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Sample records for malignant colorectal disease-a

  1. Ablative Therapies for Colorectal Polyps and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.; Nurkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques are gaining popularity in the management of colorectal polyps and occasionally superficial cancers. While their use is in many times palliative, they have proven to be curative in carefully selected patients with polyps or malignancies, with less morbidity than radical resection. However, one should note that data supporting local and ablative therapies for colorectal cancer is scarce and may be subject to publication bias. Therefore, for curative intent, these techniques should only be considered in highly select cases as higher rates of local recurrences have also been reported. The aim of this review is to explain the different modalities of local and ablative therapies specific to colorectal neoplasia and explain the indications and circumstances where they have been most successful. PMID:25089281

  2. Primary and recurrent colorectal cancer masquerading as gynaecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Brand, A; Scurry, J; Planner, R; Leung, S

    1996-05-01

    To make clinicians more aware of the phenomenon of primary and recurrent colorectal and anal carcinoma masquerading as primary gynaecological malignancy, we reviewed the records of 8 women referred to our gynaecological oncology unit with primary colorectal cancer (1), recurrent colorectal cancer (6) and primary anal cancer (1). Seven of these patients presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge. All patients had Papanicolaou smears performed; 7 were abnormal and 1 unsuitable for cytological assessment. None of the 6 patients with recurrent carcinoma had been previously treated with more than standard anterior or abdominoperineal resection; no radiotherapy had been given, and only 1 patient had received chemotherapy. These patients were treated in our gynaecological oncology unit for their recurrence by surgery and/or chemotherapy and/or irradiation. All 6 had further recurrences in the pelvis despite this aggressive therapy. Follow-up of colorectal cancer in women should involve gynaecological history, pelvirectal examination and Pap smear at each visit. Correct diagnosis of the colorectal origin of a genital tract tumour is made on careful history, examination and biopsy. An abnormal Pap smear may be the first indication of recurrent colorectal cancer in the cervix and vagina, although most patients ultimately present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. The presence of a tumour invading both cervix and posterior vaginal wall is suggestive of spread from a colorectal tumour compared to the more common lateral spread of a cervical primary.

  3. Risk factor assessment of endoscopically removed malignant colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Netzer, P; Forster, C; Biral, R; Ruchti, C; Neuweiler, J; Stauffer, E; Schonegg, R; Maurer, C; Husler, J; Halter, F; Schmassmann, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Malignant colorectal polyps are defined as endoscopically removed polyps with cancerous tissue which has invaded the submucosa. Various histological criteria exist for managing these patients. 
Aims—To determine the significance of histological findings of patients with malignant polyps. 
Methods—Five pathologists reviewed the specimens of 85 patients initially diagnosed with malignant polyps. High risk malignant polyps were defined as having one of the following: incomplete polypectomy, a margin not clearly cancer-free, lymphatic or venous invasion, or grade III carcinoma. Adverse outcome was defined as residual cancer in a resection specimen and local or metastatic recurrence in the follow up period (mean 67months). 
Results—Malignant polyps were confirmed in 70 cases. In the 32 low risk malignant polyps, no adverse outcomes occurred; 16(42%) of the 38 patients with high risk polyps had adverse outcomes (p<0.001). Independent adverse risk factors were incomplete polypectomy and a resected margin not clearly cancer-free; all other risk factors were only associated with adverse outcome when in combination. 
Conclusion—As no patients with low risk malignant polyps had adverse outcomes, polypectomy alone seems sufficient for these cases. In the high risk group, surgery is recommended when either of the two independent risk factors, incomplete polypectomy or a resection margin not clearly cancer-free, is present or if there is a combination of other risk factors. As lymphatic or venous invasion or grade III cancer did not have an adverse outcome when the sole risk factor, operations in such cases should be individually assessed on the basis of surgical risk. 

 Keywords: malignant polyps; colon cancer; colonoscopy; polypectomy; histology PMID:9824349

  4. Proactive Management for Gastric, Colorectal and Appendiceal Malignancies: Preventing Peritoneal Metastases with Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC).

    PubMed

    Sammartino, Paolo; Biacchi, Daniele; Cornali, Tommaso; Cardi, Maurizio; Accarpio, Fabio; Impagnatiello, Alessio; Sollazzo, Bianca Maria; Di Giorgio, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    An integrated treatment strategy using peritonectomy procedures plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is now a clinical standard of care in selected patients with peritoneal metastases and primary peritoneal tumors. This comprehensive approach can offer many patients, who hitherto had no hope of cure, a good quality of life and survival despite limited morbidity. The increasingly successful results and chance of interfering in the natural history of disease has prompted research to develop for some clinical conditions a therapeutic strategy designed to prevent malignant peritoneal dissemination before it becomes clinically evident and treat it microscopically (tertiary prevention). The main factor governing successful cytoreductive surgery and predicting outcome is the extent of peritoneal spread assessed with the peritoneal cancer index (PCI). In peritoneal metastases from colorectal and gastric cancer the PCI score acquires a specific role acting as the cut-off between patients who can undergo curative surgery or palliation. Long-term results show that the only group enjoying favorable results are patients with limited disease (a statistical minority). By applying to appropriately selected patients with primary malignancies a proactive management strategy including HIPEC we can treat patients with microscopic peritoneal dissemination and therefore at PCI 0. Among treated conditions pseudomyxoma peritonei enjoys the best results. But a major future advance comes from identifying among lesions at major risk of pseudomyxoma. PMID:27065712

  5. Colorectal dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease: a clinicopathologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew D; Riddell, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    Surveillance for neoplasia in colitis is the most challenging diagnostic colonoscopic procedure. The detection and treatment of colorectal dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease remain problematic to the point that unsuspected colorectal cancers (CRCs) are still identified. Excellent bowel preparation and use of high-resolution colonoscopes with chromoendoscopy facilitate the detection and characterization of subtle neoplasia. This approach is superior to taking random biopsy specimens and should be the standard of care for surveillance but requires adequate training. Suspicious lesions should be assessed carefully and described using objective terminology. The terms dysplasia-associated lesions/masses and flat dysplasia are best avoided because they may be open to misinterpretation. Most suspicious lesions detected during surveillance can be removed endoscopically, precluding the need for surgery. Nevertheless, endotherapy in colitis can be difficult as a result of underlying inflammation and scarring. Lesions that are not endoscopically resectable need to be removed surgically, although the possibility that some lesions might be amenable to local resection (including lymphadenectomy) rather than subtotal colectomy may need to be re-evaluated. Despite surveillance programs, patients still present clinically with CRC. This may occur because lesions are missed (possibly because of the failure to use optimal techniques), lesions are not adequately removed, patients fail to return for colonoscopy, or CRCs arise rapidly in mucosa that is minimally dysplastic and the CRCs are not recognized as being potentially invasive even on biopsy. Future advances in, for example, stool DNA assays, use of confocal endomicroscopy, or use of endoscopic ultrasound, may help in the identification of high-risk patients and the assessment of dysplastic lesions.

  6. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed R S; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  7. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Zan; Mo, Lin; Wu, Tong; Tan, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is one of the most important tasks of biomedical research and has become the main objective of medical investigations. The present paper proposed an analytical strategy for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues by combining the use of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with chemometrics. The successive projection algorithm-linear discriminant analysis (SPA-LDA) was used to seek a reduced subset of variables/wavenumbers and build a diagnostic model of LDA. For comparison, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based on full-spectrum classification was also used as the reference. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for a preliminary analysis. A total of 186 spectra from 20 patients with partial colorectal resection were collected and divided into three subsets for training, optimizing, and testing the model. The results showed that, compared to PLS-DA, SPA-LDA provided more parsimonious model using only three wavenumbers/variables (4065, 4173, and 5758 cm(-1)) to achieve the sensitivity of 84.6%, 92.3%, and 92.3% for the training, validation, and test sets, respectively, and the specificity of 100% for each subset. It indicated that the combination of NIR spectroscopy and SPA-LDA algorithm can serve as a potential tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues. PMID:25654106

  9. Optical diagnosis of malignant colorectal polyps: is it feasible?

    PubMed Central

    van der Vlugt, Manon; van Doorn, Sascha Corrie; Wang, Junfeng; Bastiaansen, Barbara AJ; Brosens, Lowewijk AA; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: As colorectal cancer screening programs are being implemented worldwide, an increasing number of early (T1) cancers are being diagnosed. These cancers should be recognized during colonoscopy because they require a specific therapeutic approach. Several studies have shown that Asian experts can reliably recognize T1 cancers during colonoscopy. In daily practice, however, accurate endoscopic diagnosis of T1 cancers still seems challenging. We evaluated the performance of optical diagnosis of T1 cancers by European colonoscopy experts, general gastroenterologists and gastrointestinal fellows. Patients and methods: We collected endoscopic images of 43 colonic lesions: 19 T1 cancers (excluding intramucosal carcinoma) and 24 benign polyps ranging from 7 mm to 30 mm in size. Seven colonoscopy experts, 7 general gastroenterologists, and 14 gastrointestinal fellows assessed these images. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) and their 95 % confidence intervals for optical diagnosis of T1 cancers. Results: Overall sensitivity for correct diagnosis of T1 cancers was 60 % (95 % CI;45 – 72). Sensitivity was highest for experts (67 %: 95 %CI; 48 – 81), when compared to general gastroenterologists (53 %: 95 %CI; 37 – 69) and gastrointestinal fellows (59 %: 95 %CI;45 – 72). The overall NPV was 75 % (95 %CI;60 – 86); NPV was lowest for general gastroenterologists 72 % (95 %CI;57 – 83) vs 78 % (95 %CI;63 – 89) for experts and 75 % (95 %CI;60 – 85) for gastrointestinal fellows. Conclusions: In this image-based study, both sensitivity for the optical diagnosis of a T1 cancer and NPV for excluding a T1 cancer were insufficient. Experts performed best with a sensitivity of 67 % and a NPV of 78 %, while the performance of fellows in the last year of training was comparable to that of experts. Our study

  10. Colonic perforation after stent placement for malignant colorectal obstruction--causes and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Datye, Arundhati; Hersh, Jeff

    2011-05-01

    Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are used to manage malignant colorectal obstruction. Colonic perforation is the most worrisome complication from colonic stenting. We reviewed causes and contributing factors of perforation with colonic stent placement in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Articles from both English and foreign language publications were identified from Medline. Data were collected on causes, timing, treatment and mortality related to perforation. A total of 2287 patients from 82 articles were included in this analysis, which showed an overall perforation rate of 4.9%. Perforation rates for palliation and bridge to surgery (BTS) were not significantly different (4.8% vs. 5.4%, p = 0.66); over 80% occurred within 30 days of stent placement (half during or within one day of the procedure). The mortality rate related to perforation was 0.8% per stented patient, but the mortality of patients experiencing perforation was 16.2%. There was no significant difference (p = 0.78) in the mortality rates between the palliation and the BTS group and concomitant chemotherapy, steroids, and radiotherapy are risk factors of perforation. The overall perforation related mortality is far less than that of patients undergoing emergency surgery for bowel obstruction. PMID:20929424

  11. Morphology as a risk factor for the malignant potential of T2 colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yuichi; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Endo, Shungo; Maeda, Chiyo; Mukai, Shumpei; Maeda, Yasuharu; Kataoka, Shinichi; Takeda, Kenichi; Ichimasa, Katsuro; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Sawada, Naruhiko; Hidaka, Eiji; Ishida, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Currently, depressed type T1 colorectal cancer is often detected and its malignant potential is being revealed. However, few reports have focused on the morphology of T2 colorectal cancer types. The aim of the present retrospective study was to clarify the characteristics of colorectal T2 cancer types derived from depressed type T1 cancer. The present study included 195 patients with colorectal T2 cancer surgically resected at a referral hospital between April 2001 and April 2009. A total of 48 lesions (25%) with lymph node metastasis and 4 (2%) with distant metastasis were found. The lesions were classified by their form during endoscopy into four categories: Group A, depressed type (the periphery consists of normal mucosa); group B, laterally spreading type; group C, protruded type; group D, ulcerative type (the periphery consists of neoplastic mucosa). Tumor size, lymphatic and venous involvement, lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were compared between the four categories. The distribution of patients were as follows: Group A, 73 (37%), group B, 26 (13%), group C, 24 (12%) and group D, 72 (37%). The average tumor size for each category was 23, 51, 30 and 36 mm for groups A, B, C and D, respectively. The number of positive findings for lymphatic involvement, venous involvement, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis for each category were: Group A, 50 (69%), 54 (74%), 19 (26%) and 1 (1%); group B, 14 (54%), 12 (46%), 8 (31%) and 0 (0%); group C, 14 (58%), 8 (33%), 6 (25%) and 0 (0%); group D 35 (49%), 41 (57%), 16 (22%) and 3 (4%). Group A demonstrated a significantly smaller tumor size (P<0.01), and higher rates of lymphatic and venous involvement (P=0.0333 and P=0.0019, respectively). No significant differences were observed between categories with regards to nodal and distant metastases. Of the T2 cancer types, ~40% were the depressed type. Compared with the other forms, depressed type lesions exhibited a smaller tumor size, and higher rates

  12. Size does not determine the grade of malignancy of early invasive colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka; Fujii, Takahiro; Uraoka, Toshio; Nakajima, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Nozomu; Emura, Fabian; Ono, Akiko; Shimoda, Tadakazu; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Fu, Kuang-I; Sano, Yasushi; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the clinicopathological characteristics of small and large early invasive colorectal cancers (EI-CRCs), and to determine whether malignancy grade depends on size. METHODS: A total of 583 consecutive EI-CRCs treated by endoscopic mucosal resection or surgery at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1980 and 2004 were enrolled in this study. Lesions were classified into two groups based on size: small (≤ 10 mm) and large (> 10 mm). Clinicopathological features, incidence of lymph node metastasis (LNM) and risk factors for LNM, such as depth of invasion, lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (PDA) were analyzed in all resected specimens. RESULTS: There were 120 (21%) small and 463 (79%) large lesions. Histopathological analysis of the small lesion group revealed submucosal deep cancer (sm: ≥ 1000 μm) in 90 (75%) cases, LVI in 26 (22%) cases, and PDA in 12 (10%) cases. Similarly, the large lesion group exhibited submucosal deep cancer in 380 (82%) cases, LVI in 125 (27%) cases, and PDA in 79 (17%) cases. The rate of LNM was 11.2% and 12.1% in the small and large lesion groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: Small EI-CRC demonstrated the same aggressiveness and malignant potential as large cancer. PMID:19522020

  13. In vivo use of hyperspectral imaging to develop a noncontact endoscopic diagnosis support system for malignant colorectal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhimin; Zhang, Aoyu; Wang, Xiguang; Sun, Zongxiao; Wang, May D.; Xie, Tianyu

    2016-01-01

    The early detection and diagnosis of malignant colorectal tumors enables the initiation of early-stage therapy and can significantly increase the survival rate and post-treatment quality of life among cancer patients. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is recognized as a powerful tool for noninvasive cancer detection. In the gastrointestinal field, most of the studies on HSI have involved ex vivo biopsies or resected tissues. In the present study, we aimed to assess the difference in the in vivo spectral reflectance of malignant colorectal tumors and normal mucosa. A total of 21 colorectal tumors or adenomatous polyps from 12 patients at Shanghai Zhongshan Hospital were examined using a flexible hyperspectral (HS) colonoscopy system that can obtain in vivo HS images of the colorectal mucosa. We determined the optimal wavelengths for differentiating tumors from normal tissue based on these recorded images. The application of the determined wavelengths in spectral imaging in clinical trials indicated that such a clinical support system comprising a flexible HS colonoscopy unit and band selection unit is useful for outlining the tumor region and enhancing the display of the mucosa microvascular pattern in vivo.

  14. Visfatin is involved in promotion of colorectal carcinoma malignancy through an inducing EMT mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Kun; Song, Haixing; Wu, Mingbo; Li, Jingyi; Yong, Ziyi; Jiang, Sheng; Kuang, Xi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-05-31

    Increasing evidences suggested visfatin, a newly discovered obesity-induced adipocytokine, is involved in promotion of cancer malignancy and correlated with worse clinical prognosis. While its effects and mechanisms on progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. Our clinical data show that visfatin protein is over expressed, positive associated with lymph node metastasis, high-grade tumor, and poor prognosis in 87 CRC patients. The levels of plasma visfatin are significantly upregulated in Stage IV colon cancer. Visfatin can significantly promote the in vitro migration and invasion of CRC cells via induction epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). It can increase the expression and nuclear translocation of Snail, a key transcription factor in regulating EMT. While silencing of Snail attenuates visfatin induced EMT. Further studies reveal visfatin can inhibit the association of Snail with GSK-3β and subsequently suppress ubiquitylation of Snail. In addition, visfatin can increase the expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, elevate its binding with Snail promoter, and then increase the transcription of Snail. While inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, LY294002, abolishes visfatin induced up regulation of Snail, Vimentin (Vim), β-catenin, and phosphorylated GSK-3β. In summary, our data suggest that increased expression of visfatin are associated with a more aggressive phenotype of CRC patients. It can trigger the EMT of CRC cells via Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signals.

  15. High Blood Glucose Levels Correlate with Tumor Malignancy in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ge; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Fan; Feng, Wen-Ming; Yao, Yunliang; Cui, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Shi, Qi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Research shows that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects the risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the clinicopathological features of CRC patients correlate with their blood glucose levels. Material/Methods We enrolled 391 CRC patients hospitalized in our center between 2008 and 2013. Data of their first fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postprandial glucose (2hPPG) level after admission, their clinicopathological features, and survival were collected. The correlations between blood glucose level and clinicopathological features were analyzed by Pearson chi-square analysis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. Results There were 116 out of the 391 CRC patients who had high blood glucose level (H-G group, 29.67%), among which 58 (14.83%), 18 (4.60%), and 40 (10.23%) were diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), respectively, while 275 (70.33%) patients had normal glucose level (N-G group). Compared with the N-G group, patients in the H-G group had larger tumor diameters and lower tumor differentiation (p<0.05). A higher ratio of patients in the H-G group also had more advanced TNM staging and more ulcerative CRC gross type (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed in patient overall survival among different glucose groups. No effect of insulin therapy on CRC development and patient survival was observed. Conclusions Blood glucose level in CRC patients correlates significantly with local tumor malignancy, but no significant effect on distant metastasis and patient overall survival was observed. PMID:26644185

  16. Implications of current therapeutic approaches in colorectal cancer for other gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C

    1991-02-01

    Novel immunotherapeutic strategies for combating colon cancer are also being explored in pancreatic, hepatic, and esophageal cancers. Preliminary clinical trials in patients with pancreatic cancer suggest a therapeutic role for anti-idiotypic antibodies against tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs)--eg, CO17-1A, BW 494/32--but not for MoAbs when used alone. Adding low doses of interferon gamma to CO17-1A enhances in vitro antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against pancreatic tumor cells; CO17-1A plus a regimen of 5-FU/doxorubicin/mitomycin has resulted in beneficial therapeutic effect. Treatments with immunotoxins, radiolabeled MoAbs, and adoptive immunotherapy are still being tested preclinically. In 105 patients with unresectable hepatocellular cancer, a 7% complete and 41% partial regression rate with 131I-labeled antiferritin has been reported. In several patients, radiolabeled antiferritin caused sufficient shrinkage of lesions to permit curative resection. Pretreatment with low-dose doxorubicin may improve the efficacy of low-dose radiolabeled antiferritin antibody therapy. Chemoembolization of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, based on the concept of regional therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer, has shown considerable palliative and survival benefit in patients with unresectable disease. Although adoptive immunotherapy has been used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, the results have been disappointing. The development of immunotherapeutic approaches to esophageal cancer is less advanced than that for other gastrointestinal malignancies. Paralleling the successful use of 5-FU/interferon alfa-2a in colon cancer are two phase II studies that have evaluated this combination in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. The objective response rate (27%) was encouraging. PMID:1992529

  17. Endoscopic palliation of colorectal benign and malignant tumors: YAG laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, Riccardo; Marino, Saverio; Angriman, Imerio; Vella, Vincenzo; Donadi, Michele; D'Amico, D. F.

    1997-12-01

    From November 1, 1992 to January 31, 1997, we treated 189 pts: 113 males and 76 females, of mean age 67 yrs. 148 pts were affected with colo-rectal cancer and 41 pts with extensive carpet benign tumors. Tumor location was: rectum in 115 pts, recto-sigmoid joint in 31 pts, colo-rectal anastomosis in 25 pts, sigmoid colon in 15 pts, descending colon in 2 pts and cecum in 1 pt. 26 pts were treated with diathermo-therapy, 15 pts with dilatation, 12 pts with radiotherapy, 5 pts with chemotherapy, 1 pt with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Yag-laser palliation gave good results in 90% (170 - 189) with an average survival of 24 weeks; there were complications due to the treatment in due pts (1%) without hospital mortality.

  18. Acquisition of Chemoresistance and Other Malignancy-related Features of Colorectal Cancer Cells Are Incremented by Ribosome-inactivating Stress.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Seung Joon; Park, Seong-Hwan; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) as an environmental disease is largely influenced by accumulated epithelial stress from diverse environmental causes. We are exposed to ribosome-related insults, including ribosome-inactivating stress (RIS), from the environment, dietary factors, and medicines, but their physiological impacts on the chemotherapy of CRC are not yet understood. Here we revealed the effects of RIS on chemosensitivity and other malignancy-related properties of CRC cells. First, RIS led to bidirectional inhibition of p53-macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1)-mediated death responses in response to anticancer drugs by either enhancing ATF3-linked antiapoptotic signaling or intrinsically inhibiting MIC-1 and p53 expression, regardless of ATF3. Second, RIS enhanced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and biogenesis of cancer stem-like cells in an ATF3-dependent manner. These findings indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to RIS interferes with the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, mechanistically implying that ATF3-linked malignancy and chemoresistance can be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of environmentally aggravated cancers. PMID:26961878

  19. Acquisition of Chemoresistance and Other Malignancy-related Features of Colorectal Cancer Cells Are Incremented by Ribosome-inactivating Stress.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Seung Joon; Park, Seong-Hwan; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) as an environmental disease is largely influenced by accumulated epithelial stress from diverse environmental causes. We are exposed to ribosome-related insults, including ribosome-inactivating stress (RIS), from the environment, dietary factors, and medicines, but their physiological impacts on the chemotherapy of CRC are not yet understood. Here we revealed the effects of RIS on chemosensitivity and other malignancy-related properties of CRC cells. First, RIS led to bidirectional inhibition of p53-macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1)-mediated death responses in response to anticancer drugs by either enhancing ATF3-linked antiapoptotic signaling or intrinsically inhibiting MIC-1 and p53 expression, regardless of ATF3. Second, RIS enhanced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and biogenesis of cancer stem-like cells in an ATF3-dependent manner. These findings indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to RIS interferes with the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, mechanistically implying that ATF3-linked malignancy and chemoresistance can be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of environmentally aggravated cancers.

  20. Female Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Non-Malignant Cervical Diseases: A Study from an Urban Chinese Sample

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aixia; Lei, Yu; Yang, Bin; Li, Ping; Pan, Lianjun

    2015-01-01

    Non-malignant cervical diseases are common causes of disease among women worldwide. Although many studies have focused on sexual function in women with cervical cancer, little is known about the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction and its risk factors in women with non-malignant cervical diseases. The present study aims to assess sexual function in Chinese women with non-malignant cervical diseases and to identify potential risk factors for these diseases. A cross-sectional hospital-based survey was conducted in Nanjing, China. The Chinese version of the Female Sexual Function Index (CVFSFI) was used to evaluate sexual function. Three hundred three women who had been diagnosed with at least one non-malignant cervical disease and 293 healthy women were recruited from Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. We found that women with non-malignant cervical diseases had a significantly higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) (51.8% vs. 34.8%), low desire (43.2% vs. 26.3%), arousal disorder (41.6% vs. 28.3%), and lubrication disorder (51.2% vs. 36.9%) compared with the control group. Cervicitis and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were found to be independent risk factors for FSD. Our study indicates that women with cervicitis and CIN are at a high risk for FSD and deserve focused initial and follow-up management. PMID:26473480

  1. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  2. Second malignancies after prostate brachytherapy: Incidence of bladder and colorectal cancers in patients with 15 years of potential follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Sylvester, John E. . E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostateinst.com; Morris, Christopher G.; Blasko, John C.; Grimm, Peter D.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of second bladder and colorectal cancers after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This review included 125 patients treated with I-125 brachytherapy alone, and 223 patients who received supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 10.5 years. Patients were followed for the development of lower genitourinary and colorectal cancers. Second malignancies arising five years after radiation therapy were defined as being potentially associated with treatment; observed rates were then compared with age-matched expected rates according to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Results: Five years out of treatment, there were 15 patients with a second solid tumor, including bladder cancer (n = 11), colorectal cancer (n = 3), and prostatic urethra cancer (n = 1). The incidence of second malignancy was no different in patients treated with brachytherapy alone (1.6%) vs. those receiving external beam radiotherapy (5.8%, p = 0.0623). There were more observed bladder cancers compared with those expected (relative risk, 2.34, 95% confidence interval 0.96-3.72; absolute excess risk 35 cancers per 10,000 patients). Relative risk did not significantly change over increasing follow-up intervals up to 20 years after treatment. Conclusions: There may be an increased but small risk of developing a second malignancy after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. This outcome could be related to radiation carcinogenesis, but more vigilant screening and thorough workup as a result of radiation side effects and predisposing conditions (e.g., genetic and environmental factors) in many of the patients found to have second malignancies likely contributed to the higher number of observed malignancies than expected.

  3. [Extraordinary role of self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) in the malignant colorectal obstruction: different care in two cases].

    PubMed

    Siquini, Walter; Macarri, Giampiero; Freddara, Umberto; Stortoni, Pierpaolo; Ridolfo, Raffaella; Petrolati, Paolo; Fianchini, Aroldo; Landi, Edoardo

    2007-01-01

    The colorectal cancer presents with bowel obstruction in 10%-30% of patients. Established treatment of this evolutive condition, until 15 years ago, was emergency surgery. Primary resection with or without ileostomy, staged resection, Hartmann's procedure, or definitive colostomy are the therapeutical options. There is ongoing controversy on the best procedure to apply, because the choice depends on the patient's condition, age, electrolyte imbalances, nutritional status, obstructional grade, comorbidity and surgeon's attitude. However, the obstruction and the emergency operation add risk of complications and mortality instead of elective surgery. The efficacy of self-expanding metal stent to solve the obstruction had recently changed the management of malignant luminal obstruction: it is safe, effective, with very low mortality, low morbidity and also cheap. In the inoperable cases it represents the first line therapy avoiding the colostomy. In the operable patients, instead of two-step surgery, the SEMS had to be preferred because is a one-time and election surgery and avoid colostomy too, even if temporary. SEMS versus emergency primary surgery, without randomized and controlled study, allows a safer single-staged surgery. Finally it improves the quality of life avoiding colostomy, and reducing operative risk. We present two different use of SEMS: the palliation in inoperable patient and the "bridge to surgery" in critical obstructed patient.

  4. Chemokine/chemokine receptor pair CCL20/CCR6 in human colorectal malignancy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Rubie, Claudia; Keilholz, Ulrich; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a superfamily of small, cytokine-like proteins, which induce multiple physiological functions, particularly cytoskeletal rearrangement and compartment-specific migration through their interaction with G-protein-coupled receptors. Chemokines and their receptors have been widely acknowledged as essential and selective mediators in leukocyte migration in inflammatory response. It is now established that the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is also used by cancer cells to direct lymphatic and haematogenous spreading and additionally has an impact on the site of metastatic growth of different tumours. In recent years an increasing number of studies have drawn attention to CC-chemokine cysteine motif chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its physiological sole receptor CCR6 to play a role in the onset, development and metastatic spread of various gastrointestinal cancer entities. Among various cancer types CCR6 was also demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulation by its physiological ligand CCL20 has been reported to promote CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Further, the CCL20/CCR6 system apparently plays a role in the organ-selective liver metastasis of CRC. Here we review the literature on expression patterns of CCL20 and CCR6 and their physiological interactions as well as the currently presumed role of CCL20 and CCR6 in the formation of CRC and the development of liver metastasis, providing a potential basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26811629

  5. Upregulation of nucleostemin in colorectal cancer and its effects on cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bin; Huang, Qiaoying; Zhong, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nucleostemin (NS) is a new protein localized in the nucleolus of most stem cells and tumor cells, which regulates their self-renewal and cell cycle progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of NS in colorectal cancer (CRC) and the effects of NS knockdown in the Sw620 cell line to provide basis for clinical target therapy. Methods NS expression in 372 patients with CRC and 367 normal participants was assessed using immunohistochemistry. The expression level of NS gene was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction. Then, the relationship among NS expression, clinicopathological features, and prognosis was analyzed. Silencing of NS expression was achieved by using NS-specific small-interfering RNAs. The viability and growth rate of Sw620 cells were determined by proliferation and invasion assays. Cell cycle distribution of the cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results High NS expression was positively related with node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage. In Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, patients with low NS expression always had significantly longer survival time than those with high expression. Moreover, our results showed that knockdown of NS expression inhibited proliferation and viability of Sw620 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell cycle studies revealed that NS depletion resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest at short times of transfection (24 hours), followed with apoptosis at longer times (48 hours and 72 hours), suggesting that post-G1 arrest apoptosis occurred in Sw620 cells. Conclusion Overall, these results point to the essential role of NS in Sw620 cells; thus, this gene might be considered a promising target for treatment of CRC. PMID:26229488

  6. Second malignancies complicating Hodgkin's disease: a Southwest Oncology Group 10-year followup

    SciTech Connect

    Coltman, C.A. Jr.; Dixon, D.O.

    1982-04-01

    Thirty-two second malignancies (21 acute leukemias and 11 solid tumors) were identified among 659 patients with all stages of Hodgkin's disease treated by members of the Southwest Oncology Group. There were no leukemias and one solid tumor among 95 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The actuarial risk of developing acute leukemia at 7 years was 6.2% for chemotherapy alone, 6.4% for combined modality, and 7.7% for salvage chemotherapy. The incidence of acute leukemia was higher (P . 0.002) among those whose treatment began at greater than or equal to 40 years of age. The actuarial risk of leukemia in that group was 20.7% at 7 years. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that chemotherapy alone, combined modality, and salvage chemotherapy have an equivalent oncogenic potential and that patients greater than or equal to 40 years of age have an enhanced susceptibility to these oncogenic stimuli.

  7. Claudin-3 Overexpression Increases the Malignant Potential of Colorectal Cancer Cells: Roles of ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt as Modulators of EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Waldemir F.; Fortunato-Miranda, Natalia; Robbs, Bruno K.; de Araujo, Wallace M.; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio C.; Bastos, Lilian G.; Viola, João P. B.; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2013-01-01

    The altered expressions of claudin proteins have been reported during the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these events in this cancer type are poorly understood. Here, we report that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the expression of claudin-3 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. This increase was related to increased cell migration and the formation of anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent colonies. We further showed that the ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt pathways were involved in the regulation of these effects because specific pharmacological inhibition blocked these events. Genetic manipulation of claudin-1 and claudin-3 in HT-29 cells showed that the overexpression of claudin-1 resulted in decreased cell migration; however, migration was not altered in cells that overexpressed claudin-3. Furthermore, the overexpression of claudin-3, but not that of claudin-1, increased the tight junction-related paracellular flux of macromolecules. Additionally, an increased formation of anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent colonies were observed in cells that overexpressed claudin-3, while no such changes were observed when claudin-1 was overexpressed. Finally, claudin-3 silencing alone despite induce increase proliferation, and the formation of anchoragedependent and -independent colonies, it was able to prevent the EGF-induced increased malignant potential. In conclusion, our results show a novel role for claudin-3 overexpression in promoting the malignant potential of colorectal cancer cells, which is potentially regulated by the EGF-activated ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt pathways. PMID:24069372

  8. Guidelines on the use of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients with peritoneal surface malignancy arising from colorectal or appendiceal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, P.; Sideris, L.; Law, C.; Mack, L.; Haase, E.; Giacomantonio, C.; Govindarajan, A.; Krzyzanowska, M.K.; Major, P.; McConnell, Y.; Temple, W.; Younan, R.; McCart, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the needs of patients, Canadian surgical and medical oncology leaders in the treatment of peritoneal surface malignancies (psms), together with patient representatives, formed the Canadian HIPEC Collaborative Group (chicg). The group is dedicated to standardizing and improving the treatment of psm in Canada so that access to treatment and, ultimately, the prognosis of Canadian patients with psm are improved. Patients with resectable psm arising from colorectal or appendiceal neoplasms should be reviewed by a multidisciplinary team including surgeons and medical oncologists with experience in treating patients with psm. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy should be offered to appropriately selected patients and performed at experienced centres. The aim of this publication is to present guidelines that we recommend be applied across the country for the treatment of psm. PMID:25908915

  9. Examination of Physicians' Perception of the Indications of Colorectal Stents in the Management of Malignant Large Bowel Obstruction: A Provincial Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Data are conflicting when assessing indications for colorectal self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) in managing acute malignant large bowel obstruction (MLO). In November 2014, European and American Societies published guidelines to aid in understanding which patients might benefit from colorectal stenting. Yet, there remain marked disparities in clinical practice. Methods. A web-based survey was sent to Gastroenterologists and Surgical Specialists across Quebec to assess physicians' knowledge and adherence to the indications for colonic SEMS placement in the management of MLO using eight clinical scenarios. Results. Out of 112 respondents, 74% preferred surgical intervention in young, healthy individuals with MLO. Advanced age and comorbidities motivated 56.3% (95% CI 47.1–65.5%) of participants to opt for SEMS placement. In palliative settings of patients undergoing chemotherapy including bevacizumab, a minority of respondents followed guidelines, 12.5% (95% CI 6.4–18.6%) for young patients and 25.0% for elderly patients (95% CI 17.0–33.0%). The pooled overall adherence to guidelines was 50.4% (95% CI 40.7–59.3%). Conclusion. This survey suggests that guidelines recommendations are not being implemented by at least half of specialists involved in the care of patients with MLO. Future studies should attempt to identify possible barriers responsible for this impaired knowledge translation and tailored educational initiatives planned accordingly. PMID:27725925

  10. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 promotes malignant development of colorectal cancer by targeting epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong; Ding, Qiong; Yu, Wubin; Gao, Ming; Wang, Yilian

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance and biological functions of long noncoding RNA SPRY4 intronic transcript 1 (SPRY4-IT1) in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain largely unclear. Herein, we are the first to report that the SPRY4-IT1 was significantly upregulated in CRC tissues, serum, and cells. Higher SPRY4-IT1 expression was markedly associated with advanced Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) stage in a cohort of 84 CRC patients. Multivariate analyses indicated that SPRY4-IT1 expression could be useful as an independent predictor for overall survival. Further in vitro experiments revealed that knockdown of SPRY4-IT1 inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of CRC cells and induced cell cycle arrestment. Moreover, we confirmed that the expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related genes was modulated through alteration of SPRY4-IT1 expression. These results suggest that SPRY4-IT1, as an oncogenic regulator, may serve as a candidate prognostic marker and potential target for CRC therapies.

  11. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 promotes malignant development of colorectal cancer by targeting epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong; Ding, Qiong; Yu, Wubin; Gao, Ming; Wang, Yilian

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance and biological functions of long noncoding RNA SPRY4 intronic transcript 1 (SPRY4-IT1) in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain largely unclear. Herein, we are the first to report that the SPRY4-IT1 was significantly upregulated in CRC tissues, serum, and cells. Higher SPRY4-IT1 expression was markedly associated with advanced Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) stage in a cohort of 84 CRC patients. Multivariate analyses indicated that SPRY4-IT1 expression could be useful as an independent predictor for overall survival. Further in vitro experiments revealed that knockdown of SPRY4-IT1 inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of CRC cells and induced cell cycle arrestment. Moreover, we confirmed that the expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related genes was modulated through alteration of SPRY4-IT1 expression. These results suggest that SPRY4-IT1, as an oncogenic regulator, may serve as a candidate prognostic marker and potential target for CRC therapies. PMID:27621655

  12. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 promotes malignant development of colorectal cancer by targeting epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong; Ding, Qiong; Yu, Wubin; Gao, Ming; Wang, Yilian

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance and biological functions of long noncoding RNA SPRY4 intronic transcript 1 (SPRY4-IT1) in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain largely unclear. Herein, we are the first to report that the SPRY4-IT1 was significantly upregulated in CRC tissues, serum, and cells. Higher SPRY4-IT1 expression was markedly associated with advanced Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) stage in a cohort of 84 CRC patients. Multivariate analyses indicated that SPRY4-IT1 expression could be useful as an independent predictor for overall survival. Further in vitro experiments revealed that knockdown of SPRY4-IT1 inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of CRC cells and induced cell cycle arrestment. Moreover, we confirmed that the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes was modulated through alteration of SPRY4-IT1 expression. These results suggest that SPRY4-IT1, as an oncogenic regulator, may serve as a candidate prognostic marker and potential target for CRC therapies. PMID:27621655

  13. Elastic Deformation Properties of Implanted Endobronchial Wire Stents in Benign and Malignant Bronchial Disease: A Radiographic In Vivo Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hautmann, Hubert; Rieger, Johannes; Huber, Rudolf M.; Pfeifer, Klaus J.

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term mechanical behavior in vivo of expandable endobronchial wire stents, we imaged three different prostheses in the treatment of tracheobronchial disease. Methods: Six patients with bronchial stenoses (three benign, three malignant) underwent insertion of metallic stents. Two self-expandable Wallstents, two balloon-expandable tantalum Strecker stents and two self-expandable nitinol Accuflex stents were used. Measurements of deformation properties were performed during voluntary cough by means of fluoroscopy, at 1 month and 7-10 months after implantation. The procedures were videotaped, their images digitized and the narrowing of stent diameters calculated at intervals of 20 msec. Results: After stent implantation all patients improved with respect to ventilatory function. Radial stent narrowing during cough reached 53% (Wallstent), 59% (tantalum Strecker stent), and 52% (nitinol Accuflex stent) of the relaxed post-implantation diameter. Stent compression was more marked in benign compared with malignant stenoses. In the long term permanent deformation occurred with the tantalum Strecker stents; the other stents were unchanged. Conclusion: Endobronchial wire stents can be helpful in the treatment of major airway collapse and obstructing bronchial lesions. However, evidence of material fatigue as a possible effect of exposure to recurrent mechanical stress on the flexible mesh tube may limit their long-term use. This seems to be predominantly important in benign bronchial collapse.

  14. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment.

  15. Assessing the Risk of Ovarian Malignancy in Asymptomatic Women With Abnormal CA 125 and Transvaginal Ultrasound in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Edward E.; Greenlee, Robert T.; Riley, Thomas L.; Commins, John; Ragard, Lawrence; Xu, Jian-Lun; Buys, Saundra S.; Prorok, Philip C.; Fouad, Mona N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of ovarian malignancy among asymptomatic women with abnormal transvaginal ultrasound or CA 125 and to provide guidance to physicians managing these women. Methods A cohort of women from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial with abnormal ovarian results at the initial (T0) and subsequent (T1+) screens were analyzed to estimate which findings were associated with high risk of ovarian cancer. Risks of cancer of greater than 10% were designated as high and risks of 3% or less as low. Results For the T0 screen, two high-risk categories were identified: CA 125 of 70 or more with negative transvaginal ultrasound (positive predictive value [PPV] 15.9%, CI 14.7%–17.7%); and positive for both CA 125 and transvaginal ultrasound (PPV 25.0%, CI 23.3%–27.3%). For T1+ screens, three high-risk categories were identified: negative transvaginal ultrasound with change in CA 125 greater than 45 or more (PPV 29.0%, CI 28.3%–30.3%); increase in size of cyst 6 cm or greater with negative CA 125 (PPV 13.3%, CI 10.5%–18.0%); and positive for both tests (PPV 42.9%, CI 40.0%–46.0%). High-risk criteria for T0 provide a sensitivity of 60%, specificity 96.2%, PPV 19.7%, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.3%. T1+ criteria yielded a sensitivity of 85.3%, specificity 95.6%, PPV 29.6% and NPV 99.7%. Conclusions High risk categories for predicting risk of cancer in women with abnormal CA 125, TVU or both at initial and subsequent screens have been identified. The large number of women in this study, the four year complete follow-up, and very small number of invasive cancers in the low risk categories provides guidance for clinical decisions regarding need for surgery in these women. PMID:23262924

  16. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  17. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  18. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  19. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  20. Synchronous bilateral primary breast malignant phyllodes tumor and carcinoma of the breast with Paget’s disease: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyuan; Cheng, Xiaoming; Sun, Suhong; Yang, Weiming; Kong, Fanli; Zeng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous bilateral primary breast malignant phyllodes tumor or/and carcinoma of the breast with Paget’s disease is rare. In the article, we present a case of bilateral carcinoma of the breast with Paget’s disease of the right breast and malignant phyllodes tumor of the left breast. A 44-years-old Chinese woman presented with a 1 month history of the right breast nipple with eczema and fester and growing and palpable mass of left breast. Molybdenum target X-ray revealed microcalcification in the right breast, which was highly suspected of malignant tumor, and round-like mass with smooth surface and homogeneous density in the left breast. Color ultrasound showed a lobulated lump which circumferential blood flows around in the left breast, and which did not show any mass in the right breast. The patient was undertaken the bilateral modified radical mastectomy. The histological diagnosis was Paget’s disease associated with infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the right breast and malignant phyllodes tumor the left breast. The patient also received 6 cycles of the postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy by using T.T. regimen comprised docetaxel (100 mg) and pirarubicin (60 mg). PMID:26770378

  1. Solitary intracranial tuberculoma mimicking a malignant tumor in a patient without tubercular lesions or a history of disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier A.; Sua, Luz F.; Astudillo, Miryam; Bravo, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral tuberculoma is a rare cause of intracranial mass. In Latin America and Colombia where tuberculosis is endemic, it represents between 5 and 30% of brain tumours. A 53-year-old Colombian woman was admitted to a third-level hospital in Cali, Colombia, after reporting loss of consciousness, headache, paresthesia, and flight of ideas for a two-week period. Imaging studies showed a left frontal mass of malignant appearance whose first possible diagnosis was metastatic neoplasia or glioma. With the initial results, absence of history of chronic infectious diseases and a history of thyroidectomy, a surgical procedure was carried out and a histopathological and molecular evaluation was conducted. The pathology report noted necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and tissue staining and molecular tests for detection of M. tuberculosis were positive and the patient was managed with anti-tubercular treatment. Intracranial masses are frequently targeted as a malignant neoplastic disease for surgical treatment. Considering an infectious etiology must be a diagnostic option. PMID:23725511

  2. Partially erupted third molars as a potential source of infection in patients receiving peripheral stem cell transplantation for malignant diseases: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ohman, David; Björk, Yvonne; Bratel, John; Kristiansson, Camilla; Johansson, Peter; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Brune, Mats; Hasséus, Bengt

    2010-02-01

    Forty-four patients with malignant diseases for which they received peripheral stem cell transplant therapy (PSCT) were retrospectively studied regarding local and systemic infection originating from around partially erupted third molars (PEMs). Twenty-two patients had one or more PEMs, while 22 patients had none. Data were retrieved from medical and dental records. Systemic and local signs of infection and treatment were assessed. We recorded the number of transplanted CD34(+) blood stem cells, days with white blood cell counts < 0.5 x 10(9) l(-1), days until engraftment, maximum level of C-reactive protein (CRP), days with fever, positive blood cultures, days taking antibiotics, days drinking < 0.5 l, days of total parenteral nutrition, days receiving intravenously administered analgesics, and number of admission days. No statistically significant difference was detected between patients with PEMs and those without PEMs regarding any of the studied parameters. Of patients with PEMs, 36% (8 of 22) developed local infections around PEMs during the PSCT period. The study indicates that PEMs pose no significant risk of causing systemic infection in patients receiving PSCT for malignant diseases but increase the risk of developing a local infection, justifying close supervision and early treatment in cases of local infection during PSCT treatment. PMID:20156265

  3. The role of estrogen receptor {beta} (ER{beta}) in malignant diseases-A new potential target for antiproliferative drugs in prevention and treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2010-05-21

    The discovery of ER{beta} in the middle of the 1990s represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of estrogen signaling. It has turned out that estrogen action is not mediated by one receptor, ER{alpha}, but by two balancing factors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, which are often antagonistic to one another. Excitingly, ER{beta} has been shown to be widespread in the body and to be involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological events. This has led to a strong interest of the pharmaceutical industry to target ER{beta} by drugs against various diseases. In this review, focus is on the role of ER{beta} in malignant diseases where the anti proliferative activity of ER{beta} gives hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  4. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  5. Orgaran (Org 10172) or heparin for preventing venous thrombosis after elective surgery for malignant disease? A double-blind, randomised, multicentre comparison. ANZ-Organon Investigators' Group.

    PubMed

    Gallus, A; Cade, J; Ockelford, P; Hepburn, S; Maas, M; Magnani, H; Bucknall, T; Stevens, J; Porteous, F

    1993-10-18

    This double-blind, randomised, multicentre trial in 513 patients having elective surgery for intra-abdominal or intrathoracic malignancy compared the efficacy and safety of venous thrombosis (VT) prophylaxis using 750 anti-factor Xa units of Orgaran (a mixture of low molecular weight heparinoids) given subcutaneously (sc) twice-daily with that of twice-daily injections of 5,000 units standard heparin. The main study endpoints were the development of postoperative VT detected by 125I-fibrinogen leg scanning, and the onset of clinically significant venous thromboembolism or bleeding. "Intent to treat" analysis showed a statistically non-significant trend towards less VT during Orgaran prophylaxis (10.4%) than after heparin (14.9%) and there was no difference in bleeding complications between the two study groups. Results remained similar if only patients who completed the intended course of therapy ("compliant patients") were analysed. Other trials have shown that Orgaran prevents VT after hip surgery and stroke. We now show it is also safe and effective in patients having major surgery for cancer.

