Science.gov

Sample records for male fertility endpoints

  1. [Obesity and male fertility].

    PubMed

    Martini, Ana C; Molina, Rosa I; Ruiz, Rubén D; Fiol de Cuneo, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and male infertility have increased in the last decades; therefore, a possible association between these pathologies has been explored. Studies inform that obesity may affect fertility through different mechanisms, which alltogether could exert erectile dysfunction and/or sperm quality impairment. These include: 1) hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPG) axis malfunction: obese hormonal profile is characterized by reduction of testosterone, gonadotrophins, SHBG and/or inhibin B concentrations (marker of Sertoli cells function) and hyperestrogenemy (consequence of aromatase overactivity ascribed to adipose tissue increase); 2) increased release of adipose-derived hormones: leptin increase could be responsible for some of the alterations on the HPG axis and could also exert direct deleterious effects on Leydig cells physiology, spermatogenesis and sperm function; 3) proinflammatory adipokines augmentation, higher scrotal temperature (due to fat accumulation in areas surrounding testes) and endocrine disruptors accumulation in adiposites, all of these responsible for the increase in testes oxidative stress and 4) sleep apnea, frequent in obese patients, suppresses the nocturnal testosterone rise needed for normal spermatogenesis. Finally, although controversial, all the above mentioned factors could comprise gametes quality; i.e. decrease sperm density and motility and increase DNA fragmentation, probably disturbing spermatogenesis and/or epididymal function. In summary, although obesity may impair male fertility by some/all of the described mechanisms, the fact is that only a small proportion of obese men are infertile, probably those genetically predisposed or morbidly obese. Nevertheless, it is likely that because the incidence of obesity is growing, the number of men with reduced fertility will increase as well.

  2. [Prolactin and male fertility].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, G; Börner, A; Lauterbach, H; Thiel, W

    1983-03-01

    On 68 selected patients with disturbances of the potentia generandi et/sive coeundi (25 males with healthy metabolism and 43 males with diabetes) as well as 14 control persons PRL, LH, FSH, testosterone and oestradiol were determined radioimmunologically and the results were ascribed to sexological, clinical, spermatological and testo-histological findings. A statistically secure correlation was found between PRL values and disturbance of the libido as well as the presence of a gynaecomasty. PRL did not correlate with the spermatological variables volume of ejaculate, relative and absolute number of spermatozoa and motility. PRL did also not correlate with the testohistological findings. A relation between PRL and the peptide hormones LH and FSH as well as the steroid hormones testosterone and oestradiol could not be ascertained. Therefore the diagnostic values of a PRL determination is much limited; the pertinency of a hyperprolactinaemia may be increased by the proof of the symptoms reduction of libido and gynaecomasty with simultaneous disturbance of fertility. In our opinion the definition of hyperprolactinaemia needs revision, since at only determination of the basal value of more than 800 mU/l no more frequently pathologically andrological findings are to be observed than below 200 mU/l.

  3. Male Fertility Issues

    Cancer.gov

    Fertility issues are common in boys and men getting cancer treatment. Fertility preservation options include sperm banking, testicular shielding, testicular sperm extraction (TESE), and testicular tissue freezing. Support and clinical trials are listed.

  4. Optimizing Male Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications ...

  5. Fertility regulation in the male

    PubMed Central

    de Kretser, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The current state of research into new methods of male contraception is reviewed, with special emphasis on the efforts of the WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. The article concentrates mainly on the development of orally administered or injectable substances capable of either (a) interfering with the hormonal control of testicular function, (b) disrupting spermatogenesis by direct influence on testis function, or (c) interfering with the fertilizing ability of the sperm and their transport. It is concluded that, despite the numerous areas of research currently being pursued, the availability of a new male contraceptive remains several years away. PMID:308403

  6. Effects of male sexual maturity of reproductive endpoints relevant to DART studies in Wistar Hannover rats.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Ikuro; Creasy, Dianne M; Yokoi, Ryohei; Terashima, Yukari; Onozato, Tomoya; Maruyama, Yoshimasa; Chino, Tomonobu; Tahara, Toru; Tamura, Toru; Kuroda, Junji; Kusama, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Wistar Hannover rats have been utilized as one of major strains in regulatory toxicology studies. This study was performed to verify the appropriate age of male sexual maturity in the development and reproductive toxicity (DART) study in Wistar Hannover rats (RccHan:WIST) by comparing reproductive endpoints between 8, 10 and 12 weeks of ages. Although fertility showed a tendency toward decrease in 8-week-old males, copulation index was not different among three ages. Testis weights reached a plateau at 10 weeks of age, whereas weights of other reproductive organs developed until 12 weeks of age. Indices of spermatogenesis (sperm motility, number of sperm in the epididymis and testis and contents of morphologically abnormal sperm) showed age-related progress and did not fully develop except for 12-week-old. For histology, epididymal tubules in 8-week-old animals showed immaturity with tall epithelium. At cesarean section, dams mated with 8-week-old males showed high incidence of preimplantation loss and the number of live fetuses was less than 10. In conclusion, although reproductive performance attained maturity by age of 10 weeks, spermatogenesis was not fully established at 10-week-old, which could result in a low fertility index. Therefore, we recommend that Wistar Hannover male rats at 12-week-old or older are used to conduct DART study properly and evaluate any adverse effects on dams and embryo-fetal development.

  7. Genetic basis of male fertility.

    PubMed

    Hargreave, T B

    2000-01-01

    We are in the age of genetic discovery. Now the human genome has been completely sequenced1, there will be increasing understanding and ability to manipulate biochemical pathways downstream of genes. At the same time, further development of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI) will enable procreation in situations that were formerly impossible and when there may be an increased possibility of genetic abnormality. Furthermore, preimplantation diagnosis will enable defects to be diagnosed and will give the opportunity for the couple to decide whether to continue with treatment towards a pregnancy or not. Thus, there is a need for clinicians to have a good knowledge of the gentics and hereditary aspects of male (and indeed female) infertility and for couples to have access to correct information and expert counselling. Also, there are ethical implications of these scientific and clinical advances for the future child, the individual, the couple and society. There is increasing public unease about this new science of reproduction and, in the UK, there is regulation by law; thus, there is a need for clinicians and scientists to give accurate information in everday language to the public.

  8. Increased male fertility using fertility-related biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Ryu, Do-Yeal; Park, Yoo-Jin; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    Conventional semen analyses are used to evaluate male factor fertility/infertility in humans and other animals. However, their clinical value remains controversial. Therefore, new tools that more accurately assess male fertility based on sperm function and fertilization mechanism are of interest worldwide. While protein markers in spermatozoa that might help differentiate fertile and infertile sperm have been identified, studies are in their infancy, and the markers require validation in field trials. In the present study, to discover more sensitive biomarkers in spermatozoa for predicting male fertility, we assessed protein expression in capacitated spermatozoa. The results demonstrated that cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit 2 (UQCRC2) was abundantly expressed in high-litter size spermatozoa (>3-fold). On the other hand, equatorin, beta-tubulin, cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit 1 (UQCRC1), speriolin, Ras-related protein Rab-2A (RAB2A), spermadhesin AQN-3, and seminal plasma sperm motility inhibitor were abundantly expressed in low-litter size spermatozoa (>3-fold). Moreover, RAB2A and UQCRC1 expression negatively correlated with litter size, while UQCRC2 expression positively correlated with litter size. Finally, the putative biomarkers predicted litter size in field trials. Our study suggests that biomarkers present in spermatozoa after capacitation can help differentiate superior male fertility from below-average fertility with high sensitivity. PMID:26489431

  9. Male Influences on Fertility: Needs for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marciano, Teresa Donati

    1979-01-01

    A study comparing the processes of arriving at fertility decisions in marriage shows that the husband's preference for children or for childlessness controls more often than the wife's preference in either case. Using two childless samples and one sample with children, the strong effect of male preference was found. (Author)

  10. Properties of maximum likelihood male fertility estimation in plant populations.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M T

    1998-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to evaluate maximum likelihood methods for inferring male fertility in plant populations. The maximum likelihood method can provide substantial power to characterize male fertilities at the population level. Results emphasize, however, the importance of adequate experimental design and evaluation of fertility estimates, as well as limitations to inference (e.g., about the variance in male fertility or the correlation between fertility and phenotypic trait value) that can be reasonably drawn. PMID:9611217

  11. Zinc feeding and fertility of male rats.

    PubMed

    Samanta, K; Pal, B

    1986-01-01

    Supplementation of the diet of adult male rats with 4,000 ppm zinc as ZnSO4 for 30 to 32 days increased the zinc content in the testis and sperm by 25 and 18 per cent respectively, but did not change the same in accessory reproductive tissues, e.g. epididymis, seminal vesicle and prostate. The incidence of conception from mating between normal females and zinc fed males was lower as compared to mating between normal females and control males. This observation indicated reduced fertility of the males resulting from additional zinc ingestion. Motility of the sperm collected from the epididymis (tail) of the zinc treated rats was found to be inhibited. It has been suggested that excess zinc in the sperm was responsible for their poor motility and hence a reduced fertilising capacity.

  12. Sexually transmitted infections: impact on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, F R

    2008-04-01

    The impact of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) on male fertility is strongly dependent on the local prevalence of the STDs. In Western countries STD-infections are of minor relevance. In other regions, i.e. Africa or South East Asia, the situation appears to be different. Acute urethritis could not be associated with male infertility. Chronic infections (gonorrhoea) can cause urethral strictures and epididymo-orchitis. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea can be transmitted to the female partner and cause pelvic inflammatory disease with tubal obstruction. Ureaplasma urealyticum may impair spermatozoa (motility, DNA condensation). Trichomonas vaginalis has, if any, only minor influence on male fertility. The relevance of viral infections (HPV, HSV) for male infertility is not resolved. Any STD increases the chances of transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The HIV infection is associated with infectious semen and the risk of virus transmission. Semen quality deteriorates with the progression of immunodeficiency. Special counselling of serodiscordant couples is needed. STDs should be treated early and adequately to prevent late sequelae for both men and women.

  13. Male fertility preservation before gonadotoxic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wyns, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recent advances in cancer therapy have resulted in an increased number of long-term cancer survivors. Unfortunately, aggressive chemotherapy, radiotherapy and preparative regimens for bone marrow transplantation can severely affect male germ cells, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), and lead to permanent loss of fertility. Different options for fertility preservation are dependent on the pubertal state of the patient. Methods: Relevant studies were identified by an extensive Medline search of English and French language articles. Results: Sperm cryopreservation prior to gonadotoxic treatment is a well established method after puberty. In case of ejaculation failure by masturbation, assisted ejaculation methods or testicular tissue sampling should be considered. Although no effective gonadoprotective drug is yet available for in vivo spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) protection in humans, current evidence supports the feasibility of immature testicular tissue (ITT) cryopreservation. The different cryopreservation protocols and available fertility restoration options from frozen tissue, i.e. cell suspension transplantation, tissue grafting and in vitro maturation, are presented. Results obtained in humans are discussed in the light of lessons learned from animal studies. Conclusion: Advances in reproductive technology have made fertility preservation a real possibility in young patients whose gonadal function is threatened by gonadotoxic therapies. The putative indications for such techniques, as well as their limitations according to disease, are outlined. PMID:25302103

  14. Development of male-fertility-regulating agents.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Verma, P; Kumar, A

    1991-09-01

    Steroidal, nonsteroidal, plant-derived, gonadotropin-related and immunological agents investigated for control of male fertility are reviewed with brief descriptions of their effects, and illustrations of their structures. The physiology of the male reproductive system is presented as an introduction: an ideal male antifertility agent would inhibit spermatogenesis at the level of the Sertoli cells, without affecting endogenous androgen production by Leydig cells, needed for libido and potency. Androgens down-regulate their own production at physiological levels, but few long-acting orally active derivatives are available. Anti-androgens with mixed androgen and progestin activity, combined with a pure androgen are potentially useful. Androgen-progestin combinations are being tested by WHO as implants. Dozens of miscellaneous nonsteroidal compounds have been discovered serendipitously to have antifertility activity in men or male animals, including alkylating agents antimetabolites, antibiotics, sulfa derivatives, fungicides, trichomonocides, amebicides, alpha blockers, antimalarials, coumarins, and carbohydrate derivatives. Various plant alkaloids have been screened. Those of Hibiscus, Vitex and Plumbago species, as well as Tripterygium wilfordii glycosides, which are being evaluated in combination with gossypol, are mentioned here. Gossypol has been thoroughly tested in China, but rejected because of its side effects, particularly hypokalemic paralysis, its low therapeutic index, and uncertain recovery of fertility. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists and antagonists are being researched in combination with androgens with some success. The GnRH antagonists to date have low activity , or cause histamine-related side effects at higher doses; the androgens require a new route such as a long-acting implant to overcome the need for daily injections. Immunological contraception for males has not progressed beyond the research stage.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Male-Fertility Restoration in CMS Onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS) systems. For the most commonly used CMS, male-sterile (S) cytoplasm interacts with a dominant allele at one nuclear male-fertility restoration locus (Ms) to condition male fertility. We are using proteomics ...

  16. Proteomic analyses of male-fertility restoration in CMS onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS) systems. For the most commonly used CMS, male-sterile (S) cytoplasm interacts with a dominant allele at one nuclear male-fertility restoration locus (Ms) to condition male fertility. We are using a proteomics ...

  17. Assessment of environmental factors affecting male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, R. L.; Sherins, R. J.; Lee, I. P.

    1979-01-01

    boron displayed a significant loss of germinal elements, although most of the Leydig and Sertoli cells appeared normal. Testicular atrophy was associated with a decrease in seminiferous tubular diameter and a marked reduction of spermatocytes and spermatogenic cells. These morphologic alterations were associated with a concomitant reduction of H, SDH, and LDH-X specific activities. In contrast, the specific activities of G3PDH and MDH were significantly elevated above control. The increase in these enzyme activities can be attributed to the relative enrichment of spermatogonial cells during the loss of spermatocytes and spermiogenic cells. Boron-induced male germinal aplasia was also associated with significantly elevated plasma FSH while plasma LH and testosterone levels were not significantly altered. Plasma testosterone levels were unaltered. Male fertility studies demonstrated that at the 500 ppm boron level, fertility was unaffected. However, at 1000 and 2000 ppm boron, male fertility was significantly reduced. Most effects were reversible within 5 weeks. However, the male group receiving 2000 ppm boron for 60 days remained sterile. There was no dose-related decrease in litter size or fetal death in utero. Therefore, the boron-induced infertility was apparently not due to a dominant lethal effect but rather to germinal aplasia. Boron appears toxic to spermatogenic cells at testicular concentrations of 6–8 ppm. ImagesFIGURE 6.FIGURE 9. PMID:446458

  18. INFLUENCE OF MALE OBESITY ON FERTILITY.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Anić-Jurica, Sonja; Čehić, Ermin; Klepac-Pulanić, Tajana; Juras, Josip; Žužul, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this review is to analyze current diagnostic approaches to obesity in adult men, the potential mechanisms linking obesity to infertility, and treatment options aimed at improving reproductive health. Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic with the estimated prevalence increasing from 28.8% to 36.9% between 1980 and 2013. In terms of diagnosis, numerous simple techniques have been developed including body mass index, waist to hip ratio, waist circumference, bioelectrical impedance analysis, ultrasound and skinfold measurements. Additionally, several other less available but more accurate techniques have been suggested, such as air displacement plethysmography, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to cardiovascular and other disorders, male obesity can negatively affect the male reproductive potential through abnormal reproductive hormone levels, reduced semen quality, increased release of adipose-derived hormones and adipokines, as well as thermal, genetic and sexual mechanisms. In the management of obesity related male infertility, natural weight loss is the cornerstone and regular exercise the first-line treatment. Although bariatric surgery results in greater improvements in weight loss outcomes when compared to non-surgical interventions, further research is required to clarify its overall influence on male fertility.

  19. [Male fertility after chemotherapy during childhood].

    PubMed

    Aubier, F; Patte, C; de Vathaire, F; Tournade, M F; Oberlin, O; Sakiroglu, O; Lemerle, J

    1995-01-01

    Chemotherapy has considerably improved the prognosis of solid tumours in children, but may have very adverse effects, particularly on fertility. A study was conducted at the Gustave Roussy Institute to identify the toxic effect of chemotherapy on male fertility. At present, 205 patients, treated during childhood have entered the study. Basal FSH-LH have been assayed to assess possible germ cell damage although azoosperia can not be eliminated. Results were normal in 127 patients (62%) and increased basal FSH levels were found in 78 (38%). Endocrine function was not altered: all patients were either impubertal or intrapubertal at diagnosis and subsequently achieved normal puberty. Multivariate analysis revealed an obvious toxic effect of 2 alkylating drugs: cyclophosphamide and procarbazine. No toxic effect was observed for vincristine, dohorubicin or actinomycin D. Age and pubertal status at diagnosis were not correlated with toxic effects. At present, no conclusion for other drugs may be made but results high dose metotrexate are promising. For lomustine and cisplatin, less favourable, though nonsignificant, results have been obtained. Complete recovery is possible several years later.

  20. Tapetum and middle layer control male fertility in Actinidia deliciosa

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, Giuseppina; D'Angeli, Simone; Biasi, Rita; Fattorini, Laura; Matteucci, Maja; Canini, Antonella; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Dioecism characterizes many crop species of economic value, including kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa). Kiwifruit male sterility occurs at the microspore stage. The cell walls of the microspores and the pollen of the male-sterile and male-fertile flowers, respectively, differ in glucose and galactose levels. In numerous plants, pollen formation involves normal functioning and degeneration timing of the tapetum, with calcium and carbohydrates provided by the tapetum essential for male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine whether the anther wall controls male fertility in kiwifruit, providing calcium and carbohydrates to the microspores. Methods The events occurring in the anther wall and microspores of male-fertile and male-sterile anthers were investigated by analyses of light microscopy, epifluorescence, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay) and transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron spectroscopy. The possibility that male sterility was related to anther tissue malfunctioning with regard to calcium/glucose/galactose provision to the microspores was also investigated by in vitro anther culture. Key Results Both tapetum and the middle layer showed secretory activity and both degenerated by programmed cell death (PCD), but PCD was later in male-sterile than in male-fertile anthers. Calcium accumulated in cell walls of the middle layer and tapetum and in the exine of microspores and pollen, reaching higher levels in anther wall tissues and dead microspores of male-sterile anthers. A specific supply of glucose and calcium induced normal pollen formation in in vitro-cultured anthers of the male-sterile genotype. Conclusions The results show that male sterility in kiwifruit is induced by anther wall tissues through prolonged secretory activity caused by a delay in PCD, in the middle layer in particular. In vitro culture results support the sporophytic control of male fertility

  1. Tapetum and middle layer control male fertility in Actinidia deliciosa.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Giuseppina; D'Angeli, Simone; Biasi, Rita; Fattorini, Laura; Matteucci, Maja; Canini, Antonella; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2013-10-01

    Dioecism characterizes many crop species of economic value, including kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa). Kiwifruit male sterility occurs at the microspore stage. The cell walls of the microspores and the pollen of the male-sterile and male-fertile flowers, respectively, differ in glucose and galactose levels. In numerous plants, pollen formation involves normal functioning and degeneration timing of the tapetum, with calcium and carbohydrates provided by the tapetum essential for male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine whether the anther wall controls male fertility in kiwifruit, providing calcium and carbohydrates to the microspores. The events occurring in the anther wall and microspores of male-fertile and male-sterile anthers were investigated by analyses of light microscopy, epifluorescence, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay) and transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron spectroscopy. The possibility that male sterility was related to anther tissue malfunctioning with regard to calcium/glucose/galactose provision to the microspores was also investigated by in vitro anther culture. Both tapetum and the middle layer showed secretory activity and both degenerated by programmed cell death (PCD), but PCD was later in male-sterile than in male-fertile anthers. Calcium accumulated in cell walls of the middle layer and tapetum and in the exine of microspores and pollen, reaching higher levels in anther wall tissues and dead microspores of male-sterile anthers. A specific supply of glucose and calcium induced normal pollen formation in in vitro-cultured anthers of the male-sterile genotype. The results show that male sterility in kiwifruit is induced by anther wall tissues through prolonged secretory activity caused by a delay in PCD, in the middle layer in particular. In vitro culture results support the sporophytic control of male fertility in kiwifruit and open the way to applications to

  2. The insults of illicit drug use on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Fronczak, Carolyn M; Kim, Edward D; Barqawi, Al B

    2012-01-01

    One-third of infertile couples may have a male factor present. Illicit drug use can be an important cause of male factor infertility and includes use of anabolic-androgenic steroids, marijuana, opioid narcotics, cocaine, and methamphetamines. The use of these illicit drugs is common in the United States, with a yearly prevalence rate for any drug consistently higher in males compared with females. We aim to provide a review of recent literature on the prevalence and effects of illicit drug use on male fertility and to aid health professionals when counseling infertile men whose social history suggests illicit drug use. Anabolic-androgenic steroids, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamines, and opioid narcotics all negatively impact male fertility, and adverse effects have been reported on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, sperm function, and testicular structure. The use of illicit drugs is prevalent in our society and likely adversely impacting the fertility of men who abuse drugs.

  3. Citrus limon extract: possible inhibitory mechanisms affecting testicular functions and fertility in male mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The effect of oral administration of 50% ethanolic leaf extract of Citrus limon (500 and 1,000 mg/kg body weight/day) for 35 days on fertility and various male reproductive endpoints was evaluated in Parkes strain of mice. Testicular indices such as histology, 3β- and 17β-HSD enzymes activity, immunoblot expression of StAR and P450scc, and germ cell apoptosis by TUNEL and CASP- 3 expression were assessed. Motility, viability, and number of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymidis, level of serum testosterone, fertility indices, and toxicological parameters were also evaluated. Histologically, testes in extract-treated mice showed nonuniform degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules. Treatment had adverse effects on steroidogenic markers in the testis and induced germ cell apoptosis. Significant reductions were noted in epididymal sperm parameters and serum level of testosterone in Citrus-treated mice compared to controls. Fertility of the extract-treated males was also suppressed, but libido remained unaffected. By 56 days of treatment withdrawal, alterations induced in the above parameters returned to control levels suggesting that Citrus treatment causes reversible suppression of spermatogenesis and fertility in Parkes mice. Suppression of spermatogenesis may result from germ cell apoptosis because of decreased production of testosterone. The present work indicated that Citrus leaves can affect male reproduction.

  4. Experimental Methods to Preserve Male Fertility and Treat Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Gassei, Kathrin; Orwig, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a prevalent condition that has insidious impacts on the infertile individuals, their families and society that extend far beyond the inability to have a biological child. Lifestyle changes, fertility treatments and assisted reproductive technologies are available to help many infertile couples achieve their reproductive goals. All of these technologies require that the infertile individual is able to produce at least a small number of functional gametes (eggs or sperm). It is not possible for a person who does not produce gametes to have a biological child. This review focuses on the infertile man and describes several stem cell-based methods and gene therapy approaches that are in the research pipeline and may lead to new fertility treatment options for azoospermic men. PMID:26746133

  5. Nutlin-3a Decreases Male Fertility via UQCRC2

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Kamla Kant; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Park, Yoo-Jin; You, Young-Ah; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinol-cytochrome-c reductase core protein 2 (UQCRC2) is a component of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase complex that is known to correlate with male fertility via spermatogenesis. Simultaneously, nutlin-3a is a small molecule antagonist of mouse double minute 2 repressor (MDM2), activate p53 and induce apoptosis responsible for spermatogenesis. To date, however there are no known effects of nutlin-3a on reproduction. Therefore, present study was designed to investigate the effect of nutlin-3a on male fertility via UQCRC2. In this in vitro trial with mice spermatozoa, we utilized CASA, CTC staining, ATP assay, western blotting, and IVF to measure the main study outcome. The short-term exposure of spermatozoa in nutlin-3a decreases sperm motion kinematics, intracellular ATP production, capacitation, the acrosome reaction, UQCRC2, and tyrosine phosphorylation (TYP) of sperm proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the decreased UQCRC2 and TYP were associated with reduced sperm kinematics, ATP production, and capacitation, which ultimately led to adverse effects on male fertility such as poor fertilization rates and embryo development. Thus, nutlin-3a may be considered as a potential male contraceptive agent due to its ability to decrease fertility secondary to changes in overall sperm physiology and embryonic development. However, the results of this preliminary study have to be confirmed by additional independent trial. PMID:24130818

  6. Fertility in a male with trisomy 21.

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, R; Llerena, J; Matkins, S; Debenham, P; Cawood, A; Bobrow, M

    1989-01-01

    We review the published reports on reproduction in cases of non-mosaic trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome) and present the first fully documented case of a non-mosaic male with Down's syndrome fathering a pregnancy, a fact which has important implications in the light of caring for these people in the community. Images PMID:2567354

  7. DEFINING THE SPERMATOZOA RNA FINGERPRINT FOR THE NORMAL FERTILE MALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defining the spermatozoa RNA fingerprint for the normal fertile male
    G. Charles Ostermeier1, David Dix2, David Miller3, and Stephen A. Krawetz1

    1Departments of Ob/Gyn, CMMG & ISC, Wayne State University, USA.
    2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Pr...

  8. DEFINING THE SPERMATOZOA RNA FINGERPRINT FOR THE NORMAL FERTILE MALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defining the spermatozoa RNA fingerprint for the normal fertile male
    G. Charles Ostermeier1, David Dix2, David Miller3, and Stephen A. Krawetz1

    1Departments of Ob/Gyn, CMMG & ISC, Wayne State University, USA.
    2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Pr...

  9. Regulation of male fertility by X-linked genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ke; Yang, Fang; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem, affecting men and women about equally. Mouse genetic studies demonstrate that more than 200 genes specifically or predominantly regulate fertility. However, few genetic causes of infertility in humans have been identified. Here, we focus on the regulation of male fertility by X-linked, germ cell-specific genes. Previous genomic studies reveal that the mammalian X chromosome is enriched for genes expressed in early spermatogenesis. Recent genetic studies in mice show that X-linked, germ cell-specific genes, such as A-kinase anchor protein 4 (Akap4), nuclear RNA export factor 2 (Nxf2), TBP-associated factor 7l (Taf7l), and testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11), indeed play important roles in the regulation of male fertility. Moreover, we find that the Taf7l Tex11 double-mutant males exhibit much more severe defects in meiosis than either single mutant, suggesting that these 2 X-linked genes regulate male meiosis synergistically. The X-linked, germ cell-specific genes are particularly attractive in the study of male infertility in humans. Because males are hemizygous for X-linked genes, loss-of-function mutations in the single-copy X-linked genes, unlike in autosomal genes, would not be masked by a normal allele. The genetic studies of X-linked, germ cell-specific genes in mice have laid a foundation for mutational analysis of their human orthologues in infertile men.

  10. Sperm wars and the evolution of male fertility.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Leigh W; Fitzpatrick, John L

    2012-11-01

    Females frequently mate with several males, whose sperm then compete to fertilize available ova. Sperm competition represents a potent selective force that is expected to shape male expenditure on the ejaculate. Here, we review empirical data that illustrate the evolutionary consequences of sperm competition. Sperm competition favors the evolution of increased testes size and sperm production. In some species, males appear capable of adjusting the number of sperm ejaculated, depending on the perceived levels of sperm competition. Selection is also expected to act on sperm form and function, although the evidence for this remains equivocal. Comparative studies suggest that sperm length and swimming speed may increase in response to selection from sperm competition. However, the mechanisms driving this pattern remain unclear. Evidence that sperm length influences sperm swimming speed is mixed and fertilization trials performed across a broad range of species demonstrate inconsistent relationships between sperm form and function. This ambiguity may in part reflect the important role that seminal fluid proteins (sfps) play in affecting sperm function. There is good evidence that sfps are subject to selection from sperm competition, and recent work is pointing to an ability of males to adjust their seminal fluid chemistry in response to sperm competition from rival males. We argue that future research must consider sperm and seminal fluid components of the ejaculate as a functional unity. Research at the genomic level will identify the genes that ultimately control male fertility.

  11. [Therapy of male fertility disorders with kallikrein].

    PubMed

    Schill, W B

    1976-11-26

    An overview of the use of kallikrein to treat male sterility is presented. Kallikrein was shown to increase sperm motility in both in vivo and in vitro studies. The vitality and longevity of the sperm are also enhanced. These effects are due to the stimulation of the intracellular concentration of cyclical adenosonemonophosphates in the sperm. Quinine receptors on the sperm surface are assumed to be the mechanism responsible for the kallikrein effect. Kallikrein stimulates spermal penetration of cervical mucus by about 80% and causes a significant increase in total sperm output 3 months from the beginning of treatment. After 2 months of use, kallikrein leads to an increase in the number of normally formed spermatozoa in the ejaculate. Kallikrein is indicated in cases of asthenospermia and oligozoospermia, in some cases of teratozoospermia, in cases of the vegetative-functional congestion syndrome desecribed by Hoffmann, and is recommended in cases of testicular parenchyme damage involving tubulus function. Parenteral administration involves 40 KE (1KE=8mcg) thrice weekly, oral administration 300-600 KE daily. Kallikrein is added directly to the ejaculate in instrumental insemination in cases of therapy-resistant decrease in motility associated with asthenospermia or oligozoospermia. Concentrations of 5 KE per ml ejaculate are used in such cases. Chronic infection, especially in the genital area, and the incidence of dizziness during therapy are contraindications to kellikrein use.

  12. Overweight in young males reduce fertility in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Marco-Jiménez, Francisco; Vicente, José Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Semen quality has certainly declined over the past few decades, possibly owing to modern lifestyle factors. In this sense, the role of overweight and obesity in the development of subfertility in males has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. However, there is no consensus on whether overweight or obesity impaired sperm quality. Thus, based on the ongoing debate about risk factors for subfertility associated with overweight and obesity in men, this study was designed to investigate the effect of overweight on sperm quality parameters and fertility success in randomized controlled trial in a rabbit model. Fourteen male rabbits were randomly assigned to a control group in which nutritional requirements were satisfied or a group fed to satiety from 12 to 32 weeks of age. At 24 weeks of age, semen samples were analysed weekly by conventional semen analysis for 8 weeks. In addition, during the trial female rabbits were artificially inseminated by each male to assess the fertility success and the number of offspring. Young males fed to satiety were associated with a significant increase in body weight (13.6% overweight) and perirenal fat thickness (5%). Male overweight presented a significant decrease in sperm concentration. There were no differences in the remaining sperm parameters. However, male overweight showed a clear and significant decrease in fertility success (control group, 64±8.9% versus fed to satiety group, 35±9.2%), but not in the number of offspring. Taken together, our findings provide new evidence on the loss of fertility induced by overweight in males.

  13. Overweight in young males reduce fertility in rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, José Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Semen quality has certainly declined over the past few decades, possibly owing to modern lifestyle factors. In this sense, the role of overweight and obesity in the development of subfertility in males has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. However, there is no consensus on whether overweight or obesity impaired sperm quality. Thus, based on the ongoing debate about risk factors for subfertility associated with overweight and obesity in men, this study was designed to investigate the effect of overweight on sperm quality parameters and fertility success in randomized controlled trial in a rabbit model. Fourteen male rabbits were randomly assigned to a control group in which nutritional requirements were satisfied or a group fed to satiety from 12 to 32 weeks of age. At 24 weeks of age, semen samples were analysed weekly by conventional semen analysis for 8 weeks. In addition, during the trial female rabbits were artificially inseminated by each male to assess the fertility success and the number of offspring. Young males fed to satiety were associated with a significant increase in body weight (13.6% overweight) and perirenal fat thickness (5%). Male overweight presented a significant decrease in sperm concentration. There were no differences in the remaining sperm parameters. However, male overweight showed a clear and significant decrease in fertility success (control group, 64±8.9% versus fed to satiety group, 35±9.2%), but not in the number of offspring. Taken together, our findings provide new evidence on the loss of fertility induced by overweight in males. PMID:28700645

  14. Sperm head phenotype and male fertility in ram semen.

    PubMed

    Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; García-Álvarez, O; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Fernández-Santos, M R; Roldan, E R S; Pérez-Guzmán, M D; Garde, J J

    2015-12-01

    Although there is ample evidence for the effects of sperm head shape on sperm function, its impact on fertility has not been explored in detail at the intraspecific level in mammals. Here, we assess the relationship between sperm head shape and male fertility in a large-scale study in Manchega sheep (Ovis aries), which have not undergone any selection for fertility. Semen was collected from 83 mature rams, and before insemination, head shapes were measured for five parameters: area, perimeter, length, width, and p2a (perimeter(2)/2×π×area) using a computer-assisted sperm morphometric analysis. In addition, a cluster analysis using sperm head length and p2a factor was performed to determine sperm subpopulations (SPs) structure. Our results show the existence of four sperm SPs, which present different sperm head phenotype: SP1 (large and round), SP2 (short and elongated), SP3 (shortest and round), and SP4 (large and the most elongated). No relationships were found between males' fertility rates and average values of sperm head dimensions. However, differences in fertility rates between rams were strongly associated to the proportion of spermatozoa in an ejaculate SP with short and elongated heads (P < 0.001). These findings show how the heterogeneity in sperm head shape of the ejaculate has an effect on reproductive success, and highlight the important role of modulation of the ejaculate at the intraspecific level.

  15. Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Is Essential for Male Fertility in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Anke; Grimm, Marcus O W; Scherthan, Harry; Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Ford, Steven J; Burton, Neal C; Razansky, Daniel; Trümbach, Dietrich; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Tobias; Floss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids and the derived gangliosides have critical functions in spermatogenesis, thus mutations in genes involved in sphingolipid biogenesis are often associated with male infertility. We have generated a transgenic mouse line carrying an insertion in the sphingomyelin synthase gene Sms1, the enzyme which generates sphingomyelin species in the Golgi apparatus. We describe the spermatogenesis defect of Sms1-/- mice, which is characterized by sloughing of spermatocytes and spermatids, causing progressive infertility of male homozygotes. Lipid profiling revealed a reduction in several long chain unsaturated phosphatidylcholins, lysophosphatidylcholins and sphingolipids in the testes of mutants. Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography indicated blood-testis barrier dysfunction. A supplementary diet of the essential omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid diminished germ cell sloughing from the seminiferous epithelium and restored spermatogenesis and fertility in 50% of previously infertile mutants. Our findings indicate that SMS1 has a wider than anticipated role in testis polyunsaturated fatty acid homeostasis and for male fertility.

  16. Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Is Essential for Male Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scherthan, Harry; Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Ford, Steven J.; Burton, Neal C.; Razansky, Daniel; Trümbach, Dietrich; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Tobias; Floss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids and the derived gangliosides have critical functions in spermatogenesis, thus mutations in genes involved in sphingolipid biogenesis are often associated with male infertility. We have generated a transgenic mouse line carrying an insertion in the sphingomyelin synthase gene Sms1, the enzyme which generates sphingomyelin species in the Golgi apparatus. We describe the spermatogenesis defect of Sms1-/- mice, which is characterized by sloughing of spermatocytes and spermatids, causing progressive infertility of male homozygotes. Lipid profiling revealed a reduction in several long chain unsaturated phosphatidylcholins, lysophosphatidylcholins and sphingolipids in the testes of mutants. Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography indicated blood-testis barrier dysfunction. A supplementary diet of the essential omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid diminished germ cell sloughing from the seminiferous epithelium and restored spermatogenesis and fertility in 50% of previously infertile mutants. Our findings indicate that SMS1 has a wider than anticipated role in testis polyunsaturated fatty acid homeostasis and for male fertility. PMID:27788151

  17. Bisphenol-A Affects Male Fertility via Fertility-related Proteins in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Saidur; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Lee, June-Sub; Yoon, Sung-Jae; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that has been studied for its impact on male fertility in several species of animals and humans. Growing evidence suggests that xenoestrogens can bind to receptors on spermatozoa and thus alter sperm function. The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of varying concentrations of BPA (0.0001, 0.01, 1, and 100 μM for 6 h) on sperm function, fertilization, embryonic development, and on selected fertility-related proteins in spermatozoa. Our results showed that high concentrations of BPA inhibited sperm motility and motion kinematics by significantly decreasing ATP levels in spermatozoa. High BPA concentrations also increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on sperm proteins involved in protein kinase A-dependent regulation and induced a precocious acrosome reaction, which resulted in poor fertilization and compromised embryonic development. In addition, BPA induced the down-regulation of β-actin and up-regulated peroxiredoxin-5, glutathione peroxidase 4, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. Our results suggest that high concentrations of BPA alter sperm function, fertilization, and embryonic development via regulation and/or phosphorylation of fertility-related proteins in spermatozoa. We conclude that BPA-induced changes in fertility-related protein levels in spermatozoa may be provided a potential cue of BPA-mediated disease conditions. PMID:25772901

  18. Sam68: a new STAR in the male fertility firmament.

    PubMed

    Sette, Claudio; Messina, Valeria; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2010-01-01

    Male infertility accounts for approximately 50% of the cases of sterile human couples, and in many instances the genetic or molecular defects involved remain unknown. Studies conducted in animal models have elucidated the key role played by RNA-binding proteins and by the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression during spermatogenesis. Ablation of proteins involved in each of the steps required for the processing and the utilization of messenger RNAs impairs the production of fertile spermatozoa. Recent evidence indicates that the RNA-binding protein Sam68 is absolutely required for the correct progression of spermatogenesis and for male fertility in the mouse. Sam68 belongs to the evolutionary conserved signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family of RNA-binding proteins. The members of this family have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in cell differentiation and development, including male and female gametogenesis. In this review we will summarize the observations gathered on the functions of STAR proteins in different organisms, with particular emphasis on the role of Sam68 in male fertility.

  19. Influence of hernioplastic implants on male fertility in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, T; Lechner, W

    2007-05-01

    This study explored the vulnerability of the ductus deferens due to mesh induced inflammation and shrinkage after hernia repair in the rodent model. Two commonly used types of hernioplastic implants (Prolene and Vypro II) were surgically wrapped around the ductus deferentes on both sides in 20 juvenile and 20 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Twenty male rats underwent sham surgeries as controls. After 3 months, each male was mated with 2-3 adult females, which were subsequently sacrificed and oocytes or embryos were flushed and counted. Histochemical investigations of the implants and the ductus recovered surgically 4 weeks after implantation (one side) and after the fertility test (second side) were conducted. All groups exhibited 1-3 males with decreased or restricted fertility but there was no difference between groups. Histochemical analysis of the implants and the ductus recovered 4 weeks and 4 months after implantation revealed some sperm granulomes due to lesions of the spermatic cord caused by the implant in the Prolene group. There was no inflammatory reaction in the mucosa or blockage of the spermatic cord visible. Both types of hernioplastic implants tested in this investigation do not give an indication of a negative influence on male fertility in juvenile or adult rats.

  20. Calcineurin inhibitors and male fertility after renal transplantation - a review.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, G K; Dounousi, E; Harissis, H V

    2016-06-01

    Renal transplantation and restoration of renal function are associated with significant favourable changes regarding the reproductive capacity of male patients with previous end-stage renal disease. However, there is evidence that some of the immunosuppressive agents may impair male fertility after all. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), cyclosporine A and tacrolimus (FK506), which constitute the cornerstone of immunosuppression regimen following renal transplantation, have been implicated in causing an overall decline in the fertilisation capacity of male renal transplant recipients (RTRs). In this review, data from human clinical studies are collectively presented in an effort to estimate the potential adverse effects of CNIs on the masculine reproductive organs, the hormonal axis of males, the process of spermatogenesis and generally the male RTRs capacity to fertilise. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tiseo, Bruno Camargo; Cocuzza, Marcello; Bonfá, Eloisa; Srougi, Miguel; Clovis, A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. Materials and Methods A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. Results A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Conclusions Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy. PMID:27120778

  2. Cholesterol and male fertility: what about orphans and adopted?

    PubMed

    Maqdasy, Salwan; Baptissart, Marine; Vega, Aurélie; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Volle, David H

    2013-04-10

    The link between cholesterol homeostasis and male fertility has been clearly suggested in patients who suffer from hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome. This has been confirmed by the generation of several transgenic mouse models or in animals fed with high cholesterol diet. Next to the alteration of the endocrine signaling pathways through steroid receptors (androgen and estrogen receptors); "orphan" and "adopted" nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXRs), the Proliferating Peroxisomal Activated Receptors (PPARs) or the Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1), have been involved in this cross-talk. These transcription factors show distinct expression patterns in the male genital tract, explaining the large panel of phenotypes observed in transgenic male mice and highlighting the importance of lipid homesostasis and the complexity of the molecular pathways involved. Increasing our knowledge of the roles of these nuclear receptors in male germ cell differentiation could help in proposing new approaches to either treat infertile men or define new strategies for contraception.

  3. Effects of Anethum graveolens L. on fertility in male rats.

    PubMed

    Monsefi, Malihezaman; Zahmati, Maryam; Masoudi, Mojtaba; Javidnia, Katayoun

    2011-12-01

    The effects of Anethum graveolens seed extract on fertility of male rats were investigated. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups according to the treatment they received during 42 days: control, low dose (0.5 g/kg) and high dose (5 g/kg) of aqueous extracts, and low dose (0.045 g/kg) and high dose (0.45 g/kg) of ethanol extracts of Anethum graveolens seed. Sperm count and motility and testosterone concentration were measured. Sections of the testes, epididymis, and seminal vesicles were stained with peroxidase-conjugated lectins of Ulex europaeus agglutinin, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, soy bean agglutinin and concanavalin A. The treated male rats were mated with females and the crown-rump lengths and weights of their newborn pups were measured. No significant differences in sperm count, sperm motility or testosterone concentration were observed in the experimental groups. However, female rats did not become pregnant after mating with rats given the high dose of the ethanol extract. The distribution of terminal sugars on the epithelial surface of the reproductive structures decreased in the experimental groups. Anethum graveolens extract decreased fertility rate by modifying some terminal sugars on the cell surface of male reproductive organs involved in sperm maturation, capacitation and oocyte recognition.

  4. Male coercive mating in externally fertilizing species: male coercion, female reluctance and explanation for female acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukio; Takegaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Male coercive mating exerts a strong evolutionary pressure on mating-related traits of both sexes. However, it is extremely rare in externally fertilizing species probably because the male mating behaviour is incomplete until females release their eggs. Here we showed that males of the externally fertilizing fish Rhabdoblennius nitidus coercively confine females to the nests until spawning, and investigated why females accept male coercive mating. The females entered the males’ nests following male courtship displays, but they usually tried to escape when there were no eggs because males tended to cannibalize all the eggs when there were few. Most males that used small, tight nests acquired new eggs but with experimentally enlarged nests, 90% of the males without eggs failed to confine the females. Spawning tended to occur during the early/late spawning period in nests with no eggs (i.e. male coercive mating). In the nests where the first eggs were deposited in the early period, subsequent matings with other females were more likely to occur, whereas in the late period, most parental care of the eggs failed without additional matings. The females that spawned in the late period may have been compelled to accept male coercive mating due to time constraints. PMID:27087584

  5. Fertility of a spontaneous hexaploid male Siberian sturgeon, Acipenser baerii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evolution of sturgeons and paddlefishes (order Acipenseriformes) is inherently connected with polyploidization events which resulted in differentiation of ploidy levels and chromosome numbers of present acipenseriform species. Moreover, allopolyploidization as well as autopolyploidization seems to be an ongoing process in these fishes and individuals with abnormal ploidy levels were occasionally observed within sturgeon populations. Here, we reported occurrence of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii) male with abnormal ploidy level for this species, accessed its ploidy level and chromosome number and investigate its potential sterility or fertility in comparison with normal individuals of sterlet (A. ruthenus), Russian sturgeon (A. gueldenstaedtii) and Siberian sturgeon (A. baerii). Results Acipenser ruthenus possessed 120 chromosomes, exhibiting recent diploidy (2n), A. gueldenstaedtii and A. baerii had ~245 chromosomes representing recent tetraploidy (4n), and A. baerii male with abnormal ploidy level had ~ 368 chromosomes, indicating recent hexaploidy (6n). Genealogy assessed from the mtDNA control region did not reveal genome markers of other sturgeon species and this individual was supposed to originate from spontaneous 1.5 fold increment in number of chromosome sets with respect to the number most frequently found in nature for this species. Following hormone stimulation, the spontaneous hexaploid male produced normal sperm with ability for fertilization. Fertilization of A. baerii and A. gueldenstaedtii ova from normal 4n level females with sperm of the hexaploid male produced viable, non-malformed pentaploid (5n) progeny with a ploidy level intermediate to those of the parents. Conclusion This study firstly described occurrence of hexaploid individual of A. baerii and confirmed its autopolyploid origin. In addition to that, the first detailed evidence about fertility of spontaneous hexaploid sturgeon was provided. If 1.5 fold increment in

  6. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Rubina; Gandhi, Goral; Allahbadia, Gautam N.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI) now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia) or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia). ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART), the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications, advantages

  7. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Rubina; Gandhi, Goral; Allahbadia, Gautam N

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI) now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia) or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia). ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART), the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications, advantages

  8. The hazardous effects of tobacco smoking on male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jing-Bo; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Qiao, Zhong-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The substantial harmful effects of tobacco smoking on fertility and reproduction have become apparent but are not generally appreciated. Tobacco smoke contains more than 4000 kinds of constituents, including nicotine, tar, carbonic monoxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and heavy metals. Because of the complexity of tobacco smoke components, the toxicological mechanism is notably complicated. Most studies have reported reduced semen quality, reproductive hormone system dysfunction and impaired spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and spermatozoa function in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Underlying these effects, elevated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell apoptosis may play important roles collaboratively in the overall effect of tobacco smoking on male fertility. In this review, we strive to focus on both the phenotype of and the molecular mechanism underlying these harmful effects, although current studies regarding the mechanism remain insufficient. PMID:25851659

  9. Adverse effects of common medications on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Nangia, Ajay K

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of patients require long-term medication regimens at a young age, but the adverse effects of medications on male reproduction are often inadequately considered, recognized and investigated. Medications can affect male reproduction through central hormonal effects, direct gonadotoxic effects, effects on sperm function or on sexual function. For example, exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis through central suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis. 5α-reductase inhibitors can impair sexual function, decrease semen volume and negatively affect sperm parameters, depending on dose and treatment duration. α-Blockers might decrease seminal emission and cause retrograde ejaculation, depending on the receptor specificity and dose of the agent. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors seem to have variable effects based on the isoform inhibited and evidence is conflicting. Antihypertensive and psychotropic agents can affect sperm, sexual function and hormonal parameters. For antibiotics, the literature on effects on sperm and sperm function is limited and dated. Many chemotherapeutic agents have a direct gonadotoxic effect, depending on agents used, dosing and number of treatment cycles. Overall, many medications commonly used in urology can have effects on male fertility (mostly reversible) but conclusive evidence in humans is often limited. Men should be counselled appropriately about potential drug-related adverse effects on their fertility.

  10. [Sperm-antibodies - practical importance in the male fertility disorder].

    PubMed

    Meili, H U; Bandhauer, K

    1976-07-01

    On the basis of abundant statistics it is known that in about 5% of infertile males fertility-inhibiting antibodies are present, which can lead to immobilization or agglutination of the sperm; they can block acrosome activity or become cytotoxically active. The motility of spermatozoon charged with antibodies and partially immobilized or agglutinized is probably not sufficient to penetrate the cervical mucus to reach the egg. Immunological sterility can be suspected in certain situations: infertility in a couple where there is no apparent cause of female infertility; anamnestic or clinical indication of chronic prostatitis, vesiculitis, or epididymitis; spontaneous agglutination or motility reduction in the spermiogram (not demonstrable in all cases); pathological postcoital test by the Sims-Huhner method. Since the last is only 50% reliable, diagnosis of antibodies is dependent on laboratory tests such as: micro-sperm-agglutination test, macro-sperm-agglutination test, sperm immobilization test, hema-agglutination test, and capillary X-ray. As yet there is no satisfactory treatment for this type of male fertility disorder. The only promising results in this area are achieved when the inflamed source for the antigen-antibody reaction is found and removed. Diagnosis of sperm antibodies in male infertility, however, can be the clear indication for heterologic insemination.

  11. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) decreases male rat fertility in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tahtamouni, Lubna H; Alqurna, Noor M; Al-Hudhud, Mariam Y; Al-Hajj, Hameed A

    2011-04-26

    Taraxacum officinale (L.) Weber ex F.H. Wigg. is commonly used in Jordan folk medicine for the treatment of panophthalmitis, chronic constipation, and diabetes. In addition, herbalists prescribe the aqueous extract of Taraxacum officinale to enhance male's fertility. The current work was undertaken to investigate the validity and/or invalidity of the aqueous extract of Taraxacum officinale on enhancing the reproductive activity in male rat. Thirty three adult male rats were divided into three groups. Experimental groups received the aqueous extract of Taraxacum officinale orally for 60 days in two different sublethal doses; 1/10 LD(50) as high dose and 1/20 LD(50) as low dose, whereas the control group received distilled water. The administration of the aqueous extract of Taraxacum officinale resulted in a significant decrease in testis weight in the two experimental groups in comparison to the control group but had no effect on body or organ weight. The extract of this plant caused a decrease of the following in the two experimental groups, compared to the control group: sperm count, motility and normal morphology, pregnancy rate and diameter and wall thickness of seminiferous tubules. Also, distortion of morphology of the seminiferous tubules and arrest in spermatogenesis was observed in the experimental groups. In addition, the percentage of sperm with damaged chromatin integrity was significantly higher in the two experimental groups. From the present study, we can conclude that the aqueous extract of Taraxacum officinale acts as an anti-fertility agent rather than a fertility booster as prescribed by Jordanian herbalists. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sperm Proteomics: Road to Male Fertility and Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Saidur; Lee, June-Sub

    2013-01-01

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that can be easily obtained and purified. Mature spermatozoa are transcriptionally and translationally inactive and incapable of protein synthesis. In addition, spermatozoa contain relatively higher amounts of membrane proteins compared to other cells; therefore, they are very suitable for proteomic studies. Recently, the application of proteomic approaches such as the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and differential in-gel electrophoresis has identified several sperm-specific proteins. These findings have provided a further understanding of protein functions involved in different sperm processes as well as of the differentiation of normal state from an abnormal one. In addition, studies on the sperm proteome have demonstrated the importance of spermatozoal posttranslational modifications and their ability to induce physiological changes responsible for fertilization. Large-scale proteomic studies to identify hundreds to thousands of sperm proteins will ultimately result in the development of novel biomarkers that may help to detect fertility, the state of complete contraception, and beyond. Eventually, these protein biomarkers will allow for a better diagnosis of sperm dysfunctions and aid in drug development. This paper reviews the recent scientific publications available from the PubMed database to address sperm proteomics and its potential application to characterize male fertility and contraception. PMID:24363670

  13. The Control of Male Fertility by Spermatozoan Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina V.; Kirichok, Yuriy; Ren, Dejian; Navarro, Betsy; Chung, Jean-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels control the sperm ability to fertilize the egg by regulating sperm maturation in the female reproductive tract and by triggering key sperm physiological responses required for successful fertilization such as hyperactivated motility, chemotaxis, and the acrosome reaction. CatSper, a pH-regulated, calcium-selective ion channel, and KSper (Slo3) are core regulators of sperm tail calcium entry and sperm hyperactivated motility. Many other channels had been proposed as regulating sperm activity without direct measurements. With the development of the sperm patch-clamp technique, CatSper and KSper have been confirmed as the primary spermatozoan ion channels. In addition, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 has been identified in human sperm tail, and the P2X2 ion channel has been identified in the midpiece of mouse sperm. Mutations and deletions in sperm-specific ion channels affect male fertility in both mice and humans without affecting other physiological functions. The uniqueness of sperm ion channels makes them ideal pharmaceutical targets for contraception. In this review we discuss how ion channels regulate sperm physiology. PMID:22017176

  14. The effect of alkylating agents on male rat fertility

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, H.; Fox, B. W.; Craig, A. W.

    1959-01-01

    The effects of tumour inhibitory doses of tretamine (triethylenemelamine), busulphan, and melphalan on the fertility of male rats have been examined. The aromatic nitrogen mustard, melphalan, was inactive, but busulphan has a highly selective action on spermatogenesis which contrasts strikingly with that of tretamine. The main action of tretamine was exerted upon spermatocytes or spermatids, but, with increasing dose, the effects spread to involve a wide range of spermatogenic cells including mature sperm, so that infertility could be induced very rapidly. Busulphan, however, interfered with the development of spermatogonia for several weeks, although other germinal cells were unaffected and continued to develop into mature spermatozoa. This accounted for the continuation of normal fertility for 7 weeks after a dose, before sterility suddenly developed. The antifertility activity of tretamine could be simulated by a variety of other ethyleneimino compounds, potency being greatest in trifunctional and least in monofunctional compounds. The latter were, however, very destructive to the seminiferous epithelium with increasing dose. In the rat, there appeared to be no definite relationship between the ability of alkylating substances to interfere with the activity of normal and pathological proliferating tissues, as represented by the germinal epithelium, haematopoietic, and tumour tissue. Although carcinogenicity was a biological property of alkylating agents, other chemical types of carcinogen did not interfere with fertility. ImagesFIG. 2aFIG. 2bFIG. 2c PMID:13662565

  15. High male fertility in males of a subdioecious shrub in hand-pollinated crosses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Matsushita, Michinari; Tomaru, Nobuhiro; Nakagawa, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Female reproductive success in females versus hermaphrodites has been well documented. However, documenting a potential advantage in male fertility of male versus hermaphrodite individuals in subdioecious species is also essential for understanding the evolutionary pathway toward dioecy from hermaphroditism via gynodioecy. Siring success in terms of fruit set, fruit mass, number of seeds and mean seed mass was compared by hand-pollinated crosses in the subdioecious shrub Eurya japonica. The pollen was from male and hermaphrodite individuals, and the pollen recipients were females and hermaphrodites. Seed quality was also evaluated in terms of seed germination rate, seed germination day and seedling survival. Overall, pollen from males sired more fruits of larger size and more seeds than did pollen from hermaphrodites. The male advantage was observed when pollen recipients were females, whereas no effect was found in hermaphrodite recipients. Pollen from males also produced better quality seeds with higher germination rate and sooner germination day. Although these results could also be explained by a higher pollen load for crosses with male pollen donors, we took care to saturate the stigma regardless of the pollen donor. Therefore, these results suggest that male individuals of E. japonica have advantages in male fertility in terms of both quantity and quality. Our previous studies indicated that females exhibit higher female reproductive success compared with hermaphrodites. Thus, both the female and male functions of hermaphrodites are outperformed by females and males, respectively, raising the possibility that the subdioecious E. japonica at this study site is entering the transitional phase to dioecy along the gynodioecy–dioecy pathway. PMID:27658818

  16. Evaluation of ammonium perchlorate in the endocrine disruptor screening and testing program's male pubertal protocol: ability to detect effects on thyroid endpoints.

    PubMed

    Stoker, T E; Ferrell, J M; Laws, S C; Cooper, R L; Buckalew, A

    2006-11-10

    The U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Tier 1 male pubertal protocol was designed as a screen to detect endocrine-disrupting chemicals which may alter reproductive development or thyroid function. One purpose of this in vivo screening protocol is to detect thyrotoxicants via a number of different mechanisms of action, such as thyroid hormone synthesis or clearance. Here we evaluate the ability of this EDSP male pubertal protocol to detect the known thyrotoxicant ammonium perchlorate as an endocrine disruptor. Ammonium perchlorate is a primary ingredient in rocket fuel, fertilizers, paints, and lubricants. Over the past 50 years, potassium perchlorate has been used to treat hyperthyroidism in humans. Perchlorate alters thyroid hormone secretion by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake by the thyroid gland. In this study, ammonium perchlorate was administered at 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg to male Wistar rats based on a pilot study of oral dosing. Doses of 125-500 mg/kg perchlorate decreased T4 in a dose-dependent manner. TSH was significantly increased in a dose-responsive manner at the same doses, while T3 was unchanged at any dose. Thyroid histology was significantly altered at all doses, even at the 62.5 mg/kg, with a clear dose-dependent decrease in colloid area and increase in follicular cell height. No effects on preputial separation, a marker of pubertal progression, or reproductive tract development were observed at any dose. These results demonstrate that the male pubertal protocol is useful for detecting thyrotoxicants which target the thyroid axis by this mechanism (altered uptake of iodide). This study also found that perchlorate exposure during this period did not alter any of the reproductive developmental endpoints.

  17. Regulation of Male Fertility by the Opioid System

    PubMed Central

    Subirán, Nerea; Casis, Luis; Irazusta, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides are substances involved in cell communication. They are present in various organs and tissues of the male and female reproductive tract, suggesting that they may regulate some of the processes involved in reproductive function. In fact, the opioid system that operates as a multi-messenger system can participate in the regulation of reproductive physiology at multiple levels, for example, at the levels of the central nervous system, at the testes level and at sperm level. A better understanding of the implication of the opioid system in reproductive processes may contribute to clarifying the etiology of many cases of infertility and the effect of opiate abuse on fertility. Indeed, a novel biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility could be based upon components of the opioid system. The presence of the opioid system in sperm cells also represents a novel opportunity for reproductive management, for either enhancing the probability of fertilization or reducing it through the development of novel targeted contraceptives. PMID:21431247

  18. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  19. Marijuana, phytocannabinoids, the endocannabinoid system, and male fertility.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Stefan S; Agarwal, Ashok; Syriac, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Marijuana has the highest consumption rate among all of the illicit drugs used in the USA, and its popularity as both a recreational and medicinal drug is increasing especially among men of reproductive age. Male factor infertility is on the increase, and the exposure to the cannabinoid compounds released by marijuana could be a contributing cause. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is deeply involved in the complex regulation of male reproduction through the endogenous release of endocannabinoids and binding to cannabinoid receptors. Disturbing the delicate balance of the ECS due to marijuana use can negatively impact reproductive potential. Various in vivo and in vitro studies have reported on the empirical role that marijuana plays in disrupting the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, spermatogenesis, and sperm function such as motility, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. In this review, we highlight the latest evidence regarding the effect of marijuana use on male fertility and also provide a detailed insight into the ECS and its significance in the male reproductive system.

  20. Acute alcohol exposure markedly influences male fertility and fetal outcome in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Nock, B; O'Connor, L; Adams, M L; Sewing, B N; Meyer, E R

    1994-01-01

    Although it is recognized that drugs ingested by pregnant females produce marked cognitive and physiological deficits in their offspring, the possibility that paternal exposure to drugs prior to mating may have adverse effects on fertility and fetal outcome has not received much attention. The purpose of the present studies was to examine whether a single, acute exposure to alcohol influences the subsequent ability of adult male rats to mate and produce healthy and viable litters. Our results showed that a relatively large dose of alcohol 24 hours prior to breeding had little effect on the mating behavior of male rats, but there were markedly fewer pregnancies in females mated with alcohol-exposed male rats than in controls. Of equal importance, we found that, even when conception occurred and live births were produced, there were striking differences in fetal outcome. Alcohol-treated males sired many fewer pups than control males and there was a markedly enhanced mortality rate in their offspring. Collectively, these data suggest that acute paternal alcohol administration 24 hours prior to breeding does not affect mating behavior, but results in a greatly diminished fertility rate and fewer and less viable offspring. These studies suggest that paternal alcohol use may be as important as maternal alcohol abuse as a negative variable in pregnancy and fetal outcome.

  1. Endocrine regulation of male fertility by the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Oury, Franck; Sumara, Grzegorz; Sumara, Olga; Ferron, Mathieu; Chang, Haixin; Smith, Charles E.; Hermo, Louis; Suarez, Susan; Roth, Bryan L.; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Although the endocrine capacity of bone is widely recognized, interactions between bone and the reproductive system have until now focused on the gonads as a regulator of bone remodeling. We now show that in males, bone acts as a regulator of fertility. Using co-culture assays, we demonstrate that osteoblasts are able to induce testosterone production by the testes, while they fail to influence estrogen production by the ovaries. Analyses of cell-specific loss- and gain-of-function models reveal that the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin performs this endocrine function. By binding to a G-protein coupled receptor expressed in the Leydig cells of the testes, osteocalcin regulates in a CREB-dependent manner the expression of enzymes required for testosterone synthesis, promoting germ cell survival. This study expands the physiological repertoire of osteocalcin, and provides the first evidence that the skeleton is an endocrine regulator of reproduction. PMID:21333348

  2. Assessment of forestry best management practices II: patterns in stream biological endpoints in terms of natural variability and fertilization

    Treesearch

    Camille Flinders; Daniel L. McLaughlin; Larry Korhnak; William J. Arthurs; Joan Ikoma; Matthew J. Cohen; Erik B. Schilling

    2016-01-01

    Watersheds dominated by forest cover typically have high quality water. In managed forests, fertilizers may be periodically applied during the growing period. The Florida Forest Service has developed Best Management Practices (BMPs) for managed forests to minimize the potential impacts of forestry operations, including fertilization, to forest streams and maintain ...

  3. Increased male fertility in Tribolium confusum beetles after infection with the intracellular parasite Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Wade, M J; Chang, N W

    1995-01-05

    The cytoplasmically inherited microorganism Wolbachia pipientis behaves like a sexually selected trait in its host, the flour beetle Tribolium confusum, enhancing male fertility at the expense of female fecundity. Here we show that infected females have fewer offspring than uninfected females but infected males have a large fertility advantage over uninfected males within multiply-inseminated infected or uninfected females. The male fertility effect accelerates the spread of the Wolbachia through the host population and expands the initial opportunity for hitch-hiking of host nuclear genes. Sperm competition in a host, mediated by endosymbionts, has not been previously described.

  4. DO BODY WEIGHT CHANGES IMPACT AGE OF PUBERTY AND REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS IN THE EDSP TIER 1 MALE AND FEMALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOLS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    DO BODY WEIGHT CHANGES IMPACT AGE OF PUBERTY AND REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS IN THE EDSP TIER 1 MALE AND FEMALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOLS? T.E. Stoker, K. McElroy, J. Ferrell, K. Bremser, R. Cooper and S.C. Laws. Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, NC.

    The relations...

  5. DO BODY WEIGHT CHANGES IMPACT AGE OF PUBERTY AND REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS IN THE EDSP TIER 1 MALE AND FEMALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOLS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    DO BODY WEIGHT CHANGES IMPACT AGE OF PUBERTY AND REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS IN THE EDSP TIER 1 MALE AND FEMALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOLS? T.E. Stoker, K. McElroy, J. Ferrell, K. Bremser, R. Cooper and S.C. Laws. Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, NC.

    The relations...

  6. Body size correlates with fertilization success but not gonad size in grass goby territorial males.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, Jose Martin; Locatello, Lisa; Zane, Lorenzo; Mazzoldi, Carlotta

    2012-01-01

    In fish species with alternative male mating tactics, sperm competition typically occurs when small males that are unsuccessful in direct contests steal fertilization opportunities from large dominant males. In the grass goby Zosterisessor ophiocephalus, large territorial males defend and court females from nest sites, while small sneaker males obtain matings by sneaking into nests. Parentage assignment of 688 eggs from 8 different nests sampled in the 2003-2004 breeding season revealed a high level of sperm competition. Fertilization success of territorial males was very high but in all nests sneakers also contributed to the progeny. In territorial males, fertilization success correlated positively with male body size. Gonadal investment was explored in a sample of 126 grass gobies collected during the period 1995-1996 in the same area (61 territorial males and 65 sneakers). Correlation between body weight and testis weight was positive and significant for sneaker males, while correlation was virtually equal to zero in territorial males. That body size in territorial males is correlated with fertilization success but not gonad size suggests that males allocate much more energy into growth and relatively little into sperm production once the needed size to become territorial is attained. The increased paternity of larger territorial males might be due to a more effective defense of the nest in comparison with smaller territorial males.

  7. Male-male sexual behavior in Japanese quail: being "on top" reduces mating and fertilization with females.

    PubMed

    Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) engage in vigorous same-sex sexual interactions that have been interpreted as aggressive behavior reflecting dominance relationships. The consequences of this behavior for reproductive success, and whether it is a form of competition over mating and fertilization, are unclear. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of seeing or interacting with another male on a male's subsequent mating and fertilization success with females. A vigorous interaction with another male in which the subject performed more cloacal contact movements (movements to try to make contact with the other bird's cloacal opening) reduced subsequent mating and fertilization success with a female to a similar extent as a prior mating with a different female. Receiving one or more cloacal contacts from another male was less detrimental for subsequent success. The mere presence of another (stimulus) male delayed mating initiation in those male subjects that approached the stimulus first instead of the female. These results do not support the idea that the male "on top" in male-male sexual interactions is the dominant bird who goes on to achieve greater reproductive success. Instead, the results are consistent with male-male sexual behavior as an occasionally costly by-product of strong mating motivation.

