luciferase signals driven by the IFN-β promoter in vitro, which was mediated by increased STING protein levels. The ability of CD40 to influence STING expression was confirmed in CD40-/- mice after malaria infection. Substitutions at CD40 TRAF binding domains significantly decreased the IFN-β signals and STING protein level, which was likely mediated by changes in STING ubiquitination and degradation. Increased levels of CD40, STING, and ISRE driven luciferase signal in RAW Lucia were observed after phagocytosis of N67-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), stimulation with parasite DNA/RNA, or with selected TLR ligands [LPS, poly(I:C), and Pam3CSK4]. The results suggest stimulation of CD40 expression by parasite materials through TLR signaling pathways, which was further confirmed in bone marrow derived dendritic cells/macrophages (BMDCs/BMDMs) and splenic DCs from CD40-/-, TLR3-/- TLR4-/-, TRIF-/-, and MyD88-/- mice after iRBC stimulation or parasite infection. Our data connect several signaling pathways consisting of phagocytosis of iRBCs, recognition of parasite DNA/RNA (possibly GPI) by TLRs, elevated levels of CD40 and STING proteins, increased IFN-I production, and longer host survival time. This study reveals previously unrecognized CD40 function in innate IFN-I responses and protective pathways in infections with malaria strains that induce a strong

  18. Malaria (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Malaria KidsHealth > For Parents > Malaria Print A A A ... Prevention Diagnosis and Treatment en español Malaria About Malaria Malaria is a common infection in hot, tropical ...

  19. Migration and malaria.

    PubMed

    Jitthai, Nigoon

    2013-01-01

    Migration is an important global issue as poorly managed migration can result in a diversity of problems, including an increase in the transmission of diseases such as malaria. There is evidence to suggest that malaria is no longer a forest-dependent disease and may largely be affected by population movements, mostly to agricultural areas. While internal and transnational migration has different legal implications in most countries, both types of migration occur for the same reasons; economic and/ or safety. Although migration in itself is not a definitive risk for malaria, several factors can put, migrants and local communities alike, in vulnerable situations. In particular, infrastructure and rural development, deforestation for logging and economic farming, political movements, and natural disasters are some of the major factors that push and pull people in and out of malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, understanding the changing socio-environmental situation as well as population movements and their associated risks for malaria infection, is critical for malaria control, containment, and elimination. Efforts to address these issues should include advocacy, mapping exercises and expanded/ strengthened surveillance to also include migrant health information systems. Malaria related information, prevention measures, and early diagnosis and appropriate treatment should be made easily accessible for migrants regardless of their migration status; not only to ensure that they are equipped with appropriate knowledge and devices to protect themselves, but also to ensure that they are properly diagnosed and treated, to prevent further transmission, and to ensure that they are captured by the surveillance system. PMID:24159832

  20. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in cider by flash pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Deng, M Q; Cliver, D O

    2001-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a well-recognized pathogen of significant medical importance, and cider (apple juice) has been associated with foodborne cryptosporidiosis. This study investigated the effect of flash pasteurization on the viability of contaminant C. parvum oocysts. Cider inoculated with oocysts was heated at 70 or 71.7 degrees C for 5, 10, or 20 s, and oocyst viability was measured by a semiquantitative in vitro infectivity assay. By infecting multiple wells of confluent Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells with serial dilutions of heat-treated oocysts and examining infected cells by indirect fluorescent antibody staining, the most probable number technique was applied to quantify log reduction of oocyst viability. Heating for 10 or 20 s at either temperature caused oocyst killing of at least 4.9 log (or 99.999%), whereas oocyst inactivation after pasteurization for 5 s at 70 and 71.7 degrees C was 3.0 log (99.9%) and 4.8 log (99.998%), respectively. Our results suggested that current practices of flash pasteurization in the juice industry are sufficient in inactivating contaminant oocysts.

  1. CONTROL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY STEADY-STATE CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale experiments have been performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment to control Cryptosporidium oocysts under steady-state conditions. The work was performed with a pilot plant that was designed to minimize flow rates and, as a result, the number of oocyst...

  2. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYST INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  3. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  4. Analysis of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Yavuz Corapcioglu, M.

    2004-08-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite, transmitted through aqueous environments in the form of an oocyst. In this study, a transport model into which sorption, filtration and inactivation mechanisms are incorporated is applied to simulate laboratory column data, and the suitability of a kinetic model to describe the C. parvum oocyst transport and removal in porous media is compared with an equilibrium model. The kinetic model is applied to simulate previous column experimental data and successfully simulates the concentration peak; the late time tailing effect appeared in the breakthrough curves, indicating that the kinetic model is more suitable than the equilibrium one at simulating the fate and transport of the oocysts in porous media. Simulation illustrates that sorption causes retardation along with a tailing in the breakthrough curve. Additionally, filtration acts as a major mechanism of removing the oocysts from the aqueous phase, whereas the role of inactivation in reducing the viable oocyst concentration is minimal.

  5. Malaria on the move: human population movement and malaria transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Martens, P.; Hall, L.

    2000-01-01

    Reports of malaria are increasing in many countries and in areas thought free of the disease. One of the factors contributing to the reemergence of malaria is human migration. People move for a number of reasons, including environmental deterioration, economic necessity, conflicts, and natural disasters. These factors are most likely to affect the poor, many of whom live in or near malarious areas. Identifying and understanding the influence of these population movements can improve prevention measures and malaria control programs. PMID:10756143

  6. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Ashley

    2000-01-01

    Definition Malaria is caused by a protozoan infection of red blood cells with one of four species of the genus plasmodium: P falciparum, P vivax, P ovale, or P malariae.1 Clinically, malaria may present in different ways, but it is usually characterised by fever (which may be swinging), tachycardia, rigors, and sweating. Anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, cerebral involvement, renal failure, and shock may occur. Incidence/prevalence Each year there are 300-500 million clinical cases of malaria. About 40% of the world's population is at risk of acquiring the disease.23 Each year 25-30 million people from non-tropical countries visit areas in which malaria is endemic,4 of whom between 10 000 and 30 000 contract malaria.5 Aetiology/risk factors Malaria is mainly a rural disease, requiring standing water nearby. It is transmitted by bites6 from infected female anopheline mosquitoes,7 mainly at dusk and during the night.18 In cities, mosquito bites are usually from female culicene mosquitoes, which are not vectors of malaria.9 Malaria is resurgent in most tropical countries and the risk to travellers is increasing.10 Prognosis Ninety per cent of travellers who contract malaria do not become ill until after they return home.5 “Imported malaria” is easily treated if diagnosed promptly, and it follows a serious course in only about 12% of people.1112 The most severe form of the disease is cerebral malaria, with a case fatality rate in adult travellers of 2-6%,3 mainly because of delays in diagnosis.5 Aims To reduce the risk of infection; to prevent illness and death. Outcomes Rates of malarial illness and death, and adverse effects of treatment. Proxy measures include number of mosquito bites and number of mosquitoes in indoor areas. We found limited evidence linking number of mosquito bites and risk of malaria.13 Methods Clinical Evidence search and appraisal in November 1999. We reviewed all identified systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials (RCTs

  7. Evaluation of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R D; Jaeger, K L; Wuhib, T; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of the small (4- to 6-microns) Cryptosporidium oocysts is labor intensive and relies on stool concentration, with subsequent staining and microscopy. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (LMD Laboratories, Carlsbad, Calif.) in detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stools. A total of 591 specimens (76 diarrheal, 515 control) obtained from 213 inhabitants of an urban slum in northeastern Brazil were examined by both ELISA and conventional microscopic examination (CME) of formalin-ethyl acetate-concentrated stool samples stained with modified acid-fast and auramine stains. Forty-eight diarrheal stools (63.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts by CME, with 40 of these positive by ELISA. Thirty-five control stools (6.8%) had Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by CME, with 15 of these also positive by ELISA. All of the 480 nondiarrheal stools and all but one of the diarrheal stools negative by CME were negative by ELISA. The test had an overall sensitivity of 66.3% and a specificity of 99.8% (positive predictive value, 98.2%; negative predictive value, 94.8%). In the evaluation of human diarrheal stool samples, the test sensitivity increased to 83.3%, with a specificity of 96.4%, and, in analysis of samples from individual patients with diarrhea, the sensitivity was 87.9%, with a specificity of 100%. These results indicate that this stool ELISA is sensitive and specific for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human diarrheal stool specimens but has limited use in epidemiologic studies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:8370732

  8. Adaptive introgression in an African malaria mosquito coincident with the increased usage of insecticide-treated bed nets.

    PubMed

    Norris, Laura C; Main, Bradley J; Lee, Yoosook; Collier, Travis C; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Cornel, Anthony J; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2015-01-20

    Animal species adapt to changes in their environment, including man-made changes such as the introduction of insecticides, through selection for advantageous genes already present in populations or newly arisen through mutation. A possible alternative mechanism is the acquisition of adaptive genes from related species via a process known as adaptive introgression. Differing levels of insecticide resistance between two African malaria vectors, Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae, have been attributed to assortative mating between the two species. In a previous study, we reported two bouts of hybridization observed in the town of Selinkenyi, Mali in 2002 and 2006. These hybridization events did not appear to be directly associated with insecticide-resistance genes. We demonstrate that during a brief breakdown in assortative mating in 2006, A. coluzzii inherited the entire A. gambiae-associated 2L divergence island, which includes a suite of insecticide-resistance alleles. In this case, introgression was coincident with the start of a major insecticide-treated bed net distribution campaign in Mali. This suggests that insecticide exposure altered the fitness landscape, favoring the survival of A. coluzzii/A. gambiae hybrids, and provided selection pressure that swept the 2L divergence island through A. coluzzii populations in Mali. We propose that the work described herein presents a unique description of the temporal dynamics of adaptive introgression in an animal species and represents a mechanism for the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance in this important vector of human malaria in Africa.

  9. Pulmonary pathology in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Milner, Danny; Factor, Rachel; Whitten, Rich; Carr, Richard A; Kamiza, Steve; Pinkus, Geraldine; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory signs are common in African children where malaria is highly endemic, and thus, parsing the role of pulmonary pathology in illness is challenging. We examined the lungs of 100 children from an autopsy series in Blantyre, Malawi, many of whom death was attributed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our aim was to describe the pathologic manifestations of fatal malaria; to understand the role of parasites, pigment, and macrophages; and to catalog comorbidities. From available patients, which included 55 patients with cerebral malaria and 45 controls, we obtained 4 cores of lung tissue for immunohistochemistry and morphological evaluation. We found that, in patients with cerebral malaria, large numbers of malaria parasites were present in pulmonary alveolar capillaries, together with extensive deposits of malaria pigment (hemozoin). The number of pulmonary macrophages in this vascular bed did not differ between patients with cerebral malaria, noncerebral malaria, and nonmalarial diagnoses. Comorbidities found in some cerebral malaria patients included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and systemic activation of coagulation. We conclude that the respiratory distress seen in patients with cerebral malaria does not appear to be anatomic in origin but that increasing malaria pigment is strongly associated with cerebral malaria at autopsy.

  10. Effect of ferric oxyhydroxide grain coatings on the transport of bacteriophage PRD1 and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Bogatsu, Y.G.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2005-01-01

    To test the effect of geochemical heterogeneity on microorganism transport in saturated porous media, we measured the removal of two microorganisms, the bacteriophage PRD1 and oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, in flow-through columns of quartz sand coated by different amounts of a ferric oxyhydroxide. The experiments were conducted over ranges of ferric oxyhydroxide coating fraction of ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts at pH 5.6-5.8 and 10-4 M ionic strength. To determine the effect of pH on the transport of the oocysts, experiments were also conducted over a pH range of 5.7-10.0 at a coating fraction of ?? = 0.04. Collision (attachment) efficiencies increased as the fraction of ferric oxyhydroxide coated quartz sand increased, from ?? = 0.0071 to 0.13 over ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0.059 to 0.75 over ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts. Increasing the pH from 5.7 to 10.0 resulted in a decrease in the oocyst collision efficiency as the pH exceeded the expected point of zero charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings. The collision efficiencies correlated very well with the fraction of quartz sand coated by the ferric oxyhydroxide for PRD1 but not as well for the oocysts. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  11. Influence of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated quartz sand saturated porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Landkamer, L.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a geochemically heterogeneous saturated porous medium, we measured the breakthrough and collision efficiencies of oocysts as a function of dissolved organic matter concentration in a flow-through column containing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand. We characterized the surface properties of the oocysts and ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand using microelectrophoresis and streaming potential, respectively, and the amount of organic matter adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand as a function of the concentration of dissolved organic matter (a fulvic acid isolated from Florida Everglades water). The dissolved organic matter had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the oocysts. Low concentrations of dissolved organic matter were responsible for reversing the charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand surface from positive to negative. The charge reversal and accumulation of negative charge on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand led to increases in oocyst breakthrough and decreases in oocyst collision efficiency with increasing dissolved organic matter concentration. The increase in dissolved organic matter concentration from 0 to 20 mg L-1 resulted in a two-fold decrease in the collision efficiency. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Robert C; Le Menach, Arnaud; Kunene, Simon; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Hsiang, Michelle S; Perkins, T Alex; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tatem, Andrew J; Cohen, Justin M; Smith, David L

    2015-12-29

    Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections . In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show 'malariogenic potential', a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination.

  13. Molecular-Based Detection Systems for Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation describes on-going studies in collaboration with US EPA Region 2, 3, and the CDC on identifying sources of Cryptosporidium oocyst contamination in source waters using conventional and real-time PCR approaches.

  14. Potential contamination of drinking water with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Aramini, J. J.; Stephen, C.; Dubey, J. P.; Engelstoft, C.; Schwantje, H.; Ribble, C. S.

    1999-01-01

    The world's first documented toxoplasmosis outbreak associated with a municipal water supply was recognized in 1995 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. It was hypothesized that domestic cat (Felis catus) or cougar (Felis concolor) faeces contaminated a surface water reservoir with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. An extensive investigation of the Victoria watershed 1 year following the outbreak documented the presence of an endemic T. gondii cycle involving the animals inhabiting the area. Cats and cougars were observed throughout the watershed. Serological evidence of T. gondii infection was demonstrated among domestic cats living in the Victoria area. Cougars were found to shed T. gondii oocysts. Serological evidence of T. gondii infection in deer mice living in the riparian environments of the watershed suggested that T. gondii oocysts were being shed near the water edge. Contamination of Victoria's water supply with T. gondii oocysts potentially occurred during the study period and future waterborne toxoplasmosis outbreaks in this and other communities are possible. PMID:10355797

  15. Immunity to malaria in an era of declining malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Freya J I; Boeuf, Philippe; Beeson, James G

    2016-02-01

    With increasing malaria control and goals of malaria elimination, many endemic areas are transitioning from high-to-low-to-no malaria transmission. Reductions in transmission will impact on the development of naturally acquired immunity to malaria, which develops after repeated exposure to Plasmodium spp. However, it is currently unclear how declining transmission and malaria exposure will affect the development and maintenance of naturally acquired immunity. Here we review the key processes which underpin this knowledge; the amount of Plasmodium spp. exposure required to generate effective immune responses, the longevity of antibody responses and the ability to mount an effective response upon re-exposure through memory responses. Lastly we identify research priorities which will increase our understanding of how changing transmission will impact on malarial immunity.

  16. The treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    White, N J

    1996-09-12

    Increasing drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and a resurgence of malaria in tropical areas have effected a change in treatment of malaria in the last two decades. Symptoms of malaria are fever, chills, headache, and malaise. The prognosis worsens as the parasite counts, counts of mature parasites, and counts of neutrophils containing pigment increase. Treatment depends on severity, age of patient, degree of background immunity, likely pattern of susceptibility to antimalarial drugs, and the cost and availability of drugs. Chloroquine should be used for P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale. P. vivax has shown high resistance to chloroquine in Oceania, however. Primaquine may be needed to treat P. vivax and P. ovale to rid the body of hypnozoites that survive in the liver. Chloroquine can treat P. falciparum infections acquired in North Africa, Central America north of the Panama Canal, Haiti, or the Middle East but not in most of Africa and some parts of Asia and South America. In areas of low grade resistance to chloroquine, amodiaquine can be used to effectively treat falciparum malaria. A combination of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is responsive to falciparum infections with high grade resistance to chloroquine. Mefloquine, halofantrine, or quinine with tetracycline can be used to treat multidrug-resistant P. falciparum. Derivatives of artemisinin obtained from qinghao or sweet wormwood developed as pharmaceuticals in China are the most rapidly acting of all antimalarial drugs. Children tend to tolerate antimalarial drugs well. Children who weigh less than 15 kg should not be given mefloquine. Health workers should not prescribe primaquine to pregnant women or newborns due to the risk of hemolysis. Chloroquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, quinine, and quinidine can be safely given in therapeutic doses throughout pregnancy. Clinical manifestations of severe malaria are hypoglycemia, convulsions, severe anemia, acute renal failure, jaundice, pulmonary edema

  17. Increased deposition of C3b on red cells with low CR1 and CD55 in a malaria-endemic region of western Kenya: Implications for the development of severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Odhiambo, Collins O; Otieno, Walter; Adhiambo, Christine; Odera, Michael M; Stoute, José A

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia due to Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major cause of mortality among young children in western Kenya. The factors that lead to the age-specific incidence of this anemia are unknown. Previous studies have shown an age-related expression of red cell complement regulatory proteins, which protect erythrocytes from autologous complement attack and destruction. Our primary objective was to determine whether in a malaria-endemic area red cells with low levels of complement regulatory proteins are at increased risk for complement (C3b) deposition in vivo. Secondarily, we studied the relationship between red cell complement regulatory protein levels and hemoglobin levels. Methods Three hundred and forty-two life-long residents of a malaria-holoendemic region of western Kenya were enrolled in a cross-sectional study and stratified by age. We measured red cell C3b, CR1, CD55, and immune complex binding capacity by flow cytometry. Individuals who were positive for malaria were treated and blood was collected when they were free of parasitemia. Analysis of variance was used to identify independent variables associated with the %C3b-positive red cells and the hemoglobin level. Results Individuals between the ages of 6 and 36 months had the lowest red cell CR1, highest %C3b-positive red cells, and highest parasite density. Malaria prevalence also reached its peak within this age group. Among children ≤ 24 months of age the %C3b-positive red cells was usually higher in individuals who were treated for malaria than in uninfected individuals with similarly low red cell CR1 and CD55. The variables that most strongly influenced the %C3b-positive red cells were age, malaria status, and red cell CD55 level. Although it did not reach statistical significance, red cell CR1 was more important than red cell CD55 among individuals treated for malaria. The variables that most strongly influenced the hemoglobin level were age, the %C3b-positive red cells, red

  18. Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in final reclaimed effluent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gennaccaro, A.L.; McLaughlin, M.R.; Quintero-Betancourt, W.; Huffman, D.E.; Rose, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Water samples collected throughout several reclamation facilities were analyzed for the presence of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum by the focus detection method-most-probable-number cell culture technique. Results revealed the presence of infectious C. parvum oocysts in 40% of the final disinfected effluent samples. Sampled effluent contained on average seven infectious oocysts per 100 liters. Thus, reclaimed water is not pathogen free but contains infectious C. parvum.

  19. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in different water resources by Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP).

    PubMed

    Gallas-Lindemann, Carmen; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Mahmoodi, Mohammad Reza; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2013-02-01

    Human toxoplasmosis is potentially contracted due to consumption of contaminated drinking water and represents an increasing public health risk worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts can be resistant to standard disinfection processes, including UV radiation. Increased awareness of the risk of waterborne toxoplasmosis outbreaks has led to an increase in research interest in the detection of oocysts in environmental water systems. Ninety-five environmental water samples from the Lower Rhine area in Germany have been included in the study and examined for the presence of Toxoplasma. Water samples were filtered or flocculated by aluminum sulfate and purified by sucrose density gradient. DNA was then extracted, and the DNA samples were then examined by LAMP analysis. T. gondii DNA was detected in eight out of 83 (9.6%) influent and effluent samples obtained from wastewater treatment plants. All samples (n=12) from the surface, ground, raw and tap waters tested negative. The purpose of this work was to investigate the occurrence and distribution of Toxoplasma oocysts on the Lower Rhine in Germany. Our study provides evidence that the assay is a sensitive, specific, rapid and cost effective method for the detection of T. gondii and is useful for both the investigations of cases of waterborne outbreaks and for identifying the source of contamination.

  20. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe malaria complicated by multiorgan failure and ARDS. Patient responded well to manual exchange transfusion with standard artesunate-based chemotherapy. PMID:27042503

  1. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in the river water of two recreational areas in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azman, J; Init, I; Wan Yusoff, W S

    2009-12-01

    This study is the first report on the occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in recreational rivers water from Malaysia. It was carried out in water samples at two rivers, 'Sungai Congkak' and 'Sungai Batu', located in Selangor State. The occurrence of both Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum (oo)cysts was higher in Sungai Congkak (50% or 15/30 and 10% or 3/30 respectively) than Sungai Batu (16% or 5/30 and 3.3% or 1/30 respectively). The mean density of cysts/L was 0.72 in Sungai Congkak and 0.023 in Sungai Batu, and that of oocysts/L was 0.023 in Sungai Congkak and 0.0033 in Sungai Batu, showing that the occurrence of Giardia was higher and more frequent than Cryptosporidium in both rivers. Sungai Congkak also showed higher faecal coliforms count (ranging from 0.48x10³ to 73x10³ CFU/100 mL) than Sungai Batu (0.41x10³ to 16x10³ CFU/100 mL). On the other hand, the Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts and faecal coliforms were more concentrated at the downstream station, followed by midstream and upstream stations which might be due to human factors where settlements and recreation areas were located around and between midstream and downstream stations. The (oo)cysts and faecal coliforms also increased during public holidays due to the significantly higher number of visitors (bathers) compared with the week days. All the parameters (physical, faecal coliforms and rainfall) did not show consistent significant correlation (based on r values of Pearson correlation analysis) with both protozoa, therefore these parameters are not suitable as indicator for the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in both rivers.

  2. Counting coccidial oocysts in chicken faeces: a comparative study of a standard McMaster technique and a new rapid method.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anita; Williams, R B; Larsen, S

    2006-03-31

    For the assessment of coccidial oocyst production by chickens, some modified form of the McMaster counting method is commonly used. The objective of this study was to evaluate a standard method and to compare it to a new, faster method, in which all the preparative stages before counting are carried out in the same container into which the original faecal sample was collected. A stock suspension containing purified oocysts of all seven valid Eimeria species that parasitize chickens was prepared, from which seven concentrations of oocyst suspensions were made. Since the faecal material in a sample influences the ability of oocysts to float up in a McMaster chamber, the new method was tested to establish the optimal amount of faeces in the original sample. Control oocyst suspensions containing no faeces were also tested, and three series of counts using the new method were compared with the standard McMaster method. The results were statistically analysed by agreement analysis. Repeatability and between-operator variation of both methods were also tested by agreement analysis. Counting by the standard McMaster method underestimated the true number of oocysts. The new method gave counts in agreement with the true number of oocysts if using 1 g of faeces per sample. With 2 g of faeces, counts were obtained that agreed with counts by the standard McMaster method. Both methods showed agreement between repeated measurements. The new method used on a sample containing 2 g of faeces provides a convenient alternative to the standard modified McMaster method. A 1-g faecal sample increases agreement with the true numbers of oocysts. Processing of a sample with the new method is about nine times faster than with the standard method.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Conway, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Malaria persists as an undiminished global problem, but the resources available to address it have increased. Many tools for understanding its biology and epidemiology are well developed, with a particular richness of comparative genome sequences. Targeted genetic manipulation is now effectively combined with in vitro culture assays on the most important human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and with in vivo analysis of rodent and monkey malaria parasites in their laboratory hosts. Studies of the epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of human malaria have already been influenced by the availability of molecular methods, and analyses of parasite polymorphisms have long had useful and highly informative applications. However, the molecular epidemiology of malaria is currently undergoing its most substantial revolution as a result of the genomic information and technologies that are available in well-resourced centers. It is a challenge for research agendas to face the real needs presented by a disease that largely exists in extremely resource-poor settings, but it is one that there appears to be an increased willingness to undertake. To this end, developments in the molecular epidemiology of malaria are reviewed here, emphasizing aspects that may be current and future priorities. PMID:17223628

  4. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  5. Using Quantitative Reverse Transcriptase PCR and Cell Culture Plaque Assays to Determine Resistance of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts to Chemical Sanitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii oocysts are highly resistant to many chemical sanitizers. Current methods used to determine oocyst infectivity have relied exclusively on mouse, chicken, and feline bioassays. Although considered gold standards, they only provide a qualitative assessment of oocyst infectivity. I...

  6. A fast method for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in real world samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Shona; McClelland, Lindy; Maier, John

    2005-04-01

    Contamination of drinking water with pathogenic microorganisms such as Cryptosporidium has become an increasing concern in recent years. Cryptosporidium oocysts are particularly problematic, as infections caused by this organism can be life threatening in immunocompromised patients. Current methods for monitoring and analyzing water are often laborious and require experts to conduct. In addition, many of the techniques require very specific reagents to be employed. These factors add considerable cost and time to the analytical process. Raman spectroscopy provides specific molecular information on samples, and offers advantages of speed, sensitivity and low cost over current methods of water monitoring. Raman spectroscopy is an optical method that has demonstrated the capability to identify and differentiate microorganisms at the species and strain levels. In addition, this technique has exhibited sensitivities down to the single organism detection limit. We have employed Raman spectroscopy and Raman Chemical Imaging, in conjunction with chemometric techniques, to detect small numbers of oocysts in the presence of interferents derived from real-world water samples. Our investigations have also indicated that Raman Chemical Imaging may provide chemical and physiological information about an oocyst sample which complements information provided by the traditional methods. This work provides evidence that Raman imaging is a useful technique for consideration in the water quality industry.

  7. The IL17F and IL17RA Genetic Variants Increase Risk of Cerebral Malaria in Two African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Ianina; Poudiougou, Belco; Argiro, Laurent; Cabantous, Sandrine; Dessein, Hélia; Burté, Florence; Oumar, Aboubacar A.; Brown, Biobele J.; Traore, Abdoualye; Afolabi, Nathaniel K.; Barry, Abdoulaye; Omokhodion, Samuel; Ndoumbe, Ursule Ewanda; Shokunbi, Wuraola A.; Sodeinde, Olugbemiro; Doumbo, Ogobara; Dessein, Alain J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum that is partly caused by cytokine-mediated inflammation. It is not known whether interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines, which regulate inflammation, control the development of CM. To evaluate the involvement of IL-17 cytokines in CM, we analyzed 46 common polymorphisms in IL17A, IL17F, and IL17RA (which encodes the common receptor chain of the members of the IL-17 family) in two independent African populations. A case-control study involving 115 Nigerian children with CM and 160 controls from the community (CC) showed that IL17F reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 6913472 (rs6913472) (P = 0.004; odds ratio [OR] = 3.12), IL17F rs4715291 (P = 0.004; OR = 2.82), IL17RA rs12159217 (P = 0.01; OR = 2.27), and IL17RA rs41396547 (P = 0.026; OR = 3.15) were independently associated with CM. A replication study was performed in 240 nuclear Malian family trios (two parents with one CM child). We replicated the association for 3 SNPs, IL17F rs6913472 (P = 0.03; OR = 1.39), IL17RA rs12159217 (P = 0.01; OR = 1.52), and IL17RA rs41396547 (P = 0.04; OR = 3.50). We also found that one additional SNP, IL17RA rs41433045, in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs41396547, was associated with CM in both Nigeria and Mali (P = 0.002; OR = 4.12 in the combined sample). We excluded the possibility that SNPs outside IL17F and IL17RA, in strong LD with the associated SNPs, could account for the observed associations. Furthermore, the results of a functional study indicated that the aggravating GA genotype of IL17F rs6913472 was associated with lower IL-17F concentrations. Our findings show for the first time that IL17F and IL17RA polymorphisms modulate susceptibility to CM and provide evidence that IL-17F protects against CM. PMID:26667835

  8. Malaria in the WHO Southeast Asia region.

    PubMed

    Kondrashin, A V

    1992-09-01

    Malaria endemic countries in the southeast Asia region include Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Population movement and rapid urbanization, both largely caused by unemployment, and environmental deterioration change the malaria pattern. They also increase the incidence of drug-resistant malaria, especially resistance to 4-aminoquinolines. In India, Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the density and distribution of tribals, and, in southern Thailand, rubber tappers have the highest malaria incidence rate (46.29%). Since the population is young and the young are highly sensitive to malaria infection, the region has low community immunity. High malaria priority areas are forests, forested hills, forest fringe areas, developmental project sites, and border areas. High risk groups include infants, young children, pregnant women, and mobile population groups. Malaria incidence is between 2.5-2.8 million cases, and the slide positivity rate is about 3%. P. falciparum constitutes 40% for all malaria cases. In 1988 in India, there were 222 malaria deaths. Malaria is the 7th most common cause of death in Thailand. 3 of the 19 Anopheline species are resistant to at least 1 insecticide, particularly DDT. Posteradication epidemics surfaced in the mid-1970s. Malaria control programs tend to use the primary health care and integration approach to malaria control. Antiparasite measures range from a single-dose of an antimalarial to mass drug administration. Residual spraying continues to be the main strategy of vector control. Some other vector control measures are fish feeding on mosquito larvae, insecticide impregnated mosquito nets, and repellents. Control programs also have health education activities. India allocates the highest percentage of its total health budget to malaria control (21.54%). Few malariology training programs exist in the region. Slowly processed surveillance data limit the countries' ability to

  9. A novel procedure for total nucleic acid extraction from small numbers of Eimeria species oocysts.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Galip; Dale, Colin; Maudlin, Ian; Morgan, Kenton

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed in an attempt to extract genomic DNA from a small number of Eimerian oocysts. Sonication, ammonia, ethanol and lysozyme were all found to be unsuitable for the digestion of Eimeria oocysts. The chemicals and enzyme given were not capable of either disruption or digestion of oocysts for nucleic acid extraction. They had the capability of penetrating the oocyst wall but could not break-up the oocyst wall. It is impossible to obtain nucleic acid from Eimeria oocysts if the wall is not broken-up. In this study oocyst disruption was achieved using a simple but highly effective treatment regime involving sodium hypochlorite treatment, osmotic shock and proteinase K digestion. Following the disruption of the oocyst walls, a commercially available nucleic acid purification kit (Wizard DNA Purification Kit, Promega) can be used to prepare high quality nucleic acid.

  10. GENOTYPING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER SAMPLES AS A TOOL FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF CONTAMINATION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples is largely made by the use of an immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Because IFA detects oocysts from all Cryptosporidium parasites, the species distribution and source of Cryptosporidium parasites in environmental...

  11. Clinical Aspects of Uncomplicated and Severe Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bartoloni, Alessandro; Zammarchi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The first symptoms of malaria, common to all the different malaria species, are nonspecific and mimic a flu-like syndrome. Although fever represents the cardinal feature, clinical findings in malaria are extremely diverse and may range in severity from mild headache to serious complications leading to death, particularly in falciparum malaria. As the progression to these complications can be rapid, any malaria patient must be assessed and treated rapidly, and frequent observations are needed to look for early signs of systemic complications. In fact, severe malaria is a life threatening but treatable disease. The protean and nonspecific clinical findings occurring in malaria (fever, malaise, headache, myalgias, jaundice and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea) may lead physicians who see malaria infrequently to a wrong diagnosis, such as influenza (particularly during the seasonal epidemic flu), dengue, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, viral hepatitis, encephalitis. Physicians should be aware that malaria is not a clinical diagnosis but must be diagnosed, or excluded, by performing microscopic examination of blood films. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are then crucial to prevent morbidity and fatal outcomes. Although Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the major cause of severe malaria and death, increasing evidence has recently emerged that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi can also be severe and even fatal. PMID:22708041

  12. The annual cycle of shedding Eimeria oocysts by European bison (Bison bonasus) in the Bialowieza Primeval Forest, Poland.

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M; Kowalczyk, Rafal; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W

    2011-08-01

    Between April 2008 and March 2009, we analyzed the pattern of coccidian oocysts present in the feces of the European bison (Bison bonasus L., 1758) and found 4 species (Eimeria bovis , E. canadensis, E. ellipsoidalis, E. zuernii) previously reported from this host and 3 species (Eimeria alabamensis, E. cylindrica, E. pellita) that are new host and locality records. All the species occurred in bison females, and only 4 occurred in males; E. bovis was the most prevalent in both sexes. The overall prevalence of Eimeria spp. invasion reached 34.7% in cows and 13.9% in bulls. The highest prevalence was noted in early spring, with a peak in April, and the lowest in late autumn and winter. The oocyst count per gram of feces (OPG) varied from 50 to 1,350; no symptoms of clinical coccidiosis were observed. We found a significant influence of winter aggregations of bison on shedding of coccidian oocysts. The prevalence and OPG values were higher in bison congregating in large numbers around winter-feeding sites in comparison to other sites. We suggest that the coming together of cows during the growing season impacts the gender-related differences in prevalence and the number of coccidian species involved. This observation probably results from an increased production of oocysts by sub-clinically infected individuals in high-density bison populations.

  13. Murine Cerebral Malaria Is Associated with a Vasospasm-Like Microcirculatory Dysfunction, and Survival upon Rescue Treatment Is Markedly Increased by Nimodipine

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Zanini, Graziela M.; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Brain hemodynamics in cerebral malaria (CM) is poorly understood, with apparently conflicting data showing microcirculatory hypoperfusion and normal or even increased blood flow in large arteries. Using intravital microscopy to assess the pial microvasculature through a closed cranial window in the murine model of CM by Plasmodium berghei ANKA, we show that murine CM is associated with marked decreases (mean: 60%) of pial arteriolar blood flow attributable to vasoconstriction and decreased blood velocity. Leukocyte sequestration further decreased perfusion by narrowing luminal diameters in the affected vessels and blocking capillaries. Remarkably, vascular collapse at various degrees was observed in 44% of mice with CM, which also presented more severe vasoconstriction. Coadministration of artemether and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker used to treat postsubarachnoid hemorrhage vasospasm, to mice presenting CM markedly increased survival compared with artemether plus vehicle only. Administration of nimodipine induced vasodilation and increased pial blood flow. We conclude that vasoconstriction and vascular collapse play a role in murine CM pathogenesis and nimodipine holds potential as adjunctive therapy for CM. PMID:20110412

  14. Waterborne Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in the Yukon, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Roach, P D; Olson, M E; Whitley, G; Wallis, P M

    1993-01-01

    Several outbreaks of waterborne giardiasis have occurred in southern Canada, but nothing has been reported from the Canadian North. The objective of this study was to collect information relevant to waterborne giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis in the Yukon including epidemiological data and analyses of water, sewage, and animal fecal samples. Remote, pristine water samples were found to be contaminated with Giardia cysts (7 of 22 or 32%) but not with Cryptosporidium oocysts. Giardia cysts were found in 21% (13 of 61) of animal scats, but no Cryptosporidium oocysts were observed (small sample size). Whitehorse's drinking water was episodically contaminated with Giardia cysts (7 of 42 or 17%) and Cryptosporidium oocysts (2 of 42 or 5%). Neither were found in Dawson City's water supply. The only water treatment in the Yukon is chlorination, but contact times and free chlorine residuals are often too low to provide adequate protection by disinfection. Raw sewage samples from the five largest population centers in the Yukon contained 26 to 3,022 Giardia cysts and 0 to 74 Cryptosporidium oocysts per liter. Treated sewage from Whitehorse contained fewer Giardia cysts but more Cryptosporidium oocysts on average. Both were detected in Lake Laberge, downstream of Whitehorse, which has a history of fecal coliform contamination. Daily monitoring of raw sewage from the suburbs of Whitehorse showed a summertime peak of Giardia cysts and occasional Cryptosporidium oocysts after springtime contamination of drinking water. Despite this evidence, epidemiological data for the Yukon showed an endemic infection rate of only 0.1% for giardiasis (cryptosporidiosis is not notifiable).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8439168

  15. Urbanization and the global malaria recession

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The past century has seen a significant contraction in the global extent of malaria transmission, resulting in over 50 countries being declared malaria free, and many regions of currently endemic countries eliminating the disease. Moreover, substantial reductions in transmission have been seen since 1900 in those areas that remain endemic today. Recent work showed that this malaria recession was unlikely to have been driven by climatic factors, and that control measures likely played a significant role. It has long been considered, however, that economic development, and particularly urbanization, has also been a causal factor. The urbanization process results in profound socio-economic and landscape changes that reduce malaria transmission, but the magnitude and extent of these effects on global endemicity reductions are poorly understood. Methods Global data at subnational spatial resolution on changes in malaria transmission intensity and urbanization trends over the past century were combined to examine the relationships seen over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Results/Conclusions A consistent pattern of increased urbanization coincident with decreasing malaria transmission and elimination over the past century was found. Whilst it remains challenging to untangle whether this increased urbanization resulted in decreased transmission, or that malaria reductions promoted development, the results point to a close relationship between the two, irrespective of national wealth. The continuing rapid urbanization in malaria-endemic regions suggests that such malaria declines are likely to continue, particularly catalyzed by increasing levels of direct malaria control. PMID:23594701

  16. Determining Resistance of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts to UV Disinfection Using Cell Culture and a Mouse Bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of UV exposure on Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has not been completely defined for use in water disinfection. This study evaluated irradiated oocysts by three assays: a SCID mouse biassay, an in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay), and a quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-t...

  17. Determining UV Inactivation of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by Using Cell Culture and a Mouse Bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of UV exposure on Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has not been completely defined for use in water disinfection. This study evaluated UV irradiated oocysts by three assays: a SCID mouse bioassay, an in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay), and a quantitative reve...

  18. Association of Cryptosporidium parvum with Suspended Particles: Impact on Oocyst Sedimentation

    PubMed Central

    Searcy, Kristin E.; Packman, Aaron I.; Atwill, Edward R.; Harter, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The association of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with suspended particles can alter the oocysts' effective physical properties and influence their transport in aquatic systems. To assess this behavior, C. parvum oocysts were mixed with various suspended sediments under a variety of water chemical conditions, and the resulting settling of the oocysts was observed. Direct microscopic observations showed that oocysts attached to suspended sediments. Settling column and batch experiments demonstrated that oocysts are removed from suspension at a much higher rate when associated with sediments. The rate of oocyst sedimentation depended primarily on the type of sediment with which the oocysts were mixed. Changes in background water conditions had a relatively small impact on the extent of oocyst-particle association and the resulting oocyst deposition. We believe that the ubiquitous association of C. parvum oocysts with suspended particles enhances the sedimentation of oocysts in natural waters and that this interaction should generally be considered when predicting the migration of pathogens in the environment. PMID:15691968

  19. An Open Source Business Model for Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, ‘closed’ publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more “open source” approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.’ President’s Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related to new

  20. An open source business model for malaria.

    PubMed

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, 'closed' publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more "open source" approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.' President's Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related to new malaria

  1. Malaria in pregnancy: current issues.

    PubMed

    Brabin, B

    1997-01-01

    Though not known why, pregnant women are far more susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancies. Therefore, in sub-Saharan African countries endemic for malaria, almost half of all primigravidae will be parasitemic at their first antenatal visit. Some estimate that up to half of all low birth weight babies born to primigravidae in malaria-endemic areas may be attributable to malaria. Intrauterine growth in the context of maternal parasitemia therefore has major adverse implications for child survival. For the mothers, the prevalence of anemia among pregnant women is greatly increased in malarious areas, and iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women in developed countries has been associated with pre-term birth and low birth weight. These adverse health and developmental consequences of malaria infection among mothers and their babies is compounded by the absence of any widely-applied recommendation for malaria control in pregnant women in Africa. Current control strategies are nonetheless described. The influence of HIV infection in relation to the effectiveness of malaria drug control during pregnancy has not been assessed.

  2. Effects of Developmental Temperature on Gametocysts and Oocysts of Two Species of Gregarines Blabericola migrator and Blabericola cubensis (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae) Parasitizing Blaberid Cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Kolman, Jon A; Clopton, Richard E; Clopton, Debra T

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic environmental conditions, especially temperature and humidity, have profound effects on the growth and development of gregarines, but these effects remain largely undocumented. Quantifying the effects of environmental conditions on the growth and development of exogenous gregarine ontogenetic stages is an important first step in understanding the transmission, population dynamics, and environmental persistence of gregarine infection. In this study, we examined the effect of 6 environmental temperatures (10, 18, 22, 27, 35, and 40 C) at constant humidity (0 mmHg vapor pressure deficit) on gametocyst development and oocyst viability in 2 gregarine species: Blabericola migrator and Blabericola cubensis parasitizing the Tiger-striped Hissing Cockroach, Princisia vanwaerebecki, and the Discoid Cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis, respectively. Temperature has a significant effect on gametocyst development and oocyst viability for both gregarine species. Gametocyst development for both gregarine species displays a similar threshold response to environmental temperature: 10 and 40 C represent extremes outside their developmental range, but within these extremes, the relationship between gametocyst development and temperature is weakly direct. Dehiscence increased with temperature from 68% at 18 C to 93% at 22 C and remained at that level through 35 C. Developmental temperature also has a meaningful but inverse effect on oocyst viability of both B. migrator and B. cubensis. For both species, oocyst viability is highest at 18 and 22 C and is significantly reduced at 27 and 35 C. Thus oocyst production and sporozoite viability are linked but environmentally independent phenomena. Overall, there is an acceptable developmental temperature zone for B. migrator and B. cubensis that ranges from 18 to 27 C, but production of viable sporozoites is greatest in a relatively narrow zone around 22 C. Prior studies have postulated that mechanisms that concentrate oocysts and hosts

  3. Malaria Risk in Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Askling, Helena Hervius; Nilsson, Jenny; Tegnell, Anders; Janzon, Ragnhild

    2005-01-01

    Imported malaria has been an increasing problem in several Western countries in the last 2 decades. To calculate the risk factors of age, sex, and travel destination in Swedish travelers, we used data from the routine reporting system for malaria (mixture of patients with and without adequate prophylaxis), a database on travel patterns, and in-flight or visa data on Swedish travelers of 1997 to 2003. The crude risk for travelers varied from 1 per 100,000 travelers to Central America and the Caribbean to 357 per 100,000 in central Africa. Travelers to East Africa had the highest adjusted odds ratio (OR = 341; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 134–886) for being reported with malaria, closely followed by travelers to central Africa and West Africa. Male travelers as well as children <1–6 years of age had a higher risk of being reported with malaria (OR = 1,7; 95% CI 1.3–2.3 and OR = 4,8; 95%CI 1.5–14.8) than women and other age groups. PMID:15757560

  4. Climate change and malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, S W; Birley, M H

    1996-12-01

    There is a consensus among climatologists that our planet is experiencing a progressive rise in surface temperature due to the increased production of "greenhouse" gases. Some of the possible consequences of elevated temperature on malaria transmission are examined in the present review. A simple mathematical model is first used to examine the effect of temperature on the ability of Anopheles maculipennis to transmit vivax malaria. This indicates that small increases in temperature at low temperatures may increase the risk of transmission substantially. This is important, since vulnerable communities, poorly protected by health services, in areas of unstable or no malaria are likely to be at increased risk of future outbreaks. In contrast, areas of stable transmission may be little affected by rising temperature. It is thought that global warming will lead to coastal flooding, changes in precipitation and, indirectly, changes in land use. Just how these changes will effect transmission at a regional level requires an understanding of the ecology of local vectors, since environmental changes which favour malaria transmission in one vector species may reduce it in another. Methods for predicting future changes in malaria in different regions are discussed, highlighting the need for further research in this area. Most importantly, there is a need for researchers to validate the accuracy of the models used for predicting malaria and to confirm the assumptions on which the models are based.

  5. PbSR is synthesized in macrogametocytes and involved in formation of the malaria crystalloids

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Victoria; Shimizu, Shoichi; Arai, Meiji; Dessens, Johannes T

    2008-01-01

    Crystalloids are transient organelles that form in developing malaria ookinetes and disappear after ookinete-to-oocyst transition. Their origins and functions remain poorly understood. The Plasmodium berghei scavenger receptor-like protein PbSR is essential for mosquito-to-host transmission of the parasite: PbSR knockout parasites produce normal numbers of oocysts that fail to form sporozoites, pointing to a role for PbSR in the oocyst during sporogony. Here, using fluorescent protein tagging and targeted gene disruption, we show that PbSR is synthesized in macrogametocytes, gets targeted to the crystalloids of developing ookinetes and is involved in crystalloid formation. While oocyst sporulation rates of PbSR knockout parasites are highly reduced in parasite-infected mosquitoes, sporulation rates in vitro are not adversely affected, supporting the view that mosquito factors could be involved in the PbSR loss-of-function phenotype. These findings are the first to identify a parasite protein involved with the crystalloid organelle, and suggest a novel protein-trafficking mechanism to deliver PbSR to the oocysts. PMID:18452513

  6. The history of 20th century malaria control in Peru

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria has been part of Peruvian life since at least the 1500s. While Peru gave the world quinine, one of the first treatments for malaria, its history is pockmarked with endemic malaria and occasional epidemics. In this review, major increases in Peruvian malaria incidence over the past hundred years are described, as well as the human factors that have facilitated these events, and concerted private and governmental efforts to control malaria. Political support for malaria control has varied and unexpected events like vector and parasite resistance have adversely impacted morbidity and mortality. Though the ready availability of novel insecticides like DDT and efficacious medications reduced malaria to very low levels for a decade after the post eradication era, malaria reemerged as an important modern day challenge to Peruvian public health. Its reemergence sparked collaboration between domestic and international partners towards the elimination of malaria in Peru. PMID:24001096

  7. The history of 20th century malaria control in Peru.

    PubMed

    Griffing, Sean M; Gamboa, Dionicia; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-08-30

    Malaria has been part of Peruvian life since at least the 1500s. While Peru gave the world quinine, one of the first treatments for malaria, its history is pockmarked with endemic malaria and occasional epidemics. In this review, major increases in Peruvian malaria incidence over the past hundred years are described, as well as the human factors that have facilitated these events, and concerted private and governmental efforts to control malaria. Political support for malaria control has varied and unexpected events like vector and parasite resistance have adversely impacted morbidity and mortality. Though the ready availability of novel insecticides like DDT and efficacious medications reduced malaria to very low levels for a decade after the post eradication era, malaria reemerged as an important modern day challenge to Peruvian public health. Its reemergence sparked collaboration between domestic and international partners towards the elimination of malaria in Peru.

  8. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha): evidence from the St Lawrence River.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Marcogliese, D J; de Lafontaine, Y; Da Silva, A J; Mhangami-Ruwende, B; Pieniazek, N J

    2001-03-01

    Molluscan shellfish can recover and concentrate environmentally derived waterborne pathogens and can be used for the sanitary assessment of water quality. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum (genotype 1) were identified in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) from the St. Lawrence River, Quebec. Approximately 67 oocysts/ml of hemolymph and 129 oocysts/g of soft tissue were recovered. The adjusted concentration of oocysts per gram of tissue was 2.2 x 10(2), and approximately 4.4 x 10(2) oocysts were recovered from a single mussel. Zebra mussels can serve as biological indicators of waterborne contamination with Cryptosporidium.

  9. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN SOURCE AND FINISHED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have occurred with the most notable being the 1993 episode in Milwaukee. As a result, the past decade has seen a massive effort expended on the development of methods to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in source and finish...