  6. Systemic Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Mayer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common non-cutaneous malignancy in the United States and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death. Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition. Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months. For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs. For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence. Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease. PMID:18471507

  7. The diagnostics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swiderska, Magdalena; Choromańska, Barbara; Dąbrowska, Ewelina; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Choromańska, Katarzyna; Szczurko, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Piotr; Dadan, Jacek; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. CRC has an estimated incidence of more than 1,000,000 new cases annually worldwide. Approximately one out of three people who develop CRC dies from the disease. Furthermore, CRC often affects inhabitants of industrialized countries in comparison to less developed countries. Several markers of colon cancer, including CEA, CA-19-9, TPS, TAG-72 and lysosomal hydrolases, have been identified and are now being adopted in routine clinical practice. Increased values of these markers are often the first signal of recurrence or metastases, which is useful in prediction and prognosis of clinical outcome of patients with CRC. Determination of the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in body fluids may bring some hope of improving diagnosis of colorectal cancer. However, it has to be remembered that currently the most effective diagnostic method of CRC is endoscopy. PMID:24876814

  8. Synchronous triple colorectal carcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ji; Liu, Xinghua; Shuai, Xiaoming; Deng, Meizhou; Gao, Jinbo; Tao, Kaixiong

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal carcinoma defines as multiple malignant lesions presented in a single patient at initial diagnosis. We report a case of triple synchronous colorectal carcinoma without related familial history. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and endoscopic examination suggested multiple malignant lesions occurred in separate segments of colon. Then we performed laparoscopic total colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis with a J-type pouch. Post operative pathological examination confirmed the malignant characteristics of the triple lesions. The mini review summarizes the clinicopathological and molecular features of synchronous colorectal carcinoma based on current literatures. It appears to probably have significant distinctions with solitary tumors in terms of pathological type, primary locations and microsatellite instability. PMID:26464742

  9. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant tumor and enter the bloodstream or the lymphatic system where they travel to other organs in the body. Among other things, the lymphatic system transports white blood cells that fight infection. When ...

  10. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  11. Industrial risk factors for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lashner, B.A.; Epstein, S.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in the United States, and its incidence rates have sharply increased recently, especially in males. Industrial exposures, both occupational and environmental, are important colorectal cancer risk factors that are generally unrecognized by clinicians. Migration studies have documented that colorectal cancer is strongly associated with environmental risk factors. The causal role of occupational exposures is evidenced by a substantial literature associating specific work practices with increased colorectal cancer risks. Industrially related environmental exposures, including polluted drinking water and ionizing radiation, have also been associated with excess risks. Currently, there is a tendency to attribute colorectal cancer, largely or exclusively, to dietary and other lifestyle factors, thus neglecting these industrially related effects. Concerted efforts are needed to recognize the causal role of industrial risk factors and to encourage government and industry to reduce carcinogenic exposures. Furthermore, cost-effective screening programs for high-risk population groups are critically needed to further reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. 143 references.

  12. Endoluminal Therapy in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Katherine A; Tsikitis, V Liana

    2016-09-01

    Appropriate endoscopic resection for colorectal polyps can present a challenge to endoscopists, as these lesions may harbor malignancy. With recent advances in endoscopy, however, we are now entering an exciting frontier of endoscopic therapy for gastrointestinal lesions. These techniques include endoluminal mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, which may be utilized on several colonic lesions. This article will discuss these principle endoscopic techniques, their outcomes, and briefly highlight their influence on endoscopic interventions, including transanal endoscopic microsurgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. PMID:27582646

  13. Evaluation of FTIR spectroscopy as diagnostic tool for colorectal cancer using spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liu; Sun, Xuejun; Chao, Zhang; Zhang, Shiyun; Zheng, Jianbao; Gurung, Rajendra; Du, Junkai; Shi, Jingsen; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhang, Yuanfu; Wu, Jinguang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to confirm FTIR spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for colorectal cancer. 180 freshly removed colorectal samples were collected from 90 patients for spectrum analysis. The ratios of spectral intensity and relative intensity (/I1460) were calculated. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Fisher's discriminant analysis (FDA) were applied to distinguish the malignant from normal. The FTIR parameters of colorectal cancer and normal tissues were distinguished due to the contents or configurations of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Related to nitrogen containing, water, protein and nucleic acid were increased significantly in the malignant group. Six parameters were selected as independent factors to perform discriminant functions. The sensitivity for FTIR in diagnosing colorectal cancer was 96.6% by discriminant analysis. Our study demonstrates that FTIR can be a useful technique for detection of colorectal cancer and may be applied in clinical colorectal cancer diagnosis.

  14. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  15. Unsuspected colorectal carcinoma on routine abdominopelvic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Ann; Poh, Angeline

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common lethal disease with signs and symptoms that may be nonspecific. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis with or without contrast is frequently performed for various general abdominal complaints, but unlike CT colonography, the large bowel may not be optimally prepared for evaluation. As such, careful and diligent assessment of the non-prepared colon in all CT images of the abdomen and pelvis is important, as it ensures that incidental colorectal malignancy is not missed, especially in older patients. This article gives an overview of multidetector CT imaging signs and subtle clues to aid in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, as well as their pitfalls.

  16. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  17. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  18. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  19. Label-free visualization of collagen in submucosa as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingting; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    The collagen signature in colorectal submucosa is changed due to remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the malignant process and plays an important role in noninvasive early detection of human colorectal cancer. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in normal colorectal submucosa (NCS) and cancerous colorectal submucosa (CCS). What's more, the collagen content was quantitatively measured. It was found that in CCS the morphology of collagen becomes much looser and the collagen content is significantly reduced compared to NCS. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to provide collagen signature as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  20. Malignant adenolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, H; Ryan, C; Schwartz, S; Donnelly, J A

    1980-01-01

    Adenolymphoma (Warthin's tumor) is a well studied benign tumor of the salivary gland. Malignant transformation of such a tumor is rare and not well documented in the literature. The light microscopic and ultrastructural features of an undifferentiated carcinoma arising in an adenolymphoma in the parotid gland of a middle aged male are described, and the relevant literature is reviewed. Similarities between the benign adenolymphoma and the undifferentiated malignant tumor, such as the presence of interstitial lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltrates, dark and light epithelial cells, similar cytoplasmic organelles, and nuclear morphology, suggest a malignant transformation of a previously existing benign adenolymphoma.

  1. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Brockhouse, R T

    1979-04-01

    A case has been presented that illustrates successful managment of a patient with suspected malignant hyperthermia. The causes of this disorder are uncertain. If screening procedures identify a patient as susceptible to this disorder, careful planning in the preoperative stage is indicated. Preparedness during the operative procedure for any emergency is mandatory. Early and effective treatment seems to be the only method of preventing mortality with patients experiencing malignant hyperthermia. PMID:285135

  2. Malignant oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Laurian, N; Zohar, Y; Kende, L

    1977-09-01

    A case of malignant oncocytoma of the parotid gland in a 32-year-old male is presented. Ten months after parotidectomy an undifferentiated carcinoma, in which oncocytes still could be recognized, developed in the operated area. According to the literature available to us, this is the second reported case in which malignant transformation in a benign oncocytoma of the salivary gland has been observed.

  3. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC.

  4. Endobronchial metastases from extrathoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Sebahat; Uçan, Eyüp S; Celik, Gülperi; Sener, Gülper; Sevinç, Can; Kilinç, Oğuz; Itil, Oya

    2005-01-01

    Endobronchial metastases (EBM) from extrapulmonary malignant tumors are rare. The most common extrathoracic malignancies associated with EBM are breast, renal and colorectal carcinomas. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical, radiographic and bronchoscopic aspects of patients with EBM who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2002. Data about patients' clinical conditions, symptoms, radiographic and endoscopic findings, and histopathological examination results were investigated. EBM was defined as bronchoscopically visible lesions histopathologically identical to the primary tumor in patients with extrapulmonary malignancies. We found 15 cases with EBM. Primary tumors included breast (3), colorectal (3), and renal (2) carcinomas; Malignant Melanoma (2); synovial sarcoma (1), ampulla of Vater adenocarcinoma (1), pheochromocytoma (1), hypernephroma (1), and Hodgkin's Disease (1). The most common symptoms were dyspnea (80%), cough (66.6%) and hemoptysis (33.3%). Multiple (40%) or single (13.3%) pulmonary nodules, mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy (40%), and effusion (40%) were the most common radiographic findings. The mean interval from initial diagnosis to diagnosis of EBM was 32.8 months (range, 0-96 months) and median survival time was 18 months (range, 4-84). As a conclusion, various extrapulmonary tumors can metastasize to the bronchus. Symptoms and radiographic findings are similar with those in primary lung cancer. Therefore, EBM should be discriminated from primary lung cancer histopathologically. Although mean survival time is usually short, long-term survivors were reported. Consequently, treatment must be planned according to the histology of the primary tumor, evidence of metastasis to other sites and medical status of the patient. PMID:16475029

  5. Endobronchial metastases from extrathoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Sebahat; Uçan, Eyüp S; Celik, Gülperi; Sener, Gülper; Sevinç, Can; Kilinç, Oğuz; Itil, Oya

    2005-01-01

    Endobronchial metastases (EBM) from extrapulmonary malignant tumors are rare. The most common extrathoracic malignancies associated with EBM are breast, renal and colorectal carcinomas. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical, radiographic and bronchoscopic aspects of patients with EBM who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2002. Data about patients' clinical conditions, symptoms, radiographic and endoscopic findings, and histopathological examination results were investigated. EBM was defined as bronchoscopically visible lesions histopathologically identical to the primary tumor in patients with extrapulmonary malignancies. We found 15 cases with EBM. Primary tumors included breast (3), colorectal (3), and renal (2) carcinomas; Malignant Melanoma (2); synovial sarcoma (1), ampulla of Vater adenocarcinoma (1), pheochromocytoma (1), hypernephroma (1), and Hodgkin's Disease (1). The most common symptoms were dyspnea (80%), cough (66.6%) and hemoptysis (33.3%). Multiple (40%) or single (13.3%) pulmonary nodules, mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy (40%), and effusion (40%) were the most common radiographic findings. The mean interval from initial diagnosis to diagnosis of EBM was 32.8 months (range, 0-96 months) and median survival time was 18 months (range, 4-84). As a conclusion, various extrapulmonary tumors can metastasize to the bronchus. Symptoms and radiographic findings are similar with those in primary lung cancer. Therefore, EBM should be discriminated from primary lung cancer histopathologically. Although mean survival time is usually short, long-term survivors were reported. Consequently, treatment must be planned according to the histology of the primary tumor, evidence of metastasis to other sites and medical status of the patient.

  6. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy.

  7. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy. PMID:24648381

  8. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana; Kollárová, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle - a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer.

  9. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle – a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer. PMID:27110303

  10. Pleural malignancies.

    PubMed

    Vargas, F S; Teixeira, L R

    1996-07-01

    Carcinoma of the lung, metastatic breast carcinoma, and lymphoma are responsible for approximately 75% of all malignant pleural effusions. The presence of malignant cells in the pleural fluid or in the parietal pleura confirms the diagnosis. Recently, several authors have proposed the combination of morphometric procedures and quantitative analysis of nucleolar organizer regions stained by silver nitrate. Videothoracoscopy is recommended for patients suspected of having a malignant pleural effusion in whom the diagnosis is not established after two cytologic studies of the fluid and one needle biopsy. The standard treatment is the intrapleural instillation of a chemical agent to produce a pleurodesis. The recommended sclerosant is talc, a tetracycline derivative, or Corynebacterium parvum where it is available. When a patient is not an ideal candidate for chemical pleurodesis, the options include symptomatic treatment, serial thoracentesis, implantation of a pleuroperitoneal shunt, and pleurectomy. PMID:9363162

  11. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  12. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  13. Colorectal neoplasm and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Bhat, Mohammad Hayat; Sinha, S K; Kochar, R; Vaiphi, K

    2006-01-01

    The risk for colorectal carcinoma in acromegaly remains controversial. In our earlier study, we have demonstrated that the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Asian Indians with acromegaly is not increased and after this report, routine colonoscopy in our patients with acromegaly was abandoned. Subsequently, two consecutive young men aged 30 and 35, one 6 years after and other at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly had colorectal carcinoma respectively. None of them had family history of colonic neoplasm. These two younger patients with no other predisposition for colorectal neoplasm suggests that colonoscopy should be done in all patients with acromegaly at diagnosis and they should remain under surveillance.

  14. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery.

  15. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  16. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Taiclet, L

    1985-01-01

    Despite numerous reviews and clinical reports, much remains to be learned about the cause, treatment, and prevention of malignant hyperthermia.Among the most worrisome concerns of the clinician administering anesthesia is the malignant hyperthermia crisis. When it arises, it is always frightening-and sometimes fatal. Usually occurring very suddenly and without warning, malignant hyperthermia is considered to be a hypercatabolic crisis; the condition is known to affect humans and certain breeds of pigs. The exact triggering mechanisms of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in humans are not known, but a crisis can be initiated by volatile general anesthetics, neuromuscular blocking agents, and amide local anesthetics. Although a history of an MH crisis is a diagnostic aid, previous uneventful exposure to anesthesia does not guarantee the safety of the patient in subsequent anesthetic procedures.(1) For these reasons, it is important for the anesthesiologist to be aware of the initial signs of MH and to be prepared to provide immediate treatment to reverse such a crisis. PMID:3865561

  17. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abraham, R.; Adnet, P.; Glauber, V.; Perel, A.

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a rare autosomal dominant trait that predisposes affected individuals to great danger when exposed to certain anaesthetic triggering agents (such as potent volatile anaesthetics and succinylcholine). A sudden hypermetabolic reaction in skeletal muscle leading to hyperthermia and massive rhabdomyolysis can occur. The ultimate treatment is dantrolene sodium a nonspecific muscle relaxant. Certain precautions should be taken before anaesthesia of patients known to be susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. These include the prohibition of the use of triggering agents, monitoring of central body temperature and expired CO2, and immediate availability of dantrolene. In addition, careful cleansing of the anaesthesia machine of vapours of halogenated agents is recommended. If these measures are taken, the chances of an MH episode are greatly reduced. When malignant hyperthermia-does occur in the operating room, prompt recognition and treatment usually prevent a potentially fatal outcome. The most reliable test to establish susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia is currently the in vitro caffeine-halothane contracture test. It is hoped that in the future a genetic test will be available. PMID:9538480

  18. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  19. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, Sarah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D{sub 9} (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the

  20. Aetiology of colorectal cancer and relevance of monogenic inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Ponz de Leon, M; Benatti, P; Borghi, F; Pedroni, M; Scarselli, A; Di Gregorio, C; Losi, L; Viel, A; Genuardi, M; Abbati, G; Rossi, G; Menigatti, M; Lamberti, I; Ponti, G; Roncucci, L

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Although diet and lifestyle are associated with the development of colorectal malignancies, the only clearly identified aetiological factors in colorectal cancer are inheritance (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and familial polyposis), inflammatory bowel diseases, papillomavirus, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our aim was to determine what proportion of colorectal neoplasms could be attributed to these specific factors. Patients and methods: Data from a colorectal cancer registry were analysed over a 15 year period, during which nearly 2500 cases were recorded. In patients with suspected HNPCC, microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical expression of proteins encoded by the main DNA mismatch repair genes were assessed. In families with unstable neoplasms, constitutional mutations of the mismatch repair genes hMSH2, hMLH1, and hMSH6 were evaluated by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and sequencing. Results: Inflammatory bowel diseases, familial polyposis, and AIDS were rare causes of colorectal cancer (three, three, and one case, respectively). Anal squamous carcinoma developed in 27 patients (1.0%) and could be attributed to papillomavirus infection. In 58 patients (from 34 families) a clinical diagnosis of HNPCC was established (2.4%). In total, cases with a known aetiology were 92 (3.7% of all patients). Microsatellite instability was detected in 15 cancers from HNPCC families, and germline mutations in six families (12 patients, 0.5% of the total). Families with unstable tumours, with or without mutations, were clinically similar, suggesting the involvement of the mismatch repair system even when mutations were not detected. Conclusions: The study suggests that the aetiology of colorectal malignancies remains elusive in the large majority of cases. Among specific causes, HNPCC represents the most frequent. However, with a population based approach, constitutional mutations of the

  1. Liver transplantation for malignancies.

    PubMed

    Eghtesad, Bijan; Aucejo, Federico

    2014-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) has become an acceptable and effective treatment for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma with excellent outcomes. More recently, LT has been tried in different primary and secondary malignancies of the liver. The outcomes of LT for very selected group of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) have been promising. Excellent results have been reported in LT for patients with unresectable hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE). In contrast to excellent results after LT for HEHE, results of LT for angiosarcoma have been disappointing with no long-term survivors. Hepatoblastoma (HB) is the most common primary liver cancer in pediatric age group. Long-term outcomes after LT in patients with unresectable tumor and good response to chemotherapy have been promising. Indication for LT for hepatic metastasis from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is mainly for patients with unresectable tumors and for palliation of medically uncontrollable symptoms. Posttransplant survival in those patients with low tumor activity index is excellent, despite recurrence of the tumor. More recent limited outcomes data on LT for unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer have claimed some survival benefit compared to the previous reports. However, due to the high rate of tumor recurrence in a very short time after LT, especially in the era of organ shortage, this indication has not been favored by the transplant community. PMID:24604263

  2. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  3. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  4. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Cantin, R Y; Poole, A; Ryan, J F

    1986-10-01

    The increasing use of intravenous and inhalation sedation in the dental office has the potential of increasing the incidence of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in susceptible subjects. The object of this article is to present two cases of MH and to discuss its pathophysiology, its clinical picture, and its management in the light of the current literature. Stringent screening procedures should be adopted and maintained in order to channel suspected cases to appropriate centers for expert consultation and management. It is further advocated that a program of education for patients and their families be instituted, as it is an essential prerequisite of effective prophylaxis. PMID:2946013

  5. Malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an uncommon, life-threatening pharmacogenetic disorder of the skeletal muscle. It presents as a hypermetabolic response in susceptible individuals to potent volatile anesthetics with/without depolarizing muscle relaxants; in rare cases, to stress from exertion or heat stress. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MHS) is inherited as an autosomally dominant trait with variable expression and incomplete penetrance. It is known that the pathophysiology of MH is related to an uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes resulting in hypermetabolism of the skeletal muscle. In most cases, defects in the ryanodine receptor are responsible for the functional changes of calcium regulation in MH, and more than 300 mutations have been identified in the RYR1 gene, located on chromosome 19q13.1. The classic signs of MH include increase of end-tidal carbon dioxide, tachycardia, skeletal muscle rigidity, tachycardia, hyperthermia and acidosis. Up to now, muscle contracture test is regarded as the gold standard for the diagnosis of MHS though molecular genetic test is used, on a limited basis so far to diagnose MHS. The mortality of MH is dramatically decreased from 70-80% to less than 5%, due to an introduction of dantrolene sodium for treatment of MH, early detection of MH episode using capnography, and the introduction of diagnostic testing for MHS. This review summarizes the clinically essential and important knowledge of MH, and presents new developments in the field. PMID:23198031

  6. DEK over expression as an independent biomarker for poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The DEK protein is related to chromatin reconstruction and gene transcription, and plays an important role in cell apoptosis. High expression levels of the human DEK gene have been correlated with numerous human malignancies. This study explores the roles of DEK in tumor progression and as a prognostic determinant of colorectal cancer. Methods Colorectal cancer specimens from 109 patients with strict follow-up, and colorectal adenomas from 52 patients were selected for analysis of DEK protein by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between DEK over expression and the clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers were evaluated by Chi-square test and Fisher’s exact tests. The survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between prognostic factors and patient survival was also analyzed by the Cox proportional hazard models. Results DEK protein showed a nuclear immunohistochemical staining pattern in colorectal cancers. The strongly positive rate of DEK protein was 48.62% (53/109) in colorectal cancers, which was significantly higher than that in either adjacent normal colon mucosa (9.17%, 10/109) or colorectal adenomas (13.46%, 7/52). DEK over expression in colorectal cancers was positively correlated with tumor size, grade, lymph node metastasis, serosal invasion, late stage, and disease-free survival- and 5-year survival rates. Further analysis showed that patients with late stage colorectal cancer and high DEK expression had worse survival rates than those with low DEK expression. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed high DEK expression, serosal invasion, and late stage are significant independent risk factors for mortality in colorectal cancer. Conclusions DEK plays an important role in the progression of colorectal cancers and it is an independent poor prognostic factor of colorectal cancers. PMID:23902796

  7. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options. PMID:27341596

  8. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Press Room Contact Us Sign Up We fight for Moms Dads Uncles Aunts Friends Brothers Sisters ... on Congress. Take Action Your Guide in the Fight Free resource for stage III & stage IV colorectal ...

  9. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic fields, or radioactive substances to ... has spread to the liver. Ultrasound Ultrasound uses sound waves and their echoes to create images of the ...

  10. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  11. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Ahmed Tipu, Salman; Ishtiaq, Sundas

    2013-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor of the pleura and peritoneum with limited knowledge of its natural history. The incidence has increased in the past two decades but still it is a rare tumor. Etiology of all forms of mesothelioma is strongly associated with industrial pollutants, of which asbestos is the principal carcinogen. Mesothelioma is an insidious neoplasm arising from mesothelial surfaces i.e., pleura (65%-70%), peritoneum (30%), tunica vaginalis testis, and pericardium (1%-2%). The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, due to a long latent period between onset and symptoms and the common and nonspecific clinical presentation. The definite diagnosis can only be established by diagnostic laparoscopy or open surgery along with biopsy to obtain histological examination and immunocytochemical analysis. Different treatment options are available but Surgery can achieve a complete or incomplete resection and Radical resection is the preferred treatment. Chemotherapy has an important role in palliative treatment. Photodynamic therapy is also an option under trial. Patients who successfully underwent surgical resection had a considerably longer median survival as well as a significantly higher 5-year survival. Source of Data/Study Selection: The data were collected from case reports, cross-sectional studies, Open-label studies and phase –II trials between 1973-2012. Data Extraction: Web sites and other online resources of American college of surgeons, Medline, NCBI and Medscape resource centers were used to extract data. Conclusion: Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor with limited knowledge of its natural history. The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, so level of index of suspicion must be kept high. PMID:24550969

  12. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  13. microRNAs in the Malignant Transformation Process.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Anne E; Li, Lihua; Kartha, Reena V; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2015-01-01

    Many cancers originate as benign neoplasms that transform into malignant cancerous tumors in a multistep progression that is regulated, in part, by microRNAs. Benign neoplasms, by definition, lack the ability to invade adjacent tissues or spread to distant sites through metastasis. The benign to malignant transition is a critical intervention stage as tumors diagnosed in subsequent nonlocalized and malignant stages are exponentially more difficult to treat successfully. This chapter explores the critical roles that microRNAs play in the transformation from benign to malignant in four representative cancers: colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and prostate cancer. Understanding how these microRNAs control this progression and transformation will lead to new therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers, resulting in improved treatments and patient outcomes.

  14. Core value of laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Xiang; Wang, Ren-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Since laparoscopy was first used in cholecystectomy in 1987, it has developed quickly and has been used in most fields of traditional surgery. People have now accepted its advantages like small incision, quick recovery, light pain, beauty and short hospital stays. In early times, there are still controversies about the application of laparoscopy in malignant tumor treatments, especially about the problems of oncology efficacy, incision implantation and operation security. However, these concerns have been fully eliminated by evidences on the basis of evidence-basis medicine. In recent years, new minimally invasive technologies are appearing continually, but they still have challenges and may increase the difficulties of radical dissection and the risks of potential complications, so they are confined to benign or early malignant tumors. The core value of the laparoscopic technique is to ensure the high quality of tumor’s radical resection and less complications. On the basis of this, it is allowed to pursue more minimally invasive techniques. Since the development of laparoscopic colorectal surgery is rapid and unceasing, we have reasons to believe that laparoscopic surgery will become gold standard for colorectal surgery in the near future. PMID:26676111

  15. Core value of laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xiang; Wang, Ren-Jie

    2015-12-10

    Since laparoscopy was first used in cholecystectomy in 1987, it has developed quickly and has been used in most fields of traditional surgery. People have now accepted its advantages like small incision, quick recovery, light pain, beauty and short hospital stays. In early times, there are still controversies about the application of laparoscopy in malignant tumor treatments, especially about the problems of oncology efficacy, incision implantation and operation security. However, these concerns have been fully eliminated by evidences on the basis of evidence-basis medicine. In recent years, new minimally invasive technologies are appearing continually, but they still have challenges and may increase the difficulties of radical dissection and the risks of potential complications, so they are confined to benign or early malignant tumors. The core value of the laparoscopic technique is to ensure the high quality of tumor's radical resection and less complications. On the basis of this, it is allowed to pursue more minimally invasive techniques. Since the development of laparoscopic colorectal surgery is rapid and unceasing, we have reasons to believe that laparoscopic surgery will become gold standard for colorectal surgery in the near future. PMID:26676111

  16. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  17. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  18. Public Awareness of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interventions for Increasing Screening Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno Garcia, Antonio Z.; Hernandez Alvarez Buylla, Noemi; Nicolas-Perez, David; Quintero, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks as one of the most incidental and death malignancies worldwide. Colorectal cancer screening has proven its benefit in terms of incidence and mortality reduction in randomized controlled trials. In fact, it has been recommended by medical organizations either in average-risk or family-risk populations. Success of a screening campaign highly depends on how compliant the target population is. Several factors influence colorectal cancer screening uptake including sociodemographics, provider and healthcare system factors, and psychosocial factors. Awareness of the target population of colorectal cancer and screening is crucial in order to increase screening participation rates. Knowledge about this disease and its prevention has been used across studies as a measurement of public awareness. Some studies found a positive relationship between knowledge about colorectal cancer, risk perception, and attitudes (perceived benefits and barriers against screening) and willingness to participate in a colorectal cancer screening campaign. The mentioned factors are modifiable and therefore susceptible of intervention. In fact, interventional studies focused on average-risk population have tried to increase colorectal cancer screening uptake by improving public knowledge and modifying attitudes. In the present paper, we reviewed the factors impacting adherence to colorectal cancer screening and interventions targeting participants for increasing screening uptake. PMID:24729896

  19. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  20. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer. PMID:26602923

  1. [Malignant hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Metterlein, T; Schuster, F; Graf, B M; Anetseder, M

    2014-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare hereditary, mostly subclinical myopathy. Trigger substances, such as volatile anesthetic agents and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine can induce a potentially fatal metabolic increase in predisposed patients caused by a dysregulation of the myoplasmic calcium (Ca) concentration. Mutations in the dihydropyridine ryanodine receptor complex in combination with the trigger substances are responsible for an uncontrolled release of Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This leads to activation of the contractile apparatus and a massive increase in cellular energy production. Exhaustion of the cellular energy reserves ultimately results in local muscle cell destruction and subsequent cardiovascular failure. The clinical picture of MH episodes is very variable. Early symptoms are hypoxia, hypercapnia and cardiac arrhythmia whereas the body temperature rise, after which MH is named, often occurs later. Decisive for the course of MH episodes is a timely targeted therapy. Following introduction of the hydantoin derivative dantrolene, the previously high mortality of fulminant MH episodes could be reduced to well under 10 %. An MH predisposition can be detected using the invasive in vitro contracture test (IVCT) or mutation analysis. Few elaborate diagnostic procedures are in the developmental stage. PMID:25384957

  2. Demonstration of Herpes Simplex Virus, Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr Virus in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani-Khasraghi, Sahar; Ameli, Mitra; Khalily, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study sought to investigate molecular evidence for association between the presence of herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in CRC and colorectal polyp by using the PCR method in Iran. Methods: In this analytical case-control study, we selected 15 patients with CRC, 20 patients with colorectal polyp, and 35 patients without malignancy as controls. After DNA extraction, PCR was used to determine HSV, CMV, and EBV genome by specific primers. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 tests. Results: Our findings demonstrated that there is no direct molecular evidence to support the association between HSV, CMV, and EBV and human colorectal malignancies. Conclusion: The results from this study do not exclude a possible oncogenic role of these viruses in neoplastic development of colon cells. PMID:26975327

  3. Role of microRNA-7 in digestive system malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wan-Qun; Hu, Ling; Chen, Geng-Xin; Deng, Hai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    There are several malignancies of the digestive system (including gastric, pancreatic and colorectal cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma), which are the most common types of cancer and a major cause of death worldwide. MicroRNA (miR)-7 is abundant in the pancreas, playing an important role in pancreatic development and endocrine function. Expression of miR-7 is downregulated in digestive system malignancies compared with normal tissue. Although there are contrasting results for miR-7 expression, almost all research reveals that miR-7 is a tumor suppressor, by targeting various genes in specific pathways. Moreover, miR-7 can target different genes simultaneously in different malignancies of the digestive system. By acting on many cytokines, miR-7 is also involved in many gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases as a significant carcinogenic factor. Consequently, miR-7 might be a biomarker or therapeutic target gene in digestive system malignancies. PMID:26798443

  4. Evolution of laparoscopy in colorectal surgery: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Alexander Emmanuel; Wong, Mark Te Ching; Tang, Choong Leong

    2014-01-01

    Open surgery for colorectal disease has progressed significantly over the past century from humble beginnings to form the mainstay of treatment for colorectal cancer and a number of benign conditions. Following the introduction of laparoscopic abdominal surgery, the next stage in the evolution of the specialty began in the 1990s with the first laparoscopic colonic resection. Following some early concerns regarding its safety and oncological efficacy during the latter part of that decade, laparoscopic colorectal surgery rapidly came into mainstream use in the early part of the current century with evidence supporting its use being made available from large scale randomised controlled trials. This article provides an evidence-based summary of this evolutionary process as it relates to both benign and malignant colorectal disease, as well as discussion of the next phase of new technologies such as robotic surgery. PMID:24803804

  5. Resection of Diminutive and Small Colorectal Polyps: What Is the Optimal Technique?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are classified as neoplastic or non-neoplastic on the basis of malignant potential. All neoplastic polyps should be completely removed because both the incidence of colorectal cancer and the mortality of colorectal cancer patients have been found to be strongly correlated with incomplete polypectomy. The majority of colorectal polyps discovered on diagnostic colonoscopy are diminutive and small polyps; therefore, complete resection of these polyps is very important. However, there is no consensus on a method to remove diminutive and small polyps, and various techniques have been adopted based on physician preference. The aim of this article was to review the diverse techniques used to remove diminutive and small polyps and to suggest which technique will be the most effective. PMID:27450226

  6. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  7. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  8. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Troiani, Teresa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF) is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor. Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated dose yet defined. PMID:21221177

  9. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  10. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, E E; Deland, F H; Casper, S; Corgan, R L; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D M

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with 131-I at a total dose of at least 1.0 muCi. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the 131-I-labelled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with 131-I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the appraent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  11. Colorectal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Giovanni; Messerini, Luca; Gafà, Roberta; Risio, Mauro

    2011-03-01

    Epithelial colorectal tumors are common pathologic entities. Their histology report should be comprehensive of a series of pathologic parameters essential for the correct clinical management of the patients. Diagnostic histologic criteria of adenomatous, serrated, inflammatory, and hamartomatous polyps and of polyposis syndromes are discussed. In addition, the pathologic features of early and advanced colorectal cancer are described and a checklist is given. Finally, molecular prognostic and predictive factors currently employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer are discussed.

  12. Inflammatory and redox reactions in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guina, Tina; Biasi, Fiorella; Calfapietra, Simone; Nano, Mario; Poli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    It has been established that there is a relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer development. The constant colonic inflammation typical of inflammatory bowel diseases is now considered a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. The inflammatory network of signaling molecules is also required during the late phases of carcinogenesis, to enable cancer cells to survive and to metastasize. Oxidative reactions are an integral part of the inflammatory response, and are generally associated with CRC development. However, when the malignant phenotype is acquired, increased oxidative status induces antioxidant defenses in cancer cells, favoring their aggressiveness. This contradictory behavior of cancer cells toward redox status is of great significance for potential anticancer therapies. This paper summarizes the essential background information relating to the molecules involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation during carcinogenesis. Understanding more of their function in CRC stages might provide the foundation for future developments in CRC treatment.

  13. [Gastrointestinal oncology: the genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer Prunés, Francesc

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in developed countries, and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for diagnosis, as well as specific and specialized management. In addition, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are highly effective prevention measures, but also for relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have occurred in the characterization of serrated polyposis syndrome and in the diagnosis and management of patients with Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis.

  14. Pinworm infection masquerading as colorectal liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, KJ; Hubscher, S; Mangat, K; Sutcliffe, R; Marudanayagam, R

    2012-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is responsible for a variety of diseases but rarely affects the liver. Accurate characterisation of suspected liver metastases is essential to avoid unnecessary surgery. In the presented case, following a diagnosis of rectal cancer, a solitary liver nodule was diagnosed as a liver metastasis due to typical radiological features and subsequently resected. At pathological assessment, however, a necrotic nodule containing E vermicularis was identified. Solitary necrotic nodules of the liver are usually benign but misdiagnosed frequently as malignant due to radiological features. It is standard practice to diagnose colorectal liver metastases solely on radiological evidence. Without obtaining tissue prior to liver resection, misdiagnosis of solitary necrotic nodules of the liver will continue to occur. PMID:22943320

  15. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed encouraging findings that support a role of probiotics in colorectal cancer prevention. Summary Several mechanisms could explain the preventive action of probiotics against colorectal cancer onset. They include: alteration of the intestinal microflora; inactivation of cancerogenic compounds; competition with putrefactive and pathogenic microbiota; improvement of the host’s immune response; anti-proliferative effects via regulation of apoptosis and cell differentiation; fermentation of undigested food; inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. PMID:23173670

  16. Lack of association between human papillomavirus infection and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Hanieh; Fard, Zahra Tahmasebi; Abdirad, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with nearly one million new cases identified annually. Different factors might cause colorectal cancer, one of the most prevalent cancers among both men and women. Viral aetiology in cancerous malignancies is a very important issue and so far a number of viral strains have been identified as tumour oncogene viruses. Viral infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), have recently been suggested as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unknown. Aim To assessed the association between HPV infection and colorectal cancer. Material and methods In this study, 50 cancer tissue samples and 50 samples without colon cancer were studied in order to identify HPV through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 42 adenocarcinomas, 10 were well differentiated, 30 moderated differentiated, and 2 were poorly differentiated. DNA extraction was verified by beta globin gene amplification; specific PCR was carried out based on HPV L1 consensus primers MY09/MY11. Results HPV DNA was not identified in any of the normal, adenocarcinoma, or adenoma samples. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies, the current research failed to establish a relationship between HPV infection and the incidence of colon cancer. Considering the existing inconsistencies, it is recommended that further studies be conducted with larger sample size. PMID:25396002

  17. Mechanical bowel preparation in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kolovrat, Marijan; Busić, Zeljko; Lovrić, Zvonimir; Amić, Fedor; Cavka, Vlatka; Boras, Zdenko; Servis, Drazen; Lemac, Domagoj; Busić, Njegoslav

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) and antimicrobial prophylaxis in elective colorectal surgery regarding still existing controversies. A prospective study of 85 patients undergoing elective colon and rectal surgery during 2 years period was performed, divided in two groups. Group A (N = 46) with patients who underwent mechanical bowel preparation, and group B (N = 39) patients without mechanical bowel preparation. We analysed: gender, age, preoperative difficulties, diagnostic colonoscopy, tumor localization, operation performed, pathohystological findings, Dukes classification, number of lymphonodes inspected, liver metastasis, other organ infiltrations, mean time of surgery, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications and mortality. Demographic characteristics, pathohystological findings, the site of malignancy, and type of surgical procedure did not significantly differentiate the two groups. The only significance revealed in mean time of surgery (138/178 minutes) in favor of patients with MBP (p = 0.017). Mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) for elective colorectal surgery is not advantageous. It does not influence radicalism of the procedure, does not decrease neither postoperative complications, nor hospital mortality.

  18. Colonoscopy in Colorectal Cancer Screening: Current Aspects.

    PubMed

    Triantafillidis, John K; Vagianos, Constantine; Malgarinos, George

    2015-09-01

    Colonoscopy represents a very important diagnostic modality for screening for colorectal cancer, because it has the ability to both detect and effectively remove pro-malignant and malignant lesions. It is recommended by almost all international and national gastroenterology and cancer societies, as an initial screening modality or, following a positive fecal occult blood test, to be performed every 10 years in individuals of average risk starting from the age of 50. However, a significant problem is the so-called post-screening (interval) polyps and cancers found some years after the index colonoscopy. In order to reduce the rate of interval cancers it is extremely necessary to optimize the quality and effectiveness of colonoscopy. Bowel preparation is of paramount importance for both accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment of lesions found on colonoscopy. The quality of bowel preparation could be significantly improved by splitting the dose regimens, a strategy that has been shown to be superior to single-dose regimen. A good endoscopic technique and optimal withdrawal time offering adequate time for inspection, would further optimize the rate of cecal intubation and the number of lesions detected. During the last years, sophisticated devices have been introduced that would further facilitate cecal intubation. The percentage of total colonoscopies is now super-passing the level of 95 % allowing the adenoma detection rate to be greater than the suggestive level of 25 % in men and 15 % in women. This review aims to provide the reader with the current knowledge concerning indications, usefulness, limitations and future perspectives of this probably most important screening technique for colorectal cancer available today. PMID:27217671

  19. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children.

  20. Region-specific differences in colorectal cancer: Slovakia and Hungary have highest incidence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Simko, V; Ginter, E

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data on colorectal cancer (CRC) exhibit high incidence in Central East Europe. Hungary, Slovakia and Croatia represent the lead. For decades it was the Czech Republic but it attained the fourth rank after the mid-2000. Remarkably, the Ashkenazi Jews who imigrated to the USA from Central Europe have the highest incidence of CRC among US minorities. They also have high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, a risk for CRC. Notably, countries surrounding the Central European focus of CRC, Austria, Germany, Poland, Romania, Ukraine and Russia have substantially lower incidence. CRC in Central Europe has higher incidence than CRC among the highest at-risk cohort in the USA, the elderly blacks. Research and the genome wide screening identified genetic mutations associated with CRC in Ashkenazis from Central Europe. Some risk factors for CRC are non genotypic as evidenced by wide variation in CRC incidence in the course of only a few decades. Recent trends offer hope that identification of the non-innate pathogenic mechanisms would potentially reduce the burden of this third most lethal malignancy (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 40).

  1. Molecular dissection of premalignant colorectal lesions reveals early onset of the CpG island methylator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromu; Yamano, Hiro-o; Maruyama, Reo; Nojima, Masanori; Kamimae, Seiko; Sawada, Takeshi; Ashida, Masami; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tomoaki; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Taku; Suzuki, Ryo; Sato, Akiko; Kai, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi; Sugai, Tamotsu; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Toyota, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    The concept of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is widely accepted, although the timing of its occurrence and its interaction with other genetic defects are not fully understood. Our aim in this study was to unravel the molecular development of CIMP cancers by dissecting their genetic and epigenetic signatures in precancerous and malignant colorectal lesions. We characterized the methylation profile and BRAF/KRAS mutation status in 368 colorectal tissue samples, including precancerous and malignant lesions. In addition, genome-wide copy number aberrations, methylation profiles, and mutations of BRAF, KRAS, TP53, and PIK3CA pathway genes were examined in 84 colorectal lesions. Genome-wide methylation analysis of CpG islands and selected marker genes revealed that CRC precursor lesions are in three methylation subgroups: CIMP-high, CIMP-low, and CIMP-negative. Interestingly, a subset of CIMP-positive malignant lesions exhibited frequent copy number gains on chromosomes 7 and 19 and genetic defects in the AKT/PIK3CA pathway genes. Analysis of mixed lesions containing both precancerous and malignant components revealed that most aberrant methylation is acquired at the precursor stage, whereas copy number aberrations are acquired during the progression from precursor to malignant lesion. Our integrative genomic and epigenetic analysis suggests early onset of CIMP during CRC development and indicates a previously unknown CRC development pathway in which epigenetic instability associates with genomic alterations.

  2. Radiolabeled antibody imaging in the management of colorectal cancer. Results of a multicenter clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.J.; Abdel-Nabi, H.; Krag, D.; Mitchell, E. )

    1991-08-01

    Presurgical colorectal cancer patients (n = 116) received single intravenous infusions of 1 mg of CYT-103 (OncoScint CR103), an immunoconjugate of monoclonal antibody B72.3, radiolabeled with 111In. Following gamma camera imaging, 103 patients underwent an operative procedure: 92 had primary or recurrent colorectal carcinoma, 1 patient evaluated for recurrence of colorectal cancer had a second primary malignancy (small cell lung), and 10 patients had no demonstrable evidence of malignancy. 111In-CYT-103 immunoscintigraphic findings were consistent with the pathologic diagnoses for 70% of patients with colorectal cancer and 90% of disease-free patients. Antibody imaging contributed to surgical decision making through the detection of occult disease (12% of patients) and the confirmation of localized, potentially resectable disease without regional or metastatic spread. Seven patients (6%) experienced adverse effects, primarily fevers and itching, and 33% of patients developed antibodies to murine immunoglobulin after administration of 111In-CYT-103. The results of this study suggest that 111In-CYT-103 is a useful diagnostic tool for the presurgical evaluation of colorectal cancer patients.

  3. [Prevalence and trend of gastrointestinal malignant tumors in the elderly over 75 years old in China].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Wu, Chunxiao

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal malignant tumors are the most common malignant neoplasms among the elderly people over 75 years old in China. There are 122.1 thousand new gastric cases and 78.2 thousand new colorectal cancer cases diagnosed each year in China, which accounts for 42.73% and 18.08% respectively of the cases with same age in the world. The gastric cancer accounts for 25.13% and colorectal cancer accounts for 28.86%of all the malignancies in the elderly. The gastric cancer death accounts for 36.38% and colorectal cancer death accounts for 44.68% in those people over 75 years old in China. It was estimated that the risk of developing gastrointestinal malignant tumors of these elderly people was about 5-6 times and the risk of death of gastrointestinal malignant tumors was about 7-8 times of the general population. Compared with the general population and the people of 55-74 years old, the incidence of gastric cancer in the elderly decreased more slowly and the incidence of colorectal cancer increased more quickly over the past 40 years, which brought significant double burden. The survival rate of gastrointestinal malignant tumors in these elderly was lower than that of the general population. We summarized the incidence, mortality, survival and trend of gastrointestinal malignant tumors in the Chinese elderly, in order to provide data for predicting the age distribution and disease burden in the future, to improve the awareness for cancer prevention and control among these elderly, and to call attention to epidemiology, preclinical and clinical medicine for the elderly, especially in the field of study on the influence between comorbidity and cancer treatment, with the aim of improving survival and quality of life among the elderly.

  4. Malrotation of the Intestine in Adult and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ray, Dipankar; Morimoto, Mitsuaki

    2015-12-01

    Malrotation of the gut is a congenital anomaly and usually presents in childhood. Rarely, it may present in adults. Patients may be asymptomatic, and malrotation is detected during investigations, operation or autopsy. It can cause longstanding abdominal symptoms like pain, dyspepsia or acute abdomen due to volvulus. In adults, malrotation is found with different gastrointestinal malignancies like gastric, hepatobiliary, pancreatic and, in particular, colorectal neoplasms. We are reporting a case of 60-year-old female presented with carcinoma caecum along with malrotation of the gut. It is the first case report from India. We also reviewed documented cases of malrotation associated with colorectal malignancies. A large number of cases have been reported in Japan as compared to rest of the world. Malrotation in adults is probably associated with gastrointestinal malignancies. Possible causes of this association can be genetic factors or gut changes like chronic inflammation. These associations need further study to consider intestinal malrotation as premalignant lesion which may be very important in follow-up of children with malrotation.