  8. Variation in Male Fertilities and Pairwise Mating Probabilities in Picea glauca

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, D. J.; Stewart, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Frequencies of multilocus male gametes in seeds collected from clones in several blocks of a white spruce seed orchard were analyzed as part of a 2-yr study of mating system variation in this species. Observed frequencies of male gamete types departed significantly from those expected assuming equal male fertilities among clones. Male gamete frequencies in seed crops were significantly heterogeneous among clones within blocks, and among blocks within clones. Clonal male fertilities were estimated from male gamete frequency data. These estimates were highly skewed, with a small proportion of the clones contributing male gametes to the majority of the seed. The estimates were significantly heterogeneous among clones within blocks, and among blocks within clones. Between-year variation in clonal male fertilities was also pronounced, with male fertilities of some clones changing by as much as three orders of magnitude. Clonal male fertility was significantly correlated with clonal male cone production in both years. These results are important with regard to assumptions made for the estimation of general combining ability, average genetic correlation among progeny from single parents, and expected response to selection in open-pollinated plant populations. PMID:17246377

  9. Female choice for males with greater fertilization success in the Swedish Moor frog, Rana arvalis.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Craig D H; Sagvik, Jörgen; Olsson, Mats

    2010-10-26

    Studies of mate choice in anuran amphibians have shown female preference for a wide range of male traits despite females gaining no direct resources from males (i.e. non-resource based mating system). Nevertheless, theoretical and empirical studies have shown that females may still gain indirect genetic benefits from choosing males of higher genetic quality and thereby increase their reproductive success. We investigated two components of sexual selection in the Moor frog (Rana arvalis), pre-copulatory female choice between two males of different size ('large' vs. 'small'), and their fertilization success in sperm competition and in isolation. Females' showed no significant preference for male size (13 small and six large male preferences) but associated preferentially with the male that subsequently was the most successful at fertilizing her eggs in isolation. Siring success of males in competitive fertilizations was unrelated to genetic similarity with the female and we detected no effect of sperm viability on fertilization success. There was, however, a strong positive association between a male's innate fertilization ability with a female and his siring success in sperm competition. We also detected a strong negative effect of a male's thumb length on his competitive siring success. Our results show that females show no preference for male size but are still able to choose males which have greater fertilization success. Genetic similarity and differences in the proportion of viable sperm within a males ejaculate do not appear to affect siring success. These results could be explained through pre- and/or postcopulatory choice for genetic benefits and suggest that females are able to perceive the genetic quality of males, possibly basing their choice on multiple phenotypic male traits.

  10. Female Choice for Males with Greater Fertilization Success in the Swedish Moor Frog, Rana arvalis

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Craig D. H.; Sagvik, Jörgen; Olsson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies of mate choice in anuran amphibians have shown female preference for a wide range of male traits despite females gaining no direct resources from males (i.e. non-resource based mating system). Nevertheless, theoretical and empirical studies have shown that females may still gain indirect genetic benefits from choosing males of higher genetic quality and thereby increase their reproductive success. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated two components of sexual selection in the Moor frog (Rana arvalis), pre-copulatory female choice between two males of different size (‘large’ vs. ‘small’), and their fertilization success in sperm competition and in isolation. Females' showed no significant preference for male size (13 small and six large male preferences) but associated preferentially with the male that subsequently was the most successful at fertilizing her eggs in isolation. Siring success of males in competitive fertilizations was unrelated to genetic similarity with the female and we detected no effect of sperm viability on fertilization success. There was, however, a strong positive association between a male's innate fertilization ability with a female and his siring success in sperm competition. We also detected a strong negative effect of a male's thumb length on his competitive siring success. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that females show no preference for male size but are still able to choose males which have greater fertilization success. Genetic similarity and differences in the proportion of viable sperm within a males ejaculate do not appear to affect siring success. These results could be explained through pre- and/or postcopulatory choice for genetic benefits and suggest that females are able to perceive the genetic quality of males, possibly basing their choice on multiple phenotypic male traits. PMID:21049015

  11. Decline in human fertility rates with male age: a consequence of a decrease in male fecundity with aging?

    PubMed

    Matorras, Roberto; Matorras, Francisco; Expósito, Antonia; Martinez, Lorea; Crisol, Lorena

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of male age on human fertility, defined as the birth rate for a given population. Data from the Spanish National Statistics Institute (INE) for the year 2004 from a total of 454,753 newborn infants and sorted by male and female age groups were evaluated. In order to correct the influence of female age-related fertility, a different analysis was performed considering only women under 30 years of age. From a demographic point of view, male fertility started to decline at 35-39 years of age. This decline is constant and follows an exponential pattern (slope -0.11 to -0.12). The trend persisted when the data were adjusted for every 1,000 men in the age group, as well as when only women under the age of 30 were considered. Male fertility showed a 21-23% annual decrease starting at the age of 39. An exponential decrease in human fertility which is independent of the woman's age was observed with male aging. This decay is probably due to a downfall in male fecundity, closely related to a decline in sperm quality. However, social or behavioral causes for this trend cannot be excluded. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Genomic and proteomic analyses of male-fertility restoration in onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS). The most commonly used CMS in onion requires the presence of male-sterile (S) cytoplasm and recessive alleles at one nuclear male-fertility restoration (Ms) locus. Molecular markers have been developed that dis...

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis neither exerts deleterious effects on spermatozoa nor impairs male fertility.

    PubMed

    Puerta Suarez, Jenniffer; Sanchez, Leonardo R; Salazar, Florencia C; Saka, Hector A; Molina, Rosa; Tissera, Andrea; Rivero, Virginia E; Cardona Maya, Walter D; Motrich, Ruben D

    2017-04-25

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial infection. However, whether Chlamydia trachomatis has a negative impact on sperm quality and male fertility is still controversial. Herein, we report the effects on sperm quality of the in vitro exposure of spermatozoa to Chlamydia trachomatis, and also the effects of male genital infection on male fertility using an animal model. Human and mouse sperm were obtained from healthy donors and cauda epididimys from C57BL/6 mice, respectively. Highly motile human or mouse spermatozoa were in vitro exposed to C. trachomatis (serovar E or LGV) or C. muridarum, respectively. Then, sperm quality parameters were analyzed. Moreover, male fertility of Chlamydia muridarum infected male C57BL/6 mice was assessed. Human or murine sperm in vitro exposed to increasing bacterial concentrations or soluble factors from C. trachomatis or C. muridarum, respectively, did not show differences in sperm motility and viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation, ROS production and lipid peroxidation levels, when compared with control sperm (p > 0.05). Moreover, no differences in fertility parameters (potency, fecundity, fertility index, pre- and post-implantation loss) were observed between control and infected males. In conclusion, our results indicate that Chlamydia spp. neither directly exerts deleterious effects on spermatozoa nor impairs male fertility.

  14. Effects of lead on the male mouse as investigated by in vitro fertilization and blastocyst culture

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, L.; Sjoeblom, P.; Wide, M.

    1987-02-01

    Long-term exposure of male mice to inorganic lead (lead chloride, 1 g/liter) in the drinking water reduces their fertility. The cause of this reduction, expressed as a decrease in the number of mated females showing inplantations, was investigated, using an in vivo fertilization method. It was found that spermatozoa from lead-exposed males had a significantly lower ability to fertilize mouse eggs than those from unexposed males. Preimplantation embryos, isolated from uterine horns of mice mated with lead-exposed males. Preimplantation embryos, isolated from uterine horns of mice mated with lead-exposed males, were examined. No morphologically abnormal embryos were found. However, when cultured in vitro over the implantation period, blastocysts of the group mated with lead-exposed males showed an increased frequency of delayed hatching from the zona pellucida or an inability to hatch. Among blastocysts from this group a decreased frequency of inner cell mass development was also found.

  15. Short-term exposure to 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol decreases the fertility of sexually maturing male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Schultz, Irvin R; Skillman, Ann; Nicolas, Jean-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G; Nagler, James J

    2003-06-01

    The synthetic estrogen 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a commonly used oral contraceptive that has been increasingly detected in sewage effluents. This study determined whether EE2 exposure adversely affected reproduction in sexually maturing male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We exposed male trout to graded water concentrations of EE2 (10, 100, and 1,000 ng/ L) for 62 d leading up to the time of spawning. Semen and blood plasma samples were removed from each fish. Semen was used to fertilize groups of eggs from one nonexposed female. As a measure of fertility, eggs were incubated for 28 d after fertilization to determine the proportion that attained the eyed stage of embryonic development. Additional endpoints also measured included sperm motility, spermatocrit, gonadosomatic and hepatosomatic indices, testis histology, and circulating plasma levels of the sex steroids 17 alpha, 20 beta-dihydroxyprogesterone (17,20-DHP) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). Exposure to 1,000 ng/L of EE2 caused complete mortality of the treatment group by day 57. Exposure to lower EE2 water concentrations (10 and 100 ng/L) caused an increase in sperm density, while a significant reduction in testis mass was observed only in the 100-ng/L exposure group. Most significantly, semen harvested from fish exposed to 10 and 100 ng/L EE2 caused an approximately 50% reduction in the number of eggs attaining the eyed stage of embryonic development. Plasma levels of 17,20-DHP in exposed fish were roughly twice the level of the controls, while levels of 11-KT were significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100 ng/L EE2. These results suggest that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to detrimental reproductive effects of short-term exposures to environmentally relevant levels of EE2.

  16. Short-term exposure to 17alpha-ethynylestradiol decreases the fertility of sexually maturing male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R.; Skillman, Ann D.; Nicolas, Jean-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G.; Nagler, James J.

    2003-06-01

    The synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a commonly used oral contraceptive that has been increasingly detected in sewage effluents. This study determined whether EE2 exposure adversely affected reproduction in sexually maturing male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We exposed male trout to graded water concentrations of EE2 (10, 100, and 1,000 ng/ L) for 62 d leading up to the time of spawning. Semen and blood plasma samples were removed from each fish. Semen was used to fertilize groups of eggs from one nonexposed female. As a measure of fertility, eggs were incubated for 28 d after fertilization to determine the proportion that attained the eyed stage of embryonic development. Additional endpoints also measured included sperm motility, spermatocrit, gonadosomatic and hepatosomatic indices, testis histology, and circulating plasma levels of the sex steroids 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxyprogesterone (17,20-DHP) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). Exposure to 1,000 ng/L of EE2 caused complete mortality of the treatment group by day 57. Exposure to lower EE2 water concentrations (10 and 100 ng/L) caused an increase in sperm density, while a significant reduction in testis mass was observed only in the 100-ng/L exposure group. Most significantly, semen harvested from fish exposed to 10 and 100 ng/L EE2 caused an approximately 50% reduction in the number of eggs attaining the eyed stage of embryonic development. Plasma levels of 17,20-DHP in exposed fish were roughly twice the level of the controls, while levels of 11-KT were significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100 ng/L EE2. These results suggest that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to detrimental reproductive effects of short-term exposures to environmentally relevant levels of EE2.

  17. The genetics of male fertility--from basic science to clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Alexander W; Lamb, Dolores J

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of male fertility has increased dramatically over the past several decades, in large part because of advances in technology and the ability to rapidly analyze large quantities of high-resolution genetic data. These research efforts have led to an understanding of some of the genes involved in male fertility and have enabled us to test for defects in these genes that result in infertility in men. However, our understanding of male fertility remains far from comprehensive, and many genes involved in male fertility likely remain to be identified and their mechanisms of action elucidated. This can only be accomplished through continued, persistent investigations using cutting-edge technologies. In this review, we discuss the history of genetic testing and how it applies to male fertility, from the identification of the sex chromosomes at the turn of the century to classification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that may result in infertility and are the crux of modern genetic analysis. We discuss the genetic testing methodologies traditionally used for genetic assessment of infertile males, including karyotype analysis, sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction-based testing for Y chromosomal evaluation, as well as cutting-edge genetic testing methodologies using microarrays and whole-genome sequencing, permitting analysis at a nucleotide-level resolution. Finally, we describe our vision of the future of genetic testing in the setting of male infertility, culminating in truly personalized medicine for each affected infertile male.

  18. Heterozygous alleles restore male fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.): a case of overdominance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi Wei; Wang, Chuan; Gao, Lei; Mei, Shi Yong; Zhou, Yuan; Xiang, Chang Ping; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    The practice of hybridization has greatly contributed to the increase in crop productivity. A major component that exploits heterosis in crops is the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)/nucleus-controlled fertility restoration (Rf) system. Through positional cloning, it is shown that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) encoding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are responsible for restoring fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.). Furthermore, it was found that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) show higher expression and RNA polymerase II occupancy in the CMS cytoplasmic background compared with their homozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-1 or RsRf3-2/RsRf3-2). These data provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of fertility restoration to cytoplasmic male-sterile plants and illustrate a case of overdominance. PMID:23630327

  19. Heterozygous alleles restore male fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.): a case of overdominance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi Wei; De Wang, Chuan; Wang, Chuan; Gao, Lei; Mei, Shi Yong; Zhou, Yuan; Xiang, Chang Ping; Wang, Ting

    2013-04-01

    The practice of hybridization has greatly contributed to the increase in crop productivity. A major component that exploits heterosis in crops is the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)/nucleus-controlled fertility restoration (Rf) system. Through positional cloning, it is shown that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) encoding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are responsible for restoring fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.). Furthermore, it was found that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) show higher expression and RNA polymerase II occupancy in the CMS cytoplasmic background compared with their homozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-1 or RsRf3-2/RsRf3-2). These data provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of fertility restoration to cytoplasmic male-sterile plants and illustrate a case of overdominance.

  20. THE SAGA OF A MALE FERTILITY PROTEIN (SP22)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicologic studies designed to identify chemical-induced alterations in the structure and function of the epididymis, particularly the acquisition of fertility by proximal cauda epididymal sperm, have lead to the discovery of a novel sperm protein (SP22) that is well correlated ...

  1. THE SAGA OF A MALE FERTILITY PROTEIN (SP22)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicologic studies designed to identify chemical-induced alterations in the structure and function of the epididymis, particularly the acquisition of fertility by proximal cauda epididymal sperm, have lead to the discovery of a novel sperm protein (SP22) that is well correlated ...

  2. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  3. The effects of cigarette smoking on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Jason R; Khanna, Abhinav; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-04-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the main causes of preventable morbidity and mortality, has a multitude of well-known side effects. The relationship between cigarette smoking and infertility has been studied for decades; however, large-scale, population-wide prospective studies are lacking. The majority of the current literature is in the form of retrospective studies focused on the effects of smoking on semen analyses. This article discusses the results of these studies and reviews the postulated mechanisms. The effects of smoking on assisted reproduction and in vitro fertilization outcomes are noted. The consequences of smoking while pregnant on future fertility as well as the outcomes of second-hand smoke are analyzed. The current evidence suggests that men should be advised to abstain from smoking in order to improve reproductive outcomes.

  4. Heterosis for viability, fecundity, and male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster: comparison of mutational and standing variation.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J D; Heinsohn, S L; Mackay, T F

    1998-01-01

    If genetic variation for fitness traits in natural populations ("standing" variation) is maintained by recurrent mutation, then quantitative-genetic properties of standing variation should resemble those of newly arisen mutations. One well-known property of standing variation for fitness traits is inbreeding depression, with its converse of heterosis or hybrid vigor. We measured heterosis for three fitness traits, pre-adult viability, female fecundity, and male fertility, among a set of inbred Drosophilia melanogaster lines recently derived from the wild, and also among a set of lines that had been allowed to accumulate spontaneous mutations for over 200 generations. The inbred lines but not the mutation-accumulation (MA) lines showed heterosis for pre-adult viability. Both sets of lines showed heterosis for female fecundity, but heterosis for male fertility was weak or absent. Crosses among a subset of the MA lines showed that they were strongly differentiated for male fertility, with the differences inherited in autosomal fashion; the absence of heterosis for male fertility among the MA lines was therefore not caused by an absence of mutations affecting this trait. Crosses among the inbred lines also gave some, albeit equivocal, evidence for male fertility variation. The contrast between the results for female fecundity and those for male fertility suggests that mutations affecting different fitness traits may differ in their average dominance properties, and that such differences may be reflected in properties of standing variation. The strong differentiation among the MA lines in male fertility further suggests that mutations affecting this trait occur at a high rate. PMID:9539433

  5. Heterosis for viability, fecundity, and male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster: comparison of mutational and standing variation.

    PubMed

    Fry, J D; Heinsohn, S L; Mackay, T F

    1998-03-01

    If genetic variation for fitness traits in natural populations ("standing" variation) is maintained by recurrent mutation, then quantitative-genetic properties of standing variation should resemble those of newly arisen mutations. One well-known property of standing variation for fitness traits is inbreeding depression, with its converse of heterosis or hybrid vigor. We measured heterosis for three fitness traits, pre-adult viability, female fecundity, and male fertility, among a set of inbred Drosophilia melanogaster lines recently derived from the wild, and also among a set of lines that had been allowed to accumulate spontaneous mutations for over 200 generations. The inbred lines but not the mutation-accumulation (MA) lines showed heterosis for pre-adult viability. Both sets of lines showed heterosis for female fecundity, but heterosis for male fertility was weak or absent. Crosses among a subset of the MA lines showed that they were strongly differentiated for male fertility, with the differences inherited in autosomal fashion; the absence of heterosis for male fertility among the MA lines was therefore not caused by an absence of mutations affecting this trait. Crosses among the inbred lines also gave some, albeit equivocal, evidence for male fertility variation. The contrast between the results for female fecundity and those for male fertility suggests that mutations affecting different fitness traits may differ in their average dominance properties, and that such differences may be reflected in properties of standing variation. The strong differentiation among the MA lines in male fertility further suggests that mutations affecting this trait occur at a high rate.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a male fertility gene (Ms4) in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identifying a stable male-sterility system is crucial for the development of hybrid soybean. In soybean, eleven male-sterile, female-fertile mutants (ms1, ms2, ms3, ms4, ms5, ms6, ms7, ms8, ms9, msMOS, and msp) have been identified and some of which have been mapped to soybean chromosomes. The objec...

  7. Repair of the ultraviolet-irradiated male genome in fertilized mouse eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.; Pedersen, R.A.

    1981-03-27

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis occurred in both male and female pronuclei of the mouse zygote in response to irradiation with ultraviolet light, indicating a capacity for excision repair. Furthermore, damage to DNA of the male gamete before fertilization can be repaired after the sperm enters the egg cytoplasm.

  8. [Inheritance of reversions to male fertility in male-sterile sorghum hybrids with 9E cytoplasm male sterility induced by environmental conditions].

    PubMed

    Elkonin, L A; Gerashchenkov, G A; Domanina, I V; Rozhnova, N A

    2015-03-01

    Heritable phenotypic alterations occurring during plant ontogenesis under the influence of environmental factors are among the most intriguing genetic phenomena. It was found that male-sterile sorghum hybrids in the 9E cytoplasm from the F1 and F2 generations, which were obtained by crossing CMS lines with different fertile lines grown in field conditions, were transferred to greenhouse produce fertile tillers. Lines created by the self-pollination of revertant tillers exhibit complete male fertility upon cultivation under various environments (in the field, Tdry plot,(y) Tirrigated plot(y)). In a number of test-crosses of revertants to CMS lines in the 9E cytoplasm, restoration of male fertility in F1 hybrids was found, indicating that revertants possess functional fertility-restoring genes. A high positive correlation was found between the fertility level of the test-cross hybrids and the hydrothermal coefficient (the ratio of the sum of precipitation to the sum of temperatures) during the booting stage and pollen maturation (r = 0.75...0.91; P<0.01), suggesting that a high level of plant water availability is needed for the expression of fertility-restoring genes of revertants. These data show that the fertility-restoring genes for the 9E cytoplasm are dominant in conditions of high water availability and recessive in drought conditions; reversions to male fertility are due to up-regulation of fertility-restoring genes by a high level of water availability. Comparative MSAP-analysis of DNA of male-sterile and male-fertile test-cross hybrids using HpaII/MspI restrictases and primers to polygalacturonase gene ADPG2, which is required for cell separation during reproductive development, and gene MYB46, the transcription factor regulating secondary wall biosynthesis, revealed differences in the number and the length of amplified fragments. Changes in the methylation of these genes in conditions of drought stress are apparently the reason for male sterility of

  9. Male caffeine and alcohol intake in relation to semen parameters and in vitro fertilization outcomes among fertility patients.

    PubMed

    Karmon, A E; Toth, T L; Chiu, Y-H; Gaskins, A J; Tanrikut, C; Wright, D L; Hauser, R; Chavarro, J E

    2017-03-01

    Much of the literature on the impact of male caffeine and alcohol intake on reproductive outcomes has utilized semen quality as a proxy for male fertility, although semen parameters have a limited predictive value for spontaneous pregnancy. The objective of this study was to investigate whether male caffeine and alcohol intakes are associated with semen parameters and assisted reproductive technology outcome. The Environment and Reproductive Health Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study, enrolls subfertile couples presenting for treatment at an academic fertility center (2007-2012). A total of 171 men with 338 semen analyses and 205 assisted reproductive technology cycles were included in this analysis. Diet was assessed using a 131-item food frequency questionnaire. Mixed models adjusting for potential confounders were used to evaluate the relationships of male caffeine and alcohol intakes with semen parameters and assisted reproductive technology outcomes. There was no association between male caffeine and alcohol intake and semen quality. Male caffeine intake was negatively related to live birth after assisted reproductive technologies (p-trend < 0.01), and male alcohol intake was positively related to live birth after assisted reproductive technologies (p-trend = 0.04). Adjusted live birth rate among couples with a male partner in the highest quartile of caffeine intake (≥272 mg/day) compared to couples with a male partner in the lowest quartile of intake (<99 mg/day) was 19% vs. 55%, respectively, p < 0.01. In terms of alcohol intake, adjusted live birth rate among couples with a male partner in the highest quartile of alcohol intake (≥22 g/day) compared to couples with a male partner in the lowest quartile of intake (<3 g/day) was 61% vs. 28%, respectively, p = 0.05. In conclusion, male pre-treatment caffeine and alcohol intakes were associated with live birth after assisted reproductive technologies, but not with semen parameters, among

  10. Cyclamate intake and cyclohexylamine excretion are not related to male fertility in humans.

    PubMed

    Serra-Majem, L; Bassas, L; García-Glosas, R; Ribas, L; Inglés, C; Casals, I; Saavedra, P; Renwick, A G

    2003-12-01

    Cyclamate and its metabolite cyclohexylamine affect male fertility in high dose animal studies, but this affect has not been investigated in epidemiological studies. This paper reports the first epidemiological study designed to investigate the possibility of a relationship between cyclamate and cyclohexylamine and male fertility in humans, in which 405 cases of clinically defined infertility in men and 379 controls were surveyed. Semen evaluation, urine analysis for cyclamate and cyclohexylamine and dietary questionnaires were compared between cases and controls. No evidence was found of a significant association between cyclamate intake and male infertility; neither high cyclamate nor high cyclohexylamine excretion were associated with elevated risk. The lack of association remained after adjusting by age, area of residence, education, total energy intake and other variables. No significant correlations were observed between cyclamate intake, metabolism or excretion, and sperm count and motility. The results demonstrate no effect of cyclamate or cyclohexylamine on male fertility at the present levels of cyclamate consumption.

  11. How to overcome male infertility after 40: Influence of paternal age on fertility.

    PubMed

    Belloc, Stephanie; Hazout, Andre; Zini, Armand; Merviel, Philippe; Cabry, Rosalie; Chahine, Hikmat; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2014-05-01

    The recent trend toward delayed parenthood raises major safety concerns because of the adverse effects of aging on couple fertility. Studies have demonstrated that aging clearly affects female fertility, but can also affect male fertility. Although several theories have been proposed, the exact mechanisms responsible for the observed age-related decline in male fertility remain to be elucidated. It has been shown that advanced paternal age (PA) is associated with reduced semen volume as well as, reduced sperm count, motility and morphology. Recent studies have also reported that paternal aging is associated with a significant increase in the prevalence of both genomic and epigenomic sperm defects. In the context of natural and intrauterine insemination (IUI) conception, advanced paternal age has been associated with lower pregnancy rates and increased rates of spontaneous abortion (independent of maternal age). In IVF and oocyte donation programs, a significant decrease in late blastocyst development has been seen in those cycles using spermatozoa of men older than 55. However, no significant relationship between paternal age and IVF or ICSI pregnancy rates has been observed. Although there are no treatments that can fully restore the age-related decline in male fertility, various measures have been shown to optimize male fertility potential. Specific therapies (e.g. varicocelectomy) and lifestyle changes (e.g. dietary antioxidant supplements) may help minimize some of the age-related deleterious effects on spermatogenesis, such as, oxidative stress and endocrine abnormalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional male accessory glands and fertility in Drosophila require novel ecdysone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anuj K.; Kumar, Ajay; Gupta, Himanshu P. K.; Singh, Anshuman; Buehner, Norene A.

    2017-01-01

    In many insects, the accessory gland, a secretory tissue of the male reproductive system, is essential for male fertility. Male accessory gland is the major source of proteinaceous secretions, collectively called as seminal proteins (or accessory gland proteins), which upon transfer, manipulate the physiology and behavior of mated females. Insect hormones such as ecdysteroids and juvenoids play a key role in accessory gland development and protein synthesis but little is known about underlying molecular players and their mechanism of action. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the roles of hormone-dependent transcription factors (Nuclear Receptors), in accessory gland development, function and male fertility of a genetically tractable insect model, Drosophila melanogaster. First, we carried out an RNAi screen involving 19 hormone receptors, individually and specifically, in a male reproductive tissue (accessory gland) for their requirement in Drosophila male fertility. Subsequently, by using independent RNAi/ dominant negative forms, we show that Ecdysone Receptor (EcR) is essential for male fertility due to its requirement in the normal development of accessory glands in Drosophila: EcR depleted glands fail to make seminal proteins and have dying cells. Further, our data point to a novel ecdysone receptor that does not include Ultraspiracle but is probably comprised of EcR isoforms in Drosophila male accessory glands. Our data suggest that this novel ecdysone receptor might act downstream of homeodomain transcription factor paired (prd) in the male accessory gland. Overall, the study suggests novel ecdysone receptor as an important player in the hormonal regulation of seminal protein production and insect male fertility. PMID:28493870

  13. Functional male accessory glands and fertility in Drosophila require novel ecdysone receptor.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vandana; Pandey, Anuj K; Kumar, Ajay; Misra, Snigdha; Gupta, Himanshu P K; Gupta, Snigdha; Singh, Anshuman; Buehner, Norene A; Ravi Ram, Kristipati

    2017-05-01

    In many insects, the accessory gland, a secretory tissue of the male reproductive system, is essential for male fertility. Male accessory gland is the major source of proteinaceous secretions, collectively called as seminal proteins (or accessory gland proteins), which upon transfer, manipulate the physiology and behavior of mated females. Insect hormones such as ecdysteroids and juvenoids play a key role in accessory gland development and protein synthesis but little is known about underlying molecular players and their mechanism of action. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the roles of hormone-dependent transcription factors (Nuclear Receptors), in accessory gland development, function and male fertility of a genetically tractable insect model, Drosophila melanogaster. First, we carried out an RNAi screen involving 19 hormone receptors, individually and specifically, in a male reproductive tissue (accessory gland) for their requirement in Drosophila male fertility. Subsequently, by using independent RNAi/ dominant negative forms, we show that Ecdysone Receptor (EcR) is essential for male fertility due to its requirement in the normal development of accessory glands in Drosophila: EcR depleted glands fail to make seminal proteins and have dying cells. Further, our data point to a novel ecdysone receptor that does not include Ultraspiracle but is probably comprised of EcR isoforms in Drosophila male accessory glands. Our data suggest that this novel ecdysone receptor might act downstream of homeodomain transcription factor paired (prd) in the male accessory gland. Overall, the study suggests novel ecdysone receptor as an important player in the hormonal regulation of seminal protein production and insect male fertility.

  14. Male fertility and sexual function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, D J; Hill, S T; Baker, H W G

    2006-01-01

    Spinal cord injury has an enormous impact upon the sexual relationship of a man and his partner. Erection may be partial or absent, orgasm altered or impossible, and fertility severely impaired. New understanding of the physiology of sexual function and improved treatment can enable most cord-injured men to achieve erections suitable for sexual satisfaction. Modern methods of sperm collection and fertility treatment mean that many can also be fathers. The best results are obtained by a team approach involving rehabilitation and reproductive medicine clinicians, nurses, spinal cord injury specialists and counselors with the cord-injured man and his partner. Erections can be achieved by drugs, such as sildenafil, that block phosphodiesterase 5, prolonging the action of nitric oxide with resultant smooth muscle relaxation. Intracavernosal prostaglandin E1 and mechanical systems, such as vacuum pumps and constriction rings, are also effective. Sexual gratification can be promoted in the context of an understanding relationship in which the cord-injured person can gain pleasure from pleasing his partner and also from his partner's exploration of erotogenic areas not affected by the spinal cord injury. An emphasis on the broader view of sexuality in relationships allows for a continuance and strengthening of bonds between the couple. Vibration ejaculation or electroejaculation can be used to collect semen. For a limited period in the acute phase, usually for about 6-12 days after injury, normal semen can be obtained by electroejaculation from some cord-injured men. With chronic spinal cord injury the semen is of variable quality. Some patients have necrospermia, which may be improved by regular ejaculation. Others have poor quality semen or spermatogenic disorders and, in this situation, in vitro fertilization techniques must be used to achieve parenthood. Trials of assisted ejaculation help individualize cost-effective management of the infertility.

  15. COPULATORY BEHAVIOR, GENITAL MORPHOLOGY, AND MALE FERTILIZATION SUCCESS IN WATER STRIDERS.

    PubMed

    Arnqvist, Göran; Danielsson, Ingela

    1999-02-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical interest in postmating processes have generated a need for increasing our understanding of the sources of variance in fertilization success among males. Of particular importance is whether such postmating sexual selection merely reinforces the effects of premating sexual selection or whether other types of male traits are involved. In the current study, we document large intraspecific variation in last male sperm precedence in the water strider Gerris lateralis. Male relative paternity success was repeatable across replicate females, showing that males differ consistently in their ability to achieve fertilizations. By analyzing shape variation in male genital morphology, we were able to demonstrate that the shape of male intromittent genitalia was related to relative paternity success. This is the first direct experimental support for the suggestion that male genitalia evolve by postmating sexual selection. A detailed analysis revealed that different components of male genitalia had different effects, some affecting male ability to achieve sperm precedence and others affecting male ability to avoid sperm precedence by subsequent males. Further, the effects of the shape of the male genitalia on paternity success was in part dependent on female morphology, suggesting that selection on male genitalia will depend on the frequency distribution of female phenotypes. We failed to find any effects of other morphological traits, such as male body size or the degree of asymmetry in leg length, on fertilization success. Although males differed consistently in their copulatory behavior, copulation duration was the only behavioral trait that had any significant effect on paternity. © 1999 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Male soy food intake was not associated with in vitro fertilization outcomes among their partners attending a fertility center

    PubMed Central

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Afeiche, Myriam C; Chiu, Yu-Han; Vanegas, Jose C; Williams, Paige L; Tanrikut, Cigdem; Toth, Thomas L; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    Male factor etiology may be a contributing factor in up to 60% of infertility cases. Dietary intake of phytoestrogens has been related to abnormal semen quality and hormone levels. However, its effect on couple fecundity is still unclear. Intake of soy products was assessed in 184 men from couples undergoing infertility treatment with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Couples were recruited between February 2007 and May 2014 and prospectively followed to document treatment outcomes including fertilization, implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models with random intercepts, binomial distribution and logit link function were used to examine this relation while accounting for repeated treatment cycles and adjusting for potential confounders. Male partner’s intake of soy foods and soy isoflavones was unrelated to fertilization rates, the proportions of poor quality embryos, accelerated or slow embryo cleavage rate, and implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth. The adjusted live birth rates per initiated cycle (95% CI) for partners of men in increasing categories of soy food intake were 0.36 (0.28 to 0.45), 0.42 (0.29 to 0.56), 0.36 (0.24 to 0.51), and 0.37 (0.24 to 0.52), respectively. Soy food intake in men was not related to clinical outcomes among couples presenting at an infertility clinic. Data on the relation between phytoestrogens and male reproductive potential remains scarce and additional research is needed to clarify its role in human reproduction. PMID:26097060

  17. Assessment of fertility in male rats after extended chemical castration with a GnRH antagonist.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Susan S; Selmin, Francesca; Murty, Santos B; Qiu, Wei; Thanoo, B C; DeLuca, Patrick P

    2004-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether male rats whose testosterone levels were suppressed to castration levels (<0.5 ng/mL) for a 1-year period by the sustained delivery of orntide acetate, a GnRH antagonist, would return to fertility (ie, produce offspring) after serum testosterone returned to control levels. Male rats comprising a treatment group (orntide microspheres, dose = 27 mg/kg/y), a vehicle control group, and a control group of proven male breeders were used. For the treatment and vehicle control groups, serum orntide and testosterone levels were monitored at periodic intervals for 14 months from the initiation of treatment. After serum testosterone levels returned to vehicle control levels and orntide serum levels were no longer discernible for the treated group, each of the animals was housed with 2 drug-naive, female, proven breeders. All the breeder females produced offspring with the exception of 1 female housed with a male rat from the treatment group and the 2 females housed with a single male rat from the vehicle control group. The mean size and weight of the litters from each group were not statistically different. Further, fertility of the offspring from each group was assessed. The male and female offspring studied were all shown to be fertile. The results suggest that lack of fertility due to testosterone suppression in male rats is reversible after cessation of treatment with the GnRH analog, orntide.

  18. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Walczak–Jedrzejowska, Renata; Wolski, Jan Karol

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress results from the imbalance between production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the protective effect of the antioxidant system responsible for their neutralization and removal. An excess of ROS causes a pathological reaction resulting in damage to cells and tissues. Spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of ROS. Oxidative stress affects their activity, damages DNA structure, and accelerates apoptosis, all of which consequently decrease their numbers, hinders motility and development of normal morphology, and impairs function. This leads to disturbances in fertility or embryo development disorder. The main cellular source of ROS in the semen are immature sperm cells and white blood cells. The increase in the number of leukocytes may be due to infection and inflammation, but can also be secondary to harmful environmental factors, long sexual abstinence, or varicocele. The protective antioxidant system in the semen is composed of enzymes, as well as nonenzymatic substances, which closely interact with each other to ensure optimal protection against ROS. Non–enzymatic antioxidants include vitamins A, E, C, and B complex, glutathione, pantothenic acid, coenzyme Q10 and carnitine, and micronutrients such as zinc, selenium, and copper. It seems that a deficiency of any of them can cause a decrease in total antioxidant status. In vitro and in vivo that studies demonstrate many antioxidants possess a beneficial effect on fertility and, therefore, their use is recommended as supportive therapy for the treatment of infertility in men. PMID:24578993

  19. Atropine-induced inhibition of sperm and semen transport impairs fertility in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Ban, Yoshiki; Uchida, Miki; Gondo, Eri; Yamamoto, Masakatsu; Sekiguchi, Yoshiko; Sakaue, Akiko; Kemi, Masayuki; Nakatsuka, Toshio

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies revealed that atropine reduced male fertility in rats without any effects on mating performance, sperm production and motility, and testicular morphology. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the impairment of male fertility induced by atropine was related to the inhibition of sperm and semen transports from the vas deferens and seminal vesicle to the urethra during the process of emission. Male rats were treated with atropine at 125 mg/kg/day for 10-17 days prior to mating with untreated females. After confirmation of mating, male rats were euthanized and sperm number in the vas deferens and weights of the seminal vesicle and copulatory plug were determined as indicators of inhibition of sperm and semen transports, respectively. Reproductive status of mated females was determined on gestation days 15-17. A low pregnancy rate associated with a decreased number of implants was observed in females that mated with the atropine-treated males. The average number of sperm in the vas deferens was increased in the atropine-treated males. The average seminal vesicle weight in the atropine-treated males was greater than that of controls. The copulatory plug weights were decreased in the atropine-treated males. These results suggest that inhibitions of sperm and semen transports from the vas deferens and seminal vesicle to the urethra during the process of emission result in reduced male fertility in rats.

  20. Inbreeding depresses sperm competitiveness, but not fertilization or mating success in male Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Lukasz; Martin, Oliver Y; Millard, Anna L; Emerson, Brent C; Gage, Matthew J G

    2010-11-22

    As populations decline to levels where reproduction among close genetic relatives becomes more probable, subsequent increases in homozygous recessive deleterious expression and/or loss of heterozygote advantage can lead to inbreeding depression. Here, we measure how inbreeding across replicate lines of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum impacts on male reproductive fitness in the absence or presence of male-male competition. Effects on male evolution from mating pattern were removed by enforcing monogamous mating throughout. After inbreeding across eight generations, we found that male fertility in the absence of competition was unaffected. However, we found significant inbreeding depression of sperm competitiveness: non-inbred males won 57 per cent of fertilizations in competition, while inbred equivalents only sired 42 per cent. We also found that the P(2) 'offence' role in sperm competition was significantly more depressed under inbreeding than sperm 'defence' (P(1)). Mating behaviour did not explain these differences, and there was no difference in the viability of offspring sired by inbred or non-inbred males. Sperm length variation was significantly greater in the ejaculates of inbred males. Our results show that male ability to achieve normal fertilization success was not depressed under strong inbreeding, but that inbreeding depression in these traits occurred when conditions of sperm competition were generated.

  1. Repeated carbon nanotube administrations in male mice cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Weidong; Butch, Elizabeth R.; Snyder, Scott E.; Yan, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Soluble carbon nanotubes are promising materials for in vivo delivery and imaging applications. Several reports have described the in vivo toxicity of carbon nanotubes, however, their effects on male reproduction have not been examined. Here we show that repeated intravenous injections of water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes into male mice can cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility. Nanotubes accumulated in the testes, generated oxidative stress, and decreased the thickness of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis at day 15, but the damage was repaired after 60 and 90 days. The quantity, quality, and integrity of the sperm and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 90-day period. The fertility of treated male mice was unaffected; the pregnancy rate and delivery success of female mice that mated with the treated male mice did not differ from those that mated with untreated male mice. PMID:20693989

  2. Repeated administrations of carbon nanotubes in male mice cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Weidong; Butch, Elizabeth R.; Snyder, Scott E.; Yan, Bing

    2010-09-01

    Soluble carbon nanotubes show promise as materials for in vivo delivery and imaging applications. Several reports have described the in vivo toxicity of carbon nanotubes, but their effects on male reproduction have not been examined. Here, we show that repeated intravenous injections of water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes into male mice can cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility. Nanotubes accumulated in the testes, generated oxidative stress and decreased the thickness of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis at day 15, but the damage was repaired at 60 and 90 days. The quantity, quality and integrity of the sperm and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 90-day period. The fertility of treated male mice was unaffected; the pregnancy rate and delivery success of female mice that mated with the treated male mice did not differ from those that mated with untreated male mice.

  3. Inbreeding depresses sperm competitiveness, but not fertilization or mating success in male Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Michalczyk, Łukasz; Martin, Oliver Y.; Millard, Anna L.; Emerson, Brent C.; Gage, Matthew J. G.

    2010-01-01

    As populations decline to levels where reproduction among close genetic relatives becomes more probable, subsequent increases in homozygous recessive deleterious expression and/or loss of heterozygote advantage can lead to inbreeding depression. Here, we measure how inbreeding across replicate lines of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum impacts on male reproductive fitness in the absence or presence of male–male competition. Effects on male evolution from mating pattern were removed by enforcing monogamous mating throughout. After inbreeding across eight generations, we found that male fertility in the absence of competition was unaffected. However, we found significant inbreeding depression of sperm competitiveness: non-inbred males won 57 per cent of fertilizations in competition, while inbred equivalents only sired 42 per cent. We also found that the P2 ‘offence’ role in sperm competition was significantly more depressed under inbreeding than sperm ‘defence’ (P1). Mating behaviour did not explain these differences, and there was no difference in the viability of offspring sired by inbred or non-inbred males. Sperm length variation was significantly greater in the ejaculates of inbred males. Our results show that male ability to achieve normal fertilization success was not depressed under strong inbreeding, but that inbreeding depression in these traits occurred when conditions of sperm competition were generated. PMID:20554548

  4. Male-by-female interactions influence fertilization success and mediate the benefits of polyandry in the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jonathan P; Marshall, Dustin J

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that females benefit from mating with multiple males (polyandry) by minimizing the probability of fertilization by genetically incompatible sperm. Few, however, have directly attributed variation in female reproductive success to the fertilizing capacity of sperm. In this study we report on two experiments that investigated the benefits of polyandry and the interacting effects of males and females at fertilization in the free-spawning Australian sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma. In the first experiment we used a paired (split clutch) experimental design and compared fertilization rates within female egg clutches under polyandry (eggs exposed to the sperm from two males simultaneously) and monandry (eggs from the same female exposed to sperm from each of the same two males separately). Our analysis revealed a significant fertilization benefit of polyandry and strong interacting effects of males and females at fertilization. Further analysis of these data strongly suggested that the higher rates of fertilization in the polyandry treatment were due to an overrepresentation of fertilizations due to the most compatible male. To further explore the interacting effects of males and females at fertilization we performed a second factorial experiment in which four males were crossed with two females (in all eight combinations). In addition to confirming that fertilization success is influenced by male x female interactions, this latter experiment revealed that both sexes contributed significant variance to the observed patterns of fertilization. Taken together, these findings highlight the importance of male x female interactions at fertilization and suggest that polyandry will enable females to reduce the cost of fertilization by incompatible gametes.

  5. Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS on Sperm: A Molecular Test For Male Fertility Diagnosis*

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Laura; Grasseau, Isabelle; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Currently, evaluation of sperm quality is primarily based on in vitro measures of sperm function such as motility, viability and/or acrosome reaction. However, results are often poorly correlated with fertility, and alternative diagnostic tools are therefore needed both in veterinary and human medicine. In a recent pilot study, we demonstrated that MS profiles from intact chicken sperm using MALDI-TOF profiles could detect significant differences between fertile/subfertile spermatozoa showing that such profiles could be useful for in vitro male fertility testing. In the present study, we performed larger standardized experimental procedures designed for the development of fertility- predictive mathematical models based on sperm cell MALDI-TOF MS profiles acquired through a fast, automated method. This intact cell MALDI-TOF MS-based method showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying fertile/subfertile males in a large male population of known fertility from two distinct genetic lineages (meat and egg laying lines). We additionally identified 40% of the m/z peaks observed in sperm MS profiles through a top-down high-resolution protein identification analysis. This revealed that the MALDI-TOF MS spectra obtained from intact sperm cells contained a large proportion of protein degradation products, many implicated in important functional pathways in sperm such as energy metabolism, structure and movement. Proteins identified by our predictive model included diverse and important functional classes providing new insights into sperm function as it relates to fertility differences in this experimental system. Thus, in addition to the chicken model system developed here, with the use of appropriate models these methods should effectively translate to other animal taxa where similar tests for fertility are warranted. PMID:27044871

  6. Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS on Sperm: A Molecular Test For Male Fertility Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soler, Laura; Labas, Valérie; Thélie, Aurore; Grasseau, Isabelle; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Currently, evaluation of sperm quality is primarily based on in vitro measures of sperm function such as motility, viability and/or acrosome reaction. However, results are often poorly correlated with fertility, and alternative diagnostic tools are therefore needed both in veterinary and human medicine. In a recent pilot study, we demonstrated that MS profiles from intact chicken sperm using MALDI-TOF profiles could detect significant differences between fertile/subfertile spermatozoa showing that such profiles could be useful for in vitro male fertility testing. In the present study, we performed larger standardized experimental procedures designed for the development of fertility- predictive mathematical models based on sperm cell MALDI-TOF MS profiles acquired through a fast, automated method. This intact cell MALDI-TOF MS-based method showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying fertile/subfertile males in a large male population of known fertility from two distinct genetic lineages (meat and egg laying lines). We additionally identified 40% of the m/z peaks observed in sperm MS profiles through a top-down high-resolution protein identification analysis. This revealed that the MALDI-TOF MS spectra obtained from intact sperm cells contained a large proportion of protein degradation products, many implicated in important functional pathways in sperm such as energy metabolism, structure and movement. Proteins identified by our predictive model included diverse and important functional classes providing new insights into sperm function as it relates to fertility differences in this experimental system. Thus, in addition to the chicken model system developed here, with the use of appropriate models these methods should effectively translate to other animal taxa where similar tests for fertility are warranted.

  7. Extensive nuclear influence on mitochondrial transcription and genome structure in male-fertile and male-sterile alloplasmic Nicotiana materials.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, G; Glimelius, K

    1991-10-01

    Nuclear influences on mitochondrial transcription and genome organization were analysed in six different male-fertile and male-sterile alloplasmic Nicotiana cultivars. The alloplasmic materials were compared with the corresponding nuclear species (N. tabacum) and cytoplasmic donor species (N. debneyi, N. rapanda or N. suaveolens) in Northern and Southern analyses using twelve different mitochondrial genes as probes. The investigation revealed that the nucleus exerts extensive influence on the expression and structure of the mitochondrial genome. For the majority of the probes, changes in both mitochondrial transcription and DNA patterns in alloplasmic cultivars were detected. Even though changes in transcription patterns, which correlated with male sterility, were detected for three of the probes (atpA, orf25 and coxII), the changes were not consistent for all the male-sterile materials. Likewise, no consistent association between mtDNA restriction patterns and cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) was detected.

  8. An intact Pms2 ATPase domain is not essential for male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Jared M; Dudley, Sandra; Miller, Ashleigh J; Liskay, R Michael

    2016-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery in mammals plays critical roles in both mutation avoidance and spermatogenesis. Meiotic analysis of knockout mice of two different MMR genes, Mlh1 and Mlh3, revealed both male and female infertility associated with a defect in meiotic crossing over. In contrast, another MMR gene knockout, Pms2 (Pms2ko/ko), which contained a deletion of a portion of the ATPase domain, produced animals that were male sterile but female fertile. However, the meiotic phenotype of Pms2ko/ko males was less clear-cut than for Mlh1- or Mlh3-deficient meiosis. More recently, we generated a different Pms2 mutant allele (Pms2cre), which results in deletion of the same portion of the ATPase domain. Surprisingly, Pms2cre/cre male mice were completely fertile, suggesting that the ATPase domain of Pms2 is not required for male fertility. To explore the difference in male fertility, we examined the Pms2 RNA and found that alternative splicing of the Pms2cre allele results in a predicted Pms2 containing the C-terminus, which contains the Mlh1-interaction domain, a possible candidate for stabilizing Mlh1 levels. To study further the basis of male fertility, we examined Mlh1 levels in testes and found that whereas Pms2 loss in Pms2ko/ko mice results in severely reduced levels of Mlh1 expression in the testes, Mlh1 levels in Pms2cre/cre testes were reduced to a lesser extent. Thus, we propose that a primary function of Pms2 during spermatogenesis is to stabilize Mlh1 levels prior to its critical crossing over function with Mlh3. PMID:26753533

  9. Toward a comprehensive genetic analysis of male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Barbara T; Lindsley, Dan L; Herrera, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for genetic dissection of developmental processes. To exploit its full potential for studying the genetic basis of male fertility, we performed a large-scale screen for male-sterile (ms) mutations. From a collection of 12,326 strains carrying ethyl-methanesulfonate-treated, homozygous viable second or third chromosomes, 2216 ms lines were identified, constituting the largest collection of ms mutations described to date for any organism. Over 2000 lines were cytologically characterized and, of these, 81% failed during spermatogenesis while 19% manifested postspermatogenic processes. Of the phenotypic categories used to classify the mutants, the largest groups were those that showed visible defects in meiotic chromosome segregation or cytokinesis and those that failed in sperm individualization. We also identified 62 fertile or subfertile lines that showed high levels of chromosome loss due to abnormal mitotic or meiotic chromosome transmission in the male germ line or due to paternal chromosome loss in the early embryo. We argue that the majority of autosomal genes that function in male fertility in Drosophila are represented by one or more alleles in the ms collection. Given the conservation of molecular mechanisms underlying important cellular processes, analysis of these mutations should provide insight into the genetic networks that control male fertility in Drosophila and other organisms, including humans. PMID:15166148

  10. Morphology of the external genitalia of the adult male and female mice as an endpoint of sex differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Dana A.; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Cunha, Tristan; Menshenina, Julia; Barcellos, Dale; Chan, Lok Yun; Risbridger, Gail; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Adult external genitalia (ExG) are the endpoints of normal sex differentiation. Detailed morphometric analysis and comparison of adult mouse ExG has revealed 10 homologous features distinguishing the penis and clitoris that define masculine vs. feminine sex differentiation. These features have enabled the construction of a simple metric to evaluate various intersex conditions in mutant or hormonally manipulated mice. This review focuses on the morphology of the adult mouse penis and clitoris through detailed analysis of histologic sections, scanning electron microscopy, and three-dimensional reconstruction. We also present previous results from evaluation of “non-traditional” mammals, such as the spotted hyena and wallaby to demonstrate the complex process of sex differentiation that involves not only androgen-dependent processes, but also estrogen-dependent and hormone-independent mechanisms. PMID:21893161

  11. Environmental toxins: alarming impacts of pesticides on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pallav; Banerjee, Rajdeb

    2014-10-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the effects of more than 15 mostly used pesticides on male reproductive physiology, as recent experimental and epidemiological research have indicated their alarming impact on overall human health. Mechanisms have described that pesticide exposure damages spermatozoa, alter Sertoli or Leydig cell function, both in vitro and in vivo and thus affects semen quality. But, the literature suggests a need for more intricate research in those pesticides that are defined as mutagens or carcinogens and directly affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This literature review also proposes specific solutions to overcome these health effects. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell-cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions.

  13. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell–cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions. PMID:20972450

  14. Preoperative duplex ultrasound parameters predicting male fertility after successful varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Fahad M.; Akbar, Mahboob H.; Altwairgi, Adel K.; AlThaqufi, Omar J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess duplex ultrasound (DUS) parameters, and predicti the outcome of varicocele ligation in male infertility. Methods: This retrospective and follow up study was conducted at Dr. Sulaiman Al Habib Hospital, AlQassim, Saudi Arabia between January 2011 and December 2012. Eighty-two patients were selected, who presented with clinical/subclinical varicocele and male infertility. All these patients had DUS of the scrotum and underwent for low ligation varicocelectomy. These patients were followed for a period of 12-24 months after surgery for the occurrence of paternity. We reviewed pre-operative scrotal DUS of these 82 patients for the testicular size and volume, pampiniform veins caliber and duration of reflux in the dilated veins at rest, and after valsalva maneuver. These DUS parameters were correlated with the postoperative paternity rate. Results: Postoperative paternity was achieved in 18 patients (31.6%) with normal-sized testes, and in 3 patients (12%) with small size testes. The positive paternity rate was higher (38.5%) in patients with clinically detected varicocele, compared with only 16.7% of patients with subclinical varicocele (detected by ultrasound only). In addition, postoperative paternity was significantly higher in patients with bilateral varicocele (70.6%), with shunt-type varicocele (71.4%), and patients with a permanent grade of venous reflux (62.5%). Conclusion: Selection of patients for the successful paternity after varicocele repair depends mainly on DUS parameters, which includes normal size testicles with shunt type of bilateral varicocele and continuous reflux. PMID:26620986

  15. TOWARDS USING STABLE SPERMATOZOAL RNAS FOR PROGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF MALE FACTOR FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: To establish the stability of spermatozoal RNAs as a means to validate their use as a male fertility marker. Design: Semen samples were randomly selected for 1 of 3 cryopreservation treatments. Setting: An academic research environment. Patient(s): Men aged...

  16. THE EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA ON SPERMATOGENESIS, APOPTOSIS, GENE EXPRESSION AND FERTILITY IN ADULT MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia on spermatogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression and fertility in adult male mice
    John C. Rockett1, Faye L. Mapp1, J. Brian Garges1, J. Christopher Luft1, Chisato Mori2 and David J. Dix1.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Envir...

  17. TOWARDS USING STABLE SPERMATOZOAL RNAS FOR PROGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF MALE FACTOR FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: To establish the stability of spermatozoal RNAs as a means to validate their use as a male fertility marker. Design: Semen samples were randomly selected for 1 of 3 cryopreservation treatments. Setting: An academic research environment. Patient(s): Men aged...

  18. THE EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA ON SPERMATOGENESIS, APOPTOSIS, GENE EXPRESSION AND FERTILITY IN ADULT MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia on spermatogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression and fertility in adult male mice
    John C. Rockett1, Faye L. Mapp1, J. Brian Garges1, J. Christopher Luft1, Chisato Mori2 and David J. Dix1.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Envir...

  19. Diversifying sunflower germplasm by integration and mapping of a novel male fertility restoration gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The combination of a single cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) PET-1, originating from wild Helianthus petiolaris subsp. petiolaris Nutt., and the corresponding fertility restoration gene Rf1, has been used for commercial sunflower hybrid seed production worldwide since the early 1970s. A new CMS line 5...

  20. Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and fertility in male cockroaches, but not sperm viability

    PubMed Central

    Bunning, Harriet; Rapkin, James; Belcher, Laurence; Archer, C. Ruth; Jensen, Kim; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on sperm number and viability in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea, as well as the consequences for male fertility. We found the intake of P and C influenced sperm number, being maximized at a high intake of diets with a P : C ratio of 1 : 2, but not sperm viability. The nutritional landscapes for male fertility and sperm number were closely aligned, suggesting that sperm number is the major determinant of male fertility in N. cinerea. Under dietary choice, males regulate nutrient intake at a P : C ratio of 1 : 4.95, which is midway between the ratios needed to maximize sperm production and pre-copulatory attractiveness in this species. This raises the possibility that males regulate nutrient intake to balance the trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory traits in this species. PMID:25608881

  1. A novel male sterility-fertility restoration system in plants for hybrid seed production.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra Pratap; Singh, Sudhir P; Pandey, Tripti; Singh, Ram Rakshpal; Sawant, Samir V

    2015-06-15

    Hybrid seeds are used for stimulated crop production, as they harness heterosis. The achievement of complete male-sterility in the female-parent and the restored-fertility in F1-hybrids are the major bottlenecks in the commercial hybrid seed production. Here, we report a male sterility-fertility restoration system by engineering the in most nutritive anther wall layer tapetum of female and male parents. In the female parent, high-level, and stringent expression of Arabidopsis autophagy-related gene BECLIN1 was achieved in the tapetum, which altered the tapetal degeneration program, leading to male sterility. This works on our previously demonstrated expression cassette based on functional complementation of TATA-box mutant (TGTA) promoter and TATA-binding protein mutant3 (TBPm3), with modification by conjugating Long Hypocotyle in Far-Red1 fragment (HFR1(NT131)) with TBPm3 (HFR1(NT131)-TBPm3) to exercise regulatory control over it. In the male parent, tapetum-specific Constitutive photo-morphogenesis1 (COP1) was expressed. The F1 obtained by crossing these engineered parents showed decreased BECLIN1 expression, which was further completely abolished when COP1-mutant (COP1(L105A)) was used as a male parent, leading to normal tapetal development and restored fertility. The system works on COP1-HFR1 interaction and COP1-mediated degradation of TBPm3 pool (HFR1(NT131)-TBPm3). The system can be deployed for hybrid seed production in agricultural crops.

  2. Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and fertility in male cockroaches, but not sperm viability.

    PubMed

    Bunning, Harriet; Rapkin, James; Belcher, Laurence; Archer, C Ruth; Jensen, Kim; Hunt, John

    2015-03-07

    It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on sperm number and viability in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea, as well as the consequences for male fertility. We found the intake of P and C influenced sperm number, being maximized at a high intake of diets with a P : C ratio of 1 : 2, but not sperm viability. The nutritional landscapes for male fertility and sperm number were closely aligned, suggesting that sperm number is the major determinant of male fertility in N. cinerea. Under dietary choice, males regulate nutrient intake at a P : C ratio of 1 : 4.95, which is midway between the ratios needed to maximize sperm production and pre-copulatory attractiveness in this species. This raises the possibility that males regulate nutrient intake to balance the trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory traits in this species. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Cul4A is essential for spermatogenesis and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Kopanja, Dragana; Roy, Nilotpal; Stoyanova, Tanya; Hess, Rex A; Bagchi, Srilata; Raychaudhuri, Pradip

    2011-04-15

    The mammalian Cul4 genes, Cul4A and Cul4B, encode the scaffold components of the cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligases. The two Cul4 genes are functionally redundant. Recent study indicated that mice expressing a truncated CUL4A that fails to interact with its functional partner ROC1 exhibit no developmental phenotype. We generated a Cul4A-/- strain lacking exons 4-8 that does not express any detectable truncated protein. In this strain, the male mice are infertile and exhibit severe deficiencies in spermatogenesis. The primary spermatocytes are deficient in progression through late prophase I, a time point when expression of the X-linked Cul4B gene is silenced due to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Testes of the Cul4A-/- mice exhibit extensive apoptosis. Interestingly, the pachytene spermatocytes exhibit persistent double stranded breaks, suggesting a deficiency in homologous recombination. Also, we find that CUL4A localizes to the double stranded breaks generated in pre-pachytene spermatocytes. The observations identify a novel function of CUL4A in meiotic recombination and demonstrate an essential role of CUL4A in spermatogenesis.

  4. QTL involved in the partial restoration of male fertility of C-type cytoplasmic male sterility in maize.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Susanne; Stamp, Peter; Knaak, Carsten; Messmer, Rainer

    2011-07-01

    Partial restoration of male fertility limits the use of C-type cytoplasmic male sterility (C-CMS) for the production of hybrid seeds in maize. Nevertheless, the genetic basis of the trait is still unknown. Therefore, the aim to this study was to identify genomic regions that govern partial restoration by means of a QTL analysis carried out in an F(2) population (n = 180). This population was derived from the Corn Belt inbred lines B37C and K55. F(2)BC(1) progenies were phenotyped at three locations in Switzerland. Male fertility was rated according to the quality and number of anthers as well as the anthesis-silking interval. A weak effect of environment on the expression of partial restoration was reflected by high heritabilities of all fertility-related traits. Partial restoration was inherited like an oligogenic trait. Three major QTL regions were found consistently across environments in the chromosomal bins 2.09, 3.06 and 7.03. Therefore, a marker-assisted counter-selection of partial restoration is promising. Minor QTL regions were found on chromosomes 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8. A combination of partial restorer alleles at different QTL can lead to full restoration of fertility. The maternal parent was clearly involved in the partial restoration, because the restorer alleles at QTL in bins 2.09, 6.04 and 7.03 originated from B37. The three major QTL regions collocated with other restorer genes of maize, a phenomenon, which seems to be typical for restorer genes. Therefore, a study of the clusters of restorer genes in maize could lead to a better understanding of their evolution and function. In this respect, the long arm of chromosome 2 is particularly interesting, because it harbors restorer genes for the three major CMS systems (C, T and S) of maize.

  5. Calcium Influx and Male Fertility in the Context of the Sperm Proteome: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Saidur; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2014-01-01

    Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa are incapable or poorly capable of fertilizing an oocyte. The fertilization aptness of spermatozoa depends on the appropriate and time-dependent acquisition of hyperactivation, chemotaxis, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction, where calcium (Ca2+) is extensively involved in almost every step. A literature review showed that several ion channel proteins are likely responsible for regulation of the Ca2+ uptake in spermatozoa. Therefore, manipulation of the functions of channel proteins is closely related to Ca2+ influx, ultimately affecting male fertility. Recently, it has been shown that, together with different physiological stimuli, protein-protein interaction also modifies the Ca2+ influx mechanism in spermatozoa. Modern proteomic analyses have identified several sperm proteins, and, therefore, these findings might provide further insight into understanding the Ca2+ influx, protein functions, and regulation of fertility. The objective of this review was to synthesize the published findings on the Ca2+ influx mechanism in mammalian spermatozoa and its implications for the regulation of male fertility in the context of sperm proteins. Finally, Pathway Studio (9.0) was used to catalog the sperm proteins that regulate the Ca2+ influx signaling by using the information available from the PubMed database following a MedScan Reader (5.0) search. PMID:24877140

  6. The psychological impact of infertility and fertility treatment on the male partner.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Maeve; Dineen, Tim; Sarma, Kiran; Nolan, Aonghus

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the findings of two studies that examined factors predicting infertility distress in male partners within couples with an infertility diagnosis and where the couple was receiving fertility treatment. A cross-sectional design was implemented using a questionnaire battery (The questionnaire battery comprised an inventory of four different standardised questionnaires compiled together into one booklet) compiled from earlier theory-building qualitative research conducted by the authors. Infertility related distress was examined in relation to a number of psychosocial variables including relationship dynamics, self-esteem, current mental health and attitudes towards idealised masculinity. The questionnaire battery was completed by 167 men undergoing or consulting for fertility treatment. Participants were recruited through Irish fertility clinics (Study 1, n = 111) and through an online survey (Study 2, n = 55). Regression analyses identified four variables that predicted variance in infertility distress in both studies: 'Attitude towards idealised masculinity', 'Mental health', 'Relationship satisfaction' and 'Self-esteem'. This finding was found to be robust having controlled for age, time since diagnosis, number of attempts at treatment and diagnostic category (male factor, female factor or mixed factor infertility). ConclusiON: Recommendations for fertility clinics and mental health professionals should be made in relation to managing infertility distress and supporting couples during fertility treatment.

  7. Male coping with cancer-fertility issues: putting the 'social' into biopsychosocial approaches.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Marilyn

    2013-09-01

    Biopsychosocial approaches in infertility and cancer services and research pay limited attention to 'social dimensions'. Additionally, existing cancer-related male infertility research is dominated by sperm banking studies even though fertility-related social concerns in the long term are reported to have an adverse effect on wellbeing. This paper considers whether social influences affected the fertility-related experiences of 28 men interviewed as part of a mixed-gender qualitative study of 'South Asian' and 'White' cancer survivors and their professional carers. Findings are reported under: managing stigma; sexuality and virility; ambiguity in fertile status; relationship to sperm; and meaning of fatherhood. Gender and other social influences were ambiguous, fluid and subtle--yet powerful. Combinations were neither standard nor static, indicating the dangers of practitioners stereotyping, and/or assuming homogeneity of, (in)fertile men and being unaware of their own socialized expectations. Social structures and attitudes towards valued male social roles as well as the men's psychological capacity and bodily state appear to affect experience. Men may more readily be engaged if practitioners proactively attend to the impact of social concerns, including employment and financial matters, on their perceived capacity to be fathers as a route into raising issues of sexuality and fertility. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. All males are not created equal: Fertility differences depend on gamete recognition polymorphisms in sea urchins

    PubMed Central

    Palumbi, Stephen R.

    1999-01-01

    Behaviors, morphologies, and genetic loci directly involved in reproduction have been increasingly shown to be polymorphic within populations. Explaining how such variants are maintained by selection is crucial to understanding the genetic basis of fertility differences, but direct tests of how alleles at reproductive loci affect fertility are rare. In the sea urchin genus Echinometra, the protein bindin mediates sperm attachment to eggs, evolves quickly, and is polymorphic within species. Eggs exposed to experimental sperm mixtures show strong discrimination on the basis of the males’ bindin genotype. Different females produce eggs that nonrandomly select sperm from different males, showing that variable egg–sperm interactions determine fertility. Eggs select sperm with a bindin genotype similar to their own, suggesting strong linkage between female choice and male trait loci. These experiments demonstrate that alleles at a single locus can have a strong effect on fertilization and that reproductive loci may retain functional polymorphisms through epistatic interactions between male and female traits. They also suggest that positive selection at gamete recognition loci like bindin involves strong selection within species on mate choice interactions. PMID:10535974

  9. Male fertility: Is spermiogenesis the critical step for answering biomedical issues?

    PubMed Central

    Baptissart, Marine; Vega, Aurélie; Martinot, Emmanuelle; Volle, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Regarding male fertility, biomedical issues have opposite goals to treat infertility or develop contraceptive drugs. Recently, the identification of the molecular mechanisms involved in germ cell differentiation suggest that spermiogenesis has to be put at the crossroad to reach these goals. Concerning fertility issues, citizens in our modern world are schizophrenic. On one side, couples have the possibility to control conception; and on the other side, more and more couples suffer from the misfortune of being infertile. These two societal problems lead to intensive research and conflicting government policies. However, these opposing goals rely on a better understanding of germ cell differentiation. PMID:23885302

  10. Parentage testing implications of male fertility after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lipton, J H; Marshall, W H; Waye, J S

    1999-01-01

    Fertility is expected to be reduced after the extensive chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy that is needed for conditioning prior to bone marrow transplantation. However, a male patient can be fertile, and in very rare situations such as reported here, this may confuse subsequent paternity testing. The patient, initially excluded as the biological father by red cell types but not by HLA, was subsequently included after the history of his previous marrow transplant was revealed, a review of the HLA results and further RFLP testing on buccal mucosal cells. This case points to the need for good history taking before performing paternity testing.

  11. Effect of chronic treatment with prostaglandin E2 on male rat fertility.

    PubMed

    Hib, J; Ponzio, R O; Vilar, O

    1979-01-01

    Adult male rats were treated with prostaglandin E2 (100 microgram/100 g body wt) during 60 days. Neither morphological alterations in genital organs nor modification in epididymal contractility were observed. Nevertheless, a significant diminution of fertility was registered. This was recovered after 30 days following the cessation of treatment. Since sperm maturation occurs in the epididymis, it is postulated that the decrease of fertility in our experiments was due to an incomplete maturation of germinal cells, induced by a reduction in the time taken by spermatozoa in passing through the duct.

  12. Male fertility in natural populations of red deer is determined by sperm velocity and the proportion of normal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Malo, Aurelio F; Garde, J Julián; Soler, Ana J; García, Andrés J; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2005-04-01

    Male reproductive success is determined by the ability of males to gain sexual access to females and by their ability to fertilize ova. Among polygynous mammals, males differ markedly in their reproductive success, and a great deal of effort has been made to understand how selective forces have shaped traits that enhance male competitiveness both before and after copulation (i.e., sperm competition). However, the possibility that males also may differ in their fertility has been ignored under the assumption that male infertility is rare in natural populations because selection against it is likely to be strong. In the present study, we examined which semen traits correlate with male fertility in natural populations of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus). We found no trade-offs between semen traits. Our analyses revealed strong associations between sperm production and sperm swimming velocity, sperm motility and proportion of morphologically normal spermatozoa, and sperm viability and acrosome integrity. These last two variables had the lowest coefficients of variation, suggesting that these traits have stabilized at high values and are unlikely to be related to fitness. In a fertility trial, our results show a large degree of variation in male fertility, and differences in fertility were determined mainly by sperm swimming velocity and by the proportion of morphologically normal sperm. We conclude that male fertility varies substantially in natural populations of Iberian red deer and that, when sperm numbers are equal, it is determined mainly by sperm swimming velocity and sperm morphology.