  10. A COMPARISON OF ENUMERATION TECHNIQUES FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of methods have been used to enumerate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from source or drinking waters. The reliability of these counting methods varies, in part, with suspension density, sample purity, and other factors. Frequently, the method of determination of suspens...

  11. Metam sodium reduces viability and infectivity of Eimeria oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metam sodium (MS, sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate) is a widely used soil pesticide. Fumigation or chemical sterilization of poultry litter containing infectious oocysts could be an effective strategy to block the transmission of avian coccidia. In the current study the effect of MS on the viability ...

  12. Silver Nanoparticles Decrease the Viability of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Gaiser, Birgit K.; Bhandari, Bidha; Bartley, Paul M.; Katzer, Frank; Bridle, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Oocysts of the waterborne protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum are highly resistant to chlorine disinfection. We show here that both silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions significantly decrease oocyst viability, in a dose-dependent manner, between concentrations of 0.005 and 500 μg/ml, as assessed by an excystation assay and the shell/sporozoite ratio. For percent excystation, the results are statistically significant for 500 μg/ml of AgNPs, with reductions from 83% for the control to 33% with AgNPs. For Ag ions, the results were statistically significant at 500 and 5,000 μg/ml, but the percent excystation values were reduced only to 66 and 62%, respectively, from 86% for the control. The sporozoite/shell ratio was affected to a greater extent following AgNP exposure, presumably because sporozoites are destroyed by interaction with NPs. We also demonstrated via hyperspectral imaging that there is a dual mode of interaction, with Ag ions entering the oocyst and destroying the sporozoites while AgNPs interact with the cell wall and, at high concentrations, are able to fully break the oocyst wall. PMID:26497464

  13. A sensitive method for detecting and genotyping Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts represent a considerable health risk to humans and animals because the parasite has a low infectious dose and usually exists in low numbers in environmental samples, which makes detection problematic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cryspovirus as a target f...

  14. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Soil Columns following Applications of Raw and Separated Liquid Slurries

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Heidi H.; Enemark, Heidi L.; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M. G. Mostofa

    2012-01-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry. PMID:22706058

  15. Macrophages facilitate the excystation and differentiation of Toxoplasma gondii sporozoites into tachyzoites following oocyst internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Freppel, Wesley; Puech, Pierre-Henri; Ferguson, David J. P.; Azas, Nadine; Dubey, Jitender P.; Dumètre, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of humans and animals, which is transmitted via oocysts in cat faeces or tissue cysts in contaminated meat. The robust oocyst and sporocyst walls protect the infective sporozoites from deleterious external attacks including disinfectants. Upon oocyst acquisition, these walls lose their integrity to let the sporozoites excyst and invade host cells following a process that remains poorly understood. Given the resistance of the oocyst wall to digestive enzymes and the ability of oocysts to cause parenteral infections, the present study investigated the possible contribution of macrophages in supporting sporozoite excystation following oocyst internalisation. By using single cell micromanipulations, real-time and time-point imaging techniques, we demonstrated that RAW macrophages could interact rapidly with oocysts and engulfed them by remodelling of their actin cytoskeleton. Internalised oocysts were associated to macrophage acidic compartments and showed evidences of wall disruption. Sporozoites were observed in macrophages containing oocyst remnants or in new macrophages, giving rise to dividing tachyzoites. All together, these results highlight an unexpected role of phagocytic cells in processing T. gondii oocysts, in line with non-classical routes of infection, and open new perspectives to identify chemical factors that lead to oocyst wall disruption under physiological conditions. PMID:27641141

  16. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry.

  17. Macrophages facilitate the excystation and differentiation of Toxoplasma gondii sporozoites into tachyzoites following oocyst internalisation.

    PubMed

    Freppel, Wesley; Puech, Pierre-Henri; Ferguson, David J P; Azas, Nadine; Dubey, Jitender P; Dumètre, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of humans and animals, which is transmitted via oocysts in cat faeces or tissue cysts in contaminated meat. The robust oocyst and sporocyst walls protect the infective sporozoites from deleterious external attacks including disinfectants. Upon oocyst acquisition, these walls lose their integrity to let the sporozoites excyst and invade host cells following a process that remains poorly understood. Given the resistance of the oocyst wall to digestive enzymes and the ability of oocysts to cause parenteral infections, the present study investigated the possible contribution of macrophages in supporting sporozoite excystation following oocyst internalisation. By using single cell micromanipulations, real-time and time-point imaging techniques, we demonstrated that RAW macrophages could interact rapidly with oocysts and engulfed them by remodelling of their actin cytoskeleton. Internalised oocysts were associated to macrophage acidic compartments and showed evidences of wall disruption. Sporozoites were observed in macrophages containing oocyst remnants or in new macrophages, giving rise to dividing tachyzoites. All together, these results highlight an unexpected role of phagocytic cells in processing T. gondii oocysts, in line with non-classical routes of infection, and open new perspectives to identify chemical factors that lead to oocyst wall disruption under physiological conditions. PMID:27641141

  18. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry. PMID:22706058

  19. Severe malaria in immigrant population: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Suja; Bishburg, Eliahu; Slim, Jihad; Nalmas, Sandhya

    2010-12-01

    Imported malaria continues to be an increasing medical challenge in the US. A significant proportion of imported malaria occurs in foreign born immigrants visiting their native countries and do not take prophylaxis for malaria mostly due to a misconception of being immune to malaria. The purpose of this study is to review epidemiology, clinical presentation, rate of prophylaxis and delineate the rate of severe malaria in a community hospital with largely immigrant population. Retrospective chart review of forty patients diagnosed with malaria from 1997 to 2007 at a 673 bed teaching hospital in Newark, NJ, USA. Of the 40 cases included, 90% were born in a malaria endemic area (MEA).The Majority (85%) acquired malaria while visiting the African subcontinent. Overall prophylaxis rate was only 12%. Plasmodium falciparum was the most common malaria species diagnosed. Severe malaria was diagnosed in 25% of the cases, all in foreign born subjects visiting native countries where malaria is endemic. Malaria continues to be a challenge in a population of immigrants visiting their country of origin. Low use of prophylaxis is of major concern in immigrant population especially in light of high rates of severe malaria. Primary care physicians play an important role in pre-travel advice to prevent the complications of malaria.

  20. Lymphocyte Perturbations in Malawian Children with Severe and Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Mandala, Wilson L.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Gilchrist, James J.; Graham, Stephen M.; Pensulo, Paul; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Taylor, Terrie E.; Molyneux, Elizabeth E.; Drayson, Mark T.; Ward, Steven A.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes are implicated in immunity and pathogenesis of severe malaria. Since lymphocyte subsets vary with age, assessment of their contribution to different etiologies can be difficult. We immunophenotyped peripheral blood from Malawian children presenting with cerebral malaria, severe malarial anemia, and uncomplicated malaria (n = 113) and healthy aparasitemic children (n = 42) in Blantyre, Malawi, and investigated lymphocyte subset counts, activation, and memory status. Children with cerebral malaria were older than those with severe malarial anemia. We found panlymphopenia in children presenting with cerebral malaria (median lymphocyte count, 2,100/μl) and uncomplicated malaria (3,700/μl), which was corrected in convalescence and was absent in severe malarial anemia (5,950/μl). Median percentages of activated CD69+ NK (73%) and γδ T (60%) cells were higher in cerebral malaria than in other malaria types. Median ratios of memory to naive CD4+ lymphocytes were higher in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and low in severe malarial anemia. The polarized lymphocyte subset profiles of different forms of severe malaria are independent of age. In conclusion, among Malawian children cerebral malaria is characterized by lymphocyte activation and increased memory cells, consistent with immune priming. In contrast, there are reduced memory cells and less activation in severe malaria anemia. Further studies are required to understand whether these immunological profiles indicate predisposition of some children to one or another form of severe malaria. PMID:26581890

  1. Lymphocyte Perturbations in Malawian Children with Severe and Uncomplicated Malaria.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Wilson L; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Gilchrist, James J; Graham, Stephen M; Pensulo, Paul; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Taylor, Terrie E; Molyneux, Elizabeth E; Drayson, Mark T; Ward, Steven A; Molyneux, Malcolm E; MacLennan, Calman A

    2015-11-18

    Lymphocytes are implicated in immunity and pathogenesis of severe malaria. Since lymphocyte subsets vary with age, assessment of their contribution to different etiologies can be difficult. We immunophenotyped peripheral blood from Malawian children presenting with cerebral malaria, severe malarial anemia, and uncomplicated malaria (n = 113) and healthy aparasitemic children (n = 42) in Blantyre, Malawi, and investigated lymphocyte subset counts, activation, and memory status. Children with cerebral malaria were older than those with severe malarial anemia. We found panlymphopenia in children presenting with cerebral malaria (median lymphocyte count, 2,100/μl) and uncomplicated malaria (3,700/μl), which was corrected in convalescence and was absent in severe malarial anemia (5,950/μl). Median percentages of activated CD69(+) NK (73%) and γδ T (60%) cells were higher in cerebral malaria than in other malaria types. Median ratios of memory to naive CD4(+) lymphocytes were higher in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and low in severe malarial anemia. The polarized lymphocyte subset profiles of different forms of severe malaria are independent of age. In conclusion, among Malawian children cerebral malaria is characterized by lymphocyte activation and increased memory cells, consistent with immune priming. In contrast, there are reduced memory cells and less activation in severe malaria anemia. Further studies are required to understand whether these immunological profiles indicate predisposition of some children to one or another form of severe malaria.

  2. Viability staining and animal infectivity of Cryptosporidium andersoni oocysts after long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Kvác, Martin; Kvetonová, Dana; Salát, Jirí; Ditrich, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Preservation of biological properties of oocysts during the storage is critical for experimental work. Stomach species of cryptosporidia are less resistant against external influences, and their infectivity decreases rapidly in comparison with intestinal cryptosporidia. Cryptosporidium andersoni oocysts lost their infectivity for gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) after 7 months storage in deionised water (DW) or in 2.5% potassium dichromate solution (PDS). Evaluation of oocyst viability by flow cytometry indicates higher percentage of viable oocysts stored in PDS than in DW, particularly after 6 months of storage. However, direct counting using fluorescent microscope revealed that these results are false and are influenced by the change of staining properties during the storage in PDS. Moreover, the examination of oocyst integrity by flow cytometry revealed that oocysts preserved in PDS kept their wall integrity longer than those stored in DW, and this fact should be taken into consideration during quantification of oocyst survival. PMID:17024363

  3. Co-infection with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei increases severity of malaria and trypanosomiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ademola, Isaiah Oluwafemi; Odeniran, Paul Olalekan

    2016-07-01

    Individuals in natural populations may be infected with multiple different parasites at a time. These parasites may interact with each other or act independently in the host, and this may result to varying outcomes on host health and survival. This study therefore aimed at investigating the health impact of co-infection of mice with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei. Forty Swiss albino mice (14-17g) were divided into four groups of ten. Mice in groups A and B received 10(6)P. berghei and groups B and C 10(5)T. brucei, while group D were uninfected. The co-infected mice had higher P. berghei and T. brucei parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice. The co-infected mice had significantly (p<0.05) lower survival rate compared with the mono-infected mice. Co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei resulted in rapid P. berghei and T. brucei development and increased parasitaemia. The leukocyte numbers significantly (p<0.05) reduced on days 12 and 15 post infection among P. berghei infected mice, in the presence or absence of T. brucei. Anaemia and hypoglycaemia was more severe in the co-infected mice. Therefore, co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei may increase pathologic impact to the host by increasing parasitaemia. PMID:27021269

  4. Malaria ecology and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, G. C.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the costs that climate change will exact on society is crucial to devising an appropriate policy response. One of the channels through while climate change will affect human society is through vector-borne diseases whose epidemiology is conditioned by ambient ecology. This paper introduces the literature on malaria, its cost on society, and the consequences of climate change to the physics community in hopes of inspiring synergistic research in the area of climate change and health. It then demonstrates the use of one ecological indicator of malaria suitability to provide an order-of-magnitude assessment of how climate change might affect the malaria burden. The average of Global Circulation Model end-of-century predictions implies a 47% average increase in the basic reproduction number of the disease in today's malarious areas, significantly complicating malaria elimination efforts.

  5. Malaria Prophylaxis: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Francesco; Odolini, Silvia; Autino, Beatrice; Foca, Emanuele; Russo, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    The flow of international travellers to and from malaria-endemic areas, especially Africa, has increased in recent years. Apart from the very high morbidity and mortality burden imposed on malaria-endemic areas, imported malaria is the main cause of fever possibly causing severe disease and death in travellers coming from tropical and subtropical areas, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. The importance of behavioural preventive measures (bed nets, repellents, etc.), adequate chemoprophylaxis and, in selected circumstances, stand-by emergency treatment may not be overemphasized. However, no prophylactic regimen may offer complete protection. Expert advice is needed to tailor prophylactic advice according to traveller (age, baseline clinical conditions, etc.) and travel (destination, season, etc.) characteristics in order to reduce malaria risk.

  6. Potential molecular tools for assessing the public health risk associated with waterborne Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J

    2012-08-01

    The use of multiple barrier stages at water and wastewater treatment facilities allows for the effective removal of the vast majority of coliforms and other enteric and non-enteric microbes. Subsequent disinfection steps (chlorine, ozone and UV irradiation) are utilized to inactivate microbes that escape the preceding treatment stages. Most viruses, bacteria and protozoa, such as Giardia, are effectively inactivated by chlorination; however, Cryptosporidium is relatively more resistant to environmental conditions and to chlorination. Therefore, UV disinfection has been introduced at many water and wastewater treatment plants to increase log inactivation. Any accidental treatment failure may pose a significant risk to public health. Waterborne transmission of coccidian parasites such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia continues to be a major public health concern. No effective therapies currently exist to treat cryptosporidiosis and the global increase in immunocompromised populations has emphasized the need for water utilities and public health laboratories to have immediate and reliable access to highly sensitive test methods that can determine the host specificity, viability and infectivity of protozoa in the water supply. The most common method used for monitoring Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts at intermediate treatment stages and in finished drinking water is the US EPA Method 1623. Although Cryptosporidium species are morphologically indistinguishable, they differ greatly in their host specificity and infectivity. Method 1623 provides quantitative information about Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination but cannot distinguish between species for intervention purposes in outbreak situations, nor is this method reliable for determining whether the oocyst on the slide is infective for humans. Molecular methods have proven valuable in diagnosing infectious diseases, especially those for which the causative agent is difficult to grow in culture, and

  7. Making malaria testing relevant: beyond test purchase.

    PubMed

    Bell, David; Perkins, Mark D

    2008-11-01

    Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are being procured and used in increasing numbers. However, the resultant effect of RDT-based diagnosis on fever management has been limited by lack of confidence in RDT results or the inability to act on results appropriately. If the utilisation of malaria RDTs is going to achieve the significant public health and financial benefits anticipated, they must be introduced in a carefully structured way and viewed as a tool for the management of febrile illness, not just malaria. If this is to occur, a re-think is required of the way many malaria programmes are funded and run.

  8. Inhibition of Malaria Infection in Transgenic Anopheline Mosquitoes Lacking Salivary Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sezutsu, Hideki; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an important global public health challenge, and is transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes during blood feeding. Mosquito vector control is one of the most effective methods to control malaria, and population replacement with genetically engineered mosquitoes to block its transmission is expected to become a new vector control strategy. The salivary glands are an effective target tissue for the expression of molecules that kill or inactivate malaria parasites. Moreover, salivary gland cells express a large number of molecules that facilitate blood feeding and parasite transmission to hosts. In the present study, we adapted a functional deficiency system in specific tissues by inducing cell death using the mouse Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) to the Asian malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi. We applied this technique to salivary gland cells, and produced a transgenic strain containing extremely low amounts of saliva. Although probing times for feeding on mice were longer in transgenic mosquitoes than in wild-type mosquitoes, transgenic mosquitoes still successfully ingested blood. Transgenic mosquitoes also exhibited a significant reduction in oocyst formation in the midgut in a rodent malaria model. These results indicate that mosquito saliva plays an important role in malaria infection in the midgut of anopheline mosquitoes. The dysfunction in the salivary glands enabled the inhibition of malaria transmission from hosts to mosquito midguts. Therefore, salivary components have potential in the development of new drugs or genetically engineered mosquitoes for malaria control. PMID:27598328

  9. Inhibition of Malaria Infection in Transgenic Anopheline Mosquitoes Lacking Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke S; Sumitani, Megumi; Kasashima, Katsumi; Sezutsu, Hideki; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is an important global public health challenge, and is transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes during blood feeding. Mosquito vector control is one of the most effective methods to control malaria, and population replacement with genetically engineered mosquitoes to block its transmission is expected to become a new vector control strategy. The salivary glands are an effective target tissue for the expression of molecules that kill or inactivate malaria parasites. Moreover, salivary gland cells express a large number of molecules that facilitate blood feeding and parasite transmission to hosts. In the present study, we adapted a functional deficiency system in specific tissues by inducing cell death using the mouse Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) to the Asian malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi. We applied this technique to salivary gland cells, and produced a transgenic strain containing extremely low amounts of saliva. Although probing times for feeding on mice were longer in transgenic mosquitoes than in wild-type mosquitoes, transgenic mosquitoes still successfully ingested blood. Transgenic mosquitoes also exhibited a significant reduction in oocyst formation in the midgut in a rodent malaria model. These results indicate that mosquito saliva plays an important role in malaria infection in the midgut of anopheline mosquitoes. The dysfunction in the salivary glands enabled the inhibition of malaria transmission from hosts to mosquito midguts. Therefore, salivary components have potential in the development of new drugs or genetically engineered mosquitoes for malaria control. PMID:27598328

  10. Evaluation of solar photocatalysis using TiO2 slurry in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Abeledo-Lameiro, María Jesús; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium is a genus of enteric protozoan parasites of medical and veterinary importance, whose oocysts have been reported to occur in different types of water worldwide, offering a great resistant to the water treatment processes. Heterogeneous solar photocatalysis using titanium dioxide (TiO2) slurry was evaluated on inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water. Suspensions of TiO2 (0, 63, 100 and 200mg/L) in distilled water (DW) or simulated municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent spiked with C. parvum oocysts were exposed to simulated solar radiation. The use of TiO2 slurry at concentrations of 100 and 200mg/L in DW yielded a high level of oocyst inactivation after 5h of exposure (4.16±2.35% and 15.03±4.54%, respectively, vs 99.33±0.58%, initial value), representing a good improvement relative to the results obtained in the samples exposed without TiO2 (51.06±9.35%). However, in the assays carried out using simulated MWTP effluent, addition of the photocatalyst did not offer better results. Examination of the samples under bright field and epifluorescence microscopy revealed the existence of aggregates comprising TiO2 particles and parasitic forms, which size increased as the concentration of catalyst and the exposure time increased, while the intensity of fluorescence of the oocyst walls decreased. After photocatalytic disinfection process, the recovery of TiO2 slurry by sedimentation provided a substantial reduction in the parasitic load in treated water samples (57.81±1.10% and 82.10±2.64% for 200mg/L of TiO2 in DW and in simulated MWTP effluent, respectively). Although further studies are need to optimize TiO2 photocatalytic disinfection against Cryptosporidium, the results obtained in the present study show the effectiveness of solar photocatalysis using TiO2 slurry in the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in distilled water.

  11. Evaluation of solar photocatalysis using TiO2 slurry in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Abeledo-Lameiro, María Jesús; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium is a genus of enteric protozoan parasites of medical and veterinary importance, whose oocysts have been reported to occur in different types of water worldwide, offering a great resistant to the water treatment processes. Heterogeneous solar photocatalysis using titanium dioxide (TiO2) slurry was evaluated on inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water. Suspensions of TiO2 (0, 63, 100 and 200mg/L) in distilled water (DW) or simulated municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent spiked with C. parvum oocysts were exposed to simulated solar radiation. The use of TiO2 slurry at concentrations of 100 and 200mg/L in DW yielded a high level of oocyst inactivation after 5h of exposure (4.16±2.35% and 15.03±4.54%, respectively, vs 99.33±0.58%, initial value), representing a good improvement relative to the results obtained in the samples exposed without TiO2 (51.06±9.35%). However, in the assays carried out using simulated MWTP effluent, addition of the photocatalyst did not offer better results. Examination of the samples under bright field and epifluorescence microscopy revealed the existence of aggregates comprising TiO2 particles and parasitic forms, which size increased as the concentration of catalyst and the exposure time increased, while the intensity of fluorescence of the oocyst walls decreased. After photocatalytic disinfection process, the recovery of TiO2 slurry by sedimentation provided a substantial reduction in the parasitic load in treated water samples (57.81±1.10% and 82.10±2.64% for 200mg/L of TiO2 in DW and in simulated MWTP effluent, respectively). Although further studies are need to optimize TiO2 photocatalytic disinfection against Cryptosporidium, the results obtained in the present study show the effectiveness of solar photocatalysis using TiO2 slurry in the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in distilled water. PMID:27543761

  12. Investigating Attachment Behaviors of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Using Collision Efficiency in Laboratory Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Hou, L.; Atwill, R.; Packman, A. I.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the most common enteric parasites of humans and domestic animals, and a number of outbreaks of Cryprosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by Cryptosporidium have been reported worldwide. Natural porous media has been demonstrated to be an effective filter for removing Cryptosporidium parvum from contaminated water and the amount of Cryptosporidium filtered is known to be highly dependent on physical and chemical conditions of the porous media and the water. Cryptosporidium deposition in saturated porous media involves two main steps: approach and attachment. In contrast to the approach mechanisms, attachment processes have not been systematically described to predict a priori because theories that represent attachment behavior (colloid stability) such as DLVO are insufficient to explain experimental data. For this reason, attachment efficiency is calculated based on empirical data, typically experimental breakthrough curves in laboratory columns or field experiments. In this study, collision (attachment) efficiencies (α) of C. parvum oocyst were calculated to test the effect of chemical property changes on the association of oocysts with sand grains. The breakthrough curve data obtained from twelve column experiments and three models were employed to calculate single collector efficiency (η) and α. The first ten experiments were conducted by changing ionic strength and pH, and mixing with natural sediments under the same physical properties (same η). Our experiment results show that iron coating or clay/suspended solids mixture drastically enhanced oocyst deposition. The experiments also showed that increase in ionic strength and decrease in pH enhanced the attachment efficiency. However, the experiment with 100mM NaCl resulted in low attachment efficiency and the experiment with pH 8.5 showed similar attachment efficiency to the one at pH 7. Based on the results from two additional experiments with different flow velocities, it

  13. Malaria at Christmas: risks of prophylaxis versus risks of malaria.

    PubMed

    Reid, A J; Whitty, C J; Ayles, H M; Jennings, R M; Bovill, B A; Felton, J M; Behrens, R H; Bryceson, A D; Mabey, D C

    1998-11-28

    A large increase in the number of falciparum malaria cases imported into the UK was reported to the malaria reference laboratory in the first quarter of 1998. Contributory factors were unusually heavy rains in east Africa and a reduction in the use of the most effective antimalarial drug, mefloquine. There was also an increase in the number of cases of severe malaria in the UK. During December 1997 and January 1998, the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, treated 5 patients for severe malaria and gave advice on 20 more patients with malaria who had been admitted to intensive care units throughout England. 4 of the severe cases treated at the hospital are reported. In 3 of those 4 cases, incorrect, misleading, or inadequate advice was given by health care professionals. Media coverage of the adverse effects of antimalarial drugs has contributed to confusion about prophylactic regimens among both health care professionals and the public. The incidence of falciparum malaria among travellers who do not take prophylactic drugs is about 0.6% in east Africa and 3.5% in west Africa over a 2-week travel period. Travellers need to take measures to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes and should be taught to promptly seek medical help if they develop a fever while abroad or after they return. Moreover, using any one of the recommended prophylactic regimens is better than not using a potent regimen or no prophylaxis at all. Mefloquine is 90% protective against malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. While the efficacy of proguanil and chloroquine in 1987 was about 70% in west Africa and 50% in east Africa, those levels are now probably lower. The side effects of antimalarial drugs are discussed.

  14. Characterization of a developmentally regulated oocyst protein from Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Barfield, R C

    2003-06-01

    Changes in proteins during sporulation of Eimeria tenella oocysts were investigated. Unsporulated E. tenella oocysts collected from cecal tissue at 7 days postinoculation were sporulated in aerated media at 28 C for 0-48 hr. Gel analysis of soluble protein extracts prepared from oocysts from their respective time points indicated the presence of 2 prominent bands with relative molecular weight (Mr) in the range of 30 kDa and making up 20% of the total protein. These 2 bands, designated as major oocyst proteins (MOPs), were absent or barely detectable by 21 hr of sporulation. MOP bands were weakly reactive with glycoprotein stain but showed no mobility shift on deglycosylation. By gel analysis it was shown that the purified MOPs consisted of 2 bands of Mr 28.7 and 30.1 kDa. However, by matrix-assisted laser deabsorption-time of flight analysis it was shown that masses were about 17% lower. Internal sequence analysis of the 28.7-kDa protein generated 2 peptides of 17 and 14 amino acids in length, consistent with a recently described protein coded by the gam56 gene and expressed in E. maxima gametocytes. Rabbit antibodies made against MOPs were localized to outer portions of sporocysts before excystment and to the apical end of in vitro-derived sporozoites. These same antibodies were found to react with bands of Mr 101 and 65 kDa by Western blot but did not recognize MOPs in soluble or insoluble sporozoite extracts. The data suggest that the MOPs are derived from part of a gametocyte protein similar to that coded by gam56 and are processed during sporulation into sporocyst and sporozoite proteins. Alternatively, the binding of anti-MOP to 101- and 65-kDa proteins may result from alternatively spliced genes as the development of parasite proceeds.

  15. Prevalence of Enteric Protozoan Oocysts with Special Reference to Sarcocystis cruzi among Fecal Samples of Diarrheic Immunodeficient Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Agholi, Mahmoud; Shahabadi, Shahrbanou Naderi; Motazedian, Mohammad Hossein; Hatam, Gholam Reza

    2016-01-01

    The genus Sarcocystis is not usually considered as an important enteric pathogen in immune compromised patients. It might be expected that species for which humans are the final host (Sarcocystis hominis and Sarcocystis suihominis as well as possibly others) would be encountered increasingly often in immunodeficient persons. This study aimed to address how to detect and differentiate Sarcocystis oocysts and/or sporocysts from enteric protozoans in the diarrheal samples of immunodeficient patients in Shiraz, Iran. Diarrheal samples of 741 immunodeficient patients with recurrent persistent or chronic diarrhea were examined by microscopy and molecular biological analysis. Oocysts-positive samples were 68 Cryptosporidium spp., 9 Cystoisospora belli (syn. Isospora belli), 2 Cyclospora cayetanensis, and 15 microsporidia (Enterocytozoon bieneusi). Sarcocystis-like sporocysts found from a woman were identified as Sarcocystis cruzi through 18S rDNA amplification and phylogenetic analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of S. cruzi from a human. PMID:27417091

  16. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  17. [Current malaria situation in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Gockchinar, T; Kalipsi, S

    2001-01-01

    Geographically, Turkey is situated in an area where malaria is very risky. The climatic conditions in the region are suitable for the malaria vector to proliferate. Due to agricultural infrastructural changes, GAP and other similar projects, insufficient environmental conditions, urbanization, national and international population moves, are a key to manage malaria control activities. It is estimated that malaria will be a potential danger for Turkey in the forthcoming years. The disease is located largely in south-eastern Anatolia. The Diyarbakir, Batman, Sanliurfa, Siirt, and Mardin districts are the most affected areas. In western districts, like Aydin and Manisa, an increase in the number of indigenous cases can be observed from time to time. This is due to workers moving from malaria districts to western parts to final work. Since these workers cannot be controlled, the population living in these regions get infected from indigenous cases. There were 84,345 malaria cases in 1994 and 82,096 in 1995, they decreased to 60,884 in 1996 and numbered 35,456 in 1997. They accounted for 36,842 and 20,963 in 1998 and 1999, respectively. In Turkey there are almost all cases of P. vivax malaria. There are also P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria cases coming from other countries: There were 321 P. vivax cases, including 2 P. falciparum ones, arriving to Turkey from Iraq in 1995. The P. vivax malaria cases accounted for 229 in 1996, and 67, cases P. vivax including 12 P. falciparum cases, in 1997, and 4 P. vivax cases in 1998 that came from that country. One P. vivax case entered Turkey from Georgia in 1998. The cause of higher incidence of P. vivax cases in 1995, it decreasing in 1999, is the lack of border controls over workers coming to Turkey. The other internationally imported cases are from Syria, Sudan, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Nigeria, India, Azerbaijan, Malaysia, Ghana, Indonesia, Yemen. Our examinations have shown that none of these internationally imported cases

  18. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khurana, S K; Talib, V H

    1996-12-01

    Recently it has become evident that he same candidate antigen can be shared by several of the parasite stages, and thus the concept of a multistage vaccine is becoming more and more attractive. A TDR Task Force evaluated the promise and stage of development of some 20 existing asexual blood stage candidate antigens and prepared a strategy for their development leading to clinical testing and field trials, Amongst these are merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1), Serine Rich Antigen (SERA), Apical Membrane Antigen (AMA-1), and Erythrocyte Binding Antigen (EBA). A field study conducted in Tanzanian children showed that the SPf66 Colombian vaccine was safe, induced antibodies, and reduced the risk of developing clinical malaria by around 30%. This study, confirmed the potential of the vaccine to confer partial protection in areas of high as well as low intensity of transmission. Pfs25 is a leading candidate antigen for a transmission blocking vaccine. It is found in the ookinete stage of the parasite in the mosquito midgut. Gramme amounts of GMP-grade material have been produced and a vaccine based on the Pfs25 antigen formulated with alum should have gone into phase I and II clinical trials in the USA and Africa during 1995. Because the first malaria prototype vaccine to be tried out in people on a large scale has been the polymerized synthetic peptide developed by patarroye on the basis of the SPf66 antigen of P. faliciparum, the results are with much interest. It is still premature to predict the effectiveness of this vaccine globally, but its development will encourage further progress in a fields that has repeatedly been characterized by raised and then dashed drops. These various vaccines are based on the classical approach to vaccination, which is to raise host immunity against the parasite so as to reduce parasite densities or to sterilize an infection. A newer approach is development of antidisease vaccines which aim to alleviate morbidity by suppressing

  19. Toxoplasma gondii: uptake and survival of oocysts in free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Dubey, J P; Barragan, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    Waterborne transmission of the oocyst stage of Toxoplasma gondii can cause outbreaks of clinical toxoplasmosis in humans and infection of marine mammals. In water-related environments and soil, free-living amoebae are considered potential carriers of various pathogens, but knowledge on interactions with parasitic protozoa remains elusive. In the present study, we assessed whether the free-living Acanthamoeba castellanii, due to its phagocytic activity, can interact with T. gondii oocysts. We report that amoebae can internalize T. gondii oocysts by active uptake. Intracellular oocysts in amoebae rarely underwent phagocytic lysis, retained viability and established infection in mice. Interaction of T. gondii with amoebae did not reduce the infectivity and pathogenicity of oocysts even after prolonged co-cultivation. Our results show that uptake of oocysts by A. castellanii does not restrain the transmission of T. gondii in a murine infection model.

  20. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  1. Malaria in Brazil: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Brazil, with approximately 306 000 registered cases in 2009, but it is estimated that in the early 1940s, around six million cases of malaria occurred each year. As a result of the fight against the disease, the number of malaria cases decreased over the years and the smallest numbers of cases to-date were recorded in the 1960s. From the mid-1960s onwards, Brazil underwent a rapid and disorganized settlement process in the Amazon and this migratory movement led to a progressive increase in the number of reported cases. Although the main mosquito vector (Anopheles darlingi) is present in about 80% of the country, currently the incidence of malaria in Brazil is almost exclusively (99,8% of the cases) restricted to the region of the Amazon Basin, where a number of combined factors favors disease transmission and impair the use of standard control procedures. Plasmodium vivax accounts for 83,7% of registered cases, while Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for 16,3% and Plasmodium malariae is seldom observed. Although vivax malaria is thought to cause little mortality, compared to falciparum malaria, it accounts for much of the morbidity and for huge burdens on the prosperity of endemic communities. However, in the last few years a pattern of unusual clinical complications with fatal cases associated with P. vivax have been reported in Brazil and this is a matter of concern for Brazilian malariologists. In addition, the emergence of P. vivax strains resistant to chloroquine in some reports needs to be further investigated. In contrast, asymptomatic infection by P. falciparum and P. vivax has been detected in epidemiological studies in the states of Rondonia and Amazonas, indicating probably a pattern of clinical immunity in both autochthonous and migrant populations. Seropidemiological studies investigating the type of immune responses elicited in naturally-exposed populations to several malaria vaccine candidates in

  2. Comparison of Routine Health Management Information System Versus Enhanced Inpatient Malaria Surveillance for Estimating the Burden of Malaria Among Children Admitted to Four Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Miles, Melody; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Wanzira, Humphrey; Rubahika, Denis; Nasr, Sussann; Kapella, Bryan K.; Yoon, Steven S.; Chang, Michelle; Yeka, Adoke; Staedke, Sarah G.; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The primary source of malaria surveillance data in Uganda is the Health Management Information System (HMIS), which does not require laboratory confirmation of reported malaria cases. To improve data quality, an enhanced inpatient malaria surveillance system (EIMSS) was implemented with emphasis on malaria testing of all children admitted in select hospitals. Data were compared between the HMIS and the EIMSS at four hospitals over a period of 12 months. After the implementation of the EIMSS, over 96% of admitted children under 5 years of age underwent laboratory testing for malaria. The HMIS significantly overreported the proportion of children under 5 years of age admitted with malaria (average absolute difference = 19%, range = 8–27% across the four hospitals) compared with the EIMSS. To improve the quality of the HMIS data for malaria surveillance, the National Malaria Control Program should, in addition to increasing malaria testing rates, focus on linking laboratory test results to reported malaria cases. PMID:25422396

  3. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe. PMID:26880124

  4. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe.

  5. Comparative infectivity of oocysts and bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii for intermediate (mice) and definitive (cats) hosts.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2006-08-31

    Tachyzoites, bradyzoites (in tissue cysts), and sporozoites (in oocysts) are the three infectious stages of Toxoplasma gondii. The prepatent period (time to shedding of oocysts after primary infection) varies with the stage of T. gondii ingested by the cat. The prepatent period (pp) after ingesting bradyzoites is short (3-10 days) while it is long (18 days or longer) after ingesting oocysts or tachyzoites. The conversion of bradyzoites to tachyzoites and tachyzoites to bradyzoites is biologically important in the life cycle of T. gondii and it has been proposed that the pp can be used to study stage conversion. In the present study, infectivity of oocysts and bradyzoites released from tissue cysts of a recent isolate of T. gondii, TgCkAr23, to cats and mice was compared. Ten-fold dilutions of oocysts or bradyzoites were administered orally to cats, and orally and subcutaneously to mice. Of the 29 cats each fed 1-10 million oocysts only one cat shed oocysts and the pp was 23 days; all cats remained asymptomatic. In contrast, all mice administered the same 10-fold dilutions of oocysts either orally or subcutaneously died of toxoplasmosis. The results confirm that infectivity of the oocysts to cats is lower than for mice and that oocysts are non-pathogenic for cats. Of the 41 cats each fed 1-1,000 free bradyzoites, 15 shed oocysts with a short pp of 4-9 days, and all remained asymptomatic. The infectivity of bradyzoites to mice by the oral route was approximately 100 times lower than that by the subcutaneous route. The results confirm the hypothesis that the pp in cats is stage and not dose dependent, and that transmission of T. gondii is most efficient when cats consume tissue cysts (carnivory) or when intermediate hosts consume oocysts (fecal-oral transmission).

  6. Straining, attachment, and detachment of cryptosporidium oocysts in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Bradford, S A; Bettahar, M

    2005-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the transport and deposition behavior for pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts is needed to assess contamination and protect water resources. Experimental and modeling studies were undertaken to examine the roles of attachment, detachment, and straining on oocyst transport and retention. Saturated column studies were conducted using Ottawa aquifer sands (U.S. Silica, Ottawa, IL) with median grain sizes of 710, 360, and 150 microm. Decreasing the median sand size tended to produce lower effluent concentrations, greater oocyst retention in the sand near the column inlet, and breakthrough of oocysts at later times. Oocyst transport data also exhibited concentration tailing. Mathematical modeling of the oocyst transport data using fitted first-order attachment and detachment coefficients provided a satisfactory description of the observed effluent concentration curves, but a poor characterization of the oocyst spatial distribution. Modeling of these data using an irreversible straining term that is depth dependent provided a better description of the oocyst spatial distribution, but could not account for the observed effluent concentration tailing or late breakthrough times. A more physically realistic description of the data was obtained by modeling attachment, detachment, and straining. The percentage of total oocysts retained by straining was estimated from effluent mass balance considerations to be 68% for 710-microm sand, 79% for 360-microm sand, and 87% for 150-microm sand. Straining coefficients were then selected to achieve these percentages of total oocyst retention, and attachment and detachment coefficients were fitted to the effluent concentration curves. Dramatic differences in the predicted oocyst breakthrough curves were observed at greater transport distances for the various model formulations (inclusion or exclusion of straining). Justification for oocyst straining was provided by trends in the transport data, simulation

  7. Preferential transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in variably saturated subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Darnault, Christophe J G; Garnier, Patricia; Kim, Young-Jin; Oveson, Kristina L; Steenhuis, Tammo S; Parlange, J Yves; Jenkins, Michael; Ghiorse, William C; Baveye, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    When oocysts of the protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum contaminate drinking water supplies, they can cause outbreaks of Cryptosporidiosis, a common waterborne disease. Of the different pathways by which oocysts can wind up in drinking water, one has received little attention to date; that is, because soils are often considered to be perfect filters, the transport of oocysts through the subsoil to groundwater is generally ignored. To evaluate the significance of this pathway, a series of laboratory experiments investigated subsurface transport of oocysts. Experiment 1 was carried out in a vertical 18-cm-long column filled either with glass beads or silica sand, under conditions known to foster fingered flow. Experiment 2 involved undisturbed, macroporous soil columns subjected to macropore flow. Experiment 3 aimed to study the lateral flow on an undisturbed soil block. The columns and soil samples were subjected to artificial rainfall and were allowed to reach steady state. At that point, feces of contaminated calves were applied at the surface along with a known amount of potassium chloride to serve as a tracer, and rainfall was continued at the same rate. The breakthrough of oocysts and chloride, monitored in the effluent, demonstrate the importance of preferential flow on the transport of oocysts. Compared with chloride, peak oocyst concentrations were not appreciably delayed and, in some cases, occurred even before the chloride peak. Recovery rates for oocysts were low, ranging from 0.1 to 10.4% of the oocysts originally applied on the columns. However, the numbers of oocysts present in the effluents were still orders of magnitude higher than 10 oocysts, the infectious dose considered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, to be sufficient to cause Cryptosporidiosis in healthy adults. These results suggest that the transport of oocysts in the subsurface via preferential flow may create a significant risk of

  8. Use of Mosquito Preventive Measures Is Associated with Increased RBC CR1 Levels in a Malaria Holoendemic Area of Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    King, Christine; Du, Ping; Otieno, Walter; Stoute, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is responsible for close to 1 million deaths each year, mostly among African children. Red blood cells (RBCs) of children with severe malarial anemia show loss of complement regulatory proteins such as complement receptor 1 (CR1). We carried out this study to identify socio-economic, environmental, and biological factors associated with the loss of RBC CR1. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a malaria holoendemic area of western Kenya. Twelve socioeconomic, environmental, and biological factors were examined for a relationship with RBC CR1 level using bivariate linear regression followed by creation of a multivariate linear regression model. A significant positive relationship between RBC CR1 level and use of mosquito countermeasures was found. However, there was no evidence of a significant relationship between RBC CR1 level and malaria infection or parasitemia level. Reducing mosquito exposure may aid in the prevention of severe malarial anemia by reducing the number of infections and thus preserving RBC CR1. PMID:25385855

  9. Uptake and transmission of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts by migratory, filter-feeding fish.

    PubMed

    Massie, Gloeta N; Ware, Michael W; Villegas, Eric N; Black, Michael W

    2010-05-11

    From bottlenose dolphins, to walruses, to sea otters, the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is infecting marine mammals around the world. Whereas the terrestrial transmission pathways of T. gondii are well-described, the transmission pathway by which marine mammals are being infected is unknown. We hypothesize that migratory filter feeders, specifically northern anchovies (Engraulis mordax) and Pacific sardines (Sardinops sagax), are serving as biotic vectors for T. gondii within the marine environment. By filtering oocysts from seawater, these fishes could be transporting the oocysts from nearshore to pelagic environments. In this study, we experimentally exposed northern anchovies and Pacific sardines to T. gondii oocysts under laboratory conditions. Following exposure, the fishes' alimentary canals were harvested and assayed for the presence of T. gondii by PCR. Fish exposed to as few as 1197 oocysts/L seawater tested positive for T. gondii by PCR. In total, the PCR assay detected T. gondii DNA in 66% (40/61) of the exposed fishes. Oocyst infectivity was confirmed by mouse bioassay: 30% (7/23) of mice developed toxoplasmosis when fed fish exposed to 100,000 oocysts/L. This study demonstrates that both northern anchovies and Pacific sardines can filter T. gondii oocysts out of seawater under experimental conditions. Our experiments with anchovies demonstrated that the oocysts persisted in the fish for at least 8h post-exposure and our experiments with sardines demonstrated that the oocysts remained infectious inside the fish's alimentary canals. PMID:20097009

  10. Pilot-scale evaluation of UV reactors' efficacy against in vitro infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Entrala, Emilio; Garin, Yves J F; Meneceur, Pascale; Hayat, Maud; Scherpereel, Guillaume; Savin, Cyril; Féliers, Cédric; Derouin, Francis

    2007-12-01

    An experimental protocol was developed to assess the efficacy of two UV reactors (medium-pressure UVaster), and a low-pressure reactor) on the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts under conditions mimicking small- or medium-size water distribution units. The protocol included purification of large amounts of viable oocysts from experimentally infected calf feces, pilot spiking, sample concentration and purification after UV radiation, oocyst quantification and in vitro evaluation of oocyst infectivity on HCT-8 cells. Water samples were collected at intervals upstream and downstream from the UV reactor after spiking. Oocysts were concentrated by centrifugation, purified by immunomagnetic capture and quantified using laser-scanning cytometry. An enhanced in vitro infectivity test on HCT-8 cells was developed, where oocysts were pretreated in order to obtain maximized in vitro infectivity, and infectious foci were enumerated after immunofluorescence staining after 3 days of culture. This method was superior to viability measured by excystation for assessing oocyst infectivity. The infectivity rate of untreated oocysts ranged between 9% and 30% in replicate experiments. The method allowed us to determine inactivation rates >4.92 (log) with UVaster and >4.82 with the LP reactor after exposition of oocysts to an effective dose of 400 J m(-2) at flow rates of 15 and 42 m(3) h(-1), respectively.

  11. Use of aerobic spores as a surrogate for cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Headd, Brendan; Bradford, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Waterborne illnesses are a growing concern among health and regulatory agencies worldwide. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has established several rules to combat the contamination of water supplies by cryptosporidium oocysts, however, the detection and study of cryptosporidium oocysts is hampered by methodological and financial constraints. As a result, numerous surrogates for cryptosporidium oocysts have been proposed by the scientific community and efforts are underway to evaluate many of the proposed surrogates. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the suitability of aerobic bacterial spores to serve as a surrogate for cryptosporidium oocysts in identifying contaminated drinking waters. To accomplish this we present a comparison of the biology and life cycles of aerobic spores and oocysts and compare their physical properties. An analysis of their surface properties is presented along with a review of the literature in regards to the transport, survival, and prevalence of aerobic spores and oocysts in the saturated subsurface environment. Aerobic spores and oocysts share many commonalities with regard to biology and survivability, and the environmental prevalence and ease of detection make aerobic spores a promising surrogate for cryptosporidium oocysts in surface and groundwater. However, the long-term transport and release of aerobic spores still needs to be further studied, and compared with available oocyst information. In addition, the surface properties and environmental interactions of spores are known to be highly dependent on the spore taxa and purification procedures, and additional research is needed to address these issues in the context of transport.

  12. Effect of anaerobic digestion on oocysts of the protozoan Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M R; Shih, J C

    1988-01-01

    The effect of anaerobic digestion of poultry waste on oocysts of the protozoan Eimeria tenella, a common enteric pathogen that causes coccidiosis in poultry, was investigated in this study. Thermophilic (50 degrees C) and mesophilic (35 degrees C) anaerobic digestors, with poultry manure as the substrate, were inoculated with the oocysts. The oocysts were damaged during anaerobic digestion, as determined by morphological change and loss of their ability to sporulate. The recovered oocysts were tested for their infectivity in young chicks, as measured by body weight gain, mortality, and cecal lesions. Oocysts lost all their infectivity during thermophilic digestion, while oocysts subjected to mesophilic digestion remained moderately infective in comparison with untreated oocysts, which produced severe coccidiosis, high mortality, and low body weight gain in chicks. Oocysts were inactivated at 50 degrees C when they were suspended in digestor fluid or saline. Inactivation at 35 degrees C was significantly stronger in the digestor fluid than in the saline, which implied that factors other than temperature were involved in the lethal effect of anaerobic digestion on protozoan oocysts. In this study we demonstrated that the treatment of animal waste by anaerobic digestion, especially at a thermophilic temperature, has the benefits of pathogen control and protection of human and animal health in a farm environment. Images PMID:3202626

  13. Molecules to modeling: Toxoplasma gondii oocysts at the human–animal–environment interface

    PubMed Central

    VanWormer, Elizabeth; Fritz, Heather; Shapiro, Karen; Mazet, Jonna A.K.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission of extremely resistant Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has resulted in infection of diverse species around the world, leading to severe disease and deaths in human and animal populations. This review explores T. gondii oocyst shedding, survival, and transmission, emphasizing the importance of linking laboratory and landscape from molecular characterization of oocysts to watershed-level models of oocyst loading and transport in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Building on discipline-specific studies, a One Health approach incorporating tools and perspectives from diverse fields and stakeholders has contributed to an advanced understanding of T. gondii and is addressing transmission at the rapidly changing human–animal–environment interface. PMID:23218130

  14. Radiofrequency-induced thermal inactivation of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, K E; Lagunas-Solar, M; Miller, M A; Barr, B C; Melli, A C; Packham, A E; Zeng, N; Truong, T; Conrad, P A

    2010-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, a ubiquitous parasitic protozoan, is emerging as an aquatic biological pollutant. Infections can result from drinking water contaminated with environmentally resistant oocysts. However, recommendations regarding water treatment for oocyst inactivation have not been established. In this study, the physical method of radiofrequency (RF) power was evaluated for its ability to inactivate T. gondii oocysts in water. Oocysts were exposed to various RF energy levels to induce 50, 55, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C temperatures maintained for 1 min. Post-treatment oocyst viability was determined by mouse bioassay with serology, immunohistochemistry and in vitro parasite isolation to confirm T. gondii infections in mice. None of the mice inoculated with oocysts treated with RF-induced temperatures of > or =60 degrees C in an initial experiment became infected; however, there was incomplete oocyst activation in subsequent experiments conducted under similar conditions. These results indicate that T. gondii oocysts may not always be inactivated when exposed to a minimum of 60 degrees C for 1 min. The impact of factors such as water heating time, cooling time and the volume of water treated must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of RF power for oocyst inactivation.