  5. Malrotation of the Intestine in Adult and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ray, Dipankar; Morimoto, Mitsuaki

    2015-12-01

    Malrotation of the gut is a congenital anomaly and usually presents in childhood. Rarely, it may present in adults. Patients may be asymptomatic, and malrotation is detected during investigations, operation or autopsy. It can cause longstanding abdominal symptoms like pain, dyspepsia or acute abdomen due to volvulus. In adults, malrotation is found with different gastrointestinal malignancies like gastric, hepatobiliary, pancreatic and, in particular, colorectal neoplasms. We are reporting a case of 60-year-old female presented with carcinoma caecum along with malrotation of the gut. It is the first case report from India. We also reviewed documented cases of malrotation associated with colorectal malignancies. A large number of cases have been reported in Japan as compared to rest of the world. Malrotation in adults is probably associated with gastrointestinal malignancies. Possible causes of this association can be genetic factors or gut changes like chronic inflammation. These associations need further study to consider intestinal malrotation as premalignant lesion which may be very important in follow-up of children with malrotation. PMID:26884662

  6. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Gastrointestinal and Pancreatobiliary Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fugazza, Alessandro; Gaiani, Federica; Carra, Maria Clotilde; Brunetti, Francesco; Lévy, Michaël; Sobhani, Iradj; Azoulay, Daniel; Catena, Fausto; de'Angelis, Gian Luigi; de'Angelis, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an endoscopic-assisted technique developed to obtain histopathological diagnoses of gastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary diseases in real time. The objective of this systematic review is to analyze the current literature on CLE and to evaluate the applicability and diagnostic yield of CLE in patients with gastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary diseases. A literature search was performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Cochrane Oral Health Group Specialized Register, using pertinent keywords without time limitations. Both prospective and retrospective clinical studies that evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, or accuracy of CLE were eligible for inclusion. Of 662 articles identified, 102 studies were included in the systematic review. The studies were conducted between 2004 and 2015 in 16 different countries. CLE demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus, gastric neoplasms and polyps, colorectal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease, malignant pancreatobiliary strictures, and pancreatic cysts. Although CLE has several promising applications, its use has been limited by its low availability, high cost, and need of specific operator training. Further clinical trials with a particular focus on cost-effectiveness and medicoeconomic analyses, as well as standardized institutional training, are advocated to implement CLE in routine clinical practice. PMID:26989684

  7. Evaluation of Cysteinyl Leukotriene Signaling as a Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Lorraine; Butler, Clare T.; Murphy, Adrian; Moran, Bruce; Gallagher, William M.; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, Breandán N.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current pharmacotherapy options include cytotoxic chemotherapy, anti-VEGF, and anti-EGFR targeting drugs, but these are limited by toxic side effects, limited responses and ultimately resistance. Cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT) signaling regulates intestinal homeostasis with mounting evidence suggesting that CysLT signaling also plays a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Therefore, CysLT signaling represents a novel target for this malignancy. This review evaluates reported links between CysLT signaling and established hallmarks of cancer in addition to its pharmacological potential as a new therapeutic target. PMID:27709113

  8. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D.; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E.; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  9. Occupational exposures and colorectal cancers: A quantitative overview of epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Oddone, Enrico; Modonesi, Carlo; Gatta, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    A traditional belief widespread across the biomedical community was that dietary habits and genetic predisposition were the basic factors causing colorectal cancer. In more recent times, however, a growing evidence has shown that other determinants can be very important in increasing (or reducing) incidence of this malignancy. The hypothesis that environmental and occupational risk factors are associated with colorectal cancer is gaining ground, and high risks of colorectal cancer have been reported among workers in some industrial branches. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiologic relationship between colorectal cancer and occupational exposures to several industrial activities, by means of a scientific literature review and meta-analysis. This work pointed out increased risks of colorectal cancer for labourers occupied in industries with a wide use of chemical compounds, such as leather (RR = 1.70, 95%CI: 1.24-2.34), basic metals (RR = 1.32, 95%CI: 1.07-1.65), plastic and rubber manufacturing (RR = 1.30, 95%CI: 0.98-1.71 and RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 0.92-1.76, respectively), besides workers in the sector of repair and installation of machinery exposed to asbestos (RR = 1.40, 95%CI: 1.07-1.84). Based on our results, the estimated crude excess risk fraction attributable to occupational exposure ranged from about 11% to about 15%. However, homogeneous pattern of association between colorectal cancer and industrial branches did not emerge from this review. PMID:25253943

  10. Comparison of robotic and laparoscopic colorectal resections with respect to 30-day perioperative morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Adina E.; Elnahas, Ahmad; Bashir, Shaheena; Cleghorn, Michelle C.; Quereshy, Fayez A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Robotic surgery has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional laparoscopy. Robotic surgery addresses many of the technical and ergonomic limitations of laparoscopic surgery, but the literature regarding clinical outcomes in colorectal surgery is limited. We sought to compare robotic and laparoscopic colorectal resections with respect to 30-day perioperative outcomes. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify all patients who underwent robotic or laparoscopic colorectal surgery in 2013. We performed a logistic regression analysis to compare intraoperative variables and 30-day outcomes. Results There were 8392 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery and 472 patients who underwent robotic colorectal surgery. The robotic cohort had a lower incidence of unplanned intraoperative conversion (9.5% v. 13.7%, p = 0.008). There were no significant differences between robotic and laparoscopic surgery with respect to other intraoperative and postoperative outcomes, such as operative duration, length of stay, postoperative ileus, anastomotic leak, venous thromboembolism, wound infection, cardiac complications and pulmonary complications. On multivariable analysis, robotic surgery was protective for unplanned conversion, while male sex, malignancy, Crohn disease and diverticular disease were all associated with open conversion. Conclusion Robotic colorectal surgery has comparable 30-day perioperative morbidity to laparoscopic surgery and may decrease the rate of intraoperative conversion in select patients. PMID:27240135

  11. A Critical Role for Rac1 in Tumor Progression of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Carolina; Céspedes, María Virtudes; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; del Pulgar, María Teresa Gómez; Boluda, Alicia; Oroz, Lourdes García; Cejas, Paloma; Nistal, Manuel; Mangues, Ramón; Lacal, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is the second cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. Rac1 is a member of the family of Rho GTPases that regulates many intracellular signaling pathways, including those involved in tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastasis. We have investigated the role of Rac1 in colorectal tumor progression by genetic modification of the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line SW620 to either overexpress Rac1 or lack Rac1 expression. Tumor behavior was studied by orthotopic injection of stably modified cell lines into the cecal wall of athymic nude mice, a model that replicates the histopathological appearance and clinical behavior of human colorectal adenocarcinoma in humans. While overexpression of Rac1 resulted in an accelerated tumorigenic process, inducing a faster mortality rate, inhibition of Rac1 completely suppressed tumor formation. These results suggest that Rac1 plays a major role in colorectal adenocarcinoma progression. Finally, interference with Rac1 function may provide an important tool to block the malignant phenotype of colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:18165265

  12. Fluoroscopic management of complications after colorectal stent placement.

    PubMed

    Lopera, Jorge E; De Gregorio, Miguel Angel

    2010-09-01

    Colorectal self-expanding metal stents have been widely used as a bridge to surgery in patients with acute malignant colonic obstruction by allowing a single-stage operation, or as a definitive palliative procedure in patients with inoperable tumors. Colonic stents are placed under either fluoroscopic or combined endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance, with similar technical-success and complication rates. Placement of colonic stents is a very safe procedure with a low procedure-related mortality rate, but serious complications can develop and reinterventions are not uncommon. Most of the complications can be treated by minimally invasive or conservative techniques, while surgical interventions are required for most patients with perforation.

  13. Increased risk of concurrent primary malignancies in patients diagnosed with a primary malignant epithelial ovarian tumor.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, Catharina C; Vooijs, G Peter; Bulten, Johan; van Dijck, Jos A A M; Verbeek, Andre L M

    2007-03-01

    Ovarian cancer and second malignant neoplasms are found to occur rather frequently in the same patient. From a clinical perspective, it is important to have quantitative information on concurrent malignancies in the same year of diagnosis of the epithelial ovarian cancer. In this population-based study, we used data from the Netherlands Nationwide Network for Registry of histo- and cytopathology (PALGA) and the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Data of the ovarian cancer as well as data on previous or later cancers were obtained. Age-specific cancer rates from the NCR were used to calculate expected numbers of cancer. Between 1987 and 1993, histopathology reports were identified of 4577 patients with primary epithelial malignant or primary borderline malignant ovarian cancers and its longitudinal data. As the database may lack detailed information on histopathology, a recent sample of 789 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1996-2003 was comprehensively studied as well. In the eventual data analysis of 5366 patients, 244 cases (4.5%) of concurrent primary malignancy were reported in the same year that the malignant epithelial ovarian tumor had been diagnosed against 51 expected. The observed vs expected ratio was 4.8 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) (4.3-5.5). For cancer of the uterus/endometrium the observed vs expected ratio was 62.3 (95% CI 52.5-73.5). For skin, breast, colorectal, urinary bladder, renal and cervical cancer the ratio was also larger than unity. The elevated risk of concurrent cancer may lead to clinical screening protocols. The findings on endometrial cancer may prompt research on common etiologies and biomarkers.

  14. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  15. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hance, J; Rockall, T; Darzi, A

    2004-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been shown to offer many advantages to general surgical patients but has not been widely adopted for colorectal disease. Initial fears surrounding the oncological safety of laparoscopic colectomies have largely subsided but the technical challenges still remain. Surgical robots or telemanipulators present the laparoscopic surgeon with unrivaled dexterity and vision, which may allow colonic resections to be completed with greater ease. Although initial studies suggest promising results using currently available systems, it will take further time for patient benefits to be proven, therefore justifying the greater expense of operating with this new technology.

  16. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms in developed countries and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high index of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient--for whom there are highly effective preventive measures--but also for the patient's relatives, who may carry the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of Lynch's syndrome and serrated polyposis syndrome.

  17. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  18. Rheumatic Diseases and Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    BOJINCA, Violeta; JANTA, Iustina

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are many studies which demonstrate a higher risk for malignancy in patients with rheumatic diseases. There have been a number of possible explanations for the differences in the risk of certain malignancies in patients with rheumatic disease, compared with general population, but a clear mechanism is difficult to identify. Rheumatoid syndromes may be associated with malignancy as paraneoplastic conditions, which can antedate the neoplasm diagnosis. On the other hand, autoimmune rheumatic diseases have a higher risk of malignancy by themselves or because of the immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:23482881

  19. Incidence of malignancy in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toru; Nakajima, Ayako; Inoue, Eisuke; Tanaka, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Momohara, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2011-11-01

    To determine the incidence of malignancy and site-specific malignancies in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In a prospective large observational cohort study named IORRA, 7,566 patients with RA were enrolled from April 2001 to April 2005 and were followed up to October 2005. Occurrence of malignancy was originally collected by patient reports of IORRA survey biannually from April 2001 to October 2005, and was confirmed by medical records. Standardized incidence rate (SIR) of the observed-to-expected cancer incidence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were then calculated. Factors obtained at first enrollment in IORRA were assessed for association with risk of malignancy using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 177 malignancies in 173 patients (58 in men, 115 in women) were identified during the observation period of 25,567 person-years. The age- and sex-standardized incidence rate of malignancy was 437.1 (men, 706.8; women, 366.1) per 100,000 person-years. The SIR of malignancy was slightly excess (SIR 1.18, [95% CI 1.02-1.37]) in all patients, but 1.29 (95% CI 0.99-1.67) in men, and 1.13 (95% CI 0.94-1.36) in women. A significant excess of lymphoma (SIR 6.07, [95% CI 3.71-9.37]) and lung cancer (SIR 2.29, [95% CI 1.57-3.21]), whereas decreased incidence of colorectal cancer (SIR 0.49, [95% CI 0.26-0.83]), were found. Male gender and older age were identified as risk factors for malignancy. A slight excess in the incidence of overall malignancy and highly excess of lymphoma in Japanese RA patients was demonstrated.

  20. Role of laparoscopy in hepatobiliary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Balarajah, Vickna; Watt, Jennifer; Abraham, Ajit T; Bhattacharya, Satyajit; Kocher, Hemant M

    2016-04-01

    The many benefits of laparoscopy, including smaller incision, reduced length of hospital stay and more rapid return to normal function, have seen its popularity grow in recent years. With concurrent improvements in non-surgical cancer management the importance of accurate staging is becoming increasingly important. There are two main applications of laparoscopic surgery in managing hepato-pancreatico-biliary (HPB) malignancy: accurate staging of disease and resection. We aim to summarize the use of laparoscopy in these contexts. The role of staging laparoscopy has become routine in certain cancers, in particular T[2] staged, locally advanced gastric cancer, hilar cholangiocarcinoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. For other cancers, in particular colorectal, laparoscopy has now become the gold standard management for resection such that there is no role for stand-alone staging laparoscopy. In HPB cancers, although staging laparoscopy may play a role, with ever improving radiology, its role remains controversial. PMID:27377496

  1. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  2. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  3. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  4. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  5. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  6. Population screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    Each year in the UK, around 16,000 people die from colorectal cancer. At disease presentation, around 55% of people have advanced cancer that has spread to lymph nodes, metastasised to other organs or is so locally advanced that surgery is unlikely to be curative (Dukes' stage C or D). Overall 5-year survival for colorectal cancer in the UK is around 47-51% (compared to 64% in the USA), but only 7% at most in those presenting with metastatic disease. These facts underlie the current introduction of national bowel screening programmes in the UK. Here we assess the role of screening of the general population in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. We do not consider the screening arrangements needed for high-risk populations, including those with inflammatory bowel disease or a strong family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:17009566

  7. The impact of additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Myles J; Smith, Henry G; Mahar, Alyson L; Law, Calvin; Ko, Yoo-Joung

    2016-10-15

    A higher incidence of additional malignancies has been described in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with GIST and evaluate the impact on survival. Individuals diagnosed with GIST from 2001 to2009 were identified from the SEER database. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of additional malignancies and Cox-proportional hazards regression used to identify predictors of survival. In the study period, 1705 cases of GIST were identified, with 181 (10.6%) patients developing additional malignancies. Colorectal cancer was the most common cancer developing within 6 months of GIST diagnosis (30%). The median time to diagnosis of a malignancy after 6 months of GIST diagnosis was 21.9 months. Older age (p < 0.0001) and extraoesophagogastric GIST (p = 0.0027) were significant prognostic factors associated with additional malignancies. The overall 5-year survival was 65%, with the presence of additional malignancies within 6 months of GIST diagnosis associated with poor overall survival (54%, HR 1.55 1.05-2.3 95% CI, p = 0.04). Predictive factors of additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with GIST are increasing age and the primary disease site. Developing additional malignancies within 6 months of GIST diagnosis is associated with poorer overall survival. Targeted surveillance may be warranted in patients diagnosed with GIST that are at high risk of developing additional malignancies. PMID:27299364

  8. Nrf2 as a Chemopreventive Target in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Constance Lay Lay; Kong, Tony Ah-Ng

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Numerous epidemiological studies have linked consumption of cruciferous vegetables to a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in individuals. It is currently well accepted that chronic inflammation is a contributing factor in 15-20% malignancies including CRC. Many chemopreventive compounds are effective in preclinical systems and many on-going clinical trials are showing promising findings. Many of these compounds could activate the antioxidant responsive element (ARE), a critical regulatory element for phase II protective/detoxification and anti-oxidative stress enzymes mediated by nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Recently, Nrf2 has emerged as a novel target for the prevention of CRC. Areas covered A full literature search was performed using PubMed with the key words ‘ARE, Nrf2, colon, colorectal cancer, chemoprevention, cancer prevention’, and all relevant publications are included. Expert opinion The use of Nrf2 knockout mice has provided key insights into the toxicological and chemopreventive importance of this pathway. Mounting evidence has revealed that Nrf2 is a critical regulator of inflammation as well, a major driving force for CRC progression and formation. Targeting the Nrf2/ARE pathway may present a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of not only colorectal inflammatory diseases but the frequent subsequent development of CRC as well. PMID:21261563

  9. The Role of MicroRNA-200 in Progression of Human Colorectal and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bojmar, Linda; Karlsson, Elin; Ellegård, Sander; Olsson, Hans; Björnsson, Bergthor; Hallböök, Olof; Larsson, Marie; Stål, Olle; Sandström, Per

    2013-01-01

    The role of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer has been studied extensively in vitro, but involvement of the EMT in tumorigenesis in vivo is largely unknown. We investigated the potential of microRNAs as clinical markers and analyzed participation of the EMT-associated microRNA-200–ZEB–E-cadherin pathway in cancer progression. Expression of the microRNA-200 family was quantified by real-time RT-PCR analysis of fresh-frozen and microdissected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary colorectal tumors, normal colon mucosa, and matched liver metastases. MicroRNA expression was validated by in situ hybridization and after in vitro culture of the malignant cells. To assess EMT as a predictive marker, factors considered relevant in colorectal cancer were investigated in 98 primary breast tumors from a treatment-randomized study. Associations between the studied EMT-markers were found in primary breast tumors and in colorectal liver metastases. MicroRNA-200 expression in epithelial cells was lower in malignant mucosa than in normal mucosa, and was also decreased in metastatic compared to non-metastatic colorectal cancer. Low microRNA-200 expression in colorectal liver metastases was associated with bad prognosis. In breast cancer, low levels of microRNA-200 were related to reduced survival and high expression of microRNA-200 was predictive of benefit from radiotheraphy. MicroRNA-200 was associated with ER positive status, and inversely correlated to HER2 and overactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, that was associated with high ZEB1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that the stability of microRNAs makes them suitable as clinical markers and that the EMT-related microRNA-200 – ZEB – E-cadherin signaling pathway is connected to established clinical characteristics and can give useful prognostic and treatment-predictive information in progressive breast and colorectal cancers. PMID:24376848

  10. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer ... in malignant mesothelioma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed ...

  11. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-12-14

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  12. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  13. Colorectal cancer manifesting with metastasis to prolactinoma: report of a case involving symptoms mimicking pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Siwanuwatn, Rungsak; Sunthornyothin, Sarat

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary metastasis is an uncommon first presentation of systemic malignancy. The most common presenting symptom of pituitary metastasis is diabetes insipidus reflecting involvement of the stalk and/or posterior pituitary. We herein present a unique case of the coexistence of both a functioning pituitary adenoma (prolactinoma) and pituitary metastasis of advanced colorectal cancer with pituitary apoplexy as the first manifestation of underlying malignancy. The present case emphasizes the need to consider pituitary metastasis as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with pituitary lesions and be aware that tumor-to-tumor metastasis can occur unexpectedly in those with pituitary metastases.

  14. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal adenocarcinomas from adenomas, while inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes can be distinguished based on the strain ratio calculation. Among EUS-guided therapies, the drainage of abdominal and pelvic collections has been regarded as a safe and effective procedure to be used as an alternative for the transcutaneous route, while the placing of fiducial markers under EUS guidance for targeted radiotherapy in rectal cancer or the use of contrast microbubbles as drug-delivery vehicles represent experimental therapeutic applications that could greatly impact the forthcoming management of patients with colorectal diseases, pending on further investigations. PMID:26855535

  15. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955). PMID:22280244

  16. Synchronous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Dafashy, Tamer J.; Ghaffary, Cameron K.; Keyes, Kyle T.; Sonstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    While renal cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm of the kidney, its simultaneous diagnosis with a gastrointestinal malignancy is a rare, but well reported phenomenon. This discussion focuses on three independent cases in which each patient was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma and a unique synchronous gastrointestinal malignancy. Case 1 explores the diagnosis and surgical intervention of a 66-year-old male patient synchronously diagnosed with clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a carcinoid tumor of the small bowel. Case 2 describes the diagnosis and surgical intervention of a 61-year-old male found to have clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a mucinous appendiceal neoplasm. Lastly, Case 3 focuses on the interventions and management of a 36-year-old female diagnosed with synchronous clear cell renal carcinoma and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. This case series examines each distinct patient's presentation, discusses the diagnosis, and compares and contrasts the findings while discussing the literature on this topic. PMID:26904353

  17. Laparoscopic resection for colorectal diseases: short-term outcomes of a single center

    PubMed Central

    Attaallah, Wafi; Babayev, Hayyam; Yardımcı, Samet; Cingi, Asım; Uğurlu, Mustafa Ümit; Günal, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Even though, laparoscopy is not accepted as the current gold standard in colorectal surgery, it can be performed as safely as open surgery. It is also widely accepted that the technique has many advantages. In this study, we evaluated the results of 33 patients with laparoscopic colorectal resection. Material and Methods Thirty-three patients who underwent laparoscopic colon surgery between January 2013 and September 2014 in the General Surgery Clinic at Marmara University Hospital were included in the study. Patients were evaluated in terms of their demographic and tumor histopathologic characteristics, type of surgery and early postoperative complications. Results Laparoscopic colorectal resection was performed for 33 patients who had malignant or benign lesions. The median age was 60 (35–70), and 18 (55%) were male patients. The majority of the patients (90%) were diagnosed with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Half of the patients were T3 and 67% had N0 stage. The median number of retrieved lymph nodes was 17 (4–28). Negative surgical margins were obtained in all patients. The postoperative hospital stay was 5 (4–16) days. Postoperative early complications were observed in only 5 patients. The majority of complications were treated without the need for surgery. No mortality was recorded in this series of patients. Conclusion This study showed that laparoscopic colorectal surgery could be performed safely based on its low complication rate, short length of hospital stay, providing sufficient surgical resection and lymph node dissection. PMID:27528823

  18. Study on image feature extraction and classification for human colorectal cancer using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Shan-Yi; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chiu, Han-Mo; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. OCT (Optical coherence tomography) has been several advantages including high resolution and non-invasive cross-sectional image in vivo. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the B-scan OCT image features and histology of malignant human colorectal tissues, also en-face OCT image and the endoscopic image pattern. The in-vitro experiments were performed by a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system; the swept source has a center wavelength at 1310 nm and 160nm in wavelength scanning range which produced 6 um axial resolution. In the study, the en-face images were reconstructed by integrating the axial values in 3D OCT images. The reconstructed en-face images show the same roundish or gyrus-like pattern with endoscopy images. The pattern of en-face images relate to the stages of colon cancer. Endoscopic OCT technique would provide three-dimensional imaging and rapidly reconstruct en-face images which can increase the speed of colon cancer diagnosis. Our results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas by using the OCT imaging.

  19. Identification of novel tumor suppressor proteases by degradome profiling of colorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, Julia M.; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Quirós, Pedro M.; Astudillo, Aurora; Galván, José A.; Colomer, Dolors; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M.P.; Puente, Xose S.

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play important roles during tumor development and progression through their ability to promote cell growth or by facilitating the invasion of surrounding tissues. The human genome contains more than 570 protease-coding genes, many of them forming functional networks, which has forced the use of global strategies for the analysis of this group of enzymes. In this study, we have designed a new quantitative PCR-based device for profiling the entire degradome in human malignancies. We have used this method to evaluate protease expression levels in colorectal carcinomas with the finding that most proteases with altered expression in these tumors exert their function in the extracellular compartment. In addition, we have found that among genes encoding repressed proteases there was a higher proportion with somatic mutations in colorectal cancer when compared to genes coding for upregulated proteases (14% vs. 4%, p<0.05). One of these genes, MASP3, is consistently repressed in colorectal carcinomas as well as in colorectal cancer cell lines when compared to normal colonic mucosa. Functional analysis of this gene revealed that ectopic expression of MASP3 reduces cell proliferation in vitro and restrains subcutaneous tumor growth, whereas its downregulation induces an increase in the tumorigenic potential of colorectal cancer cells. These results provide new insights into the diversity of proteases associated with cancer and support the utility of degradome profiling to identify novel proteases with tumor-defying functions.

  20. Laparoscopic Colorectal Training Gap in Colorectal and Surgical Residents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mark; Williamson, Paul; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an established safe procedure with demonstrated benefits. Proficiency in this specialty correlates with the volume of cases. We examined training in this surgical field for both general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents to determine whether the number of cases needed for proficiency is being realized. Methods: We examined the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Colorectal Surgeons (ABCRS) operative statistics for graduating general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents. Results: Although the number of advanced laparoscopy cases had increased for general surgery residents, there was still a significant gap in case volume between the average number of laparoscopic colorectal operations performed by graduating general surgery residents (21.6) and those performed by graduating colon and rectal surgery residents (81.9) in 2014. Conclusion: There is a gap between general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residency training for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. General surgery residents are not meeting the volume of cases necessary for proficiency in colorectal surgery. This deficit represents a structural difference in training. PMID:27493468

  1. Epidemiology and molecular genetics of colorectal cancer in iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Malekzadeh, Reza; Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Ansari, Reza

    2009-03-01

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer in Iranian older age subjects is currently very low compared to Western population, the younger generation is experiencing an accelerated rate approaching the Western rates and the burden of disease will increase dramatically in near future. The high frequency of positive family history of colorectal cancer in Iranian patients indicates that a significant number of colorectal cancers in Iran arise in family members and relatives of colorectal cancer patients. It is clear that the familial clustering of colorectal cancer is more often seen in younger probands and cancer located in the right side of the colon. These epidemiologic findings call for a broader attempt to promote public awareness and screening strategies in those families with a member affected by colorectal cancer, especially at younger age or with proximal tumors. Based on our present understanding, the possibility of preventing or curing most colon and rectal cancers is now plausible. The molecular biology of colon cancer has been the subject of many researches and is better understood than those for any other solid cancer and have established an important example for cancer research. It is now clear that colorectal cancer develops as the result of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to malignant transformation of normal mucosa. In spite of these scientific progresses and the fact that screening can reduce the rate of death by detecting early cancer or premalignant polyps, the rate of screening is very low globally and negligible in Iran and many other developing countries which is due to cost, resistance by physicians, patients, and the healthcare system. In Iran screening should at least be started in family members at earlier age with colonoscopy as the preferred modality of screening method. PMID:19249887

  2. TGFBI protein high expression predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Chen, Xijun; Liao, Zhongcai; He, Chao; Hu, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta-induced (TGFBI) serves as a linker protein and plays a role in the activation of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, differentiation and inflammation. High expression levels of the human TGFBI gene are correlated with numerous human malignancies. In order to explore the roles of TGFBI in the tumor progression of colorectal cancer, colorectal cancer specimens from 115 patients with strict follow-up were selected for the analysis of TGFBI by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between TGFBI expression and the clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers were evaluated. In the colorectal cancer tissues, TGFBI was mainly localized in the cytoplasm and stroma and scarcely in the nucleus. TGFBI expression in the cytoplasm and stroma was not found to be associated with age, gender, tumor histopathological grading, PT category and tumor location (P > 0.05 for each). However, high TGFBI expression in the cytoplasm and stroma correlated with lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and Dukes stage (P < 0.05 for each). The survival rate was significantly lower in patients with high TGFBI expression than in those with low TGFBI expression. Furthermore, we found that tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging (HR: 2.963; 95% CI: 1.573-1.664; P = 0.000), differentiation (HR: 1.574; 95% CI: 1.001-2.476; P = 0.049) and high TGFBI cytoplasmic expression (HR: 3.332; 95% CI: 1.410-7.873; P = 0.000) proved to be independent prognostic factors for survival in colorectal cancer. In conclusion, TGFBI plays an important role in the progression of colorectal cancers and it is an independent poor prognostic factor for colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25755764

  3. Panuveal malignant mesenchymoma.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, J; Neudorfer, M; Ron, N; Anteby, I; Lazar, M; Rosenmann, E

    1995-09-01

    Intraocular malignant mesenchymal tumors are very rare, and only a few case reports of such primary and metastatic tumors have been reported. We report a case of a malignant mesenchymoma involving the entire uveal tract. A 21-year-old woman presented with a tumor on the whole iris of the right eye, which caused intractable glaucoma. Upon enucleation of the eye, a very anaplastic tumor was found to occupy the whole uveal tract; its features were compatible with a tumor of mesenchymal origin, including rhabdomyosarcomatous and liposarcomatous characteristics. Choroidal osteoma was a coincidental finding. The histologic findings of the tumor were of two types of malignant mesenchymal tumors, and therefore the diagnosis of malignant mesenchymoma was made. This is to our knowledge the first tumor of its kind to be reported intraocularly. PMID:7668945

  4. How to decide on stent insertion or surgery in colorectal obstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Assad; Young, Christopher John

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in western society and malignant obstruction of the colon accounts for 8%-29% of all large bowel obstructions. Conventional treatment of these patients with malignant obstruction requiring urgent surgery is associated with a greater physiological insult on already nutritionally replete patients. Of late the utility of colonic stents has offered an option in the management of these patients in both the palliative and bridge to surgery setting. This has been the subject of many reviews which highlight its efficacy, particulary in reducing ostomy rates, allowing quicker return to oral diet, minimising extended post-operative recovery as well as some quality of life benefits. The uncertainity in managing patients with malignant colonic obstructions has lead to a more cautious use of stenting technology as community equipoise exists. Decision making analysis has demonstrated that surgeons’ favored the use of stents in the palliative setting preferentially when compared to the curative setting where surgery was preferred. We aim to review the literature regarding the use of stent or surgery in colorectal obstruction, and then provide a discourse with regards to the approach in synthesising the data and applying it when deciding the appropriate application of stent or surgery in colorectal obstruction. PMID:26843916

  5. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  6. Disentangling the Association between Statins, Cholesterol, and Colorectal Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Mamtani, Ronac; Lewis, James D.; Scott, Frank I.; Ahmad, Tariq; Goldberg, David S.; Datta, Jashodeep; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Boursi, Ben

    2016-01-01

    cancer was lower in statin users versus nonusers, no difference was observed among those who continued versus discontinued statin therapy, suggesting the potential for indication bias. The association between decreased serum cholesterol and colorectal cancer risk suggests a cholesterol-lowering effect of undiagnosed malignancy. Clinical judgment should be used when considering causes of cholesterol reduction in patients, including those on statin therapy. PMID:27116322

  7. Primary anorectal malignant melanoma: an uncommon anorectal pathology.

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, José Francisco; Fernández-Urien, Ignacio; Córdoba, Alicia

    2016-09-01

    Anorectal malignant melanoma (AMM) is most common primary melanoma of gastrointestinal tract, accounting for 0.05% and 1% of all colorectal and anal cancers. We reported an 85 year-old woman with no significant past medical history who presented two-month period of rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, tenesmus and 2kg weight-loss. Laboratory markers were unremarkable, although rectal examination revealed two small haemorrhoids and a firm, non-obstructing mass in the lower rectum. Colonoscopy confirmed presence of an ulcerated pigmented neoplasm arising at dental line [A,B]. No distant metastases were found on computed tomography [C] although presented metastatic regional lymph nodes on pelvic MRI [D]. Therefore, abdominoperineal resection was performed, confirming loco-regional disease. Histopathology showed malignant melanoma with positive stains in immunohistochemistry for protein S100, HMB-45 and Melan-A [E,F,G,H] and stained negative for c-Kit.

  8. Colorectal cancer progression: lessons from Drosophila?

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham P; Thompson, Barry J

    2014-04-01

    Human colorectal cancers arise as benign adenomas, tumours that retain their epithelial character, and then progress to malignant adenocarcinomas and carcinomas in which the epithelium becomes disrupted. Carcinomas often exhibit transcriptional downregulation of E-cadherin and other epithelial genes in an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism first discovered in Drosophila to be mediated by the transcription factors Twist and Snail. In contrast, adenocarcinomas retain expression of E-cadherin and disruption of the epithelium occurs through formation of progressively smaller epithelial cysts with apical Crumbs/CRB3, Stardust/PALS1, and Bazooka/PAR3 localised to the inner lumen. Results from Drosophila show that morphologically similar cysts form upon induction of clonal heterogeneity in Wnt, Smad, or Ras signalling levels, which causes extrusion of epithelial cells at clonal boundaries. Thus, intratumour heterogeneity might also promote formation of adenocarcinomas in humans. Finally, epithelial cysts can collectively migrate, as in the case of Drosophila border cells, a potential model system for the invasive migration of adenocarcinoma cells.

  9. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  10. Irreversible Electroporation for Colorectal Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Hester J; Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Echenique, Ana M; Nielsen, Karin; van Tilborg, Aukje A J M; van den Bos, Willemien; Vroomen, Laurien G P H; van den Tol, Petrousjka M P; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation techniques have significantly broadened the treatment possibilities for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. A new ablation technique, irreversible electroporation (IRE), was recently added to the treatment armamentarium. As opposed to thermal ablation, cell death with IRE is primarily induced using electrical energy: electrical pulses disrupt the cellular membrane integrity, resulting in cell death while sparing the extracellular matrix of sensitive structures such as the bile ducts, blood vessels, and bowel wall. The preservation of these structures makes IRE attractive for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) that are unsuitable for resection and thermal ablation owing to their anatomical location. This review discusses different technical and practical issues of IRE for CRLM: the indications, patient preparations, procedural steps, and different "tricks of the trade" used to improve safety and efficacy of IRE. Imaging characteristics and early efficacy results are presented. Much is still unknown about the exact mechanism of cell death and about factors playing a crucial role in the extent of cell death. At this time, IRE for CRLM should only be reserved for small tumors that are truly unsuitable for resection or thermal ablation because of abutment of the portal triad or the venous pedicles.

  11. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mager, Lukas F; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies.

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Tests, Strategies, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stracci, Fabrizio; Zorzi, Manuel; Grazzini, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Screening has a central role in colorectal cancer (CRC) control. Different screening tests are effective in reducing CRC-specific mortality. Influence on cancer incidence depends on test sensitivity for pre-malignant lesions, ranging from almost no influence for guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) to an estimated reduction of 66–90% for colonoscopy. Screening tests detect lesions indirectly in the stool [gFOBT, fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), and fecal DNA] or directly by colonic inspection [flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography (CTC), and capsule endoscopy]. CRC screening is cost-effective compared to no screening but no screening strategy is clearly better than the others. Stool tests are the most widely used in worldwide screening interventions. FIT will soon replace gFOBT. The use of colonoscopy as a screening test is increasing and this strategy has superseded all alternatives in the US and Germany. Despite its undisputed importance, CRC screening is under-used and participation rarely reaches 70% of target population. Strategies to increase participation include ensuring recommendation by physicians, introducing organized screening and developing new, more acceptable tests. Available evidence for DNA fecal testing, CTC, and capsule endoscopy is reviewed. PMID:25386553

  13. Leptomeningeal metastasis as initial manifestation of signet ring colorectal adenocarcinoma: a case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Rita; Hamieh, Lana; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali; Temraz, Sally; El-Dika, Imane

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is an exceedingly rare event especially as a first manifestation of an occult primary colorectal cancer and even when there is a known history of malignancy. Sensorineural hearing loss is by itself an unusual isolated presentation of LMC with unsolved pathophysiology in this setting. In this paper, we report such a case and review the literature for similar cases, focusing on postulated mechanisms of spread. In view of the poor prognosis they carry, we highly recommend that physicians be aware of the risk of rare metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma in order to establish an early confirmative diagnosis. PMID:26697206

  14. Colorectal cancer in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carlos Gouveia; Paquete, Ana Teresa; Pissarra, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diagnosis and deaths caused by colorectal cancer (CRC) warrant closer examination of affected patients and focus on management of CRC in Portugal. In order to assess the extent and quality of the information available in Portugal, we first analyse Portuguese cancer registries and then the management of CRC by discussing the diagnostic process and medical care provided, especially pharmaceuticals. Other cancer indications are mentioned in order to illustrate current approaches of cancer in Portugal. Current national data on cancer patients are scarce and there are divergencies in methods of data collection and treatment amongst regional cancer registries. However, the available data is sufficient enough to understand the dimension of CRC, with age-standardised incidence of 37 per 100,000 and mortality of 31 per 100,000 annually. An ongoing project is restructuring health services to improve efficiency and quality, however, some problems exist. The regional inequity of access to health care facilities and long waiting times for diagnostic examinations and surgery are major examples. Despite the non-availability of clinical guidelines, a pilot screening programme started at the beginning of 2009 in the Centre Region of the country. It is hoped that this overview will provide the basis for discussion on improvements in CRC management in Portugal and lead to better outcomes.

  15. Immunotherapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels; Zörnig, Inka; Klug, Paula; Krauss, Jürgen; Haag, Georg-Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the immune response, reflected by high T cell infiltrates in primary tumors and metastases, influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, immunotherapy concepts have been adapted from other tumor entities, which typically rely on the activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and CTLA-4). However, most of the strategies using the approved checkpoint inhibitors and/or combination strategies have more or less failed to produce impressive results in early phase trials in CRC. Therefore, a number of novel targets for checkpoint inhibition are currently in early phase clinical testing (TIM-3, Lag-3, OX40, GITR, 4-1BB, CD40, CD70). A simple activation of infiltrating T cells will not, however, lead to a meaningful anti-tumor response without modulating the environmental factors in CRC. Thus, it is absolutely necessary to improve our understanding of the complex regulation of the tumor microenvironment in CRC to design individual combination treatments leading to effective immune control. PMID:27259331

  16. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  17. Animal models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Fleet, James C

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the USA. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist.

  18. Malignant Potential of Gastrointestinal Cancers Assessed by Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Kei; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Okahara, Satoshi; Kodaira, Junichi; Oohashi, Hirokazu; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Kentaro; Yamashita, Kentaro; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Hosokawa, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Background Parameters reported in pathologic reviews have been failing to assess exactly the malignant potential of gastrointestinal cancers. We hypothesized that malignant potential could be defined by common latent variables (hypothesis I), but there are substantial differences in the associations between malignant potential and pathologic parameters according to the origin of gastrointestinal cancers (hypothesis II). We shed light on these issues by structural equation modeling. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 217 esophageal, 192 gastric, and 175 colorectal cancer patients who consecutively underwent curative surgery for their pathologic stage I cancers at Keiyukai Sapporo Hospital. Latent variables identified by factor analysis and seven conventional pathologic parameters were introduced in the structural equation modeling analysis. Results Because latent variables were disparate except for their number, 'three' in the examined gastrointestinal cancers, the first hypothesis was rejected. Because configural invariance across gastrointestinal cancers was not approved, the second hypothesis was verified. We could trace the three significant paths on the causal graph from latent variables to lymph node metastasis, which were mediated through depth, lymphatic invasion, and matrilysin expression in esophageal cancer, whereas only one significant path could be traced in both gastric and colorectal cancer. Two of the three latent variables were exogenous in esophageal cancer, whereas one factor was exogenous in the other gastrointestinal cancers. Cancer stemness promoted viability in esophageal cancer, but it was suppressed in others. Conclusion These results reflect the malignant potential of esophageal cancer is higher than that of the other gastrointestinal cancers. Such information might contribute to refining clinical treatments for gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26889682

  19. Primary Malignant Tumours of Bone Following Previous Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Patton, J. T.; Sommerville, S. M. M.; Grimer, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Destructive bone lesions occurring in patients who have previously had a malignancy are generally assumed to be a metastasis from that malignancy. We reviewed 60 patients with a previous history of malignancy, who presented with a solitary bone lesion that was subsequently found to be a new and different primary sarcoma of bone. These second malignancies occurred in three distinct groups of patients: (1) patients with original tumours well known to be associated with second malignancies (5%); (2) patients whose second malignancies were likely to be due to the previous treatment of their primary malignancy (40%); (3) patients in whom there was no clearly defined association between malignancies (55%). The purpose of this study is to emphasise the necessity for caution in assuming the diagnosis of a metastasis when a solitary bone lesion is identified following a prior malignancy. Inappropriate biopsy and treatment of primary bone sarcomas compromises limb salvage surgery and can affect patient mortality. PMID:18414590

  20. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  1. Hemostasis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L; Biggerstaff, J; Amirkhosravi, A

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the hemostatic system is involved in the growth and spread of malignant disease. There is an increased incidence of thromboembolic disease in patients with cancers and hemostatic abnormalities are extremely common in such patients. Antihemostatic agents have been successfully used to treat a variety of experimental tumors, and several clinical trials in humans have been initiated. Although metastasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, intravascular coagulation activation and peritumor fibrin deposition seem to be important. The mechanisms by which hemostatic activation facilitates the malignant process remain to be completely elucidated. Of central importance may be the presence on malignant cells of tissue factor and urokinase receptor. Recent studies have suggested that these proteins, and others, may be involved at several stages of metastasis, including the key event of neovascularization. Tissue factor, the principal initiator of coagulation, may have additional roles, outside of fibrin formation, that are central to the biology of some solid tumors.

  2. Hemostasis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L; Biggerstaff, J; Amirkhosravi, A

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the hemostatic system is involved in the growth and spread of malignant disease. There is an increased incidence of thromboembolic disease in patients with cancers and hemostatic abnormalities are extremely common in such patients. Antihemostatic agents have been successfully used to treat a variety of experimental tumors, and several clinical trials in humans have been initiated. Although metastasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, intravascular coagulation activation and peritumor fibrin deposition seem to be important. The mechanisms by which hemostatic activation facilitates the malignant process remain to be completely elucidated. Of central importance may be the presence on malignant cells of tissue factor and urokinase receptor. Recent studies have suggested that these proteins, and others, may be involved at several stages of metastasis, including the key event of neovascularization. Tissue factor, the principal initiator of coagulation, may have additional roles, outside of fibrin formation, that are central to the biology of some solid tumors. PMID:9579631

  3. Malignancy-Associated Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka-Dąbrowa, Agata; Hannam, Simon; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol and triglycerides, important lipid constituents of cell, are essential to carry out several vital physiological functions. Lipids might be associated with cancers because they play a key role in the maintenance of cell integrity. The pathway for cholesterol synthesis may also produce various tumorigenic compounds and cholesterol serves as a precursor for the synthesis of many sex hormones linked to increased risk of various cancers. In some malignant diseases, blood cholesterol undergoes early and significant changes. The mechanism for the link between cancer and cholesterol remains controversial. The dates from studies are confusing because both hypolipidemia and hypercholesterolemia might be connected with malignancy. Not only cancers but also antineoplastic therapies have an influence on lipid profile. There are also dates suggesting that antihyperlipemic drugs might nfluenced malignancy. PMID:21660223

  4. Secondary malignancies in chronic myeloid leukemia patients after imatinib-based treatment: long-term observation in CML Study IV.

    PubMed

    Miranda, M B; Lauseker, M; Kraus, M-P; Proetel, U; Hanfstein, B; Fabarius, A; Baerlocher, G M; Heim, D; Hossfeld, D K; Kolb, H-J; Krause, S W; Nerl, C; Brümmendorf, T H; Verbeek, W; Fauser, A A; Prümmer, O; Neben, K; Hess, U; Mahlberg, R; Plöger, C; Flasshove, M; Rendenbach, B; Hofmann, W-K; Müller, M C; Pfirrmann, M; Hochhaus, A; Hasford, J; Hehlmann, R; Saußele, S

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been profoundly improved by the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Long-term survival with imatinib is excellent with a 8-year survival rate of ∼88%. Long-term toxicity of TKI treatment, especially carcinogenicity, has become a concern. We analyzed data of the CML study IV for the development of secondary malignancies. In total, 67 secondary malignancies were found in 64 of 1525 CML patients in chronic phase treated with TKI (n=61) and interferon-α only (n=3). The most common malignancies (n⩾4) were prostate, colorectal and lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), malignant melanoma, non-melanoma skin tumors and breast cancer. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for all malignancies excluding non-melanoma skin tumors was 0.88 (95% confidence interval (0.63-1.20)) for men and 1.06 (95% CI 0.69-1.55) for women. SIRs were between 0.49 (95% CI 0.13-1.34) for colorectal cancer in men and 4.29 (95% CI 1.09-11.66) for NHL in women. The SIR for NHL was significantly increased for men and women. An increase in the incidence of secondary malignancies could not be ascertained. The increased SIR for NHL has to be considered and long-term follow-up of CML patients is warranted, as the rate of secondary malignancies may increase over time.