  13. Association of body mass index with some fertility markers among male partners of infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Hajshafiha, Masoumeh; Ghareaghaji, Rasul; Salemi, Sedigheh; Sadegh-Asadi, Nahid; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2013-01-01

    Background The available evidence on the role of obesity and body mass index (BMI) on male infertility has been controversial or inconclusive to some extent. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BMI on some male-fertility laboratory indicators both among infertile and fertile men in an Iranian population. Methods and materials A total of 159 male patients who had lived as a partner in an infertile couple for at least 1 year, after regular reproductive activity in their married life, and who sought infertility consultation, were investigated. BMI was assessed, and a morning blood sample was taken assessing serum levels of testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol. Semen-analysis parameters were also measured. Results In this study, it was found that the likelihood of oligospermia was increased at higher BMI values. Obese men were found to be 3.5 times more likely to have oligospermia than those with normal BMI. BMI was not found to be associated with mean numeric values of the semen-analysis parameters, including sperm count, sperm morphology, and sperm motility. BMI was not significantly correlated with some hormone levels, such as LH, prolactin, and LH/follicle-stimulating hormone ratio. However, a statistically significant association was observed between BMI and estradiol (P < 0.01), sex hormone-binding globulin (P < 0.001), and also the testosterone/estradiol ratio (P < 0.001). A different pattern of associations in this study was observed when the associations between BMI and sexual hormone levels were compared between fertile and subfertile/infertile men. Conclusion The association explored between BMI and some sexual hormones and semen characteristics, as well as different patterns of this association between fertile and subfertile/infertile men, will be of help to broaden our understanding of the effect of obesity on some male reproductive

  14. Impact of boric acid exposure at different concentrations on testicular DNA and male rats fertility.

    PubMed

    El-Dakdoky, Mai H; Abd El-Wahab, Hanan M F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of exposure to three levels of boric acid (BA) on male rats reproduction, fertility and progeny outcome, with emphasis on testicular DNA level and quality. Adult male rats (12 weeks old) were treated orally with 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg bwt/d of BA for 60 d. The results indicated that BA administration at 125 mg/kg bwt had no adverse effects on fertility, sperm characteristics or prenatal development of the impregnated females. However, at dose 250 mg, BA treatment significantly increased serum nitric oxide, testosterone, estradiol levels and testicular boron and calcium levels and also significantly reduced serum arginase activity, sperm quality and testicular DNA content with minor DNA fragmentation. The impact of BA exposure at dose 250 mg on male rats fertility was translated into increases in pre-implantation loss with a resulting decrease in the number of live fetuses/litter. In addition to the significant alteration of biochemical measurements, observed at dose 250 mg, administration of BA at 500 mg caused testicular atrophy, severe damage of spermatogenesis, spermiation failure and significant reduction of Mg and Zn testicular levels. None of the male rats, treated with 500 mg/kg bwt, could impregnate untreated females, suggesting the occurrence of definitive loss of fertility. In conclusion, BA impaired fertility, in a dose-dependant manner, by targeting the highly proliferative cells, the germ cells, through decreasing DNA synthetic rate rather than the induction of DNA damage.

  15. Effects of prenatal hydrocortisone acetate exposure on fertility and sexual behavior in male rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Oduvaldo C M; Arena, Arielle C; Yasuhara, Fabiana; Kempinas, Wilma G

    2003-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrocortisone during the prenatal period and its later repercussions on the fertility and sexual behavior of male rats. Pregnant rats were treated (s.c.) with hydrocortisone acetate, at 1.5 mg/day on the 17th, 18th, and 19th days of gestation. Decreased body weight and no alteration in anogenital distance were observed in male offspring. Adulthood, presented reductions of body weight, plasma testosterone levels, and seminal-vesicle wet weight without secretion as well as no alteration in the wet weights of the testes, epididymis, and seminal vesicle with secretion in the treated group. Males exposed to hydrocortisone during the prenatal period were able to mate with normal females, which became pregnant but exhibited an increased number of post-implantation losses. In spite of this, these treated males exhibited decreased male sexual behavior and the appearance of female sexual behavior after these male rats were castrated and pretreated with exogenous estrogen. These results indicate that exposure to hydrocortisone in the later stages of pregnancy may have a long-term effect on the fertility and sexual behavior of male rats, suggesting an incomplete masculinization and defeminization of the central nervous system.

  16. Interaction of genotype × artificial insemination conditions for male effect on fertility and prolificacy.

    PubMed

    Tusell, L; García-Tomás, M; Baselga, M; Rekaya, R; Rafel, O; Ramon, J; López-Bejar, M; Piles, M

    2010-11-01

    Failures in fertilization or embryogenesis have been shown to be partly the result of poor semen quality. When AI is practiced, fertilization rate depends on the number and quality of spermatozoa in the insemination dose around the time of application. Individual variation in the male effect on fertility (success or failure to conceive; Fert) and prolificacy (total number of kids born per litter; TB) could also depend on these factors, and it could be better observed under limited conditions of AI, such as decreased sperm concentration, small or null preselection of ejaculates for any semen quality trait, or a long storage period of the AI doses. The aim of this research was to determine if an interaction existed between male genotype and the AI conditions for male effects on Fert and TB after AI was performed under different conditions. Fertility and TB were assumed to be different traits and were analyzed in 2 sets of independent analyses. In the first step, the different conditions were determined uniquely by the sperm dosage. Artificial insemination was performed at 10 and 40 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL. In the second step, the different conditions were determined by all the factors involved in the AI process as a whole (conditions and duration of the storage period of the dose, genetic type of the female, and environmental conditions on the farm). Data from AI from the former experiment were analyzed with data from AI performed under different conditions. Threshold and linear 2-trait models were assumed for Fert and TB, respectively. The sperm dosage had a clear effect on Fert and TB, which favored the greater dosage (+0.13% and +1.25 kids born, respectively). Prolificacy was more sensitive to sperm reduction than was fertility. Male heritabilities for Fert were 0.09 for both sperm dosages, and were 0.08 and 0.06 for male TB with a smaller and larger sperm dosage, respectively. No genotype × sperm dosage interaction was found. Therefore, the same response to

  17. Male mice produced by in vitro culture have reduced fertility and transmit organomegaly and glucose intolerance to their male offspring.

    PubMed

    Calle, Alexandra; Miranda, Alberto; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Pericuesta, Eva; Laguna, Ricardo; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso

    2012-08-01

    It has been reported that suboptimal in vitro culture (IVC) of mouse embryos can affect the postnatal expression of epigenetically sensitive alleles, resulting in altered postnatal growth, organ dimensions, health, and behavior in the offspring. Although these detrimental impacts on the offspring are well described, the relative contribution of the IVC-produced fathers is unclear. In this work, we have analyzed if suboptimal IVC (achieved by altering the culture medium by the addition of FCS) can affect male fertility and if organ size and glucose clearance, two of the adverse effects produced by suboptimal IVC conditions, were transmitted to the next two generations. IVC-produced males had lower sperm concentrations (5.8 × 10(6) spermatozoa in IVC vs. 14.5 × 10(6) spermatozoa in control), and these sperm exhibited decreased overall motility (49.6% vs. 72.8% in control) and progressive motility (22.6% vs. 32.2% in control). Fertility tests demonstrated that the percentage of pregnancies was reduced for IVC males (35% for IVC-produced males vs. 86% for in vivo controls). These features were related to a modified gene expression pattern in adult male testes, showing an altered gene expression in genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis that was confirmed by TUNEL assay. Regarding the IVC related adverse phenotype transmitted to offspring, male glucose intolerance was shown only in F1 and F2 male but not female offspring. The same occurred with male abnormalities in the organ size of the liver, which were transmitted to F1 and F2 males but not to F1 females; moreover, analysis of the F0, F1, and F2 males revealed greater coefficients of variance in body weight and glucose intolerance than the control group. Finally, we analyzed, through gene silencing, the effect of IVC on the mRNA expression at the blastocyst stage for 11 known gene expression modifiers of epigenetic reprogramming. Suboptimal IVC reduced the expression of Kap1, Sox2, Hdac1, Dnmt1, and Dnmt3a

  18. Can Male Fertility Be Improved Prior to Assisted Reproduction through The Control of Uncommonly Considered Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Male factor infertility or subfertility is responsible for up to 50% of infertility cases. A considerable body of recent studies indicates that lifestyle as well as environmental and psychological factors can negatively affect male fertility, more than previously thought. These negative effects have been shown in many cases to be reversible. This review aims to provide a rationale for early clinical attention to these factors and presents a non-exhaustive evidence-based collection of primary relevant conditions and recommendations, specifically with a view to making first line diagnostics and recommendations. The presently available evidence suggests that considering the high cost, success rates, and possible side effects of assisted reproduction techniques (ART), such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), early efforts to improve male fertility appear to be an attainable and worthwhile primary goal. A series of searches was conducted of Medline, Cochrane and related databases from November 14th, 2010 to January 26th, 2012 with the following keywords: male, fertility, infertility, sperm defects, IVF, ICSI, healthy habits, and lifestyle. Subsequent follow-up searches were performed for upcoming links. The total number of studies contemplated were 1265; of these, 296 studies were reviewed with criteria of relevance; the date of study or review; study sample size and study type; and publishing journal impact status. Data were abstracted based upon probable general clinical relevancy and use. Only a selection of the references has been reflected here because of space limitations. The main results obtained were evidence-supported indications as to the other causes of male infertility, their early detection, and treatment. PMID:24520443

  19. Evaluation of the effect of using mobile phones on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Wdowiak, Artur; Wdowiak, Leszek; Wiktor, Henryk

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the lack of offspring is a phenomenon concerning approximately 15% of married couples in Poland. Infertility is defined as inability to conceive after a year of sexual intercourses without the use of contraceptives. In half of the cases the causative factor is the male. Males are exposed to the effect of various environmental factors, which may decrease their reproductive capabilities. A decrease in male fertility is a phenomenon which occurs within years, which may suggest that one of the reasons for the decrease in semen parameters is the effect of the development of techniques in the surrounding environment. A hazardous effect on male fertility may be manifested by a decrease in the amount of sperm cells, disorders in their mobility, as well as structure. The causative agents may be chemical substances, ionizing radiation, stress, as well as electromagnetic waves. The objective of the study was the determination of the effect of the usage of cellular phones on the fertility of males subjected to marital infertility therapy. The following groups were selected from among 304 males covered by the study: Group A: 99 patients who did not use mobile phones, Group B: 157 males who have used GSM equipment sporadically for the period of 1-2 years, and Group C: 48 people who have been regularly using mobile phone for more than 2 years. In the analysis of the effect of GSM equipment on the semen it was noted that an increase in the percentage of sperm cells of abnormal morphology is associated with the duration of exposure to the waves emitted by the GSM phone. It was also confirmed that a decrease in the percentage of sperm cells in vital progressing motility in the semen is correlated with the frequency of using mobile phones.

  20. Male fertility and obesity: are ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 pharmacologically relevant?

    PubMed

    Alves, Marco G; Jesus, Tito T; Sousa, Mário; Goldberg, Erwin; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is rising to unprecedented numbers, affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and young adult men. These individuals face innumerous health problems, including subfertility or even infertility. Overweight and obese men present severe alterations in their body composition and hormonal profile, particularly in ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. It is well known that male reproductive health is under the control of the individual's nutritional status and also of a tight network of regulatory signals, particularly hormonal signaling. However, few studies have been focused on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 in male reproduction and how energy homeostasis and male reproductive function are linked. These hormones regulate body glucose homeostasis and several studies suggest that they can serve as targets for anti-obesity drugs. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms of action of these hormones has grown significantly. Curiously, their effect on male reproductive potential, that is highly dependent of the metabolic cooperation established between testicular cells, remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review general concepts of male fertility and obesity, with a special focus on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 on male reproductive health. We also discuss the possible pharmacological relevance of these hormones to counteract the fertility problems that overweight and obese men face.

  1. Sensory properties and instrumental texture analysis of chevon patties from intact male Boer and Kiko goats harvested at four endpoints.

    PubMed

    Leick, C M; Behrends, J M; Solaiman, S G; Broadway, P R; Min, B R; Mikel, W B; Williams, J B; Schilling, M W

    2012-07-01

    Intact male Boer and Kiko goats (n=48) were harvested after 0, 4, 8, or 12 weeks on a 16% crude protein concentrate diet. Boneless goat carcass left sides were ground and formed into patties to evaluate cook loss, texture profile analysis, and descriptive sensory characteristics. Increasing feeding duration increased percent fat and decreased moisture in raw ground meat (P<0.05). Boer ground meat had more fat and less moisture than Kiko meat (P<0.05). Breed and feeding duration did not affect cook loss (P>0.05). Increased feeding duration increased aroma intensity and goaty, bloody, musty, and liver/organy aromas; salty, bitter, umami, grassy, goaty, fat, liver/organy, metallic, earthy, and chemical flavors; and juiciness and oiliness, while decreasing chewiness and crumbliness (P<0.05). Boer and Kiko patties had similar sensory properties after 0 and 4weeks on feed, but breeds were more distinguishable after 8 or 12 weeks on feed.

  2. THE QUALITY OF MALE FERTILITY DATA IN MAJOR U.S. SURVEYS*

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Kara; Peters, H. Elizabeth; Hynes, Kathryn; Sikora, Asia; Rubenstein, Jamie; Rendall, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers continue to question fathers’ willingness to report their biological children in surveys and the ability of surveys to adequately represent fathers. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men’s fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey to population rates based on data from the Vital Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the incomplete reporting of births in different surveys varies according to men’s characteristics, including their age, race, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth underreporting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents. We found that in the NSFG, roughly four out of five early births were reported, but in the NLSY79 and NLSY9, almost nine-tenths of early births were reported. In all three surveys, incomplete reporting was especially pronounced for nonmarital births. Our results suggest that the quality of male fertility data is strongly linked to survey design and that it has implications for models of early male fertility. PMID:22203451

  3. Contemporary and future insights into fertility preservation in male cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Chloe; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, survival rates of cancer patients have increased, resulting in a shift of focus from quantity to quality of life. A key aspect of quality of life is fertility potential; patients suffering from iatrogenic infertility often become depressed. Since many cancer therapies—chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery—and even cancer itself have detrimental effects on the male reproductive system, it is important to preserve fertility before any treatment commences. Currently, the only reliable method of male fertility preservation is sperm banking. For patients who are unable to provide semen samples by the conventional method of masturbation, there are other techniques such as electroejaculation, microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration and testicular sperm extraction that can be employed. Unfortunately, it is presently impossible to preserve the fertility potential of pre-pubertal patients. Due to the increasing numbers of adolescent cancer patients surviving treatment, extensive research is being conducted into several possible methods such as testicular tissue cryopreservation, xenografting, in vitro gamete maturation and even the creation of artificial gametes. However, in spite of its ease, safety, convenience and many accompanying benefits, sperm banking remains underutilized in cancer patients. There are several barriers involved such as the lack of information and the urgency to begin treatment, but various measures can be put in place to overcome these barriers so that sperm banking can be more widely utilized. PMID:26816750

  4. Long term impact of the endocrine disruptor tributyltin on male fertility following a single acute exposure.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sumonto; Srivastava, Ankit; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2017-10-01

    Declining rate of human fertility is a growing concern, where lifestyle and environmental factors play an important role. We recently demonstrated that tributyltin (TBT), an omnipresent endocrine disruptor, affects testicular cells in vitro. In this study, male Wistar rats were gavaged a single dose of 10, 20, and 30 mg/kg TBT-chloride (TBTC) (to mimic accidental exposure in vivo) and sacrificed on day 3 and day 7, respectively. TBT bioavailability was evaluated by estimating total tin content, and essential metal levels were analyzed along with redox molecules (ROS and GSH/GSSG) to understand the effect on physiological conditions. Blood-testicular barrier (BTB) disruption, levels of associated proteins and activity of proteolytic enzymes were evaluated to understand the effect on BTB. Histological analysis of tissue architecture and effect on protein expression of steroidogenic, stress and apoptotic markers were also evaluated. Widespread TBTC pollution can be an eventual threat to male fertility worldwide. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Negative correlation between male allocation and rate of self-fertilization in a hermaphroditic animal

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Mark O.; Das, Bijon; Hoeh, Walter R.

    1998-01-01

    Sex-allocation theory predicts that the evolution of increased rates of self-fertilization should be accompanied by decreased allocation to male reproduction (sperm production and broadcast). This prediction has found support in plants but has not previously been tested in animals, which, in contrast to biotically pollinated plants, are free of complications associated with incorporating the costs of attractive structures such as petals. Here we report rates of self-fertilization as well as proportional allocation to male reproductive tissues within populations of the simultaneous hermaphrodite Utterbackia imbecillis, a freshwater mussel. Individuals from populations with higher selfing rates devoted a lower proportion of reproductive tissue to sperm production (correlation = −0.99), in support of theory. PMID:9435241

  6. Effect of early postnatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on fertility in male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, D.B.; Shih-Schroeder, W.; Girard, D.

    1987-06-01

    Males exposed to PCBs during lactation exhibited reduced fertility, i.e., reduced incidence of implantation in normal females mated to experimental males. However, a reduced weight gain during the time of treatment in the pups exposed to the higher doses of PCBs was also observed. After treatment, weight gain was comparable or greater in the experimental pups and by the time of mating and autopsy, body weights in all groups were comparable. The present experiments were designed 1) to determine if the early reduced weight gain (previously observed) has any influence on fertility, and 2) to investigate the effect of early postnatal exposure to PCBs on sperm counts and the ability of the sperm to support normal development.

  7. Male fertility is reduced by chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea in mice.

    PubMed

    Torres, Marta; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Dalmases, Mireia; Calle, Alexandra; Pericuesta, Eva; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Farré, Ramon

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by intermittent hypoxia and oxidative stress. However, it is unknown whether intermittent hypoxia mimicking OSA modifies male fertility. We tested the hypothesis that male fertility is reduced by chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking OSA in a mouse model. Case-control comparison in a murine model. University research laboratory. Eighteen F1 (C57BL/6xCBA) male mice. Mice were subjected to a pattern of periodic hypoxia (20 sec at 5% O2 followed by 40 sec of room air) 6 h/day for 60 days or normoxia. After this period, mice performed a mating trial to determine effective fertility by assessing the number of pregnant females and fetuses. After euthanasia, oxidative stress in testes was assessed by measuring the expression of glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) and superoxide dismutase-1 (Sod1) by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm motility was determined by Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS). Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased testicular oxidative stress, showing a reduction in the expression of Gpx1 and Sod1 by 38.9% and 34.4%, respectively, as compared with normoxia (P < 0.05). Progressive sperm motility was significantly reduced from 27.0 ± 6.4% in normoxia to 12.8 ± 1.8% in the intermittent hypoxia group (P = 0.04). The proportion of pregnant females and number of fetuses per mating was significantly lower in the intermittent hypoxia group (0.33 ± 0.10 and 2.45 ± 0.73, respectively) than in normoxic controls (0.72 ± 0.16 and 5.80 ± 1.24, respectively). These results suggest that the intermittent hypoxia associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could induce fertility reduction in male patients with this sleep breathing disorder.

  8. A novel male sterility-fertility restoration system in plants for hybrid seed production

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra Pratap; Singh, Sudhir P.; Pandey, Tripti; Singh, Ram Rakshpal; Sawant, Samir V.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid seeds are used for stimulated crop production, as they harness heterosis. The achievement of complete male-sterility in the female-parent and the restored-fertility in F1-hybrids are the major bottlenecks in the commercial hybrid seed production. Here, we report a male sterility–fertility restoration system by engineering the inmost nutritive anther wall layer tapetum of female and male parents. In the female parent, high–level, and stringent expression of Arabidopsis autophagy–related gene BECLIN1 was achieved in the tapetum, which altered the tapetal degeneration program, leading to male sterility. This works on our previously demonstrated expression cassette based on functional complementation of TATA-box mutant (TGTA) promoter and TATA-binding protein mutant3 (TBPm3), with modification by conjugating Long Hypocotyle in Far-Red1 fragment (HFR1NT131) with TBPm3 (HFR1NT131-TBPm3) to exercise regulatory control over it. In the male parent, tapetum–specific Constitutive photo-morphogenesis1 (COP1) was expressed. The F1 obtained by crossing these engineered parents showed decreased BECLIN1 expression, which was further completely abolished when COP1-mutant (COP1L105A) was used as a male parent, leading to normal tapetal development and restored fertility. The system works on COP1-HFR1 interaction and COP1–mediated degradation of TBPm3 pool (HFR1NT131-TBPm3). The system can be deployed for hybrid seed production in agricultural crops. PMID:26073981

  9. Consequences of Nosema apis infection for male honey bees and their fertility.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Baer-Imhoof, Barbara; Millar, A Harvey; Baer, Boris

    2015-06-30

    The queens of eusocial bees, ants and wasps mate only during a very short period early in life and males therefore produce ejaculates consisting of large numbers of high quality sperm. Such extreme selection for high fecundity resulted in males investing minimally into their somatic survival, including their immune system. However, if susceptible males are unable to protect their reproductive tissue from infections, they compromise queen fitness if they transfer pathogens during mating. We used the honey bee Apis mellifera and investigated the course of infection of the sexually transmitted pathogen Nosema apis. We predicted that honey bee males are susceptible but protect their reproductive tissues from infections. We investigated the effects of N. apis infections on the midgut, the accessory glands and the accessory testes and quantified the consequences of infection on male survival and fecundity. We found that N. apis is able to infect males, and as infections progressed, it significantly impacted fertility and survival in older males. Even though we confirm males to be able to minimize N. apis infections of their reproductive tissues, the parasite is present in ejaculates of older males. Consequently N. apis evolved alternative routes to successfully infect ejaculates and get sexually transmitted.

  10. Consequences of Nosema apis infection for male honey bees and their fertility

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Baer-Imhoof, Barbara; Harvey Millar, A.; Baer, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The queens of eusocial bees, ants and wasps mate only during a very short period early in life and males therefore produce ejaculates consisting of large numbers of high quality sperm. Such extreme selection for high fecundity resulted in males investing minimally into their somatic survival, including their immune system. However, if susceptible males are unable to protect their reproductive tissue from infections, they compromise queen fitness if they transfer pathogens during mating. We used the honey bee Apis mellifera and investigated the course of infection of the sexually transmitted pathogen Nosema apis. We predicted that honey bee males are susceptible but protect their reproductive tissues from infections. We investigated the effects of N. apis infections on the midgut, the accessory glands and the accessory testes and quantified the consequences of infection on male survival and fecundity. We found that N. apis is able to infect males, and as infections progressed, it significantly impacted fertility and survival in older males. Even though we confirm males to be able to minimize N. apis infections of their reproductive tissues, the parasite is present in ejaculates of older males. Consequently N. apis evolved alternative routes to successfully infect ejaculates and get sexually transmitted. PMID:26123530

  11. Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Manser, A; König, B; Lindholm, A K

    2015-01-01

    The t haplotype in house mice is a well-known selfish genetic element with detrimental, nonadditive fitness consequences to its carriers: recessive lethal mutations cause t/t homozygotes to perish in utero. Given the severe genetic incompatibility imposed by the t haplotype, we predict females to avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males. Indeed, some of the strongest evidence for compatibility mate choice is related to the t haplotype in house mice. However, all previous evidence for compatibility mate choice in this system is based on olfactory preference. It is so far unknown how general these preferences are and whether they are relevant in an actual mating context. Here, we assess female compatibility mate choice related to t haplotypes in a setting that – for the first time – allowed females to directly interact and mate with males. This approach enabled us to analyse female behaviour during the testing period, and the resulting paternity success and fitness consequences of a given choice. We show that genetic incompatibilities arising from the t haplotype had severe indirect fitness consequences and t females avoided fertilization by t incompatible males. The results are inconclusive whether this avoidance of t fertilization by t females was caused by pre- or post-copulatory processes. PMID:25494878

  12. Prostaglandins in semen and their relationship to male fertility: a study of 145 men.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, M J; Emilson, L B; Cockett, A T

    1984-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha and PGE were measured in 163 semen samples from 145 men attending our male infertility clinic. In addition, each semen sample was analyzed for 13 different fertility parameters. Blood plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone were also determined in many of the patients. The data obtained were then analyzed using multiple regression analyses on each PG for all of the parameters studied. The results indicate seminal PGF2 alpha and PGE concentrations were 2.78 +/- 0.24 micrograms/ml and 46.0 +/- 4.5 micrograms/ml, respectively. The seminal parameters that were significant predictors of seminal PGF2 alpha included: Ca++ concentration (P less than 0.001), Zn++ concentration (P less than 0.01), and percentage of tapered sperm (P less than 0.05). The seminal parameters that were significant predictors of seminal PGE included: Ca++ concentration (P less than 0.01) and sperm motility (P less than 0.05). Plasma testosterone was also a significant predictor of seminal PGE (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that seminal PGs are important to the human male fertility potential in that their levels are significantly interdependent with specific parameters of male fertility.

  13. Reduction of germ cells in the Odysseus null mutant causes male fertility defect in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ya-Jen; Fang, Shu; Tsaur, Shun-Chern; Chen, Yi-Ling; Fu, Hua-Wen; Patel, Nipam H; Ting, Chau-Ti

    2012-01-01

    Odysseus (OdsH) has been identified as a hybrid male sterility gene between Drosophila mauritiana and D. simulans with accelerated evolutionary rate in both expression and DNA sequence. Loss of a testis-specific expression of OdsH causes male fertility defect in D. melanogaster. Yet, the underlying mechanisms at the cellular level are unknown. In an attempt to identify the possible mechanisms and functional roles of OdsH in spermatogenesis, the cell numbers at different developmental stages during spermatogenesis between the OdsH null mutant and wild-type flies were compared. The results showed that the early developing germ cells, including spermatogonia and spermatocytes, were reduced in the OdsH mutant males. In addition, the number of germline stem cells in aged males was also reduced, presumably due to the disruption of germline stem cell maintenance, which resulted in more severe fertility defect. These results suggest that the function of the enhancement of sperm production by OdsH acted across males of all ages.

  14. IUSSP activities. Committee on Anthropological Demography. Report: Seminar on Fertility and the Male Life Cycle in the Era of Fertility Decline, Zacatecas, Mexico, 13-16 November 1995.

    PubMed

    Infesta Dominquez, G

    1996-05-01

    This article gives an overview of a conference on Fertility and the Male Life Cycle held in Mexico on November 13-16, 1995. The seminars, organized by anthropological demographers, were based on the view that differences in men's life course events affect how many children are produced, when children are produced, and the kind of support given to children. Little research has focused on male fertility. Two overview papers addressed the issues of men's changing sexual and reproductive intentions as a response to economic changes (Jane Guyer) and theories of male fertility trends in industrialized countries (David Coleman). Other papers were presented on the following topics: changes in male fertility, sexuality and the male life cycle, polygyny and fertility, men's notions of sexuality and reproductive health, masculinity and reproduction, and future research directions. Laurent Toulemon and Evelyne Lapierre-Adamcyk and Katarina Pohl presented papers on gender differences in fertility. Philip Setel presented an analysis of the social construction of parenthood among Coastal Boiken in Papua New Guinea. Paul Miret discussed men's role in the sharp decline in Spanish fertility. Nosa Orobaton contrasted African men's changing roles over the life course. Differences in fertility among polygynous populations in Africa and in China were analyzed by Ann Blanc and Anastasia Gage, and James Lee and Wang Feng. Other papers were prepared by Juan Gillermo Figueroa Perea, John Anarfi and Clara Korkor, Frances L. Goldscheider et al., Benno de Keijzer, and Mario Humberto Ruz, Ondina Fachel Leal and Jandyra M.G. Fachel, and Kamran Asdar Ali. Seminar papers were expected to be published in several collections.

  15. Male Fertility Is Reduced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Marta; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Dalmases, Mireia; Calle, Alexandra; Pericuesta, Eva; Montserrat, Josep M.; Navajas, Daniel; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Farré, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by intermittent hypoxia and oxidative stress. However, it is unknown whether intermittent hypoxia mimicking OSA modifies male fertility. We tested the hypothesis that male fertility is reduced by chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking OSA in a mouse model. Design: Case-control comparison in a murine model. Setting: University research laboratory. Participants: Eighteen F1 (C57BL/6xCBA) male mice. Interventions: Mice were subjected to a pattern of periodic hypoxia (20 sec at 5% O2 followed by 40 sec of room air) 6 h/day for 60 days or normoxia. After this period, mice performed a mating trial to determine effective fertility by assessing the number of pregnant females and fetuses. Measurements and Results: After euthanasia, oxidative stress in testes was assessed by measuring the expression of glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) and superoxide dismutase-1 (Sod1) by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm motility was determined by Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS). Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased testicular oxidative stress, showing a reduction in the expression of Gpx1 and Sod1 by 38.9% and 34.4%, respectively, as compared with normoxia (P < 0.05). Progressive sperm motility was significantly reduced from 27.0 ± 6.4% in normoxia to 12.8 ± 1.8% in the intermittent hypoxia group (P = 0.04). The proportion of pregnant females and number of fetuses per mating was significantly lower in the intermittent hypoxia group (0.33 ± 0.10 and 2.45 ± 0.73, respectively) than in normoxic controls (0.72 ± 0.16 and 5.80 ± 1.24, respectively). Conclusions: These results suggest that the intermittent hypoxia associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could induce fertility reduction in male patients with this sleep breathing disorder. Citation: Torres M, Laguna-Barraza R, Dalmases M, Calle A, Pericuesta E, Montserrat JM, Navajas D, Gutierrez-Adan A, Farré R. Male fertility is

  16. Male Investments in High Quality Sperm Improve Fertilization Success, but May Have Negative Impact on Offspring Fitness in Whitefish.

    PubMed

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Soler, Carles; Veentaus, Sami; Huuskonen, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Many ejaculate traits show remarkable variation in relation to male social status. Males in disfavoured (subordinate) mating positions often invest heavily on sperm motility but may have less available resources on traits (e.g., secondary sexual ornaments) that improve the probability of gaining matings. Although higher investments in sperm motility can increase the relative fertilization success of subordinate males, it is unclear whether status-dependent differences in sperm traits could have any consequences for offspring fitness. We tested this possibility in whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) by experimentally fertilizing the eggs of 24 females with the sperm of either highly-ornamented (large breeding tubercles, dominant) or less-ornamented (small tubercles, subordinate) males (split-clutch breeding design). In comparison to highly-ornamented individuals, less-ornamented males had higher sperm motility, which fertilized the eggs more efficiently, but produced embryos with impaired hatching success. Also offspring size and body condition were lower among less-ornamented males. Furthermore, sperm motility was positively associated with the fertilization success and offspring size, but only in highly-ornamented males. Together our results indicate that male investments on highly motile (fertile) sperm is not necessarily advantageous during later offspring ontogeny and that male status-dependent differences in sperm phenotype may have important effects on offspring fitness in different life-history stages.

  17. Male Investments in High Quality Sperm Improve Fertilization Success, but May Have Negative Impact on Offspring Fitness in Whitefish

    PubMed Central

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Soler, Carles; Veentaus, Sami; Huuskonen, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Many ejaculate traits show remarkable variation in relation to male social status. Males in disfavoured (subordinate) mating positions often invest heavily on sperm motility but may have less available resources on traits (e.g., secondary sexual ornaments) that improve the probability of gaining matings. Although higher investments in sperm motility can increase the relative fertilization success of subordinate males, it is unclear whether status-dependent differences in sperm traits could have any consequences for offspring fitness. We tested this possibility in whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) by experimentally fertilizing the eggs of 24 females with the sperm of either highly-ornamented (large breeding tubercles, dominant) or less-ornamented (small tubercles, subordinate) males (split-clutch breeding design). In comparison to highly-ornamented individuals, less-ornamented males had higher sperm motility, which fertilized the eggs more efficiently, but produced embryos with impaired hatching success. Also offspring size and body condition were lower among less-ornamented males. Furthermore, sperm motility was positively associated with the fertilization success and offspring size, but only in highly-ornamented males. Together our results indicate that male investments on highly motile (fertile) sperm is not necessarily advantageous during later offspring ontogeny and that male status-dependent differences in sperm phenotype may have important effects on offspring fitness in different life-history stages. PMID:26389594

  18. [Calcium distribution in fertile and sterile anthers of a genic male sterile Chinese cabbage].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao-Tian; Yang, Yan-Hong; Qiu, Yi-Lan; Ge, Li-Li; Tian, Hui-Qiao

    2005-12-01

    Potassium antimonite was used to locate calcium in the fertile and sterile anthers of a genic male sterile Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino) to probe the relation between Ca(2+) and fertility and sterility of anthers of the cabbage. During fertile anther development, calcium granules increase in number in anther wall cells after meiosis, and then appeared also in locule, suggesting a calcium influx into locule from anther wall cells (Plate I-4). Then the number of calcium granules in microspore cytoplasm also increased at early stage (Plate II-1), accumulated mainly on the membrane of small vacuoles which were fusing to form big ones to make a polarity in the cell and to prepare asymmetric division of microspore (Plate II-3,4). After microspore division and the big vacuole decomposition, many calcium granules accumulated again on the membrane of the vacuoles (Plate III-1,2), displaying calcium regulates vacuole formation and decomposition during pollen development. In sterile anthers, abnormal distribution of calcium granules first appeared in callus wall of microspore mother cell (Plate IV-1). However, only a few calcium granules appeared in early microspores, which then could not form small vacuoles and finally a big vacuole (Plate IV-2,3). The aborting microspores degenerate by cytoplasm shrinking (Plate IV-5,6). The difference pattern of distribution of calcium granules between the fertile and sterile anthers indicates that anomalies in the distribution of calcium accumulation are correlated with the failure of pollen development and pollen abortion.

  19. Fertility preservation in adolescent males: experience over 22 years at Rouen University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Menon, S; Rives, N; Mousset-Siméon, N; Sibert, L; Vannier, J P; Mazurier, S; Massé, L; Duchesne, V; Macé, B

    2009-01-01

    Sperm banking is a suitable procedure to prevent infertility after cancer therapy in male adolescents. We evaluated the feasibility of semen preservation in 156 adolescents aged between 13 and 20 years and then we assessed fertility outcome after treatment. Age, urogenital history, indications for cryopreservation, histological diagnosis and semen parameters were recorded. Fertility status after treatment was assessed by a questionnaire addressed to those patients who had utilized sperm storage. Post-treatment semen analysis was performed for 22 patients. Cryopreservation was possible in 88.5% of cases. Azoospermia was detected in 2.6% of the patients at the time of diagnosis. Malignant disease accounted for 84% of our male adolescents. In this type of disease, semen parameters were significantly altered only among patients with metastatic malignant bone tumour. After treatment, nine patients presented azoospermia, five patients achieved pregnancy spontaneously, two achieved it after assisted reproductive technique using fresh ejaculated spermatozoa and one following sperm donation. Three failed with cryopreserved sperm. Semen cryopreservation is possible for most adolescents and, regardless of disease type, may be a means of preserving fertility prior to gonadotoxic treatment that might impair the spermatogenesis process.

  20. Clinical review: Present and future prospects of male fertility preservation for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd

    2012-12-01

    Rapid progress in fertility preservation strategies has led to the investigation of ways in which fertile gametes could be generated from cryopreserved immature testicular tissue. Childhood cancer patients remain the major group that can benefit from these techniques. Other potential candidates include patients undergoing gonadectomy and patients with Klinefelter's syndrome and cryptorchid testes. This review aims to present an overview of the current state of knowledge in experimental germ cell transplantation, testicular tissue transplantation, and germ cell culture as fertility preservation methods for males. We included English articles published in PubMed as well as personal files with the focus on studies including human or nonhuman material. Germ cell and testicular tissue transplantation demonstrate clinical options to mature germ cells from immature primate testicular tissue. The most promising approach involves autologous grafting of immature testicular tissue, whereas germ cell maturation in vitro provides the best strategies to overcome problems of cancer contamination in cryopreserved testicular tissue. Three-dimensional and organ culture systems offer the possibility to differentiate immature male germ cells up to the stage of elongated spermatids. Further characterization of early germ cell development in humans is needed to modify these systems for clinical use.

  1. Female sperm use and storage between fertilization events drive sperm competition and male ejaculate allocation.

    PubMed

    Requena, Gustavo S; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2014-12-01

    Sperm competition theory has traditionally focused on how male allocation responds to female promiscuity, when males compete to fertilize a single clutch of eggs. Here, we develop a model to ask how female sperm use and storage across consecutive reproductive events affect male ejaculate allocation and patterns of mating and paternity. In our model, sperm use (a single parameter under female control) is the main determinant of sperm competition, which alters the effect of female promiscuity on male success and, ultimately, male reproductive allocation. Our theory reproduces the general pattern predicted by existing theory that increased sperm competition favors increased allocation to ejaculates. However, our model predicts a negative correlation between male ejaculate allocation and female promiscuity, challenging the generality of a prevailing expectation of sperm competition theory. Early models assumed that the energetic costs of precopulatory competition and the level of sperm competition are both determined by female promiscuity, which leads to an assumed covariation between these two processes. By modeling precopulatory costs and sperm competition independently, our theoretical framework allows us to examine how male allocation should respond independently to variation in sperm competition and energetic trade-offs in mating systems that have been overlooked in the past.

  2. Fruitless RNAi knockdown in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, influences male fertility.

    PubMed

    Boerjan, Bart; Tobback, Julie; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Huybrechts, Roger; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-02-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the male-specific splice isoform of the fruitless gene (Fru(M)) encodes a set of transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of male courtship and copulation. Recent insights from non-drosophilid insects suggest a conserved evolutionary role for the transcription factor Fruitless. In the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria and the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, both orthopteran insects, a conserved functional role for fruitless has been proposed. Fru specific RNAi knockdown in the third nymphal stage of male Schistocera gregaria delays copulation initiation and results in reduced progeny. In order to identify the origin of the observed phenotypic effects following a fruitless RNAi treatment in the male, we show that the fru knockdown has no detectable effect on spermio- or spermatogenesis and on the transfer of spermatozoa during copulation. Nevertheless, it is clear that the male seminal vesicles contain significantly less spermatozoa after fru RNAi as compared to gfp RNAi controls. We conclude that a lowered male fertility, caused by the fru knockdown in male desert locusts may be the direct cause for the reduction of the progeny numbers in their naïve female copulation partners.

  3. Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2) is essential for sperm function and male fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Danshina, Polina V; Geyer, Christopher B; Dai, Qunsheng; Goulding, Eugenia H; Willis, William D; Kitto, G Barrie; McCarrey, John R; Eddy, E M; O'Brien, Deborah A

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2), an isozyme that catalyzes the first ATP-generating step in the glycolytic pathway, is encoded by an autosomal retrogene that is expressed only during spermatogenesis. It replaces the ubiquitously expressed phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) isozyme following repression of Pgk1 transcription by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation during meiotic prophase and by postmeiotic sex chromatin during spermiogenesis. The targeted disruption of Pgk2 by homologous recombination eliminates PGK activity in sperm and severely impairs male fertility, but does not block spermatogenesis. Mating behavior, reproductive organ weights (testis, excurrent ducts, and seminal vesicles), testis histology, sperm counts, and sperm ultrastructure were indistinguishable between Pgk2(-/-) and wild-type mice. However, sperm motility and ATP levels were markedly reduced in males lacking PGK2. These defects in sperm function were slightly less severe than observed in males lacking glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, spermatogenic (GAPDHS), the isozyme that catalyzes the step preceding PGK2 in the sperm glycolytic pathway. Unlike Gapdhs(-/-) males, the Pgk2(-/-) males also sired occasional pups. Alternative pathways that bypass the PGK step of glycolysis exist. We determined that one of these bypass enzymes, acylphosphatase, is active in mouse sperm, perhaps contributing to phenotypic differences between mice lacking GAPDHS or PGK2. This study determined that PGK2 is not required for the completion of spermatogenesis, but is essential for sperm motility and male fertility. In addition to confirming the importance of the glycolytic pathway for sperm function, distinctive phenotypic characteristics of Pgk2(-/-) mice may provide further insights into the regulation of sperm metabolism.

  4. Phosphoglycerate Kinase 2 (PGK2) Is Essential for Sperm Function and Male Fertility in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Danshina, Polina V.; Geyer, Christopher B.; Dai, Qunsheng; Goulding, Eugenia H.; Willis, William D.; Kitto, G. Barrie; McCarrey, John R.; Eddy, E.M.; O'Brien, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2), an isozyme that catalyzes the first ATP-generating step in the glycolytic pathway, is encoded by an autosomal retrogene that is expressed only during spermatogenesis. It replaces the ubiquitously expressed phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) isozyme following repression of Pgk1 transcription by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation during meiotic prophase and by postmeiotic sex chromatin during spermiogenesis. The targeted disruption of Pgk2 by homologous recombination eliminates PGK activity in sperm and severely impairs male fertility, but does not block spermatogenesis. Mating behavior, reproductive organ weights (testis, excurrent ducts, and seminal vesicles), testis histology, sperm counts, and sperm ultrastructure were indistinguishable between Pgk2−/− and wild-type mice. However, sperm motility and ATP levels were markedly reduced in males lacking PGK2. These defects in sperm function were slightly less severe than observed in males lacking glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, spermatogenic (GAPDHS), the isozyme that catalyzes the step preceding PGK2 in the sperm glycolytic pathway. Unlike Gapdhs−/− males, the Pgk2−/− males also sired occasional pups. Alternative pathways that bypass the PGK step of glycolysis exist. We determined that one of these bypass enzymes, acylphosphatase, is active in mouse sperm, perhaps contributing to phenotypic differences between mice lacking GAPDHS or PGK2. This study determined that PGK2 is not required for the completion of spermatogenesis, but is essential for sperm motility and male fertility. In addition to confirming the importance of the glycolytic pathway for sperm function, distinctive phenotypic characteristics of Pgk2−/− mice may provide further insights into the regulation of sperm metabolism. PMID:19759366

  5. Fertility of male and female broiler breeders following exposure to elevated ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C D; Bramwell, R K; Wilson, J L; Howarth, B

    1995-06-01

    Because elevated ambient temperatures decrease fertility, this study was designed to segregate the male and female contribution to heat stress infertility in broiler breeders. Eighty hens and 16 roosters at 21 wk of age were divided equally among two heat stress (S) and two control (C) temperature chambers. For a 10-wk pretreatment period, all birds were maintained at an ambient temperature of 21.1 C and 40% relative humidity. Following the pretreatment period, birds in the S chambers were acclimated for 1 wk at a constant temperature of 29.4 C after which the temperature in the S chambers was increased to 32.2 C for 8 wk. The temperature in the two C chambers was maintained at 21.1 C. Hens in each chamber were artificially inseminated on a weekly basis with 5 x 10(7) sperm per 50 microL from either C or S males. Egg production, semen volume, spermatocrit, and percentage dead sperm were similar during the acclimation period, even though body temperature was significantly elevated in S birds (41.8 vs 41.3 C). Sperm penetration of the perivitelline layer overlying the germinal disc (GD) was decreased in eggs from hens inseminated with semen from S males compared to eggs from hens inseminated with semen from C males (9.5 vs 23.4 sperm per GD). Following the acclimation period, body temperature remained elevated in the S birds compared to the C birds (42.2 vs 41.3 C). Also, egg production was depressed in the S vs C hens (55.8 vs 82.9%). Semen volume, spermatocrit, and percentage dead sperm were not affected by S treatment. However, when hens were inseminated with semen from S males, sperm penetration of the perivitelline layer overlying the GD and egg fertility were decreased compared to hens inseminated with semen from C males (5.4 vs 14.9 sperm per GD, 45.5 vs 73.8% fertility). In conclusion, the male bird appears to contribute more to heat stress infertility than the female.

  6. Feeding broiler breeder males. 1. Effect of feeding program and dietary crude protein during rearing on body weight and fertility of broiler breeder males.

    PubMed

    Romero-Sanchez, H; Plumstead, P W; Brake, J

    2007-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial experiment was conducted to compare the effects of 2 male broiler breeder feed allocation programs (Concave or Sigmoid) during the rearing period to 26 wk of age and the interaction with dietary CP (12 or 17%) on BW and fertility. From 0 to 2 wk, all birds received a starter diet, after which, pens were randomly assigned to the 4 treatment combinations that ended at 26 wk of age. All males were weighed individually at 4, 8, 12, 16, 22, 26, 28, 32, 36, 40, 48, 52, 56, and 64 wk of age, and fertility was determined weekly from 27 to 32 wk of age and then every 2 wk to 64 wk of age. At 49 wk of age, the male feed allocation for all treatments was increased by 5 g/d. Even when fed the same as Sigmoid program males during the production period, males reared on the Concave feeding program lost BW from 32 to 40 wk of age and exhibited lower BW from 40 to 48 wk of age, which corresponded to a more rapid decrease in fertility. The 17% CP diet increased BW from 8 to 32 wk of age, but no significant differences were subsequently observed. The 12% CP rearing diet improved both weekly and cumulative fertility. A significant interaction between rearing feeding program and dietary CP during the third quartile period showed that the Concave program-17% CP diet combination was most negatively affected. The increase in male feed allocation at 49 wk restored fertility and caused differences among treatments to diminish. These data suggested that BW during the early rearing period did not affect fertility, but an increased BW due to either providing fast feed increments toward the end of the rearing period (Concave) or feeding a 17% CP diet produced males that were unable to sustain fertility after 40 wk of age without an appropriate allocation of feed.

  7. A mitochondrial DNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase specifically impairs male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maulik R; Miriyala, Ganesh K; Littleton, Aimee J; Yang, Heiko; Trinh, Kien; Young, Janet M; Kennedy, Scott R; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Pallanck, Leo J; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    Due to their strict maternal inheritance in most animals and plants, mitochondrial genomes are predicted to accumulate mutations that are beneficial or neutral in females but harmful in males. Although a few male-harming mtDNA mutations have been identified, consistent with this ‘Mother’s Curse’, their effect on females has been largely unexplored. Here, we identify COIIG177S, a mtDNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase II, which specifically impairs male fertility due to defects in sperm development and function without impairing other male or female functions. COIIG177S represents one of the clearest examples of a ‘male-harming’ mtDNA mutation in animals and suggest that the hypomorphic mtDNA mutations like COIIG177S might specifically impair male gametogenesis. Intriguingly, some D. melanogaster nuclear genetic backgrounds can fully rescue COIIG177S -associated sterility, consistent with previously proposed models that nuclear genomes can regulate the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16923.001 PMID:27481326

  8. DNA fragmentation in brighter sperm predicts male fertility independently from age and semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Monica; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Cambi, Marta; Lotti, Francesco; Natali, Ilaria; Filimberti, Erminio; Noci, Ivo; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate whether sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF), measured in brighter, dimmer, and total populations, predicts natural conception, and to evaluate the intra-individual variability of sDF. Prospective study. Outpatient clinic and diagnostic laboratory. A total of 348 unselected patients and 86 proven fertile men. None. sDF was revealed with the use of terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)/propidium iodide (PI). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were built before and after matching fertile men to patients for age (76:152) or semen parameters (68:136) or both (49:98). Intra-individual variability of sDF was assessed over 2 years. Brighter (area under ROC curve [AUC] 0.718 ± 0.54), dimmer (AUC 0.655 ± 0.63), and total (AUC 0.757 ± 0.54) sDF predict male fertility in unmatched and age- or semen parameters-matched subjects. After matching for both age and semen parameters, only brighter (AUC 0.711 ± 0.83) and total (AUC 0.675 ± 0.92) sDF predict male fertility. At high values of total sDF, brighter predicts natural conception better than total sDF. Intra-individual coefficients of variation of sDF were 9.2 ± 8.6% (n = 25), 12.9 ± 12.7% (n = 53), and 14.0 ± 12.6% (n = 70) over, respectively, 100-day and 1- and 2-year periods, appearing to be the most stable of the evaluated semen parameters. The predictive power of total sDF partially depends on age and semen parameters, whereas brighter sDF independently predicts natural conception. Therefore, brighter sDF is a fraction of sDF that adds new information to the routine semen analysis. At high levels of sDF, distinguishing the two sperm populations improves the predictive power of sDF. Overall, our results support the idea that TUNEL/PI can be of clinical usefulness in the male fertility workup. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequencing and annotation of the chloroplast DNAs and identification of polymorphisms distinguishing normal male-fertile and male-sterile cytoplasms of onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due the biennial generation time of onion, classical crossing takes at least four years to classify cytoplasms as normal (N) male-fertile or male-sterile (S). Molecular markers in the organellar DNAs that distinguish N and S cytoplasms are useful to reduce the time required to classify onion cytopla...

  10. Comparative study on the effect of Eurycoma longifolia and Smilax myosotiflora on male rats fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Amal Salem Farag; Noor, Mahanem Mat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of Eurycoma longifolia Jack and Smilax myosotiflora were studied on sperm quality include sperm count, motility, viability and histology of the testis and pregnancy rate after mating with fertile proved females, as well as litter size on Sprague-Dawley (S-D) adult male rats. After dosing them with distilled water group A, group B 150 mg/kg body weight of aqueous extract of E. longifolia roots, group C 150 mg/kg body weight aqueous extract of S. myosotiflora leaf and group D 150 mg/kg body weight of E. longifolia combined with 150 mg/kg S. myosotiflora body weight daily for 14 days of stage (a) and 28 days for stage (b) of treatments. Results exhibited no significant variation (P>0.05) of stage (a),while results showed that E. longifolia Jack increase (P<0.05) the sperm count, motility, viability and histology of the testis and gender (male) of the litter size respectively of stage (b). This study provides evidence that E. longifolia Jack is a potent stimulator of fertility in male rat.

  11. Fertility of Male Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel M.; Kawashima, Toana; Stovall, Marilyn; Leisenring, Wendy; Sklar, Charles A.; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Byrne, Julianne; Robison, Leslie L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to determine the effect of treatment for childhood cancer on male fertility. Patients and Methods We reviewed the fertility of male Childhood Cancer Survivor Study survivor and sibling cohorts who completed a questionnaire. We abstracted the chemotherapeutic agents administered, the cumulative dose of drug administered for selected drugs, and the doses and volumes of all radiation therapy from medical records. Risk factors for siring a pregnancy were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results The 6,224 survivors age 15 to 44 years who were not surgically sterile were less likely to sire a pregnancy than siblings (hazard ratio [HR], 0.56; 95% CI, −0.49 to 0.63). Among survivors, the HR of siring a pregnancy was decreased by radiation therapy of more than 7.5 Gy to the testes (HR, 0.12; 95% CI, −0.02 to 0.64), higher cumulative alkylating agent dose (AAD) score or treatment with cyclophosphamide (third tertile HR, 0.42; 95% CI, −0.31 to 0.57) or procarbazine (second tertile HR, 0.48; 95% CI, −0.26 to 0.87; third tertile HR, 0.17; 95% CI, −0.07 to 0.41). Compared with siblings, the HR for ever siring a pregnancy for survivors who had an AAD score = 0, a hypothalamic/pituitary radiation dose = 0 Gy, and a testes radiation dose = 0 Gy was 0.91 (95% CI, 0.73 to 1.14; P = .41). Conclusion This large study identified risk factors for decreased fertility that may be used for counseling male cancer patients. PMID:19949008

  12. The Drosophila Copper Transporter Ctr1C Functions in Male Fertility*

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Dominik; Fetchko, Michael; Vardanyan, Alla; Atanesyan, Lilit; Steiner, Kurt; Turski, Michelle L.; Thiele, Dennis J.; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Living organisms have evolved intricate systems to harvest trace elements from the environment, to control their intracellular levels, and to ensure adequate delivery to the various organs and cellular compartments. Copper is one of these trace elements. It is at the same time essential for life but also highly toxic, not least because it facilitates the generation of reactive oxygen species. In mammals, copper uptake in the intestine and copper delivery into other organs are mediated by the copper importer Ctr1. Drosophila has three Ctr1 homologs: Ctr1A, Ctr1B, and Ctr1C. Earlier work has shown that Ctr1A is an essential gene that is ubiquitously expressed throughout development, whereas Ctr1B is responsible for efficient copper uptake in the intestine. Here, we characterize the function of Ctr1C and show that it functions as a copper importer in the male germline, specifically in maturing spermatocytes and mature sperm. We further demonstrate that loss of Ctr1C in a Ctr1B mutant background results in progressive loss of male fertility that can be rescued by copper supplementation to the food. These findings hint at a link between copper and male fertility, which might also explain the high Ctr1 expression in mature mammalian spermatozoa. In both mammals and Drosophila, the X chromosome is known to be inactivated in the male germline. In accordance with such a scenario, we provide evidence that in Drosophila, the autosomal Ctr1C gene originated as a retrogene copy of the X-linked Ctr1A, thus maintaining copper delivery during male spermatogenesis. PMID:20351114

  13. Effects of Saikokaryukotsuboreito on Spermatogenesis and Fertility in Aging Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Zhi-Jun; Ji, Su-Yun; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Gao, Yong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aspermia caused by exogenous testosterone limit its usage in late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) patients desiring fertility. Saikokaryukotsuboreito (SKRBT) is reported to improve serum testosterone and relieve LOH-related symptoms. However, it is unclear whether SKRBT affects fertility. We aimed to examine the effects of SKRBT on spermatogenesis and fertility in aging male mice. Methods: Thirty aging male mice were randomly assigned to three groups. Mice were orally administered with phosphate-buffer solution or SKRBT (300 mg/kg, daily) or received testosterone by subcutaneous injections (10 mg/kg, every 3 days). Thirty days later, each male mouse was mated with two female mice. All animals were sacrificed at the end of 90 days. Intratesticular testosterone (ITT) levels, quality of sperm, expression of synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3), and fertility were assayed. Results: In the SKRBT-treated group, ITT, quality of sperm, and expression of SYCP3 were all improved compared with the control group (ITT: 85.50 ± 12.31 ng/g vs. 74.10 ± 11.45 ng/g, P = 0.027; sperm number: [14.94 ± 4.63] × 106 cells/ml vs. [8.79 ± 4.38] × 106 cells/ml, P = 0.002; sperm motility: 43.16 ± 9.93% vs. 33.51 ± 6.98%, P = 0.015; the number of SYCP3-positive cells/tubule: 77.50 ± 11.01 ng/ml vs. 49.30 ± 8.73 ng/ml, P < 0.001; the expression of SYCP3 protein: 1.23 ± 0.09 vs. 0.84 ± 0.10, P < 0.001), but fertility was not significantly changed (P > 0.05, respectively). In the testosterone-treated group, ITT, quality of sperm, and expression of SYCP3 were markedly lower than the control group (ITT: 59.00 ± 8.67, P = 0.005; sperm number: [4.34 ± 2.45] × 106 cells/ml, P = 0.018; sperm motility: 19.53 ± 7.69%, P = 0.001; the number of SYCP3-positive cells/tubule: 30.00 ± 11.28, P < 0.001; the percentage of SYCP3-positive tubules/section 71.98 ± 8.88%, P = 0.001; the expression of SYCP3 protein: 0.71 ± 0.09, P < 0.001), and fertility was also suppressed (P < 0

  14. Recent progress in plant reproduction research: the story of the male gametophyte through to successful fertilization.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go

    2009-11-01

    Sexual reproduction is an important biological event not only for evolution but also for breeding in plants. It is a well known fact that Charles Darwin (1809-1882) was interested in the reproduction system of plants as part of his concept of 'species' and 'evolution.' His keen observation and speculation is timeless even in the current post-genome era. In the Darwin anniversary year of 2009, I have summarized recent molecular genetic studies of plant reproduction, focusing especially on male gametophyte development, pollination and fertilization. We are just beginning to understand the molecular mechanisms of the elaborate reproduction system in flowering plants, which have been a mystery for >100 years.

  15. Predator odour and its impact on male fertility and reproduction in Phodopus campbelli hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilieva, N. Y.; Cherepanova, E. V.; von Holst, D.; Apfelbach, R.

    This study investigated the influence of cat urine odour in suppressing development and fertility in Campbell's hamster males. Exposure to this odour from postnatal day 11 until day 45 (sexual maturation) resulted in reduced sex organ weights, reduced testosterone levels and in an increase in abnormalities of the synaptonemal complex in both sex chromosomes and autosomes. Subsequent breeding experiments revealed a significant decrease in litter size. All these data indicate a severe effect of predator odour on the breeding success of potential prey species. It is assumed that these effects are caused by the sulphurous compounds in the urine; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet known.

  16. Reproductive toxicity of 2,4-toluenediamine in the rat. 1. Effect on male fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Thysen, B.; Varma, S.K.; Bloch, E.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of 2,4-toluenediamine (TDA) on reproduction in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. Diets containing 0, 0.01 and 0.03% TDA were fed ad libitum to experimental animals for 10 wk. No signs of toxicity were found. Exposure to the high dose resulted in decreased mating frequency and an increase in infertile matings. Light-microscopic examination of the testes revealed reduced numbers of sperm in the seminiferous tubules and cauda epididymides. These results indicate that TDA is capable of reducing fertility and of exerting an inhibitory or toxic effect on spermatogenesis in the rat.

  17. Genetic parameters for male fertility and its relationship to skatole and androstenone in Danish Landrace boars.

    PubMed

    Strathe, A B; Velander, I H; Mark, T; Ostersen, T; Hansen, C; Kadarmideen, H N

    2013-10-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding selection against the boar taint compounds, androstenone and skatole, due to potential unfavorable genetic correlations with important male fertility traits (i.e., selection of boars with low levels of these boar taint compounds might also reduce male fertility). Hence, the objective of this investigation was to study the genetic association between direct measures of male fertility and the boar taint compounds in Danish Landrace pigs. Concentrations of skatole and androstenone in the back fat were available for approximately 6,000 and 1,000 Landrace boars, respectively. The litter size traits, such as total number born, live piglets at d 5, and piglet survival until d 5 on relatives of the slaughter boars, were extracted from the Danish Landrace breeding program, yielding 35,715 records. Semen volume, sperm concentration, subjective sperm quality score, and total number of sperm were available from 95,267 ejaculates. These ejaculates were collected between 2005 and 2012 and originated from 3,145 Landrace boars from 12 AI stations in Denmark. The traits were analyzed using single and multitrait animal models including univariate random regression models. Skatole and androstenone concentrations were moderate to highly heritable (i.e., 0.33 and 0.59, respectively). The genetic correlation between the two compounds was moderate (0.40). Genetic variance of sperm production per ejaculate increased during the productive life of the boar, resulting in heritability estimates increasing from 0.18 to 0.31. Genetic correlations between sperm production per ejaculate at different ages were high and generally larger than 0.8, indicating that later genetic merit can be predicted from records at an early age. The heritability (based on service-sire genetic component) of both total number of piglets born and survival to d 5 were 0.02, and the correlation between these effects and the additive genetic effect on boar taint ranged from 0.05 to -0

  18. Using the product threshold model for estimating separately the effect of temperature on male and female fertility.

    PubMed

    Tusell, L; David, I; Bodin, L; Legarra, A; Rafel, O; López-Bejar, M; Piles, M

    2011-12-01

    Animals under environmental thermal stress conditions have reduced fertility due to impairment of some mechanisms involved in their reproductive performance that are different in males and females. As a consequence, the most sensitive periods of time and the magnitude of effect of temperature on fertility can differ between sexes. The objective of this study was to estimate separately the effect of temperature in different periods around the insemination time on male and on female fertility by using the product threshold model. This model assumes that an observed reproduction outcome is the result of the product of 2 unobserved variables corresponding to the unobserved fertilities of the 2 individuals involved in the mating. A total of 7,625 AI records from rabbits belonging to a line selected for growth rate and indoor daily temperature records were used. The average maximum daily temperature and the proportion of days in which the maximum temperature was greater than 25°C were used as temperature descriptors. These descriptors were calculated for several periods around the day of AI. In the case of males, 4 periods of time covered different stages of the spermatogenesis, the transit through the epididymus of the sperm, and the day of AI. For females, 5 periods of time covered the phases of preovulatory follicular maturation including day of AI and ovulation, fertilization and peri-implantational stage of the embryos, embryonic and early fetal periods of gestation, and finally, late gestation until birth. The effect of the different temperature descriptors was estimated in the corresponding male and female liabilities in a set of threshold product models. The temperature of the day of AI seems to be the most relevant temperature descriptor affecting male fertility because greater temperature records on the day of AI caused a decrease in male fertility (-6% in male fertility rate with respect to thermoneutrality). Departures from the thermal zone in temperature

  19. Fertility suppression in male albino rats by administration of methanolic extract of Opuntia dillenii.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, V K; Gupta, R S

    2012-05-01

    To control growing world population, there is a need for male contraceptive methods that are comparable to female contraceptives, but due to lack of knowledge or investigation, no sufficient safe and effective contraceptives were developed till now. In the present investigation, the effect of 100% methanol extract of Opuntia dillenii phylloclade on reproduction in male rats was studied. A first group (I) received vehicle alone to serve as control. The second group (II) was further divided into treated and recovery groups, and the plant extract at 50 mg kg body weight(-1) was administered orally for 30 days. Biochemical, haematological and histopathological analyses were carried out to reveal the effects on reproductive organs in the male rats. The weights of reproductive organs were recorded. It was found that the number of fertile males, number of inseminated females, number of litters delivered and testosterone levels were reduced significantly. Epididymal sperm count and motility were also significantly decreased. Biochemical parameters support the antifertility activity of O. dillenii i.e. decreases in protein, glycogen content and elevation in cholesterol level. Testes and sperm morphology were altered significantly. Haematological parameters have not shown any significant changes. It is concluded that 100% methanol extract of O. dillenii possesses antifertility effects on male reproduction without change in general physiology.

  20. Mice lacking angiotensin-converting enzyme have low blood pressure, renal pathology, and reduced male fertility.

    PubMed

    Esther, C R; Howard, T E; Marino, E M; Goddard, J M; Capecchi, M R; Bernstein, K E

    1996-05-01

    Mammals produce two isozymes of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Somatic ACE plays an important role in the control of blood pressure. The function of testis ACE, produced by male and germ cells, is not known. To examine the roles of these isozymes, we used targeted homologous recombination to introduce a modified ACE allele into a mouse line. Mice homozygous for this mutant allele lack both ACE isozymes and have markedly reduced blood pressures. Contrary to a previous report, we found heterozygous male mice to have normal blood pressures. Homozygous mutant mice also have severe renal disease. The renal papilla is markedly reduced, and the intrarenal arteries exhibit vascular hyperplasia associated with a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate. These animals cannot effectively concentrate urine. They also have an abnormally low urinary sodium to potassium ratio despite reduced levels of aldosterone. Homozygous mutant male mice sire significantly smaller litters than wild-type male mice; however, no defect in sperm number, morphology, or motility was detected. ACE-deficient animals demonstrate the role of this enzyme in systemic blood pressure, renal development and function, and male fertility.

  1. Argonautes promote male fertility and provide a paternal memory of germline gene expression in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Conine, Colin C.; Moresco, James J.; Gu, Weifeng; Shirayama, Masaki; Conte, Darryl; Yates, John R.; Mello, Craig C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During each life cycle germ cells preserve and pass on both genetic and epigenetic information. In C. elegans, the ALG-3/4 Argonaute proteins are expressed during male gametogenesis and promote male fertility. Here we show that the CSR-1 Argonaute functions with ALG-3/4 to positively regulate target genes required for spermiogenesis. Our findings suggest that ALG-3/4 functions during spermatogenesis to amplify a small-RNA signal that represents an epigenetic memory of male-specific gene expression. CSR-1, which is abundant in mature sperm, appears to transmit this memory to offspring. Surprisingly, in addition to small RNAs targeting male-specific genes, we show that males also harbor an extensive repertoire of CSR-1 small RNAs targeting oogenesis-specific mRNAs. Together these findings suggest that C. elegans sperm transmit not only the genome but also epigenetic binary signals in the form of Argonaute/small-RNA complexes that constitute a memory of gene expression in preceding generations. PMID:24360276

  2. Male meiosis in Crustacea: synapsis, recombination, epigenetics and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rocío; Van Damme, Kay; Gosálvez, Jaime; Morán, Eugenio Sánchez; Colbourne, John K

    2016-09-01

    We present the first detailed cytological study of male meiosis in Daphnia (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera)-an aquatic microcrustacean with a cyclical parthenogenetic life cycle. Using immunostaining of the testes in Daphnia magna for baseline knowledge, we characterized the different stages of meiotic division and spermiogenesis in relation to the distribution of proteins involved in synapsis, early recombination events and sister chromatid cohesion. We also studied post-translational histone modifications in male spermatocytes, in relation to the dynamic chromatin progression of meiosis. Finally, we applied a DNA fragmentation test to measure sperm quality of D. magna, with respect to levels of inbreeding. As a proxy for fertility, this technique may be used to assess the reproductive health of a sentinel species of aquatic ecosystems. Daphnia proves to be a model species for comparative studies of meiosis that is poised to improve our understanding of the cytological basis of sexual and asexual reproduction.