  15. Adjunctive therapy for cerebral malaria and other severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C; Kutamba, Elizabeth; Mugarura, Keith; Opoka, Robert O

    2010-01-01

    Severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum causes more than 800,000 deaths every year. Primary therapy with quinine or artesunate is generally effective in controlling P. falciparum parasitemia, but mortality from cerebral malaria and other forms of severe malaria remains unacceptably high. Long-term cognitive impairment is also common in children with cerebral malaria. Of the numerous adjunctive therapies for cerebral malaria and severe malaria studied over the past five decades, only one (albumin) was associated with a reduction in mortality. In this article, we review past and ongoing studies of adjunctive therapy, and examine the evidence of efficacy for newer therapies, including inhibitors of cytoadherence (e.g., levamisole), immune modulators (e.g., rosiglitazone), agents that increase nitric oxide levels (e.g., arginine) and neuroprotective agents (e.g., erythropoietin). PMID:20818944

  16. Malaria situation in the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sean; Delacollette, Charles; Chavez, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion is complex and rapidly evolving. Malaria control and elimination efforts face a daunting array of challenges including multidrug-resistant parasites. This review presents secondary data collected by the national malaria control programs in the six countries between 1998 and 2010 and examines trends over the last decade. This data has a number of limitations: it is derived exclusively from public sector health facilities; falciparum-specific and then pan-specific rapid diagnostic tests were introduced during the period under review; and, recently there has been a massive increase in case detection capability as a result of increased funding. It therefore requires cautious interpretation. A series of maps are presented showing trends in incidence, mortality and proportion of cases caused by Plasmodium falciparum over the last decade. A brief overview of institutional and implementation arrangements, historical background, demographics and key issues affecting malaria epidemiology is provided for each country. National malaria statistics for 2010 are presented and their robustness discussed in terms of the public sector's share of cases and other influencing factors such as inter-country variations in risk stratification, changes in diagnostic approach and immigration. Targets are presented for malaria control and where appropriate for elimination. Each country's artemisinin resistance status is described. The epidemiological trends presented reflect the improvement in the malaria situation, however the true malaria burden is as yet unknown. There is a need for continuing strengthening and updating of surveillance and response systems. PMID:24159830

  17. Prevalence of malaria and HIV coinfection and influence of HIV infection on malaria disease severity in population residing in malaria endemic area along the Thai-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Rattanapunya, Siwalee; Kuesap, Jiraporn; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the prevalence of malaria and HIV coinfection and assess the effect of HIV coinfection on malaria disease severity in malaria patients from the endemic area of Thailand along the Thai-Myanmar border. Blood samples were collected from a total of 867 patients with malaria (all species and severity) who attended Mae Tao clinic for migrant workers, Tak Province during 2005-2007 (439 samples), 2008-2010 (273 samples), and 2011-2013 (155 samples). The average prevalence rate of malaria and HIV coinfected cases in this malaria endemic area of the country during the three periods was 1.85%. HIV coinfection was observed only in samples with mono-infection of Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax, with similar proportions (0.81 vs. 1.04%). Patients' admission parasite density, an indicator of disease severity, was significantly higher in cases with HIV coinfection observed during 2008-2010. Anemia was found at a significantly higher frequency in patients coinfected with malaria and HIV observed during 2005-2007 compared with those infected with malaria alone. No association was observed between malaria and HIV coinfection and gender, and infected malaria species during the three observation periods. Patients with malaria and HIV coinfection had a significantly lower hemoglobin level than those with malaria infection alone. In conclusion, the prevalence of malaria and HIV coinfection in population of the malaria endemic area along the Thai-Myanmar border is low. HIV coinfection tended to increase parasite density, an indicator of malaria disease severity.

  18. Climate change and the global malaria recession

    PubMed Central

    Gething, Peter W.; Smith, David L.; Patil, Anand P.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Snow, Robert W.; Hay, Simon I.

    2010-01-01

    The current and potential future impact of climate change on malaria is of major public health interest1,2. The proposed effects of rising global temperatures on the future spread and intensification of the disease3-5, and on existing malaria morbidity and mortality rates3, substantively influence global health policy6,7. The contemporary spatial limits of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and its endemicity within this range8, when compared with comparable historical maps, offer unique insights into the changing global epidemiology of malaria over the last century. It has long been known that the range of malaria has contracted through a century of economic development and disease control9. Here, for the first time, we quantify this contraction and the global decreases in malaria endemicity since c. 1900. We compare the magnitude of these changes to the size of effects on malaria endemicity hypothesised under future climate scenarios and associated with widely used public health interventions. Our findings have two key and often ignored implications with respect to climate change and malaria. First, widespread claims that rising mean temperatures have already led to increases in worldwide malaria morbidity and mortality are largely at odds with observed decreasing global trends in both its endemicity and geographic extent. Second, the proposed future effects of rising temperatures on endemicity are at least one order of magnitude smaller than changes observed since c. 1900 and up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those that can be achieved by the effective scale-up of key control measures. Predictions of an intensification of malaria in a warmer world, based on extrapolated empirical relationships or biological mechanisms, must be set against a context of a century of warming that has seen dramatic global declines in the disease and a substantial weakening of the global correlation between malaria endemicity and climate. PMID:20485434

  19. Climate change and the global malaria recession.

    PubMed

    Gething, Peter W; Smith, David L; Patil, Anand P; Tatem, Andrew J; Snow, Robert W; Hay, Simon I

    2010-05-20

    The current and potential future impact of climate change on malaria is of major public health interest. The proposed effects of rising global temperatures on the future spread and intensification of the disease, and on existing malaria morbidity and mortality rates, substantively influence global health policy. The contemporary spatial limits of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and its endemicity within this range, when compared with comparable historical maps, offer unique insights into the changing global epidemiology of malaria over the last century. It has long been known that the range of malaria has contracted through a century of economic development and disease control. Here, for the first time, we quantify this contraction and the global decreases in malaria endemicity since approximately 1900. We compare the magnitude of these changes to the size of effects on malaria endemicity proposed under future climate scenarios and associated with widely used public health interventions. Our findings have two key and often ignored implications with respect to climate change and malaria. First, widespread claims that rising mean temperatures have already led to increases in worldwide malaria morbidity and mortality are largely at odds with observed decreasing global trends in both its endemicity and geographic extent. Second, the proposed future effects of rising temperatures on endemicity are at least one order of magnitude smaller than changes observed since about 1900 and up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those that can be achieved by the effective scale-up of key control measures. Predictions of an intensification of malaria in a warmer world, based on extrapolated empirical relationships or biological mechanisms, must be set against a context of a century of warming that has seen marked global declines in the disease and a substantial weakening of the global correlation between malaria endemicity and climate.

  20. Maternally supplied S-acyl-transferase is required for crystalloid organelle formation and transmission of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jorge M; Duarte, Neuza; Kehrer, Jessica; Ramesar, Jai; Avramut, M Cristina; Koster, Abraham J; Dessens, Johannes T; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Mair, Gunnar R

    2016-06-28

    Transmission of the malaria parasite from the mammalian host to the mosquito vector requires the formation of adequately adapted parasite forms and stage-specific organelles. Here we show that formation of the crystalloid-a unique and short-lived organelle of the Plasmodium ookinete and oocyst stage required for sporogony-is dependent on the precisely timed expression of the S-acyl-transferase DHHC10. DHHC10, translationally repressed in female Plasmodium berghei gametocytes, is activated translationally during ookinete formation, where the protein is essential for the formation of the crystalloid, the correct targeting of crystalloid-resident protein LAP2, and malaria parasite transmission. PMID:27303037

  1. Imported malaria cases in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Tasato, Daisuke; Karimata, Yosuke; Nakamura, Hideta; Miyagi, Kazuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Hirata, Tetsuo; Hokama, Akira; Cash, Haley L; Toma, Hiromu; Fujita, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    With the increase in global transportation, imported malaria has become a significant public health concern in Japan. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed all imported malaria cases in Okinawa Prefecture from 1988 to 2012. In that period, 23 patients with imported malaria were admitted to the University of the Ryukyus Hospital. Malaria types observed included Plasmodium falciparum (14 cases), P. vivax (7 cases), combined P. falciparum and P. ovale (1 case), and combined P. vivax and P. malariae (1 case). All cases were resolved by anti-malarial treatment. The clinical data from these patients highlights the importance of collecting patient travel history and ensuring an adequate supply of both diagnostic test and drug treatments in Okinawa.

  2. Advances in nanomedicines for malaria treatment.

    PubMed

    Aditya, N P; Vathsala, P G; Vieira, V; Murthy, R S R; Souto, E B

    2013-12-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that mainly affects children and pregnant women from tropical countries. The mortality rate of people infected with malaria per year is enormous and became a public health concern. The main factor that has contributed to the success of malaria proliferation is the increased number of drug resistant parasites. To counteract this trend, research has been done in nanotechnology and nanomedicine, for the development of new biocompatible systems capable of incorporating drugs, lowering the resistance progress, contributing for diagnosis, control and treatment of malaria by target delivery. In this review, we discussed the main problems associated with the spread of malaria and the most recent developments in nanomedicine for anti-malarial drug delivery.

  3. Advances in nanomedicines for malaria treatment.

    PubMed

    Aditya, N P; Vathsala, P G; Vieira, V; Murthy, R S R; Souto, E B

    2013-12-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that mainly affects children and pregnant women from tropical countries. The mortality rate of people infected with malaria per year is enormous and became a public health concern. The main factor that has contributed to the success of malaria proliferation is the increased number of drug resistant parasites. To counteract this trend, research has been done in nanotechnology and nanomedicine, for the development of new biocompatible systems capable of incorporating drugs, lowering the resistance progress, contributing for diagnosis, control and treatment of malaria by target delivery. In this review, we discussed the main problems associated with the spread of malaria and the most recent developments in nanomedicine for anti-malarial drug delivery. PMID:24192063

  4. Circadian variation in shedding of the oocysts of Isospora turdi (Apicomplexa) in blackbirds (Turdusmerula): an adaptative trait against desiccation and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Martinaud, G; Billaudelle, M; Moreau, J

    2009-05-01

    Many parasite species spend part of their life cycle in the external environment waiting for a new host. Emergence of parasites often occurs once a day, which may help to minimise mortality in an inhospitable environment and increase transition rates. Many intestinal parasites in birds are released in faeces only in the late afternoon. However, the adaptative significance of this pattern is unclear. One hypothesis is that a particular time of emergence may prevent parasite desiccation and therefore increase the parasite's life expectancy in the external environment. We tested this hypothesis experimentally using the blackbird (Turdus merula) infected with Isospora turdi (Protozoa: Apicomplexa). We found that short exposure of faeces to natural sunlight has a dramatic effect on oocyst survival. This appears to be due to the effect of warmth and ultraviolet (UV) radiation with UVB waves being more damaging than UVA. Oocysts contained in faeces shed in water are protected from the effect of sunlight. Together, these results suggest that the release of oocysts in the late afternoon is an adaptative trait to avoid desiccation and UV radiation, thus reducing mortality of the oocysts in the external environment.

  5. Malaria and Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  6. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  7. Climate Change and Malaria in Canada: A Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berrang-Ford, L.; MacLean, J. D.; Gyorkos, Theresa W.; Ford, J. D.; Ogden, N. H.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential for changes in imported and autochthonous malaria incidence in Canada as a consequence of climate change. Drawing on a systems framework, we qualitatively characterize and assess the potential direct and indirect impact of climate change on malaria in Canada within the context of other concurrent ecological and social trends. Competent malaria vectors currently exist in southern Canada, including within this range several major urban centres, and conditions here have historically supported endemic malaria transmission. Climate change will increase the occurrence of temperature conditions suitable for malaria transmission in Canada, which, combined with trends in international travel, immigration, drug resistance, and inexperience in both clinical and laboratory diagnosis, may increase malaria incidence in Canada and permit sporadic autochthonous cases. This conclusion challenges the general assumption of negligible malaria risk in Canada with climate change. PMID:19277107

  8. Prevalence of gestational, placental and congenital malaria in north-west Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequency of pregnancy-associated malaria is increasingly being documented in American countries. In Colombia, with higher frequency of Plasmodium vivax over Plasmodium falciparum infection, recent reports confirmed gestational malaria as a serious public health problem. Thick smear examination is the gold standard to diagnose malaria in endemic settings, but in recent years, molecular diagnostic methods have contributed to elucidate the dimension of the problem of gestational malaria. The study was aimed at exploring the prevalence of gestational, placental and congenital malaria in women who delivered at the local hospitals of north-west Colombia, between June 2008 and April 2011. Methods A group of 129 parturient women was selected to explore the prevalence of gestational, placental and congenital malaria in a descriptive, prospective and transversal (prevalence) design. Diagnosis was based on the simultaneous application of two independent diagnostic tests: microscopy of thick blood smears and a polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR). Results The prevalence of gestational malaria (thick smear /PCR) was 9.1%/14.0%; placental malaria was 3.3%/16.5% and congenital malaria was absent. A history of gestational malaria during the current pregnancy was significantly associated with gestational malaria at delivery. Plasmodium vivax caused 65% of cases of gestational malaria, whereas P. falciparum caused most cases of placental malaria. Conclusions Gestational and placental malaria are a serious problem in the region, but the risk of congenital malaria is low. A history of malaria during pregnancy may be a practical indicator of infection at delivery. PMID:24053184

  9. Quinolone-3-Diarylethers: A new class of drugs for a new era of malaria eradication

    PubMed Central

    White, Karen L.; Forquer, Isaac P.; Cross, Richard M.; Marfurt, Jutta; Mather, Michael W.; Delves, Michael J.; Shackleford, David M.; Saenz, Fabian E.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Steuten, Jessica; Mutka, Tina; Li, Yuexin; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ryan, Eileen; Duffy, Sandra; Kelly, Jane Xu; Sebayang, Boni F.; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Noviyanti, Rintis; Sinden, Robert E.; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; Price, Ric N.; Avery, Vicky M.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Ferrer, Santiago; Herreros, Esperanza; Sanz, Laura M.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Bathurst, Ian; Burrows, Jeremy N.; Siegl, Peter; Guy, R. Kiplin; Winter, Rolf W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Charman, Susan A.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Manetsch, Roman; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ideally antimalarial drugs can be developed which target multiple life cycle stages, thus impacting prevention, treatment and transmission of disease. Here we introduce 4-(1H)-quinolone-3-diarylethers that are selectively potent inhibitors of the parasite’s mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex. These compounds are highly active against the primary human malarias (falciparum and vivax), targeting the parasite at both the liver and blood stages as well as the forms that are crucial to disease transmission: gametocytes ⇒ zygotes ⇒ ookinetes ⇒ oocysts. Chosen as the preclinical candidate, ELQ-300 has good oral bioavailability at efficacious dosages in mice, is metabolically stable, and is highly active in rodent malaria models. Given a low predicted dose in patients and a long predicted half-life, ELQ-300 offers the hope of a new molecule for the treatment, prevention and, ultimately, eradication of malaria. PMID:23515079

  10. Avian malaria in a boreal resident species: long-term temporal variability, and increased prevalence in birds with avian keratin disorder

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkinson, Laura C.; Handel, Colleen M.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Loiseau, Claire; Sehgal, Ravinder N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of vector-borne parasitic diseases is widely influenced by biological and ecological factors. Environmental conditions such as temperature and precipitation can have a marked effect on haemosporidian parasites (Plasmodium spp.) that cause malaria and those that cause other malaria-like diseases in birds. However, there have been few long-term studies monitoring haemosporidian infections in birds in northern latitudes, where weather conditions can be highly variable and the effects of climate change are becoming more pronounced. We used molecular methods to screen more than 2,000 blood samples collected from black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), a resident passerine bird. Samples were collected over a 10 year period, mostly during the non-breeding season, at seven sites in Alaska, USA. We tested for associations between Plasmodium prevalence and local environmental conditions including temperature, precipitation, site, year and season. We also evaluated the relationship between parasite prevalence and individual host factors of age, sex and presence or absence of avian keratin disorder. This disease, which causes accelerated keratin growth in the beak, provided a natural study system in which to test the interaction between disease state and malaria prevalence. Prevalence of Plasmodium infection varied by year, site, age and individual disease status but there was no support for an effect of sex or seasonal period. Significantly, birds with avian keratin disorder were 2.6 times more likely to be infected by Plasmodium than birds without the disorder. Interannual variation in the prevalence of Plasmodium infection at different sites was positively correlated with summer temperatures at the local but not statewide scale. Sequence analysis of the parasite cytochrome b gene revealed a single Plasmodiumspp. lineage, P43. Our results demonstrate associations between prevalence of avian malaria and a variety of biological and

  11. Increased Access to Care and Appropriateness of Treatment at Private Sector Drug Shops with Integrated Management of Malaria, Pneumonia and Diarrhoea: A Quasi-Experimental Study in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Awor, Phyllis; Wamani, Henry; Tylleskar, Thorkild; Jagoe, George; Peterson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug shops are a major source of care for children in low income countries but they provide sub-standard care. We assessed the feasibility and effect on quality of care of introducing diagnostics and pre-packaged paediatric-dosage drugs for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea at drug shops in Uganda. Methods We adopted and implemented the integrated community case management (iCCM) intervention within registered drug shops. Attendants were trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in each fever case and count respiratory rate in each case of cough with fast/difficult breathing, before dispensing recommended treatment. Using a quasi-experimental design in one intervention and one non-intervention district, we conducted before and after exit interviews for drug seller practices and household surveys for treatment-seeking practices in May–June 2011 and May–June 2012. Survey adjusted generalized linear models and difference-in-difference analysis was used. Results 3759 (1604 before/2155 after) household interviews and 943 (163 before/780 after) exit interviews were conducted with caretakers of children under-5. At baseline, no child at a drug shop received any diagnostic testing before treatment in both districts. After the intervention, while no child in the non-intervention district received a diagnostic test, 87.7% (95% CI 79.0–96.4) of children with fever at the intervention district drug shops had a parasitological diagnosis of malaria, prior to treatment. The prevalence ratios of the effect of the intervention on treatment of cough and fast breathing with amoxicillin and diarrhoea with ORS/zinc at the drug shop were 2.8 (2.0–3.9), and 12.8 (4.2–38.6) respectively. From the household survey, the prevalence ratio of the intervention effect on use of RDTs was 3.2 (1.9–5.4); Artemisinin Combination Therapy for malaria was 0.74 (0.65–0.84), and ORS/zinc for diarrhoea was 2.3 (1.2–4.7). Conclusion iCCM can be utilized to improve

  12. Experimental Toxoplasma gondii oocyst infections in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Bangoura, B; Zöller, B; Koethe, M; Ludewig, M; Pott, S; Fehlhaber, K; Straubinger, R K; Daugschies, A

    2013-09-23

    Toxoplasma (T.) gondii is a protozoan parasite with a broad range of intermediate hosts. Humans are often infected by ingestion of tissue cysts in raw or undercooked meat or meat products. Turkeys as food-producing animals can also serve as intermediate hosts. The aim of the present study was to investigate occurrence and predilection sites of T. gondii infection in turkeys after oral infection with oocysts. Experimental infections with different doses of T. gondii oocysts were performed in 36 turkeys to mimic natural infection. Systemic distribution of parasitic stages was investigated by screening 14 different tissues including the edible tissues heart, liver, thigh, breast and drumstick muscle. Parasite detection was based on a conventional nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Animals were sacrificed 6-12 weeks after infection. Results demonstrated parasite spreading over the whole organism after oral infection by oocysts. Most frequently affected tissues were brain (47.2% of all brains were positive for T. gondii) and thigh muscle (25.0% positive samples). Other muscles were regularly T. gondii-positive, all other sampled tissues were positive at least once. Thus, edible tissues are one of the predilection sites of T. gondii in turkeys which renders raw or undercooked turkey meat a potential risk for parasite transmission to humans. Data were compared to results from previous parenteral turkey infections with tachyzoites. With the exception of brain, liver and breast muscle affection, no significant differences were observed between both infection routes. Both infection models could be used for research purposes with certain advantages and disadvantages.

  13. RNA Extraction Methods for Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time PCR and Microarray Analysis of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of infectious oocyst forms of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. to resist disinfection treatments and cause disease may have significant public health implications. Currently, little is known about oocyst-specific factors involved during host cell invasion p...

  14. RNA Extraction Methods for Real-Time PCR and Microarray Analyses of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts - 2nd Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of infectious oocyst forms of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. to resist disinfection treatments and cause disease may have significant public health implications. Currently, little is known about oocyst-specific factors involved during host cell invasion pr...

  15. [Fake malaria drugs].

    PubMed

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2009-03-01

    The literature on fake medicaments is sparse, even if approximately 15% of all medicaments are fake, a figure that for antimalarials in particular reaches 50% in parts of Africa and Asia. Sub-standard and fake medicines deplete the public's confidence in health systems, health professionals and in the pharmaceutical industry - and increase the risk that resistance develops. For a traveller coming from a rich Western country, choosing to buy e.g. preventive antimalarials over the internet or in poor malaria-endemic areas, the consequences may be fatal. International trade-, control- and police-collaboration is needed to manage the problem, as is the fight against poverty and poor governance.

  16. Sensitive and Rapid Detection of Viable Giardia Cysts and Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Large-Volume Water Samples with Wound Fiberglass Cartridge Filters and Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kaucner, Christine; Stinear, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    We recently described a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for detecting low numbers of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts spiked into clarified environmental water concentrates. We have now modified the assay for direct analysis of primary sample concentrates with simultaneous detection of viable C. parvum oocysts, Giardia cysts, and a novel type of internal positive control (IPC). The IPC was designed to assess both efficiency of mRNA isolation and potential RT-PCR inhibition. Sensitivity testing showed that low numbers of organisms, in the range of a single viable cyst and oocyst, could be detected when spiked into 100-μl packed pellet volumes of concentrates from creek and river water samples. The RT-PCR was compared with an immunofluorescence (IF) assay by analyzing 29 nonspiked environmental water samples. Sample volumes of 20 to 1,500 liters were concentrated with a wound fiberglass cartridge filter. Frequency of detection for viable Giardia cysts increased from 24% by IF microscopy to 69% by RT-PCR. Viable C. parvum oocysts were detected only once by RT-PCR (3%) in contrast to detection of viable Cryptosporidium spp. in four samples by IF microscopy (14%), suggesting that Cryptosporidium species other than C. parvum were present in the water. This combination of the large-volume sampling method with RT-PCR represents a significant advance in terms of protozoan pathogen monitoring and in the wider application of PCR technology to this field of microbiology. PMID:9572946

  17. Evaluation of an experimental irradiated oocysts vaccine to protect broiler chicks against avian coccidosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study investigates the use of irradiated oocysts to protect broiler chicks, raised on litter, from infection with multiple species of Eimeria. In order to determine the optimum radiation dose for each Eimeria species, day- old chicks were immunized with oocysts of E. maxima, E. acervulin...

  18. Obtaining Highly Purified Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by a Discontinuous Cesium Chloride Gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen that commonly infects humans. To date, research on understanding the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the water and environment are limited due to the lack of tools to detect oocysts in the environment. This is primarily due to the...

  19. Spinacia oleracea L. leaf stomata harboring Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts: A potential threat for food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific literature documents the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in irrigation waters and on fresh produce. In the present study spinach leaves were experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium oocysts which were subsequently irrigated with clean water daily for 5 days. As determined by confoc...

  20. Seasonal recovery of Eimeria oocysts from soil on naturally contaminated pastures.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Brian; Lepik, Triin; Järvis, Toivo

    2014-03-01

    Though Eimeria is an important parasite of cattle, research is lacking on how the parasite persist in the pasture soils. In this study, feces samples were collected from three pastures in June and October 2010 and soil samples in April 2011. Coordinates of sampling locations were recorded with Global Positioning System together with information about grass cover, shade, and elevation. All soil samples were collected from the same locations as the fecal samples and used in model evaluating the possible factors influencing the concentration of oocysts in the soil. Feces and soil samples were investigated using a quantitative flotation technique. Eimeria oocysts were found in 95.6% of fecal samples collected in summer and 84.5% of samples in fall. In contrast, the same locations soil samples were positive for Eimeria oocysts in 37.3% (summer) and 44.3% (fall). Despite larger numbers of oocysts in fecal samples shed during summer compared to fall, there was no difference in the concentration of oocysts in soil samples the following spring. The odds of higher numbers of oocysts in soil samples in spring were higher if fecal samples collected in summer were in shade or if containing Eimeria alabamensis during the fall. Factors other than the concentrations of oocysts shed in feces appear to affect whether oocysts persist between grazing seasons.

  1. Depletion of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts from Contaminated Sewage by Using Freshwater Benthic Pearl Clams (Hyriopsis schlegeli)

    PubMed Central

    Yagita, Kenji; Izumiyama, Shinji; Endo, Takuro; Itoh, Yasoo

    2012-01-01

    The freshwater benthic pearl clam, Hyriopsis schlegeli, was experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, and it was verified that the oocysts were eliminated predominantly via the fecal route, retaining their ability to infect cultured cells (HCT-8). The total fecal oocyst elimination rate was more than 90% within 5 days after exposure to the oocysts. H. schlegeli was able to survive in the final settling pond of a sewage plant for long periods, as confirmed by its pearl production. In the light of these findings, the clam was placed in the final settling pond in a trial to test its long-term efficacy in depleting oocysts contaminating the pond water. The number of clams placed was set to ensure a theoretical oocyst removal rate of around 50%, and the turbidity and the density of feed microbes in the overflow trough water of the pond were about 35% and 40 to 60% lower, respectively, than in the control water throughout the year. It was found that the clam feces containing oocysts were sufficiently heavy for them to settle to the bottom of the pond, despite the upward water flow. From these results, we concluded that efficient depletion of oocysts in the sewage water of small or midscale sewage treatment plants can be achieved by appropriate placement of H. schlegeli clams. PMID:22904053

  2. Improved Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts propagation using dexamethasone suppressed CF-1 mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst production in dexamethasone suppressed CF-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Both models can yield 1 x 109 total oocysts over a 20 day production period; however, only 20 CF-1 mice are required to reliably achieve this goal compared...

  3. Macrophages facilitate the excystation and differentiation of Toxoplasma gondii sporozoites into tachyzoites following oocyst internalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of humans and domestic animals, which is transmitted via oocysts in cat faeces or tissue cysts in contaminated meat. The oocyst and sporocyst walls are multilayered polymeric structures that protect the infective sporozoites from deleterious physical and chemic...

  4. Effect of Lot Variability on Ultraviolet Radiation Inactivation Kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficiency of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for the inactivation of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum. In these studies inactivation is measured as reduction in oocysts. A primary goal is to estimate the UV radiation required to achiev...

  5. EFFECT OF LOT VARIABILITY ON ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION INACTIVATION KINETICS OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of this paper is to account for the effect of lot variability in determining the required ultraviolet (UV) radiation to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in mouse infectivity studies. The number of infectious oocysts (infective dose) per mouse is estima...

  6. Effects of ozone and UV radiation treatments on the infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical toxoplasmosis in humans has been epidemiologically-linked to the consumption of drinking water contaminated by Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. We evaluated killing of T. gondii oocysts after ultraviolet (UV) or ozone treatments by bioassay in mice and/or cell culture. A 4-log inactivation of the...

  7. Cloning and Expression of a DNA Sequence Encoding a 41-Kilodalton Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Wall Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark C.; Trout, Jim; Murphy, Charles; Harp, James A.; Higgins, Jim; Wergin, William; Fayer, Ron

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to produce a recombinant species-specific oocyst wall protein of Cryptosporidium parvum. Antigens unique to C. parvum were identified by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of oocyst proteins from several different Cryptosporidium species. Antiserum was then prepared against a 41-kDa antigen unique to C. parvum and used to identify a recombinant DNA clone, designated rCP41. Expression of CP41 mRNA in C. parvum oocysts was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Although the CP41 sequence was shown by PCR to be present in the genome of C. baileyi, CP41 mRNA was not detected in this species by RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence staining with antiserum against recombinant CP41 detected native CP41 antigen on the surface of C. parvum oocysts but failed to detect CP41 on C. baileyi oocysts. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that native CP41 was distributed unevenly on the C. parvum oocyst surface and was associated with amorphous oocyst wall material. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, purified rCP41 performed as well as native C. parvum oocyst protein in measuring the serological responses of young calves and adult cows to experimental and natural C. parvum infections. These results indicate that recombinant CP41 antigen may have potential in the immunodiagnosis of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10548585

  8. Geostatistical modelling of household malaria in Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirombo, J.; Lowe, R.; Kazembe, L.

    2012-04-01

    Malaria is one of the most important diseases in the world today, common in tropical and subtropical areas with sub-Saharan Africa being the region most burdened, including Malawi. This region has the right combination of biotic and abiotic components, including socioeconomic, climatic and environmental factors that sustain transmission of the disease. Differences in these conditions across the country consequently lead to spatial variation in risk of the disease. Analysis of nationwide survey data that takes into account this spatial variation is crucial in a resource constrained country like Malawi for targeted allocation of scare resources in the fight against malaria. Previous efforts to map malaria risk in Malawi have been based on limited data collected from small surveys. The Malaria Indicator Survey conducted in 2010 is the most comprehensive malaria survey carried out in Malawi and provides point referenced data for the study. The data has been shown to be spatially correlated. We use Bayesian logistic regression models with spatial correlation to model the relationship between malaria presence in children and covariates such as socioeconomic status of households and meteorological conditions. This spatial model is then used to assess how malaria varies spatially and a malaria risk map for Malawi is produced. By taking intervention measures into account, the developed model is used to assess whether they have an effect on the spatial distribution of the disease and Bayesian kriging is used to predict areas where malaria risk is more likely to increase. It is hoped that this study can help reveal areas that require more attention from the authorities in the continuing fight against malaria, particularly in children under the age of five.

  9. Molecular diagnostic and surveillance tools for global malaria control.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Laura K; Kain, Kevin C

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is the most devastating parasitic infection in the world, annually causing over 1 million deaths and extensive morbidity. The global burden of malaria has increased over the last several decades, as have rates of imported malaria into non-endemic regions. Rapid and accurate diagnostics are a crucial component of malaria control strategies, and epidemiological surveillance is required to monitor trends in malaria prevalence and antimalarial drug resistance. Conventional malaria diagnostic and surveillance tools can be cumbersome and slow with limitations in both sensitivity and specificity. New molecular techniques have been developed in an attempt to overcome these restrictions. These molecular techniques are discussed with regard to their technical advantages and disadvantages, with an emphasis on the practicality of implementation in malaria-endemic and non-endemic regions.

  10. Effects of ozone and ultraviolet radiation treatments on the infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts.

    PubMed

    Dumètre, Aurélien; Le Bras, Caroline; Baffet, Maxime; Meneceur, Pascale; Dubey, J P; Derouin, Francis; Duguet, Jean-Pierre; Joyeux, Michel; Moulin, Laurent

    2008-05-31

    Clinical toxoplasmosis in humans has been epidemiologically linked to the consumption of drinking water contaminated by Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. We evaluated killing of T. gondii oocysts after ultraviolet (UV) or ozone treatments by bioassay in mice and/or cell culture. A 4-log inactivation of the oocyst/sporozoite infectivity was obtained for UV fluences >20 mJ cm(-2). In contrast, oocysts were not inactivated by ozone with an exposure (Ct) up to 9.4 mg min l (-1) in water at 20 degrees C. In conclusion, UV treatment can be an effective disinfection method to inactivate T. gondii oocysts in drinking water, but ozone did not show promise in this research.

  11. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in water supplies of San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

    PubMed

    Solo-Gabriele, H M; LeRoy Ager, A; Fitzgerald Lindo, J; Dubón, J M; Neumeister, S M; Baum, M K; Palmer, C J

    1998-12-01

    During June 1996, water supplies of the city of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, were sampled to obtain an assessment of Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst concentrations. Each sample was concentrated and stained with an indirect immunofluorescent antibody, and parasites were counted through microscopic analysis. In three surface water supplies, Cryptosporidium oocyst concentrations ranged from 58 to 260 oocysts per 100 L, and Giardia cysts were present in concentrations ranging from 380 to 2100 cysts per 100 L. Unlike the surface water samples, groundwater had a higher concentration of Cryptosporidium oocysts (26/100 L) than Giardia cysts (6/100 L), suggesting that the groundwater aquifer protects the water supply more effectively from larger Giardia cysts. Cryptosporidium oocyst concentrations are within the typical range for surface water supplies in North America whereas Giardia cyst concentrations are elevated. Efforts should be made to protect raw water from sources of contamination.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of a microporous polymeric micro-filter for isolation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Lou, Chao-Ping; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2011-03-01

    A rapid and effective method to concentrate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present in large volumes of drinking water into smaller volumes is critical for accurate detection and quantification of C. parvum oocysts from drinking water. Filtration-based concentration techniques have been widely used to recover C. parvum oocysts into a small volume for downstream analysis. We present a rapid method for fabrication of a polymeric micro-filter with ordered pores and a smooth surface using UV lithography and MEMS technology. To support the filter membrane, we also developed a technique for integrated fabrication of a support mesh. We demonstrated that the filter is able to isolate the oocysts which can be further detected using fluorescent techniques. Sample loading and back-flushing using the micro-filter resulted in 95-99% recovery with a concentration ratio above 2000 of the spiked C. parvum oocysts, which showed significantly improved performance compared with current commercial filters.

  13. Cryptosporidium sp. infections in green turtles, Chelonia mydas, as a potential source of marine waterborne oocysts in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, T.K.; Balazs, G.H.; Work, T.M.; Aguirre, A.A.; Ellis, D.M.; Murakawa, S.K.K.; Morris, R.

    1997-01-01

    For the first time, Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were identified in fecal and intestinal samples from free-ranging marine turtles, Chelonia mydas, from the Hawaiian Islands. The oocysts produced positive reactions with commercial test kits recommended for the detection of human-infectious waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum.

  14. Significance of wall structure, macromolecular composition, and surface polymers to the survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure and composition of the oocyst wall are primary factors determining the survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts outside the host. An external polymer matrix (glycocalyx) may mediate interactions with environmental surfaces and, thus, affect the transport of oocysts in water, soil, an...

  15. Cryptosporidium sp. Infections in Green Turtles, Chelonia mydas, as a Potential Source of Marine Waterborne Oocysts in the Hawaiian Islands

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, T. K.; Balazs, G. H.; Work, T.; Aguirre, A. A.; Ellis, D. M.; Murakawa, S.; Morris, R.

    1997-01-01

    For the first time, Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were identified in fecal and intestinal samples from free-ranging marine turtles, Chelonia mydas, from the Hawaiian Islands. The oocysts produced positive reactions with commercial test kits recommended for the detection of human-infectious waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum. PMID:16535658

  16. REMOVAL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM BY IN-LINE FILTRATION AS A FUNCTION OF OOCYST AGE AND PRESERVATION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the impacts of oocyst preservation method and age on the removal of seeded Cryptosporidium oocysts by in-line filtration. An existing study has investigated the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum as a function of preservation method and oocyst age. Simila...

  17. REMOVAL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM BY IN-LINE FILTRATION AS A FUNCTION OF OOCYST AGE AND PRESERVATION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the impacts of oocyst preservation method and age on the removal of seeded Cryptosporidium oocysts by in-line filtration. An existing study has investigated the infectivity of Cryptosporidium Parvum as a function of preservation method and oocyst age. Simila...

  18. Modelling homogeneous regions of social vulnerability to malaria in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Bizimana, Jean Pierre; Kienberger, Stefan; Hagenlocher, Michael; Twarabamenye, Emmanuel

    2016-03-31

    Despite the decline in malaria incidence due to intense interventions, potentials for malaria transmission persist in Rwanda. To eradicate malaria in Rwanda, strategies need to expand beyond approaches that focus solely on malaria epidemiology and also consider the socioeconomic, demographic and biological/disease-related factors that determine the vulnerability of potentially exposed populations. This paper analyses current levels of social vulnerability to malaria in Rwanda by integrating a set of weighted vulnerability indicators. The paper uses regionalisation techniques as a spatially explicit approach for delineating homogeneous regions of social vulnerability to malaria. This overcomes the limitations of administrative boundaries for modelling the trans-boundary social vulnerability to malaria. The utilised approach revealed high levels of social vulnerability to malaria in the highland areas of Rwanda, as well as in remote areas where populations are more susceptible. Susceptibility may be due to the populations' lacking the capacity to anticipate mosquito bites, or lacking resilience to cope with or recover from malaria infection. By highlighting the most influential indicators of social vulnerability to malaria, the applied approach indicates which vulnerability domains need to be addressed, and where appropriate interventions are most required. Interventions to improve the socioeconomic development in highly vulnerable areas could prove highly effective, and provide sustainable outcomes against malaria in Rwanda. This would ultimately increase the resilience of the population and their capacity to better anticipate, cope with, and recover from possible infection.

  19. Modelling homogeneous regions of social vulnerability to malaria in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Bizimana, Jean Pierre; Kienberger, Stefan; Hagenlocher, Michael; Twarabamenye, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the decline in malaria incidence due to intense interventions, potentials for malaria transmission persist in Rwanda. To eradicate malaria in Rwanda, strategies need to expand beyond approaches that focus solely on malaria epidemiology and also consider the socioeconomic, demographic and biological/disease-related factors that determine the vulnerability of potentially exposed populations. This paper analyses current levels of social vulnerability to malaria in Rwanda by integrating a set of weighted vulnerability indicators. The paper uses regionalisation techniques as a spatially explicit approach for delineating homogeneous regions of social vulnerability to malaria. This overcomes the limitations of administrative boundaries for modelling the trans-boundary social vulnerability to malaria. The utilised approach revealed high levels of social vulnerability to malaria in the highland areas of Rwanda, as well as in remote areas where populations are more susceptible. Susceptibility may be due to the populations' lacking the capacity to anticipate mosquito bites, or lacking resilience to cope with or recover from malaria infection. By highlighting the most influential indicators of social vulnerability to malaria, the applied approach indicates which vulnerability domains need to be addressed, and where appropriate interventions are most required. Interventions to improve the socioeconomic development in highly vulnerable areas could prove highly effective, and provide sustainable outcomes against malaria in Rwanda. This would ultimately increase the resilience of the population and their capacity to better anticipate, cope with, and recover from possible infection. PMID:27063738

  20. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide tablets on inactivation of cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Haas, Charles N; Arrowood, Michael J; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-05-20

    The ability of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to achieve 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in drinking water has been documented. No studies have specifically addressed the effects of ClO2 on C. parvum oocyst infectivity in chlorinated recreational water venues (e.g., pools). The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of ClO2 as an alternative to existing hyperchlorination protocols that are used to achieve a 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in such venues. To obtain a 3-log inactivation of C. parvum Iowa oocysts, contact times of 105 and 128 min for a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 2.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. Contact times of 294 and 857 min for a solution containing 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 3.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. The hyperchlorination control (21 mg/L free chlorine only) required 455 min for a 3-log inactivation. Use of a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 and solutions containing 5 or 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with the addition of free chlorine appears to be a promising alternative to hyperchlorination for inactivating Cryptosporidium in chlorinated recreational water venues, but further studies are required to evaluate safety constraints on use.

  1. The Gates Malaria Partnership: a consortium approach to malaria research and capacity development.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Brian; Bhasin, Amit; Targett, Geoffrey

    2012-05-01

    Recently, there has been a major increase in financial support for malaria control. Most of these funds have, appropriately, been spent on the tools needed for effective prevention and treatment of malaria such as insecticide-treated bed nets, indoor residual spraying and artemisinin combination therapy. There has been less investment in the training of the scientists from malaria-endemic countries needed to support these large and increasingly complex malaria control programmes, especially in Africa. In 2000, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Gates Malaria Partnership was established to support postgraduate training of African scientists wishing to pursue a career in malaria research. The programme had three research capacity development components: a PhD fellowship programme, a postdoctoral fellowship programme and a laboratory infrastructure programme. During an 8-year period, 36 African PhD students and six postdoctoral fellows were supported, and two research laboratories were built in Tanzania. Some of the lessons learnt during this project--such as the need to improve PhD supervision in African universities and to provide better support for postdoctoral fellows--are now being applied to a successor malaria research capacity development programme, the Malaria Capacity Development Consortium, and may be of interest to other groups involved in improving postgraduate training in health sciences in African universities.

  2. Malaria in India: The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aparup; Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Cator, Lauren J.; Dhiman, Ramesh C.; Eapen, Alex; Mishra, Neelima; Nagpal, Bhupinder N.; Nanda, Nutan; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Read, Andrew F.; Sharma, Surya K.; Singh, Om P.; Singh, Vineeta; Sinnis, Photini; Srivastava, Harish C.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Thomas, Matthew B.; Carlton, Jane M.; Valecha, Neena

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in India and one which contributes significantly to the overall malaria burden in Southeast Asia. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Program of India reported ~1.6 million cases and ~1100 malaria deaths in 2009. Some experts argue that this is a serious underestimation and that the actual number of malaria cases per year is likely between 9 and 50 times greater, with an approximate 13-fold underestimation of malaria-related mortality. The difficulty in making these estimations is further exacerbated by (i) highly variable malaria eco-epidemiological profiles, (ii) the transmission and overlap of multiple Plasmodium species and Anopheles vectors, (iii) increasing antimalarial drug resistance and insecticide resistance, and (iv) the impact of climate change on each of these variables. Simply stated, the burden of malaria in India is complex. Here we describe plans for a Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India (CSCMi), one of ten International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMRs) located in malarious regions of the world recently funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. The CSCMi is a close partnership between Indian and United States scientists, and aims to address major gaps in our understanding of the complexity of malaria in India, including changing patterns of epidemiology, vector biology and control, drug resistance, and parasite genomics. We hope that such a multidisciplinary approach that integrates clinical and field studies with laboratory, molecular, and genomic methods will provide a powerful combination for malaria control and prevention in India. PMID:22142788

  3. [Pulmonary complications of malaria: An update].

    PubMed

    Cabezón Estévanez, Itxasne; Górgolas Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-04-15

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease worldwide, being a public health challenge in more than 90 countries. The incidence of pulmonary manifestations has increased in recent years. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe form within the pulmonary complications of malaria, with high mortality despite proper management. This syndrome manifests with sudden dyspnoea, cough and refractory hypoxaemia. Patients should be admitted to intensive care units and treated with parenteral antimalarial drug treatment and ventilatory and haemodynamic support without delay. Therefore, dyspnoea in patients with malaria should alert clinicians, as the development of respiratory distress is a poor prognostic factor.

  4. Tropical malaria does not mean hot environments.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Takaya

    2008-11-01

    If global warming progresses, many consider that malaria in presently malaria-endemic areas will become more serious, with increasing development rates of the vector mosquito and malaria parasites. However, the correlation coefficients between the monthly malaria cases and the monthly mean of daily maximum temperature were negative, showing that the number of malaria cases in tropical areas of Africa decreases during the season when temperature was higher than normal. Moreover, an analysis of temperature and development rate using a thermodynamic model showed that the estimated intrinsic optimum temperatures for the development of the malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, in the adult mosquito stage and that of the vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s. were all approximately 23-24 degrees C. Here, the intrinsic optimum temperature is defined in the thermodynamic model as the temperature at which it is assumed that there are no or negligible adverse effects for development. Therefore, this study indicates that the development of malaria parasites in their mosquito hosts and the development of their vector mosquitoes are inhibited at temperatures higher than 23-24 degrees C. If global warming progresses further, the present center of malarial endemicity in sub-Saharan Africa will move to an area with an optimum temperature for both the vector and the parasite, migrating to avoid the hot environment.

  5. Spatial targeting of interventions against malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, R.; Mendis, K. N.; Roberts, D.

    2000-01-01

    Malaria transmission is strongly associated with location. This association has two main features. First, the disease is focused around specific mosquito breeding sites and can normally be transmitted only within certain distances from them: in Africa these are typically between a few hundred metres and a kilometre and rarely exceed 2-3 kilometres. Second, there is a marked clustering of persons with malaria parasites and clinical symptoms at particular sites, usually households. In localities of low endemicity the level of malaria risk or case incidence may vary widely between households because the specific characteristics of houses and their locations affect contact between humans and vectors. Where endemicity is high, differences in human/vector contact rates between different households may have less effect on malaria case incidences. This is because superinfection and exposure-acquired immunity blur the proportional relationship between inoculation rates and case incidences. Accurate information on the distribution of malaria on the ground permits interventions to be targeted towards the foci of transmission and the locations and households of high malaria risk within them. Such targeting greatly increases the effectiveness of control measures. On the other hand, the inadvertent exclusion of these locations causes potentially effective control measures to fail. The computerized mapping and management of location data in geographical information systems should greatly assist the targeting of interventions against malaria at the focal and household levels, leading to improved effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of control. PMID:11196487

  6. Sri Lanka Malaria Maps

    PubMed Central

    Briët, Olivier JT; Gunawardena, Dissanayake M; van der Hoek, Wim; Amerasinghe, Felix P

    2003-01-01

    Background Despite a relatively good national case reporting system in Sri Lanka, detailed maps of malaria distribution have not been publicly available. Methods In this study, monthly records over the period 1995 – 2000 of microscopically confirmed malaria parasite positive blood film readings, at sub-district spatial resolution, were used to produce maps of malaria distribution across the island. Also, annual malaria trends at district resolution were displayed for the period 1995 – 2002. Results The maps show that Plasmodium vivax malaria incidence has a marked variation in distribution over the island. The incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria follows a similar spatial pattern but is generally much lower than that of P. vivax. In the north, malaria shows one seasonal peak in the beginning of the year, whereas towards the south a second peak around June is more pronounced. Conclusion This paper provides the first publicly available maps of both P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria incidence distribution on the island of Sri Lanka at sub-district resolution, which may be useful to health professionals, travellers and travel medicine professionals in their assessment of malaria risk in Sri Lanka. As incidence of malaria changes over time, regular updates of these maps are necessary. PMID:12914667

  7. Is asymptomatic malaria really asymptomatic? Hematological, vascular and inflammatory effects of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

    PubMed

    de Mast, Quirijn; Brouwers, Judith; Syafruddin, Din; Bousema, Teun; Baidjoe, Amrish Y; de Groot, Philip G; van der Ven, Andre J; Fijnheer, Rob

    2015-11-01

    Asymptomatic malaria infections are highly prevalent in malaria endemic regions and most of these infections remain undiagnosed and untreated. Whereas conventional malaria symptoms are by definition absent, little is known on the more subtle health consequences of these infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the hematologic, vascular and inflammatory effects of patent and subpatent asymptomatic malaria parasitemia in children and adults on the Indonesian island Sumba. Both children and adults with parasitemia had increased high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels compared to aparasitemic individuals. In addition, children, but not adults with parasitemia also had lower platelet counts and Hb levels and higher levels of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor-4, markers of endothelial and platelet activation, respectively. These findings suggest that asymptomatic malaria infections have subtle health consequences, especially in children, and should be regarded as potentially harmful.