  5. Secondary malignancies in chronic myeloid leukemia patients after imatinib-based treatment: long-term observation in CML Study IV

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, M B; Lauseker, M; Kraus, M-P; Proetel, U; Hanfstein, B; Fabarius, A; Baerlocher, G M; Heim, D; Hossfeld, D K; Kolb, H-J; Krause, S W; Nerl, C; Brümmendorf, T H; Verbeek, W; Fauser, A A; Prümmer, O; Neben, K; Hess, U; Mahlberg, R; Plöger, C; Flasshove, M; Rendenbach, B; Hofmann, W-K; Müller, M C; Pfirrmann, M; Hochhaus, A; Hasford, J; Hehlmann, R; Saußele, S

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been profoundly improved by the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Long-term survival with imatinib is excellent with a 8-year survival rate of ∼88%. Long-term toxicity of TKI treatment, especially carcinogenicity, has become a concern. We analyzed data of the CML study IV for the development of secondary malignancies. In total, 67 secondary malignancies were found in 64 of 1525 CML patients in chronic phase treated with TKI (n=61) and interferon-α only (n=3). The most common malignancies (n⩾4) were prostate, colorectal and lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), malignant melanoma, non-melanoma skin tumors and breast cancer. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for all malignancies excluding non-melanoma skin tumors was 0.88 (95% confidence interval (0.63–1.20)) for men and 1.06 (95% CI 0.69–1.55) for women. SIRs were between 0.49 (95% CI 0.13–1.34) for colorectal cancer in men and 4.29 (95% CI 1.09–11.66) for NHL in women. The SIR for NHL was significantly increased for men and women. An increase in the incidence of secondary malignancies could not be ascertained. The increased SIR for NHL has to be considered and long-term follow-up of CML patients is warranted, as the rate of secondary malignancies may increase over time. PMID:26859076

  6. Surveillance for gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashish K; Laird-Fick, Heather S; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are notorious for frequently progressing to advanced stages even in the absence of serious symptoms, thus leading to delayed diagnoses and dismal prognoses. Secondary prevention of GI malignancies through early detection and treatment of cancer-precursor/premalignant lesions, therefore, is recognized as an effective cancer prevention strategy. In order to efficiently detect these lesions, systemic application of screening tests (surveillance) is needed. However, most of the currently used non-invasive screening tests for GI malignancies (for example, serum markers such as alpha-fetoprotein for hepatocellular carcinoma, and fecal occult blood test, for colon cancer) are only modestly effective necessitating the use of highly invasive endoscopy-based procedures, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy for screening purposes. Even for hepatocellular carcinoma where non-invasive imaging (ultrasonography) has become a standard screening tool, the need for repeated liver biopsies of suspicious liver nodules for histopathological confirmation can’t be avoided. The invasive nature and high-cost associated with these screening tools hinders implementation of GI cancer screening programs. Moreover, only a small fraction of general population is truly predisposed to developing GI malignancies, and indeed needs surveillance. To spare the average-risk individuals from superfluous invasive procedures and achieve an economically viable model of cancer prevention, it’s important to identify cohorts in general population that are at substantially high risk of developing GI malignancies (risk-stratification), and select suitable screening tests for surveillance in these cohorts. We herein provide a brief overview of such high-risk cohorts for different GI malignancies, and the screening strategies that have commonly been employed for surveillance purpose in them. PMID:22969223

  7. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  8. Immune escape mechanisms in colorectal cancer pathogenesis and liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pancione, Massimo; Giordano, Guido; Remo, Andrea; Febbraro, Antonio; Sabatino, Lina; Manfrin, Erminia; Ceccarelli, Michele; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence indicates that the tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes with genomic/epigenomic aberrations of malignant cells to enhance cancer cells survival, invasion, and dissemination. Many factors, produced or de novo synthesized by immune, stromal, or malignant cells, acting in a paracrine and autocrine fashion, remodel TME and the adaptive immune response culminating in metastasis. Taking into account the recent accomplishments in the field of immune oncology and using metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a model, we propose that the evasion of the immune surveillance and metastatic spread can be achieved through a number of mechanisms that include (a) intrinsic plasticity and adaptability of immune and malignant cells to paracrine and autocrine stimuli or genotoxic stresses; (b) alteration of positional schemes of myeloid-lineage cells, produced by factors controlling the balance between tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting activities; (c) acquisition by cancer cells of aberrant immune-phenotypic traits (NT5E/CD73, CD68, and CD163) that enhance the interactions among TME components through the production of immune-suppressive mediators. These properties may represent the driving force of metastatic progression and thus clinically exploitable for cancer prevention and therapy. In this review we summarize results and suggest new hypotheses that favour the growing impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumour progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  10. The Mendelian colorectal cancer syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A small minority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) (≤5%) are caused by a single, inherited faulty gene. These diseases, the Mendelian colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, have been central to our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in general. Most of the approximately 13 high-penetrance genes that predispose to CRC primarily predispose to colorectal polyps, and each gene is associated with a specific type of polyp, whether conventional adenomas (APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1), juvenile polyps (SMAD4, BMPR1A), Peutz-Jeghers hamartomas (LKB1/STK11) and mixed polyps of serrated and juvenile types (GREM1). Lynch syndrome (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2), by contrast, is associated primarily with cancer risk. Major functional pathways are consistently inactivated in the Mendelian CRC syndromes: certain types of DNA repair (proofreading of DNA replication errors, mismatch repair and base excision repair) and signalling (bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt signalling and mTOR). The inheritance of the CRC syndromes also varies: most are dominant but some of the DNA repair deficiencies are recessive. Some of the Mendelian CRC genes are especially important because they play a role through somatic inactivation in sporadic CRC (APC, MLH1, SMAD4, POLE). Additional Mendelian CRC genes may remain to be discovered and searches for these genes are ongoing, especially in patients with multiple adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. PMID:26169059

  11. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  12. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  13. miR-659-3p is involved in the regulation of the chemotherapy response of colorectal cancer via modulating the expression of SPHK1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuyuan; Fang, Ying; Qin, Hai; Fu, Wenzheng; Zhang, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of most prevalent malignant diseases worldwide. Metastasis and chemo-resistance are the two prominent death-related factors of CRCs. Thus, it is urgent to understand the mechanism responsible for the chemo-resistant properties of CRC and develop new therapeutic methods. Here, we found that the expression of miR-659-3p was significantly reduced in cisplatin (CDDP)-resistant HT29 and LOVO colorectal cancer cells and in CDDP-resistant clinical colorectal cancer samples compared with respective CDDP-sensitive counterparts. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) is a direct target of miR-659-3p in colorectal cancer cells, and it is negatively regulated by miR-659-3p. We found that anti-miR-659-3p could increase the IC50 of CDDP in parental HT29 and LOVO colorectal cancer cells; additionally, miR-659-3p mimics decreased the IC50 of CDDP in HT29/CDDP and LOVO/CDDP colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that the miR-659-3p/SPHK1 pathway was involved in the regulation of chemotherapy responses of colorectal cancer cells in vivo. In all, our findings suggest a new mechanism involved in the regulation of the chemotherapy response of CRC and might provide new targets for CRC prevention and treatment. PMID:27725903

  14. "Malignant Cutaneous Ulcer".

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Kotwal, Sumedha

    2016-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive malignancy and the rich vascular supply enables it to metastasize early via haematogenous route. Skin lesions are a late manifestation of the disease. Clinicians should be aware of cutaneous presentation of RCC while evaluating a case of unknown primary with skin lesions. PMID:27651705

  15. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Carter M; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A; Choi, Bryan D; Fecci, Peter E; Sampson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  17. Colorectal adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, M B; Greenstein, A J; Sachar, D B; Barth, J; Balasubramanian, S; Harpaz, N; Heimann, T M; Aufses, A H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to review the clinical features and estimate the long-term survival of patients with colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated a significantly increased risk of colorectal carcinoma in patients with Crohns disease. METHODS: The authors reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 30 patients with Crohn's disease admitted to The Mount Sinai Hospital between 1960 and 1989 in whom colorectal adenocarcinoma developed. All patients were operated on and follow-up was complete for all patients to 10 years after operation, to the time of death, or to the closing date of the study in December 1989. RESULTS: The 30 patients in the series had 33 colorectal adenocarcinomas; three patients (10%) presented with two synchronous cancers. The patients were relatively young (mean age, 53 years) and had long-standing Crohn's disease (duration >20 years in 87%). The 5-year actuarial survival was 44% for the overall series: 100% for stage A, 86% for stage B, 60% for stage C. All five patients with excluded bowel tumor died of large bowel cancer within 2.4 years; by contrast, the actuarial 5-year survival for patients with in-continuity tumors was 56%. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease are similar to the features of cancer in ulcerative colitis, including young age, multiple neoplasms, long duration of disease, and greater than a 50% 5-year survival rate (without excluded loops). These observations suggest the advisability of surveillance programs for Crohn's disease of the colon similar to those for ulcerative colitis of comparable duration and extent. PMID:8597513

  18. PIAS3 may represent a potential biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Heping; Gao, Hua; Bijukchhe, Sunil Man; Wang, Yunhai; Li, Tao

    2013-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a challenging problem both for the developed and underdeveloped countries. Despite numerous improvements in early diagnosis and treatment, the incidence and mortality is still keeping in a high level. Molecule targeted therapy has drawn much attention as next generation anticancer agents for diagnosis and therapeutic of CRC. Protein Inhibitor of Activated Signal Transducer and Activators of Transcription 3 (PIAS3) as a novel biomarker has been focused to have a role in the development of malignancy, which was expressed at a higher level in most common malignancies compared with corresponding normal tissues. Furthermore, evidences suggest that the expression of PIAS3 can affect the growth of cancer cells by inhibiting the JAK/STAT and PI3-K/Akt signaling pathways or regulating its SUMO (small-ubiquitin like modifiers) ligase activity in some malignancy. Therefore, we hypothesized that PIAS3 may be a potential biomarker target for early cancer detection and therapeutic of human CRC.

  19. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript in your browser. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  20. Current concepts in colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A; Gerner, Eugene W

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer chemoprevention, or chemoprophylaxis, is a drug-based approach to prevent colorectal cancer. Preventing colorectal adenomas with currently available agents demonstrates the promise of pharmacologic strategies directed at critical regulatory pathways. However, agent toxicity, lesion breakthrough and competing efficacy from endoscopy procedures challenge population-based implementation. This article reviews the role of colorectal cancer chemoprevention in the context of existing screening and surveillance guidelines and practice. Emphasis is placed on the role of the colorectal adenoma as a cancer precursor and its surrogacy in assessing individual risk and for evaluating chemoprevention efficacy. We discuss the importance of risk stratification for identifying subjects at moderate-to-high risk for colorectal cancer who are most likely to benefit from chemoprevention at an acceptable level of risk. PMID:19673624

  1. The impact of new technology on surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Gregory B; Breen, David J; Monson, John RT

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology continue at a rapid pace and affect all aspects of life, including surgery. We have reviewed some of these advances and the impact they are having on the investigation and management of colorectal cancer. Modern endoscopes, with magnifying, variable stiffness and localisation capabilities are making the primary investigation of colonic cancer easier and more acceptable for patients. Imaging investigations looking at primary, metastatic and recurrent disease are shifting to digital data sets, which can be stored, reviewed remotely, potentially fused with other modalities and reconstructed as 3 dimensional (3D) images for the purposes of advanced diagnostic interpretation and computer assisted surgery. They include virtual colonoscopy, trans-rectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy. Once a colorectal carcinoma is diagnosed, the treatment options available are expanding. Colonic stents are being used to relieve large bowel obstruction, either as a palliative measure or to improve the patient’s overall condition before definitive surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery and minimally invasive techniques are being used with similar outcomes and a lower mortality, morbidity and hospital stay than open trans-abdominal surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery allows precise excision of both benign and early malignant lesions in the mid and upper rectum. Survival of patients with inoperable hepatic metastases following radiofrequency ablation is encouraging. Robotics and telemedicine are taking surgery well into the 21st century. Artificial neural networks are being developed to enable us to predict the outcome for individual patients. New technology has a major impact on the way we practice surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:11819841

  2. Chromosome 5 allele loss in human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Voss, R; Hall, V; Bodmer, W F; Jass, J R; Jeffreys, A J; Lucibello, F C; Patel, I; Rider, S H

    That the sporadic and inherited forms of a particular cancer could both result from mutations in the same gene was first proposed by Knudson. He further proposed that these mutations act recessively at the cellular level, and that both copies of the gene must be lost for the cancer to develop. In sporadic cases both events occur somatically whereas in dominant familial cases susceptibility is inherited through a germline mutation and the cancer develops after a somatic change in the homologous allele. This model has since been substantiated in the case of retinoblastoma, Wilms tumour, acoustic neuroma and several other tumours, in which loss of heterozygosity was shown in tumour material compared to normal tissue from the same patient. The dominantly inherited disorder, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, also called familial polyposis coli), which gives rise to multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon that have a relatively high probability of progressing to a malignant adenocarcinoma, provides a basis for studying recessive genes in the far more common colorectal carcinomas using this approach. Following a clue as to the location of the FAP gene given by a case report of an individual with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q, who had FAP and multiple developmental abnormalities, we have examined sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas for loss of alleles on chromosome 5. Using a highly polymorphic 'minisatellite' probe which maps to chromosome 5q we have shown that at least 20% of this highly heterogeneous set of tumours lose one of the alleles present in matched normal tissue. This parallels the assignment of the FAP gene to chromosome 5 (see accompanying paper) and suggests that becoming recessive for this gene may be a critical step in the progression of a relatively high proportion of colorectal cancers. PMID:2886919

  3. Colorectal cancer mimics: a review of the usual suspects with pathology correlation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Akash; Meredith, Sara; Probert, Cairine; Kraecevic, Jasna; Anosike, Chinedum

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide. Initial diagnosis of colorectal malignancy is generally made on colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy or digital rectal examination; however, with increased use of CT as primary investigation in patients with lower gastrointestinal symptoms, the diagnosis of colon cancer is often first apparent to a radiologist prior to more invasive tests. CT can demonstrate a discrete soft-tissue mass that narrows the colonic lumen or focal nodular wall thickening/stricture and a variety of pericolonic changes. Pattern of wall thickening has been described as an aid to differential diagnosis; however, significant overlap remains between primary colonic tumor and non-colonic tumors or benign conditions. Imaging is non-specific, and appropriate clinical history, direct inspection, histological analysis, and sometimes discussion at MDT are essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. In this article, we will review the imaging features of some of these benign and malignant mimics of colorectal cancer, with accompanying histology slides where appropriate. PMID:27178338

  4. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  5. Oats and bowel disease: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Thies, Frank; Masson, Lindsey F; Boffetta, Paolo; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2014-10-01

    Whole-grain foods such as oats may protect against colorectal cancer and have benefits on inflammatory bowel disease and coeliac disease. The present study aimed to systematically review the literature describing intervention studies that investigated the effects of oats or oat bran on risk factors for bowel disease. A literature search was conducted using Embase, Medline and the Cochrane library, which identified 654 potential articles. Thirty-eight articles describing twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Two studies carried out in participants with a history of colorectal adenomas found no effects of increased oat-bran intake on indirect risk makers for colorectal cancer. One of two interventions with oat bran in patients with ulcerative colitis showed small improvements in the patients' conditions. Most of the eleven studies carried out in adults with coeliac disease showed no negative effects of uncontaminated oat consumption. The fourteen studies carried out in volunteers with no history of bowel disease suggest that oats or oat bran can significantly increase stool weight and decrease constipation, but there is a lack of evidence to support a specific effect of oats on bowel function compared with other cereals. A long-term dietary intake of oats or oat bran could benefit inflammatory bowel disorders, but this remains to be proven. A protective effect on colorectal adenoma and cancer incidence has not yet been convincingly shown. The majority of patients with coeliac disease could consume up to 100 g/d of uncontaminated oats, which would increase the acceptability of, and adherence to, a gluten-free diet.

  6. Impact of proteolytic enzymes in colorectal cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Herszényi, László; Barabás, Loránd; Hritz, István; István, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis is a highly complicated, multi-step phenomenon. In the complex event of tumor progression, tumor cells interact with basement membrane and extracellular matrix components. Proteolytic enzymes (proteinases) are involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix, but also in cancer invasion and metastasis. The four categories of proteinases (cysteine-, serine-, aspartic-, and metalloproteinases) are named and classified according to the essential catalytic component in their active site. We and others have shown that proteolytic enzymes play a major role not only in colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion and metastasis, but also in malignant transformation of precancerous lesions into cancer. Tissue and serum-plasma antigen concentrations of proteinases might be of great value in identifying patients with poor prognosis in CRC. Our results, in concordance with others indicate the potential tumor marker impact of proteinases for the early diagnosis of CRC. In addition, proteinases may also serve as potential target molecules for therapeutic agents. PMID:25309062

  7. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy.

  8. Applications of nanoparticles to diagnostics and therapeutics in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortina, Paolo; Kricka, Larry J; Graves, David J; Park, Jason; Hyslop, Terry; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi; Surrey, Saul; Waldman, Scott A

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has considerable promise for the detection, staging and treatment of cancer. Here, we outline one such promising application: the use of nanostructures with surface-bound ligands for the targeted delivery and ablation of colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the US. Normal colonic epithelial cells as well as primary CRC and metastatic tumors all express a unique surface-bound guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), which binds the diarrheagenic bacterial heat-stable peptide enterotoxin ST. This makes GCC a potential target for metastatic tumor ablation using ST-bound nanoparticles in combination with thermal ablation with near-infrared or radiofrequency energy absorption. Furthermore, the incorporation of iron or iron oxide into such structures would provide advantages for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although the scenarios outlined in this article are hypothetical, they might stimulate ideas about how other cancers could be attacked using nanotechnology.

  9. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Raminder Kaur; Khangura, Charanpreet Kaur; Desai, Anagha; Goyert, Gregory; Sangha, Roopina

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity. PMID:26770850

  10. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based N-Glycomics of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Manveen K.; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. An increased molecular understanding of the CRC pathology is warranted to gain insights into the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of the disease. Altered protein glycosylation patterns are associated with most diseases including malignant transformation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics have accelerated glycomics research and present a new paradigm for cancer biomarker discovery. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics and glycomics, therefore, hold considerable promise to improve the discovery of novel biomarkers with utility in disease diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the emerging field of glycomics to present a comprehensive review of advances in technologies and their application in studies aimed at discovering novel glycan-based biomarkers. We will also discuss some of the challenges associated with using glycans as biomarkers. PMID:26690136

  12. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-07-28

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  13. Review on the immunotherapy strategies against metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Lucia; Delbue, Serena; Ferrante, Pasquale; Bregni, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies throughout the world and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Western countries. Recent progress in CRC treatment options, such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and target therapy, has improved the prognosis, but advanced disease with recurrence or distant metastasis is usually incurable and has an unfavorable prognosis. The introduction of immunotherapy-associated strategies, both active and passive, to the treatment of CRC aims to overcome the limits of classical treatments. We review the state of the art for CRC with respect to different immunotherapeutic approaches, such as the use of cancer vaccines and/or adoptive cellular therapy, their most current advances and limitations and perspectives for further improvements. PMID:27605072

  14. Methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer: A prognostic factor or not?

    PubMed

    Gallois, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Taieb, J

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is due to different types of genetic alterations that are translated into different phenotypes. Among them, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) is the most recently involved in carcinogenesis of some CRC. The malignant transformation in this case is mainly due to the transcriptional inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. CIMP+ are reported to be more frequently found in the elderly and in women. The tumors are more frequently located in the proximal part of the colon, BRAF mutated and are associated with microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. All sporadic MSI CRC belong to the methylator phenotype, however some non MSI CRC may also harbor a methylator phenotype. The prognostic value of CIMP is not well known. Most studies show a worse prognosis in CIMP+ CRC, and adjuvant treatments seem to be more efficient. We review here the current knowledge on prognostic and predictive values in CIMP+ CRC. PMID:26702883

  15. Colorectal cancer: role of commensal bacteria and bystander effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingmin; Huycke, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    For years the human microbiota has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, identifying the molecular mechanisms for how aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN) arise in sporadic and colitis-associated CRC has been difficult. In this Addendum we review recent work from our laboratory that explore mechanisms by which intestinal commensals polarize colon macrophages to an M1 phenotype to generate a bystander effect (BSE) that leads to mutations, spindle malfunction, cell cycle arrest, tetraploidy, and aneuploidy in epithelial cells. BSE represents the application of a phenomenon initially described in the radiation biology field. The result of commensal-driven BSE on colon epithelial cells is aneuploidy, chromosomal instability (CIN), expression of stem cell and tumor stem cell markers and, ultimately, malignant transformation. Our findings provide a conceptual framework for integrating the microbiota with aging, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inflammation as risk factors for CRC. PMID:26727419

  16. Differential expression of a new tumor-associated antigen, TLP, during human colorectal cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, F; Graziano, P; Roselli, M; Mariotti, S; Bernard, P; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Rasi, G; Garaci, E

    1999-04-01

    Tumour liberated particles (TLP) have been proposed as a potential new serum tumor marker. In particular, a high percentage of patients with early stages of lung cancer scored positive for serum TLP, suggesting its possible role as a marker for early diagnosis of disease. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of TLP in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in order to determine whether its expression correlates with the various stages of cancer transformation. TLP distribution was assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal, premalignant, and malignant colorectal lesions. Normal colonic mucosa and hyperplastic polyps showed no positive staining, whereas adenomas and adenocarcinomas reacted to anti-TLP serum. The percentage of positive tumor cells increased from adenomas with mild dysplasia to adenomas with severe dysplasia. Moreover, a supranuclear staining pattern was observed mainly in adenomas with mild dysplasia, whereas adenomas with severe dysplasia as well as adenocarcinomas showed a characteristic diffuse staining pattern and a strong staining intensity. Only a few cases of adenocarcinoma were found to be TLP-negative and all were poorly differentiated. Our results suggest that TLP antigen expression may be considered as a marker of epithelial atypia in the colorectal tract and as a potential target for new diagnostic and/or therapeutic approaches to human colorectal cancer.

  17. Isolation of genes involved in colorectal metastasis by differential display of mRNA species

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, C.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antalis, T.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic events that give rise to malignant colorectal tumors have been determined in some detail. Much less is known about the genes involved in metastasis of these neoplasms. A useful resource to study this process is the pair of cell lines, SW480 and SW620, which are derived from the primary and metastatic components, respectively, of the same colorectal tumor. We are using the method of differential display of mRNA species to isolate genes that are differentially expressed in these two cell lines. Differential display is carried out in triplicate, using three different RNA extractions from each cell line. Only fragments that are consistently up- or down-regulated in one cell line compared to another are examined further. Less than 1% of fragments are differentially expressed. These are cloned, sequenced, and used for Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-PCR in order to examine their differential expression further. The RNA sources for this expression analysis are (i) SW480 and SW620 cells, (ii) other pairs of primary and metastatic colorectal cell lines, (iii) primary and metastatic tissue from patients with colorectal cancer.

  18. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, vitamin D, and colorectal cancer among whites and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jyi; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2012-10-01

    African Americans have the highest incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer among all US racial and ethnic groups. Dietary factors, lifestyle factors, obesity, variability in screening rates, socioeconomic differences, barriers to screening, and differences in access to health care may be contributory factors to racial and ethnic disparities. African Americans are more likely to demonstrate microsatellite instability in their colorectal tumors leading to malignancy. However, these differences do not completely explain all the variances. Ample evidence implicates insulin resistance and its associated conditions, including elevated insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), in colorectal carcinogenesis. African Americans have a high risk for and a high prevalence of insulin resistance and subsequent overt type 2 diabetes. Recent clinical studies revealed that ethnic differences between whites and African Americans in early diabetes-related conditions including hyperinsulinemia already exist during childhood. African Americans have a much higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency than whites throughout their life spans. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with higher rates of diabetes and colorectal cancer, particularly in individuals with high serum insulin and IGF-1 levels. Moreover, African Americans have lower insulin sensitivity in tissues, independent of obesity, fat distribution, and inflammation. Further development of measures of biomarkers of tumor biology and host susceptibility may provide further insight on risk stratification in African Americans.

  19. Clinic-genomic association mining for colorectal cancer using publicly available datasets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Feng, Yaning; Li, Zhenye; Pan, Chao; Su, Yuncong; Yang, Rui; Song, Liying; Duan, Huilong; Deng, Ning

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a growing number of researchers began to focus on how to establish associations between clinical and genomic data. However, up to now, there is lack of research mining clinic-genomic associations by comprehensively analysing available gene expression data for a single disease. Colorectal cancer is one of the malignant tumours. A number of genetic syndromes have been proven to be associated with colorectal cancer. This paper presents our research on mining clinic-genomic associations for colorectal cancer under biomedical big data environment. The proposed method is engineered with multiple technologies, including extracting clinical concepts using the unified medical language system (UMLS), extracting genes through the literature mining, and mining clinic-genomic associations through statistical analysis. We applied this method to datasets extracted from both gene expression omnibus (GEO) and genetic association database (GAD). A total of 23,517 clinic-genomic associations between 139 clinical concepts and 7914 genes were obtained, of which 3474 associations between 31 clinical concepts and 1689 genes were identified as highly reliable ones. Evaluation and interpretation were performed using UMLS, KEGG, and Gephi, and potential new discoveries were explored. The proposed method is effective in mining valuable knowledge from available biomedical big data and achieves a good performance in bridging clinical data with genomic data for colorectal cancer.

  20. Genomic Correlates of Immune-Cell Infiltrates in Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Shukla, Sachet A.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Cohen, Ofir; Nishihara, Reiko; Bahl, Samira; Cao, Yin; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Yamauchi, Mai; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Stewart, Chip; Rosenberg, Mara; Mima, Kosuke; Inamura, Kentaro; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Nowak, Jonathan A.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.; Ng, Kimmie; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Wu, Catherine J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Large-scale genomic characterization of tumors from prospective cohort studies may yield new insights into cancer pathogenesis. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 619 incident colorectal cancers (CRCs) and integrated the results with tumor immunity, pathology, and survival data. We identified recurrently mutated genes in CRC, such as BCL9L, RBM10, CTCF, and KLF5, that were not previously appreciated in this disease. Furthermore, we investigated the genomic correlates of immune-cell infiltration and found that higher neoantigen load was positively associated with overall lymphocytic infiltration, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), memory T cells, and CRC-specific survival. The association with TILs was evident even within microsatellite-stable tumors. We also found positive selection of mutations in HLA genes and other components of the antigen-processing machinery in TIL-rich tumors. These results may inform immunotherapeutic approaches in CRC. More generally, this study demonstrates a framework for future integrative molecular epidemiology research in colorectal and other malignancies. PMID:27149842

  1. Estrogen Receptors and Their Implications in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Francesco; Ryan, Elizabeth J.; Doherty, Glen; Winter, Desmond C.; Sheahan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding their cognate receptors, ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2), estrogens activate intracellular signaling cascades that have important consequences for cellular behavior. Historically linked to carcinogenesis in reproductive organs, estrogens have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of different cancer types of non-reproductive tissues including the colon. ERβ is the predominant estrogen receptor expressed in both normal and malignant colonic epithelium. However, during colon cancer progression, ERβ expression is lost, suggesting that estrogen signaling may play a role in disease progression. Estrogens may in fact exert an anti-tumor effect through selective activation of pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by ERβ, inhibition of inflammatory signals and modulation of the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we analyze the estrogen pathway as a possible therapeutic avenue in colorectal cancer, we report the most recent experimental evidence to explain the cellular and molecular mechanisms of estrogen-mediated protection against colorectal tumorigenesis, and we discuss future challenges and potential avenues for targeted therapy. PMID:25699240

  2. Proteomics for discovery of candidate colorectal cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Chaver, Paula; Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and other Western countries, mainly due to the lack of well-validated clinically useful biomarkers with enough sensitivity and specificity to detect this disease at early stages. Although it is well known that the pathogenesis of CRC is a progressive accumulation of mutations in multiple genes, much less is known at the proteome level. Therefore, in the last years many proteomic studies have been conducted to find new candidate protein biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and as therapeutic targets for this malignancy, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis. An important advantage of the proteomic approaches is the capacity to look for multiple differentially expressed proteins in a single study. This review provides an overview of the recent reports describing the different proteomic tools used for the discovery of new protein markers for CRC such as two-dimensional electrophoresis methods, quantitative mass spectrometry-based techniques or protein microarrays. Additionally, we will also focus on the diverse biological samples used for CRC biomarker discovery such as tissue, serum and faeces, besides cell lines and murine models, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and summarize the most frequently identified candidate CRC markers. PMID:24744574

  3. Adult Celiac Disease and Its Malignant Complications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Adult celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disorder that has been estimated to affect up to 1-2% of the population in some nations. Awareness of the disease has increased, but still it remains markedly underdiagnosed. Celiac disease is a pathologically defined condition with several characteristic clinical scenarios that should lead the clinician to suspect its presence. Critical to diagnosis is a documented responsiveness to a gluten-free diet. After diagnosis and treatment, symptoms and biopsy-proven changes may recur and appear refractory to a gluten-free diet. Recurrent symptoms are most often due to poor diet compliance, a ubiquitous and unrecognized gluten source, an initially incorrect diagnosis, or an associated disease or complication of celiac disease. Some patients with persistent symptoms and biopsy-proven changes may not have celiac disease at all, instead suffering from a sprue-like intestinal disease, so-called unclassified sprue, which is a specific entity that does not appear to respond to a gluten-free diet. Some of these patients eventually prove to have an underlying malignant cause, particularly lymphoma. The risk of developing lymphoma and other malignancies is increased in celiac disease, especially if initially diagnosed in the elderly, or late in the clinical course of the disease. However, recent studies suggest that the risk of gastric and colon cancer is low. This has led to the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease may be protective, possibly due to impaired absorption and more rapid excretion of fat or fat-soluble agents, including hydrocarbons and other putative cocarcinogens, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:20431755

  4. [Signet ring cell colorectal carcinom - case report].

    PubMed

    Matkovčík, Z; Hlad, J

    2015-08-01

    Signet ring cell colorectal carcinoma is a rare aggressive tumor. The incidence of this desease is very low in young patients and accounts up to 1% of all surgical patients with colorectal cancer. The infrequency of the disease among young patients makes the diagnosis more difficult and the prognosis less favourable. Biopsy results are crucial for verification of signet ring cell carcinoma. Treatment is similar as in other types of colorectal cancer. We report a case of signet ring cell colon cancer in a 22 years old female patient.The aim of this paper is to point out this rare case of infrequent colorectal cancer in a young female patient. PMID:26395957

  5. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  6. Metastatic malignant chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W B; Mankin, H J

    1996-12-01

    A case of malignant chondroblastoma with metastases is reported. The patient initially presented with a lytic lesion in his left pubic ramus. He was treated with curettage, but the lesion recurred 3 years later. After repeated curettage, radiation therapy, and the late development of multiple bone and soft-tissue metastases, he succumbed to his disease 13 years after diagnosis. The surgical pathology from each of his several procedures was reviewed. Although no definite malignant transformation was apparent, a metastatic deposit curetted 3 months prior to death showed some increase in mitotic activity. Flow cytometry of specimens from the patient's first local recurrence and a late distant metastasis was performed and revealed the interval development of a minor aneuploid peak between the two samples. This fatal chondroblastoma is the only one in our series of 80 patients treated over the past 25 years. PMID:9001683

  7. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Mayhall, Kim; Maxwell, Nicole M.; Kandil, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Both intracellular and extracellular Nampt (iNampt and eNampt) levels are increased in several human malignancies and some studies demonstrate increased iNampt in more aggressive/invasive tumors and in tumor metastases. Several different molecular targets have been identified that promote carcinogenesis following iNampt overexpression, including SirT1, CtBP, and PARP-1. Additionally, eNampt is elevated in several human cancers and is often associated with a higher tumor stage and worse prognoses. Here we review the roles of Nampt in malignancy, some of the known mechanisms by which it promotes carcinogenesis, and discuss the possibility of employing Nampt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:24386506

  8. Lymphoscintigraphy in malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, C.G.; Norman, J.; Cruse, C.W.; Reintgen, D.S.; Clark, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The development and rationale for the use of lymphoscintigraphy in the preoperative evaluation of patients with malignant melanoma being considered for elective lymph node dissection is reviewed. This overview is updated by an analysis of 135 patients with early stage malignant melanoma involving the head, neck, shoulders, and trunk at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida (Tampa, FL). High discordancy rates (overall, 41%) were seen between drainage patterns predicted from historical anatomical guidelines and those revealed by the lymphoscintigraphic examination. The high discordancy rate was most pronounced in the head (64%) and the neck (73%). Surgical management was changed in 33% of the patients, overall. A preoperative lymphoscintigram is recommended for all patients with melanoma with head, neck, and truncal lesions evaluated for elective lymph node dissection as the lymphatic drainage patterns are often unpredictable and variable.

  9. Asbestos-related malignancy.

    PubMed

    Talcott, J A; Antman, K H

    1988-01-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. A description of the processes through which compensation claims for asbestos-associated malignancies are evaluated illustrates for physicians the legal system's approach to possible injury from toxic substances. The differences between scientific and legal reasoning about the causes of diseases with long latency

  10. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  11. Asbestos-related malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, J.A.; Antman, K.H.

    1988-05-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. 179 references.

  12. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  13. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  14. Allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, S.E.; Fearon, E.R.; Tersmette, K.W.F.; Enterline, J.P.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Yusuke; White, R. )

    1989-06-02

    Clinical and pathological associations with molecular genetic alterations were studied in colorectal carcinomas from 83 patients. Fractional allelic loss, a measure of allelic deletions throughout the genome, and allelic deletions of specific chromosomal arms (the short arm of 17 and long arm of 18) each provided independent prognostic information by multivariate analysis when considered individually with Dukes' classification. Distant metastasis was significantly associated with high fractional allelic loss and with deletions of 17p and 18q. Mutations of ras proto-oncogenes and deletions of 5q had no prognostic importance. Statistically significant associations were also found between allelic losses and a family history of cancer, left-sided tumor location, and absence of extracellular tumor mucin. Allelic deletion analysis thus identified subsets of colorectal carcinoma with increased predilection for distant metastasis and cancer-related death. Further studies may define a subset of genetic alterations that can be used clinically to help assess prognosis.

  15. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  16. Fascin expression in colorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ozerhan, Ismail Hakki; Ersoz, Nail; Onguru, Onder; Ozturk, Mustafa; Kurt, Bulent; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the significance of fascin expression in colorectal carcinoma. METHODS This is a retrospective study of 167 consecutive, well-documented cases of primary colorectal adenocarcinoma for which archival material of surgical specimens from primary tumor resections were available. We chose a representative tissue sample block and examined fascin expression by immunohistochemistry using a primary antibody against “fascin”. We calculated the “immunohistochemical score (IHS)” of fascin for each case, which was calculated from the multiplication of scores for the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity. RESULTS Fascin immunoreactivity was observed in 59 (35.3%) of all cases with strong reactivity in 24 (14.4%), moderate reactivity in 25 (14.9%) and weak reactivity in 10 (6.0%) cases. Strong/moderate immunoreactivities were mostly observed in invasive fronts of the tumors or in both invasive and other areas. Fascin immunoreactivity scores were significantly higher in tumors with lymph node metastasis (p:0.002) and advanced stage presentation (p:0.007). There was no relation between fascin expression and age, gender, depth of invasion, distant metastasis or histological grade (p>0.05). There was a higher and statistically significant correlation between fascin immunoreactivity in the invasive borders of tumors and lymph node metastasis (r:0.747, p:0.005). In stage III/IV tumors, two-year survival was 92.2% in tumors without fascin immunoreactivity, and only 60.0% in tumors with a fascin IHS>10 (p:0.003). CONCLUSION These findings suggest that fascin is heterogeneously expressed in approximately one third of colorectal carcinomas with a significant association with lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and location. Moreover, these results indicate that fascin may have a role in the lymph node metastasis of colorectal carcinomas. PMID:20186299

  17. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  18. NDRG4, a novel candidate tumor suppressor, is a predictor of overall survival of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunming; Zhu, Shaojun; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Qingchuan; Ji, Gang; Wang, Weizhong; Zheng, Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    The role of NDRG4 in human malignancies is largely unknown. We investigated the role of NDRG4 protein in colorectal cancer and its prognostic value in a hospital-based retrospective training cohort of 272 patients and a prospective validation cohort of 708 patients were. Cell line was transfected with an NDRG4 expression construct to confirm the suppression of PI3K-AKT activity by NDRG4. Appropriate statistical methods were utilized for analysis. Results showed that NDRG4 protein expression was significantly decreased from normal mucosa, chronic colitis, ulcerative colitis, atypical hyperplasia to colorectal cancer. Significant negative correlations were found between NDRG4 staining and p-AKT. Patients with positive NDRG4 staining had favorable survival in both study cohorts. In multivariate analysis, NDRG4 staining proved to be an independent predictor of overall survival. Moreover, the prognostic role of NDRG4 was stratified by p-AKT. Overexpression of NDRG4 in colorectal cancer cell can significantly suppress PI3K-AKT activity, even after EGF stimulation. These results indicated NDRG4 protein expression was decreased in colorectal cancer. It may play its tumor suppressive role in carcinogenesis and progression through attenuation of PI3K-AKT activity. Therefore, high risk colorectal cancer patients could be better identified based on the combination of NDRG4 and PI3K-AKT activity. PMID:25749388

  19. Experience with irinotecan for the treatment of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Reardon, David A.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most commonly occurring primary malignant brain tumor. It is difficult to treat and is usually associated with an inexorable, rapidly fatal clinical course. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgical excision are core components in the management of malignant glioma. However, chemotherapy, even with the most active regimens currently available, achieves only modest improvement in overall survival. Novel agents and new approaches to therapy are required to improve clinical outcomes. Irinotecan, a first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer and an agent with high activity against solid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, is an inhibitor of topoisomerase I, a critical enzyme needed for DNA transcription. Irinotecan crosses the blood-brain barrier and, in preclinical investigations, has demonstrated cytotoxic activity against central nervous system tumor xenografts. Its antitumor activity has also been demonstrated against glioblastoma cells with multi-drug resistance. Studies in adult and pediatric patients with recurrent, intractable malignant glioma have evaluated irinotecan as monotherapy and in combination with other agents, including temozolomide, carmustine, thalidomide, and bevacizumab. Studies of irinotecan in combination with other medications, particularly temozolomide and bevacizumab, have yielded promising results. Irinotecan monotherapy has demonstrated efficacy; however, its efficacy appears to be enhanced when used in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. When administered concurrently with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs, the dosage must be increased to compensate for enhanced cytochrome CY3A4/5 enzyme activity. Toxicities associated with irinotecan have been manageable; the most important dose-limiting toxicities are neutropenia and diarrhea. Irinotecan-based chemotherapy of malignant glioma merits further study. PMID:18784279

  20. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  1. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  2. Absolute neutrophil values in malignant patients on cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Madu, A J; Ibegbulam, O G; Ocheni, S; Madu, K A; Aguwa, E N

    2011-01-01

    A total of eighty patients with various malignancies seen between September 2008 and April 2009 at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Ituku Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria, had their absolute neutrophil counts, done at Days 0 and 12 of the first cycle of their various chemotherapeutic regimens. They were adult patients who had been diagnosed of various malignancies, consisting of Breast cancer 36 (45%), Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 8 (10%), Hodgkin's lymphoma 13 (16.25%), Colorectal carcinoma 6 (7.5%), Multiple myeloma 7 (8.75%), Cervical carcinoma 1 (1.25%) and other malignancies 9 (11.25%), Manual counting of absolute neutrophil count was done using Turks solution and improved Neubauer counting chamber and Galen 2000 Olympus microscope. The socio demographic data of the patients were assessed from a questionnaire. There were 27 males (33.75%) and 53 females (66.25%). Their ages ranged from 18 - 80 years with a median of 45 years. The mean absolute neutrophil count of the respondents pre-and post chemotherapy was 3.7 +/- 2.1 x 10(9)/L and 2.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(9)/L respectively. There were significant differences in both the absolute neutrophil count (p=0.00) compared to the pre-chemotherapy values. Chemotherapeutic combinations containing cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin were observed to cause significant reduction in absolute neutrophil.

  3. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  4. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  5. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  6. Folate Receptor-Beta Has Limited Value for Fluorescent Imaging in Ovarian, Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Esther; van der Vegt, Bert; van der Sluis, Tineke; Kooijman, Paulien; Low, Philip S.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Bart, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Aims Tumor-specific targeted imaging is rapidly evolving in cancer diagnosis. The folate receptor alpha (FR-α) has already been identified as a suitable target for cancer therapy and imaging. FR-α is present on ~40% of human cancers. FR-β is known to be expressed on several hematologic malignancies and on activated macrophages, but little is known about FR-β expression in solid tumors. Additional or simultaneous expression of FR-β could help extend the indications for folate-based drugs and imaging agents. In this study, the expression pattern of FR-β is evaluated in ovarian, breast and colorectal cancer. Methods FR-β expression was analyzed by semi-quantitative scoring of immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays (TMAs) of 339 ovarian cancer patients, 418 breast cancer patients, on 20 slides of colorectal cancer samples and on 25 samples of diverticulitis. Results FR-β expression was seen in 21% of ovarian cancer samples, 9% of breast cancer samples, and 55% of colorectal cancer samples. Expression was weak or moderate. Of the diverticulitis samples, 80% were positive for FR-β expression in macrophages. FR-β status neither correlated to known disease-related variables, nor showed association with overall survival and progression free survival in ovarian and breast cancer. In breast cancer, negative axillary status was significantly correlated to FR-β expression (p=0.022). Conclusions FR-β expression was low or absent in the majority of ovarian, breast and colorectal tumor samples. From the present study we conclude that the low FR-β expression in ovarian and breast tumor tissue indicates limited practical use of this receptor in diagnostic imaging and therapeutic purposes. Due to weak expression, FR-β is not regarded as a suitable target in colorectal cancer. PMID:26248049

  7. Detection Rate, Distribution, Clinical and Pathological Features of Colorectal Serrated Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hai-Long; Chen, Xue; Du, Shao-Chun; Song, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Xu, Meng-Que; Wang, Si-Nan; Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal serrated polyp is considered as histologically heterogeneous lesions with malignant potential in western countries. However, few Asian studies have investigated the comprehensive clinical features of serrated polyps in symptomatic populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the features of colorectal serrated polyps in a Chinese symptomatic population. Methods: Data from all consecutive symptomatic patients were documented from a large colonoscopy database and were analyzed. Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis were used for the data processing. Results: A total of 9191 (31.7%) patients were detected with at least one colorectal polyp. The prevalence of serrated polyps was 0.53% (153/28,981). The proportions of hyperplastic polyp (HP), sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P), and traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) of all serrated polyps were 41.2%, 7.2%, and 51.6%, respectively, which showed a lower proportion of HP and SSA/P and a higher proportion of TSA. Serrated polyps appeared more in males and elder patients while there was no significant difference in the subtype distribution in gender and age. The proportions of large and proximal serrated polyps were 13.7% (21/153) and 46.4% (71/153), respectively. In total, 98.9% (89/90) serrated adenomas were found with dysplasia. Moreover, 14 patients with serrated polyps were found with synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia, and large serrated polyps (LSPs) (odds ratio: 3.446, 95% confidence interval: 1.010–11.750, P < 0.05), especially large HPs, might have an association with synchronous advanced neoplasia (AN). Conclusions: The overall detection rate of colorectal serrated polyps in Chinese symptomatic patient population was low, and distribution pattern of three subtypes is different from previous reports. Moreover, LSPs, especially large HPs, might be associated with an increased risk of synchronous AN. PMID:27748334

  8. Establishing the link between hepatitis B virus infection and colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lipka, Seth; Shen, Huafeng; Davis-Yadley, Ashley H.; Viswanathan, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection has been associated with malignancy, most notably hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous research has shown that hepatitis C is associated with increased colorectal adenomas and neoplasia. Currently, there are no studies on the association of CHB and colorectal adenomas. We aimed to identify a possible link between CHB and colorectal adenoma. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on 588 consecutive patients undergoing screening or diagnostic colonoscopy that were previously screened or diagnosed with hepatitis B. Comparisons between categorical variables were analyzed with Chi Square test and t-test for continuous variables. Unconditional logistic regression was used to generate age-, gender-and race-adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing medication users with non-users. Statistical analyses were performed with SAS 9.3 software. Results A total of 487 patients were analyzed in the control group vs. 71 in the hepatitis B group. The adenoma detection rate was 23.9% in hepatitis B vs. 15.9% in the non-hepatitis B group for all cause colonoscopy; however this did not reach statistical significance. There was a significantly higher number of adenomas present in the distal colon compared to control (OR =2.16; 95% CI, 1.06-4.43; P=0.04). There were no significant findings between hepatitis B infection with size, multiplicity or presence of proximal adenomas. There was a significant difference noted in regards to smoking history, BMI and age between two groups. Conclusions Although the adenoma detection rate was higher in hepatitis B population vs. the non-hepatitis B group this did not reach statistical significance. However, we did find an association between CHB infection and the presence of distal colorectal adenomas. Larger prospective studies are needed to strengthen our findings along with future studies examining hepatitis B virus (HBV) and mechanisms inducing colorectal

  9. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  10. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  11. Pleural malignancies including mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, G

    1995-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is caused almost exclusively by occupational exposure to asbestos. During the past few years, however, increasing evidence has mounted that background exposure to asbestos could be sufficient to cause mesothelioma. Treatment of malignant mesothelioma remains a big problem. Some new approaches are on their way, and the most exciting ones are local immunotherapy in very early cases. Some success has been reported with local interferon treatment. As for treatment of metastatic pleural disease, the main purpose is symptomatic relief of dyspnea caused by fluid accumulation. The best way to achieve a lasting palliation is pleurodesis, and the most common way to do this, is by chemical means. The drug of choice in the United States has for many years been tetracycline, but since injectable tetracycline is no longer available, some substitute must be found. The substance that will "win" is not yet clear, but the two leading contestants are talc and doxycycline. Bleomycin also has its supporters, and a dark horse is quinacrine, which although not easily available in the United States, has been used in many European centers for decades. PMID:9363074

  12. Malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Boutin, C; Schlesser, M; Frenay, C; Astoul, P

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has risen for some decades and is expected to peak between 2010 and 2020. Up to now, no single treatment has been proven to be effective and death usually occurs within about 12-17 months after diagnosis. Perhaps because of this poor prognosis, early screening has incited little interest. However, certain forms may have a better prognosis when diagnosed early and treated by multimodal therapy or intrapleural immunotherapy. Diagnosis depends foremost on histological analysis of samples obtained by thoracoscopy. This procedure allows the best staging of the pleural cavity with an attempt to detect visceral pleural involvement, which is one of the most important prognostic factors. Although radiotherapy seems necessary and is efficient in preventing the malignant seeding after diagnostic procedures in patients, there has been no randomized phase III study showing the superiority of any treatment compared with another. However, for the early-stage disease (stage I) a logical therapeutic approach seems to be neoadjuvant intrapleural treatment using cytokines. For more advanced disease (stages II and III) resectability should be discussed with the thoracic surgeons and a multimodal treatment combining surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy should be proposed for a randomized controlled study. Palliative treatment is indicated for stage IV. In any case, each patient should be enrolled in a clinical trial.

  13. Tumor M2 pyruvate kinase: a tumor marker and its clinical application in gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2008-09-01

    Proliferating cells, in particular tumor cells, express a dimeric isoenzyme of pyruvate kinase, termed Tumor M2 pyruvate kinase. In the last few years, much attention has been paid to this novel tumor marker that can be determined in EDTA-plasma and in the feces. It has been used in diagnosis and surveillance of a variety of malignant diseases. As compared with the established tumor markers, Tumor M2-PK in EDTA-plasma proves to have at least equal sensitivity in pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, colorectal and cholangiocellular cancer. In combination with established tumor markers, EDTA-plasma M2-PK is a useful tool in diagnosis and surveillance of gastrointestinal tumors. In colorectal cancer, M2-PK in EDTA-plasma even proves superiority as compared with CEA. Fecal Tumor M2-PK testing resembles a good noninvasive screening parameter for colorectal cancer with a reported sensitivity of 68.8-91.0% and a specificity of 71.9-100%. It is superior to fecal occult blood testing in colorectal cancer screening. Since it is effective, easy to handle and bears rather low costs, fecal Tumor M2-PK testing is recommended for large-scale CRC screening.