  3. Marital status and fertility of 185 male renal transplant recipients in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long-Gen; Wang, Hong-Wei; Peng, Wang-Ling; Jin, Li-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Hui-Ming; Song, Qi-Zhe; Xu, Biao; Ding, Xian-Fan

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire was designed to assess the effects of renal transplantation in men of reproductive age on marital status and fertility. The study sought to correlate recipients' marital status and fertility with the health of the recipients after the transplantation, the health of children they fathered after the procedure, and the functioning of the transplanted kidney. Male recipients (n = 243) who were single and of reproductive age before renal transplantation were selected from 2007 recipients of a renal transplant recorded in the authors' hospitals in China. Of the 243 surveyed, 185 completed the questionnaire and participated in follow-up in the clinic or by telephone. Their marital status and fertility were investigated. Of the 185 recipients, 69 got married 12-88 months (mean, 32.19 +/- 14.30 months) after renal transplantation, and 62 of 69 couples were actively attempting to become pregnant. Fifty-three patients fathered 54 children, including 1 pair of twins, 9-72 months (mean, 25.81 +/- 15.33 months) after marriage. The birth weights of the newborns ranged from 2500 to 4600 g (mean, 3395 +/- 456.80 g). These children developed well. Nine patients did not father any children, and 3 of these 9 cases were attributable to infertility in the wife. Seven patients were using contraceptives. Three recipients suffered from chronic graft rejection and resumed hemodialysis 2-11 years after they fathered children. In addition, 2 patients died after fathering 1 child: 1 from dysfunction of the transplanted kidney 9 years after birth of his child, and another in an accident 1 year after his child's birth. Our findings suggest that, like men without renal transplants, male recipients of renal transplants can get married and father children, and the transplantation procedure appears to have no significant effect on the children fathered afterwards, on the recipients' health, or on the functioning of the transplanted kidney. It is very important to indicate that, in

  4. The enhancing effects of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed on fertility potential, plasma gonadotropins and testosterone in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Parandin, Rahmatollah; Yousofvand, Namdar; Ghorbani, Rostam

    2012-01-01

    Background: The task force on plants for fertility regulation in men continued with its program to identify novel prototypes in plants alleged to have fertility regulating properties. Nigella Sativa seeds are frequently used in folk medicine in the Middle East and some Asian countries for the promotion of good health and treatment of many ailments. Objective: To evaluated the role of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa on fertility potential, Pituitary-testicular axis hormones and Testosterone in male rats. Materials and Methods: 24 male rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; control, group A and group B, each group comprising of 8 rats. Animals in control group received 1 ml of normal saline and treatment groups (A and B) received (gavage) graded doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on a daily basis for 60 days. At the end of treatment period, fertility parameters such as body and reproductive organs weight, sperm motility, viability and count, epididymal sperm reserve (ESR), daily sperm production (DSP), blood testosterone concentration, Gonadotropins levels and fertility index were measured. Results: There was a significant difference in testes and epididymidis weight, sperm count, ESR, DSP, blood testosterone concentration, LH and fertility index in both the lower dose group and the higher group as compared to the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed especially in higher doses could increase fertility potential, LH and testosterone concentration in male rats. PMID:25246898

  5. Self-Fertilization and the Role of Males in Populations of Tadpole Shrimp (Branchiopoda: Notostraca: Triops).

    PubMed

    Horn, Rebekah L; Cowley, David E

    2016-11-01

    Self-fertilization has both negative and positive fitness effects on species evolution. Selfing can increase inbreeding depression, thereby decreasing genetic diversity. In contrast, self-fertilization can preserve beneficial gene combinations and facilitate colonization success. Within the class of crustaceans Branchiopoda, selfing is a primary reproductive mode. Some species of Triops, in the family Notostraca, are a few of the animal species thought to have a mixed mating system between hermaphrodites and males termed androdioecy. The objective of this study is to validate the reproductive mode utilized by Triops newberryi in southern New Mexico by the use of progeny arrays and population simulations. Individuals were reared in the lab from dried soil collected from temporary ponds inhabited by T. newberryi The adults reared and the encysted embryos contained within their brood pouches were genotyped using 7 T. newberryi specific microsatellite markers to determine the relatedness between parent and offspring. Overall microsatellite diversity was low with few heterozygous individuals and limited polymorphisms. Simulated populations and allele segregation analysis suggest hermaphroditism is the primary reproductive mode for T. newberryi In addition, based on the offspring's alleles, there was no direct evidence that a male (ovisacless) T. newberryi outcrossed with a female. Population simulations further suggest that the rate of successful outcrossing events must be low and could explain why outcrossing was not observed in the laboratory rearing trials. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Effects of prostaglandins on histophysiology of male reproductive organs and fertility in rats.

    PubMed

    Chinoy, N J; Sharma, J D; Seethalakshmi, L; Sanjeevan, A G

    1980-01-01

    The effects of subcutaneous injections of prostaglandins F2 alpha and E1 (PGF2 alpha and E1) on the histophysiology of male reproductive organs of mature albino rats and their fertility rate were studied. Although most of the androgensensitive biochemical parameters were reduced by PG treatment, the level of cholesterol and activities of 3 beta and 17 beta hydroxy steroid dehydrogenases were not significantly altered in the testis. These results indicate a probable decline in target organ response to androgen and/or in conversion of testosterone to its metabolites. The reduction in fertility rate of prostaglandin-treated male rats has been correlated with the altered morphology of the epididymal spermatozoa as well as with their reduced density and motility. The weights of testis and epididymis were significantly reduced but those of seminal vesicle (SV) and ventral prostate (VP) were increased by PG treatment. The height of the germinal/secretory epithelium, the tubular diameter of testis, and the epididymis were decreased, but Leydig cell diameter was not affected. The reduced fructose in SV and the corresponding increase in its weight suggest that there is hypertrophy but no hyperplasia. On the other hand, in VP there probably occur both hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It is evident from the results that PGF2 alpha and E1 exert a definite growth promoting effect particularly in SV and VP together with the antiandrogenic and partial antifertility effects.

  7. An EAR-Dependent Regulatory Module Promotes Male Germ Cell Division and Sperm Fertility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Borg, Michael; Rutley, Nicholas; Kagale, Sateesh; Hamamura, Yuki; Gherghinoiu, Mihai; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sari, Ugur; Esparza-Franco, Manuel A; Sakamoto, Wataru; Rozwadowski, Kevin; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Twell, David

    2014-05-01

    The production of the sperm cells in angiosperms requires coordination of cell division and cell differentiation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the germline-specific MYB protein DUO1 integrates these processes, but the regulatory hierarchy in which DUO1 functions is unknown. Here, we identify an essential role for two germline-specific DUO1 target genes, DAZ1 and DAZ2, which encode EAR motif-containing C2H2-type zinc finger proteins. We show that DAZ1/DAZ2 are required for germ cell division and for the proper accumulation of mitotic cyclins. Importantly, DAZ1/DAZ2 are sufficient to promote G2- to M-phase transition and germ cell division in the absence of DUO1. DAZ1/DAZ2 are also required for DUO1-dependent cell differentiation and are essential for gamete fusion at fertilization. We demonstrate that the two EAR motifs in DAZ1/DAZ2 mediate their function in the male germline and are required for transcriptional repression and for physical interaction with the corepressor TOPLESS. Our findings uncover an essential module in a regulatory hierarchy that drives mitotic transition in male germ cells and implicates gene repression pathways in sperm cell formation and fertility.

  8. A low molecular weight proteome comparison of fertile and male sterile 8 anthers of Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxue; Adams, Christopher M.; Fernandes, John F.; Egger, Rachel L.; Walbot, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Summary During maize anther development, somatic locular cells differentiate to support meiosis in the pollen mother cells. Meiosis is an important event during anther growth and is essential for plant fertility as pollen contains the haploid sperm. A subset of maize male sterile mutants exhibit meiotic failure, including ms8 (male sterile 8) in which meiocytes arrest as dyads and the locular somatic cells exhibit multiple defects. Systematic proteomic profiles were analysed in biological triplicates plus technical triplicates comparing ms8 anthers with fertile sibling samples at both the premeiotic and meiotic stages; proteins from 3.5 to 20 kDa were fractionated by 1-D PAGE, cleaved with Lys-C and then sequenced using a LTQ Orbitrap Velos MS paradigm. Three hundred and 59proteins were identified with two or more assigned peptides in which each of those peptides were counted at least two or more times (0.4% peptide false discovery rate (FDR) and 0.2% protein FDR); 2761 proteins were identified with one or more assigned peptides (0.4% peptide FDR and 7.6% protein FDR). Stage-specific protein expression provides candidate stage markers for early anther development, and proteins specifically expressed in fertile compared to sterile anthers provide important clues about the regulation of meiosis. 49% of the proteins detected by this study are new to an independent whole anther proteome, and many small proteins missed by automated maize genome annotation were validated; these outcomes indicate the value of focusing on low molecular weight proteins. The roles of distinctive expressed proteins and methods for mass spectrometry of low molecular weight proteins are discussed. PMID:22748129

  9. Influence of genetic abnormalities on semen quality and male fertility: A four-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Elfateh, Fadlalla; Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Zhihong; Jiang, Yuting; Chen, Shuang; Liu, Ruizhi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wide range of disorders ranging from genetic disorders to coital difficulties can influence male fertility. In this regard, genetic factors are highlighted as the most frequent, contributed to 10-15%, of male infertility causes. Objective: To investigate the influence of genetic abnormalities on semen quality and reproductive hormone levels of infertile men from Northeast China. Materials and Methods: 2034 infertile men including 691 patients with abnormal sperm parameters were investigated retrospectively. Semen analysis was performed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Y chromosome micro deletions were detected by polymerase chain reaction assays. Chromosome analysis was performed using G-banding. Results: The incidence of abnormal chromosomal karyotype in the patients with abnormal sperm parameters was 12.01% (83/691). The most frequent cause was Klinefelter's syndrome 37.35% (31/83). As the same as chromosomal abnormalities group, the volumes of testes (p=0.000 and 0.000, respectively) and the levels of testosterone (T) (p=0.000), and testosterone/ luteinizing hormone (T/LH) (p=0.000) of patients with Y chromosome micro deletions were significantly lower than those of fertile group. In addition, the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (p=0.000), and luteinizing hormone (LH) (p=0.000) were significantly higher in patients with Y chromosome micro deletions than those in the fertile group. Translocation abnormalities displayed slight effect on sperm motility. Conclusion: Y chromosome micro deletions and sex chromosome disorders particularly Klinefelter’s (47, XXY), have severe adverse influence on normal hormone levels, testicular volume and sperm count, whereas translocation abnormalities may inversely correlate with sperm motility. PMID:24799866

  10. Feeding programs promoting daily feed intake stability in rabbit males reduce sperm abnormalities and improve fertility.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J J; Marco-Jiménez, F; Martínez-Paredes, E; Ródenas, L; Fabre, C; Juvero, M A; Cano, J L

    2016-08-01

    males may be useful to fit their needs and provide a constant daily supply of nutrients, with some sperm morphologic characteristics being improved, as well as the fertility of their pooled semen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of new multi-site hormone blockers on the fertility of male rats.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A S; Shapiro, B H; Root, A W

    1976-04-01

    The effects on the fertility of adult male rats of six new synthetic steroids: I, 3-cyano-5alpha-androst-1-en-17-one; II, the 17beta-acetate form of I; III, 17beta-hydroxy-5beta-cyano-androstan-3-one; IV, 6-methylpregnenolone; V, 17beta-hydroxy-17alpha-ethynyl-5beta-cyano-19-norandrostan-3-one; and VI, 19-norspiroxenone (oestr-4-en-3-one-spiro-17alpha-2'-[tetrahydrofuran]) have been tested. After 6 weeks of treatment with daily doses of 5 mg (I, II, III), 15 mg (IV) or 10 mg (V, VI) only steroid VI blocked the completion of spermatogenesis and reduced the number of foetuses sired in at least five females/male. Steroid VI also diminished seminal vesicular, prostatic, testicular and epididymal weights. It inhibited the testicular enzymes, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-delta4-5-3-oxosteroid isomerase system, 17alpha-hydroxylase, and C17-20 lyase markedly, but did not affect the adrenal dehydrogenase-isomerase system. It depressed, strikingly, testicular and serum levels of testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and reduced pituitary and serum levels of FSH and LH. Although marked depression of target organ weights also occurred with steroids II, IV and V, and reduction of androgen levels and LH in the circulation with III, IV and V, only VI was a potent blocker of male fertility with the exception of a slight block of the siring of viable foetuses by steroids IV and V. The major difference in site of action of steroid VI from the others was the depression of pituitary and serum levels of FSH along with a marked diminution of testicular content of both testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. 19-Norspiroxenone in the rat is a potent anti-oestrogen without inherent oestrogenicity and is anti-uterotrophic. Thus, VI may affect male fertility by virtue of its potent anti-oestrogenic action in the hypothalamus or testis.

  12. Withania somnifera Improves Semen Quality in Stress-Related Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Shukla, Kamla Kant; Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Rajender, Singh; Shankhwar, Satya Narain; Singh, Vishwajeet; Dalela, Deepansh

    2009-09-29

    Stress has been reported to be a causative factor for male infertility. Withania somnifera has been documented in Ayurveda and Unani medicine system for its stress-combating properties. However, limited scientific literature is available on this aspect of W. somnifera. We undertook the present study to understand the role of stress in male infertility, and to test the ability of W. somnifera to combat stress and treat male infertility. We selected normozoospermic but infertile individuals (N = 60), further categorized in three groups: normozoospermic heavy smokers (N = 20), normozoospermics under psychological stress (N = 20) and normozoospermics with infertility of unknown etiology (N = 20). Normozoospermic fertile men (N = 60) were recruited as controls. The subjects were given root powder of W. somnifera at a rate of 5 g/day for 3 months. Measuring various biochemical and stress parameters before and after treatment, suggested a definite role of stress in male infertility and the ability of W. somnifera to treat stress-related infertility. Treatment resulted in a decrease in stress, improved the level of anti-oxidants and improved overall semen quality in a significant number of individuals. The treatment resulted in pregnancy in the partners of 14% of the patients.

  13. Methyltestosterone efficiently induces male development in the self-fertilizing hermaphrodite fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Akira; Yamamura, Aki; Koshiba, Satoshi; Lee, Jae-Seong; Orlando, Edward F; Hori, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    A hermaphrodite fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, is the only known vertebrate that reproduces by self-fertilization. In nature, males have been rarely observed. Low-temperature treatment during late embryonic stages is known to induce males but its efficacy is variable. Here we report that 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT) treatment of the embryos converted most of the fish to males. We examined a time course of this male induction with histological and marker gene expression analyses. Oogenesis started in the gonads of the control embryo at hatching; spermatogenesis did not start until two months after hatching. In the MT-treated fish, oogenesis started initially as in the control but stopped completely within one month after hatching. Instead, spermatogonial proliferation started earlier than in the control fish and progressed to full spermatogenesis. Expression profiles of the sex-specific marker genes corresponded well with histological observations. From one month after hatching, expression of an oocyte-specific marker, figalpha, and a testicular somatic cell marker, dmrt1, started to increase in the control and in the MT-treated fish, respectively.

  14. Withania somnifera Improves Semen Quality in Stress-Related Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Shukla, Kamla Kant; Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Rajender, Singh; Shankhwar, Satya Narain; Singh, Vishwajeet; Dalela, Deepansh

    2011-01-01

    Stress has been reported to be a causative factor for male infertility. Withania somnifera has been documented in Ayurveda and Unani medicine system for its stress-combating properties. However, limited scientific literature is available on this aspect of W. somnifera. We undertook the present study to understand the role of stress in male infertility, and to test the ability of W. somnifera to combat stress and treat male infertility. We selected normozoospermic but infertile individuals (N = 60), further categorized in three groups: normozoospermic heavy smokers (N = 20), normozoospermics under psychological stress (N = 20) and normozoospermics with infertility of unknown etiology (N = 20). Normozoospermic fertile men (N = 60) were recruited as controls. The subjects were given root powder of W. somnifera at a rate of 5 g/day for 3 months. Measuring various biochemical and stress parameters before and after treatment, suggested a definite role of stress in male infertility and the ability of W. somnifera to treat stress-related infertility. Treatment resulted in a decrease in stress, improved the level of anti-oxidants and improved overall semen quality in a significant number of individuals. The treatment resulted in pregnancy in the partners of 14% of the patients. PMID:19789214

  15. Effect of psychological stress on fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partners of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Bhongade, M B; Prasad, S; Jiloha, R C; Ray, P C; Mohapatra, S; Koner, B C

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of psychological stress on male fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partner of infertile couples. Seventy male partners of infertile couples were evaluated for level of psychological stress using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) questionnaire, serum total testosterone, luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) by electrochemiluminescence assay and serum GnRH by ELISA. Seminal analysis was performed as per WHO guideline. Nineteen (27%) of them had HADS anxiety and depression score ≥8 (abnormal HADS score). The persons having abnormal HADS had lower serum total testosterone, higher serum FSH and LH than those of persons having normal HADS. Serum total testosterone correlated negatively with HADS, but LH and FSH correlated positively. There was no change in GnRH with the change in stress or testosterone levels. Sperm count, motility and morphologically normal spermatozoa were lower in persons having abnormal HADS. Sperm count correlated positively with total testosterone and negatively with FSH and LH. Abnormal sperm motility and morphology were related to lower testosterone and higher LH and FSH levels. Psychological stress primarily lowers serum total testosterone level with secondary rise in serum LH and FSH levels altering seminal quality. Stress management is warranted for male infertility cases.

  16. Genetic correlation between growth and female and male contributions to fertility in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Piles, M; Tusell, L

    2012-08-01

    A Bayesian bivariate Linear-Threshold Animal Model was implemented to determine the genetic correlation between fertility (F), defined as success or failure to conceive, and average daily gain (ADG) in a rabbit line selected for ADG. A total of 27 234 records of F from 7895 females and 1293 males, and 114 135 records of ADG were used for the analysis. The pedigree included 114 485 animals. The model used for ADG included the systematic effects of year-season, parity order and number of kids born alive, the animal additive effect, the maternal and paternal permanent environmental effects, the common litter permanent environmental effect and the residual. The model for the liability of F included the systematic effects of year-season and physiological status of the female, the female and male additive genetic effects, the female and male permanent environmental effects and the residual, which was divided into a permanent environmental effect related to the common litter effect for ADG, and an independent term. The estimated heritabilities were 0.15 for ADG and 0.07 and 0.04 for the female and male contributions to F, respectively. Male and female contributions to F had a positive genetic correlation (0.34). The genetic correlation between ADG and the female component of F was low to moderate and negative (-0.31), whereas it was null for the male contribution to F. Thus, it is expected that only the female contribution to reproductive performance may be impaired by selection for ADG in rabbit lines. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. The role of vitamin D in male fertility: A focus on the testis.

    PubMed

    de Angelis, Cristina; Galdiero, Mariano; Pivonello, Claudia; Garifalos, Francesco; Menafra, Davide; Cariati, Federica; Salzano, Ciro; Galdiero, Giacomo; Piscopo, Mariangela; Vece, Alfonso; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2017-09-01

    In the last decade, vitamin D has emerged as a pleiotropic molecule with a multitude of autocrine, paracrine and endocrine functions, mediated by classical genomic as well as non-classical non-genomic actions, on multiple target organs and systems. The expression of vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes in male reproductive system, particularly in the testis, suggests the occurrence of vitamin D synthesis and regulation as well as function in the testis. The role of vitamin D in the modulation of testis functions, including hormone production and spermatogenesis, has been investigated in animals and humans. Experimental studies support a beneficial effect of vitamin D on male fertility, by modulating hormone production through genomic and non-genomic actions, and, particularly, by improving semen quality essentially through non-genomic actions. However, clinical studies in humans are controversial. Indeed, vitamin D seems to contribute to the modulation of the bioavailable rather than total testosterone. Moreover, although an increased prevalence or risk for testosterone deficiency was reported in men with vitamin D deficiency in observational studies, the majority of interventional studies demonstrated the lack of effect of vitamin D supplementation on circulating levels of testosterone. The most consistent effect of vitamin D was reported on semen quality. Indeed, vitamin D was shown to be positively associated to sperm motility, and to exert direct actions on spermatozoa, including non-genomic driven modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis and activation of molecular pathways involved in sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction. The current review provides a summary of current knowledge on the role of vitamin D in male fertility, by reporting clinical and experimental studies in humans and animals addressing the relationship between vitamin D and testis function.

  18. Differential Mitochondrial Electron Transport through the Cyanide-Sensitive and Cyanide-Insensitive Pathways in Isonuclear Lines of Cytoplasmic Male Sterile, Male Fertile, and Restored Petunia1

    PubMed Central

    Connett, Marie B.; Hanson, Maureen R.

    1990-01-01

    Three pairs of isonuclear lines of cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) and fertile Petunia cells (Petunia hybrida [Hook] Vilm. and Petunia parodii L.S.M.) grown in suspension culture were examined for sensitivity to inhibitors of respiratory electron transport at time-points after transfer into fresh media. Cells from CMS lines differed from cells of fertile lines in their utilization of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase pathway. Under our culture regime, after approximately 3 days of culture cells from the CMS lines exhibited much lower cyanide-insensitive, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration than cells from the fertile lines. This respiratory difference was shown to be specific to the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway by using other characteristic inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in experiments with isolated mitochondria. Immature anthers from CMS plants also showed lower alternative oxidase activity relative to anthers from male fertile plants, but no such difference was detected in leaf tissue, ovary or perianth tissue, or anthers collected just prior to anthesis. A cell line from a fertile plant carrying a nuclear fertility restorer gene and the CMS cytoplasm exhibited increased activity of the alternative pathway compared with the CMS lines. PMID:16667667

  19. Male fertility and apoptosis in normal spermatogenesis are regulated by vacuolar-ATPase isoform a2.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Agrawal, Varkha; Katara, Gajendra K; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Kulshrestha, Arpita; Chaouat, Gerard; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2015-11-01

    The a2 isoform of vacuolar-ATPase (ATP6V0A2, referred to as a2V) is required for normal spermatogenesis and maturation of sperm. Treatment of male mice with anti-a2V disturbs the testicular cytokine/chemokine balance and leads to severe deficiencies of spermatogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of a2V in male fertility and in the regulation of apoptotic pathways required for normal spermatogenesis in mice. To study the role of a2V single dose of anti-a2V monoclonal antibody or mouse IgG isotype (3μg/animal) was injected i.p. into males on alternate days for 10 days. The expression of sperm maturation-related molecules and pro-apoptotic molecules was measured by real-time PCR or immunohistochemistry in control and anti-a2V-treated testes. The caspase levels and their activity were measured by western blot and fluorometry. We found that the expression of the sperm maturation-related molecules SPAM1, ADAM1, and ADAM2 was significantly decreased in testes from anti-a2V-treated males. The expression of pro-apoptotic molecules (Bax, p53, and p21) and molecules involved in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis (caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP), which are crucial for normal spermatogenesis was significantly reduced in testes from anti-a2V-treated males compared with the control. The total ATP level was significantly lower in anti-a2V-treated testes. The data provide novel evidence showing that a2V can regulate the apoptotic pathways, an essential testicular feature, and is necessary for efficient spermatogenesis.

  20. Chronic exposures and male fertility: the impacts of environment, diet, and drug use on spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, J S; Tanrikut, C

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that sperm concentrations and semen quality have been decreasing over the past several decades in many areas of the world. The etiology of these decreases is currently unknown. Acute events can have significant impacts on spermatogenesis and are often readily identified during the male fertility evaluation. The majority of male factor infertility, however, is idiopathic. Chronic, low-dose exposures to chemicals and nutrients are more difficult to identify, but are extremely prevalent. These exposures have been shown to have dramatic effects on both individual and community health and interest in the cumulative and synergistic impacts of such agents on spermatogenesis has been increasing. While our understanding of these potential hazards is evolving, it is clear that they may significantly influence male reproductive potential. This review explores the literature related to effects of chronic exposures from drug use, dietary intake, and the environment on spermatogenesis in humans and animals. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  1. Maternal caffeine consumption has irreversible effects on reproductive parameters and fertility in male offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Dorostghoal, Mehran; Erfani Majd, Naeem; Nooraei, Parvaneh

    2012-12-01

    Concerns are growing about the decrease in male reproductive health. Caffeine is one of the popular nutrients that has been implicated as a risk factor for infertility. In the present study, we examined whether in utero and lactational exposure to caffeine affects the reproductive function of the offspring of rats. Pregnant rats received caffeine via drinking water during gestation (26 and 45 mg/kg) and lactation (25 and 35 mg/kg). Body and reproductive organ weight, seminiferous tubule diameter, germinal epithelium height, sperm parameters, fertility rate, number of implantations, and testosterone level of the offspring were assessed from birth to adulthood. Significant dose-related decreases were observed in the body and reproductive organ weight, seminiferous tubule diameter, and germinal epithelium height of the offspring. Sperm density had declined significantly in offspring of the low-dose and high-dose groups, by 8.81% and 19.97%, respectively, by postnatal day 150. The number of viable fetuses had decreased significantly in females mated with male offspring of the high-dose group at postnatal days 60, 90, 120, and 150. There were also significant reductions in testosterone levels of high-dose group offspring from birth to postnatal day 150. It is concluded that maternal caffeine consumption impairs gonadal development and has long-term adverse effects on the reproductive efficiency of male offspring rats.

  2. Pediatric Oncology Providers’ Attitudes and Practice Patterns Regarding Fertility Preservation in Adolescent Male Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Amanda; Kashanian, James A.; Clayman, Marla L.; Gosiengfiao, Yasmin; Lockart, Barbara; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Brannigan, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate pediatric oncology providers’ attitudes toward fertility preservation (FP), their use of educational materials, their approach to FP discussion, and their FP knowledge specifically pertaining to adolescent males. Methods A 40-item online survey was distributed to physicians, advanced practice nurses (APN), and nurses within pediatric oncology. Results About 78.7% of physicians, 81.4% of APN, and 51.9% of nurses reported high levels of comfort in discussing FP options with adolescent males (P<0.05). Fifty-one percent of physicians and 54.2% of APN reported using educational materials, compared with 38.9% of nurses (P<0.05). Regarding knowledge of FP technologies, 48.7% of physicians, 52.5% of APN, and 81.1% of nurses reported being unfamiliar with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (P<0.05). An overwhelming majority (92.9%) of respondents reported having no formal training in discussing FP. Finally, 84.8% of respondents believed formal training on this issue would be useful to them. Conclusions This study illustrates an unmet need in the education of pediatric oncology providers, as knowledge gaps and discomfort are common themes reported by health care professionals within the context of adolescent male FP care. In addition, this study reveals a high level of receptiveness to FP training by these same providers. PMID:26630536

  3. Maternal caffeine consumption has irreversible effects on reproductive parameters and fertility in male offspring rats

    PubMed Central

    Erfani Majd, Naeem; Nooraei, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Concerns are growing about the decrease in male reproductive health. Caffeine is one of the popular nutrients that has been implicated as a risk factor for infertility. In the present study, we examined whether in utero and lactational exposure to caffeine affects the reproductive function of the offspring of rats. Methods Pregnant rats received caffeine via drinking water during gestation (26 and 45 mg/kg) and lactation (25 and 35 mg/kg). Body and reproductive organ weight, seminiferous tubule diameter, germinal epithelium height, sperm parameters, fertility rate, number of implantations, and testosterone level of the offspring were assessed from birth to adulthood. Results Significant dose-related decreases were observed in the body and reproductive organ weight, seminiferous tubule diameter, and germinal epithelium height of the offspring. Sperm density had declined significantly in offspring of the low-dose and high-dose groups, by 8.81% and 19.97%, respectively, by postnatal day 150. The number of viable fetuses had decreased significantly in females mated with male offspring of the high-dose group at postnatal days 60, 90, 120, and 150. There were also significant reductions in testosterone levels of high-dose group offspring from birth to postnatal day 150. Conclusion It is concluded that maternal caffeine consumption impairs gonadal development and has long-term adverse effects on the reproductive efficiency of male offspring rats. PMID:23346524

  4. Acute and chronic pathological effects of sulfur mustard on genitourinary system and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Ghabili, Kamyar; Ansarin, Khalil; Aslanabadi, Saeid; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Etemadi, Jalal; Khalili, Majid; Shoja, Mohammadali Mohajel

    2013-01-01

    To review the acute and chronic pathological effects of sulfur mustard on the genitourinary system and male fertility. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar to find studies related to the sulfur mustard-induced genitourinary effects and male infertility. Information in the abstracts of non-English related papers as well as those in the proceedings of congresses on sulfur mustard were reviewed as well. In acute phase after sulfur mustard exposure, evidences are in favor of microscopic and macroscopic renal lesions, very low androgen levels, and impaired spermatogenesis. Several years following sulfur mustard exposure, the long-term pathological effects vary from the renal function impairment to the gonadal damage, in particular the spermatogenesis. Nevertheless, carcinogenic effect of sulfur mustard on the genitourinary system as well as the prevalence of male infertility among sulfur mustard-exposed veterans in the chronic post-exposure phase is still unclear. Sulfur mustard causes both acute and chronic injuries to different parts of the genitourinary system.

  5. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species

    PubMed Central

    Comizzoli, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks). Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world's unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biobanks now being actively used for endangered species management and propagation (including the introduction of species such as the black-footed ferret and the giant panda). Innovations emerging from the growing field of male fertility preservation for humans, livestock species, and laboratory animals are also becoming relevant to the protection and the propagation of valuable domestic and wild species. These new approaches extend beyond the “classical” methods associated with sperm freezing to include testicular tissue preservation combined with xenografting or in vitro culture, all of which have potential for rescuing vast amounts of unused germplasm. There also are other options under development that are predicted to have a high impact within the next decade (stem cell technologies, bio-stabilization of sperm cells at ambient temperatures, and the use of genomics tools). However, biobanking efforts and new fertility preservation strategies have to expand the way beyond mammalian species, which will offer knowledge and tools to better manage species that serve as valuable biomedical models or require assistance to reverse endangerment. PMID:25966625

  6. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species.

    PubMed

    Comizzoli, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks). Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world's unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biobanks now being actively used for endangered species management and propagation (including the introduction of species such as the black-footed ferret and the giant panda). Innovations emerging from the growing field of male fertility preservation for humans, livestock species, and laboratory animals are also becoming relevant to the protection and the propagation of valuable domestic and wild species. These new approaches extend beyond the "classical" methods associated with sperm freezing to include testicular tissue preservation combined with xenografting or in vitro culture, all of which have potential for rescuing vast amounts of unused germplasm. There also are other options under development that are predicted to have a high impact within the next decade (stem cell technologies, bio-stabilization of sperm cells at ambient temperatures, and the use of genomics tools). However, biobanking efforts and new fertility preservation strategies have to expand the way beyond mammalian species, which will offer knowledge and tools to better manage species that serve as valuable biomedical models or require assistance to reverse endangerment.

  7. Effect of sulfasalazine and its analogs on fertility in male rats.

    PubMed

    Didolkar, A K; Keizer-Zucker, A; Sundaram, K; Bardin, C W; Agback, H; Johansson, E D

    1988-05-01

    Several derivatives of sulfasalazine were tested for their antifertility activity in male rats. The compounds were administered to groups of rats daily by oral gavage for 28 days. Fertility of the rats treated with sulfasalazine or compound CH 74A was reduced, while other compounds had no effect. In a subsequent experiment, therefore, only the active compounds were studied further. Fertility of rats treated with sulfasalazine, compound CH 74A, CH 99A or sulfapyridine was reduced during 40 days of treatment. At the end of treatment, body weights were reduced in higher dose groups of sulfasalazine, CH 74A and sulfapyridine compared to control animals. The weights of the testes, prostate or seminal vesicle were not altered by any of the treatments. On the other hand, weight of the epididymides decreased in all higher dose groups except in CH 99A-treated animals. Sperm motility decreased in all the treated rats except in animals treated with low dose of sulfapyridine, whereas epididymal sperm count decreased in all but CH 99A-treated animals. These results suggest that sulfasalazine and its derivatives bring about their antifertility effects by decreasing sperm motility and/or number of spermatozoa.

  8. Deleterious effects of obesity upon the hormonal and molecular mechanisms controlling spermatogenesis and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lien M; Millar, Kate; Jones, Celine; Fatum, Muhammad; Coward, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Worldwide obesity rates have nearly doubled since 1980 and currently over 10% of the population is obese. In 2008, over 1.4 billion adults aged 20 years and older had a body mass index or BMI above a healthy weight and of these, over 200 million men and nearly 300 million women were obese. While obesity can have many ramifications upon adult life, one growing area of concern is that of reproductive capacity. Obesity affects male infertility by influencing the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, thus causing detrimental effects upon spermatogenesis and subsequent fertility. In particular, evidence indicates that excess adipose tissue can alter the relative ratio of testosterone and oestrogen. Additional effects involve the homeostatic disruption of insulin, sex-hormone-binding-globulin, leptin and inhibin B, leading to diminished testosterone production and impairment to spermatogenesis. Aberrant spermatogenesis arising from obesity is associated with downstream changes in key semen parameters, defective sperm capacitation and binding, and deleterious effects on sperm chromatin structure. More recent investigations into trans-generational epigenetic inheritance further suggest that molecular changes in sperm that arise from obesity-related impaired spermatogenesis, such as modified sperm RNA levels, DNA methylation, protamination and histone acetylation, can impact upon the development of offspring. Here, we summarise our current understanding of how obesity exerts influence over spermatogenesis and subsequent fertility status, and make recommendations for future investigative research.

  9. Uncovering Male Fertility Transition Responsive miRNA in a Wheat Photo-Thermosensitive Genic Male Sterile Line by Deep Sequencing and Degradome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jian-Fang; Wang, Yu-Kun; Wang, Peng; Duan, Wen-Jing; Yuan, Shao-Hua; Sun, Hui; Yuan, Guo-Liang; Ma, Jing-Xiu; Wang, Na; Zhang, Feng-Ting; Zhang, Li-Ping; Zhao, Chang-Ping

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs which play important negative regulatory roles at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in plants. Wheat is the most commonly cultivated plant species worldwide. In this study, RNA-seq analysis was used to examine the expression profiles of miRNA in the spikelets of photo-thermosenisitive genic male sterile (PTGMS) wheat line BS366 during male fertility transition. Through mapping on their corresponding precursors, 917-7,762 novel miRNAs were found in six libraries. Six novel miRNAs were selected for examination of their secondary structures and confirmation by stem-loop RT-PCR. In a differential expression analysis, 20, 22, and 58 known miRNAs exhibited significant differential expression between developmental stages 1 (secondary sporogenous cells had formed), 2 (all cells layers were present and mitosis had ceased), and 3 (meiotic division stage), respectively, of fertile and sterile plants. Some of these differential expressed miRNAs, such as tae-miR156, tae-miR164, tae-miR171, and tae-miR172, were shown to be associated with their targets. These targets were previously reported to be related to pollen development and/or male sterility, indicating that these miRNAs and their targets may be involved in the regulation of male fertility transition in the PTGMS wheat line BS366. Furthermore, target genes of miRNA cleavage sites were validated by degradome sequencing. In this study, a possible signal model for the miRNA-mediated signaling pathway during the process of male fertility transition in the PTGMS wheat line BS366 was developed. This study provides a new perspective for understanding the roles of miRNAs in male fertility in PTGMS lines of wheat.

  10. RNA Processing in the Male Germline: Mechanisms and Implications for Fertility.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Julien M D; Hobbs, Robin M

    2017-10-09

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a tightly coordinated process that gives rise to mature spermatozoa capable of fertilising an ovum during sexual reproduction. A population of stem and progenitor cells known as undifferentiated spermatogonia enables continual spermatogenesis throughout life. A complex transcriptional network that balances self-renewal of spermatogonia with their timely differentiation in order to maintain constant fertility regulates this process. Importantly, post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in spermatogenesis, necessitated by the profound genetic and morphological changes that occur during meiosis and sperm maturation. Pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA export, maintenance of transcript stability and translation are key RNA processing steps that are regulated in the male germline to maintain coordinated gene expression. In this review, we examine these processes in the context of mammalian spermatogenesis and provide an overview of key mediators at each step. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Proteomics of spermatogenesis: from protein lists to understanding the regulation of male fertility and infertility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Yan; Sha, Jia-Hao

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic technologies have undergone significant development in recent years, which has led to extensive advances in protein research. Currently, proteomic approaches have been applied to many scientific areas, including basic research, various disease and malignant tumour diagnostics, biomarker discovery and other therapeutic applications. In addition, proteomics-driven research articles examining reproductive biology and medicine are becoming increasingly common. The key challenge for this field is to move from lists of identified proteins to obtaining biological information regarding protein function. The present article reviews the available scientific literature related to spermatogenesis. In addition, this study uses two-dimensional electrophoresis mass spectrometry (2DE-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS to construct a series of proteome profiles describing spermatogenesis. This large-scale identification of proteins provides a rich resource for elucidating the mechanisms underlying male fertility and infertility. PMID:21076435

  12. Exogenous transforming growth factor beta1 replacement and fertility in male Tgfb1 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Leanne J; Ingman, Wendy V; Robker, Rebecca L; Robertson, Sarah A

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Tgfb1 null mutant mice has demonstrated that the cytokine transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFB1) has essential non-redundant roles in fertility. The present study attempted to alleviate the infertility phenotype of Tgfb1 null mutant male mice by administration of exogenous TGFB1, either orally by colostrum feeding or subcutaneously by delivery of recombinant human latent TGFB1 (rhLTGFB1) via osmotic mini-pumps. Bovine colostrum and fresh unpasteurised bovine milk were found to be rich sources of TGFB1 and TGFB2; however, feeding Tgfb1 null mutant mice colostrum for 2 days failed to raise serum levels of TGFB1. Administration of rhLTGFB1 (approximately 150 microg in total) over 14 days to Tgfb1 null mutant mice resulted in detectable TGFB1 in serum; however, mean levels remained 10-fold less than in Tgfb1 heterozygous mice. After 7 days and 14 days of rhLTGFB1 administration, serum testosterone, spontaneous non-contact erections and mating behaviour were assessed. Despite the increased serum TGFB1, administration of rhLTGFB1 to Tgfb1 null mutant mice failed to improve these fertility parameters. It is concluded that sustained restoration of circulating latent TGFB1 to levels approaching the normal physiological range does not rescue the infertility phenotype caused by TGFB1 deficiency. Reproductive function in male Tgfb1 null mutant mice may not respond to systemic TGFB1 supplementation due to a requirement for local sources of TGFB1 at the site of action in the reproductive tract, or perturbed development during the neonatal period or puberty such that adult reproductive function is permanently impaired.

  13. Therapeutic and fertility restoration effects of Ionidium suffruticosum on sub-fertile male albino Wistar rats: effects on testis and caudal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Chenniappan, Kuppusamy; Murugan, Kadarkari

    2017-12-01

    Ionidium suffruticosum (L.) Ging (Violaceae) is an important medicinal plant widely used as a herbal traditional medicine in Ayurveda for the treatment of infertility. Currently, little pharmacological information is available on its male fertility properties following prolonged use. To investigate I. suffruticosum leaf extracts for male fertility parameters. The ethanol lyophilized fraction was administered orally on carbendazim-induced sub-fertility rats (250 mg/kg body weight for 28 days). The effects of fractions on rat's fertility parameters i.e., body and testes weight, sperm motility, sperm vitality, epididymal sperm counts, its morphology, enzyme and antioxidant stress and histopathology were studied and compared with clomiphene citrate. The sub-fertile male rats treated with I. suffruticosum leaf extract increased the body weight of 7 g, testis weight of 97 mg, increased cauda epididymal sperm counts of 34.2 × 10(6) sperm/mL, motility of sperm 46% and vitality 28% also increased and normal sperm morphology also improved up to 32%. The carbendazim-treated group showed loss in body weight of 33 g, testis weight of 851 mg, decreased epididymal sperm counts of 15 × 10(6) sperm/mL, with sluggish motility and a highly significant fall in the live sperms of about 57%. The leaf fraction of I. suffructicosum increased the testicular weight, spermatogenesis, sperm counts, lessened sperm agglutination, and increased testicular oxidative biomarkers, SOD, and CAT. This study therefore supports the usage of I. suffructicosum in traditional medicine for infertility.

  14. Protective effect of honey against cigarette smoke induced-impaired sexual behavior and fertility of male rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mahaneem; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai Nainamohamed Salam

    2013-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with sexual dysfunction and impaired fertility in males. The aim of this study was to determine the potential protective effect of honey against the toxic effect of cigarette smoke (CS) on sexual behavior and fertility of male rats. Thirty-two adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (8 rats/group) as control, honey (H), CS and H plus CS (H + CS) groups. Rats in control and CS groups received oral administration of distilled water daily while rats in H and H + CS groups received honey (1.2 g/kg body weight/day) by oral gavage. Rats in CS and H + CS groups were also exposed to CS for 8 min 3 times/day. From 10 to 13 weeks of treatment, each male rat was cohabited with 3 untreated female rats for sexual behavioral and reproductive performance studies. Honey significantly increased the percentages of rats achieving intromission and ejaculation as well as increased mating and fertility indexes of male rats exposed to CS. Thus, honey has a protective effect against CS-induced impaired sexual behavior and fertility in male rats.

  15. Pre-chemotherapy preservation of fertility in male patients with high-grade malignant bone and soft tissue tumors

    PubMed Central

    HOSHI, MANABU; OEBISU, NAOTO; TAKADA, JUN; IWAI, TADASHI; TSURUTA, RIE; NAKAMURA, HIROAKI

    2014-01-01

    Only a limited number of orthopedic oncologists make arrangements for pre-chemotherapy fertility preservation, such as sperm cryopreservation, for their patients. The purpose of this study was to offer fertility preservation to male patients with high-grade malignant bone and soft tissue tumors and assess the outcomes. The study included 14 male patients, aged <45 years, with high-grade bone and soft tissue tumors. The median age at diagnosis was 23.0±12.0 years (range, 8–42 years). Following pathological confirmation of high-grade malignant tumor, we informed all the patients and/or their guardians on the issue of chemotherapy-related male infertility. If the patients were interested in preserving fertility, they were referred to a team of reproductive specialists. We documented the patients’ clinical characteristics and techniques used for fertility preservation. The majority of unmarried and childless patients were interested in fertility preservation. Four patients (28.5%) selected sperm cryopreservation and 1 patient (7.1%) selected hemi-testicular preservation, as he had developed erectile dysfunction following previous surgery for colon cancer. Married patients and those with children did not wish to preserve fertility. In conclusion, infertility following chemotherapy raises serious concerns for young male patients with high-grade bone and soft tissue tumors. Prior to initiating chemotherapy, the potential risks of chemotherapy should be explained, counseling should be provided and informed consent should be obtained from the patients, ideally without delaying commencement of cancer treatment. Prior to administering cancer chemotherapy, orthopedic oncologists are encouraged to offer sperm banking to young male patients at risk of infertility. PMID:25279207

  16. Obesity-Induced Infertility in Male Mice Is Associated With Disruption of Crisp4 Expression and Sperm Fertilization Capacity.

    PubMed

    Borges, Beatriz C; Garcia-Galiano, David; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Han, Xingfa; Gavrilina, Galina B; Saunders, Thomas L; Auchus, Richard J; Hammoud, Saher S; Smith, Gary D; Elias, Carol F

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 15% of human couples of reproductive age have impaired fertility, and the male component accounts for about half of these cases. The etiology is usually unknown, but high correlation with the increase in obesity rates is documented. In this study, we show that diet-induced and genetically obese mice display copulatory behavior comparable to controls, but the number of females impregnated by obese males is remarkably low. Screening for changes in gene expression in the male reproductive tract showed decreased Crisp4 expression in testis and epididymis of obese mice. Lack of CRISP4 in the luminal membrane of epididymal cells indicated inadequate secretion. Consistent with CRISP4 action in acrosome reaction, sperm from mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) had decreased fertilization capacity. CRISP4 treatment of sperm from HFD mice prior to in vitro fertilization improved fertilization rate. In leptin-deficient obese and infertile mice, leptin's effect to restore CRISP4 expression and function required gonadal hormones. Our findings indicate that the obesity-induced decline in sperm motility and fertilization capacity results in part from the disruption of epididymal CRISP4 expression and secretion. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  17. Proteasome activators, PA28γ and PA200, play indispensable roles in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Haratake, Kousuke; Miyahara, Hatsumi; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-03-22

    Protein degradation mediated by the proteasome is important for the protein homeostasis. Various proteasome activators, such as PA28 and PA200, regulate the proteasome function. Here we show double knockout (dKO) mice of Psme3 and Psme4 (genes for PA28γ and PA200), but not each single knockout mice, are completely infertile in male. The dKO sperms exhibited remarkable defects in motility, although most of them showed normal appearance in morphology. The proteasome activity of the mutant sperms decreased notably, and the sperms were strongly positive with ubiquitin staining. Quantitative analyses of proteins expressed in dKO sperms revealed up-regulation of several proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Furthermore, increased 8-OHdG staining was observed in dKO sperms head, suggesting defective response to oxidative damage. This report verified PA28γ and PA200 play indispensable roles in male fertility, and provides a novel insight into the role of proteasome activators in antioxidant response.

  18. Proteasome activators, PA28γ and PA200, play indispensable roles in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Haratake, Kousuke; Miyahara, Hatsumi; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Protein degradation mediated by the proteasome is important for the protein homeostasis. Various proteasome activators, such as PA28 and PA200, regulate the proteasome function. Here we show double knockout (dKO) mice of Psme3 and Psme4 (genes for PA28γ and PA200), but not each single knockout mice, are completely infertile in male. The dKO sperms exhibited remarkable defects in motility, although most of them showed normal appearance in morphology. The proteasome activity of the mutant sperms decreased notably, and the sperms were strongly positive with ubiquitin staining. Quantitative analyses of proteins expressed in dKO sperms revealed up-regulation of several proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Furthermore, increased 8-OHdG staining was observed in dKO sperms head, suggesting defective response to oxidative damage. This report verified PA28γ and PA200 play indispensable roles in male fertility, and provides a novel insight into the role of proteasome activators in antioxidant response. PMID:27003159

  19. The Anti-fertility Effects of Acacia nilotica in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lampiao, Fanuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A bulk of contraceptives on the market is women-oriented today. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a medicinal herb, Acacia nilotica on various parameters of male fertility using a rat model. Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 40) were randomly divided in to two groups. One group received Acacia nilotica, while the other acted as controls. Ten animals from each group were sacrificed after 16 weeks. Treatment was withdrawn for the remaining animals for 8 weeks. Blood was collected for hormonal analysis. The testis was removed for histological examination, while epididymal spermatozoa were retrieved for motility and morphological analysis. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test. A value of p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Sperm motility, progressive motility and sperm concentration significantly decreased in treated animals compared to the controls (p<0.05). Withdrawing the treatment did not restore these parameters (p<0.05). Abnormal sperm morphology significantly increased in both the treated and treatment withdrawn groups when compared to the controls (p<0.05). Testosterone concentrations were significantly lower in the treated group when compared to the controls (p<0.05) and no significant differences were observed between the controls and the treated animals when treatment was withdrawn. Histological observations showed that Acacia nilotica treatment disrupted semeniferous tubule architechture and consequently the spermatogenesis process. Conclusion These results show that Acacia nilotica severely affects sperm morphology, progressive motility and sperm concentration irreversibly in Wistar rats. PMID:23926560

  20. The SCF/c-KIT system in the male: Survival strategies in fertility and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Henrique J; Figueira, Marília I; Correia, Sara; Vaz, Cátia V; Socorro, Sílvia

    2014-12-01

    Maintaining the delicate balance between cell survival and death is of the utmost importance for the proper development of germ cells and subsequent fertility. On the other hand, the fine regulation of tissue homeostasis by mechanisms that control cell fate is a factor that can prevent carcinogenesis. c-KIT is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase activated by its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF). c-KIT signaling plays a crucial role in cell fate decisions, specifically controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Indeed, deregulating the SCF/c-KIT system by attenuation or overactivation of its signaling strength is linked to male infertility and cancer, and rebalancing its activity via c-KIT inhibitors has proven beneficial in treating human tumors that contain gain-of-function mutations or overexpress c-KIT. This review addresses the roles of SCF and c-KIT in the male reproductive tract, and discusses the potential application of c-KIT target therapies in disorders of the reproductive system.

  1. Altered helper Tcell-mediated immune responses in male mice conceived through in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hiwa; Mahdavi, Pooya; Fakhari, Shohreh; Faryabi, Mohammad Reza; Esmaeili, Parisa; Banafshi, Omid; Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Fathi, Fardin; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2017-03-08

    A study using a mouse IVF model was conducted to examine the hypothesis that in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment may lead to immune alteration in the offspring. Phagocytic activity and lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogen, alloantigen, and purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacterium bovis were investigated in the splenocytes of BCG-treated male mice conceived by IVF or natural conception. Intracellular expression of T-bet and GATA3 in helper T-cell population were examined in both groups. Moreover, the serum levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 along with BCG-specific levels of IgG1 and IgG2a were assessed by ELISA. In comparison with naturally-conceived mice, PPD-specific proliferative response and T-bet/GATA3 ratio were significantly decreased in IVF-conceived mice. Moreover, IVF-conceived mice exhibited marked decreases in IFN-γ/IL-4 and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios. Results indicate that in comparison with male mice conceived by natural conception, IVF counterparts exhibit less efficient immune responses against BCG through further promotion of Th2 responses.

  2. A new and unified nomenclature for male fertility restorer (RF) proteins in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kotchoni, Simeon O; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C; Gachomo, Emma W; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2010-12-28

    The male fertility restorer (RF) proteins belong to extended protein families associated with the cytoplasmic male sterility in higher plants. Up till now, there is no devised nomenclature for naming the RF proteins. The systematic sequencing of new plant species in recent years has uncovered the existence of several novel RF genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming has been simply arbitrary and could not be adequately handled in the context of comparative functional genomics. We propose in this study a unified nomenclature for the RF extended protein families across all plant species. This new and unified nomenclature relies upon previously developed nomenclature for the first ever characterized RF gene, RF2A/ALDH2B2, a member of ALDH gene superfamily, and adheres to the guidelines issued by the ALDH Genome Nomenclature Committees. The proposed nomenclature reveals that RF gene superfamily encodes currently members of 51 families. This unified nomenclature accommodates functional RF genes and pseudogenes, and offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional RFs as they become available in future. In addition, we provide a phylogenetic relationship between the RF extended families and use computational protein modeling to demonstrate the high divergence of RF functional specializations through specific structural features of selected members of RF superfamily.

  3. A New and Unified Nomenclature for Male Fertility Restorer (RF) Proteins in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Gachomo, Emma W.; Seufferheld, Manfredo J.

    2010-01-01

    The male fertility restorer (RF) proteins belong to extended protein families associated with the cytoplasmic male sterility in higher plants. Up till now, there is no devised nomenclature for naming the RF proteins. The systematic sequencing of new plant species in recent years has uncovered the existence of several novel RF genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming has been simply arbitrary and could not be adequately handled in the context of comparative functional genomics. We propose in this study a unified nomenclature for the RF extended protein families across all plant species. This new and unified nomenclature relies upon previously developed nomenclature for the first ever characterized RF gene, RF2A/ALDH2B2, a member of ALDH gene superfamily, and adheres to the guidelines issued by the ALDH Genome Nomenclature Committees. The proposed nomenclature reveals that RF gene superfamily encodes currently members of 51 families. This unified nomenclature accommodates functional RF genes and pseudogenes, and offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional RFs as they become available in future. In addition, we provide a phylogenetic relationship between the RF extended families and use computational protein modeling to demonstrate the high divergence of RF functional specializations through specific structural features of selected members of RF superfamily. PMID:21203394

  4. Update on the impact of Chlamydia trachomatis infection on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Muñoz, G; Sánchez, R; Henkel, R; Gallegos-Avila, G; Díaz-Gutierrez, O; Vigil, P; Vásquez, F; Kortebani, G; Mazzolli, A; Bustos-Obregón, E

    2004-02-01

    With approximately 90 million cases annually, infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial disease in the world. Considering that these infections are often asymptomatic and cause major complications like acute pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, infertility or infant pneumonia, the estimated costs for diagnosis and treatment in the USA amounts to 2.2 million US dollars for each 500 cases. Therefore, there is a high need for correct, quick and cost-effective diagnosis and treatment of this urogenital tract infection. New innovative therapies provide good results with regard to efficacy and patients' compliance. The success rates of treatments are at least 95%. However, the occurrence of antibiotic resistance should not be ignored and new treatment schemes must be developed. The state-of-the-art of diagnosis and treatment of chlamydial infections as well as the pathophysiology is discussed in this review. In conclusion, infections with C. trachomatis is an important public health problem, especially in third world and developing countries, and more socio-economic studies linking secondary prevention of chlamydial infections, infertility and adverse pregnancy outcome are needed to understand more of its aetiology. In addition, diagnosis and treatment should be improved. Data in men revealed that past infections but not present infections are more related to male infertility. There is still controversial results. In future studies, function of the seminal vesicles and evaluation of the antioxidant capacity should be taken into account when role of C. trachomatis infection on male fertility is assessed.

  5. Singular features of fertilization and their impact on the male reproductive system in eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Bedford, J Michael

    2014-02-01

    Therian (marsupial and eutherian) mammals have evolved a suite of novel reproductive features - seen variously in their gametes, the steps of fertilization and the male reproductive tract - whose adaptive significance remains unclear. Present evidence for the better-understood eutherian mammals suggests that the 'prime mover' in their evolution has been the character of the egg coat, with other such features being adaptations to the consequences of this. Its elastic thickness allows the zona pellucida to stretch to a variable degree and yet remain around the blastocyst during much or all of its expansion before implantation, but its character represents an unusual challenge for spermatozoa. Novel aspects of the acrosome related to this challenge enable it to maintain a relatively prolonged binding after the onset of the acrosome reaction, and the structure, shape and behaviour of the sperm head point to physical thrust as a major element of zona penetration - with the unique configuration of gamete fusion as a sequela of this strategy. In the male, such adaptations are reflected in sperm head formation in the testis and in sperm maturation in the epididymis involving at least the sperm head's structure, plasmalemma and acrosome. This complexity allied to a slow epididymal sperm transport, a relatively modest sperm production and the brief life span of mature spermatozoa kept above the cauda epididymidis could account for the evolution of the sperm storage function - a development seemingly linked, in turn, to the need for sperm capacitation and scrotal evolution.

  6. Testicular connexin 43, a precocious molecular target for the effect of environmental toxicants on male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Gilleron, Jérôme; Carette, Diane; Segretain, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Many recent epidemiological, clinical and experimental findings support the hypothesis that environmental toxicants are responsible for the increasing male reproductive disorders (congenital malformations, declining sperm counts and testicular cancer) over the past 20 years. It has also been reported that exposure to these toxicants, during critical periods of development (fetal and neonatal), represents a more considerable risk for animals and humans than exposure during adulthood. However, the molecular targets for these chemicals have not been clearly identified. Recent studies showed that a family of transmembranous proteins, named connexins, regulates numerous physiological processes involved in testicular development and function, such as Sertoli and germ cell proliferation, differentiation, germ cell migration and apoptosis. In the testis, knockout strategy revealed that connexin 43, the predominant connexin in this organ, is essential for spermatogenesis. In addition, there is evidence that many environmental toxicants could alter testicular connexin 43 by dysregulation of numerous mechanisms controlling its function. In the present work, we propose first to give an overview of connexin expression and intercellular gap junction coupling in the developing fetal and neonatal testes. Second, we underline the impact of maternally chemical exposure on connexin 43 expression in the perinatal developing testis. Lastly, we attempt to link this precocious effect to male offspring fertility. PMID:22332114

  7. Nonylphenol reduces sperm viability and fertility of mature male breeders in Brown Tsaiya ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min-Chien; Chiang, Hsin-I; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hung, Che-Ming; Tsai, Ming-Yang; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Cheng, Mei-Ping; Tso, Ko-Hua; Fan, Yang-Kwang

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nonylphenol (NP), a widely used surfactant, on the reproductive performance of male Brown Tsaiya ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) (MBBTDs). Mature MBBTDs (n=100) were treated with NP by daily gavaging of 0, 1 (NP1), 10 (NP10) and 250 (NP250) mg/kg-BW/d for 14 wk. Semen quality, fertilization rate and specific factors in blood plasma were measured. Weights of organs were also measured at 14 wk after NP administration. Ducks from each treatment (n=4) were continually treated with NP thereafter for 12 mo to observe changes of tissue ultrastructure by microscopic examination. The results showed that ducks treated with amounts of NP of greater than 1mg NP/kg BW/d (NP1) for 14 wk had decreased sperm viability (32.3%) compared to those in the control group (74.1%, P<0.05). The fertilization rate of ducks treated with 250mg NP/kg-BW/d (NP250) for 14 wk was reduced (21.0%) compared to the control group (74.5%, P<0.05). Plasma aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities were also greater in NP250 group at the 14th wk post-treatment. Plasma testosterone concentrations were increased by NP1 treatment at the 14th wk post-treatment. Administration at dosage 250mg NP/kg-BW/d for 12 mo resulted in reduced sperm counts (P<0.05) and histopathological changes, such as dilated seminiferous tubules (P<0.05) and degenerated spermatocytes (P<0.05). These findings strongly suggest that NP adversely affects the reproductive performance of MBBTDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal obesity and overnutrition increase oxidative stress in male rat offspring reproductive system and decrease fertility.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, G L; Vega, C C; Boeck, L; Vázquez, M; Bautista, C J; Reyes-Castro, L A; Saldaña, O; Lovera, D; Nathanielsz, P W; Zambrano, E

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence exists that maternal obesity (MO) and overnutrition during pregnancy and lactation have long-lasting consequences for progeny metabolism, cardiovascular and endocrine function. Data on effects of MO on offspring reproduction are limited. We hypothesized that MO during pregnancy and lactation in founder F(0) rat mothers would increase testicular and sperm oxidative stress (OS) and adversely impact male fertility in their F(1) offspring. We induced pre-pregnancy MO by feeding F(0) females a high-fat diet from weaning through pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, all F(1) rats ate control (C) diet. We determined serum testosterone, malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in F(1) testes and sperm at postnatal days (PNDs) 110, 450 and 650. At PNDs 450 and 650, MO offspring had lower luteinizing hormone while testosterone levels were lower at all ages. Testicular MDA and ROS concentrations and SOD and GPx activity were higher in MO F(1) at all ages. Nitrotyrosine immunostaining was higher at all ages in MO F(1) testes than C F(1). At PNDs 450 and 650, MO F(1) spermatozoa showed higher MDA concentrations and lower SOD and GPx activity with reduced sperm concentration, viability and motility, and more sperm abnormalities. Fertility rate was not affected at PND 110 but was lower in MO F(1) at PNDs 450 and 650. We conclude that MO during pregnancy and lactation increases F(1) testicular and sperm OS leading to premature aging of reproductive capacity.

  9. Adequacy of hyaluronan binding assay and a new fertility index derived from it for measuring of male fertility potential and the efficacy of supplement therapy.

    PubMed

    Szucs, M; Osvath, P; Laczko, I; Jakab, A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to statistically prove that the HBA(®) test is an efficient practical method for andrologists to determine the fertility potential as well as to measure the efficiency of oral supplement therapy in case of male infertility. In the study, 175 patients were involved and it also included the follow-up studies of 39 patients after supplement therapy. Completing the 'classic' spermatological parameters with the results of HBA(®) test, the authors have also determined a new fertility index to be used for practical rating of the measure of fertility potential. After the supplement therapy, both sperm density and hyaluronan binding capacity increased significantly. The authors are convinced that the HBA(®) analysis is an objective, standardisable test, which provides a better approach to fertility potential. This analysis enables us to detect spermatozoa that were previously misjudged as normal by morphological assay and also makes the efficiency of the therapy more measurable. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Sperm population structure and male fertility: an intraspecific study of sperm design and velocity in red deer.

    PubMed

    Ramón, Manuel; Soler, Ana Josefa; Ortiz, José Antonio; García-Alvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Roldan, Eduardo R S; Garde, José Julián

    2013-11-01

    Sperm design and velocity play key roles in influencing sperm performance and, therefore, can determine fertilization success. Several interspecific studies have demonstrated how these features correlate, and it has been hypothesized that selection may drive changes in these sperm traits. Here, we examine the association between sperm design and swimming velocity in a study conducted at an intraspecific level in Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus). We addressed how the structure of different sperm subpopulations, based on sperm morphometry and velocity, are interrelated and, in turn, how they associate with fertility. Our results show that males with high fertility rates have ejaculates with high percentages of spermatozoa exhibiting fast and linear movements and that these are highly correlated with a large proportion of spermatozoa having small and elongated heads. On the other hand, males with low fertility are characterized by a subpopulation structure in which slow and nonlinear as well as small and wide spermatozoa are predominant. These findings provide insight regarding how sperm size and velocity are interrelated and how they both are associated with fertility.

  11. Developmental synchronization of male and female gametophytes in Ginkgo biloba and its neck mother cell division prior to fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongming; Clayton, Sarah C; Cui, Keming; Lee, Chenglee

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated male and female gametophytes in Ginkgo biloba, while a droplet of fluid was present in the fertilization chamber and found that the central cell, the generative cell and the neck mother cell divided simultaneously prior to fertilization. In male gametophytes, the generative cell divided to yield two sperm cells. Concomitantly, the two neck mother cells of the archegonium increased in size then divided asymmetrically resulting in two big cover cells and two small base cells. Each cell had a fixed end in direct contact with an adjacent jacket cell and a free end overlapping its counterpart. This unique arrangement could allow for their free ends to swing into the fertilization chamber as a result of the force from the interior of the archegonium where a polar periclinal division had occurred to produce a canal cell and an egg. The subsequent withdrawal of the content of the archegonium may facilitate the entry of sperm into the archegonium. The neck apparatus closed after the fertilization occurred. The concurrence of the above divisions and the delicate structure of neck apparatus suggest that the gametophytes undergo a synchronization process to become receptive at the time of fertilization. However, the formation of neck cells and the opening time of neck apparatus of the archegonia within the same ovule were slightly different, which could lead to the formation of zygotes at a temporally distinct interval. The earlier formed zygote may progress as the only mature embryo in the ovule. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  12. Inheritance and fine mapping of a restorer-of-fertility (Rf) gene for the cytoplasmic male sterility in soybean.

    PubMed

    Dong, D K; Li, Z; Yuan, F J; Zhu, S L; Chen, P; Yu, W; Yang, Q H; Fu, X J; Yu, X M; Li, B Q; Zhu, D H

    2012-06-01

    The cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) line FuCMS5A and its restorer line FuHui9 were crossed to produce a segregating F(2) population for pollen fertility assay and the genetic mapping of restorer-of-fertility (Rf) gene. Results showed that the individual F(2) plants were fertile or semi-fertile based on their pollen fertility characteristics. The average ratios of viable pollen were 96.90% and 50.00% for each class of individuals. The segregation of F(2) plants showed a good fit to a 1:1 ratio, which reflects a typical heredity pattern of gametophytic CMS with fertility restorer being controlled by a single dominant gene. Using bulk segregation analysis (BSA) and genetic mapping, the Rf gene was mapped on molecular linkage group J (chromosome 16), between the simple sequence repeat (SSR) makers BARCSOYSSR-16-1064 and BARCSOYSSR-16-1082 with the distances of 0.59 and 0.83 cM, respectively. Four SSR markers (BARCSOYSSR-16-1070, Sctt011, BARCSOYSSR-16-1076 and BARCSOYSSR-16-1077) were cosegregating with this Rf gene in the mapping population. These makers will greatly facilitate the maker assisted selection procedures in CMS breeding programs and it lays a foundation for further map-base cloning of the Rf gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Can intracytoplasmic sperm injection prevent total fertilization failure and enhance embryo quality in patients with non-male factor infertility?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Yeong; Kim, Jee Hyun; Jee, Byung Chul; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) could prevent total fertilization failure (TFF) and enhance the embryo quality in patients with non-male factor infertility. A total of 296 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles performed in patients with non-male factor infertility between April 2009 and March 2013 were included in this retrospective study. During the period, ICSI and conventional IVF were performed in 142 and 154 cycles, respectively. The usual indications for ICSI were in the cycles of patients with (1) known low fertilization rate, (2) repetitive implantation failure, (3) advanced maternal age, (4) presence of endometrioma, (5) low oocyte yield (number of oocytes ≤3), or (6) poor quality oocytes. The rate of TFF, normal fertilization, abnormal pronuclei (PN) formation, embryo quality, and pregnancy outcomes between the patients treated with ICSI and conventional IVF cycles were compared. The patients treated with ICSI (ICSI group, n=142) presented fewer number of oocytes than patients treated with conventional IVF cycles (n=154). The TFF rate was not different (4.2% vs. 0.6%, P=0.059), but the ICSI group presented a significantly higher rate of normal fertilization (83.4% vs. 79.1%, P=0.04) and lower rate of abnormal PN formation (3.9% vs. 13.3%, P<0.01). The cleavage stage embryo quality was better in the ICSI group (grade A: 31.1% vs. 21.3%, P=0.001; grade A+B: 65.1% vs. 47.6%, P<0.001). The result of this study does not support the use of ICSI to prevent TFF in patients with non-male factor infertility. However, ICSI improved the fertilization rate and the embryo quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dose-Dependent Adverse Effects of Salinomycin on Male Reproductive Organs and Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Olajumoke Omolara; Bhadauria, Smrati; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1) were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of steroidogenesis

  15. Male Reproductive Disorders and Fertility Trends: Influences of Environment and Genetic Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Toppari, Jorma; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Eisenberg, Michael L; Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Swan, Shanna H; Sapra, Katherine J; Ziebe, Søren; Priskorn, Lærke; Juul, Anders

    2016-01-01

    It is predicted that Japan and European Union will soon experience appreciable decreases in their populations due to persistently low total fertility rates (TFR) below replacement level (2.1 child per woman). In the United States, where TFR has also declined, there are ethnic differences. Caucasians have rates below replacement, while TFRs among African-Americans and Hispanics are higher. We review possible links between TFR and trends in a range of male reproductive problems, including testicular cancer, disorders of sex development, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low testosterone levels, poor semen quality, childlessness, changed sex ratio, and increasing demand for assisted reproductive techniques. We present evidence that several adult male reproductive problems arise in utero and are signs of testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although TDS might result from genetic mutations, recent evidence suggests that it most often is related to environmental exposures of the fetal testis. However, environmental factors can also affect the adult endocrine system. Based on our review of genetic and environmental factors, we conclude that environmental exposures arising from modern lifestyle, rather than genetics, are the most important factors in the observed trends. These environmental factors might act either directly or via epigenetic mechanisms. In the latter case, the effects of exposures might have an impact for several generations post-exposure. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to prioritize research in reproductive physiology and pathophysiology, particularly in highly industrialized countries facing decreasing populations. We highlight a number of topics that need attention by researchers in human physiology, pathophysiology, environmental health sciences, and demography.