  8. Is asymptomatic malaria really asymptomatic? Hematological, vascular and inflammatory effects of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

    PubMed

    de Mast, Quirijn; Brouwers, Judith; Syafruddin, Din; Bousema, Teun; Baidjoe, Amrish Y; de Groot, Philip G; van der Ven, Andre J; Fijnheer, Rob

    2015-11-01

    Asymptomatic malaria infections are highly prevalent in malaria endemic regions and most of these infections remain undiagnosed and untreated. Whereas conventional malaria symptoms are by definition absent, little is known on the more subtle health consequences of these infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the hematologic, vascular and inflammatory effects of patent and subpatent asymptomatic malaria parasitemia in children and adults on the Indonesian island Sumba. Both children and adults with parasitemia had increased high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels compared to aparasitemic individuals. In addition, children, but not adults with parasitemia also had lower platelet counts and Hb levels and higher levels of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor-4, markers of endothelial and platelet activation, respectively. These findings suggest that asymptomatic malaria infections have subtle health consequences, especially in children, and should be regarded as potentially harmful. PMID:26304688

  9. Malaria in Zhejiang Province, China, from 2005 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hualiang; Yao, Linong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Qiaoyi; Yu, Kegen; Ruan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the changing epidemiological characteristics of malaria in Zhejiang Province, China, we collected data on malaria from the Chinese Notifiable Disease Reporting System (NDRS) and analyzed them. A total of 2,738 malaria cases were identified in Zhejiang Province from 2005 to 2014, of which 2,018 were male and 720 were female. Notably, only 7% of malaria cases were indigenous and the other cases were all imported. The number of malaria cases increased from 2005 to 2007, peaked in 2007, and then decreased from 2007 to 2011. There were no indigenous cases from 2012 to 2014. Of all cases, 68% of cases contracted Plasmodium vivax, 27% of cases contracted P. falciparum, and two cases contracted P. malariae. About 88% of malaria cases during 2005–2011 occurred yearly between May and October, but the number of malaria cases in different months during 2012–2014 was similar. The median age was 33 years, and 1,892 cases occurred in persons aged 20–50 years. The proportion of businessmen increased and the proportion of migrant laborers decreased in recent years. The median time from illness onset to confirmation of malaria cases was 5 days and it decreased from 2005 to 2014. Some epidemiological characteristics of malaria have changed, and businessmen are the emphases to surveillance in every month. PMID:26078321

  10. Patterns of Cryptosporidium Oocyst Shedding by Eastern Grey Kangaroos Inhabiting an Australian Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Power, Michelle L.; Sangster, Nicholas C.; Slade, Martin B.; Veal, Duncan A.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7%) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32% to 28.5%, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 × 106 oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum “bovine” genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium “marsupial” genotype I or “marsupial” genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species. PMID:16204534

  11. Recovery of waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium from water samples by the membrane-filter dissolution method.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Cranfield, M R; Fayer, R

    1997-01-01

    The cellulose-acetate membrane (CAM)-filter dissolution method implemented into a Millipore Glass Microanalysis system was used for recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts seeded into 25 l of drinking water in polyethylene carboy aspirator bottles. CAM-entrapped oocysts were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. From 65 to 94 oocysts/l (mean 75 oocysts/l), 34.7% overall of the inoculated oocysts, were unrecovered as determined after the water had been drained from the bottle, rinsed with 1 l of eluting fluid (EF), and CAM-filtered. Efficiency rates of oocyst recovery ranged from 24.0% to 64.0% (mean 44.1%), without the use of EF and from 72.1% to 82.3% (mean 78.8%) when EF was used. To ensure a high recovery efficiency of Cryptosporidium oocysts from sampled water by the CAM-filter dissolution method, it is recommended that 1 l of EF per 25 l of water be used. PMID:9039693

  12. Identification of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by an Artificial Neural Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Kenneth W.; Oshima, Kevin H.; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2002-01-01

    Microscopic detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts is time-consuming, requires trained analysts, and is frequently subject to significant human errors. Artificial neural networks (ANN) were developed to help identify immunofluorescently labeled C. parvum oocysts. A total of 525 digitized images of immunofluorescently labeled oocysts, fluorescent microspheres, and other miscellaneous nonoocyst images were employed in the training of the ANN. The images were cropped to a 36- by 36-pixel image, and the cropped images were placed into two categories, oocyst and nonoocyst images. The images were converted to grayscale and processed into a histogram of gray color pixel intensity. Commercially available software was used to develop and train the ANN. The networks were optimized by varying the number of training images, number of hidden neurons, and a combination of these two parameters. The network performance was then evaluated using a set of 362 unique testing images which the network had never “seen” before. Under optimized conditions, the correct identification of authentic oocyst images ranged from 81 to 97%, and the correct identification of nonoocyst images ranged from 78 to 82%, depending on the type of fluorescent antibody that was employed. The results indicate that the ANN developed were able to generalize the training images and subsequently discern previously unseen oocyst images efficiently and reproducibly. Thus, ANN can be used to reduce human errors associated with the microscopic detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts. PMID:11872458

  13. Modeling Fate and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Overland and Near- surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a manure-borne protozoan parasite which is common in the environment. It has been recognized as an important microbial contaminant of water and can cause infection and diarrhea in many mammalian hosts, including humans. The laboratory experiments carried out have demonstrated that recovery of C. parvum oocysts was significantly affected by climatic and surface conditions like slope, rainfall and surface cover. The objective of this study is to develop a model for simulating transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland and near-surface flow. Modeling can help understanding oocysts transport pathways. Accordingly, best management practices (BMP) can be developed. Transport of oocysts in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the oocysts in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay). Oocysts adsorption, advection and decay processes are considered. These processes are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in oocyst concentrations in solid and liquid phases. The model results are compared with experimental data to validate the model outcome. The model output reproduced observed recovery kinetics for 1.5% slope but not for higher slopes (3.0% and 4.5%).

  14. Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L; Sangster, Nicholas C; Slade, Martin B; Veal, Duncan A

    2005-10-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7%) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32% to 28.5%, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 x 10(6) oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum "bovine" genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium "marsupial" genotype I or "marsupial" genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species.

  15. Evaluation of USEPA method 1622 for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in stream waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, O. D.; Sobsey, M.D.; Schaefer, F. W.; Francy, D.S.; Nally, R.A.; Heaney, C.D.

    2001-01-01

    To improve surveillance for Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, the US Environmental Protection Agency developed method 1622, which consists of filtration, concentration, immunomagnetic separation, fluorescent antibody and 4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counter-staining, and microscopic evaluation. Two filters were compared for analysis of 11 stream water samples collected throughout the United States. Replicate 10-L stream water samples (unspiked and spiked with 100-250 oocysts) were tested to evaluate matrix effects. Oocyst recoveries from the stream water samples averaged 22% (standard deviation [SD] = ??17%) with a membrane disk and 12% (SD = ??6%) with a capsule filter. Oocyst recoveries from reagent water precision and recovery samples averaged 39% (SD = ??13%) with a membrane disk and 47% (SD = ??19%) with a capsule filter. These results demonstrate that Cryptosporidium oocysts can be recovered from stream waters using method 1622, but recoveries are lower than those from reagent-grade water. This research also evaluated concentrations of indicator bacteria in the stream water samples. Because few samples were oocyst-positive, relationships between detections of oocysts and concentrations of indicator organisms could not be determined.

  16. Oocyst-Derived Extract of Toxoplasma Gondii Serves as Potent Immunomodulator in a Mouse Model of Birch Pollen Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Angelika; Schabussova, Irma; Drinic, Mirjana; Akgün, Johnnie; Loupal, Gerhard; Kundi, Michael; Joachim, Anja; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previously, we have shown that oral infection with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts prevented type I allergy in mice. Here we investigated whether the application of a T. gondii oocyst lysate antigen (OLA) could also reduce allergy development. BALB/c mice were immunised twice with OLA followed by sensitisation with the major birch pollen (BP) allergen Bet v 1 and an aerosol challenge with BP extract. Methods First, we tested OLA in vitro. Stimulation of splenocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) with OLA led to the production of pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines such as IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BMDC exposed to OLA upregulated the maturation markers CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHCII. Furthermore, OLA was recognised by TLR2-transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Results Immunisation of mice with OLA induced high levels of Toxoplasma-specific IgG antibodies in sera along with increased production of IFN-γ and IL-10 in Toxoplasma-antigen restimulated splenocytes. OLA reduced allergic airway inflammation as manifested by significant reduction of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar fluids, decreased cellular infiltrates and mucus production in the lungs. Accordingly, Bet v 1-specific IgE was decreased in OLA-pretreated mice. The reduced allergic immune responses were accompanied by increased numbers of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells in spleens as well as by increased numbers of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in lungs when compared to sensitised controls suggesting that these two cell populations might be involved in the suppression of the allergic immune responses. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that pretreatment with the oocyst extract can exert anti-allergic effects comparable to T. gondii infection. Thus, the immunomodulatory properties of the parasite extract indicate that this extract and in the future defined molecules thereof might serve as immunomodulatory adjuvants in allergy treatment and prophylaxis. PMID

  17. Inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a swine waste lagoon and spray field.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Liotta, Janice L; Bowman, Dwight D

    2013-04-01

    Because of outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in humans, some Cryptosporidium spp. have become a public health concern. Commercial swine operations can be a source of this protozoan parasite. Although the species distribution of Cryptosporidium is likely dominated by Cryptosporidium suis , a fraction may be comprised of other Cryptosporidium species infectious to humans such as Cryptosporidium parvum . To better understand the survival dynamics of Cryptosporidium spp., oocysts associated with swine operations, 2 experiments were performed to determine die-off rates of C. parvum oocysts in a swine waste lagoon (2009 and 2010) and its spray field (2010 and 2011). Sentinel chambers containing a lagoon effluent suspension of C. parvum oocysts were submerged in the lagoon, and triplicate chambers were removed over time; oocysts were extracted and assayed for viability. For comparative purposes, inactivation rates of Ascaris suum eggs contained in sentinel chambers were also determined. For 2 spray field experiments, air-dried and sieved surface soil was placed in sentinel chambers, hydrated, and inoculated with a lagoon effluent suspension of C. parvum oocysts. Sentinel chambers and control oocysts in PBS contained in microcentrifuge tubes were buried 1.5 cm below the soil surface in 3 blocks. Triplicate chambers and controls were removed over time; oocysts were extracted and assayed for viability. Based on the first order decay equation, days to reach 99% die-off (T(99)) were determined. T(99)-values determined for the 2 lagoon experiments were 13.1 and 20.1 wk, respectively. A T(99)-value for C. parvum in the spray field was significantly longer at 38.0 wk than the control oocysts in PBS at 29.0 wk. The waste lagoon and spray field system of manure management at this large-scale farrowing operation appeared to reduce the load of C. parvum oocysts before they can be hydrologically transported off the operation and reduces their likelihood of contaminating surface waters

  18. Efficacy of Two Peroxygen-Based Disinfectants for Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Joaquin; Sanchez-Acedo, Caridad; Avendaño, Catalina; del Cacho, Emilio; Lopez-Bernad, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Two commercial peroxygen-based disinfectants containing hydrogen peroxide plus either peracetic acid (Ox-Virin) or silver nitrate (Ox-Agua) were tested for their ability to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Oocysts were obtained from naturally infected goat kids and exposed to concentrations of 2, 5, and 10% Ox-Virin or 1, 3, and 5% Ox-Agua for 30, 60, and 120 min. In vitro excystation, vital dyes (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide), and infectivity in neonatal BALB/c mice were used to assess the viability and infectivity of control and disinfectant-treated oocysts. Both disinfectants had a deleterious effect on the survival of C. parvum oocysts, since disinfection significantly reduced and in some cases eliminated their viability and infectivity. When in vitro assays were compared with an infectivity assay as indicators of oocyst inactivation, the excystation assay showed 98.6% inactivation after treatment with 10% Ox-Virin for 60 min, while the vital-dye assay showed 95.2% inactivation and the infectivity assay revealed 100% inactivation. Treatment with 3% Ox-Agua for 30 min completely eliminated oocyst infectivity for mice, although we were able to observe only 74.7% inactivation as measured by excystation assays and 24.3% with vital dyes (which proved to be the least reliable method for predicting C. parvum oocyst viability). These findings indicate the potential efficacy of both disinfectants for C. parvum oocysts in agricultural settings where soil, housing, or tools might be contaminated and support the argument that in comparison to the animal infectivity assay, vital-dye and excystation methods overestimate the viability of oocysts following chemical disinfection. PMID:15870337

  19. Strategies To Discover the Structural Components of Cyst and Oocyst Walls

    PubMed Central

    Bushkin, G. Guy; Chatterjee, Aparajita; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2013-01-01

    Cysts of Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica and oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are the infectious and sometimes diagnostic forms of these parasites. To discover the structural components of cyst and oocyst walls, we have developed strategies based upon a few simple assumptions. Briefly, the most abundant wall proteins are identified by monoclonal antibodies or mass spectrometry. Structural components include a sugar polysaccharide (chitin for Entamoeba, β-1,3-linked glucose for Toxoplasma, and β-1,3-linked GalNAc for Giardia) and/or acid-fast lipids (Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium). Because Entamoeba cysts and Toxoplasma oocysts are difficult to obtain, studies of walls of nonhuman pathogens (E. invadens and Eimeria, respectively) accelerate discovery. Biochemical methods to dissect fungal walls work well for cyst and oocyst walls, although the results are often unexpected. For example, echinocandins, which inhibit glucan synthases and kill fungi, arrest the development of oocyst walls and block their release into the intestinal lumen. Candida walls are coated with mannans, while Entamoeba cysts are coated in a dextran-like glucose polymer. Models for cyst and oocyst walls derive from their structural components and organization within the wall. Cyst walls are composed of chitin fibrils and lectins that bind chitin (Entamoeba) or fibrils of the β-1,3-GalNAc polymer and lectins that bind the polymer (Giardia). Oocyst walls of Toxoplasma have two distinct layers that resemble those of fungi (β-1,3-glucan in the inner layer) or mycobacteria (acid-fast lipids in the outer layer). Oocyst walls of Cryptosporidium have a rigid bilayer of acid-fast lipids and inner layer of oocyst wall proteins. PMID:24096907

  20. Integrated Approach to Malaria Control

    PubMed Central

    Shiff, Clive

    2002-01-01

    Malaria draws global attention in a cyclic manner, with interest and associated financing waxing and waning according to political and humanitarian concerns. Currently we are on an upswing, which should be carefully developed. Malaria parasites have been eliminated from Europe and North America through the use of residual insecticides and manipulation of environmental and ecological characteristics; however, in many tropical and some temperate areas the incidence of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of this increase results from a breakdown of effective control methods developed and implemented in the 1960s, but it has also occurred because of a lack of trained scientists and control specialists who live and work in the areas of endemic infection. Add to this the widespread resistance to the most effective antimalarial drug, chloroquine, developing resistance to other first-line drugs such as sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and resistance of certain vector species of mosquito to some of the previously effective insecticides and we have a crisis situation. Vaccine research has proceeded for over 30 years, but as yet there is no effective product, although research continues in many promising areas. A global strategy for malaria control has been accepted, but there are critics who suggest that the single strategy cannot confront the wide range of conditions in which malaria exists and that reliance on chemotherapy without proper control of drug usage and diagnosis will select for drug resistant parasites, thus exacerbating the problem. An integrated approach to control using vector control strategies based on the biology of the mosquito, the epidemiology of the parasite, and human behavior patterns is needed to prevent continued upsurge in malaria in the endemic areas. PMID:11932233

  1. Malaria in selected non-Amazonian countries of Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Quiñones, Martha Lucia; Guerra, Carlos; Céspedes, Nora; Giron, Sandra; Ahumada, Martha; Piñeros, Juan Gabriel; Padilla, Norma; Terrientes, Zilka; Rosas, Ángel; Padilla, Julio Cesar; Escalante, Ananias A.; Beier, John C.; Herrera, Socrates

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 170 million inhabitants of the American continent live at risk of malaria transmission. Although the continent’s contribution to the global malaria burden is small, at least 1 to 1.2 million malaria cases are reported annually. Sixty per cent of the malaria cases occur in Brazil and the other 40% are distributed in 20 other countries of Central and South America. Plasmodium vivax is the predominant species (74.2 %) followed by P. falciparum (25.7 %) and P. malariae (0.1%), and no less than 10 Anopheles species have been identified as primary or secondary malaria vectors. Rapid deforestation and agricultural practices are directly related to increases in Anopheles species diversity and abundance, as well as in the number of malaria cases. Additionally, climate changes profoundly affect malaria transmission and are responsible for malaria epidemics in some regions of South America. Parasite drug resistance is increasing, but due to bio-geographic barriers there is extraordinary genetic differentiation of parasites with limited dispersion. Although the clinical spectrum ranges from uncomplicated to severe malaria cases, due to the generally low to middle transmission intensity, features such as severe anemia, cerebral malaria and other complications appear to be less frequent than in other endemic regions and asymptomatic infections are a common feature. Although the National Malaria Control Programs (NMCP) of different countries differ in their control activities these are all directed to reduce morbidity and mortality by using strategies like health promotion, vector control and impregnate bed nets among others. Recently, international initiatives such as the Malaria Control Program in Andean-country Border Regions (PAMAFRO) (implemented by the Andean Organism for Health (ORAS) and sponsored by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM)) and The Amazon Network for the Surveillance of Antimalarial Drug Resistance (RAVREDA

  2. Malaria in selected non-Amazonian countries of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Quiñones, Martha Lucia; Guerra, Carlos; Céspedes, Nora; Giron, Sandra; Ahumada, Martha; Piñeros, Juan Gabriel; Padilla, Norma; Terrientes, Zilka; Rosas, Angel; Padilla, Julio Cesar; Escalante, Ananias A; Beier, John C; Herrera, Socrates

    2012-03-01

    Approximately 170 million inhabitants of the American continent live at risk of malaria transmission. Although the continent's contribution to the global malaria burden is small, at least 1-1.2 million malaria cases are reported annually. Sixty percent of the malaria cases occur in Brazil and the other 40% are distributed in 20 other countries of Central and South America. Plasmodium vivax is the predominant species (74.2%) followed by P. falciparum (25.7%) and P. malariae (0.1%), and no less than 10 Anopheles species have been identified as primary or secondary malaria vectors. Rapid deforestation and agricultural practices are directly related to increases in Anopheles species diversity and abundance, as well as in the number of malaria cases. Additionally, climate changes profoundly affect malaria transmission and are responsible for malaria epidemics in some regions of South America. Parasite drug resistance is increasing, but due to bio-geographic barriers there is extraordinary genetic differentiation of parasites with limited dispersion. Although the clinical spectrum ranges from uncomplicated to severe malaria cases, due to the generally low to middle transmission intensity, features such as severe anemia, cerebral malaria and other complications appear to be less frequent than in other endemic regions and asymptomatic infections are a common feature. Although the National Malaria Control Programs (NMCP) of different countries differ in their control activities these are all directed to reduce morbidity and mortality by using strategies like health promotion, vector control and impregnate bed nets among others. Recently, international initiatives such as the Malaria Control Program in Andean-country Border Regions (PAMAFRO) (implemented by the Andean Organism for Health (ORAS) and sponsored by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM)) and The Amazon Network for the Surveillance of Antimalarial Drug Resistance (RAVREDA) (sponsored by

  3. Rationale for the coadministration of albendazole and ivermectin to humans for malaria parasite transmission control.

    PubMed

    Kobylinski, Kevin C; Alout, Haoues; Foy, Brian D; Clements, Archie; Adisakwattana, Poom; Swierczewski, Brett E; Richardson, Jason H

    2014-10-01

    Recently there have been calls for the eradication of malaria and the elimination of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs). Malaria and STHs overlap in distribution, and STH infections are associated with increased risk for malaria. Indeed, there is evidence that suggests that STH infection may facilitate malaria transmission. Malaria and STH coinfection may exacerbate anemia, especially in pregnant women, leading to worsened child development and more adverse pregnancy outcomes than these diseases would cause on their own. Ivermectin mass drug administration (MDA) to humans for malaria parasite transmission suppression is being investigated as a potential malaria elimination tool. Adding albendazole to ivermectin MDAs would maximize effects against STHs. A proactive, integrated control platform that targets malaria and STHs would be extremely cost-effective and simultaneously reduce human suffering caused by multiple diseases. This paper outlines the benefits of adding albendazole to ivermectin MDAs for malaria parasite transmission suppression.

  4. Effect of Batch-Process Solar Disinfection on Survival of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Hermida, F.; Castro-Hermida, J. A.; Ares-Mazás, E.; Kehoe, S. C.; McGuigan, K. G.

    2005-01-01

    The results of batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water are reported. Oocyst suspensions were exposed to simulated sunlight (830 W m−2) at 40°C. Viability assays (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]/propidium iodide and excystation) and infectivity tests (Swiss CD-1 suckling mice) were performed. SODIS exposures of 6 and 12 h reduced oocyst infectivity from 100% to 7.5% (standard deviation = 2.3) and 0% (standard deviation = 0.0), respectively. PMID:15746372

  5. Effect of batch-process solar disinfection on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Hermida, F; Castro-Hermida, J A; Ares-Mazás, E; Kehoe, S C; McGuigan, K G

    2005-03-01

    The results of batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water are reported. Oocyst suspensions were exposed to simulated sunlight (830 W m(-2)) at 40 degrees C. Viability assays (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]/propidium iodide and excystation) and infectivity tests (Swiss CD-1 suckling mice) were performed. SODIS exposures of 6 and 12 h reduced oocyst infectivity from 100% to 7.5% (standard deviation = 2.3) and 0% (standard deviation = 0.0), respectively.

  6. Increased interleukin-10 and interferon-γ levels in Plasmodium vivax malaria suggest a reciprocal regulation which is not altered by IL-10 gene promoter polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In human malaria, the naturally-acquired immune response can result in either the elimination of the parasite or a persistent response mediated by cytokines that leads to immunopathology. The cytokines are responsible for all the symptoms, pathological alterations and the outcome of the infection depends on the reciprocal regulation of the pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. IL-10 and IFN-gamma are able to mediate this process and their production can be affected by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gene of these cytokines. In this study, the relationship between cytokine IL-10/IFN-gamma levels, parasitaemia, and their gene polymorphisms was examined and the participation of pro-inflammatory and regulatory balance during a natural immune response in Plasmodium vivax-infected individuals was observed. Methods The serum levels of the cytokines IL-4, IL-12, IFN-gamma and IL-10 from 132 patients were evaluated by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The polymorphism at position +874 of the IFN-gamma gene was identified by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASO-PCR) method, and the polymorphism at position -1082 of the IL-10 gene was analysed by PCR-RFLP (PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism). Results The levels of a pro- (IFN-gamma) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) were significantly higher in P. vivax-infected individuals as compared to healthy controls. The IFN-gamma levels in primoinfected patients were significantly higher than in patients who had suffered only one and more than one previous episode. The mutant alleles of both IFN-gamma and IL-10 genes were more frequent than the wild allele. In the case of the IFNG+874 polymorphism (IFN-gamma) the frequencies of the mutant (A) and wild (T) alleles were 70.13% and 29.87%, respectively. Similar frequencies were recorded in IL-10-1082, with the mutant (A) allele returning a frequency of 70.78%, and the wild (G) allele a frequency of 29.22%. The frequencies

  7. Impact of malaria morbidity on gross domestic product in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of malaria is a key challenge to both human and economic development in malaria endemic countries. The impact of malaria can be categorized from three dimensions, namely: health, social and economic. The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of malaria morbidity on gross domestic product (GDP) of Uganda. Methods The impact of malaria morbidity on GDP of Uganda was estimated using double-log econometric model. The 1997-2003 time series macro-data used in the analysis were for 28 quarters, i.e. 7 years times 4 quarters per year. It was obtained from national and international secondary sources. Results The slope coefficient for Malaria Index (M) was -0.00767; which indicates that when malaria morbidity increases by one unit, while holding all other explanatory variables constant, per capita GDP decreases by US$0.00767 per year. In 2003 Uganda lost US$ 49,825,003 of GDP due to malaria morbidity. Dividing the total loss of US$49.8 million by a population of 25,827,000 yields a loss in GDP of US$1.93 per person in Uganda in 2003. Conclusion Malaria morbidity results in a substantive loss in GDP of Uganda. The high burden of malaria leads to decreased long-term economic growth, and works against poverty eradication efforts and socioeconomic development of the country. PMID:22439685

  8. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance for the Greater Mekong Subregion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soika, Valerii; Nigro, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    At 4,200 km, the Mekong River is the tenth longest river in the world. It directly and indirectly influences the lives of hundreds of millions of inhabitants in its basin. The riparian countries - Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and a small part of China - form the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). This geographical region has the misfortune of being the world's epicenter of falciparum malaria, which is the most severe form of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Depending on the country, approximately 50 to 90% of all malaria cases are due to this species. In the Malaria Modeling and Surveillance Project, we have been developing techniques to enhance public health's decision capability for malaria risk assessments and controls. The main objectives are: 1) Identifying the potential breeding sites for major vector species; 2) Implementing a malaria transmission model to identify the key factors that sustain or intensify malaria transmission; and 3) Implementing a risk algorithm to predict the occurrence of malaria and its transmission intensity. The potential benefits are: 1) Increased warning time for public health organizations to respond to malaria outbreaks; 2) Optimized utilization of pesticide and chemoprophylaxis; 3) Reduced likelihood of pesticide and drug resistance; and 4) Reduced damage to environment. Environmental parameters important to malaria transmission include temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, and vegetation conditions. These parameters are extracted from NASA Earth science data sets. Hindcastings based on these environmental parameters have shown good agreement to epidemiological records.

  9. Association of PECAM1/CD31 polymorphisms with cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Jun; Naka, Izumi; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Patarapotikul, Jintana

    2016-01-01

    Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1/CD31), a receptor recognized by P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), on the vascular endothelium has been implicated in mediating cytoadherence in patients with P. falciparum malaria. To examine associations of PECAM1 polymorphisms with cerebral malaria, 11 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PECAM1 were analysed for 312 Thai patients with P. falciparum malaria (109 with cerebral malaria and 203 with mild malaria). The rs1122800-C allele was significantly associated with protection from cerebral malaria (P = 0.017), and the rs9912957-A significantly increased the risk for cerebral malaria (P = 0.0065) in malaria patients. Fine-scale mapping using genotyped and imputed SNPs and linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed that rs1122800 and rs9912957 were located in two distinct LD blocks and were independently associated with cerebral malaria. The rs1122800-C allele was significantly associated with lower expression level of PECAM1 in EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (P = 0.045). The present results suggest that PECAM1-mediated cytoadherence of iRBCs to brain endothelium plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria. PMID:27335627

  10. Malaria ecotypes and stratification.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Allan; Boutsika, Konstantina

    2012-01-01

    To deal with the variability of malaria, control programmes need to stratify their malaria problem into a number of smaller units. Such stratification may be based on the epidemiology of malaria or on its determinants such as ecology. An ecotype classification was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) around 1990, and it is time to assess its usefulness for current malaria control as well as for malaria modelling on the basis of published research. Journal and grey literature was searched for articles on malaria or Anopheles combined with ecology or stratification. It was found that all malaria in the world today could be assigned to one or more of the following ecotypes: savanna, plains and valleys; forest and forest fringe; foothill; mountain fringe and northern and southern fringes; desert fringe; coastal and urban. However, some areas are in transitional or mixed zones; furthermore, the implications of any ecotype depend on the biogeographical region, sometimes subregion, and finally, the knowledge on physiography needs to be supplemented by local information on natural, anthropic and health system processes including malaria control. Ecotyping can therefore not be seen as a shortcut to determine control interventions, but rather as a framework to supplement available epidemiological and entomological data so as to assess malaria situations at the local level, think through the particular risks and opportunities and reinforce intersectoral action. With these caveats, it does however emerge that several ecotypic distinctions are well defined and have relatively constant implications for control within certain biogeographic regions. Forest environments in the Indo-malay and the Neotropics are, with a few exceptions, associated with much higher malaria risk than in adjacent areas; the vectors are difficult to control, and the anthropic factors also often converge to impose constraints. Urban malaria in Africa is associated with lower risk than savanna

  11. The pathophysiology of vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Nicholas M; Russell, Bruce; Yeo, Tsin W; Price, Ric N

    2009-05-01

    Long considered a benign infection, Plasmodium vivax is now recognized as a cause of severe and fatal malaria, despite its low parasite biomass, the increased deformability of vivax-infected red blood cells and an apparent paucity of parasite sequestration. Severe anemia is associated with recurrent bouts of hemolysis of predominantly uninfected erythrocytes with increased fragility, and lung injury is associated with inflammatory increases in alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Although rare, vivax-associated coma challenges our understanding of pathobiology caused by Plasmodium spp. Host and parasite factors contribute to the risk of severe disease, and comorbidities might contribute to vivax mortality. In this review, we discuss potential mechanisms underlying the syndromes of uncomplicated and severe vivax malaria, identifying key areas for future research.

  12. [Update in the diagnosis and treatment of malaria].

    PubMed

    García López Hortelano, M; Fumadó Pérez, V; González Tomé, M I

    2013-02-01

    An increase in the cases of malaria in our country has been observed due to immigration, and adopted children. Malaria management requires an integrate approach, including prompt diagnoses and treatment to avoid the associated morbidity and mortality. In the last years, new recommendations have been introduced due to the appearance of new resistant areas. In this article we aim to provide a summary of the key recommendations following the main malaria guidelines (WHO and CDC).

  13. Reversibility of retinal microvascular changes in severe falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Maude, Richard J; Kingston, Hugh W F; Joshi, Sonia; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj K; White, Nicholas J; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2014-09-01

    Malarial retinopathy allows detailed study of central nervous system vascular pathology in living patients with severe malaria. An adult with cerebral malaria is described who had prominent retinal whitening with corresponding retinal microvascular obstruction, vessel dilatation, increased vascular tortuosity, and blood retinal barrier leakage with decreased visual acuity, all of which resolved on recovery. Additional study of these features and their potential role in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is warranted.

  14. Do hypnozoites cause relapse in malaria?

    PubMed

    Markus, Miles B

    2015-06-01

    The concept that hypnozoites give rise to relapses in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale malaria has become dogma. However, it is evident from particular contemporary research findings that hypnozoites are not necessarily the origin of all relapse-like recurrences of malaria caused by these parasites. This is the core opinion presented, and I discuss it fully. The hypnozoite theory of relapse needs to be re-evaluated in view of the recent, increased focus on P. vivax and liver stages of Plasmodium. Hypnozoites have also assumed a new significance because they might, by facilitating ongoing transmission, be a threat to the current (post-2007) goal of eliminating malaria globally. I have suggested some new research directions for finding putative nonhypnozoite sources of recurrent malaria.

  15. Importance of active case detection in a malaria elimination programme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the aim of eliminating malaria from Sri Lanka by 2014, the Anti-Malaria Campaign of Sri Lanka (AMC) sought the support of Tropical and Environmental Disease and Health Associates Private Limited (TEDHA), a private sector organization. In 2009, TEDHA was assigned 43 government hospitals in the district of Mannar in the Northern Province and in districts of Trincomalee, Batticaloa and Ampara in the Eastern Province to carry out malaria surveillance to complement the surveillance activities of the AMC. Passive case detection (PCD), activated passive case detection (APCD) and active case detection (ACD) for malaria have been routinely carried out in Sri Lanka. Methods The active case detection programme of TEDHA involves screening of populations irrespective of the presence of fever or any other signs or symptoms of malaria to detect infections and residual parasite carriers. ACD is done by TEDHA in a) high risk populations through mobile malaria clinics including armed forces personnel and b) pregnant females who visit antenatal clinics for asymptomatic malaria infections during the first trimester of pregnancy. Populations are selected in consultation with the Regional Malaria Officer of the AMC thus avoiding any overlap with the population screened by the government. Results TEDHA screened 387,309 individuals in the four districts for malaria by ACD including high risk groups and pregnant women between January 2010 and December 2012. During this period seven individuals were diagnosed with Plasmodium vivax infections and one individual was detected with a mixed infection of P. vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. All eight cases were detected by ACD carried out by mobile malaria clinics among high risk groups in the Mannar district. Conclusion The progress made by Sri Lanka in the malaria elimination drive is largely due to increased surveillance and judicious use of control methods which has resulted in zero indigenous malaria cases being reported since

  16. Changes in the burden of malaria following scale up of malaria control interventions in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To better understand trends in the burden of malaria and their temporal relationship to control activities, a survey was conducted to assess reported cases of malaria and malaria control activities in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe. Methods Data on reported malaria cases were abstracted from available records at all three district hospitals, three rural hospitals and 25 rural health clinics in Mutasa District from 2003 to 2011. Results Malaria control interventions were scaled up through the support of the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and The President’s Malaria Initiative. The recommended first-line treatment regimen changed from chloroquine or a combination of chloroquine plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine to artemisinin-based combination therapy, the latter adopted by 70%, 95% and 100% of health clinics by 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Diagnostic capacity improved, with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) available in all health clinics by 2008. Vector control consisted of indoor residual spraying and distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets. The number of reported malaria cases initially increased from levels in 2003 to a peak in 2008 but then declined 39% from 2008 to 2010. The proportion of suspected cases of malaria in older children and adults remained high, ranging from 75% to 80%. From 2008 to 2010, the number of RDT positive cases of malaria decreased 35% but the decrease was greater for children younger than five years of age (60%) compared to older children and adults (26%). Conclusions The burden of malaria in Mutasa District decreased following the scale up of malaria control interventions. However, the persistent high number of cases in older children and adults highlights the need for strategies to identify locally effective control measures that target all age groups. PMID:23815862

  17. Removal effect of the water purifier for home use against Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshihiro; Kajima, Junko; Fujino, Takashi

    2004-08-01

    The removal effects of the faucet mounted type water purifier for home use were examined against Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. The water purifier is composed of a layer of granular activated carbon and the hollow fiber membrane filter. The cartridges were unused, 25%, 50% and 75% flow down by Arizona-dust of U. S. A. Two respective cartridges were used of the examination. The faucet and the water purifier were connected by anti-pressure tube, and 3.0 x 10(7) oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were injected into anti-pressure tube while water was running. Twenty liter of collected purified water was examined under the fluorescent microscope. Any oocysts in the purified water collected from all cartridges were not found. Therefore, we considered this purifier as an effective one in removing Cryptosporidium oocysts from drinking water. PMID:15353844

  18. EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS AND GIARDIA CYSTS IN A WATERSHED RESERVOIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation evaluated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts at 17 sampling locations in Lake Texoma reservoir using method 1623 with standard Envirocheck" capsule filters. The watershed serves rural agricultural communities active in cattle ranching,...

  19. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ISOLATION OF CYCLOSPORA CAYETANENSIS OOCYSTS FROM HUMAN FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is the causative agent of cyclosporiasis, an emerging infections disease. A new method for the purification of Cycloposra cayetanensis oocysts from fecal matter has been developed, using a modified detachment solution and a Renocal-sucrose gradient sedimen...

  20. EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS AND GIARDIA CYSTS IN A WATERSHED RESERVOIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation evaluated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts at 17 sampling locations in Lake Texoma reservoir using method 1623 with standard Envirocheck™ capsule filters. The watershed serves rural agricultural communities active in cattle ranching, ...

  1. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYST RECOVERY IN WATER BY EPA METHOD 1623: EVALUATION OF A MODIFIED IMS DISSOCIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Methods 1622 and 1623 are the benchmarks for detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in water. These methods consist of filtration, elution, purification by immunomagnetic separation (IMS), and microscopic analysis after staining with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate...

  2. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Water Sample Concentrates by Real-Time PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenli; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Cama, Vitaliano; Schaefer, Frank W.; Villegas, Eric; Fayer, Ronald; Lewis, Earl J.; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    PCR techniques in combination with conventional parasite concentration procedures have potential for the sensitive and specific detection of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water. Three real-time PCR assays based on the B1 gene and a 529-bp repetitive element were analyzed for the detection of T. gondii tachyzoites and oocysts. Lower sensitivity and specificity were obtained with the B1 gene-based PCR than with the 529-bp repeat-based PCR. New procedures for the real-time PCR detection of T. gondii oocysts in concentrates of surface water were developed and tested in conjunction with a method for the direct extraction of inhibitor-free DNA from water. This technique detected as few as one oocyst seeded to 0.5 ml of packed pellets from water samples concentrated by Envirocheck filters. Thus, this real-time PCR may provide a detection method alternative to the traditional mouse assay and microscopy. PMID:19363083

  3. EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY FOR MEASURING UV DISINFECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN FINISHED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV technology to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts has become well established in the US. The challenge now is to effectively demonstrate UV reactor performance and disinfection capacity with various finished water matrices and under different operational conditions. In s...

  4. Detection of Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Cockles (Cerastoderma edule)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Bautista, M.; Ortega-Mora, L. M.; Tabares, E.; Lopez-Rodas, V.; Costas, E.

    2000-01-01

    Infective Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were detected in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from a shellfish-producing region (Gallaecia, northwest Spain, bounded by the Atlantic Ocean) that accounts for the majority of European shellfish production. Shellfish were collected from bay sites with different degrees of organic pollution. Shellfish harboring C. parvum oocysts were recovered only from areas located near the mouths of rivers with a high density of grazing ruminants on their banks. An approximation of the parasite load of shellfish collected in positive sites indicated that each shellfish transported more than 103 oocysts. Recovered oocysts were infectious for neonatal mice, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis demonstrated a profile similar to that described for genotype C or 2 of the parasite. These results demonstrate that mussels and cockles could act as a reservoir of C. parvum infection for humans. Moreover, estuarine shellfish could be used as an indicator of river water contamination. PMID:10788352

  5. Stem cell therapy: a novel treatment option for cerebral malaria?

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Qian, Hui; Cao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria, a severe form of the disease, is one of the most severe complications of infection with Plasmodium parasites and a leading cause of malaria mortality. Currently available antimalarial therapy has proven insufficient to prevent neurological complications and death in all cases of cerebral malaria. Souza and colleagues observed that transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) increased survival, reduced parasitemia, decreased malaria pigment accumulation in the spleen, liver and kidney, elevated Kupffer cell count in liver, alleviated renal injury and lung inflammation, and improved lung mechanics in an experimental mouse model of cerebral malaria. Although plenty of challenges lie ahead, their findings show the promise of BM-MSC therapy for the treatment of cerebral malaria. PMID:26253514

  6. Malaria resurgence in India: a critical study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V P; Mehrotra, K N

    1986-01-01

    In 1953, the Indian National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) was started. Encouraged by the results, and the fact that insecticide resistance in vector species may evolve and become an obstacle, in 1958 a control programme was converted to the National Malaria Eradication Programme (NMEP). By 1964, malaria was eradicated from 88% of the area and it was in the advanced stage of spraying in the remaining parts. At that time, focal outbreaks that occurred in 1965 and increased in later years, could not be contained due to the shortages of DDT. As a result, large areas in consolidation and maintenance phases were reverted to the attack phase. Besides, the infrastructure in general health services was not adequate and mature enough to take up surveillance and vigilance. This produced a large number of secondary cases due to the re-introduction and relapse of malaria. Added to this was the problem of urban malaria, the control of which was the responsibility of local bodies. Malaria cases increased in towns, and started diffusing to the rural areas, due to inadequate staff and the shortages of malarial larvicidal oil (MLO). Later, it turned out, that while it was technically feasible to eradicate malaria from 91% of the population, the strategy of indoor spraying of DDT to interrupt transmission did not succeed in 9.0% of the population, despite more than 12-14 years of regular spraying. During the years of resurgence, there was no research support to the programme, so that technical problems were not properly appreciated, understood and tackled. The reservoir of parasites that were present throughout the country started multiplying and spreading to newer areas due to the presence of vectors in high densities. Thus malaria resurged and re-established itself even in areas that were at one time freed from the disease. The analysis of the pattern of malaria resurgence revealed that malaria outbreaks preceded the true problem of insecticide resistance. It is noteworthy to

  7. Remotely Sensed Environmental Conditions and Malaria Mortality in Three Malaria Endemic Regions in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ahlm, Clas; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in malaria endemic countries. The malaria mosquito vectors depend on environmental conditions, such as temperature and rainfall, for reproduction and survival. To investigate the potential for weather driven early warning systems to prevent disease occurrence, the disease relationship to weather conditions need to be carefully investigated. Where meteorological observations are scarce, satellite derived products provide new opportunities to study the disease patterns depending on remotely sensed variables. In this study, we explored the lagged association of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NVDI), day Land Surface Temperature (LST) and precipitation on malaria mortality in three areas in Western Kenya. Methodology and Findings The lagged effect of each environmental variable on weekly malaria mortality was modeled using a Distributed Lag Non Linear Modeling approach. For each variable we constructed a natural spline basis with 3 degrees of freedom for both the lag dimension and the variable. Lag periods up to 12 weeks were considered. The effect of day LST varied between the areas with longer lags. In all the three areas, malaria mortality was associated with precipitation. The risk increased with increasing weekly total precipitation above 20 mm and peaking at 80 mm. The NDVI threshold for increased mortality risk was between 0.3 and 0.4 at shorter lags. Conclusion This study identified lag patterns and association of remote- sensing environmental factors and malaria mortality in three malaria endemic regions in Western Kenya. Our results show that rainfall has the most consistent predictive pattern to malaria transmission in the endemic study area. Results highlight a potential for development of locally based early warning forecasts that could potentially reduce the disease burden by enabling timely control actions. PMID:27115874

  8. Total and infectious Cryptosporidium oocyst and total Giardia cyst concentrations from distinct agricultural and urban contamination sources in Eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Lalancette, Cindy; Généreux, Mylène; Mailly, Jacinthe; Servais, Pierre; Côté, Caroline; Michaud, Aubert; Di Giovanni, George D; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-03-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cyst concentrations are frequently used for assessing drinking water safety. The widely used USEPA Method 1623 provides total counts of (oo)cysts, but may not be accurate for human health risk characterization, since it does not provide infectivity information. The total counts and infectious fraction of Cryptosporidium oocysts and the total counts of Giardia cysts were assessed in major fecal pollution sources. Fresh calf and cow feces, their manure, and the discharge point were sampled in a small rural sub-watershed (n = 20, 21, 10, 10). Median concentrations for total (oo)cysts were higher in calves (333 oocysts g(-1); 111 cysts g(-1)) than in cows (52 oocysts g(-1); 7 cysts g(-1)). Infectious oocysts were found in 17 (7%) of the samples and none were found in manure or at the discharge point. Urban sources were sampled in the influent and effluent (n = 19, 18) of two wastewater treatment plants. Peak concentrations were 533 oocysts L(-1) and 9,010 cysts L(-1) for influents and 89 oocysts L(-1) and 472 cysts L(-1) for effluents. Infectious oocyst fractions varied from below the detection limit to 7-22% in the effluent and influent respectively. These infectious fractions are significantly lower than those currently used for quantitative microbial risk assessment estimates. PMID:22361710

  9. Knowledge of Malaria and Its Association with Malaria-Related Behaviors—Results from the Malaria Indicator Survey, Ethiopia, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jimee; Graves, Patricia M.; Jima, Daddi; Reithinger, Richard; Kachur, S. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2005, the Ministry of Health in Ethiopia launched a major effort to distribute over 20 million long-lasting insecticidal nets, provide universal access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACTs), and train 30,000 village-based health extension workers. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional, nationally representative Malaria Indicator Survey was conducted during the malaria transmission season in 2007. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of women's malaria knowledge on household ITN ownership and women's ITN use. In addition, we investigated the effect of mothers' malaria knowledge on their children under 5 years of age's (U5) ITN use and their access to fever treatment on behalf of their child U5. Malaria knowledge was based on a composite index about the causes, symptoms, danger signs and prevention of malaria. Approximately 67% of women (n = 5,949) and mothers of children U5 (n = 3,447) reported some knowledge of malaria. Women's knowledge of malaria was significantly associated with household ITN ownership (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] = 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–2.7) and with increased ITN use for themselves (aOR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.3–2.5). Knowledge of malaria amongst mothers of children U5 was associated with ITN use for their children U5 (aOR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.1–2.4), but not significantly associated with their children U5 seeking care for a fever. School attendance was a significant factor in women's ITN use (aOR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.1–3.9), their children U5′s ITN use (aOR = 4.4; 95% CI 1.6–12.1), and their children U5 having sought treatment for a fever (aOR = 6.5; 95% CI 1.9–22.9). Conclusions Along with mass free distribution of ITNs and universal access to ACTs, delivery of targeted malaria educational information to women could improve ITN ownership and use. Efforts to control malaria could be influenced by progress towards broader goals of

  10. Obtaining highly purified Toxoplasma gondii oocysts by a discontinuous cesium chloride gradient.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Sarah E; See, Mary Jean; Dubey, J P; Villegas, Eric N

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen that commonly infects humans. It is a well characterized apicomplexan associated with causing food- and water-borne disease outbreaks. The definitive host is the feline species where sexual replication occurs resulting in the development of the highly infectious and environmentally resistant oocyst. Infection occurs via ingestion of tissue cysts from contaminated meat or oocysts from soil or water. Infection is typically asymptomatic in healthy individuals, but results in a life-long latent infection that can reactivate causing toxoplasmic encephalitis and death if the individual becomes immunocompromised. Meat contaminated with T. gondii cysts have been the primary source of infection in Europe and the United States, but recent changes in animal management and husbandry practices and improved food handling and processing procedures have significantly reduced the prevalence of T. gondii cysts in meat. Nonetheless, seroprevalence in humans remains relatively high suggesting that exposure from oocyst contaminated soil or water is likely. Indeed, waterborne outbreaks of toxoplasmosis have been reported worldwide supporting the theory exposure to the environmental oocyst form poses a significant health risk. To date, research on understanding the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the water and environment are limited due to the lack of tools to detect oocysts in the environment. This is primarily due to the lack of efficient purification protocols for obtaining large numbers of highly purified T gondii oocysts from infected cats for research purposes. This study describes the development of a modified CsCl method that easily purifies T. gondii oocysts from feces of infected cats that are suitable for molecular biological and tissue culture manipulation. PMID:19888193

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of toxoplasma development reveals many novel functions and structures specific to sporozoites and oocysts.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Heather M; Buchholz, Kerry R; Chen, Xiucui; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Rocke, David M; Conrad, Patricia A; Boothroyd, John C

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction of Toxoplasma gondii occurs exclusively within enterocytes of the definitive felid host. The resulting immature oocysts are excreted into the environment during defecation, where in the days following, they undergo a complex developmental process. Within each oocyst, this culminates in the generation of two sporocysts, each containing 4 sporozoites. A single felid host is capable of shedding millions of oocysts, which can survive for years in the environment, are resistant to most methods of microbial inactivation during water-treatment and are capable of producing infection in warm-blooded hosts at doses as low as 1-10 ingested oocysts. Despite its extremely interesting developmental biology and crucial role in initiating an infection, almost nothing is known about the oocyst stage beyond morphological descriptions. Here, we present a complete transcriptomic analysis of the oocyst from beginning to end of its development. In addition, and to identify genes whose expression is unique to this developmental form, we compared the transcriptomes of developing oocysts with those of in vitro-derived tachyzoites and in vivo-derived bradyzoites. Our results reveal many genes whose expression is specifically up- or down-regulated in different developmental stages, including many genes that are likely critical to oocyst development, wall formation, resistance to environmental destruction and sporozoite infectivity. Of special note is the up-regulation of genes that appear "off" in tachyzoites and bradyzoites but that encode homologues of proteins known to serve key functions in those asexual stages, including a novel pairing of sporozoite-specific paralogues of AMA1 and RON2, two proteins that have recently been shown to form a crucial bridge during tachyzoite invasion of host cells. This work provides the first in-depth insight into the development and functioning of one of the most important but least studied stages in the Toxoplasma life cycle.