  14. Quality training in laparoscopic colorectal surgery: does it improve clinical outcome?

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, M; Michailidis, L; Zezos, P; Kouklakis, G; Simopoulos, C

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCRS) is a safe, effective and cost-efficient option for the treatment of various benign and malignant conditions. However, its implementation to surgical practice is still limited. That is mainly due to its association with a steep learning curve. We performed a review of the literature to determine whether quality training in LCRS can reduce that learning curve and lead to better clinical outcomes. We concluded that a structured training program with pre-clinical phase focused on basic skill acquisition and a clinical phase focused on mentoring from experts can shorten the learning curve and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:21887564

  15. Diffuse cystic lung disease due to pulmonary metastasis of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fielli, Mariano; Avila, Fabio; Saino, Agustina; Seimah, Deborah; Fernández Casares, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a pathophysiologically heterogeneous processes characterized by the presence of multiple thin-walled, air-filled spaces within the pulmonary parenchyma. The most common causes of DCLD are lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH). DCLD develops rarely as a result of malignancy, typically secondary to metastases from peripheral sarcomas and mesenchymal tumors. DCLD have also been reported in a variety of other metastatic disease such as adenocarcinoma. Our case describes a patient with DCLD as a result of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27222791

  16. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  17. Inflammatory networks underlying colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Audrey; Zinger, Adar; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation is emerging as one of the hallmarks of cancer, yet its role in most tumors remains unclear. Whereas a minority of solid tumors are associated with overt inflammation, long-term treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is remarkably effective in reducing cancer rate and death. This indicates that inflammation might have many as-yet-unrecognized facets, among which an indolent course might be far more prevalent than previously appreciated. In this Review, we explore the various inflammatory processes underlying the development and progression of colorectal cancer and discuss anti-inflammatory means for its prevention and treatment.

  18. Chemokine CXCL14 is associated with prognosis in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine CXCL14 has been reported to play an important role in the progression of many malignancies such as breast cancer and papillary thyroid carcinoma, but the role of CXCL14 in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) remains to be established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression pattern and significance of CXCL14 in CRC progression. Method 265 colorectal carcinoma specimens and 129 matched adjacent normal colorectal mucosa specimens were collected. Expression of CXCL14 in clinical samples was examined by immunostaining. The effect of CXCL14 on colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, BrdU incorporation assay and colony formation assay. The impact of CXCL14 on migration and invasion of colorectal carcinoma cells was determined by transwell assay and Matrigel invasion assay, respectively. Results CXCL14 expression was significantly up-regulated in tumor tissues compared with adjacent nontumorous mucosa tissues (P < 0.001). Tumoral CXCL14 expression levels were significantly correlated with TNM (Tumor-node-metastasis) stage, histodifferentiation, and tumor size. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, high CXCL14 expression in tumor specimens (n = 91) from stage I/II patients was associated with increased risk for disease recurrence (risk ratio, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.15-7.40; P = 0.024). Elevated CXCL14 expression in tumor specimens (n = 135) from stage III/IV patients correlated with worse overall survival (risk ratio, 3.087; 95% CI, 1.866-5.107; P < 0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that enforced expression of CXCL14 in SW620 colorectal carcinoma cells resulted in more aggressive phenotypes. In contrast, knockdown of CXCL14 expression could mitigate the proliferative, migratory and invasive potential of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. Conclusion Taken together, CXCL14 might be a potential novel prognostic factor to predict the disease recurrence and overall survival and could be a

  19. [Malignant tumors of the colon and rectum].

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Zoran; Prodanović, Lazar; Lukić, Vladan; Randelović, Tomo; Drljević, Milorad; Rakić, Mile

    2003-01-01

    The authors present their five year long experience in surgical treatment of colorectal cancer at Zvornik Health Center. 77 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer underwent surgery during the five year period (1998-2002). This number represented about 2% of the total number of surgeries performed during the same time period. 80% of surgical interventions were elective, (82 patients), and 20% urgent (35 patients). Standard surgical procedures were applied in determining of the anatomical location of the pathological substrate. Aggravating factors in successful application of surgical intervention in treatment of colorectal cancer are: late diagnosis of colorectal cancer, low level of health education of the population, inadequate training of the physicians in primary health care, nonexistent national program for early detection of noninfectious diseases. In cases where colorectal cancer was diagnosed in an advanced stage, two-stage treatment and multi modal approach in combination with chemotherapy were treatments of choice. Incidence of colorectal cancer is still on the rise. PMID:14569684

  20. The New Nitinol Conformable Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Malignant Colonic Obstruction: A Pilot Experience as Bridge to Surgery Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are a nonsurgical option for treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction also as a bridge to surgery approach. The new nitinol conformable stent has improved clinical outcomes in these kinds of patients. We report a pilot experience with nitinol conformable SEMS placement as bridge to surgery treatment in patients with colorectal obstruction. Materials and Methods. Between April and August 2012, we collected data on colonic nitinol conformable SEMS placement in a cohort of consecutive symptomatic patients, with malignant colorectal obstruction, who were treated as a bridge to surgery. Technical success, clinical success, and adverse events were recorded. Results. Ten patients (7 male (70%)), with a mean age of 69.2 ± 10.1, were evaluated. The mean length of the stenosis was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm. Five patients (50%) were treated on an emergency basis. The median time from stent placement to surgery was 16 days (interquartile range 7–21). Technical and clinical success was achieved in all patients with a significant early improvement of symptoms. No adverse events due to the SEMS placement were observed. Conclusion. This pilot study confirmed the important role of nitinol conformable SEMS as a bridge to surgery option in the treatment of symptomatic malignant colorectal obstruction. PMID:24526914

  1. Immunohistochemical Expression of PCNA and CD34 in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas Using Specified Automated Cellular Image Analysis System: A Clinicopathologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Ban J.; Ali, Hussam H.; Hussein, Alaa G.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim: To evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD34 in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, and to correlate this expression with different clinicopathologic parameters. Materials and Methods: The study was retrospectively designed. A total of 86 tissue samples, including 33 paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenomas, 33 paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, and a control group of 20 samples of nontumerous colonic tissue, were included in the study. From each block, 3 sections of 5 ΅m thickness were taken, 1 section was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the other 2 sections were stained immunohistochemically for PCNA and CD34. Scoring of the immunohistochemical staining was performed using a specified automated cellular image analysis system (Digimizer). Results: PCNA expression was significantly increased in a sequence of normal mucosa–adenoma–carcinoma. It was significantly higher in adenomas ≥ 1 cm and those with severe dysplasia, and it showed a significant positive correlation with grade and lymph node involvement in colorectal carcinoma. CD34 showed significantly higher expression in carcinoma than adenoma and in adenoma than in the control group. CD34 expression showed a significant correlation with adenomas carrying severe dysplasia and large-sized adenomas (≥1cm). It was significantly correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node involvement in colorectal carcinoma. Conclusion: PCNA plays an important role in colorectal neoplastic progression and can be utilized as ancillary marker for the risk of malignant transformation in colorectal adenomas as it correlates with high grade dysplasia and size. Intratumoral quantification of the mean (A and N) of CD34 in colorectal carcinoma reflects the grade of tumors and can predict lymph node involvement and lymphovascular invasion, to make a useful additional prognostic

  2. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ingall, T J; Tennant, C

    1986-11-01

    The neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a relatively rare but potentially fatal complication of the use of major tranquillizers; mortality may be as high as 20%. The syndrome is manifest by the onset of hyperpyrexia, muscular rigidity and tremor, impaired consciousness and autonomic dysfunction. The pathophysiology is thought to be by way of dopamine receptor blockade. The syndrome is managed by cessation of the neuroleptic medication, by supportive measures and by instituting treatment with one or more of a number of specific drugs whose use is based on theoretical considerations rather than empirical evidence of efficacy; these drugs include anticholinergics, L-dopa, bromocriptine amantidine and dantrolene sodium. Although not proven, early recognition and treatment may reduce both the mortality and the longer term morbidity of this syndrome. PMID:3773831

  3. Primary pineal malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cedeño Diaz, Oderay Mabel; Leal, Roberto García; La Cruz Pelea, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Primary pineal malignant melanoma is a rare entity, with only thirteen cases reported in the world literature to date. We report a case of a 70-year-old man, who consulted with gait disturbance of six months duration, associated in the last month with dizziness, visual abnormalities and diplopia. No other additional melanocytic lesions were found elsewhere. The magnetic resonance showed a 25 mm expansive mass in the pineal gland that was associated with hydrocephaly, ventricular and transependimary oedema. The lesion was partially excised by a supracerebellar infratentorial approach. The histological examination revealed a melanoma. The patient received radiation therapy, but died of disease 16 weeks later. We herein review the literature on this rare tumour and comment on its clinical, radiological and histopathological features and differential diagnosis. PMID:24765293

  4. The malignant primate?

    PubMed

    de Grouchy, J

    1991-01-01

    Speciation and carcinogenesis result from genomic instability at the gametic or at the somatic levels. After an infinity of trials they occur, by chromosome rearrangements, in single individuals or in single cells and evolve by similar chromosomal or clonal evolutions. Loss of heterozygosity for the first event is essential in both processes: in evolution, a chromosomal rearrangement, a pericentric inversion or a Robertsonian fusion, must become homozygous to ensure a reproductive barrier for a new species; Knudson's two-event sequence is a similar situation in cancer. Position effect is equally important: we have shown overexpression of the SOD1 gene in the orangutan phylum probably by an intrachromosomal rearrangement; the t(9;22) in CML acts by typical position effect. Parental imprinting underlies the evolution of genome function and the unset of certain cancers. Evolution and malignancy are interweaved by viruses and oncogenes since the dawn of life. Cancer uses its intelligence to expand and to destroy the other tissues, using subtle metabolic pathways and a variety of tricks to metastasize other cells. It always wins but saws the branch on which it sits. Mankind also grows exponentially, killing thousands of other species, poisoning the oceans and soft waters, polluting the atmosphere, all for his egoistic needs. Man also travels and metastasizes other Earths. He modifies his genome or that of other species, and develops new technologies for his reproduction. He can destroy the planet in an eyeblink. To be or not to be the malignant primate, that will be the dilemma for the 21st Century. PMID:1809219

  5. Pathophysiology of colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis: Role of the peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Lieselotte; Sugarbaker, Paul; Van der Speeten, Kurt

    2016-09-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Besides the lymphatic and haematogenous routes of dissemination, CRC frequently gives rise to transcoelomic spread of tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, which ultimately leads to peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). PC is associated with a poor prognosis and bad quality of life for these patients in their terminal stages of disease. A loco-regional treatment modality for PC combining cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal peroperative chemotherapy has resulted in promising clinical results. However, this novel approach is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular events involved in peritoneal disease spread is paramount in avoiding unnecessary toxicity. The emergence of PC is the result of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and host elements, involving several well-defined steps, together known as the peritoneal metastatic cascade. Individual or clumps of tumor cells detach from the primary tumor, gain access to the peritoneal cavity and become susceptible to the regular peritoneal transport. They attach to the distant peritoneum, subsequently invade the subperitoneal space, where angiogenesis sustains proliferation and enables further metastatic growth. These molecular events are not isolated events but rather a continuous and interdependent process. In this manuscript, we review current data regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of colorectal PC, with a special focus on the peritoneum and the role of the surgeon in peritoneal disease spread. PMID:27678351

  6. Pathophysiology of colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis: Role of the peritoneum

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Lieselotte; Sugarbaker, Paul; Van der Speeten, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Besides the lymphatic and haematogenous routes of dissemination, CRC frequently gives rise to transcoelomic spread of tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, which ultimately leads to peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). PC is associated with a poor prognosis and bad quality of life for these patients in their terminal stages of disease. A loco-regional treatment modality for PC combining cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal peroperative chemotherapy has resulted in promising clinical results. However, this novel approach is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular events involved in peritoneal disease spread is paramount in avoiding unnecessary toxicity. The emergence of PC is the result of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and host elements, involving several well-defined steps, together known as the peritoneal metastatic cascade. Individual or clumps of tumor cells detach from the primary tumor, gain access to the peritoneal cavity and become susceptible to the regular peritoneal transport. They attach to the distant peritoneum, subsequently invade the subperitoneal space, where angiogenesis sustains proliferation and enables further metastatic growth. These molecular events are not isolated events but rather a continuous and interdependent process. In this manuscript, we review current data regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of colorectal PC, with a special focus on the peritoneum and the role of the surgeon in peritoneal disease spread. PMID:27678351

  7. Pathophysiology of colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis: Role of the peritoneum

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Lieselotte; Sugarbaker, Paul; Van der Speeten, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Besides the lymphatic and haematogenous routes of dissemination, CRC frequently gives rise to transcoelomic spread of tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, which ultimately leads to peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). PC is associated with a poor prognosis and bad quality of life for these patients in their terminal stages of disease. A loco-regional treatment modality for PC combining cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal peroperative chemotherapy has resulted in promising clinical results. However, this novel approach is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular events involved in peritoneal disease spread is paramount in avoiding unnecessary toxicity. The emergence of PC is the result of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and host elements, involving several well-defined steps, together known as the peritoneal metastatic cascade. Individual or clumps of tumor cells detach from the primary tumor, gain access to the peritoneal cavity and become susceptible to the regular peritoneal transport. They attach to the distant peritoneum, subsequently invade the subperitoneal space, where angiogenesis sustains proliferation and enables further metastatic growth. These molecular events are not isolated events but rather a continuous and interdependent process. In this manuscript, we review current data regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of colorectal PC, with a special focus on the peritoneum and the role of the surgeon in peritoneal disease spread.

  8. Iron overload and hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-01-01

    Although iron is essential for cell replication and survival, an increase of body iron stores has been implicated in the development of cancer. However, while the association between iron overload and hepatocellular carcinoma is well documented, the relationship with nonhepatocellular malignancies remains ill-defined. In this review, we briefly report the present knowledge regarding the association between iron overload and hematologic malignancies.

  9. Dependence receptors and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehlen, Patrick; Tauszig-Delamasure, Servane

    2014-11-01

    The research on colorectal cancer (CRC) biology has been leading the oncology field since the early 1990s. The search for genetic alterations has allowed the identification of the main tumour suppressors or oncogenes. Recent work obtained in CRC has unexpectedly proposed the existence of novel category of tumour suppressors, the so-called 'dependence receptors'. These transmembrane receptors behave as Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde with two opposite sides: they induce a positive signalling (survival, proliferation, differentiation) in presence of their ligand, but are not inactive in the absence of their ligand and rather trigger apoptosis when unbound. This trait confers them a conditional tumour suppressor activity: they eliminate cells that grow abnormally in an environment offering a limited quantity of ligand. This review will describe how receptors such as deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), uncoordinated 5 (UNC5), rearranged during transfection (RET) or TrkC constrain CRC progression and how this dependence receptor paradigm may open up therapeutical perspectives. PMID:25163468

  10. Update on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    DA Silva, Felipe Carneiro; Wernhoff, Patrik; Dominguez-Barrera, Constantino; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2016-09-01

    In the past two decades, significant advances have been made in our understanding of colorectal (CRC) tumors with DNA mismatch (MMR) repair deficiency. The knowledge from molecular and genetic alterations in a variety of clinical conditions has refined the disease terminology and classification. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) encompasses a spectrum of conditions that have significant phenotypic overlapping that makes clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Distinguishing among the HNPCC disorders is clinically important, as the approach to surveillance for patients and their at-risk family members differs according to risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Prospective and next-generation studies will provide valuable clinical information regarding the natural history of disease that will help differentiate the Lynch syndrome mimics and guide diagnosis and management for heterogeneous conditions currently grouped under the category of familial CRC. The review is intended to present and discuss the molecular nature of various conditions related to MMR deficiency and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. PMID:27630275

  11. Genetic architecture of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3-5%) of cases arise from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late onset 'sporadic' disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years, genome wide association studies have discovered that over 40 genetic regions are associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC, and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies and development of higher throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarising the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC, and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. Subsequently these new insights will lead to improved treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:26187503

  12. Evolving management of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Zijp, Jochem van der Voort; Hoekstra, Harald J; Basson, Marc D

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer, including total mesorectal excision, the resection of liver and lung metastasis and advances in chemoradiation and foreshadows some interventions that may lie just beyond the frontier. In particular, little is known about the intracellular and extracellular cascades that may influence colorectal cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. Although the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinases and focal adhesion associated proteins in response to integrin-mediated cell matrix binding (”outside in integrin signaling”) is well described, the stimulation of cell adhesion by intracellular signals activated by pressure prior to adhesion represents a different signal paradigm. However, several studies have suggested that increased pressure and shear stress activate cancer cell adhesion. Further studies of the pathways that regulate integrin-driven cancer cell adhesion may identify ways to disrupt these signals or block integrin-mediated adhesion so that adhesion and eventual metastasis can be prevented in the future. PMID:18609678

  13. E2F transcription factors and digestive system malignancies: how much do we know?

    PubMed

    Xanthoulis, Athanasios; Tiniakos, Dina G

    2013-06-01

    E2F family of transcription factors regulates various cellular functions related to cell cycle and apoptosis. Its individual members have traditionally been classified into activators and repressors, based on in vitro studies. However their contribution in human cancer is more complicated and difficult to predict. We review current knowledge on the expression of E2Fs in digestive system malignancies and its clinical implications for patient prognosis and treatment. E2F1, the most extensively studied member and the only one with prognostic value, exhibits a tumor-suppressing activity in esophageal, gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma, and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whereas in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma may function as a tumor-promoter. In the latter malignancies, E2F1 immunohistochemical expression has been correlated with higher tumor grade and worse patient survival, whereas in esophageal, gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas is a marker of increased patient survival. E2F2 has only been studied in colorectal cancer, where its role is not considered significant. E2F4's role in colorectal, gastric and hepatic carcinogenesis is tumor-promoting. E2F8 is strongly upregulated in human HCC, thus possibly contributing to hepatocarcinogenesis. Adenoviral transfer of E2F as gene therapy to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells for chemotherapeutic agents has been used in experimental studies. Other therapeutic strategies are yet to be developed, but it appears that targeted approaches using E2F-agonists or antagonists should take into account the tissue-dependent function of each E2F member. Further understanding of E2Fs' contribution in cellular functions in vivo would help clarify their role in carcinogenesis.

  14. [MOLECULAR-GENETIC ANALYSIS OF MICROORGANISMS WITH INTRAEPITHELIAL INVASION ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, N T; Vafin, R R; Rzhanov, I V; Kolpakov, A I; Gataullin, I G; Tyulkin, S V; Sinyagina, M N; Grigoryeva, T V; Ilinskaya, O N

    2016-01-01

    The facultative aerobic bacteria isolated from the mucosa of rectum in patients with colorectal cancer in the zone of malignant tumor and neighboring normal mucosa was studied using molecular-genetic methods. The species attribution of bacteria was implemented using the cultural-morphological analysis and sequencing of the 16S rRNA locus. The microorganisms with the intraepithelial invasion to rectal mucosa isolated were identified as representatives of the adherent-invasive (AIEC) subgroup of Escherichia coli and species Klebsiella pneumonia. The molecular analysis by genetic determinants controlling adhesive, hemolytic, and toxigenic activity revealed that some bacterial isolates were able to produce toxins with potential cancerogenic activity (e.g., colibactin and cytotoxic necrotic factor I). Certain bacterial species isolated from malignant and normal rectum epithelium of the same patient demonstrated no difference between analyzed factors of toxigenicity.

  15. Unexpected Malignant Diagnosis in Colonic Biopsies: Malignant Transformation of Ovarian Mature Teratomas—Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Claudia P.; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is the second cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma in the colorectum is extremely unusual. Malignant transformation from mature cystic teratoma of the ovary is a rare event. The most common transformation is squamous cell carcinoma, followed by adenocarcinoma. It occurs more often in elderly patients, who usually present with advance disease. We report two unusual cases of postmenopausal women diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma in colon biopsies. After surgical resections, the carcinoma was proven to be the result of malignant transformation of ovarian mature cystic teratomas. Since squamous cell carcinoma of the colorectum is extremely rare, the presence of squamous cell carcinoma in a colonic biopsy in a female patient should alert the clinicians to other possible primary sites, as seen in these cases. PMID:26881165

  16. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  17. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  18. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) for liver metastases secondary to colorectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James S. . E-mail: welsh@humonc.wisc.edu; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2006-10-01

    Introduction: Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a relatively new commercially available microbrachytherapy technique for treatment of malignant hepatic lesions using {sup 9}Y embedded in resin microspheres, which are infused directly into the hepatic arterial circulation. It is FDA approved for liver metastases secondary to colorectal carcinoma and is under investigation for treatment of other liver malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine malignancies. Materials/Methods: A modest number of clinical trials, preclinical animal studies, and dosimetric studies have been reported. Here we review several of the more important results. Results: High doses of beta radiation can be selectively delivered to tumors, resulting in impressive local control and survival rates. Ex vivo analyses have shown that microspheres preferentially cluster around the periphery of tumor nodules with a high tumor:normal tissue ratio of up to 200:1. Toxicity is usually mild, featuring fatigue, anorexia, nausea, abdominal discomfort, and slight elevations of liver function tests. Conclusions: Selective internal radiation therapy represents an effective means of controlling liver metastases from colorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinical trials have demonstrated improved local control of disease and survival with relatively low toxicity. Investigations of SIRT for other hepatic malignancies and in combination with newer chemotherapy agents and targeted biologic therapies are under way or in planning. A well-integrated team involving interventional radiology, nuclear medicine, medical oncology, surgical oncology, medical physics, and radiation oncology is essential for a successful program. Careful selection of patients through the combined expertise of the team can maximize therapeutic efficacy and reduce the potential for adverse effects.

  19. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  20. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  1. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  2. Non-coding RNAs Functioning in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Daniele; Barraco, Nadia; Listì, Angela; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis of the presence of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has received a considerable support. This model suggested the existence of CSCs which, thanks to their self-renewal properties, are able to drive the expansion and the maintenance of malignant cell populations with invasive and metastatic potential in cancer. Increasing evidence showed the ability of such cells to acquire self-renewal, multipotency, angiogenic potential, immune evasion, symmetrical and asymmetrical divisions which, along with the presence of several DNA repair mechanisms, further enhance their oncogenic potential making them highly resistant to common anticancer treatments. The main signaling pathways involved in the homeostasis of colorectal (CRC) stem cells are the Wnt, Notch, Sonic Hedgehog, and Bone Morfogenic Protein (BMP) pathways, which are mostly responsible for all the features that have been widely referred to stem cells. The same pathways have been identified in colorectal cancer stem cells (CRCSCs), conferring a more aggressive phenotype compared to non-stem CRC cells. Recently, several evidences suggested that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) may play a crucial role in the regulation of different biological mechanisms in CRC, by modulating the expression of critical stem cell transcription factors that have been found active in CSCs. In this chapter, we will discuss the involvement of ncRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), in stemness acquisition and maintenance by CRCSCs, through the regulation of pathways modulating the CSC phenotype and growth, carcinogenesis, differentiation, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:27573896

  3. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Schoen, Robert E; Whelan, Richard L; Steele, Robert J; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Robertson, John F R; Sewell, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  4. Non-coding RNAs Functioning in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Daniele; Barraco, Nadia; Listì, Angela; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis of the presence of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has received a considerable support. This model suggested the existence of CSCs which, thanks to their self-renewal properties, are able to drive the expansion and the maintenance of malignant cell populations with invasive and metastatic potential in cancer. Increasing evidence showed the ability of such cells to acquire self-renewal, multipotency, angiogenic potential, immune evasion, symmetrical and asymmetrical divisions which, along with the presence of several DNA repair mechanisms, further enhance their oncogenic potential making them highly resistant to common anticancer treatments. The main signaling pathways involved in the homeostasis of colorectal (CRC) stem cells are the Wnt, Notch, Sonic Hedgehog, and Bone Morfogenic Protein (BMP) pathways, which are mostly responsible for all the features that have been widely referred to stem cells. The same pathways have been identified in colorectal cancer stem cells (CRCSCs), conferring a more aggressive phenotype compared to non-stem CRC cells. Recently, several evidences suggested that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) may play a crucial role in the regulation of different biological mechanisms in CRC, by modulating the expression of critical stem cell transcription factors that have been found active in CSCs. In this chapter, we will discuss the involvement of ncRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), in stemness acquisition and maintenance by CRCSCs, through the regulation of pathways modulating the CSC phenotype and growth, carcinogenesis, differentiation, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  5. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Schoen, Robert E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Steele, Robert J.; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.; Robertson, John F. R.; Sewell, Herbert F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  6. The effect of the endoscopist on the wait-time for colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karip, Bora; İşcan, Yalın; Ağca, Birol; Fersahoğlu, Mahir; Aydın, Timuçin; Çelik, Kafkas; Bulut, Nuriye Esen; Memişoğlu, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The effect of the specialty of physicians who perform endoscopy on preoperative wait-time of colorectal cancer patients was evaluated. Material and Methods: Data from 86 patients who have been operated with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer from January 2011–February 2013 regarding age, sex, tumor location, colonoscopy date, surgery date, the expertise and institution of the endoscopist were retrospectively examined. The time between colonoscopy and surgery was accepted as the pre-operative wait time (PWT). Results: Out of 86 patients, 24 (27.9%) colonoscopies were performed by general surgeons (GS), and 62 (72.1%) by gastroenterologists (GE). When patients who underwent colonoscopy in other centers were extracted, the PWT for our center was 20.4±10.8 days. When grouped according to specialties, the PWT of patients who had their colonoscopy performed by GS was significantly shorter than patients who underwent colonoscopy by GE at the same center (p<0.05). Patient’s age, sex and location of the tumor had no effect on PWT (p>0.05). Conclusion: The preparation time for surgery in colorectal cancer patients is influenced by the specialty of the physician performing the procedure. In order to standardize this period, a common flow diagram after endoscopy should be established for patients with suspected malignancy. PMID:25931897

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of p53 and ras p21 expression in colorectal adenomas and early carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ieda, S; Watatani, M; Yoshida, T; Kuroda, K; Inui, H; Yasutomi, M

    1996-01-01

    To further investigate whether multiple genetic changes are involved in the development of colorectal cancer, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis of p53 and ras p21 protein expression in 139 specimens of colorectal adenoma with varying degrees of dysplasia, 57 specimens of early cancer with an adenomatous component, and 12 specimens of superficial early cancer without any adenomatous component. Positive p53 staining was found in 15% of the adenomas with moderate dysplasia and in 42% of the adenomas with severe dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma (IMCA). Positive immunostaining of p53 was observed to be significantly correlated with the degree of dysplasia and the depth of invasion, as was the expression of ras p21. However, a closer correlation was observed with the increasing size of the adenomas. Furthermore, p53 staining was positive in 42% of the 12 superficial early cancer specimens, while ras staining was positive in only 1 specimen (8%). These results indicate that p53 gene overexpression may play some biological role in both the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence and in de novo cancer development, whereas ras p21 expression may not be as involved in de novo cancer development as in the malignant conversion of colorectal adenomas.

  8. Reciprocal regulation of BMF and BIRC5 (Survivin) linked to Eomes overexpression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Kang, Yuki; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay A; Bradford, C Samuel; Johnson, Gavin; Dashwood, Wan Mohaiza; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2016-10-28

    Eomesodermin (Eomes) is a T-box transcription factor that has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer and other human malignancies. We screened a panel of human primary colon cancers and patient-matched controls (n = 30) and detected Eomes overexpression at the mRNA and protein level. Similar results were obtained in a panel of rat colon tumors and adjacent normal-looking colonic mucosa (n = 24). In human colon cancer cells, forced overexpression of Eomes enhanced cell viability and protected against staurosporine-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, knocking down Eomes resulted in reduced cell viability, G2/M cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis induction. The apoptotic mechanism centered on the reciprocal downregulation of anti-apoptotic BIRC5 (Survivin) and upregulation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 modifying factor (BMF). In patients with colorectal cancer, high EOMES expression (n = 95) was associated with poor overall survival compared with individuals exhibiting low EOMES levels (n = 80). We conclude from the current investigation, and prior literature, that Eomes has a divergent role in cancer development, with evidence for tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions, depending on stage and tissue context. Further studies are warranted on the apoptotic mechanisms linked to the reciprocal regulation of BMF and BIRC5 in human colorectal cancers characterized by Eomes overexpression. PMID:27539959

  9. Quantitative Diagnosis of Colorectal Polyps by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Qinqin; Wu, Xiaojing; Tang, Tao; Liu, Hong; Zhu, S. W.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The principal aim of this study is to investigate the scattering coefficient of colorectal polyp tissues using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. It combines the existing scattering coefficient model and spectral domain OCT to achieve method of early diagnosis of colorectal polyp in hospitals. Seventeen patients were studied, and a total of 1456 data points were extracted by curve-fitting the OCT signals into a confocal single-backscattering model. The results show that the mean scattering coefficient value for colorectal polyps is 1.91 mm−1 (std: ±0.54 mm−1), which is between the values for normal and malignant tissues. In addition, we studied the difference between adenomatous polyps (n = 15) and inflammatory polyps (n = 2) quantitatively and found that the adenomatous tissues had lower scattering coefficients than the inflammatory ones. The quantitative measurements confirmed that OCT can be used in primary diagnosis to compensate for the deficiencies in methods of pathological diagnosis, with a great potential for early diagnosis of tissues. PMID:24818145

  10. Increase in apoptosis by combination of metformin with silibinin in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Chuang, Tang-Wei; Chen, Li-Jen; Niu, Ho-Shan; Chung, Kun-Ming; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Lin, Kao-Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of metformin on silibinin-induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer (COLO 205) cells. METHODS: MTT assays were performed to quantify cell viability. Western blot assays were applied to identify the expression of signaling proteins. RESULTS: The combined treatment of COLO 205 cells with metformin and silibinin decreased cell survival at a dose insufficient to influence the non-malignant cells [Human colonic epithelial cells (HCoEpiC)]. Silibinin and metformin increased phosphatase and tensin homolog and 5’-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase expression in COLO 205 cells and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammol/Lalian target of rapamycin. This combined treatment resulted in an increase in the expression of activated caspase 3 and apoptosis inducing factor, indicating apoptosis. CONCLUSION: The combined treatment of human colorectal cancer cells with silibinin and metformin may induce apoptosis at a dose that does not affect HCoEpiC. This finding reveals a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:25892866

  11. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  12. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  13. [Malignant Pleural Mesotheliomas].

    PubMed

    Biancosino, C; Redwan, B; Krüger, M; Eberlein, M; Bölükbas, S

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM) are very aggressive tumors, which originate from the mesothelial cells of the pleural surface. The main risk factor associated with MPM is exposure to asbestos. The latency period between asbestos exposure and MPM can be 30-60 years. Clinical symptoms and signs are often nonspecifc. The diagnosis of MPM requires an adequate tissue specimen for pathological examination, and video assisted thoracoscopic surgey (VATS) is associated with the highest diagnostic yield. MPM are histologically classified into epitheloid, sacromatoid and biphasic (mixed) sub-types. Accurate staging with invasive tests, if needed, is an important step before an interdisciplinary team can decide on an optimal (multi-modal) treatment approach. A multi-modal treatment approach (surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy) is superior to all approaches relying only on a single modality, if the patient qualifies for it from an oncological and functional standpoint. The goal of the surgical therapy is to achieve macroscopic complete resection. There are two competing surgical approaches and philosophies: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and radical pleurectomy (RP). Over the last years a paradigm shift from EPP to RP occurred and RP is now often the preferred surgical option. PMID:27612329

  14. [Malignant mesothelioma and asbestos].

    PubMed

    Rüttner, J R

    1983-03-12

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare neoplasm of rapidly lethal course arising primarily in the pleura and less often in the peritoneum. In the majority of cases the disease is closely related to occupational exposure to asbestos. The latency period, calculated from the first contact with asbestos to the appearance of mesothelioma, is generally in the order of 20 years or more irrespective of the duration of exposure. A causal relationship can be established with certainty only by a careful history and positive tissue analysis for the presence of asbestos. The author's own series of 48 pleural mesotheliomas comprises 39 cases involving occupational exposure to asbestos, 6 others with asbestos demonstrable in pulmonary tissue but no discernible source in the history, and 3 where no relation to asbestos could be established at all. Although a dose-response relation may be assumed for asbestos as for all other carcinogens, the lack of data on asbestos dust concentrations at former places of work rendered determination of the minimal noxious dose difficult or impossible. It also remains unclear whether the various asbestos types, such as chrysotile and amphiboles, differ in pathogenic effect. It is hoped that careful registration and continuing study of mesotheliomas will shed further light on their relationship to asbestos and on the possible hazards of the mineral to the general population.

  15. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  16. Combined inhibition of MEK and Aurora A kinase in KRAS/PIK3CA double-mutant colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Davis, S Lindsey; Robertson, Kelli M; Pitts, Todd M; Tentler, John J; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L; Klauck, Peter J; Bagby, Stacey M; Hyatt, Stephanie L; Selby, Heather M; Spreafico, Anna; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Arcaroli, John J; Messersmith, Wells A; Tan, Aik Choon; Eckhardt, S Gail

    2015-01-01

    Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitors induce different, and potentially complementary, effects on the cell cycle of malignant cells, suggesting a rational basis for utilizing these agents in combination. In this work, the combination of an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor was evaluated in pre-clinical colorectal cancer models, with a focus on identifying a subpopulation in which it might be most effective. Increased synergistic activity of the drug combination was identified in colorectal cancer cell lines with concomitant KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Anti-proliferative effects were observed upon treatment of these double-mutant cell lines with the drug combination, and tumor growth inhibition was observed in double-mutant human tumor xenografts, though effects were variable within this subset. Additional evaluation suggests that degree of G2/M delay and p53 mutation status affect apoptotic activity induced by combination therapy with an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor in KRAS and PIK3CA mutant colorectal cancer. Overall, in vitro and in vivo testing was unable to identify a subset of colorectal cancer that was consistently responsive to the combination of a MEK and Aurora A kinase inhibitor. PMID:26136684

  17. Combined inhibition of MEK and Aurora A kinase in KRAS/PIK3CA double-mutant colorectal cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S. Lindsey; Robertson, Kelli M.; Pitts, Todd M.; Tentler, John J.; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L.; Klauck, Peter J.; Bagby, Stacey M.; Hyatt, Stephanie L.; Selby, Heather M.; Spreafico, Anna; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A.; Arcaroli, John J.; Messersmith, Wells A.; Tan, Aik Choon; Eckhardt, S. Gail

    2015-01-01

    Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitors induce different, and potentially complementary, effects on the cell cycle of malignant cells, suggesting a rational basis for utilizing these agents in combination. In this work, the combination of an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor was evaluated in pre-clinical colorectal cancer models, with a focus on identifying a subpopulation in which it might be most effective. Increased synergistic activity of the drug combination was identified in colorectal cancer cell lines with concomitant KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Anti-proliferative effects were observed upon treatment of these double-mutant cell lines with the drug combination, and tumor growth inhibition was observed in double-mutant human tumor xenografts, though effects were variable within this subset. Additional evaluation suggests that degree of G2/M delay and p53 mutation status affect apoptotic activity induced by combination therapy with an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor in KRAS and PIK3CA mutant colorectal cancer. Overall, in vitro and in vivo testing was unable to identify a subset of colorectal cancer that was consistently responsive to the combination of a MEK and Aurora A kinase inhibitor. PMID:26136684

  18. The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Rachel; Ansary-Moghaddam, A; Huxley, R; Lam, T H; Ueshima, H; Gu, D F; Kim, H C; Woodward, M; Fang, X; Gu, D F; Imai, Y; Pan, W H; Rodgers, A; Suh, I

    2007-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer is one of the leading malignancies worldwide, there are few data on aetiological relationships from the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, a collaborative study was conducted involving over half a million subjects from 33 cohort studies in the region. Age-adjusted death rates from colorectal cancer, over an average of 6.8 years follow-up, were 12 and 14 per 100,000 person-years among Asian women and men, respectively; corresponding values in Australasia were 31 and 41. Height was strongly associated with death from colorectal cancer: an extra 5 cm of height was associated with 10% (95%confidence interval, 3% - 18% additional risk, after adjustment for other factors. Smoking increased risk by 43% (9% - 88%), although no significant dose-response relationship was discerned (p>0.05). Other significant (p <0.05) risk factors were body mass index and lack of physical activity. There was no significant effect on colorectal cancer mortality for alcohol consumption, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose or diabetes, although the latter conferred a notable 26% additional risk. Height may be a biomarker for some currently unknown genetic, or environmental, risk factors that are related both to skeletal growth and mutanogenesis. Understanding such mechanisms could provide opportunities for novel preventive and therapeutic intervention. PMID:17696730

  19. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Baseline Dietary Knowledge of Colorectal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the dietary knowledge, attitudes and potential barriers to change of patients attending a colorectal outpatient clinic. Design: Use of a semistructured interview to generate qualitative and quantitative data. Setting: A regional colorectal outpatient clinic within Edinburgh. Method: Patients attending clinic with colorectal…

  20. Variation in the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility loci and colorectal polyps by polyp type.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Hutter, Carolyn M; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N; Schwartz, Malaika R; Upton, Melissa P; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-15

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24-79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type.

  1. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  2. Personalized Clinical Decision Making in Gastrointestinal Malignancies: The Role of PET.

    PubMed

    Hess, Søren; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Pfeiffer, Per; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that include both common and rare diseases with very different presentations and prognoses. The mainstay of treatment is surgery in combination with preoperative and adjuvant chemotherapy depending on clinical presentation and initial stages. This article outlines the potential use of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in clinical decision making with special regard to preoperative evaluation and response assessment in gastric cancer (including the gastroesophageal junction), pancreatic cancer (excluding neuroendocrine tumors), colorectal cancer, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. PMID:27321031

  3. Autophagy in colorectal cancer: An important switch from physiology to pathology

    PubMed Central

    Burada, Florin; Nicoli, Elena Raluca; Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Uscatu, Daniel Constantin; Ioana, Mihai; Gheonea, Dan Ionut

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in both men and women worldwide. Among the factors and mechanisms that are involved in the multifactorial etiology of CRC, autophagy is an important transformational switch that occurs when a cell shifts from normal to malignant. In recent years, multiple hypotheses have been considered regarding the autophagy mechanisms that are involved in cancer. The currently accepted hypothesis is that autophagy has dual and contradictory roles in carcinogenesis, but the precise mechanisms leading to autophagy in cancer are not yet fully defined and seem to be context dependent. Autophagy is a surveillance mechanism used by normal cells that protects them from the transformation to malignancy by removing damaged organelles and aggregated proteins and by reducing reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial abnormalities and DNA damage. However, autophagy also supports tumor formation by promoting access to nutrients that are critical to the metabolism and growth of tumor cells and by inhibiting cellular death and increasing drug resistance. Autophagy studies in CRC have focused on several molecules, mainly microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, beclin 1, and autophagy related 5, with conflicting results. Beneficial effects were observed for some agents that modulate autophagy in CRC either alone or, more often, in combination with other agents. More extensive studies are needed in the future to clarify the roles of autophagy-related genes and modulators in colorectal carcinogenesis, and to develop potential beneficial agents for the prognosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:26600927

  4. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for malignant mesothelioma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Defective Autophagy Initiates Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-05-19

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Park et al. (2016) elegantly demonstrate that a partial defect in autophagy supports malignant transformation as it favors the production of genotoxic reactive oxygen species by mitochondria.

  6. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  7. AMG 319 Lymphoid Malignancy FIH

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Cancer; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Hematologic Malignancies; Hematology; Leukemia; Low Grade Lymphoma; Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Oncology; Oncology Patients; T Cell Lymphoma; Tumors

  8. Malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, L; Sugarbaker, D J; Skarin, A T

    2001-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma remains a difficult tumor to treat, much less cure. Currently, the best chance for long-term survival lies with early diagnosis and aggressive surgical extirpation, but given the typically long delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, this is only possible with a high index of suspicion and an aggressive diagnosis workup. Early referral to a tertiary center experienced in the treatment of MPM may be important for several reasons: (1) decreased risk of tumor spread along multiple thoracenesis/biopsy tracts, (2) the availability of specialized pathologic assays for definitive diagnosis, (3) the availability of critical staging modalities (aggressive mediastinoscopy +/- thoracoscopy, MRI scans performed according to specific mesothelioma protocols, and perhaps PET scans), (4) surgical experience with pleurectomy/decortication and/or extrapleural pneumonectomy, that may decrease morbidity and mortality, and (5) the availability of novel adjuvant protocols. Single-modality therapy is unlikely to result in long-term survival. Aggressive surgery is required for optimal debulking, and extrapleural pneumonectomy may offer better local control compared with pleurectomy/ecortication. Delivery of optimal radiation schedules, which may involve large fractions as well as large total doses, is limited by the presence of nearby dose-limiting structures. Current chemotherapy is severely lacking in producing objective responses and improved survival although gemcitabine and IL-2 may be active agents to be combined with radiation and/or other agents. Hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, intracavitary therapy, and gene therapy are all relatively new techniques under active investigation that should be supported by enrollment in on-going protocols. Predictably, many of these techniques provide greater benefit when used in the setting of adjuvant protocols or minimal residual disease, emphasizing the importance of multimodality therapy.

  9. Malignant hypertension: a preventable emergency.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Walter; van der Merwe, Veronica

    2013-08-16

    The Waitemata Hypertension Clinic Database 2009-2012 (Auckland, New Zealand) was searched for patients meeting the definition of Malignant Hypertension. Eighteen of 565 patients met the criteria. All patients had essential hypertension which was either undiagnosed, untreated or undertreated. Most cases responded satisfactorily to standard drug therapy, but a number were left with significant chronic kidney disease. Malignant hypertension is a life-threatening disease which should be entirely preventable with regular blood pressure checks in primary care.