  16. Intraflagellar transport protein IFT20 is essential for male fertility and spermiogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Ling; Teves, Maria E.; Liu, Hong; Strauss, Jerome F.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Foster, James A.; Hess, Rex A.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a conserved mechanism believed to be essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. However, little is known about its role in mammalian sperm flagella formation. To fill this gap, we disrupted the Ift20 gene in male germ cells. Homozygous mutant mice were infertile, with significantly reduced sperm counts and motility. In addition, abnormally shaped, elongating spermatid heads and bulbous, round spermatids were found in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules. Electron microscopy revealed increased cytoplasmic vesicles, fiber-like structures, abnormal accumulation of mitochondria, and a decrease in mature lysosomes. The few developed sperm had disrupted axonemes, and some retained cytoplasmic lobe components on the flagella. ODF2 and SPAG16L, two sperm flagella proteins, failed to be incorporated into sperm tails of the mutant mice, and in the germ cells, both were assembled into complexes with lighter density in the absence of IFT20. Disrupting IFT20 did not significantly change expression levels of IFT88, a component of the IFT-B complex, and IFT140, a component of the IFT-A complex. Even though the expression level of an autophagy core protein that associates with IFT20, ATG16, was reduced in the testis of the Ift20 mutant mice, expression levels of other major autophagy markers, including LC3 and ubiquitin, were not changed. Our studies suggest that IFT20 is essential for male fertility and spermiogenesis in mice, and its major function is to transport cargo proteins for sperm flagella formation. It also appears to be involved in removing excess cytoplasmic components. PMID:27682589

  17. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Olajumoke Omolara; Bhadauria, Smrati; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1) were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of steroidogenesis

  18. Male Reproductive Disorders and Fertility Trends: Influences of Environment and Genetic Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Skakkebaek, Niels E.; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Toppari, Jorma; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Eisenberg, Michael L.; Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Swan, Shanna H.; Sapra, Katherine J.; Ziebe, Søren; Priskorn, Lærke; Juul, Anders

    2015-01-01

    It is predicted that Japan and European Union will soon experience appreciable decreases in their populations due to persistently low total fertility rates (TFR) below replacement level (2.1 child per woman). In the United States, where TFR has also declined, there are ethnic differences. Caucasians have rates below replacement, while TFRs among African-Americans and Hispanics are higher. We review possible links between TFR and trends in a range of male reproductive problems, including testicular cancer, disorders of sex development, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low testosterone levels, poor semen quality, childlessness, changed sex ratio, and increasing demand for assisted reproductive techniques. We present evidence that several adult male reproductive problems arise in utero and are signs of testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although TDS might result from genetic mutations, recent evidence suggests that it most often is related to environmental exposures of the fetal testis. However, environmental factors can also affect the adult endocrine system. Based on our review of genetic and environmental factors, we conclude that environmental exposures arising from modern lifestyle, rather than genetics, are the most important factors in the observed trends. These environmental factors might act either directly or via epigenetic mechanisms. In the latter case, the effects of exposures might have an impact for several generations post-exposure. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to prioritize research in reproductive physiology and pathophysiology, particularly in highly industrialized countries facing decreasing populations. We highlight a number of topics that need attention by researchers in human physiology, pathophysiology, environmental health sciences, and demography. PMID:26582516

  19. Performance of non-motile male gametes in the sea: analysis of paternity and fertilization success in a natural population of a red seaweed, Gracilaria gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Engel, C. R.; Wattier, R.; Destombe, C.; Valero, M.

    1999-01-01

    In haploid–diploid red seaweeds, the dispersal of male gametes is presumed limited due to their lack of flagella. It has been suggested that this group suffers from sperm limitation and, consequently, that fertilization is relatively inefficient. Fertilization in most floridean rhodophytes results in the formation a cystocarp, a swelling on the haploid female thallus housing the diploid zygote and its thousands of diploid daughter spores. To study the performance of non-motile male gametes in the sea, we evaluated both female and male fertilization success in a natural population of the red marine alga Gracilaria gracilis. Female fertilization success, estimated by cystocarp yield per unit female thallus, was evaluated with respect to the availability of male gametes. Male fertilization success, estimated by the individual contribution of different males to zygotes, was assessed by paternity analyses on 350 cystocarps produced in one reproductive season using two microsatellite loci. The results show that cystocarp yield is not sperm limited and that the large variation in male fertilization success cannot be solely explained by the distance travelled by the male gamete to find a mate. Taken together, the results suggest that, not only is fertilization efficient, but that male–male competition and/or female choice may play a role in shaping population mating patterns.

  20. Fertility considerations, counseling, and semen cryopreservation for males prior to the initiation of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Marcia; Hammelef, Karen; Smith, Gary D

    2004-04-01

    An innovative program jointly sponsored by members of the departments of obstetrics and urology and the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Michigan began in 2002. The Fertility Counseling and Gamete Cryopreservation Program (FCGCP) was created to provide counseling and education about therapy-induced infertility to newly diagnosed patients with cancer as well as facilitating the semen cryopreservation process. Unlike most sperm banking facilities in this country, this program is coordinated by an oncology nurse practitioner whose understanding of cancer and cancer treatments provides patients and staff with a unique perspective. Oncology staff misconceptions about sperm banking were addressed through intensive staff education programs. Patient education materials covering all aspects of infertility and sperm banking were developed and made available in patient care areas and on the Internet. Material aimed at young adolescents and their parents is prominent. Developmentally appropriate discussions are held with adolescent patients and their parents, both individually and together. Communication among patients and their families, the oncology team, and the sperm bank is maintained, permitting efficient and timely service. FCGCP provides an important service by affording all males with cancer the potential to father a child in the future.

  1. Endocrine disruptors: effects on male fertility and screening tools for their assessment.

    PubMed

    Eertmans, F; Dhooge, W; Stuyvaert, S; Comhaire, F

    2003-01-01

    During the recent decades, a lot of research has been performed concerning the so-called "endocrine disruptors", which are widespread in the environment. These compounds of anthropogenic or natural origin mimic the action of sex hormones and can interfere with the endocrine system. The largest body of evidence exists for those compounds that are estrogenic in nature, but the amount of experimental data on other types of interactions, especially anti-androgenic, steadily increases. Because of the growing public and scientific concern, epidemiological studies have been initiated to analyse the short and long-term effects of endocrine disruptors. In addition, a number of assays have been developed and are undergoing validation, aiming at high throughput screening of chemical agents with suspected endocrine disrupting properties. In the present review, we briefly describe the results of epidemiological studies dealing with observed time trends in male fertility disorders. In the second part of the article, an overview is given of the different classes of endocrine disruptors, followed by a description of the most important in vitro and in vivo bioassays, used to screen for the possible endocrine disruptive capacity of chemicals, together with future research needs for in vitro test development.

  2. Transcription of gypsy elements in a Y-chromosome male fertility gene of Drosophila hydei

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstenbach, R.; Harhangi, H.; Hennig, W.

    1996-02-01

    We have found that defective gypsy retrotransposons are a major constituent of the lampbrush loop pair Nooses in the short arm of Y chromosome of Drosophila hydei. The loop pair is formed by male fertility gene Q during the primary spermatocyte stage of spermatogenesis, each loop being a single transcription unit with an estimated length of 260 kb. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we show that throughout the loop transcripts gypsy elements are interspersed with blocks of a tandemly repetitive Y-specific DNA sequence, ayl. Nooses transcripts containing both sequence types show a wide size range on Northern blots, do not migrate to the cytoplasm, and are degraded just before the first meiotic division. Only one strand of ayl and only the coding strand of gypsy can be detected in the loop transcripts. However, as cloned genomic DNA fragments also display opposite orientations of ayl and gypsy, such DNA sections cannot be part of the Nooses. Hence, they are most likely derived from the flanking heterochromatin. The direction of transcription of ayl and gypsy thus appears to be of a functional significance. 76 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Mutation of β-glucosidase 2 causes glycolipid storage disease and impaired male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Yildiz; Matern, Heidrun; Thompson, Bonne; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Warren, Rebekkah L.; Ramirez, Denise M.O.; Hammer, Robert E.; Hamra, F. Kent; Matern, Siegfried; Russell, David W.

    2006-01-01

    β-Glucosidase 2 (GBA2) is a resident enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum thought to play a role in the metabolism of bile acid–glucose conjugates. To gain insight into the biological function of this enzyme and its substrates, we generated mice deficient in GBA2 and found that these animals had normal bile acid metabolism. Knockout males exhibited impaired fertility. Microscopic examination of sperm revealed large round heads (globozoospermia), abnormal acrosomes, and defective mobility. Glycolipids, identified as glucosylceramides by mass spectrometry, accumulated in the testes, brains, and livers of the knockout mice but did not cause obvious neurological symptoms, organomegaly, or a reduction in lifespan. Recombinant GBA2 hydrolyzed glucosylceramide to glucose and ceramide; the same reaction catalyzed by the β-glucosidase acid 1 (GBA1) defective in subjects with the Gaucher’s form of lysosomal storage disease. We conclude that GBA2 is a glucosylceramidase whose loss causes accumulation of glycolipids and an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease. PMID:17080196

  4. The long-term effects of superovulation on fertility and sexual behavior of male offspring in mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zeng-Tao; Lu, Xi-Lan; Zhang, Gang; Yu, Jing; Li, Hua; Jia, Gui-Hua; Li, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the long-term effects of superovulation on fertility and sexual behavior of male offspring in mice. The mice were superovaluted, and the fertility of male offspring (F1 generation and F2 generation) were evaluated in terms of the percentage of plugs and pregnancies, serum testosterone concentrations, and sperm motility. Furthermore, the sexual behavior of male offspring and sex ratio (F1 generation and F2 generation) were measured. There were no significant differences in the percentage of plug and pregnancies, serum testosterone concentrations, sperm motilities and sex ratio between the offspring in naturally conceived group and superovulation groups (both F1 generation and F2 generation). The sperm hyperactivity at 90 min after incubation of F1 generation in naturally conceived group were higher than that of F1 generation in superovulation group, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. The offspring produced by superovaluted oocytes (both F1 generation and F2 generation) did not exhibit significant alterations in sexual behavior. No significant alterations were found in fertility and sexual behavior of male offspring in mice produced by superovaluted oocytes compared with those of naturally conceived offspring.

  5. Maturational changes in the survivability and fertility of fowl sperm during their passage through the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, Muslah U; Nishino, C; Tatemoto, H; Okura, N; Kawamoto, Y; Okamoto, S; Nakada, T

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus) sperm undergo maturation in their capacity for survival and fertilization in the male reproductive tract. Sperm collected from the testis, epididymis and the proximal, middle and distal vas deferens were simultaneously stored in vitro in minimum essential medium (MEM) at 39°C for 0, 3 and 6h, and at 4°C for 24 and 48h. Sperm membrane integrity was measured using the dual fluorescent stain SYBR-14/propidium iodide (PI). Aliquots of sperm from the various sites were subjected to artificial insemination (AI) into the uteri of hens to assess the duration of sperm survival in the oviduct and to determine the fertility status of the sperm. Testicular sperm exhibited a very low capacity to survive under in vitro liquid storage conditions, irrespective of the storage temperature used, and in the oviduct, and they had a low ability to fertilize the ovum. On the contrary, sperm from the distal vas deferens had a higher survival rate during in vitro storage periods, a longer life span in the oviduct, and high fertility. Survival and fertilizing capacity of the sperm recovered from the testes increased gradually (P<0.05) from the testes to the distal vas deferens. In conclusion, we suggest that fowl sperm may undergo functional maturation through a process of gradual changes in their survival and fertilization capacities during their passage through the successive parts of the male reproductive tract. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gendered Divisions of Fertility Work: Socioeconomic Predictors of Female versus Male Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertotti, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic labor researchers have examined a multitude of duties disproportionately performed by women, yet the responsibility associated with navigating a couple's fertility--fertility work--has been overlooked. Using data from the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth ("N" = 1,415), the author examined how racial and socioeconomic…

  7. Gendered Divisions of Fertility Work: Socioeconomic Predictors of Female versus Male Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertotti, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic labor researchers have examined a multitude of duties disproportionately performed by women, yet the responsibility associated with navigating a couple's fertility--fertility work--has been overlooked. Using data from the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth ("N" = 1,415), the author examined how racial and socioeconomic…

  8. A Gene Encoding Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Partially Restores Fertility in RT98-Type Cytoplasmic Male-Sterile Rice.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Keisuke; Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2016-10-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) lines in rice, which have the cytoplasm of a wild species and the nuclear genome of cultivated rice, are of value for the study of genetic interactions between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The RT98-type CMS line RT98A and the fertility restorer line RT98C carry the cytoplasm of the wild species Oryza rufipogon and the nuclear genome of the Taichung 65 cultivar (Oryza sativa L.). Based on a classical crossing experiment, fertility is reported to be restored gametophytically by the presence of a tentative single gene, designated Rf98, which is derived from the cytoplasm donor. Fine mapping of Rf98 revealed that at least two genes, which are closely positioned, are required for complete fertility restoration in RT98A. Here, we identified seven pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) genes that are located within a 170 kb region as candidates for Rf98 Complementation tests revealed that the introduction of one of these PPR genes, PPR762, resulted in the partial recovery of fertility with a seed setting rate up to 9.3%. We conclude that PPR762 is an essential fertility restorer gene for RT98-type CMS. The low rate of seed setting suggested that some other genes near the Rf98 locus are also necessary for the full recovery of seed setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. An epididymis-specific carboxyl esterase CES5A is required for sperm capacitation and male fertility in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yan-Fei; Xue, Hai-Min; Ni, Zi-Mei; Xia, Dong; Zhou, Yu-Chuan; Zhang, Yong-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that the phenomenon of capacitation was discovered over half century ago and much progress has been made in identifying sperm events involved in capacitation, few specific molecules of epididymal origin have been identified as being directly involved in this process in vivo. Previously, our group cloned and characterized a carboxyl esterase gene Ces5a in the rat epididymis. The CES5A protein is mainly expressed in the corpus and cauda epididymidis and secreted into the corresponding lumens. Here, we report the function of CES5A in sperm maturation. By local injection of Lentivirus-mediated siRNA in the CES5A-expressing region of the rat epididymis, Ces5a-knockdown animal models were created. These animals exhibited an inhibited sperm capacitation and a reduction in male fertility. These results suggest that CES5A plays an important role in sperm maturation and male fertility. PMID:25475668

  10. Significance of microRNA targeted estrogen receptor in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Alireza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Shahnazi, Vahideh; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Farzadi, Laya; Karami, Hadi; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) mediates estrogen action in regulation of different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testis axis. It has a key role in spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptor alpha knock-out (ER koα) male mice were infertile and severe impairment in spermatogenesis and seminiferous tubules was observed. Recently, it has been reported that microRNA (miRNA) mir-100 and let-7b were predicted to target ERα gene. MiRNA are small, endogenous, single stranded RNA molecules that regulate gene expression and have been implicated in various disease states. It has been proved that some miRNAs expression is tissue- and disease-specific, giving potential for identifying miRNAs as a diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods: In this study, the change in the expression levels of mir-100, let-7b and ERα expression levels were evaluated in oligospermic infertile patients (n=43) compared to control fertile subjects (n=43). After washing and separating sperms, total RNA was isolated and then cDNA was synthesized. The expression levels of mir-100 and let-7b and ERα were evaluated by real time PCR. Results: Mir-100, let-7b levels were significantly higher than those in control group (P=0.008 and P=0.009, respectively). We have found that, ERα level was significantly decreased in comparison with normal group (P< 0.0001). Conclusion: Changes in mir-100, let-7b and ERα expression levels in oligospermic patients may be associated with the susceptibility and progression of infertility. The results of this study indicate that miRNA can have a key role in spermatogenesis and might have a diagnostic and prognostic value in men infertility. PMID:24711889

  11. A general description of additive and nonadditive elements of sperm competitiveness and their relation to male fertilization success.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Leif

    2013-05-01

    A complete understanding of male reproductive success, and thus sexual selection, often requires an insight into male success in sperm competition. Genuine conclusions on male sperm competitiveness can only be made in real competitive situations. However, statistical analyses of sperm competitiveness from fertilization success data have been shown to be problematic. Here, I first outline a comprehensive general description of the different additive and nonadditive elements relevant for the outcome of sperm competition staged between two males. Based on this description, I will highlight two main problems that are frequently encountered in experiments aiming at estimating sperm competitiveness. First, I focus on potential problems when using standardized competitors versus random mating trials, because trials with standardized competitors do not allow generalization if male-male interactions are important. Second, I illustrate the necessity to analyze data on the logit scale rather than on raw proportions, because only the logit scale allows a clean separation of additive and nonadditive effects (i.e., male × male and female × male interactions). © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution © 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Characterization of Raphanus sativus Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins Encoded by the Fertility Restorer Locus for Ogura Cytoplasmic Male Sterility[W

    PubMed Central

    Uyttewaal, M.; Arnal, N.; Quadrado, M.; Martin-Canadell, A.; Vrielynck, N.; Hiard, S.; Gherbi, H.; Bendahmane, A.; Budar, F.; Mireau, H.

    2008-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility is a maternally inherited trait in higher plants that prevents the production of functional pollen. Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility in radish (Raphanus sativus) is regulated by the orf138 mitochondrial locus. Male fertility can be restored when orf138 accumulation is suppressed by the nuclear Rfo locus, which consists of three genes putatively encoding highly similar pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR-A, -B, and -C). We produced transgenic rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants separately expressing PPR-A and PPR-B and demonstrated that both encoded proteins accumulated preferentially in the anthers of young flower buds. Immunodetection of ORF138 showed that, unlike PPR-B, PPR-A had no effect on the synthesis of the sterility protein. Moreover, immunolocalization experiments indicated that complete elimination of ORF138 from the tapetum of anthers correlated with the restoration of fertility. Thus, the primary role of PPR-B in restoring fertility is to inhibit ORF138 synthesis in the tapetum of young anthers. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed, at the cellular level, that PPR-B has no effect on the accumulation of orf138 mRNA. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PPR-B, but not PPR-A, is associated with the orf138 RNA in vivo, linking restoration activity with the ability to directly or indirectly interact with the orf138 RNA. Together, our data support a role for PPR-B in the translational regulation of orf138 mRNA. PMID:19098270

  13. Influence of 50 Hz magnetic field on sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Akhras, Moh'd-Ali; Darmani, Homa; Elbetieha, Ahmed

    2006-02-01

    The effects of an extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field on the sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. Adult male rats were exposed to a 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic field at approximately 25 microT (rms) for 18 consecutive weeks. There were no significant effects on the absolute body weight and the weight of the testes of the exposed rats. However, the weights of seminal vesicles and preputial glands were significantly reduced in the exposed male rats. Similarly, a significant reduction in sperm count was observed in the exposed group. Furthermore, there were no significant effects on the serum levels of male follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) during the 18 weeks of exposure period. On the other hand, there was a significant increase in the serum levels of male luteinizing hormone (LH) after 18 weeks of exposure (P < .005), while testosterone levels were significantly decreased only after 6 and 12 weeks of the exposure period. These results suggest that long term exposure to ELF could have adverse effects on mammalian fertility and reproduction.

  14. Analyzing the "correct" endpoint.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Pamela J; Novotny, Paul J; Tan, Angelina D

    2006-01-01

    The choice of QOL endpoints for a study should be based on which score will most likely change if the treatment is favorable. How the QOL change is calculated should be based on the expected amount of missing data, how many time points data will be collected, and whether extreme outliers in the scores impact results. The study should have sufficient power to detect a meaningful difference between arms (typically 10 points on a 0-100 point scale) in the chosen QOL endpoint. At the conclusion of a study, several secondary endpoints can be analyzed which can provide additional information and confirm primary endpoint results.

  15. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii.

    PubMed

    Ekechukwu, Nkiru E; Baeshen, Rowida; Traorè, Sékou F; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diabate, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Tripet, Frédéric

    2015-10-23

    The success of vector control strategies aiming to decrease disease transmission via the release of sterile or genetically-modified male mosquitoes critically depends on mating between laboratory-reared males and wild females. Unfortunately, mosquito colonization, laboratory rearing, and genetic manipulations can all negatively affect male competitiveness. Heterosis is commonly used to produce domestic animals with enhanced vigor and homogenous genetic background and could therefore potentially improve the mating performance of mass-reared male mosquitoes. Here, we produced enhanced hybrid males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles coluzzii by crossing two strains colonized >35 and 8 years ago. We compared the amount of sperm and mating plug proteins they transferred to females, as well as their insemination rate, reproductive success and longevity under various experimental conditions. Across experiments, widespread adaptations to laboratory mating were detected in the older strain. In large-group mating experiments, no overall hybrid advantage in insemination rates and the amount of sperm and accessory gland proteins transferred to females was detected. Despite higher sperm activity, hybrid males did not appear more fecund. However, individual-male mating and laboratory-swarm experiments revealed that hybrid males, while inseminating fewer females than older inbred males, were significantly more fertile, producing larger mating plugs and drastically increasing female fecundity. Heterotic males also showed increased longevity. These results validate the use of heterosis for creating hybrid males with improved fitness from long-established inbred laboratory strains. Therefore, this simple approach could facilitate disease control strategies based on male mosquito releases with important ultimate benefits to human health.

  16. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii

    PubMed Central

    Ekechukwu, Nkiru E.; Baeshen, Rowida; Traorè, Sékou F.; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diabate, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Tripet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The success of vector control strategies aiming to decrease disease transmission via the release of sterile or genetically-modified male mosquitoes critically depends on mating between laboratory-reared males and wild females. Unfortunately, mosquito colonization, laboratory rearing, and genetic manipulations can all negatively affect male competitiveness. Heterosis is commonly used to produce domestic animals with enhanced vigor and homogenous genetic background and could therefore potentially improve the mating performance of mass-reared male mosquitoes. Here, we produced enhanced hybrid males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles coluzzii by crossing two strains colonized >35 and 8 years ago. We compared the amount of sperm and mating plug proteins they transferred to females, as well as their insemination rate, reproductive success and longevity under various experimental conditions. Across experiments, widespread adaptations to laboratory mating were detected in the older strain. In large-group mating experiments, no overall hybrid advantage in insemination rates and the amount of sperm and accessory gland proteins transferred to females was detected. Despite higher sperm activity, hybrid males did not appear more fecund. However, individual-male mating and laboratory-swarm experiments revealed that hybrid males, while inseminating fewer females than older inbred males, were significantly more fertile, producing larger mating plugs and drastically increasing female fecundity. Heterotic males also showed increased longevity. These results validate the use of heterosis for creating hybrid males with improved fitness from long-established inbred laboratory strains. Therefore, this simple approach could facilitate disease control strategies based on male mosquito releases with important ultimate benefits to human health. PMID:26497140

  17. Transporters involved in pH and K+ homeostasis affect pollen wall formation, male fertility, and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Czerny, Daniel D; Levin, Kara A; Leydon, Alexander R; Su, Robert T; Maugel, Timothy K; Zou, Yanjiao; Chanroj, Salil; Cheung, Alice Y; Johnson, Mark A; Sze, Heven

    2017-02-23

    Flowering plant genomes encode multiple cation/H+ exchangers (CHXs) whose functions are largely unknown. AtCHX17, AtCHX18, and AtCHX19 are membrane transporters that modulate K+ and pH homeostasis and are localized in the dynamic endomembrane system. Loss of function reduced seed set, but the particular phase(s) of reproduction affected was not determined. Pollen tube growth and ovule targeting of chx17chx18chx19 mutant pollen appeared normal, but reciprocal cross experiments indicate a largely male defect. Although triple mutant pollen tubes reach ovules of a wild-type pistil and a synergid cell degenerated, half of those ovules were unfertilized or showed fertilization of the egg or central cell, but not both female gametes. Fertility could be partially compromised by impaired pollen tube and/or sperm function as CHX19 and CHX18 are expressed in the pollen tube and sperm cell, respectively. When fertilization was successful in self-pollinated mutants, early embryo formation was retarded compared with embryos from wild-type ovules receiving mutant pollen. Thus CHX17 and CHX18 proteins may promote embryo development possibly through the endosperm where these genes are expressed. The reticulate pattern of the pollen wall was disorganized in triple mutants, indicating perturbation of wall formation during male gametophyte development. As pH and cation homeostasis mediated by AtCHX17 affect membrane trafficking and cargo delivery, these results suggest that male fertility, sperm function, and embryo development are dependent on proper cargo sorting and secretion that remodel cell walls, plasma membranes, and extracellular factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Transporters involved in pH and K+ homeostasis affect pollen wall formation, male fertility, and embryo development

    DOE PAGES

    Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Czerny, Daniel D.; Levin, Kara A.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Flowering plant genomes encode multiple cation/H+ exchangers (CHXs) whose functions are largely unknown. AtCHX17, AtCHX18, and AtCHX19 are membrane transporters that modulate K+ and pH homeostasis and are localized in the dynamic endomembrane system. Loss of function reduced seed set, but the particular phase(s) of reproduction affected was not determined. Pollen tube growth and ovule targeting of chx17chx18chx19 mutant pollen appeared normal, but reciprocal cross experiments indicate a largely male defect. Although triple mutant pollen tubes reach ovules of a wild-type pistil and a synergid cell degenerated, half of those ovules were unfertilized or showed fertilization of the egg ormore » central cell, but not both female gametes. Fertility could be partially compromised by impaired pollen tube and/or sperm function as CHX19 and CHX18 are expressed in the pollen tube and sperm cell, respectively. When fertilization was successful in self-pollinated mutants, early embryo formation was retarded compared with embryos from wild-type ovules receiving mutant pollen. Thus CHX17 and CHX18 proteins may promote embryo development possibly through the endosperm where these genes are expressed. The reticulate pattern of the pollen wall was disorganized in triple mutants, indicating perturbation of wall formation during male gametophyte development. Lastly, as pH and cation homeostasis mediated by AtCHX17 affect membrane trafficking and cargo delivery, these results suggest that male fertility, sperm function, and embryo development are dependent on proper cargo sorting and secretion that remodel cell walls, plasma membranes, and extracellular factors.« less

  19. Diet-induced obesity in male mice is associated with reduced fertility and potentiation of acrylamide-induced reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Bai, Re; Kissling, Grace E; Travlos, Greg; Hoffler, Undi

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of human obesity and related chronic disorders such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer is rapidly increasing. Human studies have shown a direct relationship between obesity and infertility. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on male fertility and the effect of obesity on susceptibility to chemical-induced reproductive toxicity. From 5 to 30 wk of age, genetically intact male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a normal diet or one in which 60% of the kilocalories were from lard. Obese mice exhibited significant differences in the mRNA of several genes within the testes in comparison to lean males. Pparg was increased 2.2-fold, whereas Crem, Sh2b1, Dhh, Igf1, and Lepr were decreased 6.7, 1.4, 3.2, 1.6, and 7.2-fold, respectively. The fertility of male mice was compared through mating with control females. Acrylamide (AA)-induced reproductive toxicity was assessed in obese or lean males treated with water or 25 mg AA kg(-1) day(-1) via gavage for 5 days and then mated to control females. Percent body fat and weight were significantly increased in mice fed a high-fat vs. a normal diet. Obesity resulted in significant reduction in plugs and pregnancies of control females partnered with obese vs. lean males. Serum leptin and insulin levels were each approximately 5-fold higher in obese vs. age-matched lean mice. Sperm from obese males exhibited decreased motility and reduced hyperactivated progression vs. lean mice. Treatment with AA exacerbated male infertility of obese and lean mice; however, this effect was more pronounced in obese mice. Further, females partnered with AA-treated obese mice exhibited a further decrease in the percentage of live fetuses, whereas the percentage of resorptions increased. This work demonstrated that diet-induced obesity in mice caused a significant reduction in male fertility and exacerbated AA-induced reproductive toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity.

  20. The Effects of Exposure to Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Darbandi, Mahsa; Darbandi, Sara; Agarwal, Ashok; Henkle, Ralf; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-06-23

    Context • People are increasingly exposed to low frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs), mainly from electricity distribution networks and electronic devices. Critics of this widespread exposure believe that it can have detrimental effects on the human body. On the other hand, many in vivo and in vitro studies have claimed that low frequency electromagnetic therapy can function as a form of alternative medicine and that therapists can treat disease by applying electromagnetic radiation or pulsed EMFs to the body or cells. It is not yet entirely clear, however, whether LF-EMF is beneficial or harmful. Objectives • This study aimed to examine the effects of LF-EMFs on men's reproductive functions, according to the types of waveform and the frequency and duration of exposure. Design • The study reviewed all available research, both human and animal, on the effects of LF-EMFs on male reproductive functions, covering the literature from January 1978 to June 2016. The documents were obtained from PubMed, Science Direct, and Google Scholar, and any article that was irrelevant or a duplicate was excluded. A total of 61 articles were found, and 27 articles were reviewed. Setting • This project was performed at the Avicenna Research Center (Tehran, Iran). Participants • Literature included human and animal studies conducted on rabbits, mice, rats, and boars. Intervention • Among these studies, any article that was irrelevant, a duplicate, or published with duplicate data was excluded. At the end, 27 articles were checked. Outcome Measures • Outcome measures included testing related to reproductive organ weights, reproductive endocrinal hormones, fetal development, and spermatogenesis as well as sperm motility, morphology, and vitality. Results • The reviewed studies provided contradictory results that were highly dependent on the exposure parameters, such as the shape and frequency of wave, intensity, duration, and timing of the exposure. Conclusions

  1. Molecular mapping of three male-sterile, female-fertile mutants and generation of a comprehensive map of all known male sterility genes in soybean.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Speth, Benjamin D; Boonyoo, Napatsakorn; Baumert, Eric; Atkinson, Taylor R; Palmer, Reid G; Sandhu, Devinder

    2014-03-01

    In soybean, an environmentally stable male sterility system is vital for making hybrid seed production commercially viable. Eleven male-sterile, female-fertile mutants (ms1, ms2, ms3, ms4, ms5, ms6, ms7, ms8, ms9, msMOS, and msp) have been identified in soybean. Of these, eight (ms2, ms3, ms5, ms7, ms8, ms9, msMOS, and msp) have been mapped to soybean chromosomes. The objectives of this study were to (i) locate the ms1, ms4, and ms6 genes to soybean chromosomes; (ii) generate genetic linkage maps of the regions containing these genes; and (iii) develop a comprehensive map of all known male-sterile, female-fertile genes in soybean. The bulked segregant analysis technique was used to locate genes to soybean chromosomes. Microsatellite markers from the corresponding chromosomes were used on F2 populations to generate genetic linkage maps. The ms1 and ms6 genes were located on chromosome 13 (molecular linkage group F) and ms4 was present on chromosome 2 (molecular linkage group D1b). Molecular analyses revealed markers Satt516, BARCSOYSSR_02_1539, and AW186493 were located closest to ms1, ms4, and ms6, respectively. The ms1 and ms6 genes, although present on the same chromosome, were independently assorting with a genetic distance of 73.7 cM. Using information from this study and compiled information from previously published male sterility genes in soybean, a comprehensive genetic linkage map was generated. Eleven male sterility genes were present on seven soybean chromosomes. Four genes were present in two regions on chromosome 2 (molecular linkage group D1b) and two genes were present on chromosome 13 (molecular linkage group F).

  2. Influence of the donor male on the fertility of frozen-thawed rabbit sperm after artificial insemination of females of different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Mocé, E; Lavara, R; Vicente, J S

    2005-12-01

    In this work, the influence of the donor male on the fertility of cryopreserved rabbit sperm after artificial insemination into females from different genotypes was evaluated. Females belonged to three lines selected for maternal characteristics (A, V and H) and all the possible crosses between them. Sperm from five males from the line selected for one of the maternal characteristics (line V) was frozen individually in a Tris-citric acid-glucose diluent with 1.75 m of DMSO and 0.05 m of sucrose (final concentrations). After artificial insemination of the cryopreserved sperm, fertility rates and prolificacy were similar for all groups of females (56% of fertility rate and 7.2 total born). Significant differences between males were observed for both fertility (p < 0.05) and kindling (p < 0.01) rate. These differences could be because of differences in the freezing resistance of sperm from the different males.

  3. Ameliorating effect of olive oil on fertility of male rats fed on genetically modified soya bean

    PubMed Central

    El-Kholy, Thanaa A. F.; Al-Abbadi, Hatim A.; Qahwaji, Dina; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed K.; Shelat, Vishal G.; Sobhy, Hanan M.; Hilal, Mohammad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetically modified soya bean (GMSB) is a commercialized food. It has been shown to have adverse effects on fertility in animal trials. Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) has many beneficial effects including anti-oxidant properties. The aim of this study is to elucidate if addition of EVOO ameliorates the adverse effects on reproductive organs of rats fed on GMSB containing diet. Methods Forty adult male albino rats (150–180 g) of Sprague Dawley strain were separated into four groups of 10 rats each: Group 1 – control group fed on basal ration, Group 2 – fed on basal ration mixed with EVOO (30%), Group 3 – fed on basal ration mixed with GMSB (15%), and Group 4 – fed on basal ration mixed with GMSB (15%) and EVOO (30%). This feeding regimen was administered for 65 days. Blood samples were collected to analyze serum zinc, vitamin E, and testosterone levels. Histopathological and weight changes in sex organs were evaluated. Results GMSB diet reduced weight of testis (0.66±0.06 vs. 1.7±0.06, p<0.001), epididymis (0.489±0.03 vs. 0.7±0.03, p<0.001), prostate (0.04±0.009 vs. 0.68±0.04, p<0.001), and seminal vesicles (0.057±0.01 vs. 0.8±0.04, p<0.001). GMSB diet adversely affected sperm count (406±7.1 vs. 610±7.8, p<0.001), motility (p<0.001), and abnormality (p<0.001). GMSB diet also reduced serum zinc (p<0.05), vitamin E (p<0.05), and testosterone (p<0.05) concentrations. EVOO diet had no detrimental effect. Addition of EVOO to GMSB diet increased the serum zinc (p<0.05), vitamin E (p<0.05), and testosterone (p<0.05) levels and also restored the weights of testis (1.35±0.16 vs. 0.66±0.06, p<0.01), epididymis (0.614±0.13 vs. 0.489±0.03, p<0.001), prostate (0.291±0.09 vs. 0.04±0.009, p<0.001), seminal vesicle (0.516±0.18 vs. 0.057±0.01, p<0.001) along with sperm count (516±3.1 vs. 406±7.1, p<0.01), motility (p<0.01), and abnormality (p<0.05). Conclusion EVOO ameliorates the adverse effects of GMSB on reproductive organs in adult male

  4. EVALUATION OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE IN THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR SCREENING AND TESTING PROGRAM'S MALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOL: ABILITY TO DETECT EFFECTS OF THYROID ENDPOINTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Tier 1 male pubertal protocol was designed to detect reproductive development and thyroid function. One purpose of this in vivo protocol is to detect thyrotoxicants via a number of different mechanisms of action. Here we evaluate ...

  5. EVALUATION OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE IN THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR SCREENING AND TESTING PROGRAM'S MALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOL: ABILITY TO DETECT EFFECTS OF THYROID ENDPOINTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Tier 1 male pubertal protocol was designed to detect reproductive development and thyroid function. One purpose of this in vivo protocol is to detect thyrotoxicants via a number of different mechanisms of action. Here we evaluate ...

  6. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-07-12

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201-12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract-enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the "gold standard" to determine whether a gene's function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others.

  7. [Reproductive and developmental toxicity study of gadobenate dimeglumine formulation (E7155) (1)--Fertility study in male rats by intravenous administration].

    PubMed

    Okada, F; Sagami, F; Tirone, P; Morisetti, A; Bussi, S; Baguley, J K

    1999-11-01

    The influence of gadobenate dimeglumine formulation (E7155) on general reproductive performance and fertility in male rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain was assessed in this study. E7155 was administered by intravenous injection at a dosage of 0.3, 1.0, or 2.0 mmol/kg/day to groups of 22 male rats for 13 weeks. Control animals received 0.9% sterile physiological saline throughout the same period. After four weeks of treatment, each male was paired with an untreated female of the same strain. Each male was paired again after 10 weeks of treatment with another untreated female of the same strain. All females were killed on Day 14 of gestation for examination of pregnancy status. No significant toxicological signs associated with systemic exposure to E7155 were observed. There were no effects of treatment with E7155 on body weight gain, food consumption, macroscopic findings, reproductive organ weights and sperm count or sperm motility in male rats. Mating performance after pairing at Weeks 4 and 10 of treatment as well as litter size and number of survival embryos on Day 14 of gestation were not affected by paternal treatment with E7155. From these results, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of E7155 was 2.0 mmol/kg/day for general and reproductive toxicity parameters in male rats treated with E7155 and for development in their embryos.

  8. A critical role of solute carrier 22a14 in sperm motility and male fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Shin-ya; Ito, Momoe; Ikami, Yuusuke; Okitsu, Yu; Ito, Chizuru; Toshimori, Kiyotaka; Fujii, Wataru; Yogo, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified solute carrier 22a14 (Slc22a14) as a spermatogenesis-associated transmembrane protein in mice. Although Slc22a14 is a member of the organic anion/cation transporter family, its expression profile and physiological role have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Slc22a14 is crucial for sperm motility and male fertility in mice. Slc22a14 is expressed specifically in male germ cells, and mice lacking the Slc22a14 gene show severe male infertility. Although the overall differentiation of sperm was normal, Slc22a14−/− cauda epididymal spermatozoa showed reduced motility with abnormal flagellar bending. Further, the ability to migrate into the female reproductive tract and fertilise the oocyte were also impaired in Slc22a14−/− spermatozoa. The abnormal flagellar bending was thought to be partly caused by osmotic cell swelling since osmotic challenge or membrane permeabilisation treatment alleviated the tail abnormality. In addition, we found structural abnormalities in Slc22a14−/− sperm cells: the annulus, a ring-like structure at the mid-piece–principal piece junction, was disorganised, and expression and localisation of septin 4, an annulus component protein that is essential for the annulus formation, was also impaired. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Slc22a14 plays a pivotal role in normal flagellar structure, motility and fertility in mouse spermatozoa. PMID:27811987

  9. Isolation of RNA striped bass Monrone saxatilis spermatozoa: Implications for teleost male fertility and beyond?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vertebrate sperm has been shown to provide more than paternal genomic material to the oocyte. For example, specific transcripts have been identified in bull sperm associated with fertility and with motility in boar sperm. Very little is currently known about functional, residual RNA in spermatozoa a...

  10. Isolation of RNA from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spermatozoa: implications for teleost male fertility and beyond?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vertebrate sperm has been shown to provide more than paternal genomic material to the oocyte. For example, specific transcripts have been identified in bull sperm associated with fertility and with motility in boar sperm. Very little is currently known about functional, residual RNA in spermatozoa a...

  11. 46 XX karyotype during male fertility evaluation; case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ahmad; Arafa, Mohamed; Starks, Christopher; Elbardisi, Haitham; Al Said, Sami; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2017-01-01

    Forty-six XX disorder of sex development is an uncommon medical condition observed at times during the evaluation of a man's fertility. The following is a case series and literature review of phenotypically normal men diagnosed with this karyotype. Our goal is to comprehend the patients' clinical presentation as well as their laboratory results aiming to explore options available for their management. A formal literature review through PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed using "46 XX man" as a word search. A total of 55 patients, including those conveyed in this article were diagnosed with a 46 XX karyotype during their fertility evaluation. The patients' mean age ± s.d. was 34 ± 10 years and their mean height ± s.d. was 166 ± 6.5 cm. Overall, they presented with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Sexual dysfunction, reduced hair distribution, and gynecomastia were reported in 20% (4/20), 25.8% (8/31), and 42% (13/31) of the patients, respectively. The SRY gene was detected in 36 (83.7%) and was absent in the remaining seven (16.3%) patients. We found that a multidisciplinary approach to management is preferred in 46 XX patients. Screening for remnants of the mullerian ducts and for malignant transformation in dysgenetic gonads is imperative. Hypogonadism should be addressed, while fertility options are in vitro fertilization with donor sperm or adoption.

  12. 46 XX karyotype during male fertility evaluation; case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ahmad; Arafa, Mohamed; Starks, Christopher; Elbardisi, Haitham; Al Said, Sami; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2017-01-01

    Forty-six XX disorder of sex development is an uncommon medical condition observed at times during the evaluation of a man's fertility. The following is a case series and literature review of phenotypically normal men diagnosed with this karyotype. Our goal is to comprehend the patients’ clinical presentation as well as their laboratory results aiming to explore options available for their management. A formal literature review through PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed using “46 XX man” as a word search. A total of 55 patients, including those conveyed in this article were diagnosed with a 46 XX karyotype during their fertility evaluation. The patients’ mean age ± s.d. was 34 ± 10 years and their mean height ± s.d. was 166 ± 6.5 cm. Overall, they presented with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Sexual dysfunction, reduced hair distribution, and gynecomastia were reported in 20% (4/20), 25.8% (8/31), and 42% (13/31) of the patients, respectively. The SRY gene was detected in 36 (83.7%) and was absent in the remaining seven (16.3%) patients. We found that a multidisciplinary approach to management is preferred in 46 XX patients. Screening for remnants of the mullerian ducts and for malignant transformation in dysgenetic gonads is imperative. Hypogonadism should be addressed, while fertility options are in vitro fertilization with donor sperm or adoption. PMID:27297128

  13. The potential of sanrego (Lunasia amara) in enhancing fertility and anti-hyperglycemic effect in diabetic induced male rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor Raidah, R.; Mahanem M., N.; Mohd Shazrul Fazry, S.

    2014-09-01

    Study on the effects of Lunasia amara (LA) aqueous extract on male fertility and its anti-hyperglycemic activity was carried out. Twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups for fertility test; control given orally distilled water (n=6) and treatment (n=6) given 60 mg/kg aqueous extract of LA for 42 days. On day 43, all rats were sacrificed and cauda epididymis was isolated for sperm quality analysis that includes parameter of sperm count, motility and viability. Anti-hyperglycemic study was done on five groups of male rats; I-normal control, II-Diabetic control and three other groups induced diabetic given 500 mg/kg metformin, 60 mg/kg LA and 120 mg/kg LA respectively. Diabetes was induced in the male rats by intravenous injection of 55 mg/kg streptozotocin. On day 7, the fasting blood glucose level was measured from blood drawn by tail snip. Results showed that aqueous extract of LA increased significantly (p < 0.05) sperm count (39.88 ± 2.33) × 106, viability 82.46 ± 1.91 % and progressive motility 76.00 ± 1.51and of sperm data in treated group compared to control group. LA aqueous extract at dose 120 mg/kg was significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose in the diabetic rats by 49.53 %. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of LA effective in increasing sperm quality of male rats and suggest that LA may possess anti-hyperglycemic property.

  14. Tubulin cytoskeleton during microsporogenesis in the male-sterile genotype of Allium sativum and fertile Allium ampeloprasum L.

    PubMed

    Tchórzewska, Dorota; Deryło, Kamil; Błaszczyk, Lidia; Winiarczyk, Krystyna

    2015-12-01

    Microsporogenesis in garlic. The male-sterile Allium sativum (garlic) reproduces exclusively in the vegetative mode, and anthropogenic factors seem to be the cause of the loss of sexual reproduction capability. There are many different hypotheses concerning the causes of male sterility in A.sativum; however, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been comprehensively elucidated.Numerous attempts have been undertaken to understand the causes of male sterility, but the tubulin cytoskeleton in meiotically dividing cells during microsporogenesis has never been investigated in this species. Using sterile A.sativum genotype L13 and its fertile close relative A. ampeloprasum (leek), we have analysed the distribution of the tubulin cytoskeleton during microsporogenesis. We observed that during karyokinesis and cytokinesis, in both meiotic divisions I and II, the microtubular cytoskeleton in garlic L13 formed configurations that resembled tubulin arrangement typical of monocots. However, the tubulin cytoskeleton in garlic was distinctly poorer (composed of a few MT filaments) compared with that found in meiotically dividing cells in A. ampeloprasum. These differences did not affect the course of karyogenesis, chondriokinesis, and cytokinesis, which contributed to completion of microsporogenesis, but there was no further development of the male gametophyte. At the very beginning of the successive stage of development of fertile pollen grains, i.e. gametogenesis, there were disorders involving the absence of a normal cortical cytoskeleton and dramatically progressive degeneration of the cytoplasm in garlic. Therefore,we suggest that, due to disturbances in cortical cytoskeleton formation at the very beginning of gametogenesis, the intracellular transport governed by the cytoskeleton might be perturbed, leading to microspore decay in the male-sterile garlic genotype.

  15. Male reproductive traits, semen cryopreservation, and heterologous in vitro fertilization in the bobcat (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Gañán, N; González, R; Sestelo, A; Garde, J J; Sánchez, I; Aguilar, J M; Gomendio, M; Roldan, E R S

    2009-08-01

    There is limited information on bobcat ejaculate traits and sperm cryopreservation and fertilizing ability. Bobcats were electroejaculated under general anesthesia in November (autumn) and April (spring), and endocrine and sperm traits were characterized. Testosterone (mean+/-SEM: 0.90+/-0.15 ng/mL) was not different between sampling times, but cortisol (average: 13.95+/-1.73 microg/dL) was significantly higher in April. Average number of spermatozoa was 10.0+/-3.4 x 10(6) sperm/ejaculate, with values being significantly higher in April. Sperm motility (average 55.7+/-5.8% motile sperm) was not different between sampling times. The proportion of normal spermatozoa in the ejaculate (average: 14.7+/-2.1%) was significantly higher in April, but the percentage of spermatozoa with intact acrosomes (average: 43.7+/-3.8%) was significantly higher in autumn. Spermatozoa were cryopreserved in a Tes-Tris-based diluent (TEST) or Biladyl, both containing 20% egg yolk and 4% glycerol. Diluted sperm were loaded into straws, refrigerated using a programmable thermoblock with a dry chamber, frozen in nitrogen vapors, thawed, and incubated in F-10 medium with 5% fetal bovine serum for up to 3h. After cryopreservation in TEST, there were about 50% motile sperm upon thawing, and survival was high during incubation post-thaw. Cryopreservation in Biladyl led to similar results, but motility decreased substantially during incubation post-thaw. Bobcat spermatozoa fertilized domestic cat oocytes matured in vitro. Fertilization rates were higher for sperm collected in April and cryopreserved in TEST (46%) than for those cryopreserved using Biladyl (<3%). Fertilized oocytes cleaved in culture, and some (27%) reached the morula stage. This study has allowed us to gain further baseline information on bobcat reproduction, explore sperm cryopreservation conditions, and show that fertilizing capacity can be tested using in vitro-matured cat oocytes. These results will be important for future

  16. Polygyny, mate-guarding, and posthumous fertilization as alternative male mating strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio, Kelly R.; Sinervo, Barry

    2000-01-01

    Alternative male mating strategies within populations are thought to be evolutionarily stable because different behaviors allow each male type to successfully gain access to females. Although alternative male strategies are widespread among animals, quantitative evidence for the success of discrete male strategies is available for only a few systems. We use nuclear microsatellites to estimate the paternity rates of three male lizard strategies previously modeled as a rock-paper-scissors game. Each strategy has strengths that allow it to outcompete one morph, and weaknesses that leave it vulnerable to the strategy of another. Blue-throated males mate-guard their females and avoid cuckoldry by yellow-throated “sneaker” males, but mate-guarding is ineffective against aggressive orange-throated neighbors. The ultradominant orange-throated males are highly polygynous and maintain large territories; they overpower blue-throated neighbors and cosire offspring with their females, but are often cuckolded by yellow-throated males. Finally, yellow-throated sneaker males sire offspring via secretive copulations and often share paternity of offspring within a female's clutch. Sneaker males sire more offspring posthumously, indicating that sperm competition may be an important component of their strategy. PMID:11106369

  17. Heritable Effect of Plant Water Availability Conditions on Restoration of Male Fertility in the “9E” CMS-Inducing Cytoplasm of Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Elkonin, L. A.; Tsvetova, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    Heritable changes of phenotype arising in plant ontogenesis by the influence of environmental factors belong to the most intriguing genetic phenomena. An unusual inheritance pattern was detected during examination of male fertility restoration in the CMS-inducing “9E” type cytoplasm of sorghum: Rf-genes were functional in self-pollinated progeny of F1 hybrids yet were either not expressed or poorly expressed in backcrosses of these hybrids to CMS-lines with the same cytoplasm type. In experiments on parallel growing of the same F1 hybrid combinations in the “dry plot” and in the “irrigated plot,” it was found that high level of plant water availability during panicle and pollen developmental stages significantly increased male fertility of F1 and test-cross hybrid populations, in which fertility-restoring genes were in heterozygote state, whereas in F2 populations the influences of water availability conditions cause less pronounce effects. Similarly, male-sterile F1 plants, being transferred from the “dry plot” to greenhouse, produced male-fertile panicles. In addition, male-sterile plants from F2 families, which segregated-out as recessives, being transferred to greenhouse also produced male-fertile panicles. In the progenies of these revertants that were grown in field conditions and in the “dry plot,” stable inheritance of male fertility for three cycles of self-pollination was observed, and a number of stable fertile lines in the “9E” cytoplasm were obtained. However, in test-crosses of these fertile lines to CMS-lines with the “9E” cytoplasm restoration of male fertility was not observed, except the progeny of one revertant that behaved as fertility-restorer line. These data suggest that the functional state of fertility-restoring genes for the “9E” sorghum cytoplasm is epigenetically regulated trait established by the influence of environmental factors and is transmitted to sexual generations. PMID:22639674

  18. Reduced Fertility of Drosophila melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) Mutant Females Is Partially Complemented by Hmr Orthologs From Sibling Species

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, S.; Flores, Heather A.; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The gene Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) causes lethality in interspecific hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species. Hmr has functionally diverged for this interspecific phenotype because lethality is caused specifically by D. melanogaster Hmr but not by D. simulans or D. mauritiana Hmr. Hmr was identified by the D. melanogaster partial loss-of-function allele Hmr1, which suppresses hybrid lethality but has no apparent phenotype within pure-species D. melanogaster. Here we have investigated the possible function of Hmr in D. melanogaster females using stronger mutant alleles. Females homozygous for Hmr mutants have reduced viability posteclosion and significantly reduced fertility. We find that reduced fertility of Hmr mutants is caused by a reduction in the number of eggs laid as well as reduced zygotic viability. Cytological analysis reveals that ovarioles from Hmr mutant females express markers that distinguish various stages of wild-type oogenesis, but that developing egg chambers fail to migrate posteriorly. D. simulans and D. mauritiana Hmr+ partially complement the reduced fertility of a D. melanogaster Hmr mutation. This partial complementation contrasts with the complete functional divergence previously observed for the interspecific hybrid lethality phenotype. We also investigate here the molecular basis of hybrid rescue associated with a second D. melanogaster hybrid rescue allele, In(1)AB. We show that In(1)AB is mutant for Hmr function, likely due to a missense mutation in an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. Two independently discovered hybrid rescue mutations are therefore allelic. PMID:19153254

  19. Males are here to stay: fertilization enhances viable egg production by clonal queens of the little fire ant ( Wasmannia auropunctata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Misato O.; Mikheyev, Alexander S.

    2015-04-01

    Evolution of reproduction strategies is affected by both phylogenetic and physiological constraints. Although clonality may benefit females, it may not be selected if a male contribution is necessary to start egg laying and embryo development. In little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata, sexual populations employ a typical Hymenopteran system of reproduction. In clonal populations, however, queens and males are produced with only maternal and paternal genomes, respectively, whereas sterile workers are produced sexually. Although this system requires both sexes for worker production, previous work has shown that workers may also be produced clonally by the queens. If so, why are males maintained in this species? Our data suggest that fertilization is necessary to increase the hatching rate of eggs. Although clonal queens can indeed produce both workers and queens without mating, the hatching rate is far below the level necessary to maintain functional colonies. On the other hand, virgin queens from populations exhibiting the original Hymenopteran reproduction system also show low hatching rates, but produce only haploid male eggs. Reasons for the existence of W. auropunctata males have been disputed. However, our data suggest that physiological constraints, such as the requirement for insemination, must be considered in regard to evolution of reproduction systems, in addition to ecological data and theoretical considerations of fitness.

  20. Fertility Risk Assessment and Preservation in Male and Female Prepubertal and Adolescent Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zavras, Nikolaos; Siristatidis, Charalampos; Siatelis, Argyris; Koumarianou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents the second cause of death in prepubertal children and adolescents, although it is currently associated with an overall survival rate of 80%–85%. The annual incidence rate is 186.6 per 1 million children and adolescents aged up to 19 years. Both disease and treatment options are associated with life-altering, long-term effects that require monitoring. Infertility is a common issue, and as such, fertility preservation represents an essential part in the management of young patients with cancer who are at risk of premature gonadal failure. This review deals with the up-to-date available data on fertility risk assessment and preservation strategies that should be addressed prior to antineoplastic therapy in this vulnerable subgroup of cancer patients. PMID:27398041

  1. Male-female crosstalk during pollen germination, tube growth and guidance, and double fertilization.

    PubMed

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Franklin-Tong, Noni

    2013-07-01

    Sperm cells of flowering plants are non-motile and thus require transportation to the egg apparatus via the pollen tube to execute double fertilization. During its journey, the pollen tube interacts with various sporophytic cell types that support its growth and guide it towards the surface of the ovule. The final steps of tube guidance and sperm delivery are controlled by the cells of the female gametophyte. During fertilization, cell-cell communication events take place to achieve and maximize reproductive success. Additional layers of crosstalk exist, including self-recognition and specialized processes to prevent self-fertilization and consequent inbreeding. In this review, we focus on intercellular communication between the pollen grain/pollen tube including the sperm cells with the various sporophytic maternal tissues and the cells of the female gametophyte. Polymorphic-secreted peptides and small proteins, especially those belonging to various subclasses of small cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs), reactive oxygen species (ROS)/NO signaling, and the second messenger Ca(2+), play center stage in most of these processes.

  2. Sexual behavior and seminal characteristics of fertile mature New Zealand White male rabbits of different body weights.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-De Lara, R; Fallas-López, M; García-Muñiz, J G; Martínez-Hernández, P A; Rangel-Santos, R; Maldonado-Siman, E; Cadena-Meneses, J A

    2015-01-01

    Body weight in different mammalian species influences reproductive potential. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship of body weight at the time of semen collection with libido, seminal characteristics and number of semen doses for artificial insemination (AI) in New Zealand White mature fertile male rabbits. Data came from 728 semen collections of 14 rabbits, 15-months of age that were sexually experienced with proven semen quality and fertility. Semen collection was performed twice a week with two ejaculates at each collection time and lasted 14 weeks. A second ejaculation was collected at 1-2h after the first. Data from each male from first and second ejaculates from 1 day of semen collection throughout the trial were averaged (n=324) and partial correlation coefficients and regression equations were estimated to describe the relationship of male body weight to ejaculation reaction time and 12 semen and sperm characteristics. As body weight increased there was a linear (P<0.05) increase in reaction time, abnormal sperm with an intact membrane and abnormal sperm with a damaged membrane and a linear (P<0.05) decrease in semen volume, sperm concentration per ejaculate, normal sperm with an intact membrane, number of normal motile sperm with an intact membrane and suitable semen doses for AI. Body weight of the mature male rabbit at semen collection had some influence on libido, semen and sperm characteristics, with a general trend toward a lesser reproduction potential as body weight increases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of gibberellic acid on the quality of sperm and in vitro fertilization outcome in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Hosseinchi, Mohammadreza; Soltanalinejad, Farhad; Najafi, Gholamreza; Roshangar, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA3) is a group of plant hormones identified in various plants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of GA3 on sperm parameters and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Fifty six adult male rats were divided into seven groups as, control, treatment and sham. Following 15, 30 and 45 days of GA3 and methanol alcohol (MA) administration, rats were euthanized and epididymis tail was transferred to human tubular fluid (HTF) medium containing 4 mg mL(-1) bovine serum albumin (BSA) .Total number of sperms, the percentage of live sperms, immature sperms and sperms with damaged chromatin and IVF were examined. The oocytes were obtained from immature rats after the injection of pregnant mare's serum (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) hormones. Human tubular fluid was used as the fertilization medium and zygotes transferred to fresh 1-cell rat embryos culture medium (mR1ECM) to reach the blastocyst stage. This study showed that GA3 could decrease the number of total sperms on days 30 and 45 in treated group comparison with the control and sham groups. Additionally, GA3 increased the immature sperms and sperms with damaged chromatin. The percentage of fertilization, two-cell embryos and blastocyst resulting from the treatment group on days 30 and 45 also decreased and showed significant differences with the control and sham groups (p < 0.05). The results obtained from this study indicated that the oral use of GA3 could reduce the fertility in rats by influencing the sperm number and the quality of sperm's chromatins.

  4. Effect of gibberellic acid on the quality of sperm and in vitro fertilization outcome in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinchi, Mohammadreza; Soltanalinejad, Farhad; Najafi, Gholamreza; Roshangar, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA3) is a group of plant hormones identified in various plants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of GA3 on sperm parameters and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Fifty six adult male rats were divided into seven groups as, control, treatment and sham. Following 15, 30 and 45 days of GA3 and methanol alcohol (MA) administration, rats were euthanized and epididymis tail was transferred to human tubular fluid (HTF) medium containing 4 mg mL-1 bovine serum albumin (BSA) .Total number of sperms, the percentage of live sperms, immature sperms and sperms with damaged chromatin and IVF were examined. The oocytes were obtained from immature rats after the injection of pregnant mare's serum (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) hormones. Human tubular fluid was used as the fertilization medium and zygotes transferred to fresh 1-cell rat embryos culture medium (mR1ECM) to reach the blastocyst stage. This study showed that GA3 could decrease the number of total sperms on days 30 and 45 in treated group comparison with the control and sham groups. Additionally, GA3 increased the immature sperms and sperms with damaged chromatin. The percentage of fertilization, two-cell embryos and blastocyst resulting from the treatment group on days 30 and 45 also decreased and showed significant differences with the control and sham groups (p < 0.05). The results obtained from this study indicated that the oral use of GA3 could reduce the fertility in rats by influencing the sperm number and the quality of sperm’s chromatins. PMID:25568681

  5. Fertility preservation in males with cancer: 16-year monocentric experience of sperm banking and post-thaw reproductive outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Depalo, Raffaella; Falagario, Doriana; Masciandaro, Paola; Nardelli, Claudia; Vacca, Margherita Patrizia; Capuano, Pasquale; Specchia, Giorgina; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anticancer treatments can impair male fertility. Cryopreservation of semen is an efficient procedure for fertility preservation. The aim of this study was to evaluate pre-freeze semen parameters among the various types of cancer, post-thaw sperm viability and reproductive outcome of samples used for assisted reproductive treatment (ART). Methods: This study included 721 men with cancer that had their semen cryopreserved in our bank in 1999–2015. Semen analysis and cryopreservation were performed before the start of antineoplastic treatment, according to the World Health Organization recommendations, European Commission and Italian law. Results: Among the 721 patient, 196 had seminoma of the testis, 173 Hodgkin’s lymphoma, 108 mixed testicular tumors, 89 germ cell tumors, 67 other tumors, 46 hematological tumors, and 42 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The mean age of patients was significantly lower in Hodgkin’s lymphoma compared to other tumors. Statistically significant lower volume, sperm count and number of straws stored were observed respectively in Hodgkin’s lymphoma, mixed testicular tumor and hematological tumors. Nineteen patients used their frozen semen for 20 ART cycles. After thawing a significant reduction of motility and vitality was recorded. A lower fertilization rate was observed in patients affected by testicular tumor and lymphoma (35.42% and 50%) compared with other cancers (71.43%). No significant differences were observed in terms of cleavage and implantation rates. A total of five pregnancies and seven healthy newborns were achieved. Conclusions: Fertility preservation before gonadotoxic therapy is of great importance to patients with cancer and must be indicate before the start of treatment. PMID:27800030

  6. NMR-based plasma metabolomic discrimination for male fertility assessment of rats treated with Eurycoma longifolia extracts.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Forough; Ibrahim, Baharudin; Teh, Chin-Hoe; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2017-03-17

    Male infertility is one of the leading causes of infertility which affects many couples worldwide. Semen analysis is a routine examination of male fertility status which is usually performed on semen samples obtained through masturbation that may be inconvenient to patients. Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali, TA), native to Malaysia, has been traditionally used as a remedy to boost male fertility. In our recent studies in rats, upon the administration of high-quassinoid content extracts of TA including TA water (TAW), quassinoid-rich TA (TAQR) extracts, and a low-quassinoid content extract including quassinoid-poor TA (TAQP) extract, sperm count (SC) increased in TAW- and TAQR-treated rats when compared to the TAQP-treated and control groups. Consequently, the rats were divided into normal- (control and TAQP-treated) and high- (TAW- and TAQR-treated) SC groups [Ebrahimi et al. 2016]. Post-treatment rat plasma was collected. An optimized plasma sample preparation method was developed with respect to the internal standards sodium 3- (trimethylsilyl) propionate- 2,2,3,3- d4 (TSP) and deuterated 4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-ammonium trifluoroacetate (DSA). Carr-Purcell-Meibum-Gill (CPMG) experiments combined with orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was employed to evaluate plasma metabolomic changes in normal- and high-SC rats. The potential biomarkers associated with SC increase were investigated to assess fertility by capturing the metabolomic profile of plasma. DSA was selected as the optimized internal standard for plasma analysis due to its significantly smaller half-height line width (W h/2) compared to that of TSP. The validated OPLS-DA model clearly discriminated the CPMG profiles in regard to the SC level. Plasma profiles of the high-SC group contained higher levels of alanine, lactate, and histidine, while ethanol concentration was significantly higher in the normal-SC group. This approach might be a new alternative applicable to the

  7. Development of dimethandrolone 17beta-undecanoate (DMAU) as an oral male hormonal contraceptive: induction of infertility and recovery of fertility in adult male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Attardi, Barbara J; Engbring, Jean A; Gropp, David; Hild, Sheri Ann

    2011-01-01

    Dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU: 7α,11β-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone 17β-undecanoate) is a potent orally active androgen with progestational activity that is in development for therapeutic uses in men. We hypothesized that because of its dual activity, DMAU might have potential as a single-agent oral hormonal contraceptive. To test this possibility, adult male rabbits (5/group) of proven fertility were treated orally with vehicle or DMAU at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg/d for 12 or 13 weeks. Semen and blood samples were collected every other week through week 30. Sperm were decreased (P < .05) in semen samples from DMAU-treated rabbits at 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/d at weeks 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 compared to week 0 (prior to treatment). The percentage of forward progressive motile sperm in those rabbits that still had measurable sperm was also reduced by DMAU treatment at 2.5 mg/kg/d at weeks 14, 16, 18, and 20 and at 5.0 mg/kg/d at week 18 (P < .05). At 1.0 mg/kg/d only 1 rabbit had reduced sperm numbers and motility. A mating trial was performed at week 15. The number of bred males that were fertile was 4 of 4 in the vehicle-treated group and 4 of 5, 0 of 4, and 2 of 5 in the 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg/d DMAU treatment groups. By week 22, sperm numbers and forward progressive motility increased, and they returned to pretreatment levels in all DMAU-treated rabbits by week 30. All bred males were fertile at week 31. Serum levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) were significantly suppressed in DMAU (1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 mg/kg/d)-treated rabbits during the 12-week dosing interval, but were comparable to pretreatment levels after cessation of dosing. These data indicate that DMAU suppressed the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in severe oligospermia in the majority of rabbits in the 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/d dosing groups. Infertility was observed when sperm numbers decreased to about 10% of pretreatment levels. In

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in linkage disequilibrium with the male-fertility restoration (Ms) locus in open-pollinated and inbred populations of onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maintainer lines are used to seed propagate male-sterile lines for the development of hybrid-onion cultivars. The identification of maintainer lines would be more efficient with molecular markers distinguishing genotypes at the nuclear male-fertility restoration (Ms) locus. Ms has been mapped to chr...