  12. Effect of High-Rate Algal Ponds on Viability of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Araki, S.; Martín-Gomez, S.; Bécares, E.; De Luis-Calabuig, E.; Rojo-Vazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    The physicochemical conditions of high-rate algal ponds were responsible for a more than 97% reduction in the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in neonatal mice. The use of semipermeable bags of cellulose showed that pH, ammonia, and/or light seems to be a major factor for the inactivation of oocysts in wastewater, supporting the importance of alga-based systems for safer reuse of treated wastewater. PMID:11425762

  13. Uncomplicated malaria in children: The place of rapid diagnostic test

    PubMed Central

    Elechi, Hassan Abdullahi; Rabasa, Adamu Ibrahim; Bashir, Muhammad Faruk; Gofama, Mustapha Modu; Ibrahim, Halima Abubakar; Askira, Umoru Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malaria has remained a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the under-five children in Nigeria. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of malaria is necessary in controlling this high burden and preventing unnecessary use of anti-malarial drugs. Malaria rapid diagnostic test (MRDT) offers the hope of achieving this goal. However, the performance of these kits among the most vulnerable age group to malaria is inadequate. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 433 out-patients, aged <5 years with fever or history of fever were enrolled. Each candidate was tested for malaria parasitaemia using ACON; malaria pf. Thick and thin films were also prepared from the same finger prick blood for each candidate. Result: Malaria rapid diagnostic test had sensitivity of 8.3%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 74%. The sensitivity of MRDT increased with increasing age. This effect of age on sensitivity was statistically significant (P = 0.007). Similarly parasite density had significant effect on the sensitivity of MRDT (P = <0.001). Conclusion: Histidine-rich protein-2 based MRDT is not a reliable mean of diagnosing malaria in the under-five age children with acute uncomplicated malaria. PMID:25838621

  14. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts on Fresh Produce Using DNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Muharemagic, Darija; Sattar, Syed; Dixon, Brent R.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no standard methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp., or other protozoan parasites, in foods, and existing methods are often inadequate, with low and variable recovery efficiencies. Food testing is difficult due to the low concentrations of parasites, the difficulty in eluting parasites from some foods, the lack of enrichment methods, and the presence of PCR inhibitors. The main objectives of the present study were to obtain DNA aptamers binding to the oocyst wall of C. parvum, and to use the aptamers to detect the presence of this parasite in foods. DNA aptamers were selected against C. parvum oocysts using SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment). Ten rounds of selection led to the discovery of 14 aptamer clones with high affinities for C. parvum oocysts. For detecting parasite-bound aptamers, a simple electrochemical sensor was employed, which used a gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrode. This aptasensor was fabricated by self-assembling a hybrid of a thiolated ssDNA primer and the anti- C. parvum aptamer. Square wave voltammetry was employed to quantitate C. parvum in the range of 150 to 800 oocysts, with a detection limit of approximately 100 oocysts. The high sensitivity and specificity of the developed aptasensor suggests that this novel method is very promising for the detection and identification of C. parvum oocysts on spiked fresh fruits, as compared to conventional methods such as microscopy and PCR. PMID:26334529

  15. Effects of freeze-thaw events on the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satomi; Jenkins, Michael B; Fogarty, Elizabeth A; Bowman, Dwight D

    2002-08-01

    The effects of freeze-thaw events on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil were examined. Oocysts were inoculated into distilled water in microcentrifuge tubes or into chambers containing soil the water content of which was maintained at 3%, 43%, or 78% of the container capacity. The chambers and tubes were then embedded in 3 soil samples from different aspects of a hillside landscape (Experiments 1 and 2) and in 3 distinct soil types (Experiment 3) and frozen at -10 C. Containers were thawed every 3 days for a period of 24 hr in 1-9 freeze-thaw cycles over 27 days (Experiments 1 and 2) and 2-5 freeze-thaw cycles over 15 days (Experiment 3). Oocyst viability was measured using the fluorescent dyes 4'6-diaminidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide. Inactivation rates were greater in soils than in water and greater in dry soil than in moist and wet soils. Soil type showed no effect on inactivation. Oocysts subjected to freeze-thaw cycles had inactivation rates not significantly different from those of oocysts subjected to -10 C under static conditions. The results indicated that 99% of oocysts exposed to soils that are frozen at -10 C will become inactivated within 50 days whether or not freeze-thaw cycles occur.

  16. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in raw and treated sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Amorós, Inmaculada; Moreno, Yolanda; Reyes, Mariela; Moreno-Mesonero, Laura; Alonso, Jose L

    2016-11-01

    Treated sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is commonly used in agriculture as fertilizers and to amend soils. The most significant health hazard for sewage sludge relates to the wide range of pathogenic microorganisms such as protozoa parasites.The objective of this study was to collect quantitative data on Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in the treated sludge in wastewater treatment facilities in Spain. Sludge from five WWTPs with different stabilization processes has been analysed for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in the raw sludge and after the sludge treatment. A composting plant (CP) has also been assessed. After a sedimentation step, sludge samples were processed and (oo)cysts were isolated by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and detected by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Results obtained in this study showed that Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts were present in 26 of the 30 samples (86.6%) of raw sludge samples. In treated sludge samples, (oo)cysts have been observed in all WWTP's analysed (25 samples) with different stabilization treatment (83.3%). Only in samples from the CP no (oo)cysts were detected. This study provides evidence that (oo)cysts are present in sewage sludge-end products from wastewater treatment processes with the negative consequences for public health. PMID:27080207

  17. Effects of temperature and different food matrices on Cyclospora cayetanensis oocyst sporulation.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Lakshmi; Ortega, Ynes

    2006-04-01

    Effects of temperature on the sporulation of the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis were studied in 2 food substrates, dairy and basil. Unsporulated Cyclospora oocysts were subjected to freezing and heating conditions for time periods ranging from 15 min to 1 wk. Oocysts were then removed from the food substrates and placed in 2.5% potassium dichromate for 2 wk to allow viable unsporulated oocysts to differentiate and fully sporulate, and to determine the percentage sporulation as an indicator of viability. Sporulation occurred when oocysts resuspended in dairy substrates were stored within 24 hr at -15 C. When oocysts were placed in water or basil, sporulation occurred after incubation for up to 2 days at -20 C, and up to 4 days at 37 C. Few oocysts sporulated when incubated for 1 hr at 50 C. Sporulation was not observed in basil leaves or water at -70 C, 70 C, and 100 C. Sporulation was not affected when incubated at 4 C and 23 C for up to 1 wk, which was the duration of the experiment in both of the tested substrates.

  18. Effects of temperature and different food matrices on Cyclospora cayetanensis oocyst sporulation.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Lakshmi; Ortega, Ynes

    2006-04-01

    Effects of temperature on the sporulation of the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis were studied in 2 food substrates, dairy and basil. Unsporulated Cyclospora oocysts were subjected to freezing and heating conditions for time periods ranging from 15 min to 1 wk. Oocysts were then removed from the food substrates and placed in 2.5% potassium dichromate for 2 wk to allow viable unsporulated oocysts to differentiate and fully sporulate, and to determine the percentage sporulation as an indicator of viability. Sporulation occurred when oocysts resuspended in dairy substrates were stored within 24 hr at -15 C. When oocysts were placed in water or basil, sporulation occurred after incubation for up to 2 days at -20 C, and up to 4 days at 37 C. Few oocysts sporulated when incubated for 1 hr at 50 C. Sporulation was not observed in basil leaves or water at -70 C, 70 C, and 100 C. Sporulation was not affected when incubated at 4 C and 23 C for up to 1 wk, which was the duration of the experiment in both of the tested substrates. PMID:16729675

  19. Individual oocysts of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Coccidia) parasites from avian feces: from photo to sequence.

    PubMed

    Dolnik, Olga V; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Bensch, Staffan

    2009-02-01

    Numerous microscopic studies of coccidian oocysts from avian feces have become the basis for species identification. In contrast, molecular studies of wild birds' Coccidia are still in their infancy and are mostly based on DNA extracted from the blood stages of these parasites. Linking microscopic and molecular data requires a method that reliably extracts DNA from single oocysts with parallel detailed morphological examination of the same cell. We offer a thorough manual of isolating, photographing, and trapping single oocysts from avian feces, followed by extraction of parasite DNA and amplification of mitochondrial DNA from the same cells. In 39 single oocysts from 6 wild blackcaps, we combined microscopic studies of individual cells with studies on their mitochondrial haplotype. In 72% of the single oocysts sampled, we detected unambiguous sequences. From feces and blood of investigated birds, we obtained 6 different haplotypes of Isospora sp. (iSAT1-iSAT 6), finding both the same haplotype in different host individuals and various haplotypes in the same host individual. Our described methodology enables linking the huge amount of morphological data with innovative gene analysis. This method expands the scope of genetic studies conducted on Isospora species, including routine molecular analysis of single oocysts isolated from fecal samples. PMID:19245285

  20. Development of a PCR protocol for sensitive detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D W; Pieniazek, N J; Griffin, D W; Misener, L; Rose, J B

    1995-01-01

    The development of a reliable method of using PCR for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples with oligonucleotide primers which amplify a portion of the sequence encoding the small (18S) subunit of rRNA producing a 435-bp product was demonstrated. The PCR assay was found to provide highly genus-specific detection of Cryptosporidium spp. after release of nucleic acids from oocysts by a simple freeze-thaw procedure. The assay routinely detected 1 to 10 oocysts in purified oocyst preparations, as shown by direct microscopic counts and by an immunofluorescence assay. The sensitivity of the PCR assay in some seeded environmental water samples was up to 1,000-fold lower. However, this interference was eliminated by either flow cytometry or magnetic-antibody capture. Sensitivity was also improved 10- to 1,000-fold by probing of the PCR product on dot blots with an oligonucleotide probe detected by chemiluminescence. Confirmation of the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples from the outbreak in Milwaukee, Wis., was obtained with this technique, and PCR was found to be as sensitive as immunofluorescence for detection of oocysts in wastewater concentrates. PMID:8526496

  1. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in raw and treated sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Amorós, Inmaculada; Moreno, Yolanda; Reyes, Mariela; Moreno-Mesonero, Laura; Alonso, Jose L

    2016-11-01

    Treated sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is commonly used in agriculture as fertilizers and to amend soils. The most significant health hazard for sewage sludge relates to the wide range of pathogenic microorganisms such as protozoa parasites.The objective of this study was to collect quantitative data on Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in the treated sludge in wastewater treatment facilities in Spain. Sludge from five WWTPs with different stabilization processes has been analysed for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in the raw sludge and after the sludge treatment. A composting plant (CP) has also been assessed. After a sedimentation step, sludge samples were processed and (oo)cysts were isolated by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and detected by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Results obtained in this study showed that Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts were present in 26 of the 30 samples (86.6%) of raw sludge samples. In treated sludge samples, (oo)cysts have been observed in all WWTP's analysed (25 samples) with different stabilization treatment (83.3%). Only in samples from the CP no (oo)cysts were detected. This study provides evidence that (oo)cysts are present in sewage sludge-end products from wastewater treatment processes with the negative consequences for public health.

  2. Non-invasive methods for identifying oocysts of Sarcocystis spp. from definitive hosts.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Chen, Xinwen; Yang, Lijun; He, Yongshu; Jiang, Runsheng; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Luan, Pengtao; Attwood, S W; Zuo, Yangxian; Zhang, Ya-ping; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2009-09-01

    Because the excreted sporocysts and/or oocysts of various species of Sarcocystis may not be discriminated morphologically, we sought to validate a diagnostic technique based on variation in the 18S rDNA sequence. Oocysts and/or sporocysts from three taxa of Sarcocystis were collected from human, feline, and canine definitive hosts that had fed upon meats infected with the muscle cysts of Sarcocystis hominis, Sarcocystis fusiformis and a species of Sarcocystis from water buffalo that could not be distinguished from Sarcocystis cruzi. Using a new collection method employing filter paper, these excreted oocysts and sporocysts were subjected to DNA extraction, as were the corresponding muscle cysts. Methods employing PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing of a partial 18S rDNA gene (ssrRNA) sequence were then used to successfully distinguish among the three taxa. The same, unique restriction digestion pattern characterizes the tissue cysts and oocysts and/or sporocysts of each parasite taxon. The technique makes possible amplification and identification of species specific gene sequences based on DNA extracted from as few as 7 excreted sporocysts (the equivalent of 3 and 1/2 oocysts) from freshly prepared material, or as few as 50 sporocysts from feces samples that had been stored in potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) for as long as 6 years. This represents the first report using molecular diagnostic procedures to diagnose oocysts of Sarcocystis in faecal samples, describing a valuable new tool for studying the epidemiology of various Sarcocystis species.

  3. Malaria in South Asia: prevalence and control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Chery, Laura; Biswas, Chinmoy; Dubhashi, Nagesh; Dutta, Prafulla; Dua, Virendra Kumar; Kacchap, Mridula; Kakati, Sanjeeb; Khandeparkar, Anar; Kour, Dalip; Mahajan, Satish N; Maji, Ardhendu; Majumder, Partha; Mohanta, Jagadish; Mohapatra, Pradyumna K; Narayanasamy, Krishnamoorthy; Roy, Krishnangshu; Shastri, Jayanthi; Valecha, Neena; Vikash, Rana; Wani, Reena; White, John; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2012-03-01

    The "Malaria Evolution in South Asia" (MESA) program project is an International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health. This US-India collaborative program will study the origin of genetic diversity of malaria parasites and their selection on the Indian subcontinent. This knowledge should contribute to a better understanding of unexpected disease outbreaks and unpredictable disease presentations from Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections. In this first of two reviews, we highlight malaria prevalence in India. In particular, we draw attention to variations in distribution of different human-parasites and different vectors, variation in drug resistance traits, and multiple forms of clinical presentations. Uneven malaria severity in India is often attributed to large discrepancies in health care accessibility as well as human migrations within the country and across neighboring borders. Poor access to health care goes hand in hand with poor reporting from some of the same areas, combining to possibly distort disease prevalence and death from malaria in some parts of India. Corrections are underway in the form of increased resources for disease control, greater engagement of village-level health workers for early diagnosis and treatment, and possibly new public-private partnerships activities accompanying traditional national malaria control programs in the most severely affected areas. A second accompanying review raises the possibility that, beyond uneven health care, evolutionary pressures may alter malaria parasites in ways that contribute to severe disease in India, particularly in the NE corridor of India bordering Myanmar Narayanasamy et al., 2012.

  4. Malaria in South Asia: Prevalence and control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashwani; Chery, Laura; Biswas, Chinmoy; Dubhashi, Nagesh; Dutta, Prafulla; Dua, Virendra Kumar; Kacchap, Mridula; Kakati, Sanjeeb; Khandeparkar, Anar; Kour, Dalip; Mahajanj, Satish N.; Maji, Ardhendu; Majumder, Partha; Mohanta, Jagadish; Mohapatra, Pradyumna K.; Narayanasamy, Krishnamoorthy; Roy, Krishnangshu; Shastri, Jayanthi; Valecha, Neena; Vikash, Rana; Wani, Reena; White, John; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2013-01-01

    The “Malaria Evolution in South Asia” (MESA) program project is an International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health. This US–India collaborative program will study the origin of genetic diversity of malaria parasites and their selection on the Indian subcontinent. This knowledge should contribute to a better understanding of unexpected disease outbreaks and unpredictable disease presentations from Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections. In this first of two reviews, we highlight malaria prevalence in India. In particular, we draw attention to variations in distribution of different human-parasites and different vectors, variation in drug resistance traits, and multiple forms of clinical presentations. Uneven malaria severity in India is often attributed to large discrepancies in health care accessibility as well as human migrations within the country and across neighboring borders. Poor access to health care goes hand in hand with poor reporting from some of the same areas, combining to possibly distort disease prevalence and death from malaria in some parts of India. Corrections are underway in the form of increased resources for disease control, greater engagement of village-level health workers for early diagnosis and treatment, and possibly new public–private partnerships activities accompanying traditional national malaria control programs in the most severely affected areas. A second accompanying review raises the possibility that, beyond uneven health care, evolutionary pressures may alter malaria parasites in ways that contribute to severe disease in India, particularly in the NE corridor of India bordering Myanmar Narayanasamy et al., 2012. PMID:22248528

  5. [Malaria in Iraq].

    PubMed

    Shamo, F J

    2001-01-01

    Malaria control campaign started in Iraq in 1957. This made the country largely free of the disease. Since 1991, following the recent war, Iraq has been affected by serious epidemic of P. vivax malaria that started in 3 autonomous governorates and soon involved other parts of the country. There were 49,840 malaria cases in the country in 1995. The national malaria programme personnel did their best to contain and control the epidemic. Active and passive case detection and treatment were introduced. Free of charge drugs are provided at all levels in the endemic area. Vector control includes environmental management, distribution of Gambusia fish, larviciding, indoor residual spraying with pyrithroids. A total of 4134 malaria cases were recorded in the country in 1999. PMID:11548316

  6. Global malaria connectivity through air travel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    travel is playing an important role in the global epidemiology of malaria, with the endemic world becoming increasingly connected to both malaria-free areas and other endemic regions. The research presented here provides an initial effort to quantify and analyse the connectivity that exists across the malaria-endemic world through air travel, and provide a basic assessment of the risks it results in for movement of infections. PMID:23914776

  7. Malaria control: achievements, problems and strategies.

    PubMed

    Nájera, J A

    2001-06-01

    Even if history has not always been the Magistra vitae, Cicero expected it to be, it should provide, as Baas said, a mirror in which to observe and compare the past and present in order to draw therefrom well-grounded conclusions for the future. Based on this belief, this paper aims to provide an overview of the foundations and development of malaria control policies during the XX century. It presents an analysis of the conflicting tendencies which shaped the development of these policies and which appear to have oscillated between calls for frontal attack in an all-out campaign and calls for sustainable gains, even if slow. It discusses the various approaches to the control of malaria, their achievements and their limitations, not only to serve as a background to understand better the foundations of current policies, but also to prevent that simplistic generalisations may again lead to exaggerated expectations and disillusion. The first part of the paper is devoted to the development of malaria control during the first half of the century, characterised by the ups and downs in the reliance on mosquito control as the control measure applicable everywhere. The proliferation of "man-made-malaria", which accompanied the push for economic development in most of the endemic countries, spurred the need for control interventions and, while great successes were obtained in many specific projects, the general campaigns proposed by the enthusiasts of vector control faced increasing difficulties in their practical implementation in the field. Important events, which may be considered representative of this period are, on the campaign approach, the success of Gorgas in the Panama Canal, but also the failure of the Mian Mir project in India; while on the developmental approach, the Italian and Dutch schools of malariology, the Tennessee Valley and the development of malaria sanitation, included the so called species sanitation. The projection of these developments to a global

  8. Malaria in the Era of Food Fortification With Folic Acid.

    PubMed

    Nzila, Alexis; Okombo, John; Hyde, John

    2016-06-01

    Food fortified with folic acid has been available for consumption in North America for over a decade. This strategy has led to an increase in folate levels in the general population and, more importantly, a significant decrease in the incidence of neural tube defects. However, this increase in folate intake has been associated with a greater risk of cancer disease. Many African countries are now embracing this concept; however, because folate promotes malaria parasite division, as it does in cancer cells, there is a possibility of malaria exacerbation if folate intake is increased. A precedent for such a concern is the now compelling evidence showing that an increase in iron intake can lead to a higher malaria risk; as a result, mass administration of iron in malaria-endemic areas is not recommended. In this article, we review work on the effect of folate on malaria parasites. Although this topic has received little research attention, the available data suggest that the increase in folate concentration could be associated with an increase in malaria infection. Thus, the introduction of food fortification with folic acid in malaria-endemic areas should be attended by precautionary programs to monitor the risk of malaria.

  9. An easy 'one tube' method to estimate viability of Cryptosporidium oocysts using real-time qPCR.

    PubMed

    Paziewska-Harris, A; Schoone, G; Schallig, H D F H

    2016-07-01

    Viability estimation of the highly resistant oocysts of Cryptosporidium remains a key issue for the monitoring and control of this pathogen. We present here a simple 'one tube' quantitative PCR (qPCR) protocol for viability estimation using a DNA extraction protocol which preferentially solubilizes excysted sporozoites rather than oocysts. Parasite DNA released from excysted sporozoites was quantified by real-time qPCR using a ribosomal DNA marker. The qPCR signal was directly proportional to the number of oocysts excysted, and a power-law relationship was noted between oocyst age and the proportion excysting. Unexcysted oocysts released negligible amounts of DNA making the method suitable for estimating viability of as few as 10 oocysts. PMID:27095569

  10. Plasmodium vivax Malaria among military personnel, French Guiana, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Queyriaux, Benjamin; Texier, Gaetan; Ollivier, Lenaick; Galoisy-Guibal, Laurent; Michel, Remy; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Decam, Christophe; Verret, Catherine; Pommier de Santi, Vincent; Spiegel, Andre; Boutin, Jean-Paul; Migliani, Rene; Deparis, Xavier

    2011-07-01

    We obtained health surveillance epidemiologic data on malaria among French military personnel deployed to French Guiana during 1998-2008. Incidence of Plasmodium vivax malaria increased and that of P. falciparum remained stable. This new epidemiologic situation has led to modification of malaria treatment for deployed military personnel.

  11. Malaria situation in India with special reference to tribal areas

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ravendra K.; Thakor, H.G.; Saha, K.B.; Sonal, G.S.; Dhariwal, A.C.; Singh, Neeru

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: In India, malaria is a major public health problem in States having predominantly tribal population. The objective of this analysis was to find out the incidence of malaria in various States/districts having varied proportions of tribal population using National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) data. Methods: States and districts were classified into three categories based on proportions of Scheduled Tribes (ST) population as <10, 10-29.9 and 30 per cent + ST population. Five year average (2008-2012) of all important malaria indicators collected by NVBDCP was taken to normalize the effect of annual fluctuations in malaria incidence. Results: State level analysis revealed that ten States/UTs with 30 per cent or more tribal population comprising only three per cent of total population, contributed 14 per cent of total malaria, 21 per cent Plasmodium falciparum and 29 per cent of deaths due to malaria. Similarly, district level analysis showed that districts with 30 per cent or more tribal population comprising about eight per cent country's population contributed to 46 per cent of total malaria cases, 70 per cent P. falciparum and 47 per cent malarial deaths in the country. Interpretation & conclusions: Our analysis showed that the neglect of the ethnic communities in tribal areas would be detrimental to the overall reduction of morbidity and mortality due to malaria. The fight against the increasing burden of malaria in tribal belt requires adoption of multiple approaches and socio-economic development of the tribal communities. PMID:26139770

  12. A historical perspective on malaria control in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, Sean Michael; Tauil, Pedro Luiz; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Silva-Flannery, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    Malaria has always been an important public health problem in Brazil. The early history of Brazilian malaria and its control was powered by colonisation by Europeans and the forced relocation of Africans as slaves. Internal migration brought malaria to many regions in Brazil where, given suitableAnopheles mosquito vectors, it thrived. Almost from the start, officials recognised the problem malaria presented to economic development, but early control efforts were hampered by still developing public health control and ignorance of the underlying biology and ecology of malaria. Multiple regional and national malaria control efforts have been attempted with varying success. At present, the Amazon Basin accounts for 99% of Brazil’s reported malaria cases with regional increases in incidence often associated with large scale public works or migration. Here, we provide an exhaustive summary of primary literature in English, Spanish and Portuguese regarding Brazilian malaria control. Our goal was not to interpret the history of Brazilian malaria control from a particular political or theoretical perspective, but rather to provide a straightforward, chronological narrative of the events that have transpired in Brazil over the past 200 years and identify common themes. PMID:26517649

  13. A historical perspective on malaria control in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Griffing, Sean Michael; Tauil, Pedro Luiz; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Silva-Flannery, Luciana

    2015-09-01

    Malaria has always been an important public health problem in Brazil. The early history of Brazilian malaria and its control was powered by colonisation by Europeans and the forced relocation of Africans as slaves. Internal migration brought malaria to many regions in Brazil where, given suitable Anopheles mosquito vectors, it thrived. Almost from the start, officials recognised the problem malaria presented to economic development, but early control efforts were hampered by still developing public health control and ignorance of the underlying biology and ecology of malaria. Multiple regional and national malaria control efforts have been attempted with varying success. At present, the Amazon Basin accounts for 99% of Brazil's reported malaria cases with regional increases in incidence often associated with large scale public works or migration. Here, we provide an exhaustive summary of primary literature in English, Spanish and Portuguese regarding Brazilian malaria control. Our goal was not to interpret the history of Brazilian malaria control from a particular political or theoretical perspective, but rather to provide a straightforward, chronological narrative of the events that have transpired in Brazil over the past 200 years and identify common themes.

  14. Prospects for Malaria Elimination in Mesoamerica and Hispaniola

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Sócrates; Ochoa-Orozco, Sergio Andrés; González, Iveth J.; Peinado, Lucrecia; Quiñones, Martha L.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains endemic in 21 countries of the American continent with an estimated 427,000 cases per year. Approximately 10% of these occur in the Mesoamerican and Caribbean regions. During the last decade, malaria transmission in Mesoamerica showed a decrease of ~85%; whereas, in the Caribbean region, Hispaniola (comprising the Dominican Republic [DR] and Haiti) presented an overall rise in malaria transmission, primarily due to a steady increase in Haiti, while DR experienced a significant transmission decrease in this period. The significant malaria reduction observed recently in the region prompted the launch of an initiative for Malaria Elimination in Mesoamerica and Hispaniola (EMMIE) with the active involvement of the National Malaria Control Programs (NMCPs) of nine countries, the Regional Coordination Mechanism (RCM) for Mesoamerica, and the Council of Health Ministries of Central America and Dominican Republic (COMISCA). The EMMIE initiative is supported by the Global Fund for Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) with active participation of multiple partners including Ministries of Health, bilateral and multilateral agencies, as well as research centers. EMMIE’s main goal is to achieve elimination of malaria transmission in the region by 2020. Here we discuss the prospects, challenges, and research needs associated with this initiative that, if successful, could represent a paradigm for other malaria-affected regions. PMID:25973753

  15. Asparagine requirement in Plasmodium berghei as a target to prevent malaria transmission and liver infections.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan A; Mukhi, Dhanunjay; Sathishkumar, Vinayagam; Subramani, Pradeep A; Ghosh, Susanta K; Pandey, Rajeev R; Shetty, Manjunatha C; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    The proteins of Plasmodium, the malaria parasite, are strikingly rich in asparagine. Plasmodium depends primarily on host haemoglobin degradation for amino acids and has a rudimentary pathway for amino acid biosynthesis, but retains a gene encoding asparagine synthetase (AS). Here we show that deletion of AS in Plasmodium berghei (Pb) delays the asexual- and liver-stage development with substantial reduction in the formation of ookinetes, oocysts and sporozoites in mosquitoes. In the absence of asparagine synthesis, extracellular asparagine supports suboptimal survival of PbAS knockout (KO) parasites. Depletion of blood asparagine levels by treating PbASKO-infected mice with asparaginase completely prevents the development of liver stages, exflagellation of male gametocytes and the subsequent formation of sexual stages. In vivo supplementation of asparagine in mice restores the exflagellation of PbASKO parasites. Thus, the parasite life cycle has an absolute requirement for asparagine, which we propose could be targeted to prevent malaria transmission and liver infections. PMID:26531182

  16. Asparagine requirement in Plasmodium berghei as a target to prevent malaria transmission and liver infections.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan A; Mukhi, Dhanunjay; Sathishkumar, Vinayagam; Subramani, Pradeep A; Ghosh, Susanta K; Pandey, Rajeev R; Shetty, Manjunatha C; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    The proteins of Plasmodium, the malaria parasite, are strikingly rich in asparagine. Plasmodium depends primarily on host haemoglobin degradation for amino acids and has a rudimentary pathway for amino acid biosynthesis, but retains a gene encoding asparagine synthetase (AS). Here we show that deletion of AS in Plasmodium berghei (Pb) delays the asexual- and liver-stage development with substantial reduction in the formation of ookinetes, oocysts and sporozoites in mosquitoes. In the absence of asparagine synthesis, extracellular asparagine supports suboptimal survival of PbAS knockout (KO) parasites. Depletion of blood asparagine levels by treating PbASKO-infected mice with asparaginase completely prevents the development of liver stages, exflagellation of male gametocytes and the subsequent formation of sexual stages. In vivo supplementation of asparagine in mice restores the exflagellation of PbASKO parasites. Thus, the parasite life cycle has an absolute requirement for asparagine, which we propose could be targeted to prevent malaria transmission and liver infections.

  17. Asparagine requirement in Plasmodium berghei as a target to prevent malaria transmission and liver infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan A.; Mukhi, Dhanunjay; Sathishkumar, Vinayagam; Subramani, Pradeep A.; Ghosh, Susanta K.; Pandey, Rajeev R.; Shetty, Manjunatha C.; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    The proteins of Plasmodium, the malaria parasite, are strikingly rich in asparagine. Plasmodium depends primarily on host haemoglobin degradation for amino acids and has a rudimentary pathway for amino acid biosynthesis, but retains a gene encoding asparagine synthetase (AS). Here we show that deletion of AS in Plasmodium berghei (Pb) delays the asexual- and liver-stage development with substantial reduction in the formation of ookinetes, oocysts and sporozoites in mosquitoes. In the absence of asparagine synthesis, extracellular asparagine supports suboptimal survival of PbAS knockout (KO) parasites. Depletion of blood asparagine levels by treating PbASKO-infected mice with asparaginase completely prevents the development of liver stages, exflagellation of male gametocytes and the subsequent formation of sexual stages. In vivo supplementation of asparagine in mice restores the exflagellation of PbASKO parasites. Thus, the parasite life cycle has an absolute requirement for asparagine, which we propose could be targeted to prevent malaria transmission and liver infections. PMID:26531182

  18. Vector movement underlies avian malaria at upper elevation in Hawaii: implications for transmission of human malaria.

    PubMed

    Freed, Leonard A; Cann, Rebecca L

    2013-11-01

    With climate warming, malaria in humans and birds at upper elevations is an emerging infectious disease because development of the parasite in the mosquito vector and vector life history are both temperature dependent. An enhanced-mosquito-movement model from climate warming predicts increased transmission of malaria at upper elevation sites that are too cool for parasite development in the mosquito vector. We evaluate this model with avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) at 1,900-m elevation on the Island of Hawaii, with air temperatures too low for sporogony in the vector (Culex quinquefasciatus). On a well-defined site over a 14-year period, 10 of 14 species of native and introduced birds became infected, several epizootics occurred, and the increase in prevalence was driven more by resident species than by mobile species that could have acquired their infections at lower elevations. Greater movement of infectious mosquitoes from lower elevations now permits avian malaria to spread at 1,900 m in Hawaii, in advance of climate warming at that elevation. The increase in malaria at upper elevations due to dispersal of infectious mosquitoes is a real alternative to temperature for the increased incidence of human malaria in tropical highlands.

  19. Impact of Schistosoma mansoni on Malaria Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L.; Skrip, Laura; Greenhalgh, Scott; Hotez, Peter; Galvani, Alison P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa harbors the majority of the global burden of malaria and schistosomiasis infections. The co-endemicity of these two tropical diseases has prompted investigation into the mechanisms of coinfection, particularly the competing immunological responses associated with each disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that infection with Schistosoma mansoni is associated with a greater malaria incidence among school-age children. Methodology We developed a co-epidemic model of malaria and S. mansoni transmission dynamics which takes into account key epidemiological interaction between the two diseases in terms of elevated malaria incidence among individuals with S. mansoni high egg output. The model was parameterized for S. mansoni high-risk endemic communities, using epidemiological and clinical data of the interaction between S. mansoni and malaria among children in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the potential impact of the S. mansoni–malaria interaction and mass treatment of schistosomiasis on malaria prevalence in co-endemic communities. Principal Findings Our results suggest that in the absence of mass drug administration of praziquantel, the interaction between S. mansoni and malaria may reduce the effectiveness of malaria treatment for curtailing malaria transmission, in S. mansoni high-risk endemic communities. However, when malaria treatment is used in combination with praziquantel, mass praziquantel administration may increase the effectiveness of malaria control intervention strategy for reducing malaria prevalence in malaria- S. mansoni co-endemic communities. Conclusions/Significance Schistosomiasis treatment and control programmes in regions where S. mansoni and malaria are highly prevalent may have indirect benefits on reducing malaria transmission as a result of disease interactions. In particular, mass praziquantel administration may not only have the direct benefit of reducing schistosomiasis infection, it may also

  20. Malaria resurgence: a systematic review and assessment of its causes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Considerable declines in malaria have accompanied increased funding for control since the year 2000, but historical failures to maintain gains against the disease underscore the fragility of these successes. Although malaria transmission can be suppressed by effective control measures, in the absence of active intervention malaria will return to an intrinsic equilibrium determined by factors related to ecology, efficiency of mosquito vectors, and socioeconomic characteristics. Understanding where and why resurgence has occurred historically can help current and future malaria control programmes avoid the mistakes of the past. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify historical malaria resurgence events. All suggested causes of these events were categorized according to whether they were related to weakened malaria control programmes, increased potential for malaria transmission, or technical obstacles like resistance. Results The review identified 75 resurgence events in 61 countries, occurring from the 1930s through the 2000s. Almost all resurgence events (68/75 = 91%) were attributed at least in part to the weakening of malaria control programmes for a variety of reasons, of which resource constraints were the most common (39/68 = 57%). Over half of the events (44/75 = 59%) were attributed in part to increases in the intrinsic potential for malaria transmission, while only 24/75 (32%) were attributed to vector or drug resistance. Conclusions Given that most malaria resurgences have been linked to weakening of control programmes, there is an urgent need to develop practical solutions to the financial and operational threats to effectively sustaining today’s successful malaria control programmes. PMID:22531245

  1. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in rodent models of severe malaria infection.

    PubMed Central

    Elased, K; Playfair, J H

    1994-01-01

    Severe hypoglycemia developed during nonlethal Plasmodium chabaudi and lethal P. yoelii blood stage malaria infection in mice, always in association with hyperinsulinemia. Supernatants of lethal P. yoelii incubated overnight induced hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in normal mice. In murine malaria, hypoglycemia may be largely secondary to increased insulin secretion. PMID:7927799

  2. Neurological manifestations of malaria.

    PubMed

    Román, G C; Senanayake, N

    1992-03-01

    The involvement of the nervous system in malaria is reviewed in this paper. Cerebral malaria, the acute encephalopathy which complicates exclusively the infection by Plasmodium falciparum commonly affects children and adolescents in hyperendemic areas. Plugging of cerebral capillaries and venules by clumped, parasitized red cells causing sludging in the capillary circulation is one hypothesis to explain its pathogenesis. The other is a humoral hypothesis which proposes nonspecific, immune-mediated, inflammatory responses with release of vasoactive substances capable of producing endothelial damage and alterations of permeability. Cerebral malaria has a mortality rate up to 50%, and also a considerable longterm morbidity, particularly in children. Hypoglycemia, largely in patients treated with quinine, may complicate the cerebral symptomatology. Other central nervous manifestations of malaria include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral arterial occlusion, and transient extrapyramidal and neuropsychiatric manifestations. A self-limiting, isolated cerebellar ataxia, presumably caused by immunological mechanisms, in patients recovering from falciparum malaria has been recognized in Sri Lanka. Malaria is a common cause of febrile seizures in the tropics, and it also contributes to the development of epilepsy in later life. Several reports of spinal cord and peripheral nerve involvement are also available. A transient muscle paralysis resembling periodic paralysis during febrile episodes of malaria has been described in some patients. The pathogenesis of these neurological manifestations remains unexplored, but offers excellent perspectives for research at a clinical as well as experimental level. PMID:1307475

  3. Malaria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Richard-Fabian; Spinelli, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention. These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia. In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress) and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia) features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis. Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors) – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started. While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets, repellents and new chemoprophylaxis regimens. PMID:23205261

  4. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    PubMed

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Li, Xunde; Xiao, Chengling; Atwill, Edward R

    2015-08-01

    Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples) and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal(-1) day(-1). Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%-100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank.

  5. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    PubMed

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Li, Xunde; Xiao, Chengling; Atwill, Edward R

    2015-08-01

    Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples) and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal(-1) day(-1). Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%-100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank. PMID:25834788

  6. Correlation between diarrhea severity and oocyst count via quantitative PCR or fluorescence microscopy in experimental cryptosporidiosis in calves.

    PubMed

    Operario, Darwin J; Bristol, Lauren S; Liotta, Janice; Nydam, Daryl V; Houpt, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important diarrhea-associated pathogen, however the correlation between parasite burden and diarrhea severity remains unclear. We studied this relationship in 10 experimentally infected calves using immunofluorescence microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (N = 124 fecal samples). The qPCR data were corrected for extraction/amplification efficiency and gene copy number to generate parasite counts. The qPCR and microscopic oocyst quantities exhibited significant correlation (R(2) = 0.33, P < 0.05), however qPCR had increased sensitivity. Upon comparison with diarrhea severity scores (from 0 to 3), a PCR-based count of ≥ 2.6 × 10(5) parasites or an immunofluorescence microscopy count of ≥ 4.5 × 10(4) oocysts were discriminatory predictors of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (versus no-to-mild diarrhea), with accuracies and predictive values of 72-82%. In summary, a quantitative approach for Cryptosporidium can refine predictive power for diarrhea and appears useful for distinguishing clinical cryptosporidiosis versus subclinical infection.

  7. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Li, Xunde; Xiao, Chengling; Atwill, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples) and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal-1 day-1. Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%–100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank. PMID:25834788

  8. Future climate data from RCP 4.5 and occurrence of malaria in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jaewon; Noh, Huiseong; Kim, Soojun; Singh, Vijay P; Hong, Seung Jin; Kim, Duckgil; Lee, Keonhaeng; Kang, Narae; Kim, Hung Soo

    2014-10-15

    Since its reappearance at the Military Demarcation Line in 1993, malaria has been occurring annually in Korea. Malaria is regarded as a third grade nationally notifiable disease susceptible to climate change. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of climatic factors on the occurrence of malaria in Korea and construct a malaria occurrence model for predicting the future trend of malaria under the influence of climate change. Using data from 2001-2011, the effect of time lag between malaria occurrence and mean temperature, relative humidity and total precipitation was investigated using spectral analysis. Also, a principal component regression model was constructed, considering multicollinearity. Future climate data, generated from RCP 4.5 climate change scenario and CNCM3 climate model, was applied to the constructed regression model to simulate future malaria occurrence and analyze the trend of occurrence. Results show an increase in the occurrence of malaria and the shortening of annual time of occurrence in the future.

  9. Rapid Urban Malaria Appraisal (RUMA) IV: Epidemiology of urban malaria in Cotonou (Benin)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shr-Jie; Lengeler, Christian; Smith, Thomas A; Vounatsou, Penelope; Akogbeto, Martin; Tanner, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Background An estimated 40 % of the population in Benin lives in urban areas. The purpose of the study was to estimate malaria endemicity and the fraction of malaria-attributable fevers in health facilities in Cotonou. Methods A health care system evaluation and a series of school parasitaemia surveys and health facility-based surveys were carried out during the dry season in of 2003, applying standard Rapid Urban Malaria Appraisal (RUMA) methodology. This study was part of a multi-site assessment supported by the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. Results The field work was carried out in February-March 2003. In 2002 and out of 289,342 consultations in the public health facilities of Cotonou there were 100,257 reported simple malaria cases (34.6%) and 12,195 complicated malaria cases (4.2%). In the school parasitaemia surveys, a malaria infection was found in 5.2 % of all samples. The prevalence rates of parasitaemia in the centre, intermediate and periphery zones were 2.6%, 9.0% and 2.5%, respectively. In the health facility surveys the malaria infection rates in presenting fever cases were 0% (under one year old), 6.8% (one to five years old), 0% (> five to 15 years old) and 0.9% (over 15 years old), while these rates in the control group were 1.4%, 2.8%, 1.3% and 2.0%. The malaria-attributable fractions among presenting fever cases were 0.04 in the one to five years old and zero in the three other age groups. Hence, malaria played only a small role in fever episodes at the end of the dry season. In total, 69.2% of patients used a mosquito net the night before the survey and 35.1% used an insecticide-treated net, which was shown to be protective for an infection (OR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.78). Travelling to a rural area (5.8% of all respondents) did not increase the infection risk. Conclusion The homogenously low malaria prevalence might be associated with urban transformation and/or a high bednet usage. Over-diagnosis of malaria and over-treatment with

  10. Effect of particles on the recovery of cryptosporidium oocysts from source water samples of various turbidities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yao Yu; Ong, Say Leong; Hu, Jiang Yong; Song, Lian Fa; Tan, Xiao Lan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2003-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum can be found in both source and drinking water and has been reported to cause serious waterborne outbreaks which threaten public health safety. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed method 1622 for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts present in water. Method 1622 involves four key processing steps: filtration, immunomagnetic separation (IMS), fluorescent-antibody (FA) staining, and microscopic evaluation. The individual performance of each of these four steps was evaluated in this study. We found that the levels of recovery of C. parvum oocysts at the IMS-FA and FA staining stages were high, averaging more than 95%. In contrast, the level of recovery declined significantly, to 14.4%, when the filtration step was incorporated with tap water as a spiking medium. This observation suggested that a significant fraction of C. parvum oocysts was lost during the filtration step. When C. parvum oocysts were spiked into reclaimed water, tap water, microfiltration filtrate, and reservoir water, the highest mean level of recovery of (85.0% +/- 5.2% [mean +/- standard deviation]) was obtained for the relatively turbid reservoir water. Further studies indicated that it was the suspended particles present in the reservoir water that contributed to the enhanced C. parvum oocyst recovery. The levels of C. parvum oocyst recovery from spiked reservoir water with different turbidities indicated that particle size and concentration could affect oocyst recovery. Similar observations were also made when silica particles of different sizes and masses were added to seeded tap water. The optimal particle size was determined to be in the range from 5 to 40 micro m, and the corresponding optimal concentration of suspended particles was 1.42 g for 10 liters of tap water.

  11. [The efficacy of water ozonation on the inactivation of oocysts of Cryptosporidium].

    PubMed

    Perrine, D; Georges, P; Langlais, B

    1990-01-01

    Cryptosporidium oocysts are currently found in surface waters. Their incomplete removal by sand filtration and their high resistance to chlorinated disinfectants make possible waterborne cryptosporidiosis outbreaks after drinking treated water. Because ozone is an alternative to chlorine for final drinking water disinfection the aim of our study was to determine the ozonation conditions able to eliminate the infectivity of oocysts. Feces from horses naturally infected by C. parvum were mixed with distilled water. The obtained suspension was clarified by passing through a graded series of four sieves (pore sizes, 315, 200, 125 and 63 microns). The clarified suspension was decontaminated by adding a 10% sodium hypochlorite solution. After a 10 minute contact time at room temperature, the chlorine residual was neutralised by the exactly requisite volume of a 0.01 N sodium thiosulfate solution. Oocysts in the suspension were purified by centrifugation and washing of pellets in distilled water. Oocysts in the finally obtained suspension were numerated by counting in a Malassez haemocytometer. Ozonated water containing dissolved ozone residuals ranging from 0.44 mg/l to 1.09 mg/l were inoculated with a number of oocysts ranging from 1.10(6) to 1.10(8). Contact times with ozone were 4.6 or 8 minutes. After destroying the ozone residual by sodium thiosulfate, ozonated oocysts were administered by oral route to male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 180 to 200 g and beforehand immunosuppressed by a regimen of 25 mg hydrocortisone acetate subcutaneously twice a week, 5 weeks before and 3 weeks after Cryptosporidium challenge. Oocyst shedding was daily controlled by phase contrast microscoy in smears of fecal suspension mixed with carbolfuchsine solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Malaria and Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Aristóteles Comte; de Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-01-01

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients with infectious and parasitic diseases can result from both intrinsic mechanisms of the disease and drug intervention. Malaria is an example, considering that the endothelial injury by Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes can cause circulatory disorders. This is a literature review aimed at discussing the relationship between malaria and endothelial impairment, especially its effects on the cardiovascular system. We discuss the implications of endothelial aggression and the interdisciplinarity that should guide the malaria patient care, whose acute infection can contribute to precipitate or aggravate a preexisting heart disease. PMID:25014058

  13. Malaria prevention in travelers.

    PubMed

    Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    A common approach to malaria prevention is to follow the "A, B, C, D" rule: Awareness of risk, Bite avoidance, Compliance with chemoprophylaxis, and prompt Diagnosis in case of fever. The risk of acquiring malaria depends on the length and intensity of exposure; the risk of developing severe disease is primarily determined by the health status of the traveler. These parameters need to be assessed before recommending chemoprophylaxis and/or stand-by emergency treatment. This review discusses the different strategies and drug options available for the prevention of malaria during and post travel.

  14. Predicting malaria vector distribution under climate change scenarios in China: Challenges for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Wang, Duoquan; Ma, Aimin; Hwang, Jimee; Bennett, Adam; Sturrock, Hugh J W; Fan, Junfu; Zhang, Wenjie; Yang, Dian; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Projecting the distribution of malaria vectors under climate change is essential for planning integrated vector control activities for sustaining elimination and preventing reintroduction of malaria. In China, however, little knowledge exists on the possible effects of climate change on malaria vectors. Here we assess the potential impact of climate change on four dominant malaria vectors (An. dirus, An. minimus, An. lesteri and An. sinensis) using species distribution models for two future decades: the 2030 s and the 2050 s. Simulation-based estimates suggest that the environmentally suitable area (ESA) for An. dirus and An. minimus would increase by an average of 49% and 16%, respectively, under all three scenarios for the 2030 s, but decrease by 11% and 16%, respectively in the 2050 s. By contrast, an increase of 36% and 11%, respectively, in ESA of An. lesteri and An. sinensis, was estimated under medium stabilizing (RCP4.5) and very heavy (RCP8.5) emission scenarios. in the 2050 s. In total, we predict a substantial net increase in the population exposed to the four dominant malaria vectors in the decades of the 2030 s and 2050 s, considering land use changes and urbanization simultaneously. Strategies to achieve and sustain malaria elimination in China will need to account for these potential changes in vector distributions and receptivity. PMID:26868185

  15. Predicting malaria vector distribution under climate change scenarios in China: Challenges for malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Wang, Duoquan; Ma, Aimin; Hwang, Jimee; Bennett, Adam; Sturrock, Hugh J. W.; Fan, Junfu; Zhang, Wenjie; Yang, Dian; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Projecting the distribution of malaria vectors under climate change is essential for planning integrated vector control activities for sustaining elimination and preventing reintroduction of malaria. In China, however, little knowledge exists on the possible effects of climate change on malaria vectors. Here we assess the potential impact of climate change on four dominant malaria vectors (An. dirus, An. minimus, An. lesteri and An. sinensis) using species distribution models for two future decades: the 2030 s and the 2050 s. Simulation-based estimates suggest that the environmentally suitable area (ESA) for An. dirus and An. minimus would increase by an average of 49% and 16%, respectively, under all three scenarios for the 2030 s, but decrease by 11% and 16%, respectively in the 2050 s. By contrast, an increase of 36% and 11%, respectively, in ESA of An. lesteri and An. sinensis, was estimated under medium stabilizing (RCP4.5) and very heavy (RCP8.5) emission scenarios. in the 2050 s. In total, we predict a substantial net increase in the population exposed to the four dominant malaria vectors in the decades of the 2030 s and 2050 s, considering land use changes and urbanization simultaneously. Strategies to achieve and sustain malaria elimination in China will need to account for these potential changes in vector distributions and receptivity. PMID:26868185

  16. Predicting malaria vector distribution under climate change scenarios in China: Challenges for malaria elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Wang, Duoquan; Ma, Aimin; Hwang, Jimee; Bennett, Adam; Sturrock, Hugh J. W.; Fan, Junfu; Zhang, Wenjie; Yang, Dian; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2016-02-01

    Projecting the distribution of malaria vectors under climate change is essential for planning integrated vector control activities for sustaining elimination and preventing reintroduction of malaria. In China, however, little knowledge exists on the possible effects of climate change on malaria vectors. Here we assess the potential impact of climate change on four dominant malaria vectors (An. dirus, An. minimus, An. lesteri and An. sinensis) using species distribution models for two future decades: the 2030 s and the 2050 s. Simulation-based estimates suggest that the environmentally suitable area (ESA) for An. dirus and An. minimus would increase by an average of 49% and 16%, respectively, under all three scenarios for the 2030 s, but decrease by 11% and 16%, respectively in the 2050 s. By contrast, an increase of 36% and 11%, respectively, in ESA of An. lesteri and An. sinensis, was estimated under medium stabilizing (RCP4.5) and very heavy (RCP8.5) emission scenarios. in the 2050 s. In total, we predict a substantial net increase in the population exposed to the four dominant malaria vectors in the decades of the 2030 s and 2050 s, considering land use changes and urbanization simultaneously. Strategies to achieve and sustain malaria elimination in China will need to account for these potential changes in vector distributions and receptivity.