  10. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  11. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  12. Laparoscopic and open resection for colorectal cancer: an evaluation of cellular immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one kind of frequent malignant tumors of the digestive tract which gets high morbidity and mortality allover the world. Despite the promising clinical results recently, less information is available regarding the perioperative immunological effects of laparoscopic surgery when compared with the open surgery. This study aimed to compare the cellular immune responses of patients who underwent laparoscopic(LCR) and open resections(OCR) for colorectal cancer. Methods Between Mar 2009 and Sep 2009, 35 patients with colorectal carcinoma underwent LCR by laparoscopic surgeon. These patients were compared with 33 cases underwent conventional OCR by colorectal surgeon. Clinical data about the patients were collected prospectively. Comparison of the operative details and postoperative outcomes between laparoscopic and open resection was performed. Peripheral venous blood samples from these 68 patients were taken prior to surgery as well as on postoperative days(POD) 1, 4 and 7. Cell counts of total white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocyte subpopulations, natural killer(NK) cells as well as CRP were determined by blood counting instrument, flow cytometry and hematology analyzer. Results There was no difference in the age, gender and tumor status between the two groups. The operating time was a little longer in the laparoscopic group (P > 0.05), but the blood loss was less (P = 0.039). Patients with laparoscopic resection had earlier return of bowel function and earlier resumption of diet as well as shorter median hospital stay (P < 0.001). Compared with OCR group, cell numbers of total lymphocytes, CD4+T cells and CD8+T cells were significant more in LCR group (P < 0.05) on POD 4, while there was no difference in the CD45RO+T or NK cell numbers between the two groups. Cellular immune responds were similar between the two groups on POD1 and POD7. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal resection gets less surgery stress and short-term advantages

  13. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms with Colorectal Cancer in a Saudi Arabian Population

    PubMed Central

    Alkhayal, Khayal A.; Awadalia, Zainab H.; Vaali-Mohammed, Mansoor-Ali; Al Obeed, Omar A.; Al Wesaimer, Alanoud; Halwani, Rabih; Zubaidi, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D, causally implicated in bone diseases and human malignancies, exerts its effects through binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR). VDR is a transcription factor modulating the expression of several genes in different pathways. Genetic variants in the VDR gene have been associated with several cancers in different population including colorectal cancer. Objective To assess the association of VDR gene polymorphisms in relation with colorectal cancer (CRC) in a Saudi population. Methods The polymorphisms of VDR gene (BsmI, FokI, ApaI and TaqI) were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction amplification of segments of interest followed by Sanger sequencing. One hundred diagnosed CRC patients and 100 healthy control subjects that were age and gender matched were recruited. Results We did not observe significant association of any of the four VDR polymorphisms with colorectal cancer risk in the overall analysis. Although not statistically significant, the AA genotype of BsmI conferred about two-fold protection against CRCs compared to the GG genotype. Stratification of the study subjects based on age and gender suggests statistically significant association of CRC with the ‘C’ allele of ApaI in patients >57 years of age at disease diagnosis and BsmI polymorphism in females. In addition, statistically significant differences were observed for the genotypic distributions of VDR-BsmI, ApaI and TaqI SNPs between Saudi Arabian population and several of the International HapMap project populations. Conclusion Despite the absence of correlation of the examined VDR polymorphisms with CRCs in the combined analysis, ApaI and BsmI loci are statistically significantly associated with CRC in elderly and female patients, respectively. These findings need further validation in larger cohorts prior to utilizing these SNPs as potential screening markers for colorectal cancers in Saudi population. PMID:27309378

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans infection in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schmalzle, Sarah A; Buchwald, Ulrike K; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic invasive fungal infection that is well described and easily recognised when it occurs as meningitis in HIV-infected persons. Malignancy and its treatment may also confer a higher risk of infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, but this association has not been as well described. A case of cryptococcosis in a cancer patient is presented, and all cases of coincident C. neoformans infection and malignancy in adults published in the literature in English between 1970 and 2014 are reviewed. Data from these cases were aggregated in order to describe the demographics, type of malignancy, site of infection, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcomes of cryptococcosis in patients with cancer. Haematologic malignancies accounted for 82% of cases, with lymphomas over-represented compared to US population data (66% vs. 53% respectively). Cryptococcosis was reported rarely in patients with solid tumours. Haematologic malignancy patients were more likely to have central nervous system (P < 0.001) or disseminated disease (P < 0.001), receive Amphotericin B as part of initial therapy (P = 0.023), and had higher reported mortality rates than those with solid tumours (P = 0.222). Providers should have heightened awareness of the possibility of cryptococcosis in patients with haematologic malignancy presenting with infection. PMID:26932366

  15. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  16. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  17. Anastomotic dehiscence (AD) in colorectal cancer surgery: mechanical anastomosis versus manual anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Oprescu, C; Beuran, M; Nicolau, AE; Negoi, I; Venter, MD; Morteanu, S; Oprescu-Macovei, AM

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Anastomotic dehiscence (AD) is the “Achilles heel" for resectional colorectal pathology and is the most common cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. AD incidence is 3-8%; mortality rate due to AD two decades ago was around 60% and at present is 10% [4-6]. This paper analyzes the incidence of AD after colorectal resection performed both in emergency and elective situations, depending on the way it is done: manually or mechanically. Methods: Retrospective, single-center, observational study of patients operated in the period from 1st of January 2009 to 31th of December 2011 for malignant colorectal pathology in the Emergency Clinical Hospital of Bucharest. We evaluated the incidence of digestive fistulas according to the segment of digestive tract and time from hospital admission, to the way the anastomosis was achieved (mechanical vs. Manual), to the complexity of intervention, to the transfusion requirements pre/intra or postoperative, to the past medical history of patients (presence of colorectal inflammatory diseases: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease), to the average length of hospital stay and time of postoperative resumption of bowel transit. Results: We included 714 patients who had surgery between 1st of January 2009 and 31th of December 2011. 15.26% (109/714) of the cases were operated in emergency conditions. Of the 112 cases of medium and lower rectum, 76 have “benefited" from preoperative radiotherapy with a fistula rate of 22.36% (17/76). The incidence of anastomotic dehiscence in the group with preoperative radiotherapy and mechanical anastomosis was 64.7% (11/17) versus 35.3% (6/17) incidence recorded in the group with manual anastomosis. Colorectal inflammatory diseases have been found as a history of pathology in 41 patients - incidence of fistulas in this group was of 12.2% (5/41), compared to only 6.83% (46/673) incidence seen in patients without a history of such disease. For the group with bowel inflammatory

  18. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy via epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Y; Onodera, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Nomimura, S; Kubo, Y; Nam, J-M; Kajiwara, K; Nada, S; Oneyama, C; Sabe, H; Okada, M

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumor cells often acquire malignant properties, such as invasion/metastasis and uncontrolled cell growth, by undergoing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms by which EMT contributes to malignant progression remain elusive. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy in a manner dependent on EMT status. We previously identified ARHGEF5, a member of the Dbl family of GEFs, as a multifunctional mediator of Src-induced cell invasion and tumor growth. In the present study, ARHGEF5 was upregulated during tumor growth factor-β-induced EMT in human epithelial MCF10A cells, and promoted cell migration by activating the Rho-ROCK pathway. ARHGEF5 was necessary for the invasive and in vivo metastatic activity of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. These findings underscore the crucial role of ARHGEF5 in cell migration and invasion/metastasis. An in vivo tumorigenesis assay revealed that ARHGEF5 had the potential to promote tumor growth via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. However, ARHGEF5 was not required for tumor growth in epithelial-like human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas the growth of mesenchymal-like SW480 and SW620 cells depended on ARHGEF5. Induction of EMT by tumor necrosis factor-α or Slug in HCT116 cells resulted in the dependence of tumor growth on ARHGEF5. In these mesenchymal-like cells, Akt was activated via ARHGEF5 and its activity was required for tumor growth. Analysis of a transcriptome data set revealed that the combination of ARHGEF5 upregulation and E-cadherin downregulation or Snail upregulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers. Taken together, our findings suggest that EMT-induced ARHGEF5 activation contributes to the progression of tumor malignancy. ARHGEF5 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of malignant tumors that have undergone EMT. PMID

  19. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy via epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Y; Onodera, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Nomimura, S; Kubo, Y; Nam, J-M; Kajiwara, K; Nada, S; Oneyama, C; Sabe, H; Okada, M

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumor cells often acquire malignant properties, such as invasion/metastasis and uncontrolled cell growth, by undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms by which EMT contributes to malignant progression remain elusive. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy in a manner dependent on EMT status. We previously identified ARHGEF5, a member of the Dbl family of GEFs, as a multifunctional mediator of Src-induced cell invasion and tumor growth. In the present study, ARHGEF5 was upregulated during tumor growth factor-β-induced EMT in human epithelial MCF10A cells, and promoted cell migration by activating the Rho-ROCK pathway. ARHGEF5 was necessary for the invasive and in vivo metastatic activity of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. These findings underscore the crucial role of ARHGEF5 in cell migration and invasion/metastasis. An in vivo tumorigenesis assay revealed that ARHGEF5 had the potential to promote tumor growth via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. However, ARHGEF5 was not required for tumor growth in epithelial-like human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas the growth of mesenchymal-like SW480 and SW620 cells depended on ARHGEF5. Induction of EMT by tumor necrosis factor-α or Slug in HCT116 cells resulted in the dependence of tumor growth on ARHGEF5. In these mesenchymal-like cells, Akt was activated via ARHGEF5 and its activity was required for tumor growth. Analysis of a transcriptome data set revealed that the combination of ARHGEF5 upregulation and E-cadherin downregulation or Snail upregulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers. Taken together, our findings suggest that EMT-induced ARHGEF5 activation contributes to the progression of tumor malignancy. ARHGEF5 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of malignant tumors that have undergone EMT. PMID

  20. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  1. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, Fnu; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  2. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  3. Clinicopathologic Features of Colorectal Carcinoma in HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Carlie; Cavalcanti, Marcela S.; Daniel, Tanisha; Vakiani, Efsevia; Shia, Jinru; Sigel, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests differences in colo-rectal cancer in HIV-infected patients (HIV+) compared with HIV− patients. Microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in a subset of colorectal cancer, is present at a higher rate in certain cancers in HIV+ patients. Colorectal cancer with MSI share some characteristics with those reported for HIV+ colorectal cancer. On this premise, we studied clinical and pathologic features of HIV+ colorectal cancer and evaluated for MSI using matched HIV− colorectal cancer controls. Methods Two nested, matched cohorts were identified from a hospital-based cohort of colorectal cancer patients. HIV+ colo-rectal cancers were identified and random control patients were matched for selected characteristics. Mismatch repair protein (MMR) IHC was performed as the detection method for MSI. Variables were compared between cases and controls using fixed-effects logit modeling to account for matching. Results We included 184 colorectal cancer samples (38 HIV+, 146 HIV− control). Median patient age at colorectal cancer onset was 55. When compared with HIV− colorectal cancer, HIV+patients were more likely to have smoked (P = 0.001), have right-sided colorectal cancer (37% vs. 14%; P = 0.003), and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) above 50/10 high-power fields (21% vs. 7%). There was no difference in MMR protein expression (P = 0.6). HIV+ colorectal cancer patients had reduced overall survival (P = 0.02) but no difference in progression-free survival. Conclusions HIV+ patients developed colorectal cancer at a lower median age than population estimates, had a higher frequency of right-sided disease, and increased TILs, suggesting potential biologic differences compared with uninfected patients. Impact Clinicopathologic differences in colorectal cancer of HIV+ persons may have implications for tumor pathogenesis. PMID:27197294

  4. Bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy.

    PubMed

    Costello, L C; Franklin, R B

    1994-09-01

    Normal and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) prostate is characterized by the presence of extraordinarily high levels of citrate. Presumably, this results from the inability of the prostate epithelial cells to oxidize citrate due to a limiting mitochondrial (m-) aconitase. In contrast, prostate carcinoma (CA) is not characterized by high citrate levels. Malignant prostate epithelial cells apparently undergo a metabolic transformation from citrate-producing to citrate-oxidizing cells. A consequence of citrate production in normal and BPH cells is an inefficient and low level of ATP production. It is proposed that the process of malignancy necessitates an energy production that cannot be provided by citrate-producing cells. Consequently, the transformation of prostate epithelial cells to citrate-oxidizing cells which increases the energy production capability is essential to the process of malignancy and metastasis. The metabolic transformation likely occurs as a premalignant or early malignant stage. This bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy, if correct, will provide new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of CA. PMID:7520580

  5. [Thoracoscopy in malignant pleural effusions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Chen, Y; Tu, C

    1996-03-01

    To assess the value of thoracoscopy in malignant pleural effusions, the procedure and results of thoracoscopy by using a fiberoptic bronchoscope and a rigid cold-light thoracoscope in 130 cases with malignant pleural effusion are reported. The overall diagnostic rate was 91.5% (119/130). The malignant pleural mesothelioma in 24 cases and metastatic cancers in 95 cases were histopathologically confirmed. Talcum powder, tetracycline and Corynebacterium parvum were separately sprayed through thoracoscope into pleural cavity in 69, 10 and 10 patients, and the success rates of complete and lasting pleurodesis were 87.0%, 5/10 and 8/10 respectively. Postoperative complications included transient fever and chest pain, local subcutaneous emphysema in 6 cases and tumor seeding at thoracoscopy site in 4 cases. It is concluded that thoracoscopy is simple, safe, reliable and of high practical value in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions and in assessment before exploratory thoracotomy, and that transendoscopical administration of drugs for pleurodesis is a very effective method for controlling malignant pleural effusions. The efficacy of the talc poudrage is better than tetracycline and Corynebacterium parvum. PMID:9206045

  6. CA 72-4 compared with CEA and CA 19-9 as a marker of some gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J B; Royan, G P; Lakhwani, M N; Mahadaven, M; Timor, J

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare CA 72-4 with CEA and CA 19-9 in gastrointestinal malignancies. CA 72-4 was assayed by radioimmunoassay and CEA and CA 19-9 with the Abbott IMx analyser. The study included 52 patients with gastrointestinal cancer and 20 controls with benign gastrointestinal diseases. The 52 cases showed marker sensitivities of 39%, 49% and 35% for CA 72-4, CEA and CA 19-9, respectively, and 64% when the markers were combined. Marker expression in serum was highest in colorectal carcinoma followed by gastric and esophageal carcinoma. The sensitivities of the individual markers in colorectal, gastric and esophageal carcinomas, respectively, were: CA 72-4, 56%, 32% and 18%; CEA, 83%, 33% and 18%; CA 19-9, 53%, 25% and 18%. The sensitivity of the three markers in combination was 89%, 50% and 46% in colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancer, respectively. The specificity of CA 72-4, CEA and CA 19-9 was 100%, 72% and 86%, respectively. However, CA 72-4 is not a useful a marker for gastrointestinal cancers because of its poor sensitivity. CEA, which had the best overall sensitivity and a reasonable specificity, was the most useful single marker, especially for colorectal cancer. Whereas the single markers were not useful in gastric and esophageal cancer, the combination of the three may be.

  7. Immunotherapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Prevailing Challenges and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zumwalt, Timothy J; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurring or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have strikingly low long-term survival, while conventional treatments such as chemotherapeutic intervention and radiation therapy marginally improve longevity. Although, many factors involving immunosurveillance and immunosuppression were recently validated as important for patient prognosis and care, a multitude of experimental immunotherapies designed to combat unresectable mCRC have, in few cases, successfully mobilized antitumor immune cells against malignancies, nor conclusively or consistently granted protection, complete remission, and/or stable disease from immunotherapy – of which benefit less than 10% of those receiving therapy. After decades of progress, however, new insights into the mechanisms of immunosuppression, tolerance, and mutation profiling established novel therapies that circumvent these immunological barriers. This review underlines the most exciting methods to date that manipulate immune cells to curb mCRC, including adoptive cell therapy, dendritic cell vaccines, and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies – of which hint at effective and enduring protection against disease progression and undetected micrometastases. PMID:26441489

  8. Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma complicating ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Connell, W R; Talbot, I C; Harpaz, N; Britto, N; Wilkinson, K H; Kamm, M A; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1994-01-01

    This study examined three features associated with colorectal carcinoma complicating ulcerative colitis: (a) the distribution of 157 cancers in 120 patients with ulcerative colitis treated at St Mark's Hospital between 1947 and 1992; (b) the frequency at which dysplasia was found at a distance from the tumour in 50 total proctocolectomy specimens in which an average of 27 histology blocks were reviewed, and (c) the five year survival rate according to Dukes's stage and participation in a surveillance programme. Of 157 carcinomas, 88 (56%) occurred in the rectosigmoid, 19 (12%) in the descending colon or splenic flexure, and 50 (32%) in the proximal colon. Among the 120 patients, the rectum or sigmoid colon contained cancer in 81 (67.5%). Dysplasia was detected in 41 of 50 reviewed proctocolectomy specimens (82%). Dysplasia distant to a malignancy occurred in 37 (74%); two were classified indefinite, probably positive, 19 were low grade, and 16 were high grade; in 18 specimens there was an elevated dysplastic lesion. Survival was related to the Dukes's stage: about 90% of patients with Dukes's A or B cancer were alive at five years. The five year survival of 16 patients in whom cancer developed during surveillance was 87% compared with 55% of 104 patients who did not participate in surveillance (p = 0.024). PMID:7959198

  9. NF-κB Signaling Pathway, Inflammation and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Soly; Liu, Zhanjie; Wang, Lunshan; Zhang, Xiaoren

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence for a connection between inflammation and tumor development, and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a proinflammatory transcription factor, is hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Although the genetic evidence for the hypothesis has been lacking, recent papers have lent credence to this hypothesis. It has been reported that constitutive NF-κB activation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) increases risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the patients with the number of years of active disease. NF-κB activation might induce cellular transformation, mediate cellular proliferation, prevent the elimination of pre-neoplastic and fully malignant cells by up-regulating the anti-apoptosis proteins. Furthermore, NF-κB may contribute to the progression of CRC by regulating the expression of diverse target genes that are involved in cell proliferation (Cyclin D1), angiogenesis (VEGF, IL-8, COX2), and metastasis (MMP9). These findings implicate NF-κB inhibition as an important therapeutic target in CRC. However, due to lack of knowledge about the specific roles of different NF-κB subunits in different stage of carcinogenesis, and compounds to block specific subunits of NF-κB family, it will be a long time before the coming of targeting NF-κB in CRC therapy. PMID:19887045

  10. Colorectal carcinoma in a Southern Mediterranean country: The Libyan scenario

    PubMed Central

    Bodalal, Zuhir; Bendardaf, Riyad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the salient features of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Libya. METHODS: Patients records were gathered at the primary oncology clinic in eastern Libya for the period of one calendar year (2012). Using this data, various parameters were analyzed and age-standardized incidence rates were determined using the direct method and the standard population. RESULTS: During 2012, 174 patients were diagnosed with CRC, 51.7% (n = 90) male and 48.3% (n = 84) females. The average age was 58.7 (± 13.4) years, with men around 57.3 (± 13) years old and women usually 60.1 (± 13.8) years of age. Libya has the highest rate of CRC in North Africa, with an incidence closer to the European figures. The age-standardized rate for CRC was 17.5 and 17.2/100000 for males and females respectively. It was the second most common cancer, forming 19% of malignancies, with fluctuation in ranking and incidence in different cities/villages. Increasingly, younger ages are being afflicted and a higher proportion of patients are among the > 40 years subset. Nearly two-thirds presented at either stage III (22.4%) or IV (38.4%). CONCLUSION: Cancer surveillance systems should be established in order to effectively monitor the situation. Likewise, screening programs are invaluable in the Libyan scenario given the predominance of sporadic cases. PMID:24734155

  11. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiufeng; Li, Guodong; Dang, Shuwei; Zhou, Yuhui; Zeng, Kai; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  12. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of colorectal carcinoma: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, Ladislav; Svec, Alexandr; Lezal, Dimitrij; Zavadil, Jiri

    2003-10-01

    Diagnosis established by means of fluorescence spectroscopy is currently used in the field of urology and bronchology. Its major advantage is that it allows the diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia or malignant proliferation even if routine diagnostic endoscopy fails to reveal any macroscopic changes. The authors present results of their observations that deal with fluorescence diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma. They examined the wet microscopic mounts of healthy colon mucosa and compared them to that prepared from colon mucosa affected by adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was verified by using clinical and histology means. Fluorescence spectra of tissue samples, excited by means of 488 and 514.5 nm lines of Ar ion laser and/or by He-Ne laser line 632.8 nm, have been studied. This study demonstrated differences in both the spectral shape and in the signal intensity (at unchanged spectral shape) of photoluminescence spectra emitted from tissue affected by adenocarcinoma as compared to that of healthy colon mucosa. The results encourage us to continue the study aimed at development of the diagnostic system usable in the clinical practice.

  13. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  14. Immunohistochemical Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 in Human Colorectal Adenomas Using Specified Automated Cellular Image Analysis System: A Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Ban J.; Ali, Hussam H.; Hussein, Alaa G.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: To evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) in colorectal adenomas, and to correlate this expression with different clinicopathological parameters. Patients and Methods: The study was retrospectively designed. Thirty three paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenoma and 20 samples of non-tumerous colonic tissue taken as control group were included in the study. MMP-7 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry method. The scoring of immunohistochemical staining was conducted utilizing a specified automated cellular image analysis system (Digimizer). Results: The frequency of positive immunohistochemical expression of MMP-7 was significantly higher in adenoma than control group (45.45% versus 10%) (P value < 0.001). Strong MMP-7 staining was mainly seen in adenoma cases (30.30%) in comparison with control (0%) the difference is significant (P < 0.001). The three digital parameters of MMP-7 immunohistochemical expression (Area (A), Number of objects (N), and intensity (I)) were significantly higher in adenoma than control. Mean (A and I) of MMP-7 showed a significant correlation with large sized adenoma (≥ 1cm) (P < 0.05), also a significant positive correlation of the three digital parameters (A, N, and I) of MMP-7 expression with villous configuration and severe dysplasia in colorectal adenoma had been identified (P < 0.05). Conclusion: MMP-7 plays an important role in the growth and malignant conversion of colorectal adenomas as it is more likely to be expressed in advanced colorectal adenomatous polyps with large size, severe dysplasia and villous histology. The use of automated cellular image analysis system (Digmizer) to quantify immunohistochemical staining yields more consistent assay results, converts semi-quantitative assay to a truly quantitative assay, and improves assay objectivity and reproducibility. PMID:23319034

  15. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  16. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Fayez; Al Jerf, Feras; Al-Halabi, M. H. D. Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR) and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE) and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families. PMID:23737765

  17. The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

  18. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  19. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cipe, Gokhan; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Firat, Deniz; Bektasoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex and vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26483877

  20. Gastrointestinal malignancy and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria T; Peek, Richard M

    2014-05-01

    Microbial species participate in the genesis of a substantial number of malignancies-in conservative estimates, at least 15% of all cancer cases are attributable to infectious agents. Little is known about the contribution of the gastrointestinal microbiome to the development of malignancies. Resident microbes can promote carcinogenesis by inducing inflammation, increasing cell proliferation, altering stem cell dynamics, and producing metabolites such as butyrate, which affect DNA integrity and immune regulation. Studies in human beings and rodent models of cancer have identified effector species and relationships among members of the microbial community in the stomach and colon that increase the risk for malignancy. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome, or the immune response to such bacteria, could be developed to prevent or treat certain gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:24406471

  1. Lenvatinib and Capecitabine in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Advanced Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Malignant Neoplasms of Bone and Articular Cartilage; Malignant Neoplasms of Digestive Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Eye Brain and Other Parts of Central Nervous System; Malignant Neoplasms of Female Genital Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Ill-defined Secondary and Unspecified Sites; Malignant Neoplasms of Independent (Primary) Multiple Sites; Malignant Neoplasms of Lip Oral Cavity and Pharynx; Malignant Neoplasms of Male Genital Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Mesothelial and Soft Tissue; Malignant Neoplasms of Respiratory and Intrathoracic Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Thyroid and Other Endocrine Glands; Malignant Neoplasms of Urinary Tract

  2. [Palliative surgery for malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced and recurrent gastroenterological cancer].

    PubMed

    Kitani, Kotaro; Yukawa, Masao; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Tsujie, Masanori; Hara, Joji; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Sato, Katsuaki; Isono, Sayuri; Kawai, Kenji; Miura, Ken; Watatani, Masahiro; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    We report the outcomes of palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced gastroenterological cancer. We studied 20 patients who had undergone palliative surgery over 3 years. We analyzed the clinical findings, surgical procedure, postoperative clinical course, and prognosis. The origin of the patients was colorectal cancer( 9 cases), gastric cancer( 4 cases), uterine cancer( 3 cases), pancreatic cancer( 2 cases), bladder( 1 case), and anal cancer (1 case). Small bowel obstruction was noted in 8 cases and colorectal obstruction was noted in 14 cases. Colostomy was performed in 13 cases, resection and reconstruction were performed in 6 cases, and bypass was performed in 4 cases. Ninety percent of the patients were able to eat solid food following the surgery, but 20% of the patients were forced to have bowel obstruction. The median survival time after palliative surgery was 3 (range, 0-15) months, and 6 patients (30%) died within 2 months. We concluded that palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction could improve the patients' quality of life. The decision for performing palliative surgery should be made while considering the patient's prognosis, wishes, and potential for symptom improvement. PMID:24393893

  3. Malignant hemangiopericytoma of pituitary fossa.

    PubMed

    Das, Prasenjit; Haresh, Kunhi P; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar; Sarkar, Chitra

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial hemangiopericytomas are rare tumors with aggressive behavior. Other than the meninges, this lesion has rarely been reported in periventricular and sellar region. We report a case of malignant hemangiopericytoma in sellar region in a 47-year-old male who presented with history of sudden onset of bilateral visual disturbances. To best of our knowledge, this is the second case report of malignant hemangiopericytoma in this location. As this intracranial lesion shows aggressive behavior, in the form of recurrence or extracranial metastasis in comparison to its extracranial counterparts, diagnosis should be made cautiously. PMID:20090235

  4. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  5. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed.

  6. Malignant Hypertension with Thrombotic Microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Mitaka, Hayato; Yamada, Yuji; Hamada, Osamu; Kosaka, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Naoki; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with malignant hypertension, acute kidney injury and mental deterioration was referred to our hospital. We initially observed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney damage, indicating he had thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). We considered TMA was caused by malignant hypertension and therefore did not start plasma therapy. The French TMA reference center reported that platelet counts and serum creatine levels have high values for predicting severe ADAMTS13 deficiency. The patient fully recovered from his illness after treatment with antihypertensive drugs and intermittent hemodialysis. This case might thus be useful to understand the proper differential diagnosis and treatment of TMA. PMID:27523008

  7. [Blood test for malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Junya; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-03-01

    Malignant lymphoma is a neoplastic disease that develops in the lymph system, which consists of various different subtypes. In addition, the differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma includes infections, autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, endocrine disorders, and so on. Therefore accurate diagnosis is very important to decide therapeutic strategy. Blood test is the most common examination in clinical practice and used extensively for evaluating etiology, pathology, disease state, efficacy of treatment and disease prognosis of lymphoma. We are required to understand the characteristics of blood examinations correctly and use them appropriately in daily medical practice. Here, we introduce some blood examinations used for treatment of lymphoma.

  8. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  9. Primary malignancy, secondary malignancy and semimalignancy of bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Uehlinger, E

    1976-01-01

    1. Bone tumors in contrast to tumors in soft tissue, show a wide variety of clinical behavior qualified by the expressions semimalignancy, low grade of malignancy, sarcomatous degeneration and primarily benign bone tumors and bone lesions. 2. The term semimalignancy is characterized by local invasive and destructive tumor growth with a tendency to recur locally but no hematogeneous spreading. Semimalignancy requires wide en-bloc resection of amputation. 3. The term low grade malignancy is used to describe a tumor of very slow growth and with very late metastasis. Low-grade malignancy requires resection with careful preservation of functional structures. 4. The term secondary malignancy means the sarcomatous degeneration of a primarily benign lesion or bone tumor. This transformation is enhanced by irradiation and probably by acceleration of the normal turnover of bone tissue. In Paget's disease sarcomatous degeneration is to be expected in 2 percent of cases and in fibrous dysplasia in 0.5 percent of cases. 5. Sarcomatous degeneration of bone infarcts is rare, but an increase is to be expected due to an increased frequency of bone infarcts caused by long-term treatment with cortisone. 6. Primary bone tumors and recurrences show the same structure and cytology. In a minority of cases the recurrences are less differentiated; in a very few cases the recurrences are more highly differentiated and have a better prognosis than the initial lesion. PMID:1070716

  10. Perendoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy of colorectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, Riccardo; Marino, Saverio; Erroi, F.; Angriman, Imerio; Donadi, Michele; Paratore, S.; Scuderi, G.; D'Amico, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The range of application of Nd:YAG laser is now wide and of particular interest in the treatment of neoplastic lesions of the large bowel, both benign and malignant, which, besides the debilitating of vegetative lesions, may also provide a good hemostasis of the bleeding ones. Yag laser treatment of malignancies is indicated in patients not suitable for surgery due to the extent of the disease or to the high anesthesiologic/surgical risk. The treatment of choice for benign neoplasms is represented by endoscopic polypectomy, being Yag laser therapy reserved to patients with very large polyps and with a high anesthesiologic risk. Yag laser therapy is also recommended in teleangiectasies with active or previous bleeding, since it allows the complete ablation of such lesions with subsequent outstanding hemostasis. Furthermore this treatment may be advantageously associated to other operative endoscopic procedures, such as diatermotherapy, dilatation and injection therapy. It is also to be outlined that Yag laser therapy is currently used to cure benign diseases and for the palliation of advanced cancer in inoperable patients. Our laser instrument is an Nd:Yag laser MBB Medilas 2 with maximum power of 100 watts at the tip, with 'non-contact' laser fibers. We use flexible optic fiberendoscopes of several sizes, according to the type of lesion to be treated. Moreover we have employed both Savary dilators of progressive caliber from 5 to 15 mm and Rigiflex pneumatic balloons. Adequate bowel preparation by means of isosmotic solution was achieved in patients with non stenotic neoplasm, or evacuative enemas and fluid diet in patients with bowel neoplastic stenoses. The patients were premedicated with benzodiazepines. Stenotic malignant lesions have been treated with endoscopic dilatation before laser treatment. At each session 4,000 - 8,000 joules of energy were administered; all patients received an average of 5 - 6 laser sessions. Followup laser sessions have then been

  11. Progression of colorectal cancer is associated with multiple tumor suppressor gene defects but inhibition of tumorigenicity is accomplished by correction of any single defect via chromosome transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, M.C.; Fasching, C.L.; Stanbridge, E.J. ); Cho, K.; Levy, D.B.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. ); Paraskeva, C. )

    1992-03-01

    Colorectal cancer has been associated with the activation of ras oncogenes and with the deletion of multiple chromosomal regions including chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. The candidate tumor suppressor genes from these regions are, respectively, MCC and/or APC, p53, and DCC. In order to further understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in tumor progression and, thereby, of normal cell growth, it is important to determine whether defects in one or more of these loci contribute functionally in the progression to malignancy in colorectal cancer and whether correction of any of these defects restores normal growth control in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, the authors have utilized the technique of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to introduce normal human chromosomes 5, 17, and 18 individually into recipient colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, chromosome 15 was introduced into SW480 cells as an irrelevant control chromosome. While the introduction of chromosome 17 into the tumorigenic colorectal cell line SW480 yielded no viable clones, cell lines were established after the introduction of chromosomes 15, 5, and 18. SW480-chromosome 5 hybrids are strongly suppressed for tumorigenicity, while SW480-chromosome 18 hybrids produce slowly growing tumors in some of the animals injected. Hybrids containing the introduced chromosome 5 express the APC gene present on that chromosome as well as the endogenous mutant transcript. Expression of the putative tumor suppressor gene, DCC, was seen in the clones containing the introduced chromosome 18 but was significantly reduced in several of the tumor reconstitute cell lines. Our findings indicate that while multiple defects in tumor suppressor genes seem to be required for progression to the malignant state in colorectal cancer, correction of only a single defect can have significant effects in vivo and/or in vitro.

  12. Report From the Jerusalem Workshop on Lynch Syndrome-Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, C. Richard; Shike, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    A Workshop was held in Jerusalem, Israel, on October 26 and 27, 2009 to discuss the management of Lynch syndrome-hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (CRC), with the primary goal to develop consensus for the optimal management of this disease. A second goal was to identify areas of research with the potential to advance the clinical management of Lynch syndrome. The perspectives and recommendations from the workshop are meant to be a platform for discussion and deliberation. The Workshop was organized by Moshe Shike (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York) and sponsored by The Colon Cancer Foundation. More details of each presentation are available in an on-line supplement. PMID:20416305

  13. Single-site Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery Provides Similar Clinical Outcomes Compared to Standard Laparoscopic Surgery: An Analysis of 626 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, William; Messaris, Evangelos; Berg, Arthur S.; Stewart, David B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Compared to standard laparoscopy, single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgerymay potentially offer advantages by creating fewer surgical incisions and providing a multi-functional trocar. Previous comparisons, however, have been limited by small sample sizes and selection bias. OBJECTIVE To compare 60-day outcomes between standard laparoscopic and single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery patients undergoing elective and urgent surgeries. DESIGN This was an unselected retrospective cohort study comparing patients who underwent elective and unplanned standard laparoscopic or single-site laparoscopic colorectal resections for benign and malignant disease between 2008 and 2014. Outcomes were compared using univariate analyses. SETTING This study was conducted at a single institution. PATIENTS A total of 626 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Morbidity and mortality within 60 postoperative days. RESULTS 318 (51%) and 308 (49%) patients underwent standard laparoscopic and single-site laparoscopic procedures, respectively. No significant difference was noted in mean operative time (Standard laparoscopy 182.1 ± 81.3 vs. Single-site laparoscopy 177±86.5, p=0.30) and postoperative length of stay (Standard laparoscopy 4.8±3.4 vs. Single-site laparoscopy 5.5 ± 6.9, p=0.14). Conversions to laparotomy and 60-day readmissions were also similar for both cohorts across all procedures performed. A significant difference was identified in the number of patients who developed postoperative complications (Standard laparoscopy 19.2% vs. Single-site laparoscopy 10.7%, p=0.004), especially with respect to surgical-site infections (Standard laparoscopy 11.3% vs. Single-site laparoscopy 5.8%, p=0.02). LIMITATIONS This was a retrospective, single institution study. CONCLUSIONS Single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery demonstrates similar results to standard laparoscopic colorectal surgery in regards to

  14. [The reliability of the grading assessment of the biopsy samples in malignant colorectal neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Testa, T; Davini, M D; Ottonello, M; Capponi, G; Scarpettini, S; Beatini, M; Larghero, G C

    1990-04-01

    The authors evaluate the results of preoperative bioptic grading compared with those obtained from postoperative specimens. Altogether, there was nonagreement in 45% of cases; therefore there is the risk of underestimating the biological aggressiveness of the disease. In fact, 68% of patients who were assessed as G1 in preoperative staging were found to have a higher degree of neoplastic dedifferentiation.

  15. [Argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) as malignancy biomarkers in colorectal neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Santacroce, L; Bufo, P; Gagliardi, S; Mastropasqua, M G; Losacco, T

    2001-01-01

    The high incidence of intestinal cancer has aroused strong interest in researching and trying to discover its morphologic precursors. In this contest the study of nucleolar organizing regions could be interesting as prognostic factor for bowel neoplasm and useful for differential diagnosis of intestinal diseases. The Authors report on the results of their study performed on 30 selected samples from 6 different bowel lesions.

  16. Diet, microbiota, and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tözün, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world causing nearly 500,000 deaths every year. In addition to genetic background, environmental factors including diet and lifestyle are accepted as major contributors to adenoma and CRC development. Lifestyle factors include high BMI, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Growing interest and accumulating data on human microbiota implicate that host-microbe interplay has an important role in the development of metabolic, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases. Findings from recent studies suggest that colon cancer risk is determined by the interaction between diet and gut microbiota. Dietary changes affect gut microbiota and conversely microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. Identification of the microbial communities associated with carcinogenesis is of crucial importance. Nowadays, with the evolvement of culture-independent molecular techniques, it has become possible to identify main bacterial species in healthy individuals, inflammatory conditions, and CRC. Some recent studies have shown the differences in intestinal microbiota between colon cancer patients and healthy individuals. Animal studies have provided a better understanding of interaction between pathobionts and symbionts in the development of colon cancer. There is no single causative organism identified in CRC; however, there is strong evidence that reduction of protective bacteria, increase in some bacteria (ie, fusobacterium members; Bacteroides/Prevotella), and age-related changes in microbiota have an impact on adenoma or cancer development. Future studies will enable us to understand procarcinogenic and anticarcinogenic mechanisms and give insights to rational manipulation of the microbiota with prebiotics, probiotics, or dietary modifications. PMID:25291132

  17. Malignant transformation of uterine leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Al Ansari, Afaf A.; Al Hail, Fatima A.; Abboud, Emad

    2012-01-01

    A rare case of malignant transformation of uterine leiomyoma is reported. A 54 year old lady, nulliparous and 2 years postmenopausal presented to gynecology clinic with a pelvi – abdominal mass and ultrasound scan suggestive of multiple uterine fibroid. Total abdominal hysterectomy performed. Histopathology report showed leiomyosarcomative changes from benign leiomyoma within the huge mass. PMID:25003044

  18. Retroperitoneal malignant cyst. Case report.

    PubMed

    Melén, K; Sandermann, J; Stubberöd, A; Boiesen, P

    1991-10-01

    Forty years after removal of a benign mucinous cyst from the left retroperitoneal space, a malignant cyst with both sarcomatous and carcinomatous components was removed from the same site in a 75-year-old woman. Within 6 months the lesion recurred as a carcinoma penetrating the left colon and the abdominal wall.

  19. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  20. Malignant histiocytosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Court, E A; Earnest-Koons, K A; Barr, S C; Gould, W J

    1993-11-01

    A 13-year-old male domestic shorthair cat was found to have normocytic hypochromic regenerative anemia, lymphopenia, eosinopenia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Transfusions of packed RBC failed to maintain the PCV above 13% for > 8 hours. The cat was euthanatized. At necropsy, the spleen liver, lymph nodes, and bone marrow were infiltrated with malignant histiocytes undergoing erythrophagocytosis.

  1. Risk and surveillance of individuals with heritable factors for colorectal cancer. WHO Collaborating Centre for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, R. W.; Bishop, D. T.; Lynch, H. T.; Rozen, P.; Winawer, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Heritable and genetic factors pertinent to colon cancer can be divided into three categories: inherited syndromes, genetic epidemiology, and molecular genetics. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Gardner syndrome (GS) are rare dominantly inherited syndromes characterized by hundreds to thousands of colonic adenomatous polyps. Colon cancer occurs at a young age in both diseases unless the colon is removed. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and familial juvenile polyposis are inherited hamartomatous polyposis conditions with a less dramatic, but definite, increased risk for colon cancer. These four polyposis syndromes together account for less than 1% of cases of colon malignancy. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a dominantly inherited form of colon cancer characterized by an early age of onset and a predilection for proximal colonic tumours. Multiple primary malignancies are frequently observed and one or several adenomatous polyps are often present in affected individuals; 4-6% of colon cancer cases occur in relationship to this syndrome. Genetic epidemiological studies have consistently shown that first-degree relatives of persons with colon cancer have a twofold to threefold increased risk of having colon malignancy. More recent studies have found a similar risk among relatives of those with adenomatous polyps. Studies of colon cancer and adenomatous polyps in pedigrees have further demonstrated that this familial clustering probably occurs on the basis of partially penetrant inherited susceptibilities. These inherited susceptibilities probably interact with environmental factors to give rise to polyp growth and finally colon cancer. Molecular studies have begun to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of colon cancer at the DNA level. The germinal mutation of FAP and GS has been localized to the long arm of chromosome 5. Tissue samples from "random" adenomatous polyps and colon cancers have shown frequent and specific acquired DNA sequence deletions on

  2. Association between Gastroenterological Malignancy and Diabetes Mellitus and Anti-Diabetic Therapy: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Ming; Huang, Hui-Ling; Chu, Fang-Ying; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Hung-An; Chu, Der-Ming; Wu, Li-Wei; Wang, Chung-Ching; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer incidence has been evaluated in limited kinds of cancer. The effect of anti-diabetic therapy (ADT) on carcinogenesis among diabetic patients is also unclear. Materials and Methods Using population-based representative insurance claims data in Taiwan, 36,270 DM patients and 145,080 comparison subjects without DM were identified from claims from 2005 to 2010. The association between the top ten leading causes of cancer-related death in Taiwan and DM was evaluated. Whether ADT altered the risk of developing cancer was also investigated. Results Incidence of cancer at any site was significantly higher in patients with DM than in those without (p<0.001). The risk of carcinogenesis imparted by DM was greatest in gastroenterological malignancies (liver, pancreas, and colorectal cancer) as well as lung, breast and oral cancer (p<0.001). Among the oral types of ADT, metformin decreased the risk of lung and liver cancer, but had less effect on reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. α-glucosidase inhibitor decreased the risk of developing liver, colorectal, and breast cancer. Apart from intermediate-acting insulin, rapid-acting, long-acting, and combination insulin treatment significantly reduced the overall cancer risk among all DM patients. In subgroup analysis, long-acting insulin treatment significantly decreased the risk of lung, liver, and colorectal cancer. Conclusion Our results supported the notion that pre-existing DM increases the incidence of gastroenterological cancer. ADT, especially metformin, α-glucosidase inhibitor, and long-acting insulin treatment, may protect patients with DM against these malignancies. It is crucial that oncologists should closely collaborate with endocrinologists to provide an optimal cancer-specific therapy and diabetic treatment to patients simultaneously with cancer and DM. PMID:25978841

  3. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  4. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting colorectal cancer, followed by white, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI), and American Indian/Alaska Native ( ... white, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander women. Sources: CDC’s National Program of Cancer ...

  5. Diagnostics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Main risk factors include advanced age, family history, male sex, and lifestyle factors. Screening can reduce incidence and death from colorectal cancer. Therefore, prevention and early detection are crucial in order to detect and remove pre-neoplastic adenomas and to detect cancers at early stages. Colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood tests are established tools for screening. Newer fecal immunochemical tests reveal higher sensitivities for advanced adenoma and cancer than guaiac-based hemoccult tests. Molecular stool and blood tests as well as virtual colonoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy are promising new developments so far not established as routine instruments for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and for adenoma removal. Prognosis is essentially dependent on the tumor stage at the time of the initial diagnosis. Proper staging based on imaging prior to therapy is a prerequisite. In rectal cancer, local staging is an essential requirement for the identification of appropriate candidates for neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27493942

  6. URINARY MUTAGENICITY AND COLORECTAL ADENOMA RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We investigated urinary mutagenicity and colorectal adenoma risk in a clinic-based, case-control study of currently nonsmoking cases (n = 143) and controls (n = 156). Urinary organics were extracted by C18/methanol from 12-h overnight urine samples, and mutagenici...

  7. [Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernardeau-Mozer, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2004-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) is an inductible isoenzyme of cyclooxygenase undetectable in normal colonic mucosa and overexpressed in 80% colonic tumor. Several works in vitro and in vivo showed that Cox2 plays a key role in the multistep process of colorectal tumorigenesis such apoptosis inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis induction. So that Cox2 represent a potential molecular target in colorectal management and specific Cox2 inhibitors may be useful as chemopreventive as well as therapeutic agent in humans. In animals study Cox2 inhibitors was shown to be effective and in humans Cox2 inhibitors are approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to endoscopic surveillance and surgery in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between Cox2/Cox2 inhibitors and differents signaling pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis and to precise their possible molecular mechanisms of action. This work although review clinicals data of their efficacy as chemopreventive agent as well as therapeutic in the differents group at risk for colorectal cancer. PMID:15239336

  8. Diet and supplements and their impact on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Mandair, Dalvinder

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death among men and women. It has been proposed that dietary factors are responsible for 70-90% of colorectal cancer and diet optimization may prevent most cases. Aim To evaluate the role of dietary components and supplements in colorectal cancer. Methods Bibliographical searches were performed in Pubmed for the terms “diet and colorectal cancer”, “diet and colon cancer”, “diet and rectal cancer”, “nutrition and colorectal cancer”, “probiotics and colorectal cancer”, “prebiotics and colorectal cancer”, “alcohol and cancer” and “colorectal cancer epidemiology”. Results Consumption of processed or red meat, especially when cooked at high temperatures may be associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. The evidence for dietary fibre is unclear but foods that contain high amounts of fibre are usually rich in polyphenols which have been shown to alter molecular processes that can encourage colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses provide evidence on the benefits of circulating, diet-derived and supplemented, vitamin D and Calcium. We also found that diets rich in Folate may prevent colorectal carcinoma. The evidence on dietary micronutrients such as Zinc and Selenium in association with colorectal cancer is not conclusive. It has been suggested that there may be a direct association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted a possible protective role of prebiotics and probiotics. Conclusions The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity and diabetes may often yield inconclusive results. Carefully designed randomized trials are recommended. PMID:24294513

  9. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon; Lee, Jeonghee; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shin, Aesun; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) has been recognized as one of the major malignancies in Korea. Analyses of dietary patterns can provide insight into the complex interactions of foods, nutrients, and biologically active components within a diet, which vary among populations. We aimed to investigate the associations between dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk in Koreans. In a study of 923 cases and 1846 controls, principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns based on 33 predefined food groups using a 106-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (SQFFQ). The associations between dietary patterns and CRC risk were assessed using binary and polytomous logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Three dietary patterns (traditional, Westernized, and prudent) were derived. The proportion of total variation explained by 3 patterns was 24.2% for men and 25.3% for women. The traditional and prudent patterns were inversely associated with CRC risk [OR and 95% CI for the highest intake tertile of pattern score vs. the lowest = 0.35 (0.27–0.46) and 0.37 (0.28–0.48), respectively], whereas the Westernized pattern showed a positive association, especially among women [OR = 2.13 (1.35–3.34) for the highest tertile vs. the lowest]. A decrease in CRC risk among those with the highest intake of the prudent pattern was observed in all anatomical subsites in both men [OR = 0.36 (0.19–0.68) for proximal colon; 0.21 (0.12–0.36) for distal colon; 0.28 (0.18–0.44) for rectum] and women [OR = 0.28 (0.11–0.71); 0.27 (0.13–0.54); 0.45 (0.25–0.83)]. Our results indicate that individuals who prefer the Westernized dietary pattern should be made aware of their increased CRC risk. The traditional dietary pattern and the prudent pattern, which are rich in fruits and dairy products, are recommended for the Korean population to prevent CRC. PMID:27336862

  10. All Trans-Retinoic Acid Mediates MED28/HMG Box-Containing Protein 1 (HBP1)/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Huang, Chun-Yin; Li, Chun-I

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin A is required for normal body function, including vision, epithelial integrity, growth, and differentiation. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a family member of vitamin A, has been explored in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of cancer. Dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and disrupted cadherin-catenin complex often contribute to colorectal malignancy. MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, is found highly expressed in breast and colorectal cancers. Our laboratory has also reported that MED28 regulates cell growth, migration, and invasion in human breast cancer cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of ATRA on MED28 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer. HCT116, HT29, SW480, and SW620, four human colorectal cancer cell lines representing different stages of carcinogenesis and harboring critical genetic changes, were employed. Our data indicated that regardless of genetic variations among these cells, suppression of MED28 reduced the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and nuclear β-catenin, but increased the expression of E-cadherin and HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) where HBP1 has been described as a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The reporter activity of an HBP1 promoter increased upon MED28 knockdown, but decreased upon MED28 overexpression. ATRA reduced the expression of MED28 and mimicked the effect of MED28 suppression in down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, ATRA can reverse the suppressive effect of MED28 on HBP1 and E-cadherin and inactivate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer, suggesting a protective effect of ATRA against colorectal cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1796-1803, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. All Trans-Retinoic Acid Mediates MED28/HMG Box-Containing Protein 1 (HBP1)/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Huang, Chun-Yin; Li, Chun-I

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin A is required for normal body function, including vision, epithelial integrity, growth, and differentiation. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a family member of vitamin A, has been explored in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of cancer. Dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and disrupted cadherin-catenin complex often contribute to colorectal malignancy. MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, is found highly expressed in breast and colorectal cancers. Our laboratory has also reported that MED28 regulates cell growth, migration, and invasion in human breast cancer cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of ATRA on MED28 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer. HCT116, HT29, SW480, and SW620, four human colorectal cancer cell lines representing different stages of carcinogenesis and harboring critical genetic changes, were employed. Our data indicated that regardless of genetic variations among these cells, suppression of MED28 reduced the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and nuclear β-catenin, but increased the expression of E-cadherin and HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) where HBP1 has been described as a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The reporter activity of an HBP1 promoter increased upon MED28 knockdown, but decreased upon MED28 overexpression. ATRA reduced the expression of MED28 and mimicked the effect of MED28 suppression in down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, ATRA can reverse the suppressive effect of MED28 on HBP1 and E-cadherin and inactivate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer, suggesting a protective effect of ATRA against colorectal cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1796-1803, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660958

  12. [Intracytoplasmic lumina of benign and malignant breast diseases--a light and electron microscopic study].

    PubMed

    Gu, C M

    1990-07-01

    Intracytoplasmic lumina (ICLs) of 70 cases with breast carcinoma and 29 cases with benign breast diseases were observed by light and electron microscopy. ICLs were morphologically divided into two types. Type A was characterized by the presence of secretory materials stained with eosin in the lumen and Type B by the cytoplasmic vacuoles under light microscope. Electron microscopic observation on Type A ICLs showed numerous filiform microvilli projecting towards the lumen and various amounts of secretory materials in the lumen. Type B of ICLs only had scanty and short microvilli and rarely secretory materials in the lumen. The results indicated that: 1. The frequency of ICLs in breast cancer was significantly higher than that in benign breast disease (P less than 0.01). 2. The frequency of ICLs in breast cancer showed strong negative correlation with its histological grades but not with its histological types. 3. ICLs had similar frequency under both light and electron microscopes. As a relatively specific structure in breast carcinoma cells, ICLs may be helpful in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma and establishment of the breast origin for metastatic carcinoma. PMID:2176965

  13. [Malignant pleomorphic adenoma of the palate].