  9. Adaptive Regulation of Testis Gene Expression and Control of Male Fertility by the Drosophila Harpin RNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiayu; Duan, Hong; Bejarano, Fernando; Okamura, Katsutomo; Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A.; Bortolamiol-Becet, Diane; Martin, Raquel; Ruby, J. Graham; Lai, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Although endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) have been described in many species, still little is known about their endogenous utility. Here, we show that Drosophila hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs) generate an endo-siRNA class with predominant expression in testes. Although hpRNAs are universally recently evolved, we identify highly complementary protein-coding targets for all hpRNAs. Importantly, we find broad evidence for evolutionary divergences that preferentially maintain compensatory pairing between hpRNAs and targets, serving as first evidence for adaptive selection for siRNA-mediated target regulation in metazoans. We demonstrate organismal impact of hpRNA activity, since knockout of hpRNA1 derepresses its target ATP synthase-β in testes and compromises spermatogenesis and male fertility. Moreover, we reveal surprising male-specific impact of RNAi factors on germ cell development and fertility, consistent with testis-directed function of the hpRNA pathway. Finally, the collected hpRNA loci chronicle an evolutionary timeline that reflects their origins from prospective target genes, mirroring a strategy described for plant miRNAs. PMID:25544562

  10. The transition from stem cell to progenitor spermatogonia and male fertility requires the SHP2 protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Puri, Pawan; Phillips, Bart T; Suzuki, Hitomi; Orwig, Kyle E; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Lapinski, Philip E; King, Philip D; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Walker, William H

    2014-03-01

    SHP2 is a widely expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase required for signal transduction from multiple cell surface receptors. Gain and loss of function SHP2 mutations in humans are known to cause Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes, respectively, that are characterized by numerous pathological conditions including male infertility. Using conditional gene targeting in the mouse, we found that SHP2 is required for maintaining spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and the production of germ cells required for male fertility. After deleting SHP2, spermatogenesis was halted at the initial step during which transit-amplifying undifferentiated spermatogonia are produced from SSCs. In the absence of SHP2, proliferation of SSCs and undifferentiated spermatogonia was inhibited, thus germ cells cannot be replenished and SSCs cannot undergo renewal. However, germ cells beyond the undifferentiated spermatogonia stage of development at the time of SHP2 knockout were able to complete their maturation to become sperm. In cultures of SSCs and their progeny, inhibition of SHP2 activity reduced growth factor-mediated intracellular signaling that regulates SSC proliferation and cell fate. Inhibition of SHP2 also decreased the number of SSCs present in culture and caused SSCs to detach from supporting cells. Injection of mice with an SHP2 inhibitor blocked the production of germ cells from SSCs. Together, our studies show that SHP2 is essential for SSCs to maintain fertility and indicates that the pathogenesis of infertility in humans with SHP2 mutations is due to compromised SSC functions that block spermatogenesis. © AlphaMed Press.

  11. The effect of ethanol on spermatogenesis and fertility in male Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dare, W N; Noronha, C C; Kusemiju, O T; Okanlawon, O A

    2002-12-01

    Prenatal alcohol is associated with a variety of developmental abnormalies, including neuroanatomical, physical and behavioural features. This study was designed to determine the effects of administration of alcohol, exemplified mostly by ethanol (15 ml/kg, 25%, v/v) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 15 mg/kg) as a representative of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, individually and their combination (ethanol 15 ml/kg, 25%, v/v ASA 15 mg/kg) on semen quality and fertility after paternal intraperitoneal administration in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the combination study, the rats received ASA about 1 hour before ethanol administration. The combination experiments were conducted to determine if the effects of ethanol can be prevented by pre-treatment with acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) which has been reported to antagonise the rate-depressant effects of ethanol. All animals received this treatment for ten weeks. Semen parameters were determined and compared with controls. The result showed that when given alone, ethanol significantly reduced the sperm density and percentage of motile spermatozoa relative to controls. Pre-treatment with ASA failed to stop the decrease in sperm density and percentage motility caused by ethanol. Moreover none of the experimental male rats was able to fertilize the females exposed to them despite successful mating demonstrated by the presence of sperm plug. The present study demonstrates that chronic consumption of ethanol or ingestion of ASA has toxic effect on spermatozoa and impairs fertility in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Moreover, pre-treatment with ASA has no effect on the deleterious effects caused by ethanol.

  12. The Goddard and Saturn Genes Are Essential for Drosophila Male Fertility and May Have Arisen De Novo.

    PubMed

    Gubala, Anna M; Schmitz, Jonathan F; Kearns, Michael J; Vinh, Tery T; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Wolfner, Mariana F; Findlay, Geoffrey D

    2017-05-01

    New genes arise through a variety of mechanisms, including the duplication of existing genes and the de novo birth of genes from noncoding DNA sequences. While there are numerous examples of duplicated genes with important functional roles, the functions of de novo genes remain largely unexplored. Many newly evolved genes are expressed in the male reproductive tract, suggesting that these evolutionary innovations may provide advantages to males experiencing sexual selection. Using testis-specific RNA interference, we screened 11 putative de novo genes in Drosophila melanogaster for effects on male fertility and identified two, goddard and saturn, that are essential for spermatogenesis and sperm function. Goddard knockdown (KD) males fail to produce mature sperm, while saturn KD males produce few sperm, and these function inefficiently once transferred to females. Consistent with a de novo origin, both genes are identifiable only in Drosophila and are predicted to encode proteins with no sequence similarity to any annotated protein. However, since high levels of divergence prevented the unambiguous identification of the noncoding sequences from which each gene arose, we consider goddard and saturn to be putative de novo genes. Within Drosophila, both genes have been lost in certain lineages, but show conserved, male-specific patterns of expression in the species in which they are found. Goddard is consistently found in single-copy and evolves under purifying selection. In contrast, saturn has diversified through gene duplication and positive selection. These data suggest that de novo genes can acquire essential roles in male reproduction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Birth Order and Sibling Sex Ratio in a Population with High Fertility: Are Turkish Male to Female Transsexuals Different?

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ali; Bozkurt, Ozlem Hekim; Sonmez, Ipek

    2015-07-01

    Western studies have consistently found that androphilic (sexually attracted to men) male-to-female transsexuals have a later birth order and a relative excess of brothers compared with appropriate control participants. However, non-Western studies on birth order and sibling sex ratio in androphilic males (transsexual or non-transsexual) are rare. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that androphilic male-to-female transsexuals have a late birth order and a relative excess of brothers in a non-Western culture with a higher fertility rate. The participants were 60 androphilic male-to-female transsexuals and 61 male heterosexual controls. The transsexual participants had significantly more older brothers than the control participants, but the groups did not differ in their numbers of older sisters, younger brothers, or younger sisters. The foregoing pattern is usually referred to as the "fraternal birth order effect." Slater's and Berglin's Indexes both showed that the mean birth order of the control participants was very close to that expected from a random sample drawn from a demographically stable population whereas the mean birth order of the transsexual participants was later. A measure of sibship composition, brothers/all siblings, showed that the transsexual group had a higher proportion of male siblings compared with the control group. In conclusion, the present study found that Turkish androphilic male-to-female transsexuals show the same high fraternal birth order that has been found in comparable androphilic samples in Western Europe, North America, and the South Pacific, which suggests a common underlying biological causal mechanism.

  14. Last male wins the egg fertilization fight: A case study in ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Desh Deepak; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar

    2016-10-01

    Sexual selection and the mechanisms involved in sperm competition have not been greatly explored in ladybird beetles. The present study was conducted to investigate the processes of sperm competition and the role of mate guarding behaviour in its regulation in ladybird beetles. We investigated these questions in polyandrous females of the ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) using a phenotypic marker (typical and intermediate morph) to assess paternity of offspring; to determine sperm competition. We conducted two double mating experiments: (i) complete first and second matings, and (ii) disrupted first and complete second matings each using homomorphic and heteromorphic pairing in alternation. Males which mated last were found to sire up to 72% of the offspring produced, indicating last male sperm precedence. Morph itself, independent of mating order, did not have a significant effect on proportion of offspring sired. Paternity share of the last male was negatively associated with mating duration of the first male; mating duration of the first male being indicative of mate guarding. This therefore indicates that prolonged matings by first males are essentially examples of post-copulatory mate guarding to prevent last male sperm precedence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary patterns, foods and nutrients in male fertility parameters and fecundability: a systematic review of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Salas-Huetos, Albert; Bulló, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2017-07-01

    Infertility is a global public health issue, affecting 15% of all couples of reproductive age. Male factors, including decreased semen quality, are responsible for ~25% of these cases. The dietary pattern, the components of the diet and nutrients have been studied as possible determinants of sperm function and/or fertility. Previous systematic reviews have been made of the few heterogeneous low-quality randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted in small samples of participants and investigating the effect of specific nutrients and nutritional supplements on male infertility. However, as yet there has been no systematic review of observational studies. A comprehensive systematic review was made of the published literature, from the earliest available online indexing year to November 2016, in accordance with the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. We have included cross-sectional, case-control and prospective and retrospective studies in which fertile/infertile men were well defined (men with sperm disorders, sperm DNA damage, varicocele or idiopathic infertility). The primary outcomes were semen quality or fecundability. With the data extracted, we evaluated and scored the quality of the studies selected. We excluded RCTs, animal studies, review articles and low-quality studies. A total of 1944 articles were identified, of which 35 were selected for qualitative analysis. Generally, the results indicated that healthy diets rich in some nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids, some antioxidants (vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene, selenium, zinc, cryptoxanthin and lycopene), other vitamins (vitamin D and folate) and low in saturated fatty acids and trans-fatty acids were inversely associated with low semen quality parameters. Fish, shellfish and seafood, poultry, cereals, vegetables and fruits, low-fat dairy and skimmed milk were positively associated with several sperm quality parameters. However, diets rich in

  16. An integrated approach to male-factor subfertility: bridging the gap between fertility specialists trained in urology and gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Edward G; Grantmyre, John; Zini, Armand

    2015-03-01

    Subfertile men and women are usually cared for by different clinicians, namely urologists and gynaecologists. While these doctors share each other's goals, they may not always appreciate the content or implications of their opposite number's clinical decisions; to some degree they may practice in "silos." We address this problem by reviewing the effectiveness of medical treatments for male factor subfertility in the context of female factors. The effectiveness of treatments for couples with male factor subfertility, other than IVF with ICSI, appears modest. However, data from randomized controlled trials suggest benefits from some treatments: clomiphene and tamoxifen for the male (common odds ratio for pregnancy [COR] 2.42; 95% CI 1.47 to 3.94), antioxidants (COR 4.18; 95% CI 2.65 to 6.59) and surgical management of a clinical varicocele (COR 2.39; 95% CI 1.56 to 3.66). Nevertheless, close attention to female age and the duration of subfertility help to avoid lost opportunity through delays in treatment when IVF with ICSI is indicated. Making treatment decisions squarely in the context of the couple's overall prognosis is key for optimal outcomes. Future trials of male fertility treatments should focus on pregnancy as the primary outcome, rather than less important surrogates such as sperm quality.

  17. Identification of Genes Potentially Associated with the Fertility Instability of S-Type Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Maize via Bulked Segregant RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jinfeng; Zhao, Yanxin; Zhang, Ruyang; Li, Chunhui; Duan, Minxiao; Luo, Meijie; Shi, Zi; Zhao, Jiuran

    2016-01-01

    S-type cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) is the largest group among the three major types of CMS in maize. CMS-S exhibits fertility instability as a partial fertility restoration in a specific nuclear genetic background, which impedes its commercial application in hybrid breeding programs. The fertility instability phenomenon of CMS-S is controlled by several minor quantitative trait locus (QTLs), but not the major nuclear fertility restorer (Rf3). However, the gene mapping of these minor QTLs and the molecular mechanism of the genetic modifications are still unclear. Using completely sterile and partially rescued plants of fertility instable line (FIL)-B, we performed bulk segregant RNA-Seq and identified six potential associated genes in minor effect QTLs contributing to fertility instability. Analyses demonstrate that these potential associated genes may be involved in biological processes, such as floral organ differentiation and development regulation, energy metabolism and carbohydrates biosynthesis, which results in a partial anther exsertion and pollen fertility restoration in the partially rescued plants. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in two potential associated genes were validated to be related to the fertility restoration phenotype by KASP marker assays. This novel knowledge contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of the partial fertility restoration of CMS-S in maize and thus helps to guide the breeding programs. PMID:27669430

  18. The effects of sulfasalazine on human male fertility potential and seminal prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, M J; Chey, W Y; Takihara, H; Cockett, A T

    1984-10-01

    Fertility parameters of 10 men with chronic inflammatory bowel disease under treatment with sulfasalazine for at least 5 years were compared to those of 19 control subjects. Seminal parameters examined included ejaculate volume, sperm number and concentration, sperm motility index, sperm viability, pH, zinc concentration, prostaglandins E and F2-alpha, prolactin and 7 classes of sperm morphology. In addition, plasma concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, testosterone and prolactin were noted. The data indicate that sulfasalazine therapy reduces semen quality and that this effect can be reversed upon removal from therapy. This reversal is independent of seminal prostaglandin concentrations.

  19. DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN FERTILIZATION FAILURE AND EARLY PREGNANCY LOSS WHEN IDENTIFYING MALE-MEDIATED ADVERSE PREGNANCY OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful reproduction depends upon the precise orchestration of many physiological processes. With respect to male reproductive performance, normal copulatory behavior and ejaculatory function are required to insure that semen is deposited in the female tract. Then, a suffici...

  20. DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN FERTILIZATION FAILURE AND EARLY PREGNANCY LOSS WHEN IDENTIFYING MALE-MEDIATED ADVERSE PREGNANCY OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful reproduction depends upon the precise orchestration of many physiological processes. With respect to male reproductive performance, normal copulatory behavior and ejaculatory function are required to insure that semen is deposited in the female tract. Then, a suffici...

  1. Evaluation of possible toxic effects of spearmint (Mentha spicata) on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Nozhat, Fatemeh; Alaee, Sanaz; Behzadi, Khodabakhsh; Azadi Chegini, Najmeh

    2014-11-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of spearmint (Mentha spicata Labiatae) on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats. Adult Wistar male rats in one control (C) and three experimental groups (I, II and III) received 0, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg spearmint extract orally for 45 days, respectively. Following this treatment, the animals' weights, and the standard weight of reproductive tissues, sperm count, sperm motility and serum testosterone concentration were measured, and reproductive tissues were examined histopathologically. To evaluate the effects of spearmint on fertility of male rats and growth of their offspring, male rats of the control and experimental groups mated with untreated female rats. RESULTS showed that spearmint did not affect the rats' body and reproductive tissue weights. The sperm count, fast and slow progressive motility of sperm and serum testosterone concentration decreased while number of non-progressive sperm and immotile sperm increased in the experimental groups compared to the control group, but none of these changes were statistically significant. Histopathological studies showed no severe changes in reproductive tissues between control and experimental groups. Number and growth of offspring born from mating of male rats with untreated female rats showed no difference. We concluded that spearmint has no significant toxic effect on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats at the above mentioned dose levels. However high levels of this extract may have adverse effects on male fertility.

  2. Evaluation of possible toxic effects of spearmint (Mentha spicata) on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Nozhat, Fatemeh; Alaee, Sanaz; Behzadi, Khodabakhsh; Azadi Chegini, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this study we investigated the effects of spearmint (Mentha spicata Labiatae) on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats. Materials and Methods: Adult Wistar male rats in one control (C) and three experimental groups (I, II and III) received 0, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg spearmint extract orally for 45 days, respectively. Following this treatment, the animals’ weights, and the standard weight of reproductive tissues, sperm count, sperm motility and serum testosterone concentration were measured, and reproductive tissues were examined histopathologically. To evaluate the effects of spearmint on fertility of male rats and growth of their offspring, male rats of the control and experimental groups mated with untreated female rats. Results: Results showed that spearmint did not affect the rats’ body and reproductive tissue weights. The sperm count, fast and slow progressive motility of sperm and serum testosterone concentration decreased while number of non-progressive sperm and immotile sperm increased in the experimental groups compared to the control group, but none of these changes were statistically significant. Histopathological studies showed no severe changes in reproductive tissues between control and experimental groups. Number and growth of offspring born from mating of male rats with untreated female rats showed no difference. Conclusion: We concluded that spearmint has no significant toxic effect on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats at the above mentioned dose levels. However high levels of this extract may have adverse effects on male fertility. PMID:25386406

  3. Evidence that meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is essential for male fertility.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Polikiewicz, Grzegorz; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Prosser, Haydn; Mitchell, Mike; Bradley, Allan; de Rooij, Dirk G; Burgoyne, Paul S; Turner, James M A

    2010-12-07

    The mammalian X and Y chromosomes share little homology and are largely unsynapsed during normal meiosis. This asynapsis triggers inactivation of X- and Y-linked genes, or meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Whether MSCI is essential for male meiosis is unclear. Pachytene arrest and apoptosis is observed in mouse mutants in which MSCI fails, e.g., Brca1(-/-), H2afx(-/-), Sycp1(-/-), and Msh5(-/-). However, these also harbor defects in synapsis and/or recombination and as such may activate a putative pachytene checkpoint. Here we present evidence that MSCI failure is sufficient to cause pachytene arrest. XYY males exhibit Y-Y synapsis and Y chromosomal escape from MSCI without accompanying synapsis/recombination defects. We find that XYY males, like synapsis/recombination mutants, display pachytene arrest and that this can be circumvented by preventing Y-Y synapsis and associated Y gene expression. Pachytene expression of individual Y genes inserted as transgenes on autosomes shows that expression of the Zfy 1/2 paralogs in XY males is sufficient to phenocopy the pachytene arrest phenotype; insertion of Zfy 1/2 on the X chromosome where they are subject to MSCI prevents this response. Our findings show that MSCI is essential for male meiosis and, as such, provide insight into the differential severity of meiotic mutations' effects on male and female meiosis.

  4. Fertility in barley flowers depends on Jekyll functions in male and female sporophytes.

    PubMed

    Radchuk, Volodymyr; Kumlehn, Jochen; Rutten, Twan; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Radchuk, Ruslana; Rolletschek, Hardy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2012-04-01

    • Owing to its evolutional plasticity and adaptability, barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the most widespread crops in the world. Despite this evolutionary success, sexual reproduction of small grain cereals is poorly investigated, making discovery of novel genes and functions a challenging priority. Barley gene Jekyll appears to be a key player in grain development; however, its role in flowers has remained unknown. • Here, we studied RNAi lines of barley, where Jekyll expression was repressed to different extents. The impact of Jekyll on flower development was evaluated based on differential gene expression analysis applied to anthers and gynoecia of wildtype and transgenic plants, as well as using isotope labeling experiments, hormone analysis, immunogold- and TUNEL-assays and in situ hybridization. • Jekyll is expressed in nurse tissues mediating gametophyte-sporophyte interaction in anthers and gynoecia, where JEKYLL was found within the intracellular membranes. The repression of Jekyll impaired pollen maturation, anther dehiscence and induced a significant loss of fertility. The presence of JEKYLL on the pollen surface also hints at possible involvement in the fertilization process. • We conclude that the role of Jekyll in cereal sexual reproduction is clearly much broader than has been hitherto realized. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Do males time their mate-guarding effort with the fertile phase in order to secure fertilisation in Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques?

    PubMed Central

    Dubuc, Constance; Muniz, Laura; Heistermann, Michael; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to most mammalian species, female sexual activity is not limited to the fertile phase of the ovarian cycle in anthropoid primates, which has long been proposed to conceal the timing of ovulation to males. It is now generally believed that females are still most attractive during the fertile phase, leading to high-ranking males successfully mate-guarding them specifically during this period. While studies conducted in species exhibiting exaggerated sexual swellings (probabilistic signal of the fertile phase) have generally supported this hypothesis, mixed support comes from others. Here, we investigated whether high-ranking males timed mate-guarding effort towards female fertile phases in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In this species, adult females do not exhibit sexual swellings, but undergo facial skin colour variation, an alternative oestrogens-dependent graded-signal of female reproductive status. We collected behavioural, hormonal and genetic paternity data during two mating seasons for one group of the free-ranging population of Cayo Santiago. Our results show that mate-guarding by top-ranking males did not completely cover the entire female fertile phase and that this tactic accounted for only 30-40% of all fertilisations observed. Males tended to prolong mate-guarding into the luteal phase (null probability of fertilisation), which mirrors the pattern of male attraction to female facial colour reported in an earlier study. These findings suggest that males may have limited knowledge regarding the exact timing of females’ fertile phase in rhesus macaques, which presumably allows females to gain more control over reproduction relative to other anthropoid primate species. PMID:22449655

  6. Do males time their mate-guarding effort with the fertile phase in order to secure fertilisation in Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques?

    PubMed

    Dubuc, Constance; Muniz, Laura; Heistermann, Michael; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2012-05-01

    In contrast to most mammalian species, female sexual activity is not limited to the fertile phase of the ovarian cycle in anthropoid primates, which has long been proposed to conceal the timing of ovulation to males. It is now generally believed that females are still most attractive during the fertile phase, leading to high-ranking males successfully mate-guarding them specifically during this period. While studies conducted in species exhibiting exaggerated sexual swellings (probabilistic signal of the fertile phase) have generally supported this hypothesis, mixed support comes from others. Here, we investigated whether high-ranking males timed mate-guarding effort towards female fertile phases in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In this species, adult females do not exhibit sexual swellings, but undergo facial skin colour variation, an alternative oestrogen-dependent graded-signal of female reproductive status. We collected behavioural, hormonal and genetic paternity data during two mating seasons for one group of the free-ranging population of Cayo Santiago. Our results show that mate-guarding by top-ranking males did not completely cover the entire female fertile phase and that this tactic accounted for only 30-40% of all fertilisations observed. Males tended to prolong mate-guarding into the luteal phase (null probability of fertilisation), which mirrors the pattern of male attraction to female facial colour reported in an earlier study. These findings suggest that males may have limited knowledge regarding the exact timing of females' fertile phase in rhesus macaques, which presumably allows females to gain more control over reproduction relative to other anthropoid primate species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes during Flower Organ Development in Genetic Male Sterile and Male Fertile Tagetes erecta by Digital Gene-Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ye; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Weining; Zhang, Chunling; Cao, Zhe; Bao, Manzhu; He, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Tagetes erecta is an important commercial plant of Asteraceae family. The male sterile (MS) and male fertile (MF) two-type lines of T. erecta have been utilized in F1 hybrid production for many years, but no report has been made to identify the genes that specify its male sterility that is caused by homeotic conversion of floral organs. In this study, transcriptome assembly and digital gene expression profiling were performed to generate expression profiles of MS and MF plants. A cDNA library was generated from an equal mixture of RNA isolated from MS and MF flower buds (1 mm and 4 mm in diameter). Totally, 87,473,431 clean tags were obtained and assembled into 128,937 transcripts among which 65,857 unigenes were identified with an average length of 1,188 bp. About 52% of unigenes (34,176) were annotated in Nr, Nt, Pfam, KOG/COG, Swiss-Prot, KO (KEGG Ortholog database) and/or GO. Taking the above transcriptome as reference, 125 differentially expressed genes were detected in both developmental stages of MS and MF flower buds. MADS-box genes were presumed to be highly related to male sterility in T. erecta based on histological and cytological observations. Twelve MADS-box genes showed significantly different expression levels in flower buds 4 mm in diameter, whereas only one gene expressed significantly different in flower buds 1 mm in diameter between MS and MF plants. This is the first transcriptome analysis in T. erecta and will provide a valuable resource for future genomic studies, especially in flower organ development and/or differentiation. PMID:26939127

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes during Flower Organ Development in Genetic Male Sterile and Male Fertile Tagetes erecta by Digital Gene-Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ye; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Weining; Zhang, Chunling; Cao, Zhe; Bao, Manzhu; He, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Tagetes erecta is an important commercial plant of Asteraceae family. The male sterile (MS) and male fertile (MF) two-type lines of T. erecta have been utilized in F1 hybrid production for many years, but no report has been made to identify the genes that specify its male sterility that is caused by homeotic conversion of floral organs. In this study, transcriptome assembly and digital gene expression profiling were performed to generate expression profiles of MS and MF plants. A cDNA library was generated from an equal mixture of RNA isolated from MS and MF flower buds (1 mm and 4 mm in diameter). Totally, 87,473,431 clean tags were obtained and assembled into 128,937 transcripts among which 65,857 unigenes were identified with an average length of 1,188 bp. About 52% of unigenes (34,176) were annotated in Nr, Nt, Pfam, KOG/COG, Swiss-Prot, KO (KEGG Ortholog database) and/or GO. Taking the above transcriptome as reference, 125 differentially expressed genes were detected in both developmental stages of MS and MF flower buds. MADS-box genes were presumed to be highly related to male sterility in T. erecta based on histological and cytological observations. Twelve MADS-box genes showed significantly different expression levels in flower buds 4 mm in diameter, whereas only one gene expressed significantly different in flower buds 1 mm in diameter between MS and MF plants. This is the first transcriptome analysis in T. erecta and will provide a valuable resource for future genomic studies, especially in flower organ development and/or differentiation.

  9. Mutagenic effect of Bisphenol A on adult rat male germ cells and their fertility.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Dinesh; Vanage, Geeta

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigates the effects of Bisphenol A on the induction of dominant lethal mutation and male reproductive functions. The male rats were gavaged with BPA (10 μg, and 5.0 mg/kg/bw) over a period of six days and control group with vehicle. Each male was cohabited with untreated females sequentially over the period of eight weeks. The mated females were sacrificed on 15th day of gestation. The results revealed a significant increase in dominant lethal mutation rate during fourth and sixth week of mating intervals at 5.0mg/kgbw dose of BPA. These findings demonstrate that mid-spermatids and spermatocytes are more sensitive to BPA exposure. The male rats sacrificed at the end of mating study showed an increase in the sperm DNA damage, and decrease in motility at higher dose. However, significant reductions in sperm production effects were observed at both lower and higher doses of BPA. These preliminary results indicate that BPA may be a weak male germ cell mutagen.

  10. The importance of the one carbon cycle nutritional support in human male fertility: a preliminary clinical report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sperm chromatin structure is often impaired; mainly due to oxidative damage. Antioxidant treatments do not consistently produce fertility improvements and, when given at high doses, they might block essential oxidative processes such as chromatin compaction. This study was intended to assess the effect on male sub-fertility of a pure one carbon cycle nutritional support without strong antioxidants. Methods Male partners of couples resistant to at least 2 assisted reproductive technology (ART) attempts, with no evidence of organic causes of infertility and with either DNA fragmentation index (DFI) measured by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) or nuclear decondensation index (SDI) measured by aniline blue staining exceeding 20%, were invited to take part in a trial of a nutritional support in preparation for a further ART attempt. The treatment consisted of a combination of B vitamins, zinc, a proprietary opuntia fig extract and small amounts of N-acetyl-cysteine and Vitamin E (Condensyl™), all effectors of the one carbon cycle. Results 84 patients were enrolled, they took 1 or 2 Condensyl™ tablets per day for 2 to 12 months. Positive response rates were 64.3% for SDI, 71.4% for DFI and 47.6% for both SDI and DFI. Eighteen couples (21%) experienced a spontaneous pregnancy before the planned ART cycle, all ended with a live birth. The remaining 66 couples underwent a new ART attempt (4 IUI; 18 IVF; 44 ICSI) resulting in 22 further clinical pregnancies and 15 live births. The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) and the live birth rate (LBR) were 47.6% and 39.3% respectively. The full responders, i.e. the 40 patients achieving an improvement of both SDI and DFI, reported a CPR of 70% and a LBR of 57.5% (p < 0.001). Conclusions Nutritional support of the one carbon cycle without strong antioxidants improves both the SDI and the DFI in ART resistant male partners and results in high pregnancy rates suggesting a positive

  11. The control of male fertility by spermatid-specific factors: searching for contraceptive targets from spermatozoon's head to tail

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Batool, Aalia; Wang, Yu-Qian; Hao, Xiao-Xia; Chang, Chawn-Shang; Cheng, C Yan; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility due to abnormal spermatozoa has been reported in both animals and humans, but its pathogenic causes, including genetic abnormalities, remain largely unknown. On the other hand, contraceptive options for men are limited, and a specific, reversible and safe method of male contraception has been a long-standing quest in medicine. Some progress has recently been made in exploring the effects of spermatid-specifical genetic factors in controlling male fertility. A comprehensive search of PubMed for articles and reviews published in English before July 2016 was carried out using the search terms ‘spermiogenesis failure', ‘globozoospermia', ‘spermatid-specific', ‘acrosome', ‘infertile', ‘manchette', ‘sperm connecting piece', ‘sperm annulus', ‘sperm ADAMs', ‘flagellar abnormalities', ‘sperm motility loss', ‘sperm ion exchanger' and ‘contraceptive targets'. Importantly, we have opted to focus on articles regarding spermatid-specific factors. Genetic studies to define the structure and physiology of sperm have shown that spermatozoa appear to be one of the most promising contraceptive targets. Here we summarize how these spermatid-specific factors regulate spermiogenesis and categorize them according to their localization and function from spermatid head to tail (e.g., acrosome, manchette, head-tail conjunction, annulus, principal piece of tail). In addition, we emphatically introduce small-molecule contraceptives, such as BRDT and PPP3CC/PPP3R2, which are currently being developed to target spermatogenic-specific proteins. We suggest that blocking the differentiation of haploid germ cells, which rarely affects early spermatogenic cell types and the testicular microenvironment, is a better choice than spermatogenic-specific proteins. The studies described here provide valuable information regarding the genetic and molecular defects causing male mouse infertility to improve our understanding of the importance of spermatid

  12. Fertility in the aging male: molecular pathways in the anthropology of aging.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulou, Roxani; Lavranos, Giagkos; Manolakou, Panagiota; Katsiki, Evangelia

    2013-06-01

    The aging process is a normal stage in development characterized by the gradual deterioration of all life functions. As far as reproduction is concerned, aging is characterized by a significant limitation of fertility in both sexes. This process is, at least partially, attributed to the action (or loss of action) of sex steroids, coinciding with low activity of the pituitary-gonad axis. From an anthropological point of view, the study of reproductive aging is a unique opportunity to investigate various environmental and endogenous factors influencing sexual behavior and, thus, playing a significant role in human biology. Various techniques are now widely available to allow the detailed examination of reproductive hazards using only minor samples of genetic material. These methods are highly sensitive and specific and allow the characterization of distortions at subcellular and even molecular level. This short review briefly summarizes the current understanding of reproductive aging, as well as its potential clinical and anthropological impact.

  13. Evaluation of Aqueous Leaf Extract of Cardiospermum halicacabum (L.) on Fertility of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, L. Dinithi. C.; Dhanushka, M. A. T.; Jayathilake, T. A. H. D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight of aqueous leaf extract (ALE) of Cardiospermum halicacabum for 30 days produced a significant dose dependent increase in the sperm counts and sperm motility in both caput and cauda regions. Further, significant increase in serum testosterone level was evident at all applied doses. However, no significant changes in the weight of sex organs were observed. Aqueous leaf extract also increased the number of females impregnated, number of implantations, and number of viable fetuses while decreasing the total number of resorption sites in the pregnant females. However, the total cholesterol level in the serum remained unchanged and there were no records on renotoxicity; nevertheless ALE exhibited a hepatoprotective effect. It was concluded that aqueous leaf extract of Cardiospermum halicacabum enhanced sperm concentration, motility, and testosterone, leading to positive results in fertility. PMID:26064883

  14. The Trojan Female Technique for pest control: a candidate mitochondrial mutation confers low male fertility across diverse nuclear backgrounds in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Damian K; Tompkins, Daniel M; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-10-01

    Pest species represent a major ongoing threat to global biodiversity. Effective management approaches are required that regulate pest numbers, while minimizing collateral damage to nontarget species. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) was recently proposed as a prospective approach to biological pest control. The TFT draws on the evolutionary hypothesis that maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes are prone to the accumulation of male, but not female, harming mutations. These mutations could be harnessed to provide trans-generational fertility-based control of pest species. A candidate TFT mutation was recently described in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which confers male-only sterility in the specific isogenic nuclear background in which it is maintained. However, applicability of the TFT relies on mitochondrial mutations whose male-sterilizing effects are general across nuclear genomic contexts. We test this assumption, expressing the candidate TFT-mutation bearing haplotype alongside a range of nuclear backgrounds and comparing its fertility in males, relative to that of control haplotypes. We document consistently lower fertility for males harbouring the TFT mutation, in both competitive and noncompetitive mating contexts, across all nuclear backgrounds screened. This indicates that TFT mutations conferring reduced male fertility can segregate within populations and could be harnessed to facilitate this novel form of pest control.

  15. The Trojan Female Technique for pest control: a candidate mitochondrial mutation confers low male fertility across diverse nuclear backgrounds in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Damian K; Tompkins, Daniel M; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Pest species represent a major ongoing threat to global biodiversity. Effective management approaches are required that regulate pest numbers, while minimizing collateral damage to nontarget species. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) was recently proposed as a prospective approach to biological pest control. The TFT draws on the evolutionary hypothesis that maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes are prone to the accumulation of male, but not female, harming mutations. These mutations could be harnessed to provide trans-generational fertility-based control of pest species. A candidate TFT mutation was recently described in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which confers male-only sterility in the specific isogenic nuclear background in which it is maintained. However, applicability of the TFT relies on mitochondrial mutations whose male-sterilizing effects are general across nuclear genomic contexts. We test this assumption, expressing the candidate TFT-mutation bearing haplotype alongside a range of nuclear backgrounds and comparing its fertility in males, relative to that of control haplotypes. We document consistently lower fertility for males harbouring the TFT mutation, in both competitive and noncompetitive mating contexts, across all nuclear backgrounds screened. This indicates that TFT mutations conferring reduced male fertility can segregate within populations and could be harnessed to facilitate this novel form of pest control. PMID:26495040

  16. Decreased in vitro fertility in male rats exposed to fluoride-induced oxidative stress damage and mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo-Vega, Jeannett A.; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Manuel; Razo, Luz Maria del

    2008-08-01

    Fluorosis, caused by drinking water contamination with inorganic fluoride, is a public health problem in many areas around the world. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of environmentally relevant doses of fluoride on in vitro fertilization (IVF) capacity of spermatozoa, and its relationship to spermatozoa mitochondrial transmembrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}). Male Wistar rats were administered at 5 mg fluoride/kg body mass/24 h, or deionized water orally for 8 weeks. We evaluated several spermatozoa parameters in treated and untreated rats: i) standard quality analysis, ii) superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, iii) the generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}), iv) lipid peroxidation concentration, v) ultrastructural analyses of spermatozoa using transmission electron microscopy, vi) {delta}{psi}{sub m}, vii) acrosome reaction, and viii) IVF capability. Spermatozoa from fluoride-treated rats exhibited a significant decrease in SOD activity ({approx} 33%), accompanied with a significant increase in the generation of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}} ({approx} 40%), a significant decrease in {delta}{psi}{sub m} ({approx} 33%), and a significant increase in lipid peroxidation concentration ({approx} 50%), relative to spermatozoa from the control group. Consistent with this finding, spermatozoa from fluoride-treated rats exhibited altered plasmatic membrane. In addition, the percentage of fluoride-treated spermatozoa capable of undergoing the acrosome reaction was decreased relative to control spermatozoa (34 vs. 55%), while the percentage fluoride-treated spermatozoa capable of oocyte fertilization was also significantly lower than the control group (13 vs. 71%). These observations suggest that subchronic exposure to fluoride causes oxidative stress damage and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, resulting in reduced fertility.

  17. Human DCXR - another 'moonlighting protein' involved in sugar metabolism, carbonyl detoxification, cell adhesion and male fertility?

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Maser, Edmund

    2015-02-01

    Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase (DCXR; SDR20C1), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily catalyzes the reduction of α-dicarbonyl compounds and monosaccharides. Its role in the metabolism of L-xylulose has been known since 1970, when essential pentosuria was found to be associated with DCXR deficiency. Despite its early discovery, our knowledge about the role of human DCXR in normal physiology and pathophysiology is still incomplete. Sporadic studies have demonstrated aberrant expression in several cancers, but their physiological significance is unknown. In reproductive medicine, where DCXR is commonly referred to as 'sperm surface protein P34H', it serves as marker for epididymal sperm maturation and is essential for gamete interaction and successful fertilization. DCXR exhibits a multifunctional nature, both acting as a carbonyl reductase and also performing non-catalytic functions, possibly resulting from interactions with other proteins. Recent observations associate DCXR with a role in cell adhesion, pointing to a novel function involving tumour progression and possibly metastasis. This review summarizes the current knowledge about human DCXR and its orthologs from mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans (DHS-21) with an emphasis on its multifunctional characteristics. Due to its close structural relationship with DCXR, carbonyl reductase 2 (Cbr2), a tetrameric enzyme found in several non-primate species is also discussed. Similar to human DCXR, Cbr2 from golden hamster (P26h) and cow (P25b) is essential for sperm-zona pellucida interaction and fertilization. Because of the apparent similarity of these two proteins and the inconsistent use of alternative names previously, we provide an overview of the systematic classification of DCXR and Cbr2 and a phylogenetic analysis to illustrate their ancestry.

  18. Acceptability of drugs for male fertility regulation: a prospectus and some preliminary data. World Health Organization Task Force on Psychosocial Research in Family Planning.

    PubMed

    1980-02-01

    Hormonal substances for male fertility regulation administered orally or by injection are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These trials, sponsored by the World Health Organization, provide unique opportunities for intensive study of the acceptability of such an approach to fertility regulation, and of these drugs in particular. The research employs repeated interviews over a 15-month period and is conducted by social scientists collaborating with biomedical scientists at each of seven sites (Bangkok, Hong Kong, London, Mexico City, Santiago, Seoul, and Toronto). The focus is upon gauging male user's evaluations of hormonal methods (several androgen/gestagen combinations as well as cyproterone acetate) relative to their evaluations of other male methods they know about or have experienced. Of particular importance is to determine whether the hormonal methods modify or interfere with sexual desire, feelings, and behavior. The research is also assessing specific ways in which various perceived properties of fertility regulating methods relate to their acceptability in different socio-cultural settings.

  19. An Epididymis-Specific Secretory Protein HongrES1 Critically Regulates Sperm Capacitation and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuchuan; Zheng, Min; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Li; Zhen, Wei; Chen, Wenying; Zhang, Yonglian

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilizion. Although progress had been made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little is known about the potential roles of epididymal proteins during this process. Here we report that HongrES1, a new member of the SERPIN (serine proteinase inhibitor) family exclusively expressed in the rat cauda epididymis and up-regulated by androgen, is secreted into the lumen and covers the sperm head. Co-culture of caudal sperms with HongrES1 antibody in vitro resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa. Furthermore, the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa clearly increased in rats when HongrES1 was down-regulated by RNAi in vivo. Remarkably, knockdown of HongrES1 in vivo led to reduced fertility accompanied with deformed appearance of fetuses and pups. These results identify HongrES1 as a novel and critical molecule in the regulation of sperm capacitation and male fertility. PMID:19116669

  20. In Silico Identification of Candidate Genes for Fertility Restoration in Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Timothy; Yates, Steven; Nagy, Istvan; Asp, Torben; Small, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is widely used for forage production in both permanent and temporary grassland systems. To increase yields in perennial ryegrass, recent breeding efforts have been focused on strategies to more efficiently exploit heterosis by hybrid breeding. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a widely applied mechanism to control pollination for commercial hybrid seed production and although CMS systems have been identified in perennial ryegrass, they are yet to be fully characterized. Here, we present a bioinformatics pipeline for efficient identification of candidate restorer of fertility (Rf) genes for CMS. From a high-quality draft of the perennial ryegrass genome, 373 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) genes were identified and classified, further identifying 25 restorer of fertility-like PPR (RFL) genes through a combination of DNA sequence clustering and comparison to known Rf genes. This extensive gene family was targeted as the majority of Rf genes in higher plants are RFL genes. These RFL genes were further investigated by phylogenetic analyses, identifying three groups of perennial ryegrass RFLs. These three groups likely represent genomic regions of active RFL generation and identify the probable location of perennial ryegrass PPR-Rf genes. This pipeline allows for the identification of candidate PPR-Rf genes from genomic sequence data and can be used in any plant species. Functional markers for PPR-Rf genes will facilitate map-based cloning of Rf genes and enable the use of CMS as an efficient tool to control pollination for hybrid crop production. PMID:26951780

  1. Evaluation of sterility and fertility of male sterile lines in the USPB farm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hybrid rice has proven to have a yield advantage of 15–20% over the best inbred cultivars at the commercial scale worldwide. At present, two methods have been successfully commercialized; the three-line and two-line systems. The three-line system consists of the male sterile (MS), maintainer and res...

  2. Mating behavior and fertility of broiler breeder males reared on shortened growth cycles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the more difficult tasks when raising broiler breeder cockerels is controlling weight gain in the rearing house without inflicting excess stress. This is a period of time for the young male when many portions of reproductive system are in the formative stages and, if neglected, can have lif...

  3. Genetic Dissection of the AZF Regions of the Human Y Chromosome: Thriller or Filler for Male (In)fertility?

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; Plancha, Carlos E.; Gonçalves, João

    2010-01-01

    The azoospermia factor (AZF) regions consist of three genetic domains in the long arm of the human Y chromosome referred to as AZFa, AZFb and AZFc. These are of importance for male fertility since they are home to genes required for spermatogenesis. In this paper a comprehensive analysis of AZF structure and gene content will be undertaken. Particular care will be given to the molecular mechanisms underlying the spermatogenic impairment phenotypes associated to AZF deletions. Analysis of the 14 different AZF genes or gene families argues for the existence of functional asymmetries between the determinants; while some are prominent players in spermatogenesis, others seem to modulate more subtly the program. In this regard, evidence supporting the notion that DDX3Y, KDM5D, RBMY1A1, DAZ, and CDY represent key AZF spermatogenic determinants will be discussed. PMID:20671934

  4. Fertility preservation in the male pediatric population: factors influencing the decision of parents and children.

    PubMed

    Wyns, C; Collienne, C; Shenfield, F; Robert, A; Laurent, P; Roegiers, L; Brichard, B

    2015-09-01

    How can the decision process for fertility preservation (FP) in adolescents and prepubertal boys be improved based on patient and parent feelings about FP counseling? The content of information given to patients and parents and hope for future parenthood appeared to positively impact on the decision to preserve fertility in the pediatric population and, therefore, deserves special attention to improve FP care. A vast body of literature on adult cancer patients shows that reproductive capacity is a major quality-of-life issue. Patients also have a strong desire to be informed of available FP options with a view to future parenthood of their own genetic child, considering that <10% chose to adopt or used donated gametes. Furthermore, the quality of fertility counseling provided at the time of cancer diagnosis has been identified as a crucial factor in the decision-making process. By contrast, in the pediatric population, while it was shown that parents were able to make an informed and voluntary decision for their prepubertal sons despite the heavy emotional burden at the time of diagnosis, there is so far very limited information on patient expectations regarding FP. A lack of awareness often equates to suboptimal care by oncologists and FP specialists, and poor access to FP, therefore improving knowledge and identifying the expectations of pediatric patients and their parents are crucial for optimizing multidisciplinary collaborative care pathways (MCCPs), including counseling and access to FP methods, in the youngest population. A questionnaire survey was posted to an eligible population between May 2005 and May 2013. A total of 348 prepubertal boys and adolescents aged 0-18 years, diagnosed with cancer in a university hospital setting, were eligible. Three different questionnaires for two age groups of children (<12 and 12-18 years) and parents were established based on information from focus groups. Questions were subsequently reviewed by the institutional

  5. Sequencing and annotation of the chloroplast DNAs and identification of polymorphisms distinguishing normal male-fertile and male-sterile cytoplasms of onion.

    PubMed

    von Kohn, Christopher; Kiełkowska, Agnieszka; Havey, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Male-sterile (S) cytoplasm of onion is an alien cytoplasm introgressed into onion in antiquity and is widely used for hybrid seed production. Owing to the biennial generation time of onion, classical crossing takes at least 4 years to classify cytoplasms as S or normal (N) male-fertile. Molecular markers in the organellar DNAs that distinguish N and S cytoplasms are useful to reduce the time required to classify onion cytoplasms. In this research, we completed next-generation sequencing of the chloroplast DNAs of N- and S-cytoplasmic onions; we assembled and annotated the genomes in addition to identifying polymorphisms that distinguish these cytoplasms. The sizes (153 538 and 153 355 base pairs) and GC contents (36.8%) were very similar for the chloroplast DNAs of N and S cytoplasms, respectively, as expected given their close phylogenetic relationship. The size difference was primarily due to small indels in intergenic regions and a deletion in the accD gene of N-cytoplasmic onion. The structures of the onion chloroplast DNAs were similar to those of most land plants with large and small single copy regions separated by inverted repeats. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms, two polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites, and one indel distributed across 20 chloroplast genes in the large and small single copy regions were selected and validated using diverse onion populations previously classified as N or S cytoplasmic using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Although cytoplasmic male sterility is likely associated with the mitochondrial DNA, maternal transmission of the mitochondrial and chloroplast DNAs allows for polymorphisms in either genome to be useful for classifying onion cytoplasms to aid the development of hybrid onion cultivars.

  6. Effects of prostaglandin-F2alpha on some reproductive parameters of fertile male rats.

    PubMed

    Saksena, S K; Lau, I F; Chang, M C

    1978-08-01

    Silastic-PVP-PGF2alpha tubes significantly reduced the sperm population in the epididymis and vas-deferens of male rats 14 days after their insertion into the scrotal sacs. A reduction in testis and epididymal weights was also evident. The reduction of sperm population was accompanied by a normal sexual drive and circulating testosterone level and partial sterility. The reduction in sperm population and induction of partial sterility was detected at least 7 days after the total release of prostaglandin F2alpha from the Silastic-PVP tubes. The results suggest that the changes in the reproductive parameters might be a consequence of endocrinological and functional disturbances induced by PGF2alpha and that PGs can be used to induce temporary sterility in the male.

  7. Occupational exposure to pesticides and consequences on male semen and fertility: a review.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Omid; Karrari, Parissa; Zamani, Nasim; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-10-15

    Exposure to pesticides affects many body organs including reproductive system. Disorder of the reproductive system leads to infertility and therefore has been in the center of attention within the recent decades. Pesticides are one of the compounds that might reduce the semen quality in the exposed workers according to current knowledge. Although many underlying mechanisms have been proposed, the mechanisms of action are not clarified yet. The object of the present review was to criticize all the results of studies which evaluated the pesticide effects on male reproductive system. Results indicate that semen changes are multifactorial in the workers exposed to pesticides as there are numerous factors affecting sperm quality in occupational exposures. Majority of pesticides including organophosphoruses affect the male reproductive system by mechanisms such as reduction of sperm density and motility, inhibition of spermatogenesis, reduction of testis weights, reduction of sperm counts, motility, viability and density, and inducing sperm DNA damage, and increasing abnormal sperm morphology. Reduced weight of testes, epididymis, seminal vesicle, and ventral prostate, seminiferous tubule degeneration, change in plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH), decreased level and activity of the antioxidant enzymes in testes, and inhibited testicular steroidogenesis are other possible mechanisms. Moreover, DDT and its metabolites have estrogenic effects on males. Although effect of pesticides on sperm quality is undeniable, well-designed long-term studies are needed to elucidate all the possible affecting variables such as socioeconomic, cultural, nutritional, occupational, physical, and clinical characteristics alongside pesticides.

  8. Courtship raises male fertilization success through post-mating sexual selection in a spider.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jutta M; Lesmono, Kristiani

    2009-09-07

    Courtship is well known for its positive effects on mating success. However, in polyandrous species, sexual selection continues to operate after copulation. Cryptic female choice is expected under unpredictable mating rates in combination with sequential mate encounters. However, there are very few accounts of the effects of courtship on cryptic female choice, and the available evidence is often correlative. Mature Argiope bruennichi females are always receptive and never attack or reject males before mating, although sexual cannibalism after mating occurs regularly. Still, males usually perform an energetic vibratory display prior to copulation. We tested the hypothesis that beneficial effects of courtship arise cryptically, during or after mating, resulting in increased paternity success under polyandry. Manipulating courtship duration experimentally, we found that males that mated without display had a reduced paternity share even though no differences in post-copulatory cannibalism or copulation duration were detected. This suggests that the paternity advantage associated with courtship arose through female-mediated processes after intromission, meeting the definition of cryptic female choice.

  9. Courtship raises male fertilization success through post-mating sexual selection in a spider

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jutta M.; Lesmono, Kristiani

    2009-01-01

    Courtship is well known for its positive effects on mating success. However, in polyandrous species, sexual selection continues to operate after copulation. Cryptic female choice is expected under unpredictable mating rates in combination with sequential mate encounters. However, there are very few accounts of the effects of courtship on cryptic female choice, and the available evidence is often correlative. Mature Argiope bruennichi females are always receptive and never attack or reject males before mating, although sexual cannibalism after mating occurs regularly. Still, males usually perform an energetic vibratory display prior to copulation. We tested the hypothesis that beneficial effects of courtship arise cryptically, during or after mating, resulting in increased paternity success under polyandry. Manipulating courtship duration experimentally, we found that males that mated without display had a reduced paternity share even though no differences in post-copulatory cannibalism or copulation duration were detected. This suggests that the paternity advantage associated with courtship arose through female-mediated processes after intromission, meeting the definition of cryptic female choice. PMID:19515667

  10. Deficiency of Mkrn2 causes abnormal spermiogenesis and spermiation, and impairs male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xu; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Bo; Shi, Zhu-Mei; Ge, Xin; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Qian, Ying-Chen; Li, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Shen, Hua; Wang, Min; Guo, Xue-Jiang; He, Jun; Lin, Marie; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Sha, Jia-Hao; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies have shed insights on some of the potential causes of male infertility, new underlining molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Makorin-2 (Mkrn2) is an evolutionarily conserved gene whose biological functions are not fully known. We developed an Mrkn2 knockout mouse model to study the role of this gene, and found that deletion of Mkrn2 in mice led to male infertility. Mkrn2 knockout mice produced abnormal sperms characterized by low number, poor motility, and aberrant morphology. Disruption of Mkrn2 also caused failure of sperm release (spermiation failure) and misarrangement of ectoplasmic specialization (ES) in testes, thus impairing spermiogenesis and spermiation. To understand the molecular mechanism, we found that expression of Odf2, a vital protein in spermatogenesis, was significantly decreased. In addition, we found that expression levels of Odf2 were decreased in Mkrn2 knockout mice. We also found that MKRN2 was prominently expressed in the sperm of normal men, but was significantly reduced in infertile men. This result indicates that our finding is clinically relevant. The results of our study provided insights into a new mechanism of male infertility caused by the MKRN2 downregulation. PMID:28008940

  11. Impaired male fertility and atrophy of seminiferous tubules caused by haploinsufficiency for Foxa3

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Rüdiger; Sackett, Sara D.; Bochkis, Irina M.; Le, Phillip Phuc; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2007-01-01

    Foxa1, 2 and 3 (formerly HNF-3α, -β and -γ) constitute a sub-family of winged helix transcription factors with multiple roles in mammalian organ development. While all three Foxa mRNAs are present in endoderm derivatives including liver and pancreas, only Foxa3 is expressed in the testis. Here we demonstrate by genetic lineage tracing that Foxa3 is expressed in postmeiotic germ and interstitial Leydig cells. The germinal epithelium of Foxa3-deficient testes is characterized by a loss of germ cells secondary to an increase in germ cell apoptosis that ultimately leads to a Sertoli cell-only syndrome. Remarkably, not only the Foxa3−/− mice but also Foxa3+/− mice exhibited loss of germ cells. This cellular phenotype caused significantly reduced fertility and testis weight of both Foxa3−/− and Foxa3+/− mice. Using microarray analysis, we found a dramatic downregulation of the zinc finger protein 93 and the testicular tumor-associated paraneoplastic Ma antigen (PNMA) and increased expression of a number of genes including zinc finger protein 94 and several kallikrein 1-related peptidases which could account for at least part of the observed phenotype. In summary, we have identified Foxa3 as a transcriptional regulator with a dominant phenotype in germ cell maintenance and suggest FOXA3 as a potential candidate gene for subfertility in man. PMID:17488644

  12. RAB-Like 2 Has an Essential Role in Male Fertility, Sperm Intra-Flagellar Transport, and Tail Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Jamsai, Duangporn; O'Connor, Anne E.; Borg, Claire; Clark, Brett J.; Whisstock, James C.; Field, Mark C.; Adams, Vicki; Ishikawa, Tomomoto; Aitken, R. John; Whittle, Belinda; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; O'Bryan, Moira K.

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of young men are infertile and, for the majority, the underlying cause remains unknown. Male infertility is, however, frequently associated with defective sperm motility, wherein the sperm tail is a modified flagella/cilia. Conversely, a greater understanding of essential mechanisms involved in tail formation may offer contraceptive opportunities, or more broadly, therapeutic strategies for global cilia defects. Here we have identified Rab-like 2 (RABL2) as an essential requirement for sperm tail assembly and function. RABL2 is a member of a poorly characterized clade of the RAS GTPase superfamily. RABL2 is highly enriched within developing male germ cells, where it localizes to the mid-piece of the sperm tail. Lesser amounts of Rabl2 mRNA were observed in other tissues containing motile cilia. Using a co-immunoprecipitation approach and RABL2 affinity columns followed by immunochemistry, we demonstrated that within developing haploid germ cells RABL2 interacts with intra-flagella transport (IFT) proteins and delivers a specific set of effector (cargo) proteins, including key members of the glycolytic pathway, to the sperm tail. RABL2 binding to effector proteins is regulated by GTP. Perturbed RABL2 function, as exemplified by the Mot mouse line that contains a mutation in a critical protein–protein interaction domain, results in male sterility characterized by reduced sperm output, and sperm with aberrant motility and short tails. Our data demonstrate a novel function for the RABL protein family, an essential role for RABL2 in male fertility and a previously uncharacterised mechanism for protein delivery to the flagellum. PMID:23055941

  13. Sensibility of male rats fertility against olive oil, Nigella sativa oil and pomegranate extract

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Sherif W.; Sangi, Sibghatullah; Harsha, Sree; Khaleel, Mueen A.; Ibrahim, A. R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the modulatory effects of daily consumption of pomegranate extract (PE), olive oil (OO) and Nagilla sativa oil (NSO) on antioxidant activity, sperm quality and pituitary-testicular axis of adult male wistar rats. Methods Thirty-two adult male Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups, eight rats each. Using rat gastric tubes, 1.0 mL distilled water, 1.0 mL PE, 0.4 mL NSO and 0.4 mL OO were orally administered daily for 6 weeks in the first, second, third and fourth groups, respectively. Reproductive organs, body weight, sperm criteria, testosterone, FSH, LH, inhibin-B, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant enzyme activities were investigated. At the end of the study protocol, analyses occurred at the same time. Data were analysed by ANOVA test and P<0.05 was considered to be a significant value. Results In all studied groups, malondialdehyde level was significantly decreased accompanied with an increases in glutathione peroxidase and glutathione. Rats treated with PE showed an increase in catalase activities accompanied with an increase in sperm concentration which was also observed in NSO group. In PE treated group, sperm motility was also increased accompanied with decreased abnormal sperm rate. NSO, OO and PE treated groups shows an insignificant effect on testosterone, inhibin-B, FSH and LH in comparison with control group. Conclusions These results show that administration of PE, NSO and OO could modify sperm characteristics and antioxidant activity of adult male wistar rats. PMID:23836459

  14. CTCF contributes in a critical way to spermatogenesis and male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Abrahan; Lilienthal, Ingrid; Fukuda, Nanaho; Galjart, Niels; Höög, Christer

    2016-01-01

    The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an architectural protein that governs chromatin organization and gene expression in somatic cells. Here, we show that CTCF regulates chromatin compaction necessary for packaging of the paternal genome into mature sperm. Inactivation of Ctcf in male germ cells in mice (Ctcf-cKO mice) resulted in impaired spermiogenesis and infertility. Residual spermatozoa in Ctcf-cKO mice displayed abnormal head morphology, aberrant chromatin compaction, impaired protamine 1 incorporation into chromatin and accelerated histone depletion. Thus, CTCF regulates chromatin organization during spermiogenesis, contributing to the functional organization of mature sperm. PMID:27345455

  15. A Young Drosophila Duplicate Gene Plays Essential Roles in Spermatogenesis by Regulating Several Y-Linked Male Fertility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yuan; Zhao, Ruoping; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Guojie; Dong, Yang; Yu, Haijing; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplication is supposed to be the major source for genetic innovations. However, how a new duplicate gene acquires functions by integrating into a pathway and results in adaptively important phenotypes has remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated the biological roles and the underlying molecular mechanism of the young kep1 gene family in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup to understand the origin and evolution of new genes with new functions. Sequence and expression analysis demonstrates that one of the new duplicates, nsr (novel spermatogenesis regulator), exhibits positive selection signals and novel subcellular localization pattern. Targeted mutagenesis and whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis provide evidence that nsr is required for male reproduction associated with sperm individualization, coiling, and structural integrity of the sperm axoneme via regulation of several Y chromosome fertility genes post-transcriptionally. The absence of nsr-like expression pattern and the presence of the corresponding cis-regulatory elements of the parental gene kep1 in the pre-duplication species Drosophila yakuba indicate that kep1 might not be ancestrally required for male functions and that nsr possibly has experienced the neofunctionalization process, facilitated by changes of trans-regulatory repertories. These findings not only present a comprehensive picture about the evolution of a new duplicate gene but also show that recently originated duplicate genes can acquire multiple biological roles and establish novel functional pathways by regulating essential genes. PMID:21203494

  16. The Magea gene cluster regulates male germ cell apoptosis without affecting the fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Siyuan; Xian, Li; Shi, Peiliang; Li, Chaojun; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    While apoptosis is essential for male germ cell development, improper activation of apoptosis in the testis can affect spermatogenesis and cause reproduction defects. Members of the MAGE-A (melanoma antigen family A) gene family are frequently clustered in mammalian genomes and are exclusively expressed in the testes of normal animals but abnormally activated in a wide variety of cancers. We investigated the potential roles of these genes in spermatogenesis by generating a mouse model with a 210-kb genomic deletion encompassing six members of the Magea gene cluster (Magea1, Magea2, Magea3, Magea5, Magea6 and Magea8). Male mice carrying the deletion displayed smaller testes from 2 months old with a marked increase in apoptotic germ cells in the first wave of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, we found that Magea genes prevented stress-induced spermatogenic apoptosis after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) treatment during the adult stage. Mechanistically, deletion of the Magea gene cluster resulted in a dramatic increase in apoptotic germ cells, predominantly spermatocytes, with activation of p53 and induction of Bax in the testes. These observations demonstrate that the Magea genes are crucial in maintaining normal testicular size and protecting germ cells from excessive apoptosis under genotoxic stress. PMID:27226137

  17. [Study of male mating behavior in some Drosophila melanogaster strains in experiments with fertilized females].

    PubMed

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2004-07-01

    Male courtship ritual is among the main behavioral characteristics of Drosophila. This is a complex, genetically determined process consisting of four general stages: orientation, vibration, licking, and attempts at copulation (or successful copulation). Several genes are known that control some stages of this behavior. Most of them have pleiotropic effects and are involved in other biological processes. Earlier, we have shown that a mutation in locus flamenco (20A1-3), which controls transposition and infectivity of retrotransposon gypsy (MDG4), is involved in the genetic control of behavior. In strains mutant for this locus, the male mating activity is decreased and the structure of courtship ritual is changed. To understand the mechanisms of these changes, it is important to study all behavioral stages in genetically identical strains. For this purpose, the normal allele of gene flamenco from the X chromosome of the wild-type strain (stock) Canton S was introduced into strain SS carrying flamMS. This offers new opportunities in studying the role of gene flamenco in the control of mating behavior in Drosophila.

  18. Wolbachia-induced loss of male fertility is likely related to branch chain amino acid biosynthesis and iLvE in Laodelphax striatellus.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jia-Fei; Hoffmann, Ary A; Zhang, Yan-Kai; Duan, Xing-Zhi; Guo, Yan; Gong, Jun-Tao; Zhu, Wen-Chao; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2017-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many species of arthropods and nematodes. Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is the most common phenotype in affected hosts, involving embryonic lethality in crosses between Wolbachia-infected males and uninfected females. The molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are currently unclear. Here we examine the molecular correlates of the Wolbachia infection in Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), an important rice pest, where embryonic lethality is strong and almost complete. We compared the gene expression of 4-day-old Wolbachia-infected and uninfected L. striatellus testes to identify candidate genes for paternal-effect embryonic lethality induction. Based on microarray analysis, iLvE was the most down-regulated gene; this gene mediates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis and participates in many processes related to reproductive performance. After knocking down iLvE by RNAi in uninfected male L. striatellus, male fertility was reduced, leading to a decrease in embryo hatching rates, but fertility was rescued in crosses between these males and Wolbachia-infected females. Removal of BCAA in chemically-defined diets of uninfected males also led to a loss of male fertility. Low amino acid nutrition may enhance exposure time of sperm to Wolbachia in the testes to affect adult reproduction in L. striatellus by reducing the number of sperm transferred per mating by males. These results indicate that Wolbachia may decrease male fertility in L. striatellus by acting on iLvE, a key factor of BCAA biosynthesis, and delaying sperm maturation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transgenerational impaired male fertility with an Igf2 epigenetic defect in the rat are induced by the endocrine disruptor p,p'-DDE.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Wu, Nanxiang; Wang, Simeng; Gao, Ming; Song, Peng; Lou, Jianlin; Tan, Yufeng; Liu, Kecheng

    2014-11-01

    What are the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the transgenerational effect of p,p'-DDE on male fertility? Impaired male fertility with an Igf2 epigenetic defect is transgenerationally inherited upon exposure of p,p'-DDE. p,p'-Dichlorodiphenoxydichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) is one of the primary metabolite products of the ancestral organochlorine pesticide dichlorodiphenoxytrichloroethane. As it is a known anti-androgen endocrine disruptor, it could cause harmful effects on the male reproductive system. Pregnant rats (F0) were administered with p,p'-DDE or corn oil at the critical time of testis development, i.e. from gestation days 8 to 15. Male and female rats of the F1 generation were mated with each other to produce F2 progeny. To reveal whether the transgenerational phenotype is produced by the maternal or paternal line, F3 progeny were generated by intercrossing control (C) and treated (DDE) males and females of the F2 generation according to the following groups: (i) C♂-C♀, (ii) DDE♂-DDE♀, (iii) DDE♂-C♀ and (iv) C♂-DDE♀. Mature sperm and testes were collected from male offspring of the F1-F3 generations for the examination of male fertility parameters, i.e. sperm count and motility, testis histology and apoptosis. Expression of the imprinted genes, H19 and Igf2, was detected by real-time PCR. Igf2 DMR2 methylation was analyzed by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Upon exposure of p,p'-DDE, the male F1 generation showed impaired male fertility and altered imprinted gene expression caused by Igf2 DMR2 hypomethylation. These defects were transferred to the F3 generation through the male germline. This study has examined the effect of p,p'-DDE only on the sperm number and motility and the possible mechanism of Igf2 DMR2 methylation in vivo and thus has some limitations. Further investigation is necessary to focus on the epigenetic effects of p,p'-DDE at the genome level and to include a more detailed semen quality analysis including sperm morphology

  20. Differential mitochondrial electron transport through the cyanide-sensitive and cyanide-insensitive pathways in isonuclear lines of cytoplasmic male sterile, male fertile, and restored petunia. [Petunia parodii L. S. M

    SciTech Connect

    Connett, M.B.; Hanson, M.R. )

    1990-08-01

    Three pairs of isonuclear lines of cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) and fertile Petunia cells (Petunia hybrida (Hook) Vilm. and Petunia parodii L.S.M.) grown in suspension culture were examined for sensitivity to inhibitors of respiratory electron transport at time-points after transfer into fresh media. Cells from CMS lines differed from cells of fertile lines in their utilization of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase pathway. Under our culture regime, after approximately 3 days of culture cells from the CMS lines exhibited much lower cyanide-insensitive, salicylhydoxamic acid-sensitive respiration than cells from the fertile lines. This respiratory difference was shown to be specific to the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway by using other characteristic inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in experiments with isolated mitochondria. Immature anthers from CMS plants also showed lower alternative oxidase activity relative to anthers from male fertile plants, but no such difference was detected in leaf tissue, ovary or perianth tissue, or anthers collected just prior to anthesis. A cell line from a fertile plant carrying a nuclear fertility restorer gene and the CMS cytoplasm exhibited increased activity of the alternative pathway compared with the CMS lines.

  1. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase β subunit is essential for male fertility and tip growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Malgorzata; Wnuk, Marta; Nowakowska, Julita; Lichocka, Malgorzata; Stronkowski, Michal M; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Rab proteins, key players in vesicular transport in all eukaryotic cells, are post-translationally modified by lipid moieties. Two geranylgeranyl groups are attached to the Rab protein by the heterodimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RGT) αβ. Partial impairment in this enzyme activity in Arabidopsis, by disruption of the AtRGTB1 gene, is known to influence plant stature and disturb gravitropic and light responses. Here it is shown that mutations in each of the RGTB genes cause a tip growth defect, visible as root hair and pollen tube deformations. Moreover, FM 1-43 styryl dye endocytosis and recycling are affected in the mutant root hairs. Finally, it is demonstrated that the double mutant, with both AtRGTB genes disrupted, is non-viable due to absolute male sterility. Doubly mutated pollen is shrunken, has an abnormal exine structure, and shows strong disorganization of internal membranes, particularly of the endoplasmic reticulum system.