  17. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  18. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  19. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  20. Malaria in Britain: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Katrin Gaardbo; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid H; Armstrong, Ben; Davies, Clive R

    2003-08-19

    There has been much recent speculation that global warming may allow the reestablishment of malaria transmission in previously endemic areas such as Europe and the United States. In this report we analyze temporal trends in malaria in Britain between 1840 and 1910, to assess the potential for reemergence of the disease. Our results demonstrate that at least 20% of the drop-off in malaria was due to increasing cattle population and decreasing acreage of marsh wetlands. Although both rainfall and average temperature were associated with year-to-year variability in death rates, there was no evidence for any association with the long-term malaria trend. Model simulations for future scenarios in Britain suggest that the change in temperature projected to occur by 2050 is likely to cause a proportional increase in local malaria transmission of 8-14%. The current risk is negligible, as >52,000 imported cases since 1953 have not led to any secondary cases. The projected increase in proportional risk is clearly insufficient to lead to the reestablishment of endemicity.

  1. Malaria--a disease of travellers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Pieruń, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The number of people travelling to regions with hot climate such as Asia, Africa and South America increases steadily every year. The reason for travel varies greatly, from business trips to tourist excursions, the latter definitely prevailing. There has been an increase in travel to destinations where exposure to vector-borne, food- and water-borne, air-borne or sexually transmitted pathogens is common. As one of vector-borne diseases, malaria poses as a serious health hazard to local as well as immigrant populations. Over 40% of the world's inhabitants live in malaria-endemic regions. Although highly developed countries of North America and Europe are generally free from endemic malaria foci, numerous cases of imported infections are observed. Some cases of malaria are also reported in Poland, they are usually brought by persons returning from tropical regions in Africa, Asia, South America, Australia and Oceania. The number of cases depends on the destination as well as on the use or rejection of chemoprophylaxis. The article provides general information on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation and diagnosis of malaria. Emphasis has been put on treatment as well as on chemoprophylaxis of the disease, which are changing relatively quickly, what is mainly related to increasing Plasmodium resistance to applied medicines.

  2. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage through intact soil cores following surface application and injection of slurry.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-11-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions. PMID:21948848

  3. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Bacteriophage through Intact Soil Cores following Surface Application and Injection of Slurry▿

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B.; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions. PMID:21948848

  4. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage through intact soil cores following surface application and injection of slurry.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-11-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions.

  5. Plasma glutamine levels and falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Cowan, G; Planche, T; Agbenyega, T; Bedu-Addo, G; Owusu-Ofori, A; Adebe-Appiah, J; Agranoff, D; Woodrow, C; Castell, L; Elford, B; Krishna, S

    1999-01-01

    Glutamine deficiency is associated with increased rates of sepsis and mortality, which can be prevented by glutamine supplementation. Changes in glutamine concentration were examined in Ghanaian children with acute falciparum malaria and control cases. The mean (SD) plasma glutamine concentration was lower in patients with acute malaria (401 (82) mumol/L, n = 50) than in control patients (623 (67) mumol/L, n = 7; P < 0.001). Plasma glutamine concentrations all rose in convalescence. The mean (SD) increase in plasma glutamine was 202 (123) mumol/L (n = 18; P < 0.001) compared with acute infection. We conclude that acute falciparum malaria is associated with large decreases in plasma glutamine and these falls may increase susceptibility to sepsis and dyserythropoeisis.

  6. A nation-wide malaria knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in Malawi: introduction.

    PubMed

    Wirima, J J

    1994-03-01

    In Malawi malaria is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in children and pertinent hospitalizations have been increasing annually since 1982. In 1990, malaria and malaria-associated anemia constituted the leading cause of outpatient visits for all age groups and the leading cause of pediatric hospitalizations, and pediatric inpatient deaths. The Ministry of Health in Malawi has had a National Malaria Control Plan since 1985. This plan calls for improvement in: 1) awareness of malaria in the population; 2) accurate diagnosis; (3) effective and affordable treatment nationwide; 4) effective prevention for high risk groups; 5) clarification of feasibility of alternative methods of vector control; 6) improved training in diagnosis and management; 7) accurate reporting; 8) effective management at national, regional, and district levels; 9) improved ability to monitor and evaluate progress; and 10) increased government and donor investment in malaria control. The Ministry of Health undertook a national baseline survey to explore deficiencies in current malaria control practices, and also included a cost assessment of household expenditure on malaria. A number of articles document the results of this effort highlighting characteristics of malaria in Malawi and current control methods by the population. These aspects include: 1) malaria is perceived as a very important health problem: 2) prompt treatment with a full dosage of the recommended antimalarials occurs in less than 10% of febrile children; 3) a malaria prevention program based in antenatal clinics could provide affordable malaria prevention for most pregnant women; 4) few households use measures to prevent malaria which is largely associated with poverty: and 5) a high proportion of available household income is spent on malaria treatment or is lost to malaria illness. The Malawian situation is similar to that of neighboring nations, and it is hoped that they also embark on malaria control in their

  7. Epidemiology of malaria in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M

    1982-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in Malaysia, particularly in peninsular Malaysia and the state of Sabah. An eradication program started in the states of Sabah and Sarawak in 1961 initially was remarkably successful. A similar but staged program was started in peninsular Malaysia in 1967 and was also quite successful. However, a marked upsurge in incidence in Sabah in 1975-1978 showed that malaria is still a major hazard. The disease leads to great economic losses in terms of the productivity of the labor force and the learning capacity of schoolchildren. The topography, the climate, and the migrations of the people due to increased economic activity are similar in peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, the epidemiologic picture differs strikingly from area to area in terms of species of vectors, distribution of parasitic species, and resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine. Likewise, the problems faced by the eradication or control programs in the three regions are dissimilar. Because solutions to only some of these problems are possible, the eradication of malaria in Malaysia is not likely in the near future. However, the situation offers an excellent opportunity for further studies of antimalaria measures. PMID:6755616

  8. A global model of malaria climate sensitivity: comparing malaria response to historic climate data based on simulation and officially reported malaria incidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of the Anopheles vector in malaria transmission and the effect of climate on Anopheles populations are well established. Models of the impact of climate change on the global malaria burden now have access to high-resolution climate data, but malaria surveillance data tends to be less precise, making model calibration problematic. Measurement of malaria response to fluctuations in climate variables offers a way to address these difficulties. Given the demonstrated sensitivity of malaria transmission to vector capacity, this work tests response functions to fluctuations in land surface temperature and precipitation. Methods This study of regional sensitivity of malaria incidence to year-to-year climate variations used an extended Macdonald Ross compartmental disease model (to compute malaria incidence) built on top of a global Anopheles vector capacity model (based on 10 years of satellite climate data). The predicted incidence was compared with estimates from the World Health Organization and the Malaria Atlas. The models and denominator data used are freely available through the Eclipse Foundation’s Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeller (STEM). Results Although the absolute scale factor relating reported malaria to absolute incidence is uncertain, there is a positive correlation between predicted and reported year-to-year variation in malaria burden with an averaged root mean square (RMS) error of 25% comparing normalized incidence across 86 countries. Based on this, the proposed measure of sensitivity of malaria to variations in climate variables indicates locations where malaria is most likely to increase or decrease in response to specific climate factors. Bootstrapping measures the increased uncertainty in predicting malaria sensitivity when reporting is restricted to national level and an annual basis. Results indicate a potential 20x improvement in accuracy if data were available at the level ISO 3166–2 national subdivisions and

  9. [Postmortem diagnosis of tropical malaria].

    PubMed

    Albert, S; Schröter, A; Bratzke, H; Brade, V

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen days after returning from a four week holiday in Kenya a 35-year-old man consulted his doctor complaining of feeling unwell. The doctor diagnosed influenza and gave him a sickness certificate for three days. Because the patient did not reappear at his workplace a search was made and he was found dead in his flat seven days after seeing his doctor. A medicolegal autopsy was performed two days after the estimated time of death. There was marked swelling of liver and spleen together with jaundice and "dirty grey" colouration of the viscera. Samples of heart blood and spleen puncture material were taken. Giemsa stained preparations (ordinary and thick blood smears) revealed numerous objects 1.2 to 1.5 microns in size with indistinct reddish blue staining, some of them arranged in rosettes reminiscent of schizonts. A few of them contained pigment. In material from the spleen there were masses of blackish-brown pigment. The malaria immunofluorescence test performed on serum gave a weakly positive titre of 1:40. The findings were considered enough to support a diagnosis of fulminant falciparum malaria, and this was confirmed by histological changes in various organs, notably the typical capillary blockages in the brain. Because of the popularity of long-haul tourism, cases of imported malaria are increasingly frequent and, in view of the insidiously progressive course of the disease, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis. In cases of unexplained death, if there is any suspicion of malaria, blood should always be taken for appropriate investigations, in addition to blocks for histological examination. PMID:7821199

  10. Placental Malaria in Colombia: Histopathologic Findings in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Arango, Eliana; Maestre, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Studies on gestational malaria and placental malaria have been scarce in malaria-endemic areas of the Western Hemisphere. To describe the histopathology of placental malaria in Colombia, a longitudinal descriptive study was conducted. In this study, 179 placentas were studied by histologic analysis (112 with gestational malaria and 67 negative for malaria). Placental malaria was confirmed in 22.35%, 50.0% had previous infections, and 47.5% had acute infections. Typical malaria-associated changes were observed in 37%. The most common changes were villitis, intervillitis, deciduitis, increased fibrin deposition, increased syncytial knots, mononuclear (monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes), polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, and trophozoites in fetal erythrocytes. No association was found between type of placental changes observed and histopathologic classification of placental malaria. The findings are consistent with those reported for placental malaria in other regions. Plasmodium vivax was the main parasite responsible for placental and gestational malaria, but its role in the pathogenesis of placental malaria was not conclusive. PMID:23546807

  11. Strengthening the policy setting process for global malaria control and elimination.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Bianca J; Newman, Robert D

    2012-01-27

    The scale-up of malaria control efforts in recent years, coupled with major investments in malaria research, has produced impressive public health impact in a number of countries and has led to the development of new tools and strategies aimed at further consolidating malaria control goals. As a result, there is a growing need for the malaria policy setting process to rapidly review increasing amounts of evidence. The World Health Organization Global Malaria Programme, in keeping with its mandate to set evidence-informed policies for malaria control, has convened the Malaria Policy Advisory Committee as a mechanism to increase the timeliness, transparency, independence and relevance of its recommendations to World Health Organization member states in relation to malaria control and elimination. The Malaria Policy Advisory Committee, composed of 15 world-renowned malaria experts, will meet in full twice a year, with the inaugural meeting scheduled for 31 January to 2 February 2012 in Geneva. Policy recommendations, and the evidence to support them, will be published within two months of every meeting as part of an open access Malaria Journal thematic series. This article is a prelude to that series and provides the global malaria community with the background and overview of the Committee and its terms of reference.

  12. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is dispensable in blood-stage Plasmodium berghei rodent malaria but essential in the mosquito phase

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Angelika; Mollard, Vanessa; Cozijnsen, Anton; Goodman, Christopher D.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase is driven by chemiosmotic oxidation of pyruvate derived from glycolysis. Blood-stage malaria parasites eschew chemiosmosis, instead relying almost solely on glycolysis for their ATP generation, which begs the question of whether mitochondrial ATP synthase is necessary during the blood stage of the parasite life cycle. We knocked out the mitochondrial ATP synthase β subunit gene in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, ablating the protein that converts ADP to ATP. Disruption of the β subunit gene of the ATP synthase only marginally reduced asexual blood-stage parasite growth but completely blocked mouse-to-mouse transmission via Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Parasites lacking the β subunit gene of the ATP synthase generated viable gametes that fuse and form ookinetes but cannot progress beyond this stage. Ookinetes lacking the β subunit gene of the ATP synthase had normal motility but were not viable in the mosquito midgut and never made oocysts or sporozoites, thereby abrogating transmission to naive mice via mosquito bite. We crossed the self-infertile ATP synthase β subunit knockout parasites with a male-deficient, self-infertile strain of P. berghei, which restored fertility and production of oocysts and sporozoites, which demonstrates that mitochondrial ATP synthase is essential for ongoing viability through the female, mitochondrion-carrying line of sexual reproduction in P. berghei malaria. Perturbation of ATP synthase completely blocks transmission to the mosquito vector and could potentially be targeted for disease control. PMID:25831536

  13. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is dispensable in blood-stage Plasmodium berghei rodent malaria but essential in the mosquito phase.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Angelika; Mollard, Vanessa; Cozijnsen, Anton; Goodman, Christopher D; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2015-08-18

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase is driven by chemiosmotic oxidation of pyruvate derived from glycolysis. Blood-stage malaria parasites eschew chemiosmosis, instead relying almost solely on glycolysis for their ATP generation, which begs the question of whether mitochondrial ATP synthase is necessary during the blood stage of the parasite life cycle. We knocked out the mitochondrial ATP synthase β subunit gene in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, ablating the protein that converts ADP to ATP. Disruption of the β subunit gene of the ATP synthase only marginally reduced asexual blood-stage parasite growth but completely blocked mouse-to-mouse transmission via Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Parasites lacking the β subunit gene of the ATP synthase generated viable gametes that fuse and form ookinetes but cannot progress beyond this stage. Ookinetes lacking the β subunit gene of the ATP synthase had normal motility but were not viable in the mosquito midgut and never made oocysts or sporozoites, thereby abrogating transmission to naive mice via mosquito bite. We crossed the self-infertile ATP synthase β subunit knockout parasites with a male-deficient, self-infertile strain of P. berghei, which restored fertility and production of oocysts and sporozoites, which demonstrates that mitochondrial ATP synthase is essential for ongoing viability through the female, mitochondrion-carrying line of sexual reproduction in P. berghei malaria. Perturbation of ATP synthase completely blocks transmission to the mosquito vector and could potentially be targeted for disease control.

  14. Characterization of Plasmodium developmental transcriptomes in Anopheles gambiae midgut reveals novel regulators of malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina A; Bushell, Ellen S C; Ukegbu, Chiamaka Valerie; Schlegelmilch, Timm; Cho, Jee-Sun; Redmond, Seth; Sala, Katarzyna; Christophides, George K; Vlachou, Dina

    2015-02-01

    The passage through the mosquito is a major bottleneck for malaria parasite populations and a target of interventions aiming to block disease transmission. Here, we used DNA microarrays to profile the developmental transcriptomes of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei in vivo, in the midgut of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, from parasite stages in the midgut blood bolus to sporulating oocysts on the basal gut wall. Data analysis identified several distinct transcriptional programmes encompassing genes putatively involved in developmental processes or in interactions with the mosquito. At least two of these programmes are associated with the ookinete development that is linked to mosquito midgut invasion and establishment of infection. Targeted disruption by homologous recombination of two of these genes resulted in mutant parasites exhibiting notable infection phenotypes. GAMER encodes a short polypeptide with granular localization in the gametocyte cytoplasm and shows a highly penetrant loss-of-function phenotype manifested as greatly reduced ookinete numbers, linked to impaired male gamete release. HADO encodes a putative magnesium phosphatase with distinctive cortical localization along the concave ookinete periphery. Disruption of HADO compromises ookinete development leading to significant reduction of oocyst numbers. Our data provide important insights into the molecular framework underpinning Plasmodium development in the mosquito and identifies two genes with important functions at initial stages of parasite development in the mosquito midgut.

  15. Malaria vaccine offers hope. International / Africa.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) may soon sign an agreement with the Colombian government to build a plant in Colombia for the mass production of the malaria vaccine SPf66. SPf66 consists of a combination of synthetic peptides. It will eventually be available in Africa, where 90% of all recorded malaria cases occur each year. 1 million of the 1.5-3 million malaria-related deaths each year also occur in Africa. Many of these deaths take place in children. The indirect costs of malaria in Africa is expected to increase from $800 million to $1.8 billion between 1987 and the end of 1995. Based on findings from the various clinical trials in Colombia, Thailand, The Gambia, and Tanzania, WHO's director of Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) claims that, if SPf66 can reduce the malaria incidence rate by 50% and thereby also the malaria-related death rate, the lives of 500,000 children in Africa would be spared. TDR will meet in mid-1996 to sort through all the SPf66 findings and then develop a policy for further development or production and use of SPf66. The price of each SPf66 vaccination should be around $5, comparable with the higher range of costs of other vaccines provided by WHO's Expanded Program of Immunization and UNICEF. At the 1992 WHO summit in Amsterdam, the president of the Congo called for the international community to join forces to eliminate malaria. When it was first tested on humans, in Colombia, the protection rate of SPf66 ranged from 22% to 77%, with the best results among the young and the very old. It has not caused any harmful side effects.

  16. Establishment of a germ carrier assay to assess disinfectant efficacy against oocysts of coccidian parasites.

    PubMed

    Dresely, Ira; Daugschies, Arwid; Lendner, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Parasites are a common threat to human and animal health. One option to combat parasites that produce infective environmental stages is to inactivate them by chemical disinfection. Standardised laboratory assays that enable proper evaluation of products suspected to be efficient are highly desirable to allow prudent selection and use of such potentially hazardous agents. Here, we present a newly developed in vitro germ carrier assay to evaluate inactivation of oocysts of the model organism Cryptosporidium parvum by chemical disinfectants. Stainless steel discs were used as carrier to mimic surface contamination by C. parvum oocysts. The germ carriers were incubated with approved chemical disinfectant for the specified time (2 h) and rinsed thereafter to remove the disinfectant and recover the exposed oocysts. Recovered oocysts were transferred to HCT-8 monolayers, and 48 h later, genomic DNA was extracted and quantified by real-time PCR targeting the hsp70 gene to estimate parasite reproduction. A panel of commercially available and approved disinfectants were examined and data compared with those of suspension assays and historical data obtained from efficacy assays based on infection of chicken with oocysts of Eimeria tenella. Altogether, data achieved by these divergent assays allowed similar conclusions although the sensitivity of the in vitro assay was higher. Consequently, a threshold of 99.5% inactivation is proposed to evaluate disinfectants in vitro using C. parvum as model organism as compared to the E. tenella animal infection assay (95%).

  17. Low-Pressure UV Inactivation and DNA Repair Potential of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Gwy-Am; Linden, Karl G.; Arrowood, Michael J.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2001-01-01

    Because Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are very resistant to conventional water treatment processes, including chemical disinfection, we determined the kinetics and extent of their inactivation by monochromatic, low-pressure (LP), mercury vapor lamp UV radiation and their subsequent potential for DNA repair of UV damage. A UV collimated-beam apparatus was used to expose suspensions of purified C. parvum oocysts in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.3, at 25°C to various doses of monochromatic LP UV. C. parvum infectivity reductions were rapid, approximately first order, and at a dose of 3 mJ/cm2 (=30 J/m2), the reduction reached the cell culture assay detection limit of ∼3 log10. At UV doses of 1.2 and 3 mJ/cm2, the log10 reductions of C. parvum oocyst infectivity were not significantly different for control oocysts and those exposed to dark or light repair conditions for UV-induced DNA damage. These results indicate that C. parvum oocysts are very sensitive to inactivation by low doses of monochromatic LP UV radiation and that there is no phenotypic evidence of either light or dark repair of UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:11425717

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Fractionated Toxoplasma Oocysts Reveals Clues to Their Environmental Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bogyo, Matthew; Conrad, Patricia A.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is unique in its ability to infect a broad range of birds and mammals, including humans, leading to an extremely high worldwide prevalence and distribution. This work focuses on the environmentally resistant oocyst, which is the product of sexual replication in felids and an important source of human infection. Due to the difficulty in producing and working with oocysts, relatively little is known about how this stage is able to resist extreme environmental stresses and how they initiate a new infection, once ingested. To fill this gap, the proteome of the wall and sporocyst/sporozoite fractions of mature, sporulated oocysts were characterized using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS on trypsin-digested peptides. A combined total of 1021 non-redundant T. gondii proteins were identified in the sporocyst/sporozoite fraction and 226 were identified in the oocyst wall fraction. Significantly, 172 of the identified proteins have not previously been identified in Toxoplasma proteomic studies. Among these are several of interest for their likely role in conferring environmental resistance including a family of small, tyrosine-rich proteins present in the oocyst wall fractions and late embryogenesis abundant domain-containing (LEA) proteins in the cytosolic fractions. The latter are known from other systems to be key to enabling survival against desiccation. PMID:22279555

  19. Development of Eimeria nieschulzi (Coccidia, Apicomplexa) Gamonts and Oocysts in Primary Fetal Rat Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Wiedmer, Stefanie; Hanig, Sacha; Entzeroth, Rolf; Kurth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro production of gametocytes and oocysts of the apicomplexan parasite genus Eimeria is still a challenge in coccidiosis research. Until today, an in vitro development of gametocytes or oocysts had only been shown in some Eimeria species. For several mammalian Eimeria species, partial developments could be achieved in different cell types, but a development up to gametocytes or oocysts is still lacking. This study compares several permanent cell lines with primary fetal cells of the black rat (Rattus norvegicus) concerning the qualitative in vitro development of the rat parasite Eimeria nieschulzi. With the help of transgenic parasites, the developmental progress was documented. The selected Eimeria nieschulzi strain constitutively expresses the yellow fluorescent protein and a macrogamont specific upregulated red tandem dimer tomato. In the majority of all investigated host cells the development stopped at the second merozoite stage. In a mixed culture of cells derived from inner fetal organs the development of schizont generations I-IV, macrogamonts, and oocysts were observed in crypt-like organoid structures. Microgamonts and microgametes could not be observed and oocysts did not sporulate under air supply. By immunohistology, we could confirm that wild-type E. nieschulzi stages can be found in the crypts of the small intestine. The results of this study may be helpful for characterization of native host cells and for development of an in vitro cultivation system for Eimeria species. PMID:23862053

  20. Diagnosis of placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Ulmen, Ulrike; von Gaertner, Christiane; Bedu-Addo, George; Bienzle, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    In a group of 596 delivering Ghanaian women, the sensitivities of peripheral blood thick film microscopy, ICT Malaria P.f/P.v test, and PCR in detecting microscopically confirmed placental Plasmodium falciparum infection were 42, 80, and 97%, respectively. In addition to the gross underestimation of placental malaria by peripheral blood film microscopy, submicroscopic infections were found to be a risk factor for maternal anemia.

  1. [An outbreak of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Kyrghyzstan].

    PubMed

    Usenbaev, N T; Ezhov, M N; Zvantsov, A B; Annarbaev, A; Zhoroev, A A; Almerekov, K Sh

    2006-01-01

    Malaria was not notified in the republic in 1960 to 1982, with exception of 1963 where one case of imported malaria was identified. Twenty-four cases of locally transmitted malaria were detected, 11 of them being registered in the Batken district, Osh Region, contiguous with Tadjikistan and Uzbekistan. In 1981 to 2000, a total of 101 cases of malaria were notified, in 2001 there was an increase in cases of malaria to 136, while in 2002, a total of 2744 cases of malaria were registered mainly in the Fergana valley. Malaria was imported from Tadjikistan, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan. The infectious agent of malaria was P. vivax in 98% of cases and P. falciparum in 2%. The high malarial potential areas are the Osh, Zhalalabat, and Batken Regions and town of Osh. In 2002, the investigators identified patients with malaria, made its chloroquine eliminating treatment, seasonal chemoprevention of some 5000 dwellers of the Leilek District of the Batken Region contiguous with Tadjikistan, and larvicidal treatments of water reservoirs and rice checks with dimilin. Almost 1,988,000 m2 of premises were treated with Solfac. Mosquito fishes were placed into more water reservoirs in 2003. In 2003 there was a tendency for a decrease in the incidence of malaria, as compared with 2002, which may be ascribed to the small size of vectors, which is due to the cold spring and cool June and July. In 2003, there were treatments of premises, mosquito fish enrichment of water reservoirs, interseasonal chemoprophylaxis of patients who experienced malaria in 2002; impregnated bed curtains were available to protect the dwellers of foci from mosquito bites. PMID:16562744

  2. Human movement data for malaria control and elimination strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Pindolia, Deepa K; Garcia, Andres J; Wesolowski, Amy; Smith, David L; Buckee, Caroline O; Noor, Abdisalan M; Snow, Robert W; Tatem, Andrew J

    2012-06-18

    Recent increases in funding for malaria control have led to the reduction in transmission in many malaria endemic countries, prompting the national control programmes of 36 malaria endemic countries to set elimination targets. Accounting for human population movement (HPM) in planning for control, elimination and post-elimination surveillance is important, as evidenced by previous elimination attempts that were undermined by the reintroduction of malaria through HPM. Strategic control and elimination planning, therefore, requires quantitative information on HPM patterns and the translation of these into parasite dispersion. HPM patterns and the risk of malaria vary substantially across spatial and temporal scales, demographic and socioeconomic sub-groups, and motivation for travel, so multiple data sets are likely required for quantification of movement. While existing studies based on mobile phone call record data combined with malaria transmission maps have begun to address within-country HPM patterns, other aspects remain poorly quantified despite their importance in accurately gauging malaria movement patterns and building control and detection strategies, such as cross-border HPM, demographic and socioeconomic stratification of HPM patterns, forms of transport, personal malaria protection and other factors that modify malaria risk. A wealth of data exist to aid filling these gaps, which, when combined with spatial data on transport infrastructure, traffic and malaria transmission, can answer relevant questions to guide strategic planning. This review aims to (i) discuss relevant types of HPM across spatial and temporal scales, (ii) document where datasets exist to quantify HPM, (iii) highlight where data gaps remain and (iv) briefly put forward methods for integrating these datasets in a Geographic Information System (GIS) framework for analysing and modelling human population and Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection movements.

  3. Human movement data for malaria control and elimination strategic planning

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in funding for malaria control have led to the reduction in transmission in many malaria endemic countries, prompting the national control programmes of 36 malaria endemic countries to set elimination targets. Accounting for human population movement (HPM) in planning for control, elimination and post-elimination surveillance is important, as evidenced by previous elimination attempts that were undermined by the reintroduction of malaria through HPM. Strategic control and elimination planning, therefore, requires quantitative information on HPM patterns and the translation of these into parasite dispersion. HPM patterns and the risk of malaria vary substantially across spatial and temporal scales, demographic and socioeconomic sub-groups, and motivation for travel, so multiple data sets are likely required for quantification of movement. While existing studies based on mobile phone call record data combined with malaria transmission maps have begun to address within-country HPM patterns, other aspects remain poorly quantified despite their importance in accurately gauging malaria movement patterns and building control and detection strategies, such as cross-border HPM, demographic and socioeconomic stratification of HPM patterns, forms of transport, personal malaria protection and other factors that modify malaria risk. A wealth of data exist to aid filling these gaps, which, when combined with spatial data on transport infrastructure, traffic and malaria transmission, can answer relevant questions to guide strategic planning. This review aims to (i) discuss relevant types of HPM across spatial and temporal scales, (ii) document where datasets exist to quantify HPM, (iii) highlight where data gaps remain and (iv) briefly put forward methods for integrating these datasets in a Geographic Information System (GIS) framework for analysing and modelling human population and Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection movements. PMID:22703541

  4. Human movement data for malaria control and elimination strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Pindolia, Deepa K; Garcia, Andres J; Wesolowski, Amy; Smith, David L; Buckee, Caroline O; Noor, Abdisalan M; Snow, Robert W; Tatem, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in funding for malaria control have led to the reduction in transmission in many malaria endemic countries, prompting the national control programmes of 36 malaria endemic countries to set elimination targets. Accounting for human population movement (HPM) in planning for control, elimination and post-elimination surveillance is important, as evidenced by previous elimination attempts that were undermined by the reintroduction of malaria through HPM. Strategic control and elimination planning, therefore, requires quantitative information on HPM patterns and the translation of these into parasite dispersion. HPM patterns and the risk of malaria vary substantially across spatial and temporal scales, demographic and socioeconomic sub-groups, and motivation for travel, so multiple data sets are likely required for quantification of movement. While existing studies based on mobile phone call record data combined with malaria transmission maps have begun to address within-country HPM patterns, other aspects remain poorly quantified despite their importance in accurately gauging malaria movement patterns and building control and detection strategies, such as cross-border HPM, demographic and socioeconomic stratification of HPM patterns, forms of transport, personal malaria protection and other factors that modify malaria risk. A wealth of data exist to aid filling these gaps, which, when combined with spatial data on transport infrastructure, traffic and malaria transmission, can answer relevant questions to guide strategic planning. This review aims to (i) discuss relevant types of HPM across spatial and temporal scales, (ii) document where datasets exist to quantify HPM, (iii) highlight where data gaps remain and (iv) briefly put forward methods for integrating these datasets in a Geographic Information System (GIS) framework for analysing and modelling human population and Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection movements. PMID:22703541

  5. Barriers to Malaria Control among Marginalized Tribal Communities: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Radhika; Kalkonde, Yogeshwar; Gokhale, Charuta; Greenough, P. Gregg; Bang, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    healers partners in malaria control; promoting within-village rapid diagnosis and treatment; increasing ITN distribution and promoting their use as potential strategies to decrease infection rates in these communities. These insights may be used to shape malaria control programs among marginalized populations. PMID:24376507

  6. Epidemic malaria and warmer temperatures in recent decades in an East African highland.

    PubMed

    Alonso, David; Bouma, Menno J; Pascual, Mercedes

    2011-06-01

    Climate change impacts on malaria are typically assessed with scenarios for the long-term future. Here we focus instead on the recent past (1970-2003) to address whether warmer temperatures have already increased the incidence of malaria in a highland region of East Africa. Our analyses rely on a new coupled mosquito-human model of malaria, which we use to compare projected disease levels with and without the observed temperature trend. Predicted malaria cases exhibit a highly nonlinear response to warming, with a significant increase from the 1970s to the 1990s, although typical epidemic sizes are below those observed. These findings suggest that climate change has already played an important role in the exacerbation of malaria in this region. As the observed changes in malaria are even larger than those predicted by our model, other factors previously suggested to explain all of the increase in malaria may be enhancing the impact of climate change.

  7. Epidemic malaria and warmer temperatures in recent decades in an East African highland.

    PubMed

    Alonso, David; Bouma, Menno J; Pascual, Mercedes

    2011-06-01

    Climate change impacts on malaria are typically assessed with scenarios for the long-term future. Here we focus instead on the recent past (1970-2003) to address whether warmer temperatures have already increased the incidence of malaria in a highland region of East Africa. Our analyses rely on a new coupled mosquito-human model of malaria, which we use to compare projected disease levels with and without the observed temperature trend. Predicted malaria cases exhibit a highly nonlinear response to warming, with a significant increase from the 1970s to the 1990s, although typical epidemic sizes are below those observed. These findings suggest that climate change has already played an important role in the exacerbation of malaria in this region. As the observed changes in malaria are even larger than those predicted by our model, other factors previously suggested to explain all of the increase in malaria may be enhancing the impact of climate change. PMID:21068045

  8. Time trend of malaria in relation to climate variability in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Kolam, Joel; Inape, Kasis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to describe the regional malaria incidence in relation to the geographic and climatic conditions and describe the effect of altitude on the expansion of malaria over the last decade in Papua New Guinea. Methods Malaria incidence was estimated in five provinces from 1996 to 2008 using national health surveillance data. Time trend of malaria incidence was compared with rainfall and minimum/maximum temperature. In the Eastern Highland Province, time trend of malaria incidence over the study period was stratified by altitude. Spatio-temporal pattern of malaria was analyzed. Results Nationwide, malaria incidence was stationary. Regionally, the incidence increased markedly in the highland region (292.0/100000/yr, p =0.021), and remained stationary in the other regions. Seasonality of the malaria incidence was related with rainfall. Decreasing incidence of malaria was associated with decreasing rainfall in the southern coastal region, whereas it was not evident in the northern coastal region. In the Eastern Highland Province, malaria incidence increased in areas below 1700 m, with the rate of increase being steeper at higher altitudes. Conclusions Increasing trend of malaria incidence was prominent in the highland region of Papua New Guinea, while long-term trend was dependent upon baseline level of rainfall in coastal regions. PMID:26987606

  9. Travel risk, malaria importation and malaria transmission in Zanzibar

    PubMed Central

    Le Menach, Arnaud; Tatem, Andrew J.; Cohen, Justin M.; Hay, Simon I.; Randell, Heather; Patil, Anand P.; Smith, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Zanzibar has reached historic lows. Improving control requires quantifying malaria importation rates, identifying high-risk travelers, and assessing onwards transmission. Estimates of Zanzibar's importation rate were calculated through two independent methodologies. First, mobile phone usage data and ferry traffic between Zanzibar and mainland Tanzania were re-analyzed using a model of heterogeneous travel risk. Second, a dynamic mathematical model of importation and transmission rates was used. Zanzibar residents traveling to malaria endemic regions were estimated to contribute 1–15 times more imported cases than infected visitors. The malaria importation rate was estimated to be 1.6 incoming infections per 1,000 inhabitants per year. Local transmission was estimated too low to sustain transmission in most places. Malaria infections in Zanzibar largely result from imported malaria and subsequent transmission. Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination appears feasible by implementing control measures based on detecting imported malaria cases and controlling onward transmission. PMID:22355611

  10. Prospects for malaria elimination in non-Amazonian regions of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Sócrates; Quiñones, Martha Lucia; Quintero, Juan Pablo; Corredor, Vladimir; Fuller, Douglas O; Mateus, Julio Cesar; Calzada, Jose E; Gutierrez, Juan B; Llanos, Alejandro; Soto, Edison; Menendez, Clara; Wu, Yimin; Alonso, Pedro; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Galinski, Mary; Beier, John C; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2012-03-01

    Latin America contributes 1-1.2 million clinical malaria cases to the global malaria burden of about 300 million per year. In 21 malaria endemic countries, the population at risk in this region represents less than 10% of the total population exposed worldwide. Factors such as rapid deforestation, inadequate agricultural practices, climate change, political instability, and both increasing parasite drug resistance and vector resistance to insecticides contribute to malaria transmission. Recently, several malaria endemic countries have experienced a significant reduction in numbers of malaria cases. This is most likely due to actions taken by National Malaria Control Programs (NMCP) with the support from international funding agencies. We describe here the research strategies and activities to be undertaken by the Centro Latino Americano de Investigación en Malaria (CLAIM), a new research center established for the non-Amazonian region of Latin America by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Throughout a network of countries in the region, initially including Colombia, Guatemala, Panama, and Peru, CLAIM will address major gaps in our understanding of changing malaria epidemiology, vector biology and control, and clinical malaria mainly due to Plasmodium vivax. In close partnership with NMCPs, CLAIM seeks to conduct research on how and why malaria is decreasing in many countries of the region as a basis for developing and implementing new strategies that will accelerate malaria elimination.

  11. Prospects for malaria elimination in non-Amazonian regions of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Sócrates; Quiñones, Martha Lucia; Quintero, Juan Pablo; Corredor, Vladimir; Fuller, Douglas O; Mateus, Julio Cesar; Calzada, Jose E; Gutierrez, Juan B; Llanos, Alejandro; Soto, Edison; Menendez, Clara; Wu, Yimin; Alonso, Pedro; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Galinski, Mary; Beier, John C; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2012-03-01

    Latin America contributes 1-1.2 million clinical malaria cases to the global malaria burden of about 300 million per year. In 21 malaria endemic countries, the population at risk in this region represents less than 10% of the total population exposed worldwide. Factors such as rapid deforestation, inadequate agricultural practices, climate change, political instability, and both increasing parasite drug resistance and vector resistance to insecticides contribute to malaria transmission. Recently, several malaria endemic countries have experienced a significant reduction in numbers of malaria cases. This is most likely due to actions taken by National Malaria Control Programs (NMCP) with the support from international funding agencies. We describe here the research strategies and activities to be undertaken by the Centro Latino Americano de Investigación en Malaria (CLAIM), a new research center established for the non-Amazonian region of Latin America by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Throughout a network of countries in the region, initially including Colombia, Guatemala, Panama, and Peru, CLAIM will address major gaps in our understanding of changing malaria epidemiology, vector biology and control, and clinical malaria mainly due to Plasmodium vivax. In close partnership with NMCPs, CLAIM seeks to conduct research on how and why malaria is decreasing in many countries of the region as a basis for developing and implementing new strategies that will accelerate malaria elimination. PMID:21781953

  12. Prospects for malaria elimination in non-Amazonian regions of Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Sócrates; Quiñones, Martha Lucia; Quintero, Juan Pablo; Corredor, Vladimir; Fuller, Douglas O.; Mateus, Julio Cesar; Calzada, Jose E.; Gutierrez, Juan B.; Llanos, Alejandro; Soto, Edison; Menendez, Clara; Wu, Yimin; Alonso, Pedro; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Galinski, Mary; Beier, John C.; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Latin America contributes 1 to 1.2 million clinical malaria cases to the global malaria burden of about 300 million per year. In 21 malaria endemic countries, the population at risk in this region represents less than 10% of the total population exposed worldwide. Factors such as rapid deforestation, inadequate agricultural practices, climate change, political instability, and both increasing parasite drug resistance and vector resistance to insecticides contribute to malaria transmission. Recently, several malaria endemic countries have experienced a significant reduction in numbers of malaria cases. This is most likely due to actions taken by National Malaria Control Programs (NMCP) with the support from international funding agencies. We describe here the research strategies and activities to be undertaken by the Centro Latino Americano de Investigación en Malaria (CLAIM), a new research center established for the non-Amazonian region of Latin America by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Throughout a network of countries in the region, initially including Colombia, Guatemala, Panama, and Peru, CLAIM will address major gaps in our understanding of changing malaria epidemiology, vector biology and control, and clinical malaria mainly due to Plasmodium vivax. In close partnership with NMCPs, CLAIM seeks to conduct research on how and why malaria is decreasing in many countries of the region as a basis for developing and implementing new strategies that will accelerate malaria elimination. PMID:21781953

  13. Direct and indirect QMRA of infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts in reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Agulló-Barceló, M; Casas-Mangas, R; Lucena, F

    2012-12-01

    Water scarcity leads to an increased use of reclaimed water, which in turn calls for an improvement in water reclamation procedures to ensure adequate quality of the final effluent. The presence of infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts (IOO) in reclaimed water is a health hazard for users of this resource. Here, we gathered information on Cryptosporidium (concentrations, infectivity and genotype) in order to perform quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). Moreover, data concerning the spores of sulphite-reducing clostridia (SRC) were used to undertake QMRA at a screening level. Our results show that the probability of infection (PI) by Cryptosporidium depends on the tertiary treatment type. The mean PI using the exponential dose-response model was 3.69 × 10(-6) in tertiary effluents (TE) treated with UV light, whereas it was 3 log(10) units higher, 1.89 × 10(-3), in TE not treated with this disinfection method. With the β-Poisson model, the mean PI was 1.56 × 10(-4) in UV-treated TE and 2 log(10) units higher, 4.37 × 10(-2), in TE not treated with UV. The use of SRC to perform QMRA of Cryptosporidium showed higher PI than when using directly IOO data. This observation suggests the former technique is a conservative method of QMRA.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIES AND SOURCES OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN STORM WATERS BY A SMALL SUBUNIT RRNA-BASED DIAGNOSTIC AND GENOTYPING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples is largely made by the use of immunofluorescent assay (IFA). because IFA detects oocysts from all Cryptosporidium parasites, the species distribution and source of Cryptosporidium parasites in environmental sa...

  15. Inpatient Mortality in Children With Clinically Diagnosed Malaria As Compared With Microscopically Confirmed Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Opoka, Robert O.; Xia, Zongqi; Bangirana, Paul; John, Chandy C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment for malaria without microscopic confirmation of the diagnosis occurs commonly in sub-Saharan Africa. Differences in mortality in children who are tested by microscopy for Plasmodium falciparum infection as compared with those not tested are not well characterized. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of all children up to 15 years of age admitted to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda from January 2002 to July 2005, with a diagnosis of malaria and analyzed according to microscopy testing for P. falciparum. Results A total of 23,342 children were treated for malaria during the study period, 991 (4.2%) of whom died. Severe malarial anemia in 7827 (33.5%) and cerebral malaria in 1912 (8.2%) were the 2 common causes of malaria-related admissions. Children who did not receive microscopy testing had a higher case fatality rate than those with a positive blood smear (7.5% versus 3.2%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, malaria complications, and comorbid conditions, children who did not have microscopy performed or had a negative blood smear had a higher risk of death than those with a positive blood smear [odds ratio (OR): 3.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.88–4.22, P < 0.001; and OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.29–1.96, P < 0.001, respectively]. Conclusions Diagnosis of malaria in the absence of microscopic confirmation is associated with significantly increased mortality in hospitalized Ugandan children. Inpatient diagnosis of malaria should be supported by microscopic or rapid diagnostic test confirmation. PMID:18316995

  16. Tackling Imported Malaria: An Elimination Endgame

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Hugh J. W.; Roberts, Kathryn W.; Wegbreit, Jennifer; Ohrt, Colin; Gosling, Roly D.

    2015-01-01

    As countries move toward malaria elimination, imported infections become increasingly significant as they often represent the majority of cases, can sustain transmission, cause resurgences, and lead to mortality. Here we review and critique current methods to prevent malaria importation in countries pursuing elimination and explore methods applied in other transmission settings and to other diseases that could be transferred to support malaria elimination. To improve intervention targeting we need a better understanding of the characteristics of populations importing infections and their patterns of migration, improved methods to reliably classify infections as imported or acquired locally, and ensure early and accurate diagnosis. The potential for onward transmission in the most receptive and vulnerable locations can be predicted through high-resolution risk mapping that can help malaria elimination or prevention of reintroduction programs target resources. Cross border and regional initiatives can be highly effective when based on an understanding of human and parasite movement. Ultimately, determining the optimal combinations of approaches to address malaria importation will require an evaluation of their impact, cost effectiveness, and operational feasibility. PMID:26013369

  17. Malaria vaccines: identifying Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets.

    PubMed

    Longley, Rhea J; Hill, Adrian V S; Spencer, Alexandra J

    2015-01-01

    The development of a highly efficacious and durable vaccine for malaria remains a top priority for global health researchers. Despite the huge rise in recognition of malaria as a global health problem and the concurrent rise in funding over the past 10-15 years, malaria continues to remain a widespread burden. The evidence of increasing resistance to anti-malarial drugs and insecticides is a growing concern. Hence, an efficacious and durable preventative vaccine for malaria is urgently needed. Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective tools and have successfully been used in the prevention and control of many diseases, however, the development of a vaccine for the Plasmodium parasite has proved difficult. Given the early success of whole sporozoite mosquito-bite delivered vaccination strategies, we know that a vaccine for malaria is an achievable goal, with sub-unit vaccines holding great promise as they are simple and cheap to both manufacture and deploy. However a major difficulty in development of sub-unit vaccines lies within choosing the appropriate antigenic target from the 5000 or so genes expressed by the parasite. Given the liver-stage of malaria represents a bottle-neck in the parasite's life cycle, there is widespread agreement that a multi-component sub-unit malaria vaccine should preferably contain a liver-stage target. In this article we review progress in identifying and screening Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets for use in a malaria vaccine. PMID:26441899

  18. Development of a malaria knowledge test for student travelers

    PubMed Central

    Hartjes, Laurie B.; Baumann, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a malaria knowledge test (MKT) developed to evaluate a web-based game for students who increasingly travel to malaria-risk regions of the world. The 18-item MKT was structured according to the dimensions of the self-regulation model (SRM) to measure the accuracy of students’ beliefs about malaria. An experimental design was used to compare three game versions. Students (N=482) participated in 2010 by completing a pre-test, playing a Web-based game simulating student travel to malaria-endemic destinations, and completing a post-test. Study data support the validity and reliability of the MKT for the evaluation of malaria education interventions and for student self-assessment. Use of the MKT to evaluate an educational game about malaria revealed a strong overall learning effect and discrimination by game version, travel experience, and SRM dimension. This 5-min test may also be adapted for educational outreach purposes among health care providers globally, residents of malaria-endemic regions, and other high risk travel groups (e.g., elderly, chronic health conditions, pregnant, or returning to malaria-endemic regions to visit friends/relatives). PMID:24382993

  19. Does malaria epidemiology project Cameroon as 'Africa in miniature'?

    PubMed

    Mbenda, Huguette Gaelle Ngassa; Awasthi, Gauri; Singh, Poonam K; Gouado, Inocent; Das, Aparup

    2014-09-01

    Cameroon, a west-central African country with a ~ 20 million population, is commonly regarded as 'Africa in miniature' due to the extensive biological and cultural diversities of whole Africa being present in a single-country setting. This country is inhabited by ancestral human lineages in unique eco-climatic conditions and diverse topography. Over 90 percent Cameroonians are at risk of malaria infection, and ~ 41 percent have at least one episode of malaria each year. Historically, the rate of malaria infection in Cameroon has fluctuated over the years; the number of cases was about 2 million in 2010 and 2011. The Cameroonian malaria control programme faces an uphill task due to high prevalence of multidrug-resistant parasites and insecticide-resistant malaria vectors. Above all, continued human migration from the rural to urban areas as well as population exchange with adjoining countries, high rate of ecological instabilities caused by deforestation, poor housing, lack of proper sanitation and drainage system might have resulted in the recent increase in incidences of malaria and other vector-borne diseases in Cameroon. The available data on eco-environmental variability and intricate malaria epidemiology in Cameroon reflect the situation in the whole of Africa, and warrant the need for in-depth study by using modern surveillance tools for meaningful basic understanding of the malaria triangle (host-parasite-vector-environment). PMID:25116627

  20. Infectivity to experimental rodents of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from Siberian chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) originated in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Fujino, T; Kajima, J; Tsuji, M

    2000-05-01

    We isolated Cryptosporidium parvum-type oocysts from naturally infected siberian chipmunks which originated in the People's Republic of China and examined the infectivity to rodents as experimental animals. The naturally infected chipmunks did not show any clinical symptoms. The oocysts were 4.8 x 4.2 microm on average in size. They were ovoid and morphologically similar to the C. parvum oocysts isolated from human and cattle. Experimental rodents were inoculated with 1.6 x 10(6) original oocysts each. SCID mice began to shed oocysts on day 7 and the OPG value was 10(5) from 50 days. The oocysts were found from ICR mice on days 13 and 16 by only sugar flotation method, however, any oocysts were not detected from the rats, guinea pigs and rabbits until 30 days. Two infected SCID mice were necropsied on days 100 and 102 and examined for coccidian organisms. Merozoites and oocysts were found in the low part of jejunum and ileum, however, no parasites were detected in the stomach. Consequently, it was considered that the present species was C. parvum and was probably genotype 2 from result of infectivity to rodents.