    PubMed

    Martín Vázquez, C; Muñoz Colado, M; Lorente Tortosa, J M; Abad Róyo, J M; Alvarez Montero, O L

    1998-03-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma or mixed tumor is the most common benign neoplasm of the minor salivary glands. These tumors rarely have malignant features. Three varieties are differentiated by histological features and tumor behavior. Whether malignant tumors develop on benign adenomas or are malignant from onset is still not known. A malignant mixed tumor of the minor salivary glands of the palate is reported. The difficulty of histological diagnosis, in spite of immunohistochemical techniques, is emphasized and the surgical treatment is described.

  14. Implementation Intentions and Colorectal Screening

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.; Epp, Aaron; James, Aimee; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Geana, Mugur; Born, Wendi; Engelman, Kimberly K.; Shellhorn, Jeremy; Hester, Christina M.; LeMaster, Joseph; Buckles, Daniel; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations experience disproportionate colorectal cancer (CRC) burden and poorer survival. Novel behavioral strategies are needed to improve screening rates in these groups. Purpose To test a theoretically based “implementation intentions” intervention for improving CRC screening among unscreened adults in urban safety-net clinics. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting/participants Adults (N=470) aged ≥50 years, due for CRC screening, from urban safety-net clinics were recruited. Intervention The intervention (conducted in 2009–2011) was delivered via touchscreen computers that tailored informational messages to decisional stage and screening barriers. The computer then randomized participants to generic health information on diet and exercise (Comparison group) or “implementation intentions” questions and planning (Experimental group) specific to the CRC screening test chosen (fecal immunochemical test or colonoscopy). Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was completion of CRC screening at 26 weeks based on test reports (analysis conducted in 2012–2013). Results The study population had a mean age of 57 years, and was 42% non-Hispanic African American, 28% non-Hispanic white, and 27% Hispanic. Those receiving the implementation intentions–based intervention had higher odds (AOR=1.83, 95% CI=1.23, 2.73) of completing CRC screening than the Comparison group. Those with higher self-efficacy for screening (AOR=1.57, 95% CI=1.03, 2.39), history of asthma (AOR=2.20, 95% CI=1.26, 3.84), no history of diabetes (AOR=1.86, 95% CI=1.21, 2.86), and reporting they had never heard that “cutting on cancer” makes it spread (AOR=1.78, 95% CI=1.16, 2.72) were more likely to complete CRC screening. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that programs incorporating an implementation intentions approach can contribute to successful completion of CRC screening even among very low-income and

  15. Surgical quality in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Joseph M.; Williams, Nadia; Leake, Pierre-Anthony; Ferron-Boothe, Doreen; Meeks-Aitken, Nicola; Mitchell, Derek I.; McFarlane, Michael E.; East, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the quality of surgical management offered to patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as measured by adequacy of nodal resections and compare variations across the major hospitals in Jamaica. Method Data was obtained from the CRC Registry of patients diagnosed and treated surgically for CRC during the 3-year period commencing January 1, 2011. Variables analyzed included tumor site, stage and number of lymph nodes resected across hospitals. Results During the period under review 60% (349) of 586 patients had resections and formed the basis of this study. Of these 49% were treated at the UHWI, 27% from the KPH and STH, 15% from CRH and MRH and 8% from a private laboratory (DPS). Patient distribution was similar at UHWI compared to the others with mean age (61 vs 62) and with slightly more women having surgery (53% Vs 54%) (UHWI vs Others). For tumor grade, margin status, lymphovascular and depth of invasion (majority T3) there was no difference between UHWI and the other sites, although a smaller percentage of tumors treated at UHWI had Crohn's like reaction (p = 0.01). There was a larger proportion of sigmoid cancer at UHWI while the reverse trend was seen in cancers of the rectum (p = 0.027). The tumors treated at UHWI have a larger median number of regional nodes when compared to the other facilities (14 vs 10; p < 0.001) and also more likely to have positive nodes, as were women and younger patients. Comparison across facilities revealed that the proportion of tumors classed as well differentiated, circumferential margin involvement, and having lymphovascular invasion were higher for specimens processed at the private facility (p = 0.021, 0.035, 0.01 respectively). Histopathology reports of tumors treated at UHWI and DPS had median 14 and 18 nodes respectively while at NPH laboratory and CRH they were 9 and 10 respectively (p < 0.001), whilst those of the ascending, descending, sigmoid colon and rectum had median 15, 11, 13, 11

  16. Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) can be a useful indicator to determine prognosis of patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Tadahiro; Matono, Rumi; Ijichi, Hideki; Ohga, Takefumi; Ezaki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based score, has been used to predict the biologic behavior of malignant tumors. The aim of the current study was to elucidate a further significance of GPS in colorectal carcinoma. Correlation of GPS and modified GPS (mGPS), which are composed of combined score provided for serum elevation of C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminemia examined before surgical treatment, with clinicopathologic features was investigated in 272 patients with colorectal carcinoma. Survival of GPS 1 patients was significantly worse than that of GPS 0 patients (P= 0.009), and survival of GPS 2 patients was significantly worse than that of GPS 1 patients (P < 0.0001). Similarly, survival of mGPS 1 patients was significantly worse than that of mGPS 0 patients (P = 0.009), and survival of mGPS 2 patients was significantly worse than that of mGPS 1 patients (P = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that GPS (P < 0.0001) as well as tumor stage (P= 0.004) and venous invasion (P = 0.011) were factors independently associated with worse prognosis. Both GPS and mGPS could classify outcome of patients with a clear stratification, and could be applied as prognostic indicators in colorectal carcinoma.

  17. KRAS gene mutations are more common in colorectal villous adenomas and in situ carcinomas than in carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the frequency of KRAS gene mutations during the critical transition from villous adenoma to colorectal carcinoma to assess whether the adenomas contain a KRAS mutation more frequently than carcinomas. We analyzed sporadic villous and tubulovillous adenomas, in situ carcinomas, and primary colorectal carcinomas from multiple patients. The cancers were further evaluated for mucinous status and microsatellite instability. Standard PCR molecular techniques were used for KRAS and microsatellite analyses. A KRAS mutation was found in 61.9% of 134 adenomas, 67.8% of 84 in situ carcinomas, and just 31.6% of 171 carcinomas. Our study clearly demonstrates that tubulovillous and villous adenomas, as well as both the benign and malignant parts of in situ carcinomas, are statistically more likely to contain a somatic KRAS gene mutation than colorectal carcinomas. This difference is confined to the non-mucinous and the microsatellite stable tumors. Our data support the possibility that non-mucinous and microsatellite stable carcinomas with wild-type KRAS gene may have had a mutation in the KRAS gene during their earlier stages, with the mutation lost during further growth. PMID:23565319

  18. Predictive value of HLA-G and HLA-E in the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhang-Yan; Lv, Yong-Gang; Wang, Lei; Shi, Sheng-Jia; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Guo-Xu; Wen, Wei-Hong; Yang, An-Gang

    2015-01-01

    HLA-G and HLA-E are non-classical HLA Ib molecules. Recently, increasingly more reports have shown that HLA-G is highly expressed in different malignancies. In this article, we detected the expression levels of HLA-G and HLA-E in primary colorectal cancer patients. Our results showed that 70.6% and 65.7% of the colorectal cancer tissues had positive HLA-G or HLA-E expression, respectively, and that 46.1% positively expressed both molecules. We also analyzed the correlations between the expression levels of HLA-G, HLA-E or both combined and the clinical outcomes of the patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis results showed that the expression levels of HLA-G or HLA-E alone and the combined expression of both molecules were all statistically correlated with the overall survival of colorectal cancer patients. Cox multivariate analysis showed that only HLA-G expression can serve as independent factor for OS. Our results also showed that the expression of HLA-E was significantly correlated with tumor metastasis.

  19. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  20. Endometrial metastasis of colorectal cancer with coincident endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Richard; Lopes, Tito; Das, Nagiindra; Mathew, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis to the uterine corpus is uncommon and secondary colorectal tumours of the endometrium are rare. We describe a uterine tumour with components of both primary endometrial and metastatic colorectal carcinomata. In this case, a 72-year-old obese woman presented with a 2-week history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum and weight loss. She had an abdominoperineal resection 3 years previously for a Dukes stage B rectal carcinoma. A transvaginal ultrasonography showed a thickened endometrium. Histology immunophenotyping showed a CK7+, CK20+, CA125− and CEA+ colorectal metastasis (a profile consistent with her previous cancer) associated with a primary CK7+, CK20−, CA125+ and CEA− endometroid endometrial adenocarcinoma. We conclude this represents endometrial metastasis of colorectal carcinoma with coincident primary endometrial adenocarcinoma. We speculate as to whether the endometrial carcinoma arose de novo or was induced by the colorectal metastasis, or whether the primary endometrial tumour provided a fertile site for the colorectal metastasis. PMID:22791861

  1. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  2. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  3. Protein Ubiquitination in Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yibin; Staudt, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human lymphoid malignancies inherit gene expression networks from their normal B-cell counterpart and co-opt them for their own oncogenic purpose, which is usually governed by transcriptional factors and signaling pathways. These transcriptional factors and signaling pathways are precisely regulated at multiple steps, including ubiquitin modification. With a function involved in almost all cellular events, protein ubiquitination plays a role in many human diseases. In the past few years, multiple studies have expanded the role of ubiquitination in the genesis of diverse lymphoid malignancies. Here we discuss our current understanding of both proteolytic and nonproteolytic functions of the protein ubiquitination system and describe how it is involved in the pathogenesis of human lymphoid cancers. Lymphoid-restricted ubiquitination mechanisms, including ubiquitin E3 ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes, provide great opportunities for the development of targeted therapies for lymphoid cancers. PMID:25510281

  4. Recurrence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Blanco, Leticia; García-Prada, Hilario; Santamarina, Susana; Jiménez-Treviño, Luis; Bobes, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare idiosyncratic reaction associated with the use of neuroleptics that has an incidence of 0.02 to 3% among patients taking these drugs. This is a very serious complication with a mortality rate that reaches 10-20%. It is therefore very important to have high clinical suspicion and use appropriate criteria to objectify this clinical picture early, stopping the medication causing the picture and to avoid the subsequent complications as much as possible that would be responsible for both its mortality and sequels. We present that case of an 81-year old woman who was admitted to the Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (PHU) for a depressive episode with psychotic symptoms who developed a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) when Haloperidol was introduced. After its suspension and subsequent clinical recovery, antipsychotic treatment with Risperidone was reintroduced and she suffered a recurrence of NMS. Finally, significant improvement was achieved with several sessions of electroshock therapy (EST).

  5. PTK7 overexpression in colorectal tumors: Clinicopathological correlation and prognosis relevance

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiuyun; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Donghai; Guan, Xiaoya; Dong, Bin; Zhao, Min; Hao, Chunyi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has one of the highest mortality rates in the worldwide and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. Protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) is an inactive member of receptor protein tyrosine kinase (RPTK)-like molecules, which is involved in tumorigenesis of a variety of cancers. Our study aimed to investigate expression of PTK7 in colorectal tumors (including benign adenomas and malignant carcinomas), and its potential function in tumorigenesis and prognosis. A total of 209 CRC patients and 28 colonic adenoma patients were included in this study. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR were performed in 14 pairs of fresh frozen tissues to evaluate mRNA expression of PTK7. Expression of PTK7 protein in 209 CRC tissues with paired non-cancerous mucosa and 28 adenoma specimens were tested using immunohistochemistry. The expression difference and its correlation with clinicopathological features and overall survival were assessed by SPSS statistics (version 22). P<0.05 was considered significant. RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR showed a higher expression of PTK7 mRNA in CRC compared with non-tumorous mucosa (4.87±3.71 vs. 1.33±1.05; P<0.001). PTK7 expression was significantly higher in adenoma (75%) and CRC (68.3%) than in non-tumorous mucosa (P<0.001). PTK7 expression was correlated with tumor differentiation (P=0.027), lymph node metastasis (P=0.005), distant metastasis (P=0.001) and TNM stage (P=0.028) of CRC patients. Significant correlation between PTK7 overexpression and favorable overall survival of CRC patients was observed (P=0.005). Therefore, it may act as a candidate biomarker to predict the occurrence and prognosis of colorectal tumor. PMID:27499181

  6. Adherence to colonoscopy recommendations for first-degree relatives of young patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme H; Riechelmann, Rachel P; Hoff, Paulo M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The American College of Gastroenterology recommends screening for first-degree relatives of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer before the age of 50. A colonoscopy is one of the most commonly recommended exams due to its specificity and the possibility to resect pre-malignant lesions. Nevertheless, the rate of physician adherence to this recommendation is unknown. METHODS: This transversal study was performed at a major cancer center in Brazil with 62 patients, aged 18 to 50, who completed a questionnaire on information received from their physicians regarding screening their first-degree relatives. We used the answers from patients who provided explicit consent. RESULTS: Two hundred and three patients were eligible to participate and 93 (45.8%) agreed to complete the questionnaire. Twenty-three questionnaires (24.73%) were returned and 39 were completed by telephone. Of the patients who answered the questionnaire, 39 (62.9%) had received a colonoscopy recommendation for their first-degree relatives and 23 (37.1%) were not informed of the recommendation. Among the patients who received the recommendations, 20.51% affirmed that all relatives completed the exam and 51.28% stated that no relatives completed the exam. DISCUSSION: The adherence rate of our physicians to the ACG guideline recommendations was 62.9%. Considering that our study was performed at a leading center for cancer treatment in Latin America, we had expected better adherence. The results show that adherence to the colorectal cancer screening recommendations for high-risk patients must be improved. PMID:26598083

  7. MLH1-Silenced and Non-Silenced Subgroups of Hypermutated Colorectal Carcinomas Have Distinct Mutational Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, Lawrence A.; Creighton, Chad J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shinbrot, Eve; Chang, Kyle; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Muzny, Donna; Sander, Chris; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15% of colorectal carcinomas (CRC) exhibit a hypermutated genotype accompanied by high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and defects in DNA mismatch repair. These tumors, unlike the majority of colorectal carcinomas, are often diploid, exhibit frequent epigenetic silencing of the MLH1 DNA mismatch repair gene, and have a better clinical prognosis. As an adjunct study to The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium that recently analyzed 224 colorectal cancers by whole exome sequencing, we compared the 35 CRC (15.6%) with a hypermutated genotype to those with a non-hypermutated genotype. We found that 22 (63%) of hypermutated CRC exhibited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 gene, a high frequency of BRAF V600E gene mutations and infrequent APC and KRAS mutations, a mutational pattern significantly different from their non-hypermutated counterparts. However, the remaining 13 (37%) hypermutated CRC lacked MLH1 silencing, contained tumors with the highest mutation rates (“ultramutated” CRC), and exhibited higher incidences of APC and KRAS mutations, but infrequent BRAF mutations. These patterns were confirmed in an independent validation set of 250 exome-sequenced CRC. Analysis of mRNA and microRNA expression signatures revealed that hypermutated CRC with MLH1 silencing had greatly reduced levels of WNT signaling and increased BRAF signaling relative non-hypermutated CRC. Our findings suggest that hypermutated CRC include one subgroup with fundamentally different pathways to malignancy than the majority of CRC. Examination of MLH1 expression status and frequencies of APC, KRAS, and BRAF mutation in CRC may provide a useful diagnostic tool that could supplement the standard microsatellite instability assays and influence therapeutic decisions. PMID:22899370

  8. Prospective study of intratumoral microvessel density, p53 expression and survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, P B; Eynden, G G Van den; Huget, P; Goovaerts, G; Weyler, J; Lardon, F; Marck, E Van; Hubens, G; Dirix, L Y

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant treatment of patients with colorectal cancer is hampered by a lack of reliable prognostic factors in addition to the clinicopathological staging system. A poorly defined but considerable fraction of Astler–Coller stage B patients will experience tumour recurrence, and some of the stage C patients will probably survive for a prolonged time after surgery without adjuvant treatment. Assessing parameters related to tumour angiogenesis has provided valuable prognostic information in different tumour types. The formation of new microvessels is part of the malignant phenotype in the majority of tumours. Alterations in tumour-suppressor genes, such as the p53 gene, or oncogenes, such as the ras gene, have been found to be responsible for changing the local balance of pro- and antiangiogenic factors in favour of the former. In this prospective study, intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) was assessed by immunostaining tissue sections for CD31 and counting individual microvessels in selected and highly vascular regions in specimens of 145 colorectal cancer patients. p53 protein overexpression was semiquantitatively determined after immunohistochemistry. In both uni- and multivariate analysis, high IMD was significantly associated with shorter survival in the patients undergoing surgery with curative intent (Astler–Coller stages A–C). p53 added prognostic power to IMD, both in Astler–Coller stage B and stage C patients. An association between IMD and mode of metastasis was also noted. High IMD was strongly associated with the incidence of haematogenous metastasis during follow-up, but not with the presence of lymphogenic metastasis observed at surgery. This study confirms the results of previous retrospective analyses of IMD and survival in colorectal cancer and warrants a clinical validation by randomizing stage B tumour patients with high IMD and p53 overexpression between adjuvant treatment or not. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888475

  9. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  10. Malignant schwannoma of kidney capsule.

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D; Beutler, W

    1992-11-01

    This report is of a malignant schwannoma originating in the capsule of the right kidney. Using sonography, nephroangiography, cavography, computer tomography, and bone scanning, metastases in the kidney or a retroperitoneal tumor could be diagnosed. After transperitoneal exploration, the right kidney and mesenteric metastases were removed. Due to tumor infiltration into the liver and tumor masses in the retroperitoneum, only nephrectomy and palliative excision of retroperitoneal metastases were done. Pulmonary metastases developed postoperatively, and the patient died three months after the operation.

  11. Malignant hemangiopericytoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Kudawara, I; Ueda, T; Araki, N; Mori, S

    2001-01-01

    A55-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of mass in the right breast. Incisional biopsy showed the tumor to be malignant hemangiopericytoma from its histology. The tumor showed low--intermediate density and peripheral contrast enhancement on CT, and inhomogeneous mixed-signal intensity both on T1W and T2W images, and peripheral enhancement with Gd-DTPA on MRI with no invasion of the duct.

  12. Circulating Non-coding RNA as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, Manuela; Lupini, Laura; Mangolini, Alessandra; Negrini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that colorectal cancer influences the types and quantity of nucleic acids - especially microRNAs - detected in the bloodstream. Concentration of circulating (cell-free) microRNAs, and possibly of other non-coding RNAs, could therefore serve as valuable colorectal cancer biomarker and could deliver insight into the disease process. This chapter addresses the recent discoveries on circulating microRNA and long non-coding RNA as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer. PMID:27573900

  13. RNF43 is frequently mutated in colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Yamauchi, Mai; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Cibulskis, Kristian; Saksena, Gordon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Qian, ZhiRong; Nishihara, Reiko; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Hahn, William C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2014-01-01

    We report somatic mutations of RNF43 in over 18% of colorectal adenocarcinomas and endometrial carcinomas. RNF43 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively regulates Wnt signaling. Truncating mutations of RNF43 are more prevalent in microsatellite-unstable tumors and show mutual exclusivity with inactivating APC mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas. These results indicate that RNF43 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in colorectal and endometrial cancers. PMID:25344691

  14. An analysis of malignant tumour incidence in the male population of Poland in the period 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Gałęziowska, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    In the period 2006–2010, the National Cancer Registry indicated a gradual increase in the incidence of malignant tumours among men, from 64,092 thousand in 2006 to 70,024 thousand in 2010. In the reference period, the number of deaths due to malignant tumours among men oscillated around 52 thousand. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of malignant tumours in the male population of Poland in the period 2006–2010. The study material comprised data obtained from the National Cancer Registry and from the Central Statistical Office, available on the websites of these institutions. The malignant-tumour incidence rate among the male population in 2006–2010 showed a slow but steady growth, while the death rate dropped slightly at the end of 2010. The hypothesis that the cancer-incidence risk grows with age has been proven, and a substantial increase in this risk is observed from the fourth decade of life. The most common malignant tumours in Poland in the analysed period included lung cancer, followed by prostate cancer and colorectal cancer. Future prophylactic and educational programmes should be addressed to men prior to reaching the age of increased cancer risk. PMID:26843846

  15. MicroRNAs in colorectal cancer: small molecules with big functions.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yu; Yang, Huiliang; Zhao, Linjie; Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Ren, Ning; Hu, Yuehong; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Zhou, Shengtao; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most lethal malignancy, with pathogenesis intricately dependent upon microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are short, non-protein coding RNAs, targeting the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR) of certain mRNAs. They usually serve as tumor suppressors or oncogenes, and participate in tumor phenotype maintenance. Therefore, miRNAs consequently regulate CRC carcinogenesis and other biological functions, including apoptosis, development, angiogenesis, migration, and proliferation. Due to its differential expression and distinct stability, miRNAs are regarded as molecular biomarkers (for diagnosis/prognosis) and therapeutic targets for CRC. Recently, a remarkable number of miRNAs have been discovered with implications via incompletely understood mechanisms in CRC. As further study of relevant miRNAs continues, it is hopeful that novel miRNA-based therapeutic strategies may be available for CRC patients in the future. PMID:25524553

  16. Recent insights into nanotechnology development for detection and treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Buddolla; Kim, Sanghyo; Lee, Kiyoung

    2016-01-01

    The global incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is 1.3 million cases. It is the third most frequent cancer in males and females. Most CRCs are adenocarcinomas and often begin as a polyp on the inner wall of the rectum or colon. Some of these polyps become malignant, eventually. Detecting and removing these polyps in time can prevent CRC. Therefore, early diagnosis of CRC is advantageous for preventive and instant action interventions to decrease the mortality rates. Nanotechnology has been enhancing different methods for the detection and treatment of CRCs, and the research has provided hope within the scientific community for the development of new therapeutic strategies. This review presents the recent development of nanotechnology for the detection and treatment of CRC. PMID:27330292

  17. Increased suppression of oncolytic adenovirus carrying mutant k5 on colorectal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Junkai; Xiao Tian; Gu Jinfa; Wei Na; He Lingfeng; Ding Miao; Liu Xinyuan

    2008-09-19

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in the development of a wide variety of malignant tumors. The approach of targeting antiangiogenesis has become an important field of cancer gene therapy. In this study, the antiangiogenesis protein K5 (the kringle 5 of human plasminogen) has been mutated by changing leucine71 to arginine to form mK5. Then the ZD55-mK5, which is an oncolytic adenovirus expressing mK5, was constructed. It showed stronger inhibition on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell. Moreover, in tube formation and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay, ZD55-mK5 exhibited more effective antiangiogenesis than ZD55-K5. In addition, ZD55-mK5 generated obvious suppression on the growth of colorectal tumor xenografts and prolonged the life span of nude mice. These results indicate that ZD55-mK5 is a potent agent for inhibiting the tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  18. Anesthesia and colorectal cancer - The perioperative period as a window of opportunity?

    PubMed

    Piegeler, T; Beck-Schimmer, B

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies largely contribute to cancer related deaths in the United States, with colorectal cancer representing the 3rd place of the ten leading entities of mortality due to cancer for both females and males. The majority of patients with GI tumors has to undergo surgery (either as a curative or palliative intervention) and are therefore also in need for a proper general and/or regional anesthesia. Recent findings have suggested that the type of anesthesia administered might have an impact on cancer recurrence and metastasis and thus this new field in the anesthesia world has become a largely studied topic. This review highlights current concepts and summarizes the evidence for an impact of the type of anesthesia on patient outcome after cancer surgery, suggesting the perioperative period might be a "window of opportunity" which should not be missed.

  19. Management of Inoperable Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    For patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy, radiation therapy has significant limitations but has been the mainstay of treatment. With standard photon radiation (X-rays), the 10-year loco-regional control (LRC) and overall survival rates are only ∼25%. Neutron radiation has potential biological advantages over photon radiation because it causes increased DNA damage, and studies of patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy have shown improved 6-year LRC and overall survival of ∼60%. However, neutron radiation may also increase the risk of late toxicities, especially central nervous system toxicities after treatment of tumors involving the base of the skull. Proton radiation has potential physical advantages due to minimal exit dose through normal tissues, and a recent study has demonstrated 90% 5-year LRC after combined proton/photon radiation for adenoid cystic carcinoma involving the base of the skull. Stereotactic radiosurgery has also been used in combination with neutrons or standard photons as a technique to boost the skull base. The use of concurrent chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer has been considered based on extrapolation of data on squamous cell carcinomas, but further data are needed on inoperable salivary gland malignancies. Newer targeted therapies are also under investigation, and clinical trial enrollment is encouraged. PMID:27093559

  20. TGFα expression in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mirzai, Bob; Fuller, Kathy; Erber, Wendy N

    2016-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor α (TGFα) is a peptide growth factor known to be expressed in normal haemopoiesis. It is also expressed in a range of epithelial neoplasms but has not been assessed in haemopoietic malignancies. We have performed an immunohistochemical evaluation of TGFα in acute and chronic myeloid malignancies. Methods TGFα expression was semiquantitatively assessed in 69 normal bone marrow trephines and 157 cases of myeloid malignancy using an immunohistochemical approach. Results Blast cells of myeloid origin in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), myelodysplasia and accelerated and blast phases of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) were TGFα positive. In acute promyelocytic leukaemia the neoplastic cells had significantly weaker TGFα expression than seen in other forms of AML. The blast cells in CML-accelerated and blast phases were positive with similar expression to AML. Conclusions TGFα is expressed in neoplastic myeloblasts and could, therefore, be used as blast cell biomarker in diagnostic haematopathology. In addition, TGFα immunohistochemistry may be of use in identifying a therapeutic target. PMID:26984929

  1. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  2. Recurrent malignant salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bigas, M A; Sako, K; Razack, M S; Shedd, D P; Bakamjian, V Y; Castillo, N B; Rao, U

    1989-10-01

    Recurrent salivary gland malignancies present difficult therapeutic decisions and poor prognosis in many instances, and treatment becomes of a palliative nature only. As many of the salivary gland malignancies we see are of the recurrent type, the following study was done to determine the efficacy of a vigorous attempt at retreatment. During the period January 1, 1960, through December 31, 1984, 352 patients with major and minor salivary gland tumors were evaluated at our institution. There were 149 benign lesions and 203 patients with malignant tumors. Of these, 99 patients had recurrent and metastatic tumors that had been treated initially elsewhere. Thirty-three of these patients were able to be treated with curative intent: surgery, 21; surgery plus radiation, 9; radiation therapy alone, 2; and radiation plus chemotherapy, 1. The 5 year survival with no evidence of disease was achieved in three patients with surgery alone and two patients with surgery plus radiation therapy. The group of five patients was comprised of two patients with adenoid cystic carcinomas of the parotid, one with intermediate grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid, one, sebaceous cell carcinoma of the parotid, and one, adenoid cystic carcinoma of an accessory salivary gland. The results of this study serve to re-emphasize the relative poor yield of attempts at retreatment of loco-regional recurrence of salivary gland tumors.

  3. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J M; Vyas, B R M

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport "synergism." PMID:23511582

  4. Loss of heterozygosity and PCR artifacts in a microsatellite analysis of psoriasis and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jeong Sun; Jo, Bo-Kyong; Park, Chul Jong; Yi, Jong Yuk; Lee, Jun Young; Rhyu, Mun-Gan

    2002-01-01

    Although a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is commonly observed using microsatellite markers in a cell-proliferating malignant disorder, controversial findings of psoriasis, a keratinocyte-outgrowth disease, remain to be explained. It was hypothesized that unstable natures of the microsatellite markers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) might give a rise to either a false-positive or -negative LOH. Twenty-one frozen skin tissues and 33 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives were obtained from patients with psoriatic plaques and colorectal cancers, respectively. In the frozen psoriatic skin, two of the 17 microsatellite markers selected from 11 chromosomal arms were associated with artifact LOHs that were not reproduced in repeated PCRs. The remaining 15 stable microsatellite markers with few PCR artifacts demonstrated a borderline-level LOH in cases with an ambiguous heterozygosity such as a juxtaposed allelic band. Infrequent LOHs (3 out of 242 heterozygous markers, 1.2%) were detected in psoriatic cases with two separate alleles. In colorectal cancers, a set of the 15 stable microsatellite markers identified a minimal borderline-level LOH at the cut-off point that was same with that of psoriasis. These results indicate that the selection of reproducible microsatellite sequences and the cautious criteria for informative heterozygosity are required to obtain the reliable LOH results from variable genomic DNAs, and that psoriatic lesions harbor few LOH. PMID:12378016

  5. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  6. Assessing the role of IL-35 in colorectal cancer progression and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi; Li, Tian-Yu; Liang, Yan-Fang; Wang, Hong-Mei; Bao, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wang, Wan-Dang; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bin-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Dong; He, Long; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent realization of Interleukin (IL)-35 in tumorigenesis, its exact impact on colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and prognosis, however, is yet to be elucidated clearly. We thus in the present report conducted comparative analysis of IL-35 levels between CRC patients and matched control subjects. IL-35 is highly expressed in all CRC tissues, which can be detected in vast majority of colorectal cancer cells. IL-35 levels in CRC lysates and serum samples are highly correlated to the severity of malignancy and the clinical stage of tumor. Particularly, a significant reduction for serum IL-35 was noted in patients after surgical resection, indicating that IL-35 promotes CRC progression associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistic study demonstrated a significant correlation between serum IL-35 levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T (Treg) cells in CRC patients, suggesting that IL-35 implicates in CRC pathogenesis probably by inducing Treg cells, while cancer cell-derived IL-35 may also recruit Treg cells into the tumor microenvironment in favor of tumor growth. Together, our data support that IL-35 could be a valuable biomarker for assessing CRC progression and prognosis in clinical settings.

  7. Applications of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant cytokines for the treatment of human colorectal and other carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Smalley, R.V.; Borden, E.C.; Martin, E.W.; Guadagni, F.; Roselli, M.; Schlom, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which recognize a human tumor antigen, termed tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72), have successfully been used to localize primary as well as metastatic colorectal tumor lesions in patients. The localization of the anti-TAG-72 MAbs has also been exploited intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma probe. That procedure, termed radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), has identified occult tumors which were not detected using standard external imaging techniques. In another clinical trial, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was administered intraperitoneally to patients diagnosed with either gastrointestinal or ovarian carcinoma with secondary ascites. Analysis of the tumor cells isolated from the malignant ascites revealed a substantial increase in TAG-72 expression on the surface of tumor cells isolated from seven of eight patients. The results provide evidence that the combination of an anti-carcinoma MAb with the administration of a cytokine, such as IFN-gamma, may be an effective approach for the detection and subsequent treatment, of colorectal carcinoma. 15 references.

  8. Indication for Endoscopic Resection of Submucosal Colorectal Carcinoma: Special Reference to Lymph Node Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruta, Osamu; Tsuji, Yuichiroh; Kawano, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Shiroh; Watanabe, Masahide; Nakahara, Keita; Tateishi, Hideo; Fujita, Mitsutake; Ban, Shigeki; Sata, Michio; Toyonaga, Atsushi; Morimatsu, Minoru

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between histological factors and lymph node metastasis in 77 lesions with submucosally invasive colorectal carcinomas to establish useful criteria for lesions in which endoscopic treatment alone results in cure of malignancy. There were positive correlations between histological factors, including the level of invasion, the histologic grade, presence or absence of lymphatic invasion, presence or absence of budding, and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.005, p < 0.01). The presence or absence of venous invasion did not influence lymph node metastasis. Laparoscopic surgery involving lymph node dissection should be indicated for sm1 carcinoma lesions with unfavorable histological factors. In lesions diagnosed as sm2 or sm3 prior to resection, intestinal resection involving lymph node dissection by laparoscopic surgery should be directly performed without endoscopic resection. In treating submucosally invasive colorectal carcinomas, the level of invasion can be clinically diagnosed, consequently endoscopic resection should be initially performed when lesions are evaluated as sm1 prior to resection. When histological investigation reveals sm1 carcinoma with histologic grade I (well-differentiated) or II (moderately-differentiated), and the absence of lymphatic invasion and budding, endoscopic treatment alone is sufficient. PMID:18493513

  9. Option appraisal of population‐based colorectal cancer screening programmes in England

    PubMed Central

    Tappenden, Paul; Chilcott, James; Eggington, Simon; Patnick, Julietta; Sakai, Hannah; Karnon, Jonathon

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the effectiveness, cost‐effectiveness and resource impact of faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) screening options for colorectal cancer to inform the Department of Health's policy on bowel cancer screening in England. Methods We developed a state transition model to simulate the life experience of a cohort of individuals without polyps or cancer through to the development of adenomatous polyps and malignant carcinoma and subsequent death in the general population of England. The costs, effects and resource impact of five screening options were evaluated: (a) FOBT for individuals aged 50–69 (biennial screening); (b) FOBT for individuals aged 60–69 (biennial screening); (c) once‐only FSIG for individuals aged 55; (d) once‐only FSIG for individuals aged 60; and (e) once‐only FSIG for individuals aged 60, followed by FOBT for individuals aged 61–70 (biennial screening). Results The model suggests that screening using FSIG with or without FOBT may be cost‐saving and may produce additional benefits compared with a policy of no screening. The marginal cost‐effectiveness of FOBT options compared to a policy of no screening is estimated to be below £3000 per quality adjusted life year gained. Conclusions Screening using FOBT and/or FSIG is potentially a cost‐effective strategy for the early detection of colorectal cancer. However, the practical feasibility of alternative screening programmes is inevitably limited by current pressures on endoscopy services. PMID:17142648

  10. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes. PMID:25221563

  11. Is the routine microscopic examination of proximal and distal resection margins in colorectal cancer surgery justified?

    PubMed

    Morlote, Diana M; Alexis, John B

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic examination of the proximal and distal resection margins is part of the routine pathologic evaluation of colorectal surgical specimens removed for adenocarcinoma. Anastomotic donuts are frequently received and microscopically examined. We examined 594 specimens received over a period of 10 years and found only 3 cases of definitive direct involvement of a longitudinal margin by carcinoma. All 3 cases also showed tumor at the margin grossly. One case of margin involvement by adenocarcinoma was found in which the tumor was grossly 1.7 cm away; however, this finding was likely a tumor deposit, as the patient had diffuse metastatic disease. All 242 anastomotic donuts examined were free of carcinoma. Our study suggests that the proximal and distal margins of colorectal cancer specimens need not be examined microscopically in order to accurately assess margin status in cases where the tumor is at least 2 cm away from the margin of resection. Also, in cases in which anastomotic donuts are included with the case, these should be considered the true margins of resection and may be microscopically examined in place of the bowel specimen margins when margin examination is needed. Anastomotic donuts need not be examined if the tumor is more than 2 cm away from the margin. An exception to this rule would be cases of rectal adenocarcinoma where neoadjuvant therapy is given prior to surgery. In these cases, mucosal evidence of malignancy may be absent and microscopic examination of the margins is the only way to assure complete excision. PMID:27402222

  12. [The Alliance for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in Spain. A civil commitment to society].

    PubMed

    Morillas, Juan Diego; Castells, Antoni; Oriol, Isabel; Pastor, Ana; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Echevarría, José Manuel; Caballero, Begoña; González-Navarro, Andrés; Bandrés, Fernando; Brullet, Enric; Iniesta, Antonio; Carballo, Fernando; Bouzas, Rosa; Ariza, Aurelio; Ibisate, Alfredo; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Escudero, Beatriz; Camacho, Silvia; Fernández-Marcos, Ana; González, Teresa; Quintero, Enrique; Lanas, Angel; Marzo, Mercè; Mascort, Juanjo; Andréu, Monserrat; Cerezo, Laura; Vázquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Borrás, Josep María; Salas, Dolores; Ascunce, Nieves; Portillo, Isabel; Herráiz, Mayte; Valle, María Luisa; Sotoca, Amalia; Nieto, Santiago; Hué, Carlos; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common malignant tumor in Spain, when men and women are considered together, and the second leading cause of cancer death. Every week in Spain over 500 cases of CRC are diagnosed, and nearly 260 people die from the disease. Epidemiologic estimations for the coming years show a significant increase in the number of annual cases. CRC is a perfectly preventable tumor and can be cured in 90% of cases if detected in the early stages. Population-based screening programs have been shown to reduce the incidence of CRC and mortality from the disease. Unless early detection programs are established in Spain, it is estimated that in the coming years, 1 out of 20 men and 1 out of 30 women will develop CRC before the age of 75. The Alliance for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in Spain is an independent and non-profit organization created in 2008 that integrates patients' associations, altruistic non-governmental organizations and scientific societies. Its main objective is to raise awareness and disseminate information on the social and healthcare importance of CRC in Spain and to promote screening measures, early detection and prevention programs. Health professionals, scientific societies, healthcare institutions and civil society should be sensitized to this highly important health problem that requires the participation of all sectors of society. The early detection of CRC is an issue that affects the whole of society and therefore it is imperative for all sectors to work together.

  13. Microsatellite Instability Status of Interval Colorectal Cancers in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kil Woo; Park, Soo-Kyung; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Choi, Kyu Yong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Jung, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyung Ook; Kim, Hungdai; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Park, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A subset of patients may develop colorectal cancer after a colonoscopy that is negative for malignancy. These missed or de novo lesions are referred to as interval cancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether interval colon cancers are more likely to result from the loss of function of mismatch repair genes than sporadic cancers and to demonstrate microsatellite instability (MSI). Methods Interval cancer was defined as a cancer that was diagnosed within 5 years of a negative colonoscopy. Among the patients who underwent an operation for colorectal cancer from January 2013 to December 2014, archived cancer specimens were evaluated for MSI by sequencing microsatellite loci. Results Of the 286 colon cancers diagnosed during the study period, 25 (8.7%) represented interval cancer. MSI was found in eight of the 25 patients (32%) that presented interval cancers compared with 22 of the 261 patients (8.4%) that presented sporadic cancers (p=0.002). In the multivariable logistic regression model, MSI was associated with interval cancer (OR, 3.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.38 to 11.05). Conclusions Interval cancers were approximately four times more likely to show high MSI than sporadic cancers. Our findings indicate that certain interval cancers may occur because of distinct biological features. PMID:27114419

  14. Lack of BRAFV600E mutation in stage I and II of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Mahsa; Kishani Farahani, Roya; Maftouh, Mina; Taleghani, Mohammad Yaghoob; Vahdatinia, Mahsa; Khatami, Fatemeh; Nazemalhosseini- Mojarad, Ehsan; Asadzadeh Aghdae, Hamid; Aboutorabi, Akram; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to explore the frequency of BRAFV600E mutation in Iranian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as its association with clinic pathological characteristic of patients. Background: CRC is the third leading cause of cancer related death. There is a growing body of data showing the association of BRAFV600E mutation with malignant transformation and clinical outcome of different tumors, including CRC. These findings suggest that BRAFV600E mutation can be used as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarker for management of cancer patients. Patients and methods: A total of 85 patients with sporadic tumor were recruited. BRAFV600E mutation was investigated using sequencing of extracted DNAs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues. Electropherograms were analyzed using Laser-gene 6 software. Results: More than 95% of patients were in stage I and II and none of them were in stage IV. Patients were mostly below 55 years old and tumors were dominantly located in the distal colon. Of note, no BRAFV600E mutations were detected in our population. Conclusion: Our results showed no V600E mutation in the BRAF gene in stage I and II of CRC patients. Further studies in multi-center settings are warranted to examine the prognostic and/or predictive value of this marker in different stages of colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27099668

  15. Colorectal cancer screening in African Americans: practice patterns in the United States. Are we doing enough?

    PubMed Central

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Jain, Alok; Waghray, Nisheet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common form of malignancy and a leading cause of death in the United States. Screening decreases CRC incidence and mortality. African Americans are at an increased risk of developing CRC, and recommendations are to initiate screening at the age of 45. This study aims to assess the rate of screening for colorectal cancer in African Americans between the ages of 45–49. Methods: African Americans between the ages of 45–49 were identified in the Explorys national database. Patients who completed a colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy or fecal occult blood test were identified and stratified by sex and insurance status. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 181 200 African Americans were identified as eligible for screening. Only 31 480 patients (17.4%) received at least one screening procedure for CRC. The majority of patients (66.7%) were screened via colonoscopy. African American females were more likely to complete a screening test (17.8% vs 16.7%; P < 0.01). The majority of patients (66.0%) who completed a screening test had private insurance. Conclusion: Race, gender and barriers to medical care contribute to disparities in CRC screening rates. Among African Americans, CRC screening remains suboptimal. Tailored public health initiatives, medical record alerts and improved communication between providers and patients are fundamental to addressing issues that impact poor adherence to CRC screening in African Americans. PMID:27071411

  16. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J M; Vyas, B R M

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport "synergism."

  17. Alternatively spliced variants of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 and tumour progression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D. C.; Fawcett, J.; Walsh, M. D.; Reeder, J. A.; Simmons, D. L.; Antalis, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    Increased expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CD44 family of cell adhesion molecules has been associated with tumour metastasis. In the present study, expression of alternatively spliced variants of CD44 and their cellular distribution have been investigated in human colonic tumours and in the corresponding normal mucosa, in addition to benign adenomatous polyps. The expression of CD44 alternatively spliced variants has been correlated with tumour progression according to Dukes' histological stage. CD44 variant expression was determined by immunohistochemisty using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific CD44 variant domains together with RT-PCR analysis of CD44 variant mRNA expression in the same tissue specimens. We demonstrate that as well as being expressed in colonic tumour cells, the full range of CD44 variants, CD44v2-v10, are widely expressed in normal colonic crypt epithelium, predominantly in the crypt base. CD44v6, the epitope which is most commonly associated with tumour progression and metastasis, was not only expressed by many benign colonic tumours, but was expressed as frequently in normal basal crypt epithelium as in malignant colonic tumour cells, and surprisingly, was even absent from some metastatic colorectal tumours. Expression of none of the CD44 variant epitopes was found to be positively correlated with tumour progression or with colorectal tumour metastasis to the liver, results which are inconsistent with a role for CD44 variants as indicators of colonic cancer progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8695347

  18. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T.; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J.M.; Vyas, B.R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport “synergism.” PMID:23511582

  19. Evaluation of immunological escape mechanisms in a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The local and systemic activation and regulation of the immune system by malignant cells during carcinogenesis is highly complex with involvement of the innate and acquired immune system. Despite the fact that malignant cells do have antigenic properties their immunogenic effects are minor suggesting tumor induced mechanisms to circumvent cancer immunosurveillance. The aim of this study is the analysis of tumor immune escape mechanisms in a colorectal liver metastases mouse model at different points in time during tumor growth. Methods CT26.WT murine colon carcinoma cells were injected intraportally in Balb/c mice after median laparotomy using a standardized injection technique. Metastatic tumor growth in the liver was examined by standard histological procedures at defined points in time during metastatic growth. Liver tissue with metastases was additionally analyzed for cytokines, T cell markers and Fas/Fas-L expression using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Comparisons were performed by analysis of variance or paired and unpaired t test when appropriate. Results Intraportal injection of colon carcinoma cells resulted in a gradual and time dependent metastatic growth. T cells of regulatory phenotype (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) which might play a role in protumoral immune response were found to infiltrate peritumoral tissue increasingly during carcinogenesis. Expression of cytokines IL-10, TGF-β and TNF-α were increased during tumor growth whereas IFN-γ showed a decrease of the expression from day 10 on following an initial increase. Moreover, liver metastases of murine colon carcinoma show an up-regulation of FAS-L on tumor cell surface with a decreased expression of FAS from day 10 on. CD8+ T cells express FAS and show an increased rate of apoptosis at perimetastatic location. Conclusions This study describes cellular and macromolecular changes contributing to immunological escape mechanisms during metastatic growth in a colorectal liver

  20. Correlations Between Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma and Other Cancers: An Ecological Study in Forty European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Pablo Fernandez-Crehuet; Serrano, Jose Luis Fernandez-Crehuet; Allam, Mohamed Farouk; Navajas, Rafael Fernandez-Crehuet

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of noncutaneous neoplasms does not seem to increase the risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma; however, it seems to be associated with the development of other hematological, brain, breast, uterine, and prostatic neoplasms. An ecological transversal study was conducted to study the geographic association between cutaneous malignant melanoma and 24 localizations of cancer in forty European countries. Methods: Cancer incidence rates were extracted from GLOBOCAN database of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We analyzed the age-adjusted and gender-stratified incidence rates for different localizations of cancer in forty European countries and calculated their correlation using Pearson's correlation test. Results: In males, significant correlations were found between cutaneous malignant melanoma with testicular cancer (r = 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68–0.89]), myeloma (r = 0.68 [95% CI: 0.46–0.81]), prostatic carcinoma (r = 0.66 [95% CI: 0.43–0.80]), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (r = 0.63 [95% CI: 0.39–0.78]). In females, significant correlations were found between cutaneous malignant melanoma with breast cancer (r = 0.80 [95% CI: 0.64–0.88]), colorectal cancer (r = 0.72 [95% CI: 0.52–0.83]), and NHL (r = 0.71 [95% CI: 0.50–0.83]). Conclusions: These correlations call to conduct new studies about the epidemiology of cancer in general and cutaneous malignant melanoma risk factors in particular. PMID:27217938

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin.