  2. The SLO3 sperm-specific potassium channel plays a vital role in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Santi, Celia M; Martínez-López, Pablo; de la Vega-Beltrán, José Luis; Butler, Alice; Alisio, Arturo; Darszon, Alberto; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Here we show a unique example of male infertility conferred by a gene knock-out of the sperm-specific, pH-dependent SLO3 potassium channel. In striking contrast to wild-type sperm which undergo membrane hyperpolarization during capacitation, we found that SLO3 mutant sperm undergo membrane depolarization. Several defects in SLO3 mutant sperm are evident under capacitating conditions, including impaired motility, a bent “hairpin” shape, and failure to undergo the acrosome reaction (AR). The failure of AR is rescued by valinomycin which hyperpolarizes mutant sperm. Thus SLO3 is the principal potassium channel responsible for capacitation-induced hyperpolarization, and membrane hyperpolarization is crucial to the AR. PMID:20138882

  3. Effect of Vitamin C on Male Fertility in Rats Subjected to Forced Swimming Stress

    PubMed Central

    BB, Ghongane; BB, Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stress is defined as a general body response to initially threatening external or internal demands, involving the mobilization of physiological and psychological resources to deal with them. Recently, oxidative stress has become the focus of interest as a potential cause of male infertility. Normally, equilibrium exists between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant scavenging activities in the male reproductive organs. The ascorbic acid is a known antioxidant present in the testis with the precise role of protecting the latter from the oxidative damage. It also contributes to the support of spermatogensis at least in part through its capacity to maintain antioxidant in an active state. Materials and Methods: Group1: Normal Control animal received Distilled water, Group 2: Positive control (Only Stress), Group 3: Normal rats received an intermediate dose of Vitamin C (20mg/kg/day), Group 4: Stress + Low dose Vitamin C (10mg/kg/day), Group 5: Stress+ Intermediate dose Vitamin C (20mg/kg/day), Group 6: High dose Vitamin C (30mg/kg/day). On 16th day effect of stress on body weight, Reproductive organ weight, sperm parameters, and hormonal assay was studied. Results: In the present context, in stress group the sperm count, motility, testicular weight declined significantly. The intermediate dose and high dose of vitamin C showed significantly increased effect on the sperm count and motility. Conclusion: Various physiological changes produced force swimming indicates that swimming is an effective model for producing stress in albino rats. The results suggest that Vitamin C supplementation improves the stress induced reproductive infertility due to both their testosterone increase effect and their antioxidant effect. PMID:25177581

  4. Overexpressing the Multiple-Stress Responsive Gene At1g74450 Reduces Plant Height and Male Fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, Anne M.; Belfield, Eric J.; Vlad, Daniela; Irani, Niloufer; Moore, Ian; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be up-regulated in response to a wide range of different environmental stress factors. However, not all of these genes are characterized as yet with respect to their functions. In this study, we used transgenic knockout, overexpression and reporter gene approaches to try to elucidate the biological roles of five unknown multiple-stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis. The selected genes have the following locus identifiers: At1g18740, At1g74450, At4g27652, At4g29780 and At5g12010. Firstly, T-DNA insertion knockout lines were identified for each locus and screened for altered phenotypes. None of the lines were found to be visually different from wildtype Col-0. Secondly, 35S-driven overexpression lines were generated for each open reading frame. Analysis of these transgenic lines showed altered phenotypes for lines overexpressing the At1g74450 ORF. Plants overexpressing the multiple-stress responsive gene At1g74450 are stunted in height and have reduced male fertility. Alexander staining of anthers from flowers at developmental stage 12–13 showed either an absence or a reduction in viable pollen compared to wildtype Col-0 and At1g74450 knockout lines. Interestingly, the effects of stress on crop productivity are most severe at developmental stages such as male gametophyte development. However, the molecular factors and regulatory networks underlying environmental stress-induced male gametophytic alterations are still largely unknown. Our results indicate that the At1g74450 gene provides a potential link between multiple environmental stresses, plant height and pollen development. In addition, ruthenium red staining analysis showed that At1g74450 may affect the composition of the inner seed coat mucilage layer. Finally, C-terminal GFP fusion proteins for At1g74450 were shown to localise to the cytosol. PMID:26485022

  5. Decreased Implantation Number After In Utero Artificial Insemination Can Reflect an Impairment of Fertility in Adult Male Rats After Exogenous Leptin Exposure.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Carla D B; Fernandes, Glaura S A; Favareto, Ana Paula A; Perobelli, Juliana E; Sanabria, Marciana; Kempinas, Wilma D G

    2017-02-01

    Leptin is a protein secreted by the adipocytes, which serves as a link between fat and brain. Its main action is to decrease appetite and increase energy expenditure, but it is also involved in the control of different neuroendocrine systems, including gonadal axis. Although the effects of leptin deficiency on reproduction are well recognized, the effect of excess leptin on male reproductive function is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate fertility and sperm parameters of male rats exposed to exogenous leptin. A group of adult male rats received exogenous leptin intraperitoneally (30 μg/kg/day) for 42 days, and a control group received only the vehicle during the same period. After the treatment, animals were evaluated for sperm count, sperm motility, and fertility after intrauterine artificial insemination. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups related to sperm production, sperm concentration, and sperm motility. However, fertility evaluation after artificial insemination showed a quantitative decrease in the uterus plus fetuses weight, number of implantation sites, and number of live fetuses. The fertility potential showed a reduction of about 40%, whereas the preimplantation loss rate increased more than 2-fold in leptin-treated animals. In conclusion, leptin administration to nonobese male rats impairs ability of treated animals to generate offspring, since the occurrence of implantation was diminished. So leptin can impair sperm quality, affecting the reproductive capacity.

  6. Critical Roles of Vacuolar Invertase in Floral Organ Development and Male and Female Fertilities Are Revealed through Characterization of GhVIN1-RNAi Cotton Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Seed number and quality are key traits determining plant fitness and crop yield and rely on combined competence in male and female fertilities. Sucrose metabolism is central to reproductive success. It remains elusive, though, how individual sucrose metabolic enzymes may regulate the complex reproductive processes. Here, by silencing vacuolar invertase (VIN) genes in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) reproductive organs, we revealed diverse roles that VIN plays in multiple reproductive processes. A set of phenotypic and genetic studies showed significant reductions of viable seeds in GhVIN1-RNAi plants, attributed to pollination failure and impaired male and female fertilities. The former was largely owing to the spatial mismatch between style and stamen and delayed pollen release from the anthers, whereas male defects came from poor pollen viability. The transgenic stamen exhibited altered expression of the genes responsible for starch metabolism and auxin and jasmonic acid signaling. Further analyses identified the reduction of GhVIN expression in the seed coat as the major cause for the reduced female fertility, which appeared to disrupt the expression of some key genes involved in trehalose and auxin metabolism and signaling, leading to programmed cell death or growth repression in the filial tissues. Together, the data provide an unprecedented example of how VIN is required to synchronize style and stamen development and the formation of male and female fertilities for seed development in a crop species, cotton. PMID:26969720

  7. Introgression and molecular tagging of Rf (4), a new male fertility restoration gene from wild sunflower Helianthus maximiliani L.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiuhuan; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2008-07-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and its fertility restoration (Rf) genes are critical tools for hybrid seed production to utilize heterosis. In sunflower, CMS PET1 and the associated Rf gene Rf (1) is the only source extensively used in commercial hybrid production. The objective of this research was to develop new sources of CMS and fertility restorers to broaden the genetic diversity of hybrid seed production. We identified a new type of CMS, named as CMS GIG2, from an interspecific cross between Helianthus giganteus accession1934 and H. annuus cv. HA 89. Based on reactions to a set of standard Rf testers, CMS GIG2 is different from all previously reported CMS types, including the CMS GIG1 from another H. giganteus accession. We also identified an Rf gene for CMS GIG2 from wild species H. maximiliani accession 1631. The CMS GIG2 and its restoration gene were introduced into HA 89 background through recurrent backcross and single plant selection techniques. Genetic analysis revealed that the CMS GIG2-Rf system is controlled by a completely dominant gene, named as Rf (4), and the gene additive and dominance effects were estimated as 39.9 and 42.2%, respectively, in the HA 89 background. The gene Rf (4) was mapped onto linkage group 3 with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and RFLP-derived STS-marker, and is about 0.9 cM away from the SSR marker ORS1114 based on a segregation population of 933 individuals. The CMS GIG2-Rf (4) system tagged by molecular markers provides an alternative genetic source for hybrid breeding in the sunflower crop.

  8. Observations as to male fertility in the Flemish environment and health studies.

    PubMed

    Dhooge, W; Stuyvaert, S; Kaufman, J M; Koppe, G; Nele, V; Schoeters, G; van Larebeke, N; Comhaire, F

    2001-01-01

    We report the observations made on 101 healthy non-smoking men aged 21-40 (50 from two industrial suburbs of the big city of Antwerp and 51 from Peer, a predominantly rural municipality with 14,622 inhabitants, 70 km east of Antwerp, chosen as the "control" area in spite of its intensive agriculture). Persons with known occupational exposures, persons working in a region with characteristics clearly different from the area of residence, and people commuting over long distances were excluded from the study. Sperm morphology was significantly worse in Peer than in Antwerp. Serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in Peer than in Antwerp. The proportions of men with very low and low serum testosterone levels, of men with very low and low spermatozoa concentrations and of men with very low and low percentages of spermatozoa with normal morphology, were all higher in Peer than in Antwerp. We speculate that both the lower testosterone concentrations and the poorer sperm quality are due to disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function by hormone disrupters. Our data suggest that exposure to levels of environmental pollution which are widespread in developed nations, can have unfavourable effects on endocrine equilibrium and may disturb male fertiline disrupters.

  9. Leukocytes and oxidative stress: dilemma for sperm function and male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Ralf R

    2011-01-01

    Spermatozoa are constantly exposed to the interphase between oxidation through high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leukocytes, and reduction by means of scavengers and antioxidants. Considering the very special functions as being the only cells with such high polarization and exerting their functions outside the body, even in a different individual, the female genital tract, the membranes of these cells are chemically composed of an extraordinary high amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. This in turn, renders them very susceptible to oxidative stress, which is defined as an imbalance between oxidation and reduction towards the oxidative status. As a result, ROS deriving from both leukocytes and the male germ cells themselves cause a process called ‘lipid peroxidation' and other damages to the sperm cell. On the other hand, a certain limited amount of ROS is essential in order to trigger vital physiological reactions in cells, including capacitation or the acrosome reaction in sperm. The treatment of patients with antioxidants to compensate the oxidative status caused by oxidative stress is highly debated as uncontrolled antioxidative treatment might derail the system towards the reduced status, which is also unphysiological and can even induce cancer. This paradox is called the ‘antioxidant paradox'. Therefore, a proper andrological diagnostic work-up, including the evaluation of ROS levels and the antioxidant capacity of the semen, has to be carried out beforehand, aimed at keeping the fine balance between oxidation and scavenging of vital amounts of ROS. PMID:21076433

  10. Protective Effect of Royal Jelly on In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in Male Mice Treated with Oxymetholone

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Najafi, Gholamreza; Nejati, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on catalase, total antioxidant capacity and embryo development in adult mice treated with oxymetholone (OXM). Materials and Methods In this exprimental study, 32 male and 96 female adult Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice (7-9 weeks of age) with a ratio of 1:3 for fertili- zation purposes were randomly divided into 4 groups as follows: i. Control group (n=8) receiving 0.1 ml/mice saline daily by gavage for 30 day, ii. RJ group (n=8) treated with RJ at a dose of 100 mg/kg daily by gavage for 30 days, iii. OXM group (n=8) receiving OXM at the dose of 5 mg/kg daily by gavage for 30 days and iv. RJ+OXM group (n=8) receiving RJ at the dose of 100 mg/kg daily by gavage concomitant with 100 mg/kg OXM adminis- tration for 30 days. Results Analysis revealed a significant reduction in catalase, total antioxidant, as well as embryo development in OXM group (P<0.05). However, RJ group showed a salient recovery in the all of the above mentioned parameters and embryo toxicity. Conclusion The results of this study indicated a partially protective effect of RJ against OXM-induced embryo toxicity. PMID:26464831

  11. What is harmful for male fertility: cell phone or the wireless Internet?

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Mehmet Erol; Kaynar, Mehmet; Badem, Huseyin; Cavis, Mucahıt; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Cimentepe, Ersın

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to assess the potential harmful effects of radiofrequency-electromagnetic radiation on sperm parameters. We requested semen for analyses from the male patients coming to our infertility division and also asked them to fill out an anonymous questionnaire. We queried their mobile phone and wireless Internet usage frequencies in order to determine their radiofrequency-electromagnetic radiation exposure. A total of 1082 patients filled the questionnaire but 51 of them were excluded from the study because of azoospermia. There was no significant difference between sperm counts and sperm morphology excluding sperm motility, due to mobile phone usage period, (p = 0.074, p = 0.909, and p = 0.05, respectively). The total motile sperm count and the progressive motile sperm count decreased due to the increase of internet usage (p = 0.032 and p = 0.033, respectively). In line with the total motile sperm count, progressive motile sperm count also decreased with wireless Internet usage compared with the wired Internet connection usage (p = 0.009 and p = 0.018, respectively). There was a negative correlation between wireless Internet usage duration and the total sperm count (r = -0.089, p = 0.039). We have also explored the negative effect of wireless Internet use on sperm motility according to our preliminary results.

  12. Paternal obesity negatively affects male fertility and assisted reproduction outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jared M; Lane, Michelle; Owens, Julie A; Bakos, Hassan W

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review investigated the effect of paternal obesity on reproductive potential. Databases searched were Pubmed, Ovid, Web of Science, Scopus, Cinahl and Embase. Papers were critically appraised by two reviewers, and data were extracted using a standardized tool. Outcomes were: likelihood of infertility, embryo development, clinical pregnancy, live birth, pregnancy viability, infant development, sperm; concentration, morphology, motility, volume, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and seminal plasma factors. Thirty papers were included, with a total participant number of 115,158. Obese men were more likely to experience infertility (OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.53-1.79), their rate of live birth per cycle of assisted reproduction technology (ART) was reduced (OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.44-0.97) and they had a 10% absolute risk increase of pregnancy non-viability. Additionally, obese men had an increased percentage of sperm with low MMP, DNA fragmentation, and abnormal morphology. Clinically significant differences were not found for conventional semen parameters. From these findings it can be concluded that male obesity is associated with reduced reproductive potential. Furthermore, it may be informative to incorporate DNA fragmentation analysis and MMP assessment into semen testing, especially for obese men whose results suggest they should have normal fertility.

  13. Low temperatures are required to induce the development of fertile flowers in transgenic male and female early flowering poplar (Populus tremula L.).

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lehnhardt, Denise; Briones, Valentina; Nilsson, Ove; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Until now, artificial early flowering poplar systems have mostly led to the development of sterile flowers. In this study, several strategies aimed at inducting fertile flowers in pHSP::AtFT transgenic poplar were evaluated, in particular the influence of temperature and photoperiod. Our results provide evidence that temperature, and not photoperiod, is the key factor required for the development of fertile flowers in early flowering poplar. Fertile flowers were only obtained when a cold treatment phase of several weeks was used after the heat treatment phase. Heat treatments induced AtFT gene activity through activation of the heat-shock promoter (pHSP). Photoperiod did not show a similar influence on flower fertility as pollen grains were obtained under both long- and short-day conditions. Fertility was confirmed in flowers of both male and female plants. For the first time, crosses were successfully performed with transgenic female early flowering poplar. All mature flowers obtained after 8 weeks of inductive treatments were fertile. Gene expression studies also confirmed that cold temperatures influenced expression of poplar genes homologous to 'pollen development genes' from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Homology and expression patterns suggested a role for PtTDF1, PtBAM1, PtSERK1/2 and PtMS1 on anther and pollen development in poplar flowers. The system developed in this study allows a fast and very reliable induction of fertile poplar flowers in a very short period of time. The non-reproductive phase, usually 7-10 years, can now be shortened to 6-10 months, and fertile flowers can be obtained independently of the season. This system is a reliable tool for breeding purposes (high-speed breeding technology), genomics and biosafety research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Isolation and identification of specific sequences correlated to cytoplasmic male sterility and fertile maintenance in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Guo; Chen, Xiao Qiang; Li, Hui; Zhao, Qian Cheng; Sun, De Ling; Song, Wen Qin

    2008-02-01

    significant information to investigate the molecular mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility and fertile maintenance in cauliflower.

  15. Post-translational mechanisms are associated with fertility restoration of cytoplasmic male sterility in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Arakawa, Takumi; Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Yui-Kurino, Rika; Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2015-07-01

    Genetic conflict between cytoplasmically inherited elements and nuclear genes arising from their different transmission patterns can be seen in cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), the mitochondrion-encoded inability to shed functional pollen. CMS is associated with a mitochondrial open reading frame (ORF) that is absent from non-sterility inducing mitochondria (S-orf). Nuclear genes that suppress CMS are called restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes. Post-transcriptional and translational repression of S-orf mediates the molecular action of Rf that encodes a class of RNA-binding proteins with pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motifs. Besides the PPR-type of Rfs, there are also non-PPR Rfs, but the molecular interactions between non-PPR Rf and S-orf have not been described. In this study, we investigated the interaction of bvORF20, a non-PPR Rf from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), with preSatp6, the S-orf from sugar beet. Anthers expressing bvORF20 contained a protein that interacted with preSATP6 protein. Analysis of anthers and transgenic calli expressing a FLAG-tagged bvORF20 suggested the binding of preSATP6 to bvORF20. To see the effect of bvORF20 on preSATP6, which exists as a 250-kDa protein complex in CMS plants, signal bands of preSATP6 in bvORF20-expressing and non-expressing anthers were compared by immunoblotting combined with Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The signal intensity of the 250-kDa band decreased significantly, and 200- and 150-kDa bands appeared in bvORF20-expressing anthers. Transgenic callus expressing bvORF20 also generated the 200- and 150-kDa bands. The 200-kDa complex is likely to include both preSATP6 and bvORF20. Post-translational interaction between preSATP6 and bvORF20 appears to alter the higher order structure of preSATP6 that may lead to fertility restoration in sugar beet.

  16. Production of fertile unreduced sperm by hybrid males of the Rutilus alburnoides complex (Teleostei, cyprinidae). An alternative route to genome tetraploidization in unisexuals.

    PubMed Central

    Alves, M J; Coelho, M M; Próspero, M I; Collares-Pereira, M J

    1999-01-01

    The hybrid minnow Rutilus alburnoides comprises diploid and polyploid females and males. Previous studies revealed that diploid and triploid females exhibit altered oogenesis that does not involve random segregation and recombination of the genomes of the two ancestors, constituting unisexual lineages. In the present study, we investigated the reproductive mode of hybrid males from the Tejo basin, using experimental crosses and flow cytometric analysis of blood and sperm. The results suggest that diploid hybrids produced fertile unreduced sperm, transmitting their hybrid genome intact to offspring. Triploid hybrids also produced unreduced sperm, but it was not possible to obtain data concerning their fertility. Finally, tetraploid hybrids produced fertile diploid sperm, which exhibited Mendelian segregation. Tetraploid R. alburnoides may reestablish biparental reproduction, as individuals of both sexes with the appropriate constitution for normal meiosis (two haploid genomes from each parental species) are likely to occur in natural populations. Tetraploids probably have arisen from syngamy of diploid eggs and diploid sperm produced by diploid hybrid males. Diploid hybrid males may therefore play a significant role in the dynamics of the complex, starting the evolutionary process that may ultimately lead to a new sexually reproducing species. PMID:9872966

  17. Detection of TEM-induced reciprocal translocations in F/sub 1/ sons of CD-1 male mice: comparison of sequential fertility evaluation and cytogenetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.M.; Kodell, R.L.; Domon, O.E.; Bishop, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the positive and negative classification error rates associated with the HTA in our laboratory, F/sub 1/ sons of TEM-exposed CD-1 male mice were evaluated by the sequential fertility method with subsequent cytogenetic analysis. Males who sired three litters of size 10 or less when mated to primiparous females from either the B6C3F/sub 1/ or the BCF/sub 1/ strain were classified as partial steriles. When meiotic chromosomes analyses revealed the presence of at least two cells containing multivalent figures, males were classified as translocation heterozygotes. When the fertility evaluation and the cytogenetic analysis were compared, normal fertility was observed on 5 of 83 (6.02%) translocation-bearing F/sub 1/ males mated to B6C3F/sub 1/ tester females and on 3 of 83 (3.61%) F/sub 1/ males mated to BCF/sub 1/ tester females. Thus, the false-negative error rates were 6.02% and 3.61% with these two tester strains. Multivalent figures were not observed in the meiotic chromosomes of 410 F/sub 1/ males. The false-positive error rates with these two tester strains were 2.93% for the B6C3F/sub 1/ strain and 1.71% for the BCF/sub 1/ strain. The results indicate that nonzero error rates, both false-positive and false-negative, are associated with the sequential mating method HTA. In addition, the magnitude of these error rates was influenced not only by the tester female strain but also by the genotype of the F/sub 1/ male.

  18. ICSI treatment of severe male infertility can achieve prospective embryo quality compared with IVF of fertile donor sperm on sibling oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ju-Fen; Chen, Xiao-Bao; Zhao, Lei-Wen; Gao, Min-Zhi; Peng, Jie; Qu, Xian-Qin; Shi, Hui-Juan; Jin, Xing-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Azoospermia, cryptozoospermia and necrospermia can markedly decrease the ability of males to achieve pregnancy in fertile females. However, patients with these severe conditions still have the option to be treated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to become biological fathers. This study analyzed the fertilization ability and the developmental viabilities of the derived embryos after ICSI treatment of the sperm from these patients compared with in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment of the proven-fertile donor sperm on sibling oocytes as a control. On the day of oocyte retrieval, the number of sperm suitable for ICSI collected from two ejaculates or testicular sperm extraction was lower than the oocytes, and therefore, excess sibling oocytes were treated by IVF with donor sperm. From 72 couples (73 cycles), 1117 metaphase II oocytes were divided into 512 for ICSI and 605 for IVF. Compared with the control, husbands’ sperm produced a lower fertilization rate in nonobstructive azoospermia (65.4% vs 83.2%; P < 0.001), crytozoospermia (68.8% vs 75.5%; P < 0.05) and necrospermia (65.0% vs 85.2%; P < 0.05). The zygotes derived in nonobstructive azoospermia had a lower cleavage rate (96.4% vs 99.4%; P < 0.05), but the rate of resultant good-quality embryos was not different. Analysis of the rates of cleaved and good-quality embryos in crytozoospermia and necrospermia did not exhibit a significant difference from the control. In conclusion, although the sperm from severe male infertility reduced the fertilization ability, the derived embryos had potential developmental viabilities that might be predictive for the expected clinical outcomes. PMID:25652630

  19. ICSI treatment of severe male infertility can achieve prospective embryo quality compared with IVF of fertile donor sperm on sibling oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ju-Fen; Chen, Xiao-Bao; Zhao, Lei-Wen; Gao, Min-Zhi; Peng, Jie; Qu, Xian-Qin; Shi, Hui-Juan; Jin, Xing-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Azoospermia, cryptozoospermia and necrospermia can markedly decrease the ability of males to achieve pregnancy in fertile females. However, patients with these severe conditions still have the option to be treated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to become biological fathers. This study analyzed the fertilization ability and the developmental viabilities of the derived embryos after ICSI treatment of the sperm from these patients compared with in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment of the proven-fertile donor sperm on sibling oocytes as a control. On the day of oocyte retrieval, the number of sperm suitable for ICSI collected from two ejaculates or testicular sperm extraction was lower than the oocytes, and therefore, excess sibling oocytes were treated by IVF with donor sperm. From 72 couples (73 cycles), 1117 metaphase II oocytes were divided into 512 for ICSI and 605 for IVF. Compared with the control, husbands' sperm produced a lower fertilization rate in nonobstructive azoospermia (65.4% vs 83.2%; P< 0.001), crytozoospermia (68.8% vs 75.5%; P< 0.05) and necrospermia (65.0% vs 85.2%; P< 0.05). The zygotes derived in nonobstructive azoospermia had a lower cleavage rate (96.4% vs 99.4%; P< 0.05), but the rate of resultant good-quality embryos was not different. Analysis of the rates of cleaved and good-quality embryos in crytozoospermia and necrospermia did not exhibit a significant difference from the control. In conclusion, although the sperm from severe male infertility reduced the fertilization ability, the derived embryos had potential developmental viabilities that might be predictive for the expected clinical outcomes.

  20. Short communication: A missense mutation in the PROP1 (prophet of Pit 1) gene affects male fertility and milk production traits in the US Holstein population.

    PubMed

    Lan, X Y; Peñagaricano, F; DeJung, L; Weigel, K A; Khatib, H

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies, we reported significant associations of the POU1F1 pathway genes with reproduction and production traits in several dairy cattle populations. Polymorphisms in genes of this pathway were found to be associated with both female and male fertility traits in dairy cattle. The POU1F1 gene is a direct downstream target for the regulation of the prophet of Pit1 (PROP1) gene, also known as PROP paired-like homeobox 1. Interestingly, the position of PROP1 coincides with a quantitative trait locus affecting ovulation rate in cattle. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether PROP1 affects fertility and milk production traits in Holstein cattle. Using the DNA pooling sequencing approach, a missense single nucleotide polymorphism that replaces a histidine amino acid with an arginine was detected in exon 3 of PROP1. The arginine allele was found to be associated with a decrease in sire conception rate and an increase in productive life, protein yield, and net merit index in a population of 1,951 Holstein bulls. The transcription factors produced from the histidine and arginine isoforms are known to have different transcription, DNA binding, and regulation activities. As such, we propose that the association of the arginine isoform with decreased bull fertility is likely caused by reduced activity of this allele in male functions. The findings of this study suggest PROP1 polymorphisms as candidates in selection programs for fertility, health, and milk production traits in dairy cattle.

  1. Male fertility status is associated with DNA methylation signatures in sperm and transcriptomic profiles of bovine preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Jenna; Carrillo, José A; Namous, Hadjer; Daniels, Alyssa; Salih, Sana M; Song, Jiuzhou; Khatib, Hasan

    2017-04-05

    Infertility in dairy cattle is a concern where reduced fertilization rates and high embryonic loss are contributing factors. Studies of the paternal contribution to reproductive performance are limited. However, recent discoveries have shown that, in addition to DNA, sperm delivers transcription factors and epigenetic components that are required for fertilization and proper embryonic development. Hence, characterization of the paternal contribution at the time of fertilization is warranted. We hypothesized that sire fertility is associated with differences in DNA methylation patterns in sperm and that the embryonic transcriptomic profiles are influenced by the fertility status of the bull. Embryos were generated in vitro by fertilization with either a high or low fertility Holstein bull. Blastocysts derived from each high and low fertility bulls were evaluated for morphology, development, and transcriptomic analysis using RNA-Sequencing. Additionally, DNA methylation signatures of sperm from high and low fertility sires were characterized by performing whole-genome DNA methylation binding domain sequencing. Embryo morphology and developmental capacity did not differ between embryos generated from either a high or low fertility bull. However, RNA-Sequencing revealed 98 genes to be differentially expressed at a false discovery rate < 1%. A total of 65 genes were upregulated in high fertility bull derived embryos, and 33 genes were upregulated in low fertility derived embryos. Expression of the genes CYCS, EEA1, SLC16A7, MEPCE, and TFB2M was validated in three new pairs of biological replicates of embryos. The role of the differentially expressed gene TFB2M in embryonic development was further assessed through expression knockdown at the zygotic stage, which resulted in decreased development to the blastocyst stage. Assessment of the epigenetic signature of spermatozoa between high and low fertility bulls revealed 76 differentially methylated regions. Despite

  2. The bromodomain-containing protein tBRD-1 is specifically expressed in spermatocytes and is essential for male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Leser, Katja; Awe, Stephan; Barckmann, Bridlin; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Rathke, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Summary By a conserved cellular differentiation process, spermatogenesis leads to formation of haploid sperm for successful reproduction. In Drosophila and in mammals, post-meiotic spermatid differentiation depends on several translationally repressed and stored mRNAs that are often expressed exclusively in the testis through a cell type specific transcriptional program. In Drosophila, the mRNAs of proteins required for post-meiotic chromatin reorganisation, like ProtB and Mst77F, are transcribed in meiotic spermatocytes and subjected to translational repression for days. Transcription of many of these translationally repressed mRNAs depends on testis-specific homologs of TATA box binding protein-associated factors (tTAFs). Here, we identified the testis-specific bromodomain protein, tBRD-1, that is only expressed in primary spermatocytes. Bromodomain proteins are able to recognise and bind acetylated histones and non-histone proteins. We generated tbrd-1 mutant flies and observed that function of tBRD-1 is required for male fertility. tBRD-1 partially colocalised with tTAFs, TAF1 and Polycomb to a Fibrillarin-deficient region within the spermatocyte nucleolus. The nucleolar localisation of tBRD-1 depended on tTAF function but not the other way round. Further, we could show that ectopically expressed tBRD-1-eGFP is able to bind to the interbands of polytene chromosomes. By inhibitor treatment of cultured testis we observed that sub-cellular localisation of tBRD-1 may depend on the acetylation status of primary spermatocytes. PMID:23213453

  3. Fertility treatment and reproductive health of male offspring: a study of 1,925 young men from the general population.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Asklund, Camilla; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Holm, Mette; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2007-03-01

    Little is known the about the reproductive health of offspring after fertility treatment. In 2001-2005, the authors approached young Danish men attending a compulsory physical examination to determine their fitness for military service. A total of 1,925 men volunteered, delivered a semen sample, had a physical examination performed and a blood sample drawn, and responded to a questionnaire. Their mothers were questioned about whether they had received fertility treatment in order to conceive their sons. Forty-seven mothers reported having received fertility treatment to conceive the index subject. After control for confounders, men whose mothers had received fertility treatment to conceive them had a 46% lower sperm concentration (95% confidence interval (CI): -63, -20) and a 45% lower total sperm count (95% CI: -64, -16). They had a smaller testis size (-0.9 ml, 95% CI: -2.2, 0.4), fewer motile sperm (-4.0%, 95% CI: -8.0, -0.1), and fewer morphologically normal spermatozoa (-2.0%, 95% CI: -4.1, 0.0). They also had a lower serum testosterone level and free androgen index (results not statistically significant). These findings should be viewed in light of the increasing use of fertility treatments. Although the cause of these findings is unknown, they raise concern about possible late effects of fertility treatment. Larger-scale studies of children born after fertility treatment should be performed.

  4. The roles of testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) in male fertility-priapism and sexual behavior defects in TR4 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Collins, Loretta L; Lee, Yi-Fen; Ting, Huei-Ju; Lin, Wen-Jye; Liu, Ning-Chun; Meshul, Charles K; Uno, Hideo; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ta; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-10-13

    Successful reproductive efforts require the establishment of a situation favorable for reproduction that requires integration of both behavior and internal physiological events. TR4 nuclear receptor is known to be involved in male fertility via controlling spermatogenesis, yet its roles in regulating other biological events related to reproduction have not been completely revealed. Male TR4 knockout (TR4 -/-) and wild type mice were used for the sexual behavior and penile dysfunction studies. Mice were sacrificed for histological examination and corresponding genes profiles were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Reporter gene assays were performed. We describe an unexpected finding of priapism in TR4 -/- mice. As a transcriptional factor, we demonstrated that TR4 transcriptionally modulates a key enzyme regulating penis erection and neuronal nitric oxide synthese NOS (nNOS). Thereby, elimination of TR4 results in nNOS reduction in both mRNA and protein levels, consequently may lead to erectile dysfunction. In addition, male TR4 -/- mice display defects in sexual and social behavior, with increased fear or anxiety, as well as reduced mounting, intromission, and ejaculation. Reduction of ER alpha, ER beta, and oxytocin in the hypothalamus may contribute to defects in sexual behavior and stress response. Together, these results provide in vivo evidence of important TR4 roles in penile physiology, as well as in male sexual behavior. In conjunction with previous finding, TR4 represents a key factor that controls male fertility via regulating behavior and internal physiological events.

  5. [Intermediate endpoints in clinical research].

    PubMed

    Peters, Sanne A E; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    An intermediate variable such as blood pressure is part of the causal pathway of mechanisms to a clinical outcome, e.g. myocardial infarction. An intervention affects a clinical outcome through its effect on that intermediate variable. In studies designed to assess the effects of interventions an intermediate variable may be used as surrogate for clinical outcomes. Such an endpoint is also known as an intermediate endpoint. Intervention studies with intermediate endpoints are commonly performed in medical research to evaluate the effects of an intervention on clinical outcomes. Intervention studies with an intermediate endpoint are conducted in a smaller study population and with a shorter duration of follow-up than studies using clinical outcomes. An intermediate variable is not eligible as an intermediate endpoint when the intervention also affects other biological mechanisms that subsequently affect the clinical endpoint. Due to a smaller sample size and shorter study duration, side effects of intervention are more difficult to evaluate in studies with an intermediate endpoint than in studies with clinical endpoints.

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity in Male Mice Is Associated with Reduced Fertility and Potentiation of Acrylamide-Induced Reproductive Toxicity1

    PubMed Central

    Ghanayem, Burhan I.; Bai, Re; Kissling, Grace E.; Travlos, Greg; Hoffler, Undi

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of human obesity and related chronic disorders such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer is rapidly increasing. Human studies have shown a direct relationship between obesity and infertility. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on male fertility and the effect of obesity on susceptibility to chemical-induced reproductive toxicity. From 5 to 30 wk of age, genetically intact male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a normal diet or one in which 60% of the kilocalories were from lard. Obese mice exhibited significant differences in the mRNA of several genes within the testes in comparison to lean males. Pparg was increased 2.2-fold, whereas Crem, Sh2b1, Dhh, Igf1, and Lepr were decreased 6.7, 1.4, 3.2, 1.6, and 7.2-fold, respectively. The fertility of male mice was compared through mating with control females. Acrylamide (AA)-induced reproductive toxicity was assessed in obese or lean males treated with water or 25 mg AA kg−1 day−1 via gavage for 5 days and then mated to control females. Percent body fat and weight were significantly increased in mice fed a high-fat vs. a normal diet. Obesity resulted in significant reduction in plugs and pregnancies of control females partnered with obese vs. lean males. Serum leptin and insulin levels were each approximately 5-fold higher in obese vs. age-matched lean mice. Sperm from obese males exhibited decreased motility and reduced hyperactivated progression vs. lean mice. Treatment with AA exacerbated male infertility of obese and lean mice; however, this effect was more pronounced in obese mice. Further, females partnered with AA-treated obese mice exhibited a further decrease in the percentage of live fetuses, whereas the percentage of resorptions increased. This work demonstrated that diet-induced obesity in mice caused a significant reduction in male fertility and exacerbated AA-induced reproductive toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity. PMID:19696015

  7. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism within the Novel Sex-Linked Testis-Specific Retrotransposed PGAM4 Gene Influences Human Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hidenobu; Tsujimura, Akira; Irie, Shinji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Nonomura, Norio; Wada, Morimasa; Tanaka, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of novel fertilization treatments, including in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic injection, has made pregnancy possible regardless of the level of activity of the spermatozoa; however, the etiology of male-factor infertility is poorly understood. Multiple studies, primarily through the use of transgenic animals, have contributed to a list of candidate genes that may affect male infertility in humans. We examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as a cause of male infertility in an analysis of spermatogenesis-specific genes. Methods and Finding We carried out the prevalence of SNPs in the coding region of phosphoglycerate mutase 4 (PGAM4) on the X chromosome by the direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA from male patients. Using RT-PCR and western blot analyses, we identified that PGAM4 is a functional retrogene that is expressed predominantly in the testes and is associated with male infertility. PGAM4 is expressed in post-meiotic stages, including spermatids and spermatozoa in the testes, and the principal piece of the flagellum and acrosome in ejaculated spermatozoa. A case-control study revealed that 4.5% of infertile patients carry the G75C polymorphism, which causes an amino acid substitution in the encoded protein. Furthermore, an assay for enzymatic activity demonstrated that this polymorphism decreases the enzyme’s activity both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion These results suggest that PGAM4, an X-linked retrogene, is a fundamental gene in human male reproduction and may escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. These findings provide fresh insight into elucidating the mechanisms of male infertility. PMID:22590500

  8. Identification of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) Markers Tightly Associated with Drought Stress Gene in Male Sterile and Fertile Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuejin; Guo, Lijun; Shu, Zhiming; Sun, Yiyue; Chen, Yuanyuan; Liang, Zongsuo; Guo, Hongbo

    2013-03-22

    Consistent grain yield in drought environment has attracted wide attention due to global climate change. However, the important drought-related traits/genes in crops have been rarely reported. Many near-isogenic lines (NILs) of male sterile and fertile Salvia miltiorrhiza have been obtained in our previous work through testcross and backcross in continuous field experiments conducted in 2006-2009. Both segregating sterile and fertile populations were subjected to bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with 384 and 170 primer combinations, respectively. One out of 14 AFLP markers (E9/M3246) was identified in treated fertile population as tightly linked to the drought stress gene with a recombination frequency of 6.98% and at a distance of 7.02 cM. One of 15 other markers (E2/M5357) was identified in a treated sterile population that is closely associated with the drought stress gene. It had a recombination frequency of 4.65% and at a distance of 4.66 cM. Interestingly, the E9/M3246 fragment was found to be identical to another AFLP fragment E11/M4208 that was tightly linked to the male sterile gene of S. miltiorrhiza with 95% identity and e-value 4 × 10-93. Blastn analysis suggested that the drought stress gene sequence showed higher identity with nucleotides in Arabidopsis chromosome 1-5.

  9. Genetically-induced Estrogen Receptor Alpha mRNA (Esr1) Overexpression Does Not Adversely Affect Fertility or Penile Development in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heath, John; Abdelmageed, Yazeed; Braden, Tim D.; Williams, Carol S.; Williams, John W.; Paulose, Tessie; Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel; Gupta, Rupesh; Flaws, Jodi A.; Goyal, Hari O.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that estrogen receptor alpha mRNA (Esr1) or protein (ESR1) overexpression resulting from neonatal exposure to estrogens in rats was associated with infertility and mal-developed penis characterized by reduced length and weight and abnormal accumulation of fat cells. The objective of this study was to determine if mutant male mice overexpressing Esr1 are naturally infertile or have reduced fertility and/or develop abnormal penis. The fertility parameters, including fertility and fecundity indices, numbers of days from the day of cohabitation to the day of delivery, and numbers of pups per female, were not altered from controls, as a result of Esr1 overexpression. Likewise, penile morphology, including the length, weight, and diameter and os penis development, was not altered from controls. Conversely, weights of the seminal vesicles and bulbospongiosus and levator ani (BS/LA) muscles were significantly (P < 0.05) lower as compared to controls; however, the weight of the testis, the morphology of the testis and epididymis, and the plasma and testicular testosterone concentration were not different from controls. Hence, the genetically-induced Esr1 overexpression alone, without an exogenous estrogen exposure during the neonatal period, is unable to adversely affect the development of the penis as well as other male reproductive organs, except limited, but significant, reductions in weights of the seminal vesicles and BS/LA muscles. PMID:20930192

  10. A Combined Approach to Heat Stress Effect on Male Fertility in Nasonia vitripennis: From the Physiological Consequences on Spermatogenesis to the Reproductive Adjustment of Females Mated with Stressed Males

    PubMed Central

    Chirault, Marlène; Lucas, Christophe; Goubault, Marlène; Chevrier, Claude

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown a decline in reproductive success in males in both humans and wildlife. Research on male fertility has largely focused on vertebrates, although invertebrates constitute the vast majority of terrestrial biodiversity. The reduction of their reproductive capacities due to environmental stresses can have strong negative ecological impacts, and also dramatic consequences on world food production if it affects the reproductive success of biological control agents, such as parasitic wasps used to control crop pests. Here Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitic wasp of various fly species, was studied to test the effects of 24h-heat stress applied during the first pupal stage on male fertility. Results showed that only primary spermatocytes were present at the first pupal stage in all cysts of the testes. Heat stress caused a delay in spermatogenesis during development and a significant decrease in sperm stock at emergence. Females mated with these heat-stressed males showed a reduce sperm count stored in their spermatheca. Females did not appear to distinguish heat-stressed from control males and did not remate more frequently to compensate for the lack of sperm transferred. As a result, females mated with heat-stressed males produced a suboptimal lifetime offspring sex ratio compared to those mated with control males. This could further impact the population dynamics of this species. N. vitripennis appears to be an interesting biological model to study the mechanisms of subfertility and its consequence on female reproductive strategies and provides new research perspectives in both invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:25807005

  11. Engineering the 1BS chromosome arm in wheat to remove the Rf (multi) locus restoring male fertility in cytoplasms of Aegilops kotschyi, Ae. uniaristata and Ae. mutica.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Christopher E; Lukaszewski, Adam J

    2016-09-01

    By removing the Rf (multi) locus from chromosome 1BS of wheat via chromosome engineering we were able to generate a resource for the production of male sterile wheats in three new cytoplasms. Cytoplasmic male sterility is an essential component in the development of many hybrid crops. In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) only the cytoplasm of T. timopheevi cytoplasm has been extensively tested even though many other cytoplasms are also known to produce male sterility. Among them are the cytoplasms of Ae. kotschyi, Ae. uniaristata and Ae. mutica but here male sterility manifests itself only when the 1RS.1BL rye-wheat translocation is present in the nuclear genome. The location of the male fertility restoring gene on the chromosome arm 1BS (Rf (multi) ) has recently been determined using a set of primary recombinants of chromosome arms 1RS with 1BS. Using this knowledge the same recombinants were used to create chromosome arm 1BS in wheat with a small insert from rye that removes the restorer locus. The disomic engineered chromosome 1B1:6 assures male sterility in all three cytoplasms and any standard chromosome 1B in wheat is capable of restoring it. This newly engineered chromosome in combination with the three cytoplasms of Aegilops sp extends the range of possibilities in attempts to create a viable system for hybrid wheat production.

  12. [Influence of several weeks' treatment of male and female mice with saccharin, cyclamate or cyclohexylamine sulfate on fertility and dominant lethal effects (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lorke, D; Machemer, L

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to find out whether long-term treatment of male and female mice with saccharin sodium, sodium cyclamate or cyclohexylamine sulfate, would reduce fertility or induce dominant lethal mutations. Before mating, saccharin sodium or sodium cyclamate were added to the food in a concentration of 1%, while cyclohexylamine sulfate was added in a concentration of 0.11% for at least 10 weeks. This treatment corresponded, in the case of saccharin sodium and sodium cyclamate, to an active substance intake of approx. 2000 mg/kg per day and for cyclohexylamine sulfate to an intake of approx. 200 mg/kg per day (corresponding to approx. 136 mg cyclohexylamine per kilogram per day). These doses affected neither the females nor the males in respect of appearance, behaviour, and weight gain. The doses were also compatible with the normal fertility of the animals. Furthermore, in all cases the treatment did not cause a biologically important increase of pre-implantative and post-implantative losses. The dominant lethal tests did not indicate a mutagenic action of saccharin sodium or sodium cyclamate (1% in the food) and of cyclohexylamine sulfate (0.11% in the food) after 10 weeks' treatment of male and female mice. These results, obtained after long-term treatment, corresponded generally to the findin

  13. Selective restoration of male fertility in mice lacking angiotensin-converting enzymes by sperm-specific expression of the testicular isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaraj, P; Kessler, S P; Colmenares, C; Sen, G C

    1998-01-01

    Although angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been studied primarily in the context of its role in blood pressure regulation, this widely distributed enzyme has many other physiological functions. The ACE gene encodes two isozymes. The somatic isozyme is expressed in many tissues, including vascular endothelial cells, renal epithelial cells, and testicular Leydig cells, whereas the testicular or germinal angiotensin-converting enzyme is expressed only in sperm. The ACE gene knockout mice lack both isozymes and they exhibit low blood pressure, kidney dysfunctions, and male infertility. Here, we report the use of a sperm-specific promoter and interbreeding of transgenic and gene knockout mice for generating a mouse strain that expressed ACE only in sperm. The experimental mice maintained the kidney defects of ACE-/- mice, but unlike the knockout strain, the males were fertile. Thus, we established that the role of ACE in male fertility is completely dependent on its exclusive expression in sperm. Our study clearly demonstrated how transgenic and knockout techniques can be combined for ascribing a specific physiological function to the expression of a multifunctional protein in a given tissue. PMID:9664078

  14. Expression of a Catalytically Inactive Mutant Form of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) Confers a Dominant-negative Effect in Male Fertility*

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Irina; Aichler, Michaela; Yefremova, Elena; Roveri, Antonella; Buday, Katalin; Doll, Sebastian; Tasdemir, Adrianne; Hoffard, Nils; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walch, Axel; Ursini, Fulvio; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro; Conrad, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The selenoenzyme Gpx4 is essential for early embryogenesis and cell viability for its unique function to prevent phospholipid oxidation. Recently, the cytosolic form of Gpx4 was identified as an upstream regulator of a novel form of non-apoptotic cell death, called ferroptosis, whereas the mitochondrial isoform of Gpx4 was previously shown to be crucial for male fertility. Here, we generated and analyzed mice with a targeted mutation of the active site selenocysteine of Gpx4 (Gpx4_U46S). Mice homozygous for Gpx4_U46S died at the same embryonic stage (E7.5) as Gpx4−/− embryos as expected. Surprisingly, male mice heterozygous for Gpx4_U46S presented subfertility. Subfertility was manifested in a reduced number of litters from heterozygous breeding and an impairment of spermatozoa to fertilize oocytes in vitro. Morphologically, sperm isolated from heterozygous Gpx4_U46S mice revealed many structural abnormalities particularly in the spermatozoa midpiece due to improper oxidation and polymerization of sperm capsular proteins and malformation of the mitochondrial capsule surrounding and stabilizing sperm mitochondria. These findings are reminiscent of sperm isolated from selenium-deprived rodents or from mice specifically lacking mitochondrial Gpx4. Due to a strongly facilitated incorporation of Ser in the polypeptide chain as compared with selenocysteine at the UGA codon, expression of the catalytically inactive Gpx4_U46S was found to be strongly increased. Because the stability of the mitochondrial capsule of mature spermatozoa depends on the moonlighting function of Gpx4 both as an enzyme oxidizing capsular protein thiols and as a structural protein, tightly controlled expression of functional Gpx4 emerges as a key for full male fertility. PMID:25922076

  15. Expression of a Catalytically Inactive Mutant Form of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) Confers a Dominant-negative Effect in Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Ingold, Irina; Aichler, Michaela; Yefremova, Elena; Roveri, Antonella; Buday, Katalin; Doll, Sebastian; Tasdemir, Adrianne; Hoffard, Nils; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walch, Axel; Ursini, Fulvio; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro; Conrad, Marcus

    2015-06-05

    The selenoenzyme Gpx4 is essential for early embryogenesis and cell viability for its unique function to prevent phospholipid oxidation. Recently, the cytosolic form of Gpx4 was identified as an upstream regulator of a novel form of non-apoptotic cell death, called ferroptosis, whereas the mitochondrial isoform of Gpx4 was previously shown to be crucial for male fertility. Here, we generated and analyzed mice with a targeted mutation of the active site selenocysteine of Gpx4 (Gpx4_U46S). Mice homozygous for Gpx4_U46S died at the same embryonic stage (E7.5) as Gpx4(-/-) embryos as expected. Surprisingly, male mice heterozygous for Gpx4_U46S presented subfertility. Subfertility was manifested in a reduced number of litters from heterozygous breeding and an impairment of spermatozoa to fertilize oocytes in vitro. Morphologically, sperm isolated from heterozygous Gpx4_U46S mice revealed many structural abnormalities particularly in the spermatozoa midpiece due to improper oxidation and polymerization of sperm capsular proteins and malformation of the mitochondrial capsule surrounding and stabilizing sperm mitochondria. These findings are reminiscent of sperm isolated from selenium-deprived rodents or from mice specifically lacking mitochondrial Gpx4. Due to a strongly facilitated incorporation of Ser in the polypeptide chain as compared with selenocysteine at the UGA codon, expression of the catalytically inactive Gpx4_U46S was found to be strongly increased. Because the stability of the mitochondrial capsule of mature spermatozoa depends on the moonlighting function of Gpx4 both as an enzyme oxidizing capsular protein thiols and as a structural protein, tightly controlled expression of functional Gpx4 emerges as a key for full male fertility.

  16. Comparative Transcript Profiling of a Male Sterile Cybrid Pummelo and Its Fertile Type Revealed Altered Gene Expression Related to Flower Development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bei-Bei; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Ge, Xiao-Xia; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Grosser, Jude W.; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2012-01-01

    Male sterile and seedless characters are highly desired for citrus cultivar improvement. In our breeding program, a male sterile cybrid pummelo, which could be considered as a variant of male fertile pummelo, was produced by protoplast fusion. Herein, ecotopic stamen primordia initiation and development were detected in this male sterile cybrid pummelo. Histological studies revealed that the cybrid showed reduced petal development in size and width, and retarded stamen primordia development. Additionally, disorganized cell proliferation was also detected in stamen-like structures (fused to petals and/or carpel). To gain new insight into the underlying mechanism, we compared, by RNA-Seq analysis, the nuclear gene expression profiles of floral buds of the cybrid with that of fertile pummelo. Gene expression profiles which identified a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two lines were captured at both petal primordia and stamen primordia distinguishable stages. For example, nuclear genes involved in nucleic acid binding and response to hormone synthesis and metabolism, genes required for floral bud identification and expressed in particular floral whorls. Furthermore, in accordance with flower morphology of the cybrid, expression of PISTILLATA (PI) was reduced in stamen-like structures, even though it was restricted to correct floral whorls. Down-regulated expression of APETALA3 (AP3) coincided with that of PI. These finding indicated that, due to their whorl specific effects in flower development, citrus class-B MADS-box genes likely constituted ‘perfect targets’ for CMS retrograde signaling, and that dysfunctional mitochondria seemed to cause male sterile phenotype in the cybrid pummelo. PMID:22952758

  17. A fertilization promoting peptide (FPP)-related tripeptide competitively inhibits responses to FPP: a cause of male subfertility?

    PubMed

    Fraser, L R; Hanyaloglu, A; Cockle, S M

    1997-12-01

    Fertilization promoting peptide (FPP; pGlu-Glu-ProNH2), a tripeptide structurally related to thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH; pGlu-His-ProNH2), is present in the prostate gland and seminal plasma of several mammalian species. FPP has been shown not only to stimulate the capacitation and fertilizing ability of epididymal mouse and ejaculated human spermatozoa, but also to inhibit spontaneous acrosome loss in mouse spermatozoa. These results suggest a possible role in vivo for FPP to maximize the fertilizing potential of the few cells that reach the ampulla. In this study we have investigated the effects of FPP-related peptides on mouse sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction (using chlortetracycline fluorescence) and in vitro fertilizing ability. Deamidated FPP neither stimulated capacitation when tested at 50-200 nM nor interfered with FPP's stimulation of capacitation. Three neutral peptides (pGlu-Phe-ProNH2, MeO-FPP, pGlu-Gln-ProNH2) were also evaluated. pGlu-Phe-ProNH2, slightly stimulatory when used alone, had no additive effect when used in combination with FPP and the methyl derivative of FPP had no bioactivity itself and did not inhibit responses to FPP. In marked contrast, pGlu-Gln-ProNH2 (Gln-FPP), which had no bioactivity when added to uncapacitated suspensions at 50-100 nM, significantly inhibited FPP's stimulation of capacitation and fertilizing ability in vitro. Furthermore, when Gln-FPP + FPP were added to capacitated suspensions, Gln-FPP prevented FPP's inhibition of spontaneous acrosome loss. Our recent studies have indicated that FPP and adenosine can elicit similar responses but appear to act at different sites. The fact that Gln-FPP inhibited responses to FPP, but not to adenosine, indicates that Gln-FPP is acting at an FPP-specific site. We, therefore, conclude that the specific structure of the FPP molecule is crucial for biological activity. Removal of the terminal amide group abolishes bioactivity and changes to the central amino

  18. A nuclear restorer-of-fertility mutation disrupts accumulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit alpha in developing pollen of S male-sterile maize.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lanying; Ruesch, Kimberly L; Ortega, Victor M; Kamps, Terry L; Gabay-Laughnan, Susan; Chase, Christine D

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function depend upon the interaction of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Forward genetic analysis of mitochondrial function presents a challenge in organisms that are obligated to respire. In the S-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) system of maize, expression of mitochondrial open reading frames (orf355-orf77) conditions collapse of developing haploid pollen. Nuclear restorer-of-fertility mutations that circumvent pollen collapse are often homozygous lethal. These spontaneous mutations potentially result from disruption of nuclear genes required for mitochondrial gene expression, in contrast to homozygous-viable restorer-of-fertility alleles that function to block or compensate for the expression of mitochondrial CMS genes. Consistent with this hypothesis, the homozygous-lethal restoring allele historically designated RfIII was shown to be recessive in diploid pollen produced by tetraploid CMS-S plants. Accordingly, the symbol for this allele has been changed to restorer-of-fertility lethal 1 (rfl1). In haploid rfl1 pollen, orf355-orf77 transcripts and mitochondrial transcripts encoding the alpha-subunit of the ATP synthase (ATPA) were decreased in abundance. Haploid rfl1 pollen failed to accumulate wild-type levels of ATPA protein, indicating that functional requirements for mitochondrial protein accumulation are relaxed in maize pollen. The CMS-S system and rfl mutations therefore allow for the selection of nuclear mutations disrupting mitochondrial biogenesis in a multicellular eukaryote. PMID:14573487

  19. Mapping QTLs for Fertility Restoration of Different Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Types in Rice Using Two Oryza sativa ×O. rufipogon Backcross Inbred Line Populations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao-Lin; Xie, Jian-Kun; Wan, Yong; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Zhang, Fan-Tao; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice breeding using cytoplasmic male sterility/fertility restoration (CMS/Rf) systems plays an important role in ensuring global food security. Two backcross inbred line (BIL) populations derived from either Xieqingzao B (XB)//XB/Dongxiang wild rice (DWR) (XXD) or XB//DWR/XB (XDX) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fertility restoration of Dwarf wild abortive- (DA-), Indonesia Paddy- (ID-), and DWR-type CMS in rice. Lines with ID- and DA-type CMS were testcrossed with both the XXD- and XDX-BILs, while the line with DWR-type CMS was testcrossed with the XDX-BILs only. A total of 16 QTLs for fertility restoration of CMS systems were identified, including three for DWR-type CMS, six for DA-type CMS, and seven for ID-type CMS. All of the additive alleles in the QTLs were derived from Oryza rufipogon. Eleven QTLs were clustered in five chromosomal regions, indicating that common Rf loci restored different CMS systems, and the favorable O. rufipogon alleles could be used to develop restorer lines for various CMS types by marker-assisted selection.

  20. Mapping QTLs for Fertility Restoration of Different Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Types in Rice Using Two Oryza sativa ×O. rufipogon Backcross Inbred Line Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biao-lin; Wan, Yong; Zhang, Jin-wei; Zhang, Fan-tao; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice breeding using cytoplasmic male sterility/fertility restoration (CMS/Rf) systems plays an important role in ensuring global food security. Two backcross inbred line (BIL) populations derived from either Xieqingzao B (XB)//XB/Dongxiang wild rice (DWR) (XXD) or XB//DWR/XB (XDX) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fertility restoration of Dwarf wild abortive- (DA-), Indonesia Paddy- (ID-), and DWR-type CMS in rice. Lines with ID- and DA-type CMS were testcrossed with both the XXD- and XDX-BILs, while the line with DWR-type CMS was testcrossed with the XDX-BILs only. A total of 16 QTLs for fertility restoration of CMS systems were identified, including three for DWR-type CMS, six for DA-type CMS, and seven for ID-type CMS. All of the additive alleles in the QTLs were derived from Oryza rufipogon. Eleven QTLs were clustered in five chromosomal regions, indicating that common Rf loci restored different CMS systems, and the favorable O. rufipogon alleles could be used to develop restorer lines for various CMS types by marker-assisted selection. PMID:27872859

  1. Altered spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis and suppressed fertility in adult male rats exposed to genistein, a non-steroidal phytoestrogen during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Meena, R; Supriya, Ch; Pratap Reddy, K; Sreenivasula Reddy, P

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the effects of prenatal exposure to genistein on the mother, her pregnancy and reproductive functions of the male progeny, since these issues have ethological relevance in both animals and humans. Pregnant Wistar rats received i.p. injections of genistein at a dose level of 2, 20 or 100 mg/kg body weight daily from 12(th) to 19(th) day of gestation. Male pups from control and genistein exposed animals were weaned and allowed to develop until 100 days of age; however, when they were 90 days old, twelve males from each group were cohabited with untreated 90-day old females for 8 days. Results revealed a significant decrease in indices of reproductive organs in adult male rats exposed to genistein during embryonic development. Dose dependent reduction was observed in daily sperm production and epididymal sperm density and quality in genistein treated rats. Significant decrease was observed in the activity levels of 3β- and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in testis of experimental rats with a decline in plasma testosterone levels. Histological examination of testis of genistein treated rats indicated deterioration in testicular architecture. In the fertility study, the mean number of implantations and live fetuses per dam mated with 100 mg genistein exposed males was reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spink13, an Epididymis-specific Gene of the Kazal-type Serine Protease Inhibitor (SPINK) Family, Is Essential for the Acrosomal Integrity and Male Fertility*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Yu, Heguo; Ni, Zimei; Hu, Shuanggang; Ma, Wubin; Chu, Chen; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Yonglian

    2013-01-01

    Sperm maturation involves numerous surface modifications by a variety of secreted proteins from epididymal epithelia. The sperm surface architecture depends on correct localization of its components and highlights the importance of the sequence of the proteolytic processing of the sperm surface in the epididymal duct. The presence of several protease inhibitors from different families is consistent with the hypothesis that correctly timed epididymal protein processing is essential for proper sperm maturation. Here we show that the rat (Rattus norvegicus) epididymis-specific gene Spink13, an androgen-responsive serine protease inhibitor, could bind to the sperm acrosome region. Furthermore, knockdown of Spink13 in vivo dramatically enhanced the acrosomal exocytosis during the process of capacitation and thus led to a significant reduction in male fertility, indicating that Spink13 was essential for sperm maturation. We conclude that blockade of SPINK13 may provide a new putative target for post-testicular male contraceptives. PMID:23430248

  3. ECHIDNA protein impacts on male fertility in Arabidopsis by mediating trans-Golgi network secretory trafficking during anther and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Yang, Caiyun; Klisch, Doris; Ferguson, Alison; Bhaellero, Rishi P; Niu, Xiwu; Wilson, Zoe A

    2014-03-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role in cellular secretion and has been implicated in sorting cargo destined for the plasma membrane. Previously, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) echidna (ech) mutant was shown to exhibit a dwarf phenotype due to impaired cell expansion. However, ech also has a previously uncharacterized phenotype of reduced male fertility. This semisterility is due to decreased anther size and reduced amounts of pollen but also to decreased pollen viability, impaired anther opening, and pollen tube growth. An ECH translational fusion (ECHPro:ECH-yellow fluorescent protein) revealed developmentally regulated tissue-specific expression, with expression in the tapetum during early anther development and microspore release and subsequent expression in the pollen, pollen tube, and stylar tissues. Pollen viability and production, along with germination and pollen tube growth, were all impaired. The ech anther endothecium secondary wall thickening also appeared reduced and disorganized, resulting in incomplete anther opening. This did not appear to be due to anther secondary thickening regulatory genes but perhaps to altered secretion of wall materials through the TGN as a consequence of the absence of the ECH protein. ECH expression is critical for a variety of aspects of male reproduction, including the production of functional pollen grains, their effective release, germination, and tube formation. These stages of pollen development are fundamentally influenced by TGN trafficking of hormones and wall components. Overall, this suggests that the fertility defect is multifaceted, with the TGN trafficking playing a significant role in the process of both pollen formation and subsequent fertilization.

  4. Effects of x-ray irradiation on male navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) on mating, fecundity, fertility, and inherited sterility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Male adult navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella, were irradiated using a laboratory x-ray emitter to determine the dose needed to achieve complete egg sterility of mated female moths and inherited egg sterility of F1 generation. Adult male A. transitella were irradiated in a series of two experime...

  5. Effect of chronic administration of 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone on serum testosterone, number of spermatozoa and fertility in adult male bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, S G; Ramesh, V; Krishnamurthy, H N; Kumar, N; Sundaram, K; Hardy, M P; Rao, A Jagannadha

    2002-08-01

    Hormonal approaches to male contraception that are based on the suppression of LH secretion require androgen replacement treatment to maintain sexual behaviour and secondary sexual characteristics. Androgen supplementation not only involves large and frequent doses of testosterone esters but also results in undesirable effects on the prostate gland. In an attempt to avoid such problems, a synthetic androgen, 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT), which is much more potent than testosterone, has been developed. In the present study, MENT was administered at different doses (25, 50, 100, 300 and 1000 microg day(-1)) either alone or in combination with oestradiol via Silastic implants for a specified period to adult male bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata). Blood and semen samples were collected at specific intervals and analysed for serum testosterone and seminal parameters, respectively. The results of the present study clearly indicate that administration of MENT at all doses tested results in suppression of the nocturnal surge of testosterone (by day 3), as well as a decrease in the number of spermatozoa (by day 45). Co-administration of oestradiol resulted in a reduction in the dose of MENT required to suppress the nocturnal surge. None of the male bonnet monkeys treated with MENT were able to impregnate females, clearly demonstrating the efficacy of MENT in blocking fertility in male bonnet monkeys.

  6. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the fertile and sterile flower buds of a dominant genic male sterile line in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Tan, Mingpu; Yu, Haijuan; Li, Liang; Zhou, Fang; Yang, Minmin; Zhou, Ting; Zhao, Yingzhong

    2016-11-10

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is a globally important oilseed crop with highly-valued oil. Strong hybrid vigor is frequently observed within this crop, which can be exploited by the means of genic male sterility (GMS). We have previously developed a dominant GMS (DGMS) line W1098A that has great potential for the breeding of F1 hybrids. Although it has been genetically and anatomically characterized, the underlying molecular mechanism for male sterility remains unclear and therefore limits the full utilization of such GMS line. In this study, RNA-seq based transcriptome profiling was carried out in two near-isogenic DGMS lines (W1098A and its fertile counterpart, W1098B) to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to male sterility. A total of 1,502 significant DEGs were detected, among which 751 were up-regulated and 751 were down-regulated in sterile flower buds. A number of DEGs were implicated in both ethylene and JA synthesis & signaling pathway; the expression of which were either up- or down-regulated in the sterile buds, respectively. Moreover, the majority of NAC and WRKY transcription factors implicated from the DEGs were up-regulated in sterile buds. By querying the Plant Male Reproduction Database, 49 sesame homologous genes were obtained; several of these encode transcription factors (bHLH089, MYB99, and AMS) that showed reduced expression in sterile buds, thus implying the possible role in specifying or determining tapetal fate and development. The predicted effect of allelic variants on the function of their corresponding DEGs highlighted several Insertions/Deletions (InDels), which might be responsible for the phenotype of sterility/fertility in DGMS lines. The present comparative transcriptome study suggested that both hormone signaling pathway and transcription factors control the male sterility of DGMS in sesame. The results also revealed that several InDels located in DEGs prone to cause loss of function, which might contribute to

  7. Pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in male rabbits after acute and chronic administration and effect of chronic treatment on seminal prostaglandins, sperm quality and fertility.

    PubMed

    Löscher, W; Lüttgenau, H; Schlegel, W; Krüger, S

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were determined to find dosage regimens by which drug concentrations known as active from human anti-inflammatory therapy could be reached and maintained in rabbits during continued administration. Based on the pharmacokinetics and side-effects of the different drugs, phenylbutazone was selected for the fertility experiments. Treatment of male rabbits with phenylbutazone for 9 consecutive days significantly reduced seminal concentrations of PGE-2 and PGF-2 alpha and tended to increase ejaculate volumes, sperm motility, and fertility. These results indicate that, at least in rabbits, inhibition of PG synthesis by prolonged treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs does not impair male fertility. Instead, chronic treatment with the drugs at non-toxic doses may improve sperm quality and fertility.

  8. Efficient plant male fertility depends on vegetative nuclear movement mediated by two families of plant outer nuclear membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Meier, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nuclear migration is important for eukaryotic development. Although nuclear migration is conserved in plants, its importance for plant development has not yet been established. The most extraordinary plant nuclear migration events involve plant fertilization, which is starkly different from that of animals. Instead of evolving self-propelled sperm cells (SCs), plants use pollen tubes to deliver SCs, in which the pollen vegetative nucleus (VN) and the SCs migrate as a unit toward the ovules, a fundamental but barely understood process. Here, we report that WPP domain-interacting proteins (WIPs) and their binding partners the WPP domain-interacting tail-anchored proteins (WITs) are essential for pollen nuclear migration. Loss-of-function mutations in WIT and/or WIP gene families resulted in impaired VN movement, inefficient SC delivery, and defects in pollen tube reception. WIPs are Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 Homology (KASH) analogs in plants. KASH proteins are key players in animal nuclear migration. Thus, this study not only reveals an important nuclear migration mechanism in plant fertilization but also, suggests that similar nuclear migration machinery is conserved between plants and animals. PMID:25074908

  9. Surrogate Endpoints in Suicide Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortzel, Hal S.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Breshears, Ryan E.; Harwood, Jeri E.

    2010-01-01

    Surrogate endpoints frequently substitute for rare outcomes in research. The ability to learn about completed suicides by investigating more readily available and proximate outcomes, such as suicide attempts, has obvious appeal. However, concerns with surrogates from the statistical science perspective exist, and mounting evidence from…

  10. Surrogate Endpoints in Suicide Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortzel, Hal S.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Breshears, Ryan E.; Harwood, Jeri E.