  1. Oral iron supplements for children in malaria-endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Ami; Okebe, Joseph; Yahav, Dafna; Paul, Mical

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency anaemia is common during childhood. Iron administration has been claimed to increase the risk of malaria. Objectives To evaluate the effects and safety of iron supplementation, with or without folic acid, in children living in areas with hyperendemic or holoendemic malaria transmission. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (up to August 2015) and LILACS (up to February 2015). We also checked the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) up to February 2015. We contacted the primary investigators of all included trials, ongoing trials, and those awaiting assessment to ask for unpublished data and further trials. We scanned references of included trials, pertinent reviews, and previous meta-analyses for additional references. Selection criteria We included individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs conducted in hyperendemic and holoendemic malaria regions or that reported on any malaria-related outcomes that included children younger than 18 years of age. We included trials that compared orally administered iron, iron with folic acid, and iron with antimalarial treatment versus placebo or no treatment. We included trials of iron supplementation or fortification interventions if they provided at least 80% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for prevention of anaemia by age. Antihelminthics could be administered to either group, and micronutrients had to be administered equally to both groups. Data collection and analysis The primary outcomes were clinical malaria, severe malaria, and death from any cause. We assessed the risk of bias in included trials with domain-based evaluation and assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment

  2. DDT, global strategies, and a malaria control crisis in South America.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D R; Laughlin, L L; Hsheih, P; Legters, L J

    1997-01-01

    Malaria is reemerging in endemic-disease countries of South America. We examined the rate of real growth in annual parasite indexes (API) by adjusting APIs for all years to the annual blood examination rate of 1965 for each country. The standardized APIs calculated for Brazil, Peru, Guyana, and for 18 other malaria-endemic countries of the Americas presented a consistent pattern of low rates up through the late 1970s, followed by geometric growth in malaria incidence in subsequent years. True growth in malaria incidence corresponds temporally with changes in global strategies for malaria control. Underlying the concordance of these events is a causal link between decreased spraying of homes with DDT and increased malaria; two regression models defining this link showed statistically significant negative relationships between APIs and house-spray rates. Separate analyses of data from 1993 to 1995 showed that countries that have recently discontinued their spray programs are reporting large increases in malaria incidence. Ecuador, which has increased use of DDT since 1993, is the only country reporting a large reduction (61%) in malaria rates since 1993. DDT use for malaria control and application of the Global Malaria Control Strategy to the Americas should be subjects of urgent national and international debate. We discuss the recent actions to ban DDT, the health costs of such a ban, perspectives on DDT use in agriculture versus malaria control, and costs versus benefits of DDT and alternative insecticides.

  3. Costs of Eliminating Malaria and the Impact of the Global Fund in 34 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Zelman, Brittany; Kiszewski, Anthony; Cotter, Chris; Liu, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Background International financing for malaria increased more than 18-fold between 2000 and 2011; the largest source came from The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund). Countries have made substantial progress, but achieving elimination requires sustained finances to interrupt transmission and prevent reintroduction. Since 2011, global financing for malaria has declined, fueling concerns that further progress will be impeded, especially for current malaria-eliminating countries that may face resurgent malaria if programs are disrupted. Objectives This study aims to 1) assess past total and Global Fund funding to the 34 current malaria-eliminating countries, and 2) estimate their future funding needs to achieve malaria elimination and prevent reintroduction through 2030. Methods Historical funding is assessed against trends in country-level malaria annual parasite incidences (APIs) and income per capita. Following Kizewski et al. (2007), program costs to eliminate malaria and prevent reintroduction through 2030 are estimated using a deterministic model. The cost parameters are tailored to a package of interventions aimed at malaria elimination and prevention of reintroduction. Results The majority of Global Fund-supported countries experiencing increases in total funding from 2005 to 2010 coincided with reductions in malaria APIs and also overall GNI per capita average annual growth. The total amount of projected funding needed for the current malaria-eliminating countries to achieve elimination and prevent reintroduction through 2030 is approximately US$8.5 billion, or about $1.84 per person at risk per year (PPY) (ranging from $2.51 PPY in 2014 to $1.43 PPY in 2030). Conclusions Although external donor funding, particularly from the Global Fund, has been key for many malaria-eliminating countries, sustained and sufficient financing is critical for furthering global malaria elimination. Projected cost estimates for elimination provide

  4. [Current data on malaria in metropolitan France].

    PubMed

    Danis, M; Legros, F; Thellier, M; Caumes, E

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological data from the French National Reference Center for Imported Diseases showed that the estimated number of cases of imported malaria in France increased from 5,940 in 1998 to 7,127 in 1999 and 8,056 in 2000. This three-year progression ended in 2001 when the number of estimated cases fell back to 7,223. It was due mainly to the concomitant increase in the number of people traveling to endemic zones especially in Africa. In 2000 the median age of patients with imported malaria in France was 29.5 years and the sex ratio was 1.78. Sixty-three percent of cases involved people of African origin and 37% involved "Westerners". The countries in which contamination occurred were located in tropical Africa (95%), Asia (2.2%), and Latin America (2.7%). During the three year period from 1998 to 2000, there were a total of 13 accidental autochtonous cases of malaria involving patients with no history of travel to tropical areas. The distribution of Plasmodium species involved in imported malaria in France was stable with 83% of cases involving Plasmodium falciparum, 6% involving Plasmodium vivax, 6.5% involving Plasmodium ovale and 1.3% involving Plasmodium malariae. Attacks were clinically uncomplicated in 90 to 95% of cases and severe in 2 to 5% including fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 0.49 to 0.37% of cases. Less than 10% of the 45% of patients claiming use of prophylaxis complied properly. Analysis of the drugs used for curative treatment in 2000 showed an increase in the use of quinine and mefloquine and decrease in the use of halofantrine. The main objectives remain reduction of mortality and improvement of prevention.

  5. Efficacy of treatment of elevated coccidial oocyst counts in goats using amprolium versus ponazuril.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Philippa; Love, David; Craig, Thomas; Budke, Christine

    2016-03-15

    Coccidiosis is an important disease of young goats leading to weight loss, diarrhea, and death. In the USA, both ionophores and decoquinate are labeled for prevention of coccidia in goats. However, there are no drugs approved for treatment of clinical cases of coccidiosis in this species. Amprolium is labeled for treatment of coccidiosis in calves while ponazuril, a metabolite of toltrazuril, is labeled for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. In this study, 150 young goats housed on concrete lots had fecal samples collected and McMaster fecal oocyst per gram counts performed at 0, 7, 14, and 21 days post-processing. Goats were randomly assigned to receive either amprolium (50mg/kg once a day for 5 days by mouth) or ponazuril (10mg/kg by mouth once) if they had fecal oocyst counts >5,000 per gram. Fecal samples were obtained and oocyst counts performed at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the cessation of treatment. Goats were weighed on days 0 and 21 post-processing. Seven goats were enrolled into the amprolium group and 8 into the ponazuril group. Both treatments resulted in decreased oocyst counts post-treatment compared to before treatment. There was no significant difference between fecal coccidian oocyst counts between goats in each group. There was no significant difference in body weight between goats in each group. This study showed that both amprolium and ponazuril were effective in decreasing fecal coccidia oocyst counts in this group of goats. Use of both drugs is currently extra-label in the USA.

  6. Efficacy of treatment of elevated coccidial oocyst counts in goats using amprolium versus ponazuril.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Philippa; Love, David; Craig, Thomas; Budke, Christine

    2016-03-15

    Coccidiosis is an important disease of young goats leading to weight loss, diarrhea, and death. In the USA, both ionophores and decoquinate are labeled for prevention of coccidia in goats. However, there are no drugs approved for treatment of clinical cases of coccidiosis in this species. Amprolium is labeled for treatment of coccidiosis in calves while ponazuril, a metabolite of toltrazuril, is labeled for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. In this study, 150 young goats housed on concrete lots had fecal samples collected and McMaster fecal oocyst per gram counts performed at 0, 7, 14, and 21 days post-processing. Goats were randomly assigned to receive either amprolium (50mg/kg once a day for 5 days by mouth) or ponazuril (10mg/kg by mouth once) if they had fecal oocyst counts >5,000 per gram. Fecal samples were obtained and oocyst counts performed at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the cessation of treatment. Goats were weighed on days 0 and 21 post-processing. Seven goats were enrolled into the amprolium group and 8 into the ponazuril group. Both treatments resulted in decreased oocyst counts post-treatment compared to before treatment. There was no significant difference between fecal coccidian oocyst counts between goats in each group. There was no significant difference in body weight between goats in each group. This study showed that both amprolium and ponazuril were effective in decreasing fecal coccidia oocyst counts in this group of goats. Use of both drugs is currently extra-label in the USA. PMID:26872920

  7. Survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in calf housing facilities in the New York City watersheds.

    PubMed

    Collick, A S; Fogarty, E A; Ziegler, P E; Walter, M T; Bowman, D D; Steenhuis, T S

    2006-01-01

    Pathogen contamination of the public drinking water supply in the New York City watersheds is a serious concern. New York City's Watershed Agriculture Program is working with dairy farms in the watersheds to implement management practices that will reduce the risk of pathogens contaminating the water supply. Solar calf housing (SCH) was suggested as a best management practice (BMP) to control Cryptosporidium parvum, a common protozoan parasite that causes disease in humans. This BMP targets young calves because they are the primary source of C. parvum in dairy herds. The objective of this project was to assess and compare the survivability of C. parvum in SCH and in conventional calf housing (CCH), usually located in the main barn. C. parvum oocysts were secured in sentinel chambers and placed in SCH and CCH bedding on four farms. The chambers were in thermal, chemical, and moisture equilibrium with their microenvironments. An oocyst-filled control chamber, sealed from its surroundings, was placed near each chamber. Chambers and controls were sampled after 4, 6, and 8 wk. Oocyst viability in the chambers decreased to less than 10% in warm months and between 15 and 30% in the winter months. The viability of the control oocysts was similar to the chambers during warm months and generally higher during winter months. There was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the viability decrease between SCH and CCH. Although oocyst viability was similar in both types of calf housing, SCH allow contaminated calf manure to be isolated from the main barn manure and potentially managed differently and in a way to decrease the number of viable oocysts entering the environment during field spreading.

  8. Effects of kefir on coccidial oocysts excretion and performance of dairy goat kids following weaning.

    PubMed

    Daş, Gürbüz; Ataşoğlu, Cengiz; Akbağ, Hande Işıl; Tölü, Cemil; Yurtman, Ismail Yaman; Savaş, Türker

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of kefir, a traditional source of probiotic, on coccidial oocysts excretion and on the performance of dairy goat kids following weaning. Twin kids were randomly allocated to one of two groups at weaning. Kids of the first group received 20 ml of kefir daily for 6 weeks (KEF), while kids in the control group were given a placebo (CON). Individual faecal samples were regularly (n = 18 per kid) taken to quantify the number of coccidial oocysts per gram of faeces (OpG). There were no differences between the groups in terms of body weight development (P > 0.05) and feed consumption. Kids of both groups were not able to consume enough feed to meet their nutrient requirements during the first 3 weeks following weaning. KEF had a lower frequency of OpG positive samples than CON (P = 0.043). Kefir did not affect the maximum oocyst excretion and age of the kids at the highest oocyst excretion (P > 0.05). KEF shed numerically 35% lower coccidial oocysts than the controls, which corresponded to a statistical tendency (P = 0.074) in lowering Log-OpG in comparison to CON. While KEF had a lower frequency of OpG positive samples and tended to shed lower OPG by around one-third, the frequency of diarrhea, level of highest oocyst excretion, and performance of the kids remained unaffected. Therefore, it is concluded that overall effects of kefir do not have a significant impact on sub-clinical infection and performance in weaned kids under relatively high-hygienic farming conditions.

  9. A simple method for extracting DNA from Cryptosporidium oocysts using the anionic surfactant LSS.

    PubMed

    Sekikawa, Takahiro; Kawasaki, Yu; Katayama, Yasuto; Iwahori, Keisuke

    2011-12-15

    Detection of low amounts of Cryptosporidium oocysts in raw water sources is considered an important component in the management, prevention and control of Cryptosporidium in drinking water supplies as Cryptosporidium causes massive waterborne outbreaks worldwide. As Cryptosporidium has a robust oocyst that is extremely resistant to chlorine and other drinking water disinfectants, both the freeze-thaw method and DNA extraction kits have been commonly used for extracting and purifying DNA from the oocyst. However, the DNA extraction procedures are time consuming and costly. Therefore, a simple and low-cost method to extract and purify DNA from the robust oocyst has been required. In this study, we discussed a simple method for detecting Cryptosporidium DNA with the anionic surfactant, n-lauroylsarcosine sodium salt (LSS) using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to eliminate the need for the freeze-thaw method and the DNA extraction kits. As a result, Bst DNA polymerase was inhibited by 0.1% LSS but not 0.01% LSS and 5% Triton X-100 or Tween 20. Although DNA was extracted from the oocysts by incubating with 0.1% LSS at 90°C for 15 min, Bst DNA polymerase was inhibited by 0.1% LSS. The inhibition by 0.1% LSS was suppressed by adding 5% of the nonionic surfactants, Triton X-100 or Tween 20. The concentration of LSS in a LAMP tube was 0.01% while that in an incubation tube was 0.1%, because LSS in an incubation tube was diluted by a factor of 10 at the DNA amplification process. Therefore, we found that ten oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum could be detected by incubation with 0.1% LSS, without removing LSS or adding the nonionic surfactants in the LAMP method. PMID:21924387

  10. Monkey malaria kills four humans.

    PubMed

    Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W

    2009-05-01

    Four human deaths caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria species, are stimulating a surge of public health interest and clinical vigilance in vulnerable areas of Southeast Asia. We, and other colleagues, emphasize that these cases, identified in Malaysia, are a clear warning that health facilities and clinicians must rethink the diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases presumed to be caused by a less virulent human malaria species, Plasmodium malariae.

  11. Malaria: progress, perils, and prospects for eradication

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Brian M.; Fidock, David A.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Kappe, Stefan H.I.; Alonso, Pedro L.; Collins, Frank H.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2008-01-01

    There are still approximately 500 million cases of malaria and 1 million deaths from malaria each year. Yet recently, malaria incidence has been dramatically reduced in some parts of Africa by increasing deployment of anti-mosquito measures and new artemisinin-containing treatments, prompting renewed calls for global eradication. However, treatment and mosquito control currently depend on too few compounds and thus are vulnerable to the emergence of compound-resistant parasites and mosquitoes. As discussed in this Review, new drugs, vaccines, and insecticides, as well as improved surveillance methods, are research priorities. Insights into parasite biology, human immunity, and vector behavior will guide efforts to translate parasite and mosquito genome sequences into novel interventions. PMID:18382739

  12. Understanding the link between malaria risk and climate.

    PubMed

    Paaijmans, Krijn P; Read, Andrew F; Thomas, Matthew B

    2009-08-18

    The incubation period for malaria parasites within the mosquito is exquisitely temperature-sensitive, so that temperature is a major determinant of malaria risk. Epidemiological models are increasingly used to guide allocation of disease control resources and to assess the likely impact of climate change on global malaria burdens. Temperature-based malaria transmission is generally incorporated into these models using mean monthly temperatures, yet temperatures fluctuate throughout the diurnal cycle. Here we use a thermodynamic malaria development model to demonstrate that temperature fluctuation can substantially alter the incubation period of the parasite, and hence malaria transmission rates. We find that, in general, temperature fluctuation reduces the impact of increases in mean temperature. Diurnal temperature fluctuation around means >21 degrees C slows parasite development compared with constant temperatures, whereas fluctuation around <21 degrees C speeds development. Consequently, models which ignore diurnal variation overestimate malaria risk in warmer environments and underestimate risk in cooler environments. To illustrate the implications further, we explore the influence of diurnal temperature fluctuation on malaria transmission at a site in the Kenyan Highlands. Based on local meteorological data, we find that the annual epidemics of malaria at this site cannot be explained without invoking the influence of diurnal temperature fluctuation. Moreover, while temperature fluctuation reduces the relative influence of a subtle warming trend apparent over the last 20 years, it nonetheless makes the effects biologically more significant. Such effects of short-term temperature fluctuations have not previously been considered but are central to understanding current malaria transmission and the consequences of climate change.

  13. Tools and Strategies for Malaria Control and Elimination: What Do We Need to Achieve a Grand Convergence in Malaria?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Shretta, Rima; Wells, Timothy N C; Bell, David; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; Achee, Nicole; Qi, Gao

    2016-03-01

    Progress made in malaria control during the past decade has prompted increasing global dialogue on malaria elimination and eradication. The product development pipeline for malaria has never been stronger, with promising new tools to detect, treat, and prevent malaria, including innovative diagnostics, medicines, vaccines, vector control products, and improved mechanisms for surveillance and response. There are at least 25 projects in the global malaria vaccine pipeline, as well as 47 medicines and 13 vector control products. In addition, there are several next-generation diagnostic tools and reference methods currently in development, with many expected to be introduced in the next decade. The development and adoption of these tools, bolstered by strategies that ensure rapid uptake in target populations, intensified mechanisms for information management, surveillance, and response, and continued financial and political commitment are all essential to achieving global eradication.

  14. Tools and Strategies for Malaria Control and Elimination: What Do We Need to Achieve a Grand Convergence in Malaria?

    PubMed Central

    Hemingway, Janet; Shretta, Rima; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Bell, David; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A.; Achee, Nicole; Qi, Gao

    2016-01-01

    Progress made in malaria control during the past decade has prompted increasing global dialogue on malaria elimination and eradication. The product development pipeline for malaria has never been stronger, with promising new tools to detect, treat, and prevent malaria, including innovative diagnostics, medicines, vaccines, vector control products, and improved mechanisms for surveillance and response. There are at least 25 projects in the global malaria vaccine pipeline, as well as 47 medicines and 13 vector control products. In addition, there are several next-generation diagnostic tools and reference methods currently in development, with many expected to be introduced in the next decade. The development and adoption of these tools, bolstered by strategies that ensure rapid uptake in target populations, intensified mechanisms for information management, surveillance, and response, and continued financial and political commitment are all essential to achieving global eradication. PMID:26934361

  15. Real-time, sensitive electrical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts based on chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    It Wong, Jen; Wang, Lu; Shi, Yumeng; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing; Dong, Xiaochen; Ying Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a common intestinal parasitic protozoan that causes gastroenteritis in man and animals. It poses high risks to drinking water supply because of its ubiquitous distribution in water and their oocysts are resistant to harsh environment conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the use of large-size chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene films configured as field-effect device for rapid electrical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (Cp. oocysts). The presence of Cp. oocysts causes the change in the transport characteristics of the antibody-functionalized graphene device, which can be measured in terms of the dependence of the drain current on the sweep of the gate voltage or the real-time drain current data under a constant gate voltage. The high sensor sensitivity of 25 oocysts per milliliter solution and good specificity were evaluated, indicating it a promising candidate for detecting waterborne pathogens in water quality control.

  16. Detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Oocyst and Giardia sp. cyst in faucet water samples from cattle and goat farms in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuko; Kimura, Kenji; Yang, Cheng-Hsiung; Ooi, Hong-Kean

    2005-12-01

    A survey on the presence of Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst in livestock drinking water as well as the urban tap water throughout Taiwan was carried out. Water examination for the presence of the protozoa was conducted by filtering through a PTFE membrane followed by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and immunostaining the sediment with commercially available monoclonal antibody against Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Of the 55 different water samples from various sources examined, 2 were found to contain both of Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst, 1 was found to contain Cryptosporidium oocyst only. These protozoa-positive water samples, originating from underground well and from the mountain spring, were also used as drinking water for livestock. However, no Cryptosporidium oocyst was found in the city tap water. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst being found in the drinking water for livestock.

  17. Application of Genomics to Field Investigations of Malaria by the International Centers for Excellence in Malaria Research

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, Sarah K.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Diakite, Mahamadou; Koita, Ousmane; Nwakanma, Davis; Daniels, Rachel; Park, Danny; Neafsey, Dan; Muskavitch, Marc; Krogstad, Don; Sabeti, Pardis; Hartl, Dan; Wirth, Dyann

    2011-01-01

    Success of the global research agenda toward eradication of malaria will depend on development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genomic information, now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors, and human host, can be leveraged to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Although knowledge of genomic sequences for the malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, have helped advance our understanding of malaria biology, simply knowing this sequence information has not yielded a plethora of new interventions to reduce the burden of malaria. Here we review and provide specific examples of how genomic information has increased our knowledge of parasite biology, focusing on P. falciparum malaria. We then discuss how population genetics can be applied toward the epidemiological and transmission-related goals outlined by the International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research groups recently established by the National Institutes of Health. Finally, we propose genomics is a research area that can promote coordination and collaboration between various ICEMR groups, and that working together as a community can significantly advance the value of this information toward reduction of the global malaria burden. PMID:22182668

  18. Malaria or Kalimbe: how to choose?

    PubMed

    Carme, Bernard

    2009-12-04

    Should the Kalimbe (a traditional Amerindian loincloth) be banned, based on its association with an increased risk of malaria? Studies on malaria conducted on Amerindian children in the Oyapock region, French Guiana suggest that there is an argument for replacing the Kalimbe with a modern alternative. However, the wider issue of how the positive (risk reduction and related benefits) and negative effects (exacerbation of acculturation processes and associated consequences) should be assessed needs to be considered before suggesting a change in ancestral behaviour for medical purposes. A multidisciplinary approach is needed, together with caution and humility from epidemiologists.

  19. Vulnerability to changes in malaria transmission due to climate change in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, T. K.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Malaria transmission in West Africa is strongly tied to climate; temperature affects the development rate of the malaria parasite, as well as the survival of the mosquitoes that transmit the disease, and rainfall is tied to mosquito abundance, as the vector lays its eggs in rain-fed water pools. As a result, the environmental suitability for malaria transmission in this region is expected to change as temperatures rise and rainfall patterns are altered. The vulnerability to changes in transmission varies throughout West Africa. Areas where malaria prevalence is already very high will be less sensitive to changes in transmission. Increases in environmental suitability for malaria transmission in the most arid regions may still be insufficient to allow sustained transmission. However, areas were malaria transmission currently occurs at low levels are expected to be the most sensitive to changes in environmental suitability for transmission. Here, we use data on current environment and malaria transmission rates to highlight areas in West Africa that we expect to be most vulnerable to an increase in malaria under certain climate conditions. We then analyze climate predictions from global climate models in vulnerable areas, and make predictions for the expected change in environmental suitability for malaria transmission using the Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS), a mechanistic model developed to simulate village-scale response of malaria transmission to environmental variables in West Africa.

  20. Vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates. PMID:21893544

  1. Cost of malaria control in China: Henan's consolidation programme from community and government perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Sukhan; Sleigh, Adrian C.; Liu, Xi-Li

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assist with strategic planning for the eradication of malaria in Henan Province, China, which reached the consolidation phase of malaria control in 1992, when only 318 malaria cases were reported. METHODS: We conducted a prospective two-year study of the costs for Henan's malaria control programme. We used a cost model that could also be applied to other malaria programmes in mainland China, and analysed the cost of the three components of Henan's malaria programme: suspected malaria case management, vector surveillance, and population blood surveys. Primary cost data were collected from the government, and data on suspected malaria patients were collected in two malaria counties (population 2 093 100). We enlisted the help of 260 village doctors in six townships or former communes (population 247 762), and studied all 12 325 reported cases of suspected malaria in their catchment areas in 1994 and 1995. FINDINGS: The average annual government investment in malaria control was estimated to be US$ 111 516 (case-management 59%; active blood surveys 25%; vector surveillance 12%; and contingencies and special projects 4%). The average cost (direct and indirect) for patients seeking treatment for suspected malaria was US$ 3.48, equivalent to 10 days' income for rural residents. Each suspected malaria case cost the government an average of US$ 0.78. CONCLUSION: Further cuts in government funding will increase future costs when epidemic malaria returns; investment in malaria control should therefore continue at least at current levels of US$ 0.03 per person at risk. PMID:12219157

  2. Community mobilization for malaria elimination: application of an open space methodology in Ruhuha sector, Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the significant reduction of malaria transmission in Rwanda, Ruhuha sector is still a highly endemic area for malaria. The objective of this activity was to explore and brainstorm the potential roles of various community stakeholders in malaria elimination. Methods Horizontal participatory approaches such as ‘open space’ have been deployed to explore local priorities, stimulate community contribution to project planning, and to promote local capacity to manage programmes. Two open space meetings were conducted with 62 and 82 participants in years 1 and 2, respectively. Participants included purposively selected community and local organizations’ representatives. Results Malaria was perceived as a health concern by the respondents despite the reported reduction in prevalence from 60 to 20% for cases at the local health centre. Some misconceptions of the cause of malaria and misuse of preventive strategies were noted. Poverty was deemed to be a contributing factor to malaria transmission, with suggestions that improvement of living conditions for poor families might help malaria reduction. Participants expressed willingness to contribute to malaria elimination and underscored the need for constant education, sensitization and mobilization towards malaria control in general. Active diagnosis, preventative strategies and prompt treatment of malaria cases were all mentioned by participants as ways to reduce malaria. Participants suggested that partnership of stakeholders at various levels could speed up programme activities. A community rewards system was deemed important to motivate engaged participants, i.e., community health workers and households. Establishment of malaria clubs in schools settings was also suggested as crucial to speed up community awareness and increase skills towards further malaria reduction. Conclusions This bottom-up approach was found useful in engaging the local community, enabling them to explore issues related to

  3. Potential impact of global climate change on malaria risk

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, W.J.M.; Rotmans, J. |; Niessen, L.W.; Jetten, T.H.; McMichael, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    The biological activity and geographic distribution of the malarial parasite and its vector are sensitive to climatic influences, especially temperature and precipitation. We have incorporated General Circulation Model-based scenarios of anthropogenic global climate change in an integrated linked-system model for predicting changes in malaria epidemic potential in the next century. The concept of the disability-adjusted life years is included to arrive at a single measure of the effect of anthropogenic climate change on the health impact of malaria. Assessment of the potential impact of global climate change on the incidence of malaria suggests a widespread increase of risk due to expansion of the areas suitable for malaria transmission. This predicted increase is most pronounced at the borders of endemic malaria areas and at higher altitudes within malarial areas. The incidence of infection is sensitive to climate changes in areas of Southeast Asia, South America, and parts of Africa where the disease is less endemic; in these regions the numbers of years of healthy life lost may increase significantly. However, the simulated changes in malaria risk must be interpreted on the basis of local environmental conditions, the effects of socioeconomic developments, and malaria control programs or capabilities. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Quantifying the impact of decay in bed-net efficacy on malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Ngonghala, Calistus N; Del Valle, Sara Y; Zhao, Ruijun; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal

    2014-12-21

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are at the forefront of malaria control programs and even though the percentage of households in sub-Saharan Africa that owned nets increased from 3% in 2000 to 53% in 2012, many children continue to die from malaria. The potential impact of ITNs on reducing malaria transmission is limited due to inconsistent or improper use, as well as physical decay in effectiveness. Most mathematical models for malaria transmission have assumed a fixed effectiveness rate for bed-nets, which can overestimate the impact of nets on malaria control. We develop a model for malaria spread that captures the decrease in ITN effectiveness due to physical and chemical decay, as well as human behavior as a function of time. We perform uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to identify and rank parameters that play a critical role in malaria transmission. These analyses show that the basic reproduction number R0, and the infectious human population are most sensitive to bed-net coverage and the biting rate of mosquitoes. Our results show the existence of a backward bifurcation for the case in which ITN efficacy is constant over time, which occurs for some range of parameters and is characterized by high malaria mortality in humans. This result implies that bringing R0 to less than one is not enough for malaria elimination but rather additional efforts will be necessary to control the disease. For the case in which ITN efficacy decays over time, we determine coverage levels required to control malaria for different ITN efficacies and demonstrate that ITNs with longer useful lifespans perform better in malaria control. We conclude that malaria control programs should focus on increasing bed-net coverage, which can be achieved by enhancing malaria education and increasing bed-net distribution in malaria endemic regions. PMID:25158163

  5. The changing epidemiology of malaria in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Seys, S A; Bender, J B

    2001-01-01

    Malaria cases reported to the Minnesota Department of Health increased from 5 in 1988 to 76 in 1998, paralleling the number of immigrants to Minnesota. In 20% of cases, the Plasmodium species was not identified; 44% of cases were hospitalized. The public health community needs to reevaluate current recommendations for refugee screening, provider and patient education, and laboratory capacity.

  6. The changing epidemiology of malaria in Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Seys, S. A.; Bender, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    Malaria cases reported to the Minnesota Department of Health increased from 5 in 1988 to 76 in 1998, paralleling the number of immigrants to Minnesota. In 20% of cases, the Plasmodium species was not identified; 44% of cases were hospitalized. The public health community needs to reevaluate current recommendations for refugee screening, provider and patient education, and laboratory capacity. PMID:11747727

  7. Estimating malaria burden in Nigeria: a geostatistical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Onyiri, Nnadozie

    2015-01-01

    This study has produced a map of malaria prevalence in Nigeria based on available data from the Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa (MARA) database, including all malaria prevalence surveys in Nigeria that could be geolocated, as well as data collected during fieldwork in Nigeria between March and June 2007. Logistic regression was fitted to malaria prevalence to identify significant demographic (age) and environmental covariates in STATA. The following environmental covariates were included in the spatial model: the normalized difference vegetation index, the enhanced vegetation index, the leaf area index, the land surface temperature for day and night, land use/landcover (LULC), distance to water bodies, and rainfall. The spatial model created suggests that the two main environmental covariates correlating with malaria presence were land surface temperature for day and rainfall. It was also found that malaria prevalence increased with distance to water bodies up to 4 km. The malaria risk map estimated from the spatial model shows that malaria prevalence in Nigeria varies from 20% in certain areas to 70% in others. The highest prevalence rates were found in the Niger Delta states of Rivers and Bayelsa, the areas surrounding the confluence of the rivers Niger and Benue, and also isolated parts of the north-eastern and north-western parts of the country. Isolated patches of low malaria prevalence were found to be scattered around the country with northern Nigeria having more such areas than the rest of the country. Nigeria's belt of middle regions generally has malaria prevalence of 40% and above. PMID:26618305

  8. Potential Biomarkers and Their Applications for Rapid and Reliable Detection of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Priyamvada; Chakma, Babina; Patra, Sanjukta; Goswami, Pranab

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has been responsible for the highest mortality in most malaria endemic countries. Even after decades of malaria control campaigns, it still persists as a disease of high mortality due to improper diagnosis and rapidly evolving drug resistant malarial parasites. For efficient and economical malaria management, WHO recommends that all malaria suspected patients should receive proper diagnosis before administering drugs. It is thus imperative to develop fast, economical, and accurate techniques for diagnosis of malaria. In this regard an in-depth knowledge on malaria biomarkers is important to identify an appropriate biorecognition element and utilize it prudently to develop a reliable detection technique for diagnosis of the disease. Among the various biomarkers, plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase and histidine-rich protein II (HRP II) have received increasing attention for developing rapid and reliable detection techniques for malaria. The widely used rapid detection tests (RDTs) for malaria succumb to many drawbacks which promotes exploration of more efficient economical detection techniques. This paper provides an overview on the current status of malaria biomarkers, along with their potential utilization for developing different malaria diagnostic techniques and advanced biosensors. PMID:24804253

  9. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  10. The potential effects of climate change on malaria in tropical Africa using regionalised climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermert, V.; Fink, A. H.; Paeth, H.; Morse, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    The projected climate change will probably alter the range and transmission potential of malaria in Africa. The potential impacts of climate change on the malaria distribution is assessed for tropical Africa. Bias-corrected regional climate projections with a horizontal resolution of 0.5° are used from the Regional Model (REMO), which include land use and land cover changes. The malaria models employed are the 2010 version of the Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM2010), the Garki model, the Plasmodium falciparum infection model from Smith et al. (2005) (S2005), and the Malaria Seasonality Model (MSM) from the Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa project. The results of the models are compared with data from the Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) and novel validation procedures for the LMM2010 and MSM lend more credence to their results. For climate scenarios A1B and B1 and for 2001-2050, REMO projects an overall drying and warming trend in the African malaria belt, that is largely imposed by the man-made degradation of vegetation. As a result, the malaria projections show a decreased malaria spread in West Africa. The northern Sahel is no more suitable for malaria in the projections. More unstable malaria transmission and shorter malaria seasons are expected for various areas farther south. An increase in the malaria epidemic risk is found for more densely populated areas in the southern part of the Sahel. In East Africa, higher temperatures and nearly unchanged precipitation patterns lead to longer transmission seasons and an increase in the area of highland malaria. For altitudes up to 2000 m the malaria transmission stabilises and the epidemic risk is reduced but for higher altitudes the risk of malaria epidemics is increased. The results of the more complex and simple malaria models are similar to each other. However, a different response to the warming of highlands is found for the LMM2010 and MSM. This shows the requirement of a multi model uncertainty analysis for the

  11. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dennis A; Atkinson, Carter T; Samuel, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand. PMID:22320256

  12. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dennis A; Atkinson, Carter T; Samuel, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

  13. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPointe, Dennis A.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

  14. Investigation of Host Candidate Malaria-Associated Risk/Protective SNPs in a Brazilian Amazonian Population

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Santos, Simone; Clark, Taane G.; Campino, Susana; Suarez-Mutis, Martha Cecília; Rockett, Kirk A.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fernandes, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilian Amazon is a hypo-endemic malaria region with nearly 300,000 cases each year. A variety of genetic polymorphisms, particularly in erythrocyte receptors and immune response related genes, have been described to be associated with susceptibility and resistance to malaria. In order to identify polymorphisms that might be associated with malaria clinical outcomes in a Brazilian Amazonian population, sixty-four human single nucleotide polymorphisms in 37 genes were analyzed using a Sequenom massARRAY iPLEX platform. A total of 648 individuals from two malaria endemic areas were studied, including 535 malaria cases (113 individuals with clinical mild malaria, 122 individuals with asymptomatic infection and 300 individuals with history of previous mild malaria) and 113 health controls with no history of malaria. The data revealed significant associations (p<0.003) between one SNP in the IL10 gene (rs1800896) and one SNP in the TLR4 gene (rs4986790) with reduced risk for clinical malaria, one SNP in the IRF1 gene (rs2706384) with increased risk for clinical malaria, one SNP in the LTA gene (rs909253) with protection from clinical malaria and one SNP in the TNF gene (RS1800750) associated with susceptibility to clinical malaria. Also, a new association was found between a SNP in the CTL4 gene (rs2242665), located at the major histocompatibility complex III region, and reduced risk for clinical malaria. This study represents the first association study from an Amazonian population involving a large number of host genetic polymorphisms with susceptibility or resistance to Plasmodium infection and malaria outcomes. Further studies should include a larger number of individuals, refined parameters and a fine-scale map obtained through DNA sequencing to increase the knowledge of the Amazonian population genetic diversity. PMID:22615793

  15. Non-invasive methods for identifyig oocysts of Sarcocystis spp. from definitive hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because the excreted sporocysts of various species of Sarcocystis may not be discriminated morphologically, we sought to validate a diagnostic technique based on variation in the 18S rDNA sequence. Oocysts of Sarcocystis hominis, Sarcocystis fusiformis and Sarcocystis cruzi were collected from the f...

  16. MOLECULAR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER: THE CHALLENGE AND PROMISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the presence of host-adapted Cryptosporidium species and genotypes, molecular tools can help assess the source and hazardous potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. The development and use of molecular tools in the analysis of environmental samples have gone tho...

  17. Herd factors influencing oocyst production of Eimeria and Cryptosporidium in Estonian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Brian; Viltrop, Arvo; Järvis, Toivo

    2009-10-01

    Cryptosporidium and Eimeria are intestinal parasites which are sensitive to the surroundings, behaviour and well-being of their host. In the present study, a range of factors related to farm management systems, environment, housing and herd characteristics were investigated with regard to alterations in oocyst excretion in cattle, using a mixed-effects model. Information and samples for three age categories were obtained from 45 Estonian dairy farms, located in 15 counties. Leaving the calf with the mother after birth reduced the risk of shedding higher levels of Cryptosporidium (OR = 0.20) and Eimeria (OR = 0.68) oocysts in all animals. The calves younger than 3 months kept on farms housing at least 150 animals had less risk (OR = 0.39) of producing higher numbers of Cryptosporidium oocysts. A somewhat lower infection level was observed in 3- to 12-month-old animals housed in separate buildings (OR = 0.64). The chance of shedding higher levels of Eimeria doubled (OR = 2.27) in cattle older than a year in case a vacancy period was used before replacing animals in pens and tripled (OR = 2.94) when the relative humidity exceeded 75% in the cowshed. Winter reduced the odds (OR = 0.25) of shedding Eimeria oocysts in the oldest animals compared to the fall season. Simple changes in handling and housing of cattle may produce a positive effect on controlling coccidian infections in Estonian dairy herds.

  18. Detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels (Perna viridis) from shell-fish markets of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisuphanunt, M; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Saksirisampant, W; Karanis, P

    2009-09-01

    Mussels filter large volumes of water and can concentrate pathogenic organisms, which may act as potential vehicles of transmission to the consumer. A survey study was carried out to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium protozoan parasites in green mussels (Perna viridis), the smussles pecies most destined for consumption in Thailand. In total, 56 samples were examined from Bangkok (n = 24) and Samut Prakan (n = 32) a wholesale shell-fish markets located at the mouth of the Chao Phraya River. The market for green mussels was closed to the mussel culture placed along the coastal line and this localization may have significant economical impact if the mussels' cultures are found contaminated. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by the immunofluorescence antibody method (IFA) in 12.5% of the samples examined. The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels' population of Samut Prakan was higher (15.6%) than in Bangkok market (8.3%). These differences in positive samples from the two locations may be caused by physical, ecological and anthropogenic conditions. This could relay to different contamination levels of marine water by Cryptosporidium oocysts and consequently to contamination of harvested shellfish populations. The results demonstrate that the Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were found indigenous in mussels from the coastal line of Thailand, indicating that mussels may act as a reservoir of Cryptosporidium foodborne infections for humans. PMID:19839271

  19. Cryptosporidium Propidium Monoazide-PCR, a Molecular Biology-Based Technique for Genotyping Viable Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium is an important waterborne protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea and death in the immunocompromised. Current methods to monitor for Cryptosporidium oocysts in water are microscopy-based USEPA Methods 1622 and 1623. These methods assess total levels o...

  20. BLIND TRIALS EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS USING CELL CULTURE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized cell culture-immunofluorescence (IFA) procedure, using the HCT-8 cell line, was evaluated in 'blind' trials to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility for measuring infectivity of flow cytometry prepared inocula of C. parvum oocysts. In separate trials, suspens...

  1. TOXOPLASMA GONDII : UPTAKE AND SURVIVAL OF OOCYSTS IN FREE-LIVING AMOEBAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waterborne transmission of the oocyst stage of Toxoplasma gondii can cause outbreaks of clinical toxoplasmosis in humans and infection of marine mammals. In water-related environments and soil, free-living amoebae are considered potential carriers of various pathogens, but knowledge on interactions ...

  2. Evaluating the transport of bacillus subtilis spores as a potential surrogate for Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USEPA has recommended the use of aerobic spores as an indicator for Cryptosporidium oocysts when determining groundwater under the direct influence of surface water. Surface properties, interaction energies, transport, retention, and release behavior of B. subtilis spores were measured over a r...

  3. Effect of Tillage and Rainfall on Transport of Manure-Applied Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts through Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have been attributed to agricultural sources due to the high prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in animal wastes and the practice of spreading manure on farmlands. No-till is an effective soil conservation practice, but it often results in soil havin...

  4. COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS FOR DETECTION OF GIARDIA CYSTS AND CRYTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The steps of two immunofluorescent-antibody-based detection methods were evaluated for their efficiencies in detecting Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. The two methods evaluated were the American Society for Testing and Materials proposed test method for Giardia cysts a...

  5. Molecular analysis of single oocyst of Eimeria by whole genome amplification (WGA) based nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunzhou; Tao, Geru; Cui, Yujuan; Lv, Qiyao; Xie, Li; Li, Yuan; Suo, Xun; Qin, Yinghe; Xiao, Lihua; Liu, Xianyong

    2014-09-01

    PCR-based molecular tools are widely used for the identification and characterization of protozoa. Here we report the molecular analysis of Eimeria species using combined methods of whole genome amplification (WGA) and nested PCR. Single oocyst of Eimeria stiedai or Eimeriamedia was directly used for random amplification of the genomic DNA with either primer extension preamplification (PEP) or multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and then the WGA product was used as template in nested PCR with species-specific primers for ITS-1, 18S rDNA and 23S rDNA of E. stiedai and E. media. WGA-based PCR was successful for the amplification of these genes from single oocyst. For the species identification of single oocyst isolated from mixed E. stiedai or E. media, the results from WGA-based PCR were exactly in accordance with those from morphological identification, suggesting the availability of this method in molecular analysis of eimerian parasites at the single oocyst level. WGA-based PCR method can also be applied for the identification and genetic characterization of other protists.

  6. Gel-Bead Delivery of Eimeria Oocysts Protects Chickens Against Coccidiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines composed of either virulent or attenuated Eimeria spp. oocysts have been developed as an alternative to medication of feed with ionophore drugs or synthetic chemicals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of gel beads containing a mixture of E. acervulina, E. maxima, and E. te...

  7. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Single Cryptosporidium Oocysts from Archived Glass Slides

    PubMed Central

    Sunnotel, O.; Snelling, W. J.; Xiao, L.; Moule, K.; Moore, J. E.; Millar, B. Cherie; Dooley, J. S. G.; Lowery, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we report on the development and application of a novel method for efficiently extracting and detecting single Cryptosporidium oocysts from archived glass slides. Laser capture microscopy was used to extract low numbers of oocysts from archived glass slides. Highly sensitive real-time PCR methods were then developed to enable the rapid detection and identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts from these samples. The method was applied to fecal smears stained with a variety of standard oocyst stains and water samples. This application, with samples derived from both public health and water service laboratories, highlighted the strong potential of this method to be used as a rapid high-throughput screening tool for the routine monitoring of Cryptosporidium and other medically important pathogens from clinical, veterinary, and environmental water samples. Importantly, the application of our protocol could be used to type Cryptosporidium and other pathogens from stored archived glass slides in public health and water service laboratories, providing vital epidemiological updates and helping to identify and trace pathogens and their routes of infection and ultimately improve their control. PMID:16954262

  8. SEROLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS FINDINGS IN THE WATER SUPPLY OF SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    From July to September, 1998, high levels of Cryptospordium oocysts and Giardia cysts were detected in Sydney, Australia drinking water. To evaluate whether Sydney residents had an elevated risk of infection, serological responses to two Cryptospordium antigen groups (15/17 - an...

  9. Detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels (Perna viridis) from shell-fish markets of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisuphanunt, M; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Saksirisampant, W; Karanis, P

    2009-09-01

    Mussels filter large volumes of water and can concentrate pathogenic organisms, which may act as potential vehicles of transmission to the consumer. A survey study was carried out to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium protozoan parasites in green mussels (Perna viridis), the smussles pecies most destined for consumption in Thailand. In total, 56 samples were examined from Bangkok (n = 24) and Samut Prakan (n = 32) a wholesale shell-fish markets located at the mouth of the Chao Phraya River. The market for green mussels was closed to the mussel culture placed along the coastal line and this localization may have significant economical impact if the mussels' cultures are found contaminated. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by the immunofluorescence antibody method (IFA) in 12.5% of the samples examined. The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels' population of Samut Prakan was higher (15.6%) than in Bangkok market (8.3%). These differences in positive samples from the two locations may be caused by physical, ecological and anthropogenic conditions. This could relay to different contamination levels of marine water by Cryptosporidium oocysts and consequently to contamination of harvested shellfish populations. The results demonstrate that the Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were found indigenous in mussels from the coastal line of Thailand, indicating that mussels may act as a reservoir of Cryptosporidium foodborne infections for humans.

  10. Impact of climate change on global malaria distribution

    PubMed Central

    Caminade, Cyril; Kovats, Sari; Rocklov, Joacim; Tompkins, Adrian M.; Morse, Andrew P.; Colón-González, Felipe J.; Stenlund, Hans; Martens, Pim; Lloyd, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is an important disease that has a global distribution and significant health burden. The spatial limits of its distribution and seasonal activity are sensitive to climate factors, as well as the local capacity to control the disease. Malaria is also one of the few health outcomes that has been modeled by more than one research group and can therefore facilitate the first model intercomparison for health impacts under a future with climate change. We used bias-corrected temperature and rainfall simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 climate models to compare the metrics of five statistical and dynamical malaria impact models for three future time periods (2030s, 2050s, and 2080s). We evaluated three malaria outcome metrics at global and regional levels: climate suitability, additional population at risk and additional person-months at risk across the model outputs. The malaria projections were based on five different global climate models, each run under four emission scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways, RCPs) and a single population projection. We also investigated the modeling uncertainty associated with future projections of populations at risk for malaria owing to climate change. Our findings show an overall global net increase in climate suitability and a net increase in the population at risk, but with large uncertainties. The model outputs indicate a net increase in the annual person-months at risk when comparing from RCP2.6 to RCP8.5 from the 2050s to the 2080s. The malaria outcome metrics were highly sensitive to the choice of malaria impact model, especially over the epidemic fringes of the malaria distribution. PMID:24596427

  11. Malaria and tuberculosis: our concerns.

    PubMed

    Shiva, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1978 the concept of primary health care was adopted by 116 countries at Alma Ata, yet the negative impact of structural readjustment programs in Africa and South America could be felt due to the cuts in expenditures on health, education, and social matters. The result is a resurgence of communicable diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis. Another factor in this resurgence is extreme poverty. In 1994 over 1000 people died in Rajasthan, India, of a malaria epidemic, and during the same time in Delhi over 300 deaths were attributed to hemorrhagic dengue fever. Malariogenic and tuberculous conditions continue to flourish owing to distorted development patterns and commercialization of medical care as public health and community health services are being replaced by profit-oriented curative care, 80% of which is in private hands. This has resulted in spiraling medical care costs and rural indebtedness. Socioeconomic deprivation in developing countries threatens TB control. Factors contributing to the spread of TB were established in 1899 and are still valid in India and other developing countries: TB contamination of air, inadequate food, overcrowded dwelling, and low state of physical health. Even in developed countries TB is on the rise: there were 172 cases in 1991 in England vs. 305 cases in 1993, half of them among immigrants. The increase occurred in the poorest 30% of the population. The World Bank is providing loans for a revised TB and malaria strategy, and the Disability Adjusted Life Year has been used to identify the greatest burden of diseases. On the other hand, the Indian National Health Policy has not been revised since 1983. Priority must be given to those living in extreme poverty to curb the resurgence of once controlled diseases.