  2. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  3. Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cancer is largely considered to be a disease of genetic and environmental factors, increasing evidence has demonstrated a role for the microbiota (the microorganisms associated with the human body) in shaping inflammatory environments and promoting tumor growth and spread. Herein, we discuss both human data from meta'omics analyses and data from mechanistic studies in cell culture and animal models that support specific bacterial agents as potentiators of tumorigenesis-including Fusobacterium nucleatum, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, and colibactin-producing Escherichia coli. Further, we consider how microbes can be used in diagnosing colorectal cancer and manipulating the tumor environment to encourage better patient outcomes in response to immunotherapy treatments. PMID:27607555

  4. BRAF Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the deadliest cancer-related diseases. About 10% of CRC patients are characterized by a mutation in the B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene resulting in a valine-to-glutamate change at the residue 600 (V600E). This mutation is also present in more than 60% of melanoma patients. BRAF inhibitors were developed and found to improve patient survival; however, most patients at the end of the track ultimately develop resistance to these inhibitors. Melanoma patients benefit from the combination of BRAF inhibitors with mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, among others. Unfortunately, colorectal patients do not respond much efficiently, which suggests different resistance mechanisms between the two cancer types. This review aims at shedding light on recent discoveries that improve our understanding of the BRAF mutation biology in CRC. PMID:26396549

  5. Colorectal Cancer and Basement Membranes: Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Charalampos C.; Lazaris, Andreas C.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males and the second in females. In 2008, an estimated 1.2 million people were diagnosed with and 608,700 people died of CRC. Besides diagnosis and treatment, prognosis is an important matter for cancer patients. Today, clinicopathological correlations have many applications in cancer prognostication. Examples include the prediction of the medium patient survival and the screening for patients suitable for specific therapeutic approaches. Apart from traditional prognostic factors, such as tumor stage and grade, new markers may be useful in clinical practice. Possible markers may result from the study of basement membranes (BMs). BM seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, so BM alterations may have prognostic significance as well. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe BMs and their relationship with CRC, in the aspect of clinicopathological correlations. PMID:25614736

  6. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  7. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an established therapeutic technique for the treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Because it is typically completed as en bloc resection, this technique provides a complete specimen for precise pathological evaluation. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in treating colorectal neoplasms as with gastric cancers, due to its technical difficulty, longer procedure time, and increased risk of perforation. However, some devices that facilitate ESD and improve the safety of the procedure have been recently reported, and the use of the technique has gradually spread worldwide. Endoscopists who begin to perform ESD need to recognize the indications of ESD, the technical issue involved in this procedure, and its associated complications. This review outlines the methods and certain types of devices used for colorectal ESD. PMID:25333002

  8. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-09-21

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  9. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  10. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

  11. What's new in hereditary colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-11-01

    Precancerous polyposes other than classic familial adenomatous polyposis and the condition hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome, continue to present major diagnostic challenges for the anatomic pathologist. This editorial highlights the practical significance of novel insights and clinical guidelines in the recent literature, as well as in 4 contributions to this edition of the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine. The first section will address attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and a newly recognized type of autosomal-recessive adenomatous polyposis associated with the DNA repair gene MYH. The remainder of the editorial discusses the role of the revised Bethesda guidelines in the diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and concludes with the recently identified serrated pathway syndrome.

  12. Colorectal Stenting: An Effective Therapy for Preoperative and Palliative Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Rahel S. Jost, Res; Schoch, Erich; Brunner, Brigit; Decurtins, Marco; Zollikofer, Christoph L.

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To demonstrate the effectiveness of preoperative and palliative colorectal stent placement in acute colonic obstruction. Methods. Sixty-seven consecutive patients (mean age 67.3 years, range 25-93 years) with clinical and radiological signs of colonic obstruction were treated: 45 (67%) preoperatively and 22 (33%) with a palliative intent. In 59 patients (88%) the obstruction was malignant, while in 8 (12%) it was benign. A total of 73 enteric Wallstents were implanted under combined fluoroscopic/endoscopic guidance. Results. Forty-five patients were treated preoperatively with a technical success rate of 84%, a clinical success rate of 83%, and a complication rate of 16%. Of the 38 patients who were successfully stented preoperatively, 36 (95%) underwent surgery 2-22 days (mean 7.2 days) after stent insertion. The improved general condition and adequate bowel cleansing allowed single-stage tumor resection and primary end-to-end anastomosis without complications in 31 cases (86% of all operations), while only 5 patients had colostomies. Stent placement was used as the final palliative treatment in 22 patients. The technical success rate was 95%, the clinical success rate 72%, and the complication rate relatively high at 67%, caused by reocclusion in most cases. After noninvasive secondary interventions (e.g., tube placement, second stenting, balloon dilatation) the secondary patency of stents was 71% and mean reported survival time after stent insertion was 92 days (range 10-285 days). Conclusion. Preoperative stent placement in acute colonic obstruction is minimally invasive and allows an elective one-stage surgery in most cases. Stent placement also proved a valuable alternative to avoid colostomy in palliation.

  13. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  14. The clinical impact of ICOS signal in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Luo, Yang; Qin, Shao-Lan; Mu, Yi-Fei; Qi, Yang; Yu, Min-Hao; Zhong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inducible T-cell co-stimulator (ICOS) belongs to the B7-CD28 immunoglobulin superfamily, which is currently the subject of intense study due to great successes gained in treatment of different malignancies by disrupting their family members. However, the role of ICOS played in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A tissue microarray (n = 310) was stained with the ICOS specific antibody and ICOS expression is decreased in patients with either lymphatic or distant metastasis and inversely associated with CEA level and TNM stage of CRC patients. Importantly, high ICOS expression is significantly correlated with overall survival (OS) of CRC patients (n = 230, p < 0.001), and ICOS expression is also proved to be an independent prognostic factor by multivariate analysis. Surgical excised CRC specimens (n = 26) were enzymatically digested to get the tumor-infiltrating leukocytes and ICOS is mainly expressed on CD4+ T cells and its ligand ICOSL is detected on macrophages and tumor cells. ICOS expression level is associated with increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4 (p < 0.001) and programmed death (PD-1) (p = 0.005) expression on T cells and more infiltrated CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001). Interestingly, ICOS+CD4+ cells isolated from tumor tissues have high T-bet and interferon (IFN)γ expression, the characteristics of Th1 cells, compared to ICOS−CD4+ cells. In addition, the correlation between the percentage of ICOS+CD4+ T cells in tumor tissue and peripheral blood was detected. Conclusively, expression of ICOS is associated with improved survival in CRC and percentage of ICOS+CD4+ cells acting as Th1 cells in either primary tumor tissue or peripheral blood may be a clinical biomarker for good prognosis of CRC patients. PMID:27467961

  15. Colorectal cancer management in Poland: current improvements and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly identified malignant neoplasm diagnosed in men (12% of total cancers) and women (11%) in Poland, while CRC mortality is second in men (10.1%) and third in women (11.2%). The main reasons for increasing incidence and mortality are an aging population and an increase in environmental and lifestyle factors which may lead to cancer. In Poland there is a lack of historical (regularly published and accessible) data on cancer morbidity and survival rates. The Oncology Centre published cancer data for the first time in February 2009 the 2006, which, also for the first time, embraced the entire country. Oncology data collection in Poland is based on a network of 16 Regional Cancer Registries reporting to the Polish National Cancer Registry in Warsaw. An additional source of oncology data is the National Health Fund and the Central Statistical Office. The National Cancer Programme (2005) provides funding at ca 780 million euro, which includes amongst others the Early CRC Detection Programme to promote a free screening colonoscopy. Oncology services in Poland are funded almost entirely by public resources--the national budget as sustained by tax revenues (Ministry of Health) and the National Health Fund as sustained by the obligatory public health insurance contribution. Oncology expenditure covered by the national budget (Ministry of Health) and the National Cancer Programme in 2006 amounted to 44.8 million euro and 105.2 million euro, respectively. All these preventive, curative and organizational efforts have significantly improved access to efficient therapies (including radiotherapy) and diagnostic procedures in recent years in Poland, although, clearly, a lot remains to be done.

  16. Pattern of cell kinetics in colorectal mucosa of patients with different types of adenomatous polyps of the large bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Roncucci, L.; Scalmati, A.; Ponz de Leon, M. )

    1991-08-15

    It is generally accepted that adenomatous polyps represent the natural precursor of many colorectal malignancies. The sequence, however, which leads from a normally appearing mucosa to cancer is complex and involves many steps, including a hyperproliferative mucosa with an upward expansion of the replicative compartment. The current study evaluates cell replication in normal colorectal mucosa of patients with adenomatous polyps of various types and relates the observed findings to the main clinical and morphologic features of adenomas. Forty-four patients with polyps and 27 controls entered the study. Samples of colorectal mucosa were taken at endoscopy and cell replication was evaluated with a standard autoradiographic procedure. Cell replication was expressed as labeling index (LI), in the whole crypt and in each of the five longitudinal compartments in which the crypts were divided. Total LI and LI per crypt compartment were significantly higher (P less than 0.02 and P less than 0.01, respectively) than in controls. There was no appreciable difference of LI values between patients with single or multiple, tubular or tubulovillous, small or large adenomas, but in all of these subgroups LI was significantly higher than in controls. In conclusion, in normally appearing colorectal mucosa of patients with adenomatous polyps there was a significant increase of cell replication and a marked upward expansion of the proliferative zone; these changes were more evident in the left colon and in the rectum. Finally, cell replication did not seem to be related to the number of polyps, to the most common histotypes, or to the pattern of recurrence.

  17. PD-L1 expression in colorectal cancer is associated with microsatellite instability, BRAF mutation, medullary morphology and cytotoxic tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Bledsoe, Jacob R; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Huynh, Tiffany G; Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1) are key suppressors of the cytotoxic immune response. PD-L1 expression on tumor cells may be induced by the immune microenvironment, resulting in immune escape (adaptive immune resistance), and an adverse prognosis in many malignancies. In colorectal carcinoma the response to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibition is correlated with microsatellite instability. However, little is known about the clinicopathologic, molecular, and prognostic characteristics of colorectal carcinoma with PD-L1 expression. We performed immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 on 181 cases of colorectal carcinoma with known microsatellite instability and mutational status, and correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic features including tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte burden/immunophenotype, tumor mutational profile, and disease-specific survival. PD-L1 was expressed in tumors from 16 patients (9%) who were more often older (P=0.006) and female (P=0.035), with tumors exhibiting a larger size (P=0.013), but lower stage (P<0.001). PD-L1 expression was associated with increased CD8 and TBET-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, medullary phenotype, poor differentiation, microsatellite instability, BRAF mutation (P<0.001 for each), and a lower frequency of KRAS mutation (P=0.012). On multivariate analysis, PD-L1 expression was associated with medullary morphology and frequent CD8-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting adaptive immune resistance. PD-L1 positivity was not predictive of survival in the entire cohort, but it was associated with a lower disease-specific survival within the microsatellite-instability high cohort. PD-L1 expression in colorectal carcinoma is associated with clinicopathologic and molecular features of the serrated pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis, and is associated with a worse outcome within microsatellite-unstable tumors. These findings support the role of PD-L1 expression in providing normally immunogenic

  18. Television watching and risk of colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y; Keum, N N; Chan, A T; Fuchs, C S; Wu, K; Giovannucci, E L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged TV watching, a major sedentary behaviour, is associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes and may involve in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 31 065 men with ⩾1 endoscopy in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1988–2008) to evaluate sitting while watching TV and its joint influence with leisure-time physical activity on risk of colorectal adenoma. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Prolonged sitting while watching TV was significantly associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma (n=4280), and adjusting for physical activity or a potential mediator body mass index did not change the estimates. The ORs (95% CIs) across categories of TV watching (0–6, 7–13, 14–20, and 21+ h per week) were 1.00 (referent), 1.09 (1.01–1.17), 1.16 (1.06–1.27), and 1.10 (0.97–1.25) (OR per 14-h per week increment=1.11; 95% CI: 1.04–1.18; Ptrend=0.001). Compared with the least sedentary (0–6 h per week of TV) and most physically active (highest quintile) men, the most sedentary (14+ h per week) and least active (lowest quintile) men had a significant increased risk of adenoma (OR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.05–1.49), particularly for high-risk adenoma. Conclusions: Prolonged TV viewing is associated with modest increased risk of colorectal adenoma independent of leisure-time physical activity and minimally mediated by obesity. PMID:25590667

  19. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  20. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  1. Colorectal Cancer with Uncommon Metastatic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Dellavedova, Luca; Calcagno, Anna; Roncoroni, Lucia; Maffioli, Lorenzo Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of bone metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) is quite low and the presence of isolated osseous metastases at the time of diagnosis or the onset of bone metastases without other organ involvement during follow-up is even lower. Here, we present an interesting case of diffuse skeletal metastases from CRC in which both the atypical presentation of the metastatic spread and the presence of infective comorbidities created some troubles in getting the final diagnosis. PMID:26420997

  2. Future of Minimally Invasive Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Whealon, Matthew; Vinci, Alessio; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is slowly taking over as the preferred operative approach for colorectal diseases. However, many of the procedures remain technically difficult. This article will give an overview of the state of minimally invasive surgery and the many advances that have been made over the last two decades. Specifically, we discuss the introduction of the robotic platform and some of its benefits and limitations. We also describe some newer techniques related to robotics. PMID:27582647

  3. Multiple Primary Malignancies in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Liao, Wenjun; Ge, Penglei; Ren, Jinjun; Xu, Haifeng; Yang, Huayu; Sang, Xinting; Lu, Xin; Mao, Yilei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multiple primary malignancies (MPMs) are defined as 2 or more malignancies without subordinate relationship detected in different organs of an individual patient. Reports addressing MPM patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are rare. We perform a 26-year follow-up study to investigate characteristics and prognosis of MPM patients associated with HCC due to the scarcity of relative researches. We retrospectively analyzed records of 40 patients who were diagnosed with MPM including HCC at the Departments of Surgery at Peking Union Medical College Hospital during 1989 to 2010. Their clinical characteristics and postoperative survival were compared with those of 448 patients who had HCC only during the study period. Among the 40 MPM patients, 11 were diagnosed synchronously and 29 metachronously. The most common extra-hepatic malignancies were lung cancer (15%), colorectal (12.5%), and thyroid carcinoma (12.5%). MPM patients had a negative hepatitis B virus infection rate (P = 0.013) and lower median alfa-fetoprotein (AFP) level (P = 0.001). Post-operative 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for MPM patients were 82.5%, 64.5%, and 38.6% respectively, and showed no significant difference with those of HCC-only patients (84.7%, 54.2%, and 38.3% P = 0.726). During follow-up, 24 MPM patients died, including 17 (70.8%) who died of HCC-related causes. In univariate analysis, synchronous diagnosis, higher gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) and/or AFP levels, tumor >5 cm and vascular invasion were significantly associated with shorter OS, but only tumor size was an independent OS factor in Cox modeling analysis. HCC should be considered as a potential second primary for all cancer survivors. Most MPM patients died of HCC-related causes and showed no significant difference in OS compared with HCC-only patients. Tumor size of HCC, rather than MPMs itself, was the only independent OS predictor for the MPM patients. PMID:27124050

  4. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  5. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  6. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  7. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  8. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Adam; Hanna, Mark H; Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient’s chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery. PMID:27231513

  9. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Truong, Adam; Hanna, Mark H; Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-05-27

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient's nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient's chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery. PMID:27231513

  10. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik−/−/Apcmin/+ mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apcmin/+ mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  11. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik(-/-)/Apc(min/+) mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  12. Hyperplastic polyposis: association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Devereaux, B; Biden, K; Searle, J; Young, J; Jass, J

    2001-02-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis is a loosely defined syndrome initially thought not to confer a clinically important predisposition to colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical, histologic, and molecular features of a prospective series of cases meeting a strict definition of the condition. Twelve patients were identified, seven of whom had developed colorectal cancer. Most polyps were hyperplastic, but 11 patients also had polyps containing dysplasia as either serrated adenomas. mixed polyps, or traditional adenomas. The mean percentage of dysplastic polyps in patients with cancer was 35%, and in patients without cancer, 11% (p < 0.05). Microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 3 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. Kras was mutated in 8 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. No polyps showed loss of heterozygosity of chromosomes 5q, 1p, or 18q. Two of seven cancers showed a high level of MSI. It is concluded that hyperplastic polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer. Hyperplastic polyps are the dominant type of polyp, but most cases have some dysplastic epithelium. A higher proportion of dysplastic polyps is associated with increased cancer risk. Clonal genetic changes are observed in some hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas.

  13. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Monica; Merino, Sandra; Caro, Aleidis; Feliu, Francesc; Escuder, Jordi; Francesch, Tani

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approximately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients (> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are under-represented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population. PMID:26483875

  14. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  15. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2012-01-01

    While surgery is the cornerstone treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer, chemotherapy is the first treatment option for metastatic disease when tumor lesions are frequently not fully resectable at presentation. Mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, but there is still a huge heterogeneity in survival rates that can be mainly explained by patient and tumor characteristics, host response factors, and treatment modalities. The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is a global treatment strategy, which applies several lines of therapy, salvage surgery, maintenance, and treatment-free intervals. The individualization of cancer treatment is based on the evaluation of prognostic factors for survival (serum lactate dehydrogenase level, performance status), and predictive factors for treatment efficacy [Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status]. The available treatment modalities for metastatic colorectal cancer are chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab), and anti-epidermal growth factor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab). The increasing number of active compounds dictates the strategy of trials evaluating these treatments either in combination or sequentially. Alternative outcomes that can be measured earlier than overall survival are needed to shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of clinical trials. PMID:22423266

  16. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ankita; Moussa, Ahmed; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40-60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels.

  17. Treatment of peritoneal surface malignancies with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy—current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Spiliotis, J.; Halkia, E.; de Bree, E.

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (ptc) represents advanced malignant disease and has generally been associated with a grim prognosis. Peritoneal surface malignancy is often the major source of morbidity and mortality; it is of major concern in cancer management. Although ptc is categorized as metastatic disease, it represents a special disease pattern considered to be a locoregional disease limited to the abdominal cavity. The combination of cytoreductive surgery (crs) and intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec) has successfully been used as locoregional treatment for selected patients with ptc from gastric, colorectal, and ovarian cancer; with mesothelioma; and with pseudomyxoma peritonei. In the prophylactic setting, hipec can also be used to prevent ptc in high-risk patients, and the first results of the “second-look” approach are promising. Patient selection—in which the risks of perioperative morbidity and mortality, which are analogous to those for any other major gastrointestinal surgery, are assessed—is of utmost importance. Those risks have to be weighed against the anticipated survival benefit, which depends mainly on tumour biology, extent of disease, and probability of achieving complete crs. The present review discusses the principles of crs and hipec, the most significant recent clinical data, and current perspectives concerning the application of this treatment modality in various malignancies. Ongoing trials and future directions are noted. It appears that the combination of crs and hipec is an indispensable tool in the oncologist’s armamentarium. PMID:27330364

  18. Treatment of peritoneal surface malignancies with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy-current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Spiliotis, J; Halkia, E; de Bree, E

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (ptc) represents advanced malignant disease and has generally been associated with a grim prognosis. Peritoneal surface malignancy is often the major source of morbidity and mortality; it is of major concern in cancer management. Although ptc is categorized as metastatic disease, it represents a special disease pattern considered to be a locoregional disease limited to the abdominal cavity. The combination of cytoreductive surgery (crs) and intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec) has successfully been used as locoregional treatment for selected patients with ptc from gastric, colorectal, and ovarian cancer; with mesothelioma; and with pseudomyxoma peritonei. In the prophylactic setting, hipec can also be used to prevent ptc in high-risk patients, and the first results of the "second-look" approach are promising. Patient selection-in which the risks of perioperative morbidity and mortality, which are analogous to those for any other major gastrointestinal surgery, are assessed-is of utmost importance. Those risks have to be weighed against the anticipated survival benefit, which depends mainly on tumour biology, extent of disease, and probability of achieving complete crs. The present review discusses the principles of crs and hipec, the most significant recent clinical data, and current perspectives concerning the application of this treatment modality in various malignancies. Ongoing trials and future directions are noted. It appears that the combination of crs and hipec is an indispensable tool in the oncologist's armamentarium. PMID:27330364

  19. Simplified and optimized multispectral imaging for 5-ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis of malignant lesions

    PubMed Central

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Hisataka; Kato, Yoshiyuki; Harada, Yoshinori; Otsuji, Eigo; Yanagisawa, Akio; Tanaka, Hideo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-based fluorescence diagnosis is now clinically applied for accurate and ultrarapid diagnosis of malignant lesions such as lymph node metastasis during surgery. 5-ALA-based diagnosis evaluates fluorescence intensity of a fluorescent metabolite of 5-ALA, protoporphyrin IX (PPIX); however, the fluorescence of PPIX is often affected by autofluorescence of tissue chromophores, such as collagen and flavins. In this study, we demonstrated PPIX fluorescence estimation with autofluorescence elimination for 5-ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis of malignant lesions by simplified and optimized multispectral imaging. We computationally optimized observation wavelength regions for the estimation of PPIX fluorescence in terms of minimizing prediction error of PPIX fluorescence intensity in the presence of typical chromophores, collagen and flavins. By using the fluorescence intensities of the optimized wavelength regions, we verified quantitative detection of PPIX fluorescence by using chemical mixtures of PPIX, flavins, and collagen. Furthermore, we demonstrated detection capability by using metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes of colorectal cancer patients. These results suggest the potential and usefulness of the background-free estimation method of PPIX fluorescence for 5-ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis of malignant lesions, and we expect this method to be beneficial for intraoperative and rapid cancer diagnosis. PMID:27149301

  20. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ankita; Moussa, Ahmed; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40-60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels. PMID:27276067

  1. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ankita; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40–60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels. PMID:27276067

  2. Haemogram pattern at diagnosis of malignant disorders and variations post-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Madu, A J; Ibegbulam, O G; Ocheni, S; Madu, K A; Aguwa, E N

    2011-01-01

    A total of eighty patients with various malignancies seen between September 2008 and April 2009 at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, (UNTH) Ituku-Ozalla Enugu Nigeria had their haemogram values done at Days 0 and 12 of the first cycle of their various chemotherapeutic regimens. They were adult patients who had been diagnosed of various malignancies, consisting of Breast cancer 36 patients (45%), Non-Hodgkin's iymphoma 8 (10%), Hodgkin's lymphoma 13 (16.25%), Colorectal carcinoma 6 (7.5%), Multiple myeloma 7 (8.75%), Cervical carcinoma 1 (1.25%) and other malignancies 9 (11.25%). Haematological indices evaluated include: packed cell volume, haemoglobin concentration; total white blood cell count, platelet count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The socio demographic data of the patients were assessed from a questionnaire. There were 27 males (33.75%) and 53 females (66.25%). The age of the patients ranged from 18-80 years with a median of 45 years. Haematological parameters which were found to be significantly reduced include: haemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume and total white cell count.

  3. Meningioma after radiotherapy for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Shah, Kalee; Dunkel, Ira J; Reiner, Anne S; Khakoo, Yasmin; Rosenblum, Marc K; Gutin, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Complications of radiation exposure have gained importance with increasing cancer survivorship. Secondary malignancies have been associated with cranial radiation exposure. We present our experience with intracranial radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) and discuss the implications of its presentation and natural history for patient management. Patients diagnosed with meningioma who had received radiation therapy between 1960 and 2014 were identified. Records were retrospectively reviewed for details of radiation exposure, previous malignancies, meningioma subtypes, multiplicity and pathologic descriptions, treatment and follow-up. Thirty patients were diagnosed with RIM. Initial malignancies included acute lymphocytic leukemia (33.3%), medulloblastoma (26.7%) and glioma (16.7%) at a mean age of 8.1years (range 0.04-33years). The mean radiation dose was 34Gy (range 16-60Gy) and latency time to meningioma was 26years (range 8-51years). Twenty-one patients (70%) underwent surgery. Of these, 57.1% of tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I while 42.9% were WHO II (atypical). The mean MIB-1 labeling index for patients with WHO I tumors was 5.44%, with 33.3% exhibiting at least 5% staining. Mean follow-up after meningioma diagnosis was 5.8years. Mortality was zero during the follow-up period. Meningioma is an important long-term complication of therapeutic radiation. While more aggressive pathology occurs more frequently in RIM than in sporadic meningioma, it remains unclear whether this translates into an effect on survival. Further study should be aimed at delineating the risks and benefits of routine surveillance for the development of secondary neoplasms after radiation therapy.

  4. Primary malignant myelomatous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Kim, George J; Catchatourian, Rosalind

    2016-08-01

    Primary malignant myelomatous pleural effusion (PMMPE) occurs in less than 1% of patients with multiple myeloma and is diagnosed either by visualization of plasma cells on cytology or by positive flow cytometry. The presence of immature plasma cells characterized by high nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, visible nucleolus and presence of Mott cells and Russell bodies are independent poor prognostic factors. The clinician should differentiate PMMPE from secondary pleural effusion as it is associated with a significantly worse prognosis and poor overall survival. PMID:27525090

  5. Multidisciplinary management of prostate malignancy.

    PubMed

    Basler, Joseph W; Jenkins, Carol; Swanson, Gregory

    2005-05-01

    Most urologic malignancies are diagnosed initially and managed by urologists. However, better outcomes may be attained by integrating the surgical, medical, and radiologic disciplines. The primary care physician remains an important cornerstone whose talents should not be underestimated in the overall patient management scheme. Additional services such as endocrinology, physical therapy, pain control, hospice, nutrition, biofeedback, and hyperbarics, among others, should be considered in the overall health care team. The organization of the team, including definition of the duties of key personnel and even the physical framework of the clinic, contribute to its success in treating patients with prostate cancer. Pitfalls of the process also are discussed in this article.

  6. Vaccine therapies for pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Raphaël F; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2005-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are examples of active immunotherapy. In pediatric malignancy such active strategies may be particularly problematic because of immune suppression produced by the tumor or its intensive treatment with combined chemotherapy. Nonetheless, the expression of tumor-specific and tumor-associated antigens on a range of pediatric tumors has encouraged investigation of the approach in patients with either bulky or minimal residual disease. Here we describe promising results in neuroblastoma and acute leukemia, suing genetically modified whole cell vaccines, peptides, and dendritic cells. The difficulties of conducting and evaluating such studies in a pediatric population are also described, and a strategy for cancer vaccine development is outlined.

  7. Life insurance after malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R H

    1981-11-01

    Forty-five life insurance companies responded to a questionnaire on insurance industry attitudes towards patients with a history of malignancy other than skin carcinoma. Although the criteria for acceptance, provisions of the policy, and philosophy about adjuvant treatment varied, all companies would underwrite such patients provided that at application there was no evidence of persistent or recurrent disease or severe complications of therapy. The concept of excess mortality (observed death rates versus standard expected death rates) is used with other factors in calculating premiums. Legal and ethical responsibilities of physicians associated with insurance applications are briefly discussed.

  8. Rare emerging malignant skin tumours.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F; Ferreli, C; Pinna, A L; Atzori, L

    2015-08-01

    As clinical skills improve and innovative diagnostic techniques become available in the field of dermatology and dermatopathology, new types or additional variants of malignant skin tumors are described. This article reviews the current nomenclature, clinico-pathological features, differential diagnosis, prognostic and therapeutic implications of some new dermato(patho)logical rare emerging skin tumors, including epithelial tumors (squamous cell carcinoma with mucinous metaplasia), adnexal tumors (endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma), soft tissue tumors of vascular differentiation (pseudolymphomatous cutaneous angiosarcoma, pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma), hematopoietic tumors (blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm) and mixed epithelial/melanocytic tumor (squamomelanocytic tumor). PMID:26086411

  9. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  11. Postirradiation malignant salivary gland tumor.

    PubMed

    Rice, D H; Batsakis, J G; McClatchey, K D

    1976-11-01

    Information concerning the relationship between salivary gland tumors and prior exposure to radiation for benign conditions or by accident is slowly being gathered. As yet, no statistical confidence can be established in this relationship. Very likely, this confidence will require studies akin to those done on the problem of thyroid cancer and irradiation. Including the case reported here, 50 tumors of the salivary glands have been reported to have followed prior radiation exposure. Twenty-three of these tumors have been malignant, with the mucoepidermoid carcinoma the most frequent histological type. The latent period in salivary tissues is 20 or more years.

  12. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70–90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2–3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of

  13. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  14. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  15. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  16. The identification and differentiation of secondary colorectal cancer in human liver tissue using X-ray fluorescence, coherent scatter spectroscopy, and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Darvish-Molla, Sahar; Al-Ebraheem, Alia; Farquharson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Secondary colorectal liver cancer is the most widespread malignancy in patients with colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to identify and differentiate between normal liver tissue and malignant secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue using X-ray scattering and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the best combination of data that can be used to enable classification of these two tissue types. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and coherent scatter data were collected for 24 normal and 24 tumor matched pair tissue samples. The levels of 12 elements (P, S, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, and Rb) were measured in all samples. When comparisons were made between normal and tumor tissues, statistically significant differences were determined for K (p = 0.046), Ca (p = 0.040), Cr (p = 0.011), Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, and Rb (p < 0.01). However, for P, S, As, and Se, no statistically significant differences were found (p > 0.05). For the coherent scatter spectra collected, three peaks due to adipose, fibrous content, and water content of tissue were observed. The amplitude, full width half-maximum, and area under both fibrous content and water content peaks were found to be significantly higher in secondary colorectal liver tumors compared with surrounding normal liver tissue (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were found for the adipose peak parameters (p > 0.05). Soft independent modeling of class analogy was performed using the XRF, coherent scatter, and elemental ratio data separately, and the accuracy of the classification of 20 unknown samples was found to be 50, 30, and 80%, respectively. Further analysis has shown that using a combination of the XRF and coherent scatter data in a single combined model gave improved normal and tumor liver tissue classification, with an accuracy that was found to be 85%.

  17. Gut Microbiota and Colorectal Surgery: Impact on Postoperative Complications.

    PubMed

    Russ, Andrew J; Casillas, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leakage is a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery and causes high morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of anastomotic healing remains unclear despite numerous studies. In this article, our aim is to provide different perspectives on what is known about the role of the gastrointestinal tract microbiome and its relation to anastomotic integrity. PMID:27582651

  18. Colorectal cancer screening: The role of the noninvasive options.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Lisa; Varcak, Susan Combs

    2016-09-01

    Recommended screening options for colorectal cancer are divided into noninvasive stool-based options, and invasive procedure-based options. Because multiple screening strategies are effective, efforts to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer should focus on maximizing the number of patients who are screened. This article reviews noninvasive stool-based screening options. PMID:27575898

  19. Is height a risk factor for colorectal adenoma?

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Although it is generally known that the risk for all types of cancer increases with adult height, combined and for several common site-specific cancers (including colon and rectal), evidence is limited for adenomas, which are precursors to colorectal cancer. We evaluated the association between height and risk of colorectal adenoma at various stages of the adenoma-carcinoma pathway. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using data from patients who had undergone a complete colonoscopy as part of a health examination at the Health Promotion Center of Samsung Medical Center between October 13, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A total of 1,347 male subjects were included in our study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between height and colorectal adenoma. Results: Each 5-cm increase in height was associated with 1.6% and 5.3% higher risks of advanced colorectal adenoma and high-risk colorectal adenoma, respectively, but associations were not significant after adjusting for age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome, alcohol intake, smoking, family history of colorectal cancer, and regular aspirin use (p = 0.840 and p = 0.472, respectively). Conclusions: No clear association was found between colorectal adenoma risk and height. Unlike other site-specific tumors reported to have a consistent relationship with height, the association between colorectal tumor and height remains controversial. PMID:26701232

  20. Endoscopic management of acute colorectal anastomotic complications with temporary stent.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Maher A

    2009-01-01

    Acute postoperative anastomotic complications following colorectal resection include leak and obstruction. Often an operation is necessary to treat these complications. The role of endoluminal procedures to treat these complications has been limited. This article illustrates that such an approach is technically feasible and can be used to treat some colorectal anastomotic complications.

  1. NIH study finds sigmoidoscopy reduces colorectal cancer rates

    Cancer.gov

    Study finds that flexible sigmoidoscopy is effective in reducing the rates of new cases and deaths due to colorectal cancer. Researchers found that overall colorectal cancer mortality was reduced by 26 percent and incidence was reduced by 21 percent as a

  2. Malignant chondroid syringoma of the pinna.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Aggarwal, Niharika; Deen, Suhail; Majhi, Urmila; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Chondroid syringoma (CS) represents the cutaneous counterpart of mixed tumor (pleomorphic adenoma) of salivary glands. The malignant counterpart of CS, termed as "malignant CS" is a malignant eccrine neoplasm which lacks distinctive clinical features, often delaying initial diagnosis. Unlike its benign counterpart which often localizes in the head and neck region, malignant CS most often encountered in the trunk and the extremities. We report a rare case of an aggressive malignant CS of the left pinna with cervical lymph node metastasis. Our patient, to the best of our knowledge, possibly is the first case of malignant CS of the pinna and the fourth to arise in the head and neck region. The diagnostic challenges with an added emphasis on the role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in aiding the management of this rare tumor are discussed.

  3. [Malignant melanoma coexisting with pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Krasomski, G; Broniarczyk, D; Gładysiak, A

    1992-09-01

    An extremely rare case of melanoma amelanoticum coexisting with pregnancy has been discussed. Pregnant A. Ch., age 42, was admitted to the Polish Mother's Health Centre Memorial Hospital on the 22nd of August, 1990 with a diagnosis of the 5th pregnancy, the 2nd delivery, the 30th week of gestation, state after cesarean section. Suspected malignant melanoma. Stomach ulceration. Thrombophlebitis of left lower extremity. General condition--medium hard. For the last three days she did not report fetal movements, fetal heartbeat was not detected either. Us examination confirmed fetal death. On the 24th of August, 1990, spontaneous vaginal delivery terminated the pregnancy, giving a dead, macerated female fetus, body weight of 1500 g. On the 3rd day after delivery the patient died with growing circulation-respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy revealed melanoma malignum amelanoticum disseminatum. Neither an autopsy of the fetus nor histopathological examinations of the secundines were performed for the advanced maceration. The coexistence of pregnancy with malignant melanoma in this case brought a tragic end both for the mother and the fetus. PMID:1305602

  4. Cutaneous manifestations of genitourinary malignancy.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary cancers are associated with a range of cutaneous syndromes, which can reflect direct metastatic spread, non-metastatic manifestations of malignancy or the consequences of treatment. More than 220,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur each year in the United States, and thus the associations with cutaneous involvement are quite well documented-rare metastatic spread, vasculitic and hemorrhagic syndromes. Cancers of the bladder and kidney may be associated with direct cutaneous metastases, vasculitic syndromes, hereditary leiomyomatosis, and other familial syndromes. Testicular cancer occasionally metastasizes to the skin but more commonly is associated with the dysplastic nevus (multiple atypical nevus) syndrome. A structured approach to history-taking, examination, and investigation is essential for optimal management, especially when these syndromes precede the diagnosis of a known malignancy. A brief review of the more common iatrogenic cutaneous complications is provided, and includes Raynaud's phenomenon, purpura, rash, hand-foot syndrome, the consequences of marrow failure, and bleomycin-induced pigmentation. PMID:27178687

  5. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Hematopoietic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the ocular findings in patients with hematopoietic malignancy with optic nerve involvement and abducens nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of all cases of hematopoietic cancer with ophthalmic involvements seen in the Department of Ophthalmology of the National Center for Global Health and Medicine between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Results. Eight patients with hematopoietic cancer with optic nerve invasion or abducens nerve palsy were studied. The primary diseases were 3 cases of multiple myeloma, 1 case of acute lymphocytic leukemia, 1 case of follicular lymphoma, and 3 cases of AIDS-related lymphoma. Six cases had optic nerve invasion, 2 cases had abducens nerve palsy, and 1 case had optic nerve invasion of both eyes. The median visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 0.885 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units. The final visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 1.25 logMAR units, and that of those with sixth-nerve palsy was −0.1 logMAR units. Six cases died during the five-year follow-up period. An ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic cancer, especially AIDS-related lymphoma, was associated with poor prognosis. Conclusion. Because ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic malignancy has a poor prognosis, an early diagnosis of the cancers by the ophthalmologic findings by ophthalmologists could improve the prognosis. PMID:27375913

  6. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  7. Malignant hyperthermia. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, F J; Vatral, J J; Moore, R C; Pickett, A B; Nylander, J E; Gullett, F C

    1979-03-01

    A dentist using local or general anesthetics must be cognizant of the possibility of malignant hyperthermia presenting as a catastrophic emergency. The purpose of this article is to describe the syndrome of malignant hyperthermia, to emphasize its early clinical symptoms, and to outline definitive treatment. Two cases of malignant hyperthermia in pediatric dental patients illustrate the clinical and laboratory features and the appropriate therapy. PMID:283351

  8. Evolution of management in peritoneal surface malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Emel; Torun, Bahar Canbay; Torun, Ege Sinan; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Management of peritoneal surface malignancies has gradually evolved by the introduction of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy applications. Recently, peritoneal metastases of intraabdominal solid organ tumors and primary peritoneal malignancies such as peritoneal mesothelioma are being treated with this new approach. Selection criteria are important to reduce morbidity and mortality rates of patients who will experience minimal or no benefit from these combined treatment modalities. Management of peritoneal surface malignancies with this current trend is presented in this review. PMID:27528813

  9. Leuloplakia - Review of A Potentially Malignant Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abidullah, Mohammed; Gaddikeri, Kavitha; Raghoji, Swetha; Ravishankar T, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    Leukoplakias are oral white lesions that have not been diagnosed as any other specific disease. They are grouped under premalignant lesions, now redesignated as potentially malignant disorders. Their significance lies in the fact that they have propensity for malignant transformation at a higher rate when compared to other oral lesions. This article reviews aetiology, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, histopathologic features, malignant potential and treatment of oral leukoplakia. PMID:25302287

  10. Evolution of management in peritoneal surface malignancies.

    PubMed

    Canbay, Emel; Torun, Bahar Canbay; Torun, Ege Sinan; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Management of peritoneal surface malignancies has gradually evolved by the introduction of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy applications. Recently, peritoneal metastases of intraabdominal solid organ tumors and primary peritoneal malignancies such as peritoneal mesothelioma are being treated with this new approach. Selection criteria are important to reduce morbidity and mortality rates of patients who will experience minimal or no benefit from these combined treatment modalities. Management of peritoneal surface malignancies with this current trend is presented in this review. PMID:27528813

  11. Fusobacterium nucleatum: an emerging bug in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Y; Bhat, Ashaqullah; Fazili, Khalid M; Ganai, Bashir A

    2015-09-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a plethora of diverse microbial species, wherein certain bacteria considered as driver bacteria with procarcinogenic features contribute directly toward colonic epithelium cell damage to initiate colorectal carcinogenesis. However, some bacteria, in particular Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is otherwise a normal resident of the oral microflora and a relatively poor colonizer of the healthy gut, have also been considered to play a role in the development of colorectal cancer. Many studies have reported that F. nucleatum is associated with colorectal adenomas and advanced-stage colorectal cancer, but its precise role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we review some of the important features of F. nucleatum, its association with inflammatory bowel disease, modulation of the tumor-immune microenvironment, and E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling.

  12. Aflibercept in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Fei; Lockhart, Albert Craig

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US. In recent decades, an improved understanding of the role of the angiogenesis pathway in colorectal cancer has led to advancements in treatment. Bevacizumab has been shown to improve the progression-free survival and overall survival when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and at present is the only antiangiogenesis agent approved for the treatment of this cancer. Aflibercept is a novel angiogenesis-targeting agent, and has demonstrated efficacy in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in a recent randomized Phase III trial. Here we review the role of angiogenesis in the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, strategies for targeting angiogenesis, and the clinical development of aflibercept. PMID:22253552

  13. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  14. The cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R

    2016-06-01

    The skin is often the herald of an underlying systemic illness, and gastrointestinal malignancies can present in numerous ways in the skin. Paraneoplastic phenomenon, such as acanthosis nigricans and tripe palm, may be the first indicator of a gastrointestinal malignancy. In addition, gastrointestinal cancers can metastasize to the skin, as described in the well-known Sister Mary Joseph's nodule. Inflammatory systemic conditions such as dermatomyositis and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis can be associated with underlying malignancy. Finally, in numerous genetic syndromes with underlying malignancies, such as Muir-Torre, recognition of the skin signs leads to early diagnosis and screening. PMID:27178686

  15. Perceived religiousness is protective for colorectal cancer: data from the Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed Central

    Kune, G A; Kune, S; Watson, L F

    1993-01-01

    The perceived or self-reported degree of 'religiousness' was obtained by interview from 715 colorectal cancer patients and 727 age/sex matched community controls, as part of a large, comprehensive population-based study of colorectal cancer incidence, aetiology and survival (The Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study) conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Self-reported or perceived 'religiousness', as defined in the study, was a statistically significant protective factor [relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9, P = 0.002]. This statistically significant protection remained after the previously determined major risk factors found in the study, namely a family history of colorectal cancer, dietary risk factors, beer consumption, number of children and age at birth of the first child, were statistically corrected for (P = 0.004). There was no association between Dukes' staging of the cancer and perceived degree of 'religiousness' (P = 0.42). Although self-reported or perceived 'religiousness' was associated with a median survival time of 62 months compared with 52 months in those self-reporting as being 'non-religious', this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.64). PMID:8258800

  16. Meta-analysis of organ-specific differences in the structure of the immune infiltrate in major malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Gautier; Bindea, Gabriela; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer immunosurveillance is one of the major endogenous breaks of tumor progression. Here, we analyzed gene expression pattern indicative of the presence of distinct leukocyte subtypes within four cancer types (breast cancer, colorectal carcinoma, melanoma, and non-small cell lung cancer) and 20 different microarray datasets corresponding to a total of 3471 patients. Multiple metagenes reflecting the presence of such immune cell subtypes were highly reproducible across distinct cohorts. Nonetheless, there were sizable differences in the correlation patterns among such immune-relevant metagenes across distinct malignancies. The reproducibility of the correlations among immune-relevant metagenes was highest in breast cancer (followed by colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma), reflecting the fact that mammary carcinoma has an intrinsically better prognosis than the three other malignancies. Among breast cancer patients, we found that the expression of a lysosomal enzyme-related metagene centered around ASAH1 (which codes for N-acylsphingosine amidohydrolase-1, also called acid ceramidase) exhibited a higher correlation with multiple immune-relevant metagenes in patients that responded to neoadjuvant chemotherapy than in non-responders. Altogether, this meta-analysis revealed novel organ-specific features of the immune infiltrate in distinct cancer types, as well as a strategy for defining new prognostic biomarkers. PMID:26059437

  17. Changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciasca, Gabriele; Papi, Massimiliano; Minelli, Eleonora; Palmieri, Valentina; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development represents a multistep process starting with specific mutations that affect proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. These mutations confer a selective growth advantage to colonic epithelial cells that form first dysplastic crypts, and then malignant tumours and metastases. All these steps are accompanied by deep mechanical changes at the cellular and the tissue level. A growing consensus is emerging that such modifications are not merely a by-product of the malignant progression, but they could play a relevant role in the cancer onset and accelerate its progression. In this review, we focus on recent studies investigating the role of the biomechanical signals in the initiation and the development of CRC. We show that mechanical cues might contribute to early phases of the tumour initiation by controlling the Wnt pathway, one of most important regulators of cell proliferation in various systems. We highlight how physical stimuli may be involved in the differentiation of non-invasive cells into metastatic variants and how metastatic cells modify their mechanical properties, both stiffness and adhesion, to survive the mechanical stress associated with intravasation, circulation and extravasation. A deep comprehension of these mechanical modifications may help scientist to define novel molecular targets for the cure of CRC.

  18. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip Pn

    2015-11-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of (1) CSC; (2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs; (3) markers of CSC; (4) characteristics; and (5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt.

  19. SERPINA4 is a novel independent prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-Min; Mi, Yu-Shuai; Yu, Fu-Dong; Han, Yang; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Lu, Su; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Sen-Lin; Ye, Ling; Liu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Dao-Hua; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Xue-Bin; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Tang, Hua-Mei; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serpina family A member 4 (SERPINA4), also known as kallistatin, exerts important effects in inhibiting tumor growth and angiogenesis in many malignancies. However, the precise role of SERPINA4 in CRC has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of SERPINA4 and its clinical significance in CRC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of SERPINA4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens was significantly decreased than that in adjacent normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of SERPINA4 by using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 327 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that decreased SERPINA4 expression was significantly associated with invasion depth, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and tumor differentiation. SERPINA4 was also an independent prognostic indicator of disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with CRC. Furthermore, the impact of altered SERPINA4 expression on CRC cells was analyzed with a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. The results demonstrated that SERPINA4 significantly inhibits malignant tumor progression and serves as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27648355

  20. Changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciasca, Gabriele; Papi, Massimiliano; Minelli, Eleonora; Palmieri, Valentina; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development represents a multistep process starting with specific mutations that affect proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. These mutations confer a selective growth advantage to colonic epithelial cells that form first dysplastic crypts, and then malignant tumours and metastases. All these steps are accompanied by deep mechanical changes at the cellular and the tissue level. A growing consensus is emerging that such modifications are not merely a by-product of the malignant progression, but they could play a relevant role in the cancer onset and accelerate its progression. In this review, we focus on recent studies investigating the role of the biomechanical signals in the initiation and the development of CRC. We show that mechanical cues might contribute to early phases of the tumour initiation by controlling the Wnt pathway, one of most important regulators of cell proliferation in various systems. We highlight how physical stimuli may be involved in the differentiation of non-invasive cells into metastatic variants and how metastatic cells modify their mechanical properties, both stiffness and adhesion, to survive the mechanical stress associated with intravasation, circulation and extravasation. A deep comprehension of these mechanical modifications may help scientist to define novel molecular targets for the cure of CRC. PMID:27621568