    2010-01-01

    Surrogate endpoints frequently substitute for rare outcomes in research. The ability to learn about completed suicides by investigating more readily available and proximate outcomes, such as suicide attempts, has obvious appeal. However, concerns with surrogates from the statistical science perspective exist, and mounting evidence from…

  11. [Effect of Guilingji Capsule on the fertility, liver functions, and serum LDH of male SD rats exposed by 900 mhz cell phone].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-Rong; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Ya-Ping; Ma, Xue-Lian; Gong, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-04-01

    To observe the effect of Guilingji Capsule (GC) on the fertility, liver functions, and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of adult male SD rats exposed by 900 MHz cell phone. Totally 18 adult male SD rats and 36 adult female rats in child-bearing period were selected and randomly divided into three groups according to weight equilibrium principle, i.e., the normal group, the radiated group, and the GC group, 6 males and 12 females in each group. Male rats in the normal group and all female rats were not radiated. Male rats in the radiated group and the GC group received radiation for 4 h per day, lasting for 18 successive days. Rats in the GC group received GC suspension at the daily dose of 0. 15 g/kg by gastrogavage at the same time. Equal volume of normal saline was administrated to other male rats. Then male rats were mated with corresponding female rats from the 14th radiation night to the 18th radiation night in the ratio of 1:2. Male rats were killed following on the next morning of ending the radiation. Female rats were normally fed and then killed before delivery. The pregnant outcomes of female rats in responding groups (the rates of pregnancy and the number of death fetus, birth weight, body length, and tail length) were observed and compared. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transferase (AST), AST/ALT, and LDH levels of the male rats were detected by colorimetry. Histological and morphological changes of liver were observed by HE staining. Compared with the normal group, the pregnancy rates of female rats decreased and the number of death fetus increased, the serum LDH level obviously increased in the radiated group (P < 0.05). Serum levels of ALT, AST, and AST/ALT were no significantly changed in the radiated group. The hepatocyte nuclear atrophy and cytoplasm vacuolar degeneration appeared. Compared with the radiated group, the pregnancy rates increased, the number of death fetus dropped, and the serum level of LDH decreased in the GC

  12. Paradoxical Impact of Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis on Male and Female Fertility in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Pachler, Frederik R; Brandsborg, Søren B; Laurberg, Søren

    2017-06-01

    Birth rates in males with ulcerative colitis and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis have not been studied. This study aimed to estimate birth rates in males and females with ulcerative colitis and study the impact of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. This was a retrospective registry-based cohort study that was performed over a 30-year period. Records for parenting a child from the same period were cross-linked with patient records, and birth rates were calculated using 15 through 49 years as age limits. All data were prospectively registered. All patients with ulcerative colitis and ulcerative colitis with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis between 1980 and 2010 were identified in Danish national databases. The primary outcomes measured were birth rates in females and males with ulcerative colitis and ulcerative colitis with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. We included 27,379 patients with ulcerative colitis (12,812 males and 14,567 females); 1544 had ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (792 males and 752 females). Patients with ulcerative colitis have slightly reduced birth rates (males at 40.8 children/1000 years, background population 43.2, females at 46.2 children/1000 years, background population 49.1). After ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, males had increased birth rates at 47.8 children/1000 years in comparison with males with ulcerative colitis without ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (40.5 children/1000 years), whereas females had reduced birth rates at 27.6 children/1000 years in comparison with females with ulcerative colitis without ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (46.8 children/1000 years). Only birth rates were investigated and not fecundability. Furthermore, there is a question about misattributed paternity, but this has previously been shown to be less than 5%. Ulcerative colitis per se has little impact on birth rates in both sexes, but ileal pouch-anal anastomosis surgery leads to a reduction in birth rates in females and an increase in birth rates in males. This has clinical

  13. The impact of sperm protamine deficiency and sperm DNA damage on human male fertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ni, K; Spiess, A-N; Schuppe, H-C; Steger, K

    2016-09-01

    Existing literature suggests evidence that protamine deficiency is related to DNA damage and male fertility. In this meta-analysis, we analyzed the relationship between the ratio of protamine-1 and protamine-2 with male fertility and the association of protamine deficiency with sperm DNA damage. Quality of available cohort studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale checklist. Summary effect estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using a random effects model. The effect of the protamine ratio on male fertility was analyzed in nine studies demonstrating a significantly higher value of the protamine ratio in subfertile men (n = 633) when compared with controls (n = 453, SMD = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.66, Z = 4.42, p < 0.00001). Both protamine mRNA (SMD = 0.45, 95% CI 0.11-0.79, Z = 2.63, p = 0.009) and protein ratio (SMD = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.68, Z = 4.22, p < 0.0001) showed significantly increased values in subfertile patients. The association between protamine deficiency and DNA damage was analyzed in 12 studies (n = 845) exhibiting a combined overall correlation coefficient (COR) of 0.53 (95% CI 0.28-0.71, Z = 3.87, p < 0.001). Protamine deficiency measured by CMA3 staining was significantly associated with sperm DNA damage (COR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.48-0.85, Z = 4.87, p < 0.001), whereas the P1/P2 ratio was not (COR = 0.17, 95% CI -0.16 to 0.46, Z = 0.99, p = 0.33). It is concluded that the protamine ratio represents a suitable biomarker for the assessment of sperm quality and protamine deficiency is closely related with sperm DNA damage. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. Obesity is associated with increased seminal insulin and leptin alongside reduced fertility parameters in a controlled male cohort.

    PubMed

    Leisegang, Kristian; Bouic, Patrick J D; Menkveld, Roelof; Henkel, Ralf R

    2014-05-07

    Obesity appears to be associated with male reproductive dysfunction and infertility, although this has been inconsistent and inconclusive. Insulin and leptin are known mediators and modulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-testes axis, contributing to the regulation of male reproductive potential and overall wellbeing. These hormones are also present in semen influencing sperm functions. Although abdominal obesity is closely associated with insulin resistance (hyperinsulinaemia), hyperleptinaemia and glucose dysfunction, changes in seminal plasma concentrations of insulin, leptin and glucose in obese males has not previously been investigated. This small case controlled study assessed serum and seminal concentrations of insulin, leptin and glucose in obese (BMI > =30; n = 23) and non-obese (BMI < 30; n = 19) males. Following a detailed medical history and examination, participants meeting the inclusion criteria were entered for data analysis. Body parameters such as BMI, waist and hip circumference and the waist hip ratio were measured. Serum and semen samples were collected and assayed for insulin, leptin and glucose. Semen samples also underwent a standard semen analysis, with sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and DNA fragmentation (DF). Obesity was associated with increased serum and seminal insulin and leptin, with no significant difference in seminal glucose. Serum and seminal concentrations of insulin and leptin were positively correlated. Furthermore, obesity was associated with decreased sperm concentration, sperm vitality and increased MMP and DF, with a non-significant impact on motility and morphology. Hyperinsulinaemia and hyperleptinaemia are associated with increased seminal insulin and leptin concentrations, which may negatively impact male reproductive function in obesity. Insulin was also found to be highly concentrated in the seminal plasma of both groups. This data will contribute to the contradictive information

  15. Obesity is associated with increased seminal insulin and leptin alongside reduced fertility parameters in a controlled male cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity appears to be associated with male reproductive dysfunction and infertility, although this has been inconsistent and inconclusive. Insulin and leptin are known mediators and modulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-testes axis, contributing to the regulation of male reproductive potential and overall wellbeing. These hormones are also present in semen influencing sperm functions. Although abdominal obesity is closely associated with insulin resistance (hyperinsulinaemia), hyperleptinaemia and glucose dysfunction, changes in seminal plasma concentrations of insulin, leptin and glucose in obese males has not previously been investigated. Methods This small case controlled study assessed serum and seminal concentrations of insulin, leptin and glucose in obese (BMI > =30; n = 23) and non-obese (BMI < 30; n = 19) males. Following a detailed medical history and examination, participants meeting the inclusion criteria were entered for data analysis. Body parameters such as BMI, waist and hip circumference and the waist hip ratio were measured. Serum and semen samples were collected and assayed for insulin, leptin and glucose. Semen samples also underwent a standard semen analysis, with sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and DNA fragmentation (DF). Results Obesity was associated with increased serum and seminal insulin and leptin, with no significant difference in seminal glucose. Serum and seminal concentrations of insulin and leptin were positively correlated. Furthermore, obesity was associated with decreased sperm concentration, sperm vitality and increased MMP and DF, with a non-significant impact on motility and morphology. Conclusions Hyperinsulinaemia and hyperleptinaemia are associated with increased seminal insulin and leptin concentrations, which may negatively impact male reproductive function in obesity. Insulin was also found to be highly concentrated in the seminal plasma of both groups. This data will contribute

  16. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4bΔ/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis. PMID:26832838

  17. The testis anion transporter 1 (Slc26a8) is required for sperm terminal differentiation and male fertility in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Touré, Aminata; Lhuillier, Pierre; Gossen, Jan A; Kuil, Cor W; Lhôte, David; Jégou, Bernard; Escalier, Denise; Gacon, Gérard

    2007-08-01

    The Slc26 family is a conserved family of anion transporters. In the human, their physiological relevance was highlighted with the discovery of pathogenic mutations in several Slc26 transporters that lead to distinctive clinical disorders (Pendred syndrome, deafness, diastrophic dysplasia, congenital chloride diarrhoea) that are related to the specific distribution of these genes. We previously identified TAT1 as a new family member (Slc26A8), very specifically expressed in male germ cells in both the human and the mouse. To investigate Tat1 function in the male germline, we generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Tat1 gene. Heterozygous and homozygous Tat1 mutant mice were indistinguishable from wild-type littermates concerning survival rate, general appearance and gross behaviour; however, Tat1 null males were sterile due to complete lack of sperm motility and reduced sperm fertilization potential. Ultra-structural analysis revealed defects in flagellar differentiation leading to an abnormal annulus, disorganization of the midpiece-principal piece junction, hairpin bending of the sperm tail with disruption of the axial structures, and abnormal mitochondrial sheath assembly. While ATP levels were normal, ATP consumption was strongly reduced in Tat1 null spermatozoa. Interestingly, Tat1 is located at the annulus, a septin-based circular structure connecting the midpiece to the principal piece. Altogether, our results indicate that Tat1 is a critical component of the sperm annulus that is essential for proper sperm tail differentiation and motility.

  18. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-02-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4b(Δ)/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis.

  19. Male and couple fertility impairment due to HPV-DNA sperm infection: update on molecular mechanism and clinical impact--systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Ferrari, Bruno; Noventa, Marco; Ferrari, Emanuele; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Gangemi, Michele; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences identify Human Papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection as a possible cause of male and couple infertility. It acts through different mechanisms at various steps of human conception and early gestational development. We performed a systematic review to assess the role of HPV semen infection on male and couple infertility. Analysis of available and eligible data does not permit us to fund clear evidences about clinical impact of HPV infection on fertility, although sperm parameters impairment is the most widely recognized effect. Regarding biomolecular implications, the available data are often conflicting. More studies are required to define the role of HPV sperm infection in clinical practice. The great majority of evidences are obtained by in vitro studies and this fact represents a limitation for the clinical management of HPVDNA sperm infection. Understanding the biological significance of HPV-DNA semen infection could permit us to explain most of the idiopathic male and couple infertility, leading to a better management of infertile men and a better timing for sperm banking storage before ART cycles.

  20. Transposon Tagging of a Male-Sterility, Female-Sterility Gene, St8, Revealed that the Meiotic MER3 DNA Helicase Activity Is Essential for Fertility in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Jordan; Pudake, Ramesh N.; Johnson, Callie; Kleinhans, Kaylin; Ollhoff, Alexandrea; Palmer, Reid G.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder

    2016-01-01

    The W4 locus in soybean encodes a dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR2) that regulates pigmentation patterns in flowers and hypocotyl. The mutable w4-m allele that governs variegated flowers has arisen through insertion of a CACTA-type transposable element, Tgm9, in DFR2. In the w4-m line, reversion from variegated to purple flower indicates excision of Tgm9, and its insertion at a new locus. Previously, we have identified a male-sterile, female-sterile mutant among the selfed progenies of a revertant plant carrying only purple flowers. Co-segregation between Tgm9 and the sterility phenotype suggested that the mutant was generated by insertion of Tgm9 at the St8 locus. The transposon was localized to exon 10 of Glyma.16G072300 that shows high identity to the MER3 DNA helicase involved in crossing over. Molecular analysis of fertile branches from two independent revertant plants confirmed precise excision of Tgm9 from the st8 allele, which restored fertility. In soybean, the gene is expressed in flower-buds, trifoliate leaves and stem. Phylogenetic analysis placed St8 in a clade with the Arabidopsis and rice MER3 suggesting that St8 is most likely the orthologous MER3 soybean gene. This study established the utility of Tgm9 in gene identification as well as in forward and reverse genetics studies. PMID:26930200

  1. Fertility and Markers of Male Reproductive Function in Inuit and European Populations Spanning Large Contrasts in Blood Levels of Persistent Organochlorines

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Toft, Gunnar; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Giwercman, Aleksander; Spano, Marcello; Manicardi, Gian Carlo; Bizzaro, Davide; Ludwicki, Jan K.; Zvyezday, Valentina; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C.; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Jönsson, Bo A.G.; Thulstrup, Ane Marie

    2008-01-01

    Objective We synthesized the main findings from an international epidemiologic study on the impact of biopersistent organic pollutants (POPs) on human reproductive function. Data sources and extraction We used a database with interview and biological data from 2,269 women and their spouses, and 18 published core papers. Data synthesis The study did not provide direct evidence of hormone-like activity of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener CB-153 and the main dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolite, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p′-DDE), as serum concentrations of these compounds were not consistently related to either endogenous or exogenous hormone activity in serum. Nevertheless several links bewteen POP exposure and biomarkers of male reproductive function were identified. First, an association between high CB-153 serum levels and low sperm counts was detected within a subgroup of men with short androgen receptor CAG repeat length. Second, a relationship between increased CB-153 serum concentrations and decreased sperm motility was seen in all four studied regions, and indications of reduced neutral α-glucosidase activity in seminal plasma point to a post-testicular effect. Third, damage of sperm chromatin integrity was considerably less frequent in Greenlandic Inuits compared with that in European groups, and only in the latter was impairment of sperm chromatin integrity related to POPs. Despite these effects, fertility in terms of time taken to conceive was not related to POPs except in Inuits. A likely explanation of the latter was not identified. Conclusions POPs may interfere with male reproductive function without major impact on fertility. The data do not provide direct evidence for endocrine disruption, hence other mechanisms should also be considered. PMID:18335090

  2. Economic endpoints in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cook, John; Drummond, Michael; Heyse, Joseph F

    2004-04-01

    Healthcare decision makers are increasingly requesting information on the cost and cost-effectiveness of new medicines at the time of product launch. In order to provide this information, data on healthcare resource utilization and, in some cases, costs, may be collected in clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss some of the issues statisticians need to address when it is appropriate to include these economic endpoints in the trial. Several design issues are discussed, including the alternative types of and methods for collecting economic endpoint data, sample size and generalizability. Alternative approaches in the analysis of resource utilization, cost and cost-effectiveness are also presented. Finally, several of the analytic approaches are applied to actual data from a clinical trial.

  3. Evaluating Candidate Principal Surrogate Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Hudgens, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Frangakis and Rubin (2002, Biometrics 58, 21–29) proposed a new definition of a surrogate endpoint (a “principal” surrogate) based on causal effects. We introduce an estimand for evaluating a principal surrogate, the causal effect predictiveness (CEP) surface, which quantifies how well causal treatment effects on the biomarker predict causal treatment effects on the clinical endpoint. Although the CEP surface is not identifiable due to missing potential outcomes, it can be identified by incorporating a baseline covariate(s) that predicts the biomarker. Given case–cohort sampling of such a baseline predictor and the biomarker in a large blinded randomized clinical trial, we develop an estimated likelihood method for estimating the CEP surface. This estimation assesses the “surrogate value” of the biomarker for reliably predicting clinical treatment effects for the same or similar setting as the trial. A CEP surface plot provides a way to compare the surrogate value of multiple biomarkers. The approach is illustrated by the problem of assessing an immune response to a vaccine as a surrogate endpoint for infection. PMID:18363776

  4. Assessment of spermatozoa in fertile alpaca (Vicugna pacos) males: Study of sperm head morphometry using a nonautomated digital method and sperm morphology based on strict criteria.

    PubMed

    Evangelista-Vargas, D; Evangelista-Vargas, S; Valdivia, M; Santiani, A

    2017-04-01

    Although computer-assisted systems for sperm morphometry and morphological analysis are important tools in the study of male fertility, their use in extensive systems in alpacas is limited by factors such as the expense of equipment and the high altitudes of the Andean region. The objectives of this study were to evaluate alpaca sperm head morphometry using a nonautomated digital method and determine the frequency of sperm abnormalities based on strict criteria for sperm morphology in fertile male alpacas. Ejaculates (n = 15) from seven alpacas were collected, and sperm smears stained with modified Papanicolaou were processed. For morphometric analysis, 3,000 sperm (200 cells/sample) images were captured at 400× magnification and Quick Photo MICRO 3.0 software was used for manual measurement of basic (sperm head length, width, perimeter and area) and derived variables (ellipticity, shape factor, elongation and regularity). For morphology assessment, smears were observed at 1000× magnification according to WHO and strict criteria. Average morphometric parameters were length 5.48 μm, width 2.99 μm, perimeter 13.62 μm, area 12.43 μm(2) , ellipticity 1.86, shape factor 1.20, elongation 0.29 and regularity 1.05. Significant between-individual and within-individual differences were found in morphometric parameters. Based on morphometric study, sperm heads were classified as elliptical or normal (49%), long (18%), short (2%), pyriform (12%), round (9%), large (6%) and small (4%). Morphological analysis found no additional sperm head defects in 49% of normal sperm obtained by morphometry, although a 4% incidence of neck/mid-piece defects and a 16% incidence of principal-piece defects were found. We conclude that sperm head morphometry assessment in fertile alpacas using a nonautomated digital method is feasible, and that defects in sperm heads constitute the main morphological alteration (>50% of the sperm population), based on WHO and strict criteria. © 2016

  5. Drosophila mitoferrin is essential for male fertility: evidence for a role of mitochondrial iron metabolism during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mammals and Drosophila melanogaster share some striking similarities in spermatogenesis. Mitochondria in spermatids undergo dramatic morphological changes and syncytial spermatids are stripped from their cytoplasm and then individually wrapped by single membranes in an individualization process. In mammalian and fruit fly testis, components of the mitochondrial iron metabolism are expressed, but so far their function during spermatogenesis is unknown. Here we investigate the role of Drosophila mitoferrin (dmfrn), which is a mitochondrial carrier protein with an established role in the mitochondrial iron metabolism, during spermatogenesis. Results We found that P-element insertions into the 5'-untranslated region of the dmfrn gene cause recessive male sterility, which was rescued by a fluorescently tagged transgenic dmfrn genomic construct (dmfrnvenus). Testes of mutant homozygous dmfrnSH115 flies were either small with unorganized content or contained some partially elongated spermatids, or testes were of normal size but lacked mature sperm. Testis squashes indicated that spermatid elongation was defective and electron micrographs showed mitochondrial defects in elongated spermatids and indicated failed individualization. Using a LacZ reporter and the dmfrnvenus transgene, we found that dmfrn expression in testes was highest in spermatids, coinciding with the stages that showed defects in the mutants. Dmfrn-venus protein accumulated in mitochondrial derivatives of spermatids, where it remained until most of it was stripped off during individualization and disposed of in waste bags. Male sterility in flies with the hypomorph alleles dmfrnBG00456 and dmfrnEY01302 over the deletion Df(3R)ED6277 was increased by dietary iron chelation and suppressed by iron supplementation of the food, while male sterility of dmfrnSH115/Df(3R)ED6277 flies was not affected by food iron levels. Conclusions In this work, we show that mutations in the Drosophila mitoferrin gene

  6. Occupational risk for male infertility: a case-control study of 218 infertile and 227 fertile men.

    PubMed

    Chia, S E; Tay, S K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if certain occupations pose an increased risk for infertility (of no known cause) among a group of infertile men compared with a group of fertile men. A total of 640 consecutive men whose spouses were unable to conceive were recruited from an infertility clinic. Of these, 218 men (cases) were found to have no known cause for their infertility. A total of 227 men whose spouses were pregnant at the time of the study were recruited as controls. The Singapore Standard Occupational Classification was used to code the subjects' occupations. Semen parameters (density, total sperm counts, motility, viability, and normal morphology) in all of the cases were significantly poorer than those in the controls. The risk for infertility is associated with smoking adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.85 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91 to 4.24. Work, independently, is not a risk factor for infertility. Engineering technicians (adjusted OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.36 to 5.54), finance analysts (adjusted OR, 4.66; 95% CI, 1.90 to 11.40), corporate and computing managers (adjusted OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.98), and teachers (adjusted OR, 7.72; 95% CI, 1.86 to 32.10) were at a greater risk of infertility compared with "services and clerical workers." Using services and clerical workers as a reference group, certain occupations are at a higher risk for infertility. Higher work demands and possible electromagnetic field exposure could be contributory factors for infertility.

  7. Establishing a group of endpoints to support collective operations without specifying unique identifiers for any endpoints

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksom, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanghon

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  8. UPF2, a nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor, is required for prepubertal Sertoli cell development and male fertility by ensuring fidelity of the transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianqiang; Tang, Chong; Yuan, Shuiqiao; Porse, Bo T; Yan, Wei

    2015-01-15

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) represents a highly conserved RNA surveillance mechanism through which mRNA transcripts bearing premature termination codons (PTCs) are selectively degraded to maintain transcriptomic fidelity in the cell. Numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated the importance of the NMD pathway; however, evidence supporting its physiological necessity has only just started to emerge. Here, we report that ablation of Upf2, which encodes a core NMD factor, in murine embryonic Sertoli cells (SCs) leads to severe testicular atrophy and male sterility owing to rapid depletion of both SCs and germ cells during prepubertal testicular development. RNA-Seq and bioinformatic analyses revealed impaired transcriptomic homeostasis in SC-specific Upf2 knockout testes, characterized by an accumulation of PTC-containing transcripts and the transcriptome-wide dysregulation of genes encoding splicing factors and key proteins essential for SC fate control. Our data demonstrate an essential role of UPF2-mediated NMD in prepubertal SC development and male fertility. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Drosophila Larp associates with poly(A)-binding protein and is required for male fertility and syncytial embryo development.

    PubMed

    Blagden, Sarah P; Gatt, Melanie K; Archambault, Vincent; Lada, Karolina; Ichihara, Keiko; Lilley, Kathryn S; Inoue, Yoshihiro H; Glover, David M

    2009-10-01

    As the influence of mRNA translation upon cell cycle regulation becomes clearer, we searched for genes that might specify such control in Drosophila. A maternal-effect lethal screen identified mutants in the Drosophila gene for Larp (La-related protein) which displayed maternal-effect lethality and male sterility. A role for La protein has already been implicated in mRNA translation whereas Larp has been proposed to regulate mRNA stability. Here we demonstrate that Larp exists in a physical complex with, and also interacts genetically with, the translation regulator poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). Most mutant alleles of pAbp are embryonic lethal. However hypomorphic pAbp alleles show similar meiotic defects to larp mutants. We find that larp mutant-derived syncytial embryos show a range of mitotic phenotypes, including failure of centrosomes to migrate around the nuclear envelope, detachment of centrosomes from spindle poles, the formation of multipolar spindle arrays and cytokinetic defects. We discuss why the syncytial mitotic cycles and male meiosis should have a particularly sensitive requirement for Larp proteins in regulating not only transcript stability but also potentially the translation of mRNAs.

  10. Study of Seminal Fluid Parameters and Fertility of Male Sickle Cell Disease Patients and Potential Impact of Hydroxyurea Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Lulup Kumar; Kullu, Bipin Kishore; Patel, Siris; Patel, Nayan Kumar; Rout, Pragyan; Purohit, Prasanta; Meher, Satyabrata

    2017-06-01

    Male Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients often have moderate to severe hypogonadism resulting in abnormal seminal fluid parameters due to testicular dysfunction. Hydroxyurea (HU), the only drug found to be effective in preventing morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease patients has been found to further aggravate the testicular dysfunction. This was a prospective study done at a tertiary care hospital over 26 months between September 2011 to October 2013. 100 male sickle cell disease patients of age group 15 to 45 years were recruited in the study. We evaluated seminal fluid indices in all patients and the effect of hydroxyurea on seminal fluid parameters. Hydroxyurea was given at low dose of 10mg/kg/day orally to patients with frequent vaso-occlusive crisis and frequent need of blood transfusion. Seminal fluid analysis was done according to WHO criteria before starting hydroxyurea and every 3 months after initiation of hydroxyurea. Patients with abnormal seminal parameters before hydroxyurea therapy were not given hydroxyurea therapy. Patients with abnormal sperm parameters were subjected for FNAC of testis. In sickle cell disease patients with hydroxyurea therapy, who developed abnormal seminal fluid parameters, hydroxyurea was stopped for 3 months and seminal fluid parameters were re-evaluated. Patients who had recovery of seminal indices after hydroxyurea cessation were restarted with hydroxyurea therapy at low dose. Among Sickle cell disease patients without hydroxyurea therapy, 18% of patients developed oligospermia and 4% developed azoospermia. Among sickle cell disease patients with hydroxyurea therapy, 20% of patients developed oligospermia and 10% developed azoospermia. Seminal fluid parameters reverted back to normal after stoppage of hydroxyurea for 3 months in 73% of patients. Alteration of sperm parameters is seen in a significant number of sickle cell disease patients. Also, alterations of seminal fluid parameters are exacerbated by hydroxyurea

  11. Pathophysiological Progression Model for Selected Toxicological Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    The existing continuum paradigms are effective models to organize toxicological data associated with endpoints used in human health assessments. A compendium of endpoints characterized along a pathophysiological continuum would serve to: weigh the relative importance of effects o...

  12. Embryonic pathogenesis of hypogonadism and renal hypoplasia in hgn/hgn rats characterized by male sterility, reduced female fertility and progressive renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroetsu; Yagi, Mio; Saito, Kenichi; Suzuki, Katsushi

    2007-03-01

    Congenital hypoplasia and dysplasia affect the postnatal development of organs, their physiological functioning in adulthood and the incidence of related diseases at an advanced age. Hypogonadic (hgn/hgn) rats are characterized by male sterility, reduced female fertility, progressive renal insufficiency and growth retardation, all controlled by a single recessive allele (hgn) located on chromosome 10. Since our previous studies indicated that the hypoplasia (dysplasia) of the affected organs was present at birth, we examined the embryonic pathogenesis. We mated hgn/hgn females to Brown Norway males and backcrossed F(1) males to hgn/hgn females. The resulting N(1) fetuses were genotyped using a hgn-linked microsatellite. Both sexes of hgn/hgn fetuses showed low body weight after embryonic day (ED) 15.5 and renal hypoplasia after ED 17.5. Their kidneys contained a reduced number of nephrons in a poorly formed nephrogenic zone and renal cortex. The hgn/hgn ovaries contained a small number of oogonia at ED 15.5 and oocytes after ED 17.5. Testicular growth defects were obvious after ED 17.5, and reduced numbers of Sertoli cells were detected at ED 19.5 and 21.5. The seminiferous cords in hgn/hgn testes contained more apoptotic and mitotic cells than those in +/hgn testes. These findings suggest that the phenotypes described in adult hgn/hgn rats result from embryonic hypogenesis, which continues to early postnatal stage and causes a reduction in functional tissues and cells. Since hgn/hgn rats have an insertion mutation in the microtubule-associated protein Spag5 gene, the embryonic hypogenesis described in hgn/hgn rats might result from defective cell proliferation.

  13. Registration of cytoplasmic male-sterile oilseed sunflower genetic stocks CMS GIG2 and CMS GIG2-RV, and fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) oilseed sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genetic stocks, CMS GIG2 (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx), and CMS GIG2-RV (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx), and corresponding fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx) and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxx...

  14. Dietary selenium deficiency as well as excess supplementation induces multiple defects in mouse epididymal spermatozoa: understanding the role of selenium in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Shalini, Sonia; Bansal, M P

    2008-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is essential for male fertility. The present study was carried out to observe the defects associated with Se deficiency as well as excess Se supplementation by analyzing the sperm ultrastructure and chromatin organization. Different Se status mice were generated viz. Se deficient (group I), Se adequate (group II) and Se excess (group III) by feeding the respective diets for a period of 4 (group Ia, IIa and IIIa) and 8 weeks (group Ib, IIb and IIIb). Reduction in sperm concentration, motility and percentage fertility was observed in Se deficient and Se excess groups. Electron microscopy revealed mitochondrial swelling and gaps between adjacent mitochondria in mice fed Se-deficient diet for 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, several abnormalities such as loose contact of the mitochondrial helix with the plasma membrane, loss of mitochondria, retention of cytoplasmic droplet, fracturing of outer dense fibres and presence of both the midpiece and the principal piece cross-sections in a common plasma membrane were observed. In Se excess group, the predominant defect was the frequent presence of equidistant, cross-sectioned midpieces of the tail embedded in a common cytoplasm. These defects are indicative of loss of sperm motility. Spermatozoa from Se-deficient mice had incompletely condensed chromatin and indicated an increase in occurrence of DNA strand breaks. The animals fed Se excess diet also indicated increase in DNA breaks but this was significantly less than the deficient diet fed groups. Our study reveals the defects associated with Se deficiency that result in loss of reproductive ability and also reflects its possible harmful effects on spermatozoa after prolonged consumption at supranutritional level.

  15. Comparative Transcriptome Profile of the Cytoplasmic Male Sterile and Fertile Floral Buds of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Shiyong; Liu, Touming; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Radish cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been widely used for breeding in Raphanus and Brassica genera. However, the detailed regulation network of the male sterility remains to be determined. Our previous work has shown that the abnormalities in a CMS radish appeared shortly after the tetrad stage when microspores were malformed and the tapetal cells grew abnormally large. In this work, histological analysis shows that anthers are at the tetrad stage when the radish buds are about 1.5 mm in length. Furthermore, a high throughput RNA sequencing technology was employed to characterize the transcriptome of radish buds with length about 1.5 mm from two CMS lines possessing the CMS-inducing orf138 gene and corresponding near-isogenic maintainer lines. A total of 67,140 unigenes were functionally annotated. Functional terms for these genes are significantly enriched in 55 Gene Ontology (GO) groups and 323 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The transcriptome detected transcripts for 72 out of a total of 79 protein genes encoded in the chloroplast genome from radish. In contrast, the radish mitochondrial genome contains 34 protein genes, but only 16 protein transcripts were detected from the transcriptome. The transcriptome comparison between CMS and near-isogenic maintainer lines revealed 539 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), indicating that the false positive rate for comparative transcriptome profiling was clearly decreased using two groups of CMS/maintainer lines with different nuclear background. The level of 127 transcripts was increased and 412 transcripts were decreased in the CMS lines. No change in levels of transcripts except CMS-inducing orf138 was identified from the mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. Some DEGs which would be associated with the CMS, encoding MYB and bHLH transcription factors, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), are discussed. The

  16. The Total Antioxidant Power of Semen and Its Correlation with the Fertility Potential of Human Male Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pahune, Pranjali Prabhakarrao; Choudhari, Ajay Rajeshwar; Muley, Parikshit Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are growing evidences that the damage which is caused to the spermatozoa by the Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) plays a key role in the male infertility. The seminal plasma is endowed with many enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants which protect the spermatozoa against oxidative stress.The present study was undertaken by using a simple, colourimetric, ferric reducing, antioxidant power for assessing the total antioxidant power rather than the individual antioxidants. The measurement of the individual antioxidants in the seminal plasma, such as Superoxide Dismutase, Vitamin E, etc. is time consuming, which often requires sophisticated and expensive techniques and these measurements may not correlate with the quality of semen. Aim: To evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma by estimating the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) of semen in different groups of subjects and to correlate it with the different seminogram parameters. Material and Methods: The semen samples were obtained from 150 male partners of infertile couples who attended the Reproductive Biology Unit (Infertility Clinic) of the Department of Physiology, MGIMS, Sevagram, who were aged 20-58 years and they were analyzed for the routine seminogram parameters. All the subjects were categorized into two main groups, A. The subjects with abnormal ejaculates, who were further sub classified into the following groups i) Asthenoteratozoospermics (n=25) ii) Oligoasthenoteratozoospermics (n=26) and iii) Azoospermics (n=19) and B. The subjects with normal ejaculates (n=80). The total antioxidant power was measured spectrophotometrically by using the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) assay. Results: The Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) was found to be significantly lower in the abnormal ejaculates than in the normal ejaculates. A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the TAC and all the seminogram parameters such as the sperm

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Profile of the Cytoplasmic Male Sterile and Fertile Floral Buds of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Mei, Shiyong; Liu, Touming; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-06

    Radish cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been widely used for breeding in Raphanus and Brassica genera. However, the detailed regulation network of the male sterility remains to be determined. Our previous work has shown that the abnormalities in a CMS radish appeared shortly after the tetrad stage when microspores were malformed and the tapetal cells grew abnormally large. In this work, histological analysis shows that anthers are at the tetrad stage when the radish buds are about 1.5 mm in length. Furthermore, a high throughput RNA sequencing technology was employed to characterize the transcriptome of radish buds with length about 1.5 mm from two CMS lines possessing the CMS-inducing orf138 gene and corresponding near-isogenic maintainer lines. A total of 67,140 unigenes were functionally annotated. Functional terms for these genes are significantly enriched in 55 Gene Ontology (GO) groups and 323 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The transcriptome detected transcripts for 72 out of a total of 79 protein genes encoded in the chloroplast genome from radish. In contrast, the radish mitochondrial genome contains 34 protein genes, but only 16 protein transcripts were detected from the transcriptome. The transcriptome comparison between CMS and near-isogenic maintainer lines revealed 539 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), indicating that the false positive rate for comparative transcriptome profiling was clearly decreased using two groups of CMS/maintainer lines with different nuclear background. The level of 127 transcripts was increased and 412 transcripts were decreased in the CMS lines. No change in levels of transcripts except CMS-inducing orf138 was identified from the mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. Some DEGs which would be associated with the CMS, encoding MYB and bHLH transcription factors, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), are discussed. The

  18. Dose-dependent effects of caffeine in human Sertoli cells metabolism and oxidative profile: relevance for male fertility.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tânia R; Alves, Marco G; Bernardino, Raquel L; Martins, Ana D; Moreira, Ana C; Silva, Joaquina; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-02-03

    Caffeine is a widely consumed substance present in several beverages. There is an increasing consumption of energetic drinks, rich in caffeine, among young individuals in reproductive age. Caffeine has been described as a modulator of cellular metabolism. Hence, we hypothesized that it alters human Sertoli cells (hSCs) metabolism and oxidative profile, which are essential for spermatogenesis. For that purpose, hSCs were cultured with increasing doses of caffeine (5, 50, 500 μM). Caffeine at the lowest concentrations (5 and 50 μM) stimulated lactate production, but only hSCs exposed to 50 μM showed increased expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs). At the highest concentration (500 μM), caffeine stimulated LDH activity to sustain lactate production. Notably, the antioxidant capacity of hSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner and SCs exposed to 500 μM caffeine presented a pro-oxidant potential, with a concurrent increase of protein oxidative damage. Hence, moderate consumption of caffeine appears to be safe to male reproductive health since it stimulates lactate production by SCs, which can promote germ cells survival. Nevertheless, caution should be taken by heavy consumers of energetic beverages and food supplemented with caffeine to avoid deleterious effects in hSCs functioning and thus, abnormal spermatogenesis.

  19. Protective effect of royal jelly on fertility and biochemical parameters in bleomycin-‎induced male rats

    PubMed Central

    Amirshahi, Tayebeh; Najafi, Gholamreza; Nejati, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bleomycin (BL) is a glycopeptide antibiotic obtained from the bacterium Streptomyces verticillus which is routinely used for treatment of human cancers. Royal jelly (RJ) is a production from the hypo pharyngeal, mandibular and post cerebral glands of nurse bees. RJ consists of 66% water, 15% sugars, 5% lipids, and 13% proteins, essential amino acids and vitamins. Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate protective effect of royal jelly on sperm parameters and malondialdehyde (MDA) production in rat. Materials and Methods: Forty adult male wistar rats (220±20gr) were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10). Control group (CG) received normal saline 10 ml/kg twice a week with Intraperitoneal (I.P) for 48 days (0.3 ml/rat(. Royal Jelly group (RJG) received jelly (100 mg/kg daily) for 48 days orally. Bleomycin group (BLG) received BL (10 mg/kg twice a week) with I.P for 48 days. Royal Jelly+ Bleomycin group (RJ+BLG) received royal Jelly (100 mg/kg /day) orally concomitant with BL administration. Sperm count, motility, and viability were investigated and chromatin quality and DNA integrity were also analyzed. Serum testosterone and MDA concentrations were measured as well. Results: BL caused decline significantly (p<0.05) sperm count, sperm viability, motility as well as testosterone concentration compared to control group while significant (p<0.05) increases in immature sperm, sperm with damaged DNA and MDA concentration were announced in BL in comparison with CG and RJ+BLG. Royal jelly improved Bleomycin-induced toxicity on sperm parameters and testosterone and MDA concentrations. Conclusion: The present results support the idea that BL adversely affects sperm parameters and MDA and the RJ with antioxidant properties has positive effects on these parameters. This article extracted from M.Sc. thesis. (Tayebeh amirshahi) PMID:24799882

  20. Semen evaluation and fertility assessment in a purebred dog breeding facility.

    PubMed

    Hesser, Andrea; Darr, Christa; Gonzales, Kris; Power, Heather; Scanlan, Tawny; Thompson, James; Love, Charles; Christensen, Bruce; Meyers, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Semen quality in dogs has not been assessed in a longitudinal study that includes endpoints of female fertility and pregnancy. Although use of artificial insemination with chilled semen is increasingly used in canine reproduction, the resultant level of predictability and odds of fertile matings for dogs is still not fully understood. This research provides, for the first time, comprehensive semen evaluation in a large population of dogs in which fertility has been tracked. Duplicate ejaculates were obtained from 39 Labrador retriever males of the Guide Dogs for the Blind (San Rafael, CA, USA) breeding program. Sperm endpoints were determined in fresh semen and extended chilled semen at 48 hour after collection. Evaluation included total and progressive motility, average path velocity, morphology, membrane lipid peroxidation, presence of sperm reactive oxygen species, sperm chromatin structure, and mitochondrial DNA copy number. Male age ranged from 1 to 10 years and were grouped as young (Y; 1-3 years, n = 21), middle aged (M; 4-6 years, n = 13), and senior (S; 7 years or greater, n = 5) for analysis. The effects of age and sperm state (fresh vs. chilled) on the above sperm endpoints were determined using a linear mixed effects model. Semen endpoint values for all parameters were established for this group of fertile males. Progressive motility was only lower in the senior male chilled samples compared to all other groups, fresh and chilled (P < 0.05). Velocity decreased with increasing age and was lower overall in chilled samples (P < 0.05). Percent morphologically normal sperm was lower in senior dogs compared with the other age groups (P < 0.05). The presence of reactive oxygen species was lower in chilled samples compared with fresh (P < 0.05). For sperm chromatin structure, the senior-aged group had a higher %COMPαt than the middle-aged group (P < 0.05). Bayesian analysis determined that no differences were seen in total motility, membrane

  1. Behavioral endpoints for radiation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Hunt, W. A.; Dalton, T. B.; Kandasamy, S. B.; Harris, A. H.; Ludewig, B.

    1994-10-01

    The relative behavioral effectiveness of heavy particles was evaluated. Using the taste aversion paradigm in rats, the behavioral toxicity of most types of radiation (including 20Ne and 40Ar) was similar to that of 60Co photons. Only 56Fe and 93Nb particles and fission neutrons were significantly more effective. Using emesis in ferrets as the behavioral endpoint, 56Fe particles and neutrons were again the most effective; however, 60Co photons were significantly more effective than 18 MeV electrons. These results suggest that LET does not completely predict behavioral effectiveness. Additionally, exposing rats to 10 cGy of 56Fe particles attenuated amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning. This behavior is one of a broad class of behaviors which depends on the integrity of the dopaminergic system and suggests the possibility of alterations in these behaviors following exposure to heavy particles in a space radiation environment.

  2. Neofunctionalization of Duplicated Tic40 Genes Caused a Gain-of-Function Variation Related to Male Fertility in Brassica oleracea Lineages1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Xiaoling; Shen, Wenhao; Hu, Kaining; Zhou, Zhengfu; Xia, Shengqian; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by functional divergence in the event of polyploidization is a major contributor to evolutionary novelties. The Brassica genus evolved from a common ancestor after whole-genome triplication. Here, we studied the evolutionary and functional features of Brassica spp. homologs to Tic40 (for translocon at the inner membrane of chloroplasts with 40 kDa). Four Tic40 loci were identified in allotetraploid Brassica napus and two loci in each of three basic diploid Brassica spp. Although these Tic40 homologs share high sequence identities and similar expression patterns, they exhibit altered functional features. Complementation assays conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana tic40 and the B. napus male-sterile line 7365A suggested that all Brassica spp. Tic40 homologs retain an ancestral function similar to that of AtTic40, whereas BolC9.Tic40 in Brassica oleracea and its ortholog in B. napus, BnaC9.Tic40, in addition, evolved a novel function that can rescue the fertility of 7365A. A homologous chromosomal rearrangement placed bnac9.tic40 originating from the A genome (BraA10.Tic40) as an allele of BnaC9.Tic40 in the C genome, resulting in phenotypic variation for male sterility in the B. napus near-isogenic two-type line 7365AB. Assessment of the complementation activity of chimeric B. napus Tic40 domain-swapping constructs in 7365A suggested that amino acid replacements in the carboxyl terminus of BnaC9.Tic40 cause this functional divergence. The distribution of these amino acid replacements in 59 diverse Brassica spp. accessions demonstrated that the neofunctionalization of Tic40 is restricted to B. oleracea and its derivatives and thus occurred after the divergence of the Brassica spp. A, B, and C genomes. PMID:25185122

  3. Neofunctionalization of duplicated Tic40 genes caused a gain-of-function variation related to male fertility in Brassica oleracea lineages.

    PubMed

    Dun, Xiaoling; Shen, Wenhao; Hu, Kaining; Zhou, Zhengfu; Xia, Shengqian; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2014-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by functional divergence in the event of polyploidization is a major contributor to evolutionary novelties. The Brassica genus evolved from a common ancestor after whole-genome triplication. Here, we studied the evolutionary and functional features of Brassica spp. homologs to Tic40 (for translocon at the inner membrane of chloroplasts with 40 kDa). Four Tic40 loci were identified in allotetraploid Brassica napus and two loci in each of three basic diploid Brassica spp. Although these Tic40 homologs share high sequence identities and similar expression patterns, they exhibit altered functional features. Complementation assays conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana tic40 and the B. napus male-sterile line 7365A suggested that all Brassica spp. Tic40 homologs retain an ancestral function similar to that of AtTic40, whereas BolC9.Tic40 in Brassica oleracea and its ortholog in B. napus, BnaC9.Tic40, in addition, evolved a novel function that can rescue the fertility of 7365A. A homologous chromosomal rearrangement placed bnac9.tic40 originating from the A genome (BraA10.Tic40) as an allele of BnaC9.Tic40 in the C genome, resulting in phenotypic variation for male sterility in the B. napus near-isogenic two-type line 7365AB. Assessment of the complementation activity of chimeric B. napus Tic40 domain-swapping constructs in 7365A suggested that amino acid replacements in the carboxyl terminus of BnaC9.Tic40 cause this functional divergence. The distribution of these amino acid replacements in 59 diverse Brassica spp. accessions demonstrated that the neofunctionalization of Tic40 is restricted to B. oleracea and its derivatives and thus occurred after the divergence of the Brassica spp. A, B, and C genomes.

  4. Statistical analysis of histopathological endpoints.

    PubMed

    Green, John W; Springer, Timothy A; Saulnier, Amy N; Swintek, Joe

    2014-05-01

    Histopathological assessments of fish from aquatic ecotoxicology studies are being performed with increasing frequency. Aquatic ecotoxicology studies performed for submission to regulatory agencies are usually conducted with multiple subjects (e.g., fish) in each of multiple vessels (replicates) within a water control and within each of several concentrations of a test substance. A number of histopathological endpoints are evaluated in each fish, and a severity score is generally recorded for each endpoint. The severity scores are often recorded using a nonquantitative scale of 0 to 4, with 0 indicating no effect, 1 indicating minimal effect, through 4 for severe effect. Statistical methods often used to analyze these scores suffer from several shortcomings: computing average scores as though scores were quantitative values, considering only the frequency of abnormality while ignoring severity, ignoring any concentration-response trend, and ignoring the possible correlation between responses of individuals within test vessels. A new test, the Rao-Scott Cochran-Armitage by Slices (RSCABS), is proposed that incorporates the replicate vessel experimental design and the biological expectation that the severity of the effect tends to increase with increasing doses or concentrations, while retaining the individual subject scores and taking into account the severity as well as frequency of scores. A power simulation and examples demonstrate the performance of the test. R-based software has been developed to carry out this test and is available free of charge at www.epa.gov/med/Prods_Pubs/rscabs.htm. The SAS-based RSCABS software is available from the first and third authors. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Professionals' views on the issues and challenges arising from providing a fertility preservation service through sperm banking to teenage males with cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Marilyn; Glaser, Adam; Hale, Juliet; Sloper, Patricia

    2004-03-01

    Interviews were undertaken with 22 health and social work professionals. Their analysis was completed using "selective transcription", noting understanding of process, issues and themes, and building a picture against which to consider the analysis of subsequent interviews with teenagers and parents. Professionals were also asked to identify areas for feedback from these participants. This work was part of a larger study of (i) the perceptions of adolescent males and their parents of fertility preservation services following a cancer diagnosis, and (ii) national postal surveys of common practices, areas of variance and issues experienced by professionals in UK regional paediatric oncology centres and licensed assisted conception centres. A large number of concerns were identified, which reflected professionals' difficulties in building and maintaining a relevant, adequate knowledge and skills base given the limited numbers of teenagers offered this service. The lack of appropriate training about the legal and consent frameworks, and the processes involved was also highlighted across all professional groups as was the confusion around professional and legal responsibilities for follow up. Thus, there was considerable professional uncertainty in a number of aspects of this sensitive area of service provision. Consideration needs to be given to the needs for national guidance, for training, support and updating, for liaison between the different health and social care sectors that may be involved, and for appropriate information systems. These need to be in place for each stage of the process, from diagnosis through to eventual discharge from the health system.

  6. Pulsed or continuous electromagnetic field induce p53/p21-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in mouse spermatogenic cells in vitro and thus may affect male fertility.

    PubMed

    Solek, Przemyslaw; Majchrowicz, Lena; Bloniarz, Dominika; Krotoszynska, Ewelina; Koziorowski, Marek

    2017-05-01

    The impact of electromagnetic field (EMF) on the human health and surrounding environment is a common topic investigated over the years. A significant increase in the electromagnetic field concentration arouses public concern about the long-term effects of EMF on living organisms associated with many aspects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pulsed and continuous electromagnetic field (PEMF/CEMF) on mouse spermatogenic cell lines (GC-1 spg and GC-2 spd) in terms of cellular and biochemical features in vitro. We evaluated the effect of EMF on mitochondrial metabolism, morphology, proliferation rate, viability, cell cycle progression, oxidative stress balance and regulatory proteins. Our results strongly suggest that EMF induces oxidative and nitrosative stress-mediated DNA damage, resulting in p53/p21-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Therefore, spermatogenic cells due to the lack of antioxidant enzymes undergo oxidative and nitrosative stress-mediated cytotoxic and genotoxic events, which contribute to infertility by reduction in healthy sperm cells pool. In conclusion, electromagnetic field present in surrounding environment impairs male fertility by inducing p53/p21-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetics and mapping of the R₁₁ gene conferring resistance to recently emerged rust races, tightly linked to male fertility restoration, in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Qi, L L; Seiler, G J; Vick, B A; Gulya, T J

    2012-09-01

    Sunflower oil is one of the major sources of edible oil. As the second largest hybrid crop in the world, hybrid sunflowers are developed by using the PET1 cytoplasmic male sterility system that contributes to a 20 % yield advantage over the open-pollinated varieties. However, sunflower production in North America has recently been threatened by the evolution of new virulent pathotypes of sunflower rust caused by the fungus Puccinia helianthi Schwein. Rf ANN-1742, an 'HA 89' backcross restorer line derived from wild annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), was identified as resistant to the newly emerged rust races. The aim of this study was to elucidate the inheritance of rust resistance and male fertility restoration and identify the chromosome location of the underlying genes in Rf ANN-1742. Chi-squared analysis of the segregation of rust response and male fertility in F(2) and F(3) populations revealed that both traits are controlled by single dominant genes, and that the rust resistance gene is closely linked to the restorer gene in the coupling phase. The two genes were designated as R ( 11 ) and Rf5, respectively. A set of 723 mapped SSR markers of sunflower was used to screen the polymorphism between HA 89 and the resistant plant. Bulked segregant analysis subsequently located R ( 11 ) on linkage group (LG) 13 of sunflower. Based on the SSR analyses of 192 F(2) individuals, R ( 11 ) and Rf5 both mapped to the lower end of LG13 at a genetic distance of 1.6 cM, and shared a common marker, ORS728, which was mapped 1.3 cM proximal to Rf5 and 0.3 cM distal to R ( 11 ) (Rf5/ORS728/R ( 11 )). Two additional SSRs were linked to Rf5 and R ( 11 ): ORS995 was 4.5 cM distal to Rf5 and ORS45 was 1.0 cM proximal to R ( 11 ). The advantage of such an introduced alien segment harboring two genes is its large phenotypic effect and simple inheritance, thereby facilitating their rapid deployment in sunflower breeding programs. Suppressed recombination was observed in LGs 2, 9

  8. A high-resolution linkage map of the Rfd1, a restorer-of-fertility locus for cytoplasmic male sterility in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) produced by a combination of bulked segregant analysis and RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Pyo; Cho, Youngcho; Kim, Sunggil

    2014-10-01

    We utilized a combination of BSA and RNA-Seq to identify SNPs linked to the Rfd1 locus, a restorer-of-fertility gene in radish. A high-density linkage map was constructed using this approach. Male fertility of cytoplasmic male sterility conditioned by the Dongbu cytoplasmic and genic male-sterility cytoplasm can be restored by a restorer-of-fertility locus, Rfd1, in radish. To construct a high-density linkage map and to identify a candidate gene for the Rfd1 locus, bulked segregant analysis and RNA-seq approaches were combined. A total of 26 and 28 million reads produced from male-fertile and male-sterile bulked RNA were mapped to the radish reference unigenes. After stringent screening of SNPs, 327 reliable SNPs of 109 unigenes were selected. Arabidopsis homologs for 101 of the 109 genes were clustered around the 4,000 kb region of Arabidopsis chromosome 3, which was syntenic to the Rfd1 flanking region. Since the reference unigene set was incomplete, the contigs were de novo assembled to identify 134 contigs harboring SNPs. Most of SNP-containing contigs were also clustered on the same syntenic region in Arabidopsis chromosome. A total of 21 molecular markers positioned within a 2.1 cM interval including the Rfd1 locus were developed, based on the selected unigenes and contigs. A segregating population consisting of 10,459 individuals was analyzed to identify recombinants containing crossovers within this interval. A total of 284 identified recombinants were then used to construct a high-density map, which delimited the Rfd1 locus into an 83-kb syntenic interval of Arabidopsis chromosome 3. Since no candidate gene, such as a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR)-coding gene, was found in this interval, 231 unigenes and 491 contigs containing putative PPR motifs were analyzed further, but no PPR gene in linkage disequilibrium with the Rfd1 locus could be found.

  9. Correlating pharmacokinetics and teratogenic endpoints.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, C A; Young, J F

    1983-01-01

    The use of pharmacokinetics can improve the extrapolation of animal teratology data for human risk evaluation. Before one can extrapolate between species, however, the pharmacokinetic model must be predictable within the species for which it was developed. This article summarizes an approach being used for correlating pharmacokinetics and teratology endpoints in the same animal and predicting the teratogenic outcome for other animals of the same species. With the aid of micro-sampling procedures, and sensitive and rapid analytical techniques, blood, urine and feces samples are obtained from individual animals following dosing and the data are simulated using a hybrid computer to develop a pharmacokinetic model. The model is validated in other animals by measuring the parent compound and metabolites in various "compartments" predicted by the model. Then the pharmacokinetic model is tested by predicting the teratogenic outcome in single ani-analyses indicated the most predictive pharmacokinetic parameters to be two maternal blood concentration values. Prediction of the teratogenic outcome based on these parameters was accurate for 74% of the litters in the 95% confidence interval. This approach is discussed as it relates to its utility for other exposure routes and for extrapolation to other species.

  10. Characterization of null and hypomorphic alleles of the Drosophila l(2)dtl/cdt2 gene: Larval lethality and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Roketa S; Swanson, Christina I; Gavilano, Lily; Smith, Kristen N; Malek, Pamela Y; Snow-Smith, Mayronne; Duronio, Robert J; Key, S Catherine Silver

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila lethal(2)denticleless (l(2)dtl) gene was originally reported as essential for embryogenesis and formation of the rows of tiny hairs on the larval ventral cuticle known as denticle belts. It is now well-established that l(2)dtl (also called cdt2) encodes a subunit of a Cullin 4-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets a number of key cell cycle regulatory proteins, including p21, Cdt1, E2F1 and Set8, to prevent replication defects and maintain cell cycle control. To investigate the role of l(2)dtl/cdt2 during development, we characterized existing l(2)dtl/cdt2 mutants and generated new deletion alleles, using P-element excision mutagenesis. Surprisingly, homozygous l(2)dtl/cdt2 mutant embryos developed beyond embryogenesis, had intact denticle belts, and lacked an observable embryonic replication defect. These mutants died during larval stages, affirming that loss of l(2)dtl/cdt2 function is lethal. Our data show that L(2)dtl/Cdt2 is maternally deposited, remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle, and has a previously unreported, elevated expression in the developing gonads. We also find that E2f1 regulates l(2)dtl/cdt2 expression during embryogenesis, possibly via several highly conserved putative E2f1 binding sites near the l(2)dtl/cdt2 promoter. Finally, hypomorphic allele combinations of the l(2)dtl/cdt2 gene result in a novel phenotype: viable, low-fertility males. We conclude that "denticleless" is a misnomer, but that l(2)dtl/cdt2 is an essential gene for Drosophila development.

  11. The roles played by mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes in reversion to fertility in S-Type male-sterile maize. Progress report, April 1, 1985--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Laughnan, J.R.

    1995-03-01

    This is a progress report/renewal request for work of the roles played by mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes in reversion to fertility in s-type male sterile maize. Information is included for the following major catagories of research on this project: molecular basis for nuclear reversion; molecular characterization of cytoplasmic revertants; nuclear control over cytoplasmic reversion and over replication of S1 and S2; developmental studies; transposition of nuclear restorer elements.

  12. Expanding the ecotoxicological toolbox: the inclusion of polychaete reproductive endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ceri; Watson, Gordon J

    2012-04-01

    In the last 15 years the diversity of pollutants and routes of impact have increased. However, the polychaete families, species and endpoints investigated have remained fairly constant. Reproductive outputs are more ecologically relevant than adult physiological or biochemical changes. Nevertheless, there remains a paucity of data on the reproductive responses of the popular species to pollutants which limits our ability to understand the true ecological impacts of such contaminants on natural populations. We highlight the current knowledge gaps in our understanding of the impacts of pollutants on the 'model' species' reproductive biology and therefore the potential ecological impacts of such contaminants on their natural populations, and the potential benefits of a wider use of polychaete reproductive endpoints for ecotoxicological assessments. The following priority areas are suggested for inclusion in the polychaete ecotoxicology toolbox: 1. Include reproductive endpoints as assessments of ecotoxicology for the traditional 'model' species and those that have different reproductive traits to ensure broad ecological relevance. 2. Nereids and Arenicola marina should be used to investigate the interaction of pollutants with the endocrine/environmental control of reproduction. 3. Polychaetes are ideal for addressing the under representation of male eco-toxicity effects. 4. Emerging pollutants should be assessed with reproductive endpoints together with the traditional biomarkers. 5. Effects of pollutants on larval behaviour need to be explored considering the limited but equivocal results so far.

  13. Surrogate endpoint analysis: an exercise in extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G; Kramer, Barnett S

    2013-03-06

    Surrogate endpoints offer the hope of smaller or shorter cancer trials. It is, however, important to realize they come at the cost of an unverifiable extrapolation that could lead to misleading conclusions. With cancer prevention, the focus is on hypothesis testing in small surrogate endpoint trials before deciding whether to proceed to a large prevention trial. However, it is not generally appreciated that a small surrogate endpoint trial is highly sensitive to a deviation from the key Prentice criterion needed for the hypothesis-testing extrapolation. With cancer treatment, the focus is on estimation using historical trials with both surrogate and true endpoints to predict treatment effect based on the surrogate endpoint in a new trial. Successively leaving out one historical trial and computing the predicted treatment effect in the left-out trial yields a standard error multiplier that summarizes the increased uncertainty in estimation extrapolation. If this increased uncertainty is acceptable, three additional extrapolation issues (biological mechanism, treatment following observation of the surrogate endpoint, and side effects following observation of the surrogate endpoint) need to be considered. In summary, when using surrogate endpoint analyses, an appreciation of the problems of extrapolation is crucial.

  14. [Immunological surrogate endpoints to evaluate vaccine efficacy].

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengfei; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Fengcai

    2015-12-01

    An immunological surrogate endpoints is a vaccine-induced immune response (either humoral or cellular immune) that predicts protection against clinical endpoints (infection or disease), and can be used to evaluate vaccine efficacy in clinical vaccine trials. Compared with field efficacy trials observing clinical endpoints, immunological vaccine trials could reduce the sample size or shorten the duration of a trial, which promote the license and development of new candidate vaccines. For these reasons, establishing immunological surrogate endpoints is one of 14 Grand Challenges of Global Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. From two parts of definition and statistical methods for evaluation of surrogate endpoints, this review provides a more comprehensive description.

  15. Cancer and fertility: strategies to preserve fertility.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, K; Fauser, B C J M; Devroey, P

    2011-03-01

    Fertility preservation is a key component of cancer management in young people. The Fourth Evian Annual Reproduction Workshop Meeting was held in April 2009 to discuss cancer and fertility in young adults. Specialists in oncology, assisted reproduction, embryology and clinical genetics presented published data and ongoing research on cancer and fertility, with particular focus on strategies to preserve fertility. This report is based on the expert presentations and group discussions, supplemented with publications from literature searches and the authors' knowledge. Fertility preservation should be considered for all young people undergoing potentially gonadotoxic cancer treatment. A variety of options are required to facilitate safe and effective fertility preservation for individual patients. Sperm banking is a simple and low-cost intervention. Embryo cryopreservation is the only established method of female fertility preservation. Oocyte cryopreservation offers a useful option for women without a male partner. Emergency ovarian stimulation and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue (followed by tissue transplantation or in-vitro maturation of oocytes) are experimental techniques for women who require urgent cancer treatment. Further prospective studies are required to validate cryopreservation of oocytes and ovarian tissue, in-vitro maturation of oocytes and new vitrification techniques and to identify any long-term sequelae of slow freezing of embryos.

  16. Fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-06-07

    Essential facts [Figure: see text] Fertility preservation involves freezing and storing eggs, sperm, embryos and ovarian or testicular tissue for use in a person's future fertility treatment. Men and women may wish to preserve their fertility for a variety of reasons, including delaying parenthood and allowing treatment of a medical condition that may affect future fertility, including some cancer treatments.

  17. Effects of the leaf decoction of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) on Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability Transition Pore (MMPTP) and fertility in normal male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Odewusi, A F; Oyeyemi, M O; Olayemi, F O; Emikpe, B; Ehigie, L O; Adisa, R A; Olorunsogo, O O

    2010-12-01

    groups in comparison to the control group. These findings thus suggest dose-related negative or toxic effects of sub acute (30-day) oral administration of leaf decoction of M. charantia in albino rats and may therefore pose some danger to humans especially in regard to male fertility in individuals who rely on oral administration of the decoction in treating various ailments.

  18. The Rice Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein RF5 Restores Fertility in Hong-Lian Cytoplasmic Male-Sterile Lines via a Complex with the Glycine-Rich Protein GRP162[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Wang, Kun; Huang, Wenchao; Liu, Gai; Gao, Ya; Wang, Jianming; Huang, Qi; Ji, Yanxiao; Qin, Xiaojian; Wan, Lei; Zhu, Renshan; Li, Shaoqing; Yang, Daichang; Zhu, Yingguo

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) phenotype in plants can be reversed by the action of nuclear-encoded fertility restorer (Rf) genes. The molecular mechanism involved in Rf gene–mediated processing of CMS-associated transcripts is unclear, as are the identities of other proteins that may be involved in the CMS–Rf interaction. In this study, we cloned the restorer gene Rf5 for Hong-Lian CMS in rice and studied its fertility restoration mechanism with respect to the processing of the CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79. RF5, a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein, was unable to bind to this CMS-associated transcript; however, a partner protein of RF5 (GRP162, a Gly-rich protein encoding 162 amino acids) was identified to bind to atp6-orfH79. GRP162 was found to physically interact with RF5 and to bind to atp6-orfH79 via an RNA recognition motif. Furthermore, we found that RF5 and GRP162 are both components of a restoration of fertility complex (RFC) that is 400 to 500 kD in size and can cleave CMS-associated transcripts in vitro. Evidence that a PPR protein interacts directly with a Gly-rich protein to form a subunit of the RFC provides a new perspective on the molecular mechanisms underlying fertility restoration. PMID:22247252

  19. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Using DNA-Fragmented Sperm in Mice Negatively Affects Embryo-Derived Embryonic Stem Cells, Reduces the Fertility of Male Offspring and Induces Heritable Changes in Epialleles

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-González, Raúl; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Calero, Antonia; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in mice using DNA-fragmented sperm (DFS) has been linked to an increased risk of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities both in embryos and offspring. This study examines: whether embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from DFS-ICSI embryos reflect the abnormalities observed in the DFS-ICSI progeny; the effect of DFS-ICSI on male fertility; and whether DFS-ICSI induces epigenetic changes that lead to a modified heritable phenotype. DFS-ICSI-produced embryos showed a low potential to generate ESC lines. However, these lines had normal karyotype accompanied by early gene expression alterations, though a normal expression pattern was observed after several passages. The fertility of males in the DFS-ICSI and control groups was compared by mating test. Sperm quantity, vaginal plug and pregnancy rates were significantly lower for the DFS-ICSI-produced males compared to in vivo-produced mice, while the number of females showing resorptions was higher. The epigenetic effects of DFS-ICSI were assessed by analyzing the phenotype rendered by the Axin1Fu allele, a locus that is highly sensitive to epigenetic perturbations. Oocytes were injected with spermatozoa from Axin1Fu/+ mice and the DFS-ICSI-generated embryos were transferred to females. A significantly higher proportion of pups expressed the active kinky-tail epiallele in the DFS-ICSI group than the controls. In conclusion: 1) ESCs cannot be used as a model of DFS-ICSI; 2) DFS-ICSI reduces sperm production and fertility in the male progeny; and 3) DFS-ICSI affects the postnatal expression of a defined epigenetically sensitive allele and this modification may be inherited across generations. PMID:24743851

  20. Discriminant analysis indicates a single sperm protein (SP22) is predictive of fertility following exposure to epididymal toxicants.

    PubMed

    Klinefelter, G R; Laskey, J W; Ferrell, J; Suarez, J D; Roberts, N L

    1997-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that ethane dimethanesulphonate (EDS) compromised the fertilizing ability of proximal cauda epididymal sperm from the rat within 4 days of exposure, an effect that persisted in castrated, testosterone (T)-implanted animals, establishing direct action on the epididymis. This EDS-induced reduction in fertilizing ability was highly correlated with a quantitative decrease in specific sperm protein. Here we sought to determine whether the fertility of proximal cauda epididymal sperm recovered from animals exposed to a variety of male reproductive toxicants could be predicted by assessing quantitative changes in specific sperm protein(s), or whether more common endpoints (e.g., sperm motility, sperm morphology, serum and epididymal tissue T, cauda epididymal sperm reserves) also are required to predict fertility. Intact adult male rats were dosed with EDS (25 or 50 mg/kg), chloroethylmethanesulphonate (CEMS; 12.5 or 18.75 mg/kg), or epichlorohydrin (EPI; 3 or 6 mg/kg) daily for 4 days. Castrated, T-implanted rats were dosed with hydroxyflutamide (HFLUT; 12.5 or 25 mg/kg) daily for 5 days. On day 5, proximal cauda epididymal sperm were inseminated in utero into receptive, cervically stimulated adult females, and on day 9, fertility (implants/corpora lutea) was assessed. Fertility-was decreased by the higher dose of each toxicant (P < 0.05) and also by the lower dose of EPI and HFLUT. Likewise, an acidic 22 kDa sperm protein (SP22) was decreased quantitatively (P < 0.05) in silver-stained two-dimensional gels by the higher dose of each toxicant as well as by the lower dose of EPI and HFLUT. Although sperm motility and serum T were altered by specific exposures, these endpoints were not useful in predicting fertility. In contrast, SP22 was highly correlated (P < 0.0001; r2 = 0.83) with fertility. Indeed, the amount of SP22 correctly predicted 90% and 94% of the fertile (> 50% fertility) and subfertile (< 50 fertility) animals, respectively