  12. Avian malaria in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Schoener, E R; Banda, M; Howe, L; Castro, I C; Alley, M R

    2014-07-01

    Avian malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium have the ability to cause morbidity and mortality in naïve hosts, and their impact on the native biodiversity is potentially serious. Over the last decade, avian malaria has aroused increasing interest as an emerging disease in New Zealand with some endemic avian species, such as the endangered mohua (Mohua ochrocephala), thought to be particularly susceptible. To date, avian malaria parasites have been found in 35 different bird species in New Zealand and have been diagnosed as causing death in threatened species such as dotterel (Charadrius obscurus), South Island saddleback (Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus), mohua, hihi (Notiomystis cincta) and two species of kiwi (Apteryx spp.). Introduced blackbirds (Turdus merula) have been found to be carriers of at least three strains of Plasmodium spp. and because they are very commonly infected, they are likely sources of infection for many of New Zealand's endemic birds. The spread and abundance of introduced and endemic mosquitoes as the result of climate change is also likely to be an important factor in the high prevalence of infection in some regions and at certain times of the year. Although still limited, there is a growing understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of Plasmodium spp. in New Zealand. Molecular biology has played an important part in this process and has markedly improved our understanding of the taxonomy of the genus Plasmodium. This review presents our current state of knowledge, discusses the possible infection and disease outcomes, the implications for host behaviour and reproduction, methods of diagnosis of infection, and the possible vectors for transmission of the disease in New Zealand. PMID:24313228

  13. Aquatic biomonitoring of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ching; Ngui, Romano; Tan, Tiong Kai; Roslan, Muhammad Aidil; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2014-01-01

    An aquatic biomonitoring of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in river water corresponding to five villages situated in three states in peninsular Malaysia was determined. There were 51.3% (20/39) and 23.1% (9/39) samples positive for Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts, respectively. Overall mean concentration between villages for Giardia cysts ranged from 0.10 to 25.80 cysts/l whilst Cryptosporidium oocysts ranged from 0.10 to 0.90 oocysts/l. Detailed results of the river samples from five villages indicated that Kuala Pangsun 100% (9/9), Kemensah 77.8% (7/9), Pos Piah 33.3% (3/9) and Paya Lebar 33.3% (1/3) were contaminated with Giardia cysts whilst Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts were only detected in Kemensah (100 %; 9/9) and Kuala Pangsun (66.6%; 6/9). However, the water samples from Bentong were all negative for these waterborne parasites. Samples were collected from lower point, midpoint and upper point. Midpoint refers to the section of the river where the studied communities are highly populated. Meanwhile, the position of the lower point is at least 2 km southward of the midpoint and upper point is at least 2 km northward of the midpoint. The highest mean concentration for (oo)cysts was found at the lower points [3.15 ± 6.09 (oo)cysts/l], followed by midpoints [0.66 ± 1.10 (oo)cysts/l] and upper points [0.66 ± 0.92 (oo)cysts/l]. The mean concentration of Giardia cysts was highest at Kuala Pangsun (i.e. 5.97 ± 7.0 cysts/l), followed by Kemensah (0.83 ± 0.81 cysts/l), Pos Piah (0.20 ± 0.35 cysts/l) and Paya Lebar (0.10 ± 0.19 cysts/l). On the other hand, the mean concentration of Cryptosporidium oocysts was higher at Kemensah (0.31 ± 0.19 cysts/l) compared to Kuala Pangsun (0.03 ± 0.03cysts/l). All the physical and chemical parameters did not show significant correlation with both protozoa. In future, viability status and molecular characterisation of Giardia and Cryptosporidium should be applied to identify

  14. Profoundly Reduced CD1c+ Myeloid Dendritic Cell HLA-DR and CD86 Expression and Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor Production in Experimental Human Blood-Stage Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Minigo, Gabriela; Burel, Julie; Tipping, Peta E.; Piera, Kim A.; Amante, Fiona H.; Engwerda, Christian R.; Good, Michael F.; Doolan, Denise L.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; McCarthy, James S.; Woodberry, Tonia

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinels of the immune system that uniquely prime naive cells and initiate adaptive immune responses. CD1c (BDCA-1) myeloid DCs (CD1c+ mDCs) highly express HLA-DR, have a broad Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and secrete immune modulatory cytokines. To better understand immune responses to malaria, CD1c+ mDC maturation and cytokine production were examined in healthy volunteers before and after experimental intravenous Plasmodium falciparum infection with 150- or 1,800-parasite-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). After either dose, CD1c+ mDCs significantly reduced HLA-DR expression in prepatent infections. Circulating CD1c+ mDCs did not upregulate HLA-DR after pRBC or TLR ligand stimulation and exhibited reduced CD86 expression. At peak parasitemia, CD1c+ mDCs produced significantly more tumor necrosis factor (TNF), whereas interleukin-12 (IL-12) production was unchanged. Interestingly, only the 1,800-pRBC dose caused a reduction in the circulating CD1c+ mDC count with evidence of apoptosis. The 1,800-pRBC dose produced no change in T cell IFN-γ or IL-2 production at peak parasitemia or at 3 weeks posttreatment. Overall, CD1c+ mDCs are compromised by P. falciparum exposure, with impaired HLA-DR and CD86 expression, and have an increased capacity for TNF but not IL-12 production. A first prepatent P. falciparum infection is sufficient to modulate CD1c+ mDC responsiveness, likely contributing to hampered effector T cell cytokine responses and assisting parasite immune evasion. PMID:26902728

  15. Profoundly Reduced CD1c+ Myeloid Dendritic Cell HLA-DR and CD86 Expression and Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor Production in Experimental Human Blood-Stage Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Loughland, Jessica R; Minigo, Gabriela; Burel, Julie; Tipping, Peta E; Piera, Kim A; Amante, Fiona H; Engwerda, Christian R; Good, Michael F; Doolan, Denise L; Anstey, Nicholas M; McCarthy, James S; Woodberry, Tonia

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinels of the immune system that uniquely prime naive cells and initiate adaptive immune responses. CD1c (BDCA-1) myeloid DCs (CD1c(+) mDCs) highly express HLA-DR, have a broad Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and secrete immune modulatory cytokines. To better understand immune responses to malaria, CD1c(+) mDC maturation and cytokine production were examined in healthy volunteers before and after experimental intravenous Plasmodium falciparum infection with 150- or 1,800-parasite-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). After either dose, CD1c(+) mDCs significantly reduced HLA-DR expression in prepatent infections. Circulating CD1c(+) mDCs did not upregulate HLA-DR after pRBC or TLR ligand stimulation and exhibited reduced CD86 expression. At peak parasitemia, CD1c(+) mDCs produced significantly more tumor necrosis factor (TNF), whereas interleukin-12 (IL-12) production was unchanged. Interestingly, only the 1,800-pRBC dose caused a reduction in the circulating CD1c(+) mDC count with evidence of apoptosis. The 1,800-pRBC dose produced no change in T cell IFN-γ or IL-2 production at peak parasitemia or at 3 weeks posttreatment. Overall, CD1c(+) mDCs are compromised by P. falciparum exposure, with impaired HLA-DR and CD86 expression, and have an increased capacity for TNF but not IL-12 production. A first prepatent P. falciparum infection is sufficient to modulate CD1c(+) mDC responsiveness, likely contributing to hampered effector T cell cytokine responses and assisting parasite immune evasion.

  16. The Effect of the Anionic Surfactant Aerosol-80 on the Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts through Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.; Darnault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of the pathogenic protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum through soils threatens ground and surface waters. C. parvum may be introduced into soils in the manure of infected calves. The presence of other chemicals in the soil applied as or with amendments, may affect the transport of the C. parvum oocysts. Surfactants, which are used in many herbicide formulations, decrease water tension and may disrupt the air-water interface where oocysts are thought to accumulate. We investigate the effect of the anionic surfactant Aerosol-80, at two concentrations, on the transport of C. parvum oocysts by unsaturated flow through "undisturbed" soil columns from Illinois and Utah. Following each experiment oocysts in the leachate and distributed throughout the soil profile are quantified by real time PCR. We find that the presence of the surfactant accelerates the transport of the oocysts through preferential flow paths. On the other hand, when connected macropores are not present in the soils, the presence of the surfactant retards the transport of the oocysts through the soil matrix by straining oocyst-surfactant-Ca flocs. Surfactant efficacy is affected by soil type.

  17. Effect of disinfection of drinking water with ozone or chlorine dioxide on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Mazás, E A; Masschelein, W J; Villacorta Martiez de Maturana, I; Debacker, E

    1989-01-01

    Demineralized water was seeded with controlled numbers of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum purified from fresh calf feces and subjected to different treatments with ozone or chlorine dioxide. The disinfectants were neutralized by sodium thiosulfate, and neonatal mice were inoculated intragastrically and sacrificed 7 days later for enumeration of oocyst production. Preliminary trials indicated that a minimum infection level of 1,000 oocysts (0.1-ml inoculum) per mouse was necessary to induce 100% infection. Treatment of water containing 10(4) oocysts per ml with 1.11 mg of ozone per liter (concentration at time zero [C0]) for 6 min totally eliminated the infectivity of the oocysts for neonatal mice. A level of 2.27 mg of ozone per liter (C0) was necessary to inactivate water containing 5 x 10(5) oocysts per ml within 8 min. Also, 0.4 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter (C0) significantly reduced infectivity within 15 min of contact, although some oocysts remained viable. PMID:2764564

  18. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis. PMID:26354673

  19. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis.

  20. Unrecognized Ingestion of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts Leads to Congenital Toxoplasmosis and Causes Epidemics in North America

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Kenneth; Hill, Dolores; Mui, Ernest; Wroblewski, Kristen; Karrison, Theodore; Dubey, J. P.; Sautter, Mari; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Withers, Shawn; Swisher, Charles; Heydemann, Peter; Hosten, Tiffany; Babiarz, Jane; Lee, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Linn, on pages 1090–1.) Background. Congenital toxoplasmosis presents as severe, life-altering disease in North America. If mothers of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis could be identified by risks, it would provide strong support for educating pregnant women about risks, to eliminate this disease. Conversely, if not all risks are identifiable, undetectable risks are suggested. A new test detecting antibodies to sporozoites demonstrated that oocysts were the predominant source of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 4 North American epidemics and in mothers of children in the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS). This novel test offered the opportunity to determine whether risk factors or demographic characteristics could identify mothers infected with oocysts. Methods. Acutely infected mothers and their congenitally infected infants were evaluated, including in-person interviews concerning risks and evaluation of perinatal maternal serum samples. Results. Fifty-nine (78%) of 76 mothers of congenitally infected infants in NCCCTS had primary infection with oocysts. Only 49% of these mothers identified significant risk factors for sporozoite acquisition. Socioeconomic status, hometown size, maternal clinical presentations, and ethnicity were not reliable predictors. Conclusions. Undetected contamination of food and water by oocysts frequently causes human infections in North America. Risks are often unrecognized by those infected. Demographic characteristics did not identify oocyst infections. Thus, although education programs describing hygienic measures may be beneficial, they will not suffice to prevent the suffering and economic consequences associated with congenital toxoplasmosis. Only a vaccine or implementation of systematic serologic testing of pregnant women and newborns, followed by treatment, will prevent most congenital toxoplasmosis in North America. PMID:22021924

  1. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity over 60% and ambient temperature of 25-30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10-14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 69 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acoustic buzzers, aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), doxycycline, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vaporising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines. PMID:19450348

  2. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity greater than 60% and ambient temperature of 25 °C to 30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10 to 14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in adult and child travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone–proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), dietary supplementation, doxycycline, electronic mosquito repellents, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vapourising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine–dapsone, pyrimethamine–sulfadoxine, smoke

  3. The dynamics of malaria.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, G; Cuellar, C B; Foll, C V

    1968-01-01

    Previous studies on dynamic systems of transmission of malaria, and of eradication of infection following the interruption of transmission, have now been adapted for advanced techniques using the facilities offered by computers.The computer programmes have been designed for a deterministic model suitable for a large community and also for a stochastic model relevant to small populations in which infections reach very low finite numbers. In this model, new infections and recoveries are assessed by the daily inoculation rate and are subject to laws of chance. Such a representation is closer than previous models to natural happenings in the process of malaria eradication. Further refinements of the new approach include the seasonal transmission and simulation of mass chemotherapy aimed at a cure of P. falciparum infections.These programmes present models on which the actual or expected results of changes due to various factors can be studied by the analysis of specific malaria situations recorded in the field. The value of control methods can also be tested by the study of such hypothetical epidemiological models and by trying out various procedures.Two specific malaria situations (in a pilot project in Northern Nigeria and in an outbreak in Syria) were studied by this method and provided some interesting results of operational value. The attack measures in the pilot project in Northern Nigeria were carried out according to the theoretical model derived from the basic data obtained in the field. PMID:5303328

  4. Epidemiology of Malaria in Amritsar District of India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Mittal, Mridula; Sharma, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Objective Malaria is today one of the major causes of human suffering, both in terms of increasing morbidity/mortality and stunting intellectual/ economic growth. In a developing country like India, it has devastating socioeconomic consequences. The present study was therefore carried out to study the epidemiology of malaria in Amritsar district. Methods Diagnosed cases of Malaria reported from 1st January to 31st December 2009 in the erstwhile District of Amritsar were collected from the District Epidemiologist of Amritsar and Taran Taaran and studied. A total of 314 patients were studied. Data was assessed, systematically compiled and statistically analyzed. Results Most (84%) of the malaria patients in our study were less than 45 years of age. Male patients (57%) outnumbered females (43%). The majority of patients with malaria (98%) were from rural areas and 68.5% of the studied patients belonged to upper lower socioeconomical class according to Kuppuswamy socioeconomic status scale. The majority (83%) of patients took treatment from Registered Medical Practitioners/quacks. Out of the total patients, only 14% used mosquito nets, 13% used repellents, and 7% had wire gauze doors in their homes Conclusion The people living in rural areas were found to be more vulnerable to malaria. The disease was found to be more prevalent among the lower socio economic strata and young population leading to considerable adverse effect on health and economy. Our study aims to stress the estimation of the true burden of malaria. PMID:24715945

  5. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  6. Epidemiology of malaria in pregnancy in central India.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N.; Shukla, M. M.; Sharma, V. P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of three years of data from a malaria clinic operated by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in the Government Medical College Hospital in Jabalpur, central India, showed a high malaria prevalence among pregnant women, which was statistically highly significant (P < 0.0001) compared with the situation among nonpregnant women. Cerebral malaria was a common complication of severe Plasmodium falciparum infection, with a high mortality during pregnancy, requiring immediate attention. The study also showed that malaria infection was more frequent in primigravidae, falling progressively with increasing parity. Mean parasite densities were significantly higher in pregnant women compared with nonpregnant women for both P. falciparum (P < 0.001; df = 137) and P. vivax (P < 0.05; df = 72) infection. Pregnant women with falciparum or vivax malaria were significantly more anaemic than noninfected pregnant women or infected nonpregnant women. The average weight of 155 neonates from infected mothers was 350 g less than that of 175 neonates from noninfected mothers. This difference in birth weight was statistically significant for both P. falciparum (P < 0.0001; df = 278) and P. vivax (P < 0.0001; df = 223) infection. Congenital malaria was not recorded. We conclude that pregnant women from this geographical area require systematic intervention owing to their high susceptibility to malaria during pregnancy and the puerperium. PMID:10444880

  7. Malaria theranostics using hemozoin-generated vapor nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-01-01

    Malaria remains a widespread and deadly infectious human disease, with increasing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges due to the drug resistance and aggressiveness of malaria infection. Early detection and innovative approaches for parasite destruction are needed. The high optical absorbance and nano-size of hemozoin crystals have been exploited to detect and mechanically destroy the malaria parasite in a single theranostic procedure. Transient vapor nanobubbles are generated around hemozoin crystals in malaria parasites in infected erythrocytes in response to a single short laser pulse. Optical scattering signals of the nanobubble report the presence of the malaria parasite. The mechanical impact of the same nanobubble physically destroys the parasite in nanoseconds in a drug-free manner. Laser-induced nanobubble treatment of human blood in vitro results in destruction of up to 95% of parasites after a single procedure, and delivers an 8-fold better parasiticidal efficacy compared to standard chloroquine drug treatment. The mechanism of destruction is highly selective for malaria infected red cells and does not harm neighboring, uninfected erythrocytes. Thus, laser pulse-induced vapor nanobubble generation around hemozoin supports both rapid and highly specific detection and destruction of malaria parasites in one theranostic procedure.

  8. Malaria in gold-mining areas in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Angélica; Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; Morales-Plaza, Cristhian David; Alzate, Alberto; Padilla, Julio; Arévalo, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-01-01

    Gold-mining may play an important role in the maintenance of malaria worldwide. Gold-mining, mostly illegal, has significantly expanded in Colombia during the last decade in areas with limited health care and disease prevention. We report a descriptive study that was carried out to determine the malaria prevalence in gold-mining areas of Colombia, using data from the public health surveillance system (National Health Institute) during the period 2010-2013. Gold-mining was more prevalent in the departments of Antioquia, Córdoba, Bolívar, Chocó, Nariño, Cauca, and Valle, which contributed 89.3% (270,753 cases) of the national malaria incidence from 2010-2013 and 31.6% of malaria cases were from mining areas. Mining regions, such as El Bagre, Zaragoza, and Segovia, in Antioquia, Puerto Libertador and Montelíbano, in Córdoba, and Buenaventura, in Valle del Cauca, were the most endemic areas. The annual parasite index (API) correlated with gold production (R2 0.82, p < 0.0001); for every 100 kg of gold produced, the API increased by 0.54 cases per 1,000 inhabitants. Lack of malaria control activities, together with high migration and proliferation of mosquito breeding sites, contribute to malaria in gold-mining regions. Specific control activities must be introduced to control this significant source of malaria in Colombia. PMID:26814645

  9. Malaria Ecology, Disease Burden and Global Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccord, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Malaria has afflicted human society for over 2 million years, and remains one of the great killer diseases today. The disease is the fourth leading cause of death for children under five in low income countries (after neonatal disorders, diarrhea, and pneumonia) and is responsible for at least one in every five child deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. It kills up to 3 million people a year, though in recent years scale up of anti-malaria efforts in Africa may have brought deaths to below 1 million. Malaria is highly conditioned by ecology, because of which climate change is likely to change the local dynamics of the disease through changes in ambient temperature and precipitation. To assess the potential implications of climate change for the malaria burden, this paper employs a Malaria Ecology Index from the epidemiology literature, relates it to malaria incidence and mortality using global country-level data , and then draws implications for 2100 by extrapolating the index using several general circulation model (GCM) predictions of temperature and precipitation. The results highlight the climate change driven increase in the basic reproduction number of the disease and the resulting complications for further gains in elimination. For illustrative purposes, I report the change in malaria incidence and mortality if climate change were to happen immediately under current technology and public health efforts.

  10. Absence of apolipoprotein E protects mice from cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Rainone, Anthony; Fournier, Sylvie; Boilard, Eric; Olivier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria claims the life of millions of people each year, particularly those of children, and is a major global public health problem. Thus, the identification of novel malaria biomarkers that could be utilized as diagnostic or therapeutic targets is becoming increasingly important. Using a proteomic approach, we previously identified unique biomarkers in the sera of malaria-infected individuals, including apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is the dominant apolipoprotein in the brain and has been implicated in several neurological disorders; therefore, we were interested in the potential role of ApoE in cerebral malaria. Here we report the first demonstration that cerebral malaria is markedly attenuated in ApoE(-/-) mice. The protection provided by the absence of ApoE was associated with decreased sequestration of parasites and T cells within the brain, and was determined to be independent from the involvement of ApoE receptors and from the altered lipid metabolism associated with the knock-out mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of mice with the ApoE antagonist heparin octasaccharide significantly decreased the incidence of cerebral malaria. Overall, our study indicates that the reduction of ApoE could be utilized in the development of therapeutic treatments aimed at mitigating the neuropathology of cerebral malaria. PMID:27647324

  11. Malaria in gold-mining areas in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Angélica; Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; Morales-Plaza, Cristhian David; Alzate, Alberto; Padilla, Julio; Arévalo, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-01-01

    Gold-mining may play an important role in the maintenance of malaria worldwide. Gold-mining, mostly illegal, has significantly expanded in Colombia during the last decade in areas with limited health care and disease prevention. We report a descriptive study that was carried out to determine the malaria prevalence in gold-mining areas of Colombia, using data from the public health surveillance system (National Health Institute) during the period 2010-2013. Gold-mining was more prevalent in the departments of Antioquia, Córdoba, Bolívar, Chocó, Nariño, Cauca, and Valle, which contributed 89.3% (270,753 cases) of the national malaria incidence from 2010-2013 and 31.6% of malaria cases were from mining areas. Mining regions, such as El Bagre, Zaragoza, and Segovia, in Antioquia, Puerto Libertador and Montelíbano, in Córdoba, and Buenaventura, in Valle del Cauca, were the most endemic areas. The annual parasite index (API) correlated with gold production (R2 0.82, p < 0.0001); for every 100 kg of gold produced, the API increased by 0.54 cases per 1,000 inhabitants. Lack of malaria control activities, together with high migration and proliferation of mosquito breeding sites, contribute to malaria in gold-mining regions. Specific control activities must be introduced to control this significant source of malaria in Colombia. PMID:26814645

  12. An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Torres Strait.

    PubMed

    Preston-Thomas, Annie; Gair, Richard W; Hosking, Kelly A; Devine, Gregor J; Donohue, Steven D

    2012-06-01

    This report describes the largest outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Torres Strait for more than 25 years. It details factors that may have contributed to the outbreak, the public health response and implications for the broader region. Eight cases of locally-acquired falciparum malaria occurred on Saibai and Dauan islands during March and April 2011. Including imports, there were 17 P. falciparum notifications between February and May 2011. Three cases of pure P. vivax malaria that might have been locally acquired have been omitted from this report. Malaria is endemic on the nearby coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG), and regularly imported to the Torres Strait where a competent vector exists in sufficient numbers to transmit the disease to the local population. The most common malaria vectors in northern Australia and Torres Strait are the Anopheles farauti complex. Factors contributing to the outbreak may include an increase in travel between the outer islands and PNG, inadequate local vector control and late or missed diagnoses of malaria. Outbreak management involved intensive case finding and treatment, vector control and health promotion. Reducing the risk of future outbreaks requires studies of vector behaviour, ecology and management, health promotion, improvements to protective infrastructure, and clinical guideline revision. Further malaria outbreaks are likely in the Torres Strait and elsewhere in northern Australia. It is important to maintain awareness and be prepared to respond rapidly. PMID:23186217

  13. Absence of apolipoprotein E protects mice from cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Rainone, Anthony; Fournier, Sylvie; Boilard, Eric; Olivier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria claims the life of millions of people each year, particularly those of children, and is a major global public health problem. Thus, the identification of novel malaria biomarkers that could be utilized as diagnostic or therapeutic targets is becoming increasingly important. Using a proteomic approach, we previously identified unique biomarkers in the sera of malaria-infected individuals, including apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is the dominant apolipoprotein in the brain and has been implicated in several neurological disorders; therefore, we were interested in the potential role of ApoE in cerebral malaria. Here we report the first demonstration that cerebral malaria is markedly attenuated in ApoE−/− mice. The protection provided by the absence of ApoE was associated with decreased sequestration of parasites and T cells within the brain, and was determined to be independent from the involvement of ApoE receptors and from the altered lipid metabolism associated with the knock-out mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of mice with the ApoE antagonist heparin octasaccharide significantly decreased the incidence of cerebral malaria. Overall, our study indicates that the reduction of ApoE could be utilized in the development of therapeutic treatments aimed at mitigating the neuropathology of cerebral malaria. PMID:27647324

  14. Malaria in Tunisian Military Personnel after Returning from External Operation

    PubMed Central

    Ajili, Faïda; Battikh, Riadh; Laabidi, Janet; Abid, Rim; Bousetta, Najeh; Jemli, Bouthaina; Ben abdelhafidh, Nadia; Bassem, Louzir; Gargouri, Saadia; Othmani, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Malaria had been eliminated in Tunisia since 1979, but there are currently 40 to 50 imported cases annually. Soldiers are no exception as the incidence of imported malaria is increasing in Tunisian military personnel after returning from malaria-endemic area, often in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and biological presentations, treatment, and outcomes of 37 Tunisian military personnel hospitalized at the Department of Internal Medicine, the Military Hospital of Tunis, between January 1993 and January 2011, for imported malaria. The clinical and laboratory features were obtained from the medical records and a questionnaire was filled by the patients about the compliance of malaria prophylaxis. Results. Thirty-seven male patients, with a mean age of 41 years, were treated for malaria infection. Twenty-two were due to Plasmodium falciparum. The outcome was favourable for all patients, despite two severe access. The long-term use of chemoprophylaxis has been adopted by only 21 (51%) of expatriate military for daily stresses. Moreover, poor adherence was found in 32 patients. Conclusion. The risk of acquiring malaria infection in Tunisian military personnel can largely be prevented by the regular use of chemoprophylactic drugs combined with protective measures against mosquito bites. PMID:23766922

  15. Malaria in gold-mining areas in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Angélica; Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; Morales-Plaza, Cristhian David; Alzate, Alberto; Padilla, Julio; Arévalo, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-01-01

    Gold-mining may play an important role in the maintenance of malaria worldwide. Gold-mining, mostly illegal, has significantly expanded in Colombia during the last decade in areas with limited health care and disease prevention. We report a descriptive study that was carried out to determine the malaria prevalence in gold-mining areas of Colombia, using data from the public health surveillance system (National Health Institute) during the period 2010-2013. Gold-mining was more prevalent in the departments of Antioquia, Córdoba, Bolívar, Chocó, Nariño, Cauca, and Valle, which contributed 89.3% (270,753 cases) of the national malaria incidence from 2010-2013 and 31.6% of malaria cases were from mining areas. Mining regions, such as El Bagre, Zaragoza, and Segovia, in Antioquia, Puerto Libertador and Montelíbano, in Córdoba, and Buenaventura, in Valle del Cauca, were the most endemic areas. The annual parasite index (API) correlated with gold production (R2 0.82, p < 0.0001); for every 100 kg of gold produced, the API increased by 0.54 cases per 1,000 inhabitants. Lack of malaria control activities, together with high migration and proliferation of mosquito breeding sites, contribute to malaria in gold-mining regions. Specific control activities must be introduced to control this significant source of malaria in Colombia.

  16. Nanomedicine against malaria.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is arguably one of the main medical concerns worldwide because of the numbers of people affected, the severity of the disease and the complexity of the life cycle of its causative agent, the protist Plasmodium sp. The clinical, social and economic burden of malaria has led for the last 100 years to several waves of serious efforts to reach its control and eventual eradication, without success to this day. With the advent of nanoscience, renewed hopes have appeared of finally obtaining the long sought-after magic bullet against malaria in the form of a nanovector for the targeted delivery of antimalarial drugs exclusively to Plasmodium-infected cells. Different types of encapsulating structure, targeting molecule, and antimalarial compound will be discussed for the assembly of Trojan horse nanocapsules capable of targeting with complete specificity diseased cells and of delivering inside them their antimalarial cargo with the objective of eliminating the parasite with a single dose. Nanotechnology can also be applied to the discovery of new antimalarials through single-molecule manipulation approaches for the identification of novel drugs targeting essential molecular components of the parasite. Finally, methods for the diagnosis of malaria can benefit from nanotools applied to the design of microfluidic-based devices for the accurate identification of the parasite's strain, its precise infective load, and the relative content of the different stages of its life cycle, whose knowledge is essential for the administration of adequate therapies. The benefits and drawbacks of these nanosystems will be considered in different possible scenarios, including cost-related issues that might be hampering the development of nanotechnology-based medicines against malaria with the dubious argument that they are too expensive to be used in developing areas.

  17. Early malaria resurgence in pre-elimination areas in Kokap Subdistrict, Kulon Progo, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Indonesia is among those countries committed to malaria eradication, with a continuously decreasing incidence of malaria. However, at district level the situation is different. This study presents a case of malaria resurgence Kokap Subdistrict of the Kulon Progo District in Yogyakarta Province, Java after five years of low endemicity. This study also aims to describe the community perceptions and health services delivery situation that contribute to this case. Methods All malaria cases (2007–2011) in Kulon Progo District were stratified to annual parasite incidence (API). Two-hundred and twenty-six cases during an outbreak (May 2011 to April 2012) were geocoded by household addresses using a geographic information system (GIS) technique and clusters were identified by SaTScan software analysis (Arc GIS 10.1). Purposive random sampling was conducted on respondents living inside the clusters to identify community perceptions and behaviour related to malaria. Interviews were conducted with malaria health officers to understand the challenges of malaria surveillance and control. Results After experiencing three consecutive years with API less than 1 per thousand, malaria in Kokap subdistrict increased almost ten times higher than API in the district level and five times higher than national API. Malaria cases were found in all five villages in 2012. One primary and two secondary malaria clusters in Hargotirto and Kalirejo villages were identified during the 2011–2012 outbreak. Most of the respondents were positively aware with malaria signs and activities of health workers to prevent malaria, although some social economic activities could not be hindered. Return transmigrants or migrant workers entering to their villages, reduced numbers of village malaria workers and a surge in malaria cases in the neighbouring district contributed to the resurgence. Conclusion Community perception, awareness and participation could constitute a solid foundation for

  18. Malaria and HIV among pediatric inpatients in two Tanzanian referral hospitals: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smart, Luke R; Orgenes, Neema; Mazigo, Humphrey D; Minde, Mercy; Hokororo, Adolfine; Shakir, Muhammad; Verweij, Jaco J; Downs, Jennifer A; Peck, Robert N

    2016-07-01

    Malaria remains common in sub-Saharan Africa, but it is frequently over-diagnosed and over-treated in hospitalized children. HIV is prevalent in many malaria endemic areas and may delay parasite clearance and increase mortality among children with malaria. This prospective cohort study enrolled children with suspected malaria between 3 months and 12 years of age hospitalized at two referral hospitals in Tanzania. Both a thick blood smear (BS) and a malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) were performed. If discordant results were obtained, PCR was performed for Plasmodium falciparum. Malaria was confirmed if two out of three tests were positive. Malaria parasite densities were determined for two consecutive days after diagnosis and treatment of malaria. All participants were tested for HIV. Among 1492 hospitalized children, 400 (26.8%) were enrolled with suspected malaria infection. There were 196/400 (49.0%) males, and the median age was 18 [9-36] months. BS was positive in 95/400 (23.8%), and mRDT was positive in 70/400 (17.5%), with moderate agreement (Kappa=0.598). Concordant results excluded malaria in 291/400 (72.8%) and confirmed malaria in 56/400 (14.0%). PCR performed on 53 discordant results confirmed malaria in 1/39 of the BS-positive/mRDT-negative cases, and 6/14 of the BS-negative/mRDT-positive cases. The prevalence of confirmed malaria was 63/400 (15.8%). In multivariable logistic regression, malaria was associated with HIV (OR 3.45 [1.65-7.20], p=0.001). Current breastfeeding (OR 0.25 [0.11-0.56], p=0.001) and higher hemoglobin (OR 0.70 [0.60-0.81], p<0.001 per 1g/dL) were associated with decreased odds of malaria. Malaria parasite clearance was delayed in HIV-infected participants (p<0.001). Malaria is over-diagnosed even at referral centers in high transmission areas. Hospitalized HIV-infected children are more likely to have malaria and exhibit delayed clearance of parasites. Hospitals should consider using mRDTs as a first step for malaria testing

  19. Malaria and HIV among pediatric inpatients in two Tanzanian referral hospitals: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smart, Luke R; Orgenes, Neema; Mazigo, Humphrey D; Minde, Mercy; Hokororo, Adolfine; Shakir, Muhammad; Verweij, Jaco J; Downs, Jennifer A; Peck, Robert N

    2016-07-01

    Malaria remains common in sub-Saharan Africa, but it is frequently over-diagnosed and over-treated in hospitalized children. HIV is prevalent in many malaria endemic areas and may delay parasite clearance and increase mortality among children with malaria. This prospective cohort study enrolled children with suspected malaria between 3 months and 12 years of age hospitalized at two referral hospitals in Tanzania. Both a thick blood smear (BS) and a malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) were performed. If discordant results were obtained, PCR was performed for Plasmodium falciparum. Malaria was confirmed if two out of three tests were positive. Malaria parasite densities were determined for two consecutive days after diagnosis and treatment of malaria. All participants were tested for HIV. Among 1492 hospitalized children, 400 (26.8%) were enrolled with suspected malaria infection. There were 196/400 (49.0%) males, and the median age was 18 [9-36] months. BS was positive in 95/400 (23.8%), and mRDT was positive in 70/400 (17.5%), with moderate agreement (Kappa=0.598). Concordant results excluded malaria in 291/400 (72.8%) and confirmed malaria in 56/400 (14.0%). PCR performed on 53 discordant results confirmed malaria in 1/39 of the BS-positive/mRDT-negative cases, and 6/14 of the BS-negative/mRDT-positive cases. The prevalence of confirmed malaria was 63/400 (15.8%). In multivariable logistic regression, malaria was associated with HIV (OR 3.45 [1.65-7.20], p=0.001). Current breastfeeding (OR 0.25 [0.11-0.56], p=0.001) and higher hemoglobin (OR 0.70 [0.60-0.81], p<0.001 per 1g/dL) were associated with decreased odds of malaria. Malaria parasite clearance was delayed in HIV-infected participants (p<0.001). Malaria is over-diagnosed even at referral centers in high transmission areas. Hospitalized HIV-infected children are more likely to have malaria and exhibit delayed clearance of parasites. Hospitals should consider using mRDTs as a first step for malaria testing

  20. Declining incidence of imported malaria in the Netherlands, 2000-2007

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To describe the epidemiology and trends of imported malaria in the Netherlands from 2000 through 2007. Methods Based on national surveillance data regarding all reported infections of imported malaria, diagnosed 2000 through 2007, incidence and trends of imported malaria in the Netherlands were estimated. Travellers statistics were used to estimate incidence, and data on malaria chemoprophylaxis prescriptions were used to estimate the number of unprotected travellers. Results Importation of malaria to the Netherlands is declining even as more travellers visit malaria-endemic countries. On average, 82% were acquired in sub-Saharan Africa, and 75% were caused by Plasmodium falciparum. The overall incidence in imported falciparum malaria fell from 21.5 to 6.6/10,000 of unprotected travellers. The percentage of unprotected travellers rose from 47% to 52% of all travellers. The incidence of imported falciparum infections is greatest from Middle and West Africa, and decreased from 121.3 to 36.5/10,000 travellers. The import of malaria from this region by immigrants visiting friends and relatives (VFR) decreased from 138 infections in 2000, to 69 infections in 2007. Conclusion The annual number of imported malaria shows a continuing declining trend, even with an increasing number of travellers visiting malaria endemic countries. VFR import less malaria than previously, and contribute largely to the declining incidence seen. The decline is not readily explained by increased use of chemoprophylaxis and may reflect a reduced risk of infection due to decreasing local malaria transmission as observed in some malaria endemic areas. Nevertheless, the increasing number of unprotected travellers remains worrisome. PMID:21029424

  1. Use of Integrated Malaria Management Reduces Malaria in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Okech, Bernard A.; Mwobobia, Isaac K.; Kamau, Anthony; Muiruri, Samuel; Mutiso, Noah; Nyambura, Joyce; Mwatele, Cassian; Amano, Teruaki; Mwandawiro, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Background During an entomological survey in preparation for malaria control interventions in Mwea division, the number of malaria cases at the Kimbimbi sub-district hospital was in a steady decline. The underlying factors for this reduction were unknown and needed to be identified before any malaria intervention tools were deployed in the area. We therefore set out to investigate the potential factors that could have contributed to the decline of malaria cases in the hospital by analyzing the malaria control knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) that the residents in Mwea applied in an integrated fashion, also known as integrated malaria management (IMM). Methods Integrated Malaria Management was assessed among community members of Mwea division, central Kenya using KAP survey. The KAP study evaluated community members' malaria disease management practices at the home and hospitals, personal protection measures used at the household level and malaria transmission prevention methods relating to vector control. Concurrently, we also passively examined the prevalence of malaria parasite infection via outpatient admission records at the major referral hospital in the area. In addition we studied the mosquito vector population dynamics, the malaria sporozoite infection status and entomological inoculation rates (EIR) over an 8 month period in 6 villages to determine the risk of malaria transmission in the entire division. Results A total of 389 households in Mwea division were interviewed in the KAP study while 90 houses were surveyed in the entomological study. Ninety eight percent of the households knew about malaria disease while approximately 70% of households knew its symptoms and methods to manage it. Ninety seven percent of the interviewed households went to a health center for malaria diagnosis and treatment. Similarly a higher proportion (81%) used anti-malarial medicines bought from local pharmacies. Almost 90% of households reported owning and using an

  2. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-10-27

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis.

  3. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis. PMID:26503461

  4. Longitudinal Visuomotor Development in a Malaria Endemic Area: Cerebral Malaria and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Mbale, Emme; Malewa, Macpherson; Czanner, Gabriela; Harding, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    rate was also confirmed in the older, healthy Malawian participants from the cross sectional study. Our observation of similar oculomotor performance in cerebral malaria and control groups at long follow-up periods suggests that cerebral malaria survivors are not at a generally increased risk of persistent cognitive deficits. Our data raise questions about the prevailing hypothesis that cerebral malaria has gross impacts on the development of processes such as attention and behavioural inhibition. More importantly, our novel finding of a clear difference in antisaccade performance between all of the Malawi participants and published data suggests that the Malawian paediatric population as a whole faces serious challenges to cognitive development beyond cerebral malaria. PMID:27764173

  5. Application of loop analysis for evaluation of malaria control interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite continuous efforts and recent rapid expansion in the financing and implementation of malaria control interventions, malaria still remains one of the most devastating global health issues. Even in countries that have been successful in reducing the incidence of malaria, malaria control is becoming more challenging because of the changing epidemiology of malaria and waning community participation in control interventions. In order to improve the effectiveness of interventions and to promote community understanding of the necessity of continued control efforts, there is an urgent need to develop new methodologies that examine the mechanisms by which community-based malaria interventions could reduce local malaria incidence. Methods This study demonstrated how the impact of community-based malaria control interventions on malaria incidence can be examined in complex systems by qualitative analysis combined with an extensive review of literature. First, sign digraphs were developed through loop analysis to analyse seven interventions: source reduction, insecticide/larvicide use, biological control, treatment with anti-malarials, insecticide-treated mosquito net/long-lasting insecticidal net, non-chemical personal protection measures, and educational intervention. Then, for each intervention, the sign digraphs and literature review were combined to analyse a variety of pathways through which the intervention can influence local malaria incidence as well as interactions between variables involved in the system. Through loop analysis it is possible to see whether increases in one variable qualitatively increases or decreases other variables or leaves them unchanged and the net effect of multiple, interacting variables. Results Qualitative analysis, specifically loop analysis, can be a useful tool to examine the impact of community-based malaria control interventions. Without relying on numerical data, the analysis was able to describe pathways through

  6. Forecasting paediatric malaria admissions on the Kenya Coast using rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Karuri, Stella Wanjugu; Snow, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria is a vector-borne disease which, despite recent scaled-up efforts to achieve control in Africa, continues to pose a major threat to child survival. The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium and requires mosquitoes and humans for transmission. Rainfall is a major factor in seasonal and secular patterns of malaria transmission along the East African coast. Objective The goal of the study was to develop a model to reliably forecast incidences of paediatric malaria admissions to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH). Design In this article, we apply several statistical models to look at the temporal association between monthly paediatric malaria hospital admissions, rainfall, and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures. Trend and seasonally adjusted, marginal and multivariate, time-series models for hospital admissions were applied to a unique data set to examine the role of climate, seasonality, and long-term anomalies in predicting malaria hospital admission rates and whether these might become more or less predictable with increasing vector control. Results The proportion of paediatric admissions to KDH that have malaria as a cause of admission can be forecast by a model which depends on the proportion of malaria admissions in the previous 2 months. This model is improved by incorporating either the previous month's Indian Ocean Dipole information or the previous 2 months’ rainfall. Conclusions Surveillance data can help build time-series prediction models which can be used to anticipate seasonal variations in clinical burdens of malaria in stable transmission areas and aid the timing of malaria vector control. PMID:26842613

  7. The distinctive features of Indian malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparup

    2015-03-01

    Malaria and factors driving malaria are heterogeneous in India, unlike in other countries, and the epidemiology of malaria therefore is considered 'highly complex'. This complexity is primarily attributed to several unique features of the malaria parasites, mosquito vectors, malaria-susceptible populations, and ecoclimatic variables in India. Recent research on the genetic epidemiology of Indian malaria parasites has been successful in partly unraveling the mysteries underlying these complexities.

  8. Malaria control in Nepal 1963–2012: challenges on the path towards elimination

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria is still a priority public health problem of Nepal where about 84% of the population are at risk. The aim of this paper is to highlight the past and present malaria situation in this country and its challenges for long-term malaria elimination strategies. Methods Malariometric indicator data of Nepal recorded through routine surveillance of health facilities for the years between 1963 and 2012 were compiled. Trends and differences in malaria indicator data were analysed. Results The trend of confirmed malaria cases in Nepal between 1963 and 2012 shows fluctuation, with a peak in 1985 when the number exceeded 42,321, representing the highest malaria case-load ever recorded in Nepal. This was followed by a steep declining trend of malaria with some major outbreaks. Nepal has made significant progress in controlling malaria transmission over the past decade: total confirmed malaria cases declined by 84% (12,750 in 2002 vs 2,092 in 2012), and there was only one reported death in 2012. Based on the evaluation of the National Malaria Control Programme in 2010, Nepal recently adopted a long-term malaria elimination strategy for the years 2011–2026 with the ambitious vision of a malaria-free Nepal by 2026. However, there has been an increasing trend of Plasmodium falciparum and imported malaria proportions in the last decade. Furthermore, the analysis of malariometric indicators of 31 malaria-risk districts between 2004 and 2012 shows a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of confirmed malaria and of Plasmodium vivax, but not in the incidence of P. falciparum and clinically suspected malaria. Conclusions Based on the achievements the country has made over the last decade, Nepal is preparing to move towards malaria elimination by 2026. However, considerable challenges lie ahead. These include especially, the need to improve access to diagnostic facilities to confirm clinically suspected cases and their treatment, the development of

  9. Estimates of child deaths prevented from malaria prevention scale-up in Africa 2001-2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Funding from external agencies for malaria control in Africa has increased dramatically over the past decade resulting in substantial increases in population coverage by effective malaria prevention interventions. This unprecedented effort to scale-up malaria interventions is likely improving child survival and will likely contribute to meeting Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 to reduce the < 5 mortality rate by two thirds between 1990 and 2015. Methods The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) model was used to quantify the likely impact that malaria prevention intervention scale-up has had on malaria mortality over the past decade (2001-2010) across 43 malaria endemic countries in sub-Saharan African. The likely impact of ITNs and malaria prevention interventions in pregnancy (intermittent preventive treatment [IPTp] and ITNs used during pregnancy) over this period was assessed. Results The LiST model conservatively estimates that malaria prevention intervention scale-up over the past decade has prevented 842,800 (uncertainty: 562,800-1,364,645) child deaths due to malaria across 43 malaria-endemic countries in Africa, compared to a baseline of the year 2000. Over the entire decade, this represents an 8.2% decrease in the number of malaria-caused child deaths that would have occurred over this period had malaria prevention coverage remained unchanged since 2000. The biggest impact occurred in 2010 with a 24.4% decrease in malaria-caused child deaths compared to what would have happened had malaria prevention interventions not been scaled-up beyond 2000 coverage levels. ITNs accounted for 99% of the lives saved. Conclusions The results suggest that funding for malaria prevention in Africa over the past decade has had a substantial impact on decreasing child deaths due to malaria. Rapidly achieving and then maintaining universal coverage of these interventions should be an urgent priority for malaria control programmes in the future. Successful scale-up in many

  10. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.

    PubMed

    Visser, Theodoor; Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them.

  11. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them. PMID:26668438

  12. A co-infection model of malaria and cholera diseases with optimal control.

    PubMed

    Okosun, K O; Makinde, O D

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for malaria-cholera co-infection in order to investigate their synergistic relationship in the presence of treatments. We first analyze the single infection steady states, calculate the basic reproduction number and then investigate the existence and stability of equilibria. We then analyze the co-infection model, which is found to exhibit backward bifurcation. The impact of malaria and its treatment on the dynamics of cholera is further investigated. Secondly, we incorporate time dependent controls, using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle to derive necessary conditions for the optimal control of the disease. We found that malaria infection may be associated with an increased risk of cholera but however, cholera infection is not associated with an increased risk for malaria. Therefore, to effectively control malaria, the malaria intervention strategies by policy makers must at the same time also include cholera control.

  13. Climate Change and Vector-borne Diseases: An Economic Impact Analysis of Malaria in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Musumba, Mark; McCarl, Bruce A.; Wu, Ximing

    2011-01-01

    A semi-parametric econometric model is used to study the relationship between malaria cases and climatic factors in 25 African countries. Results show that a marginal change in temperature and precipitation levels would lead to a significant change in the number of malaria cases for most countries by the end of the century. Consistent with the existing biophysical malaria model results, the projected effects of climate change are mixed. Our model projects that some countries will see an increase in malaria cases but others will see a decrease. We estimate projected malaria inpatient and outpatient treatment costs as a proportion of annual 2000 health expenditures per 1,000 people. We found that even under minimal climate change scenario, some countries may see their inpatient treatment cost of malaria increase more than 20%. PMID:21556186

  14. Importance of adequate local spatiotemporal transmission measures in malaria cohort studies: application to the relation between placental malaria and first malaria infection in infants.

    PubMed

    Le Port, Agnès; Cottrell, Gilles; Chandre, Fabrice; Cot, Michel; Massougbodji, Achille; Garcia, André

    2013-07-01

    According to several studies, infants whose mothers had a malaria-infected placenta (MIP) at delivery are at increased risk of a first malaria infection. Immune tolerance caused by intrauterine contact with the parasite could explain this phenomenon, but it is also known that infants who are highly exposed to Anopheles mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium are at greater risk of contracting malaria. Consequently, local malaria transmission must be taken into account to demonstrate the immune tolerance hypothesis. From data collected between 2007 and 2010 on 545 infants followed from birth to age 18 months in southern Benin, we compared estimates of the effect of MIP on time to first malaria infection obtained through different Cox models. In these models, MIP was adjusted for either 1) "village-like" time-independent exposure variables or 2) spatiotemporal exposure prediction derived from local climatic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Only the use of exposure prediction improved the model's goodness of fit (Bayesian Information Criterion) and led to clear conclusions regarding the effect of placental infection, whereas the models using the village-like variables were less successful than the univariate model. This demonstrated clearly the benefit of adequately taking transmission into account in cohort studies of malaria.