Science.gov

Sample records for malpractice

  1. Research Malpractice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chubin, Daryl E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the issue of academic fraud in the form of science research malpractice. Topic areas considered include: malpractice studies; causes of misconduct; normal and deviant research behavior; and distinguished research characteristics in production, reporting, dissemination, and evaluation. Consequences of malpractice and…

  2. [Autoptically confirmed malpractice cases].

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Claims of lethal medical malpractice cases in penal law are mostly dealt with by experts in forensic medicine since in lethal cases the autopsy is crucial for determining the cause of death. Knowledge of the cause of death, in turn, is the necessary basis of an expert opinion on negligence and the causality between negligence and cause of death. Compared to civil lawsuits filed for malpractice and cases dealt with at the arbitration committees of the medical councils penal lawsuits with 1500 to 2000 cases per year are of minor importance. Our own retrospective multicentre study on lawsuits filed for lethal cases of medical malpractice (based on autopsy findings of 4450 cases) revealed an annual increase in autopsies due to medical negligence from 3 to 6 hundred. Hospital doctors are more frequently affected by medical malpractice claims than private-practice physicians. However, the rate of confirmed medical malpractice cases is much higher for doctors in private practice. Although surgeons are most frequently charged with medical malpractice the rate of confirmed medical malpractice cases is comparatively low in surgery. Medico-legal autopsies in cases of alleged medical malpractice are often ordered by the public prosecutor because the manner of death was classified as unnatural or undetermined. Therefore the often-heard reproach that doctors frequently make mistakes and do their very best to hide them is not true. Thus, it has to be recommended that in a case of unexpected death associated with medical treatment the doctor in his own interest should classify the manner of death as undetermined.

  3. Educational Malpractice Worrying You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Cynthia; McCarthy, Bernice

    1980-01-01

    Reviews case studies of students who were promoted regularly in public schools without having mastered basic skills required at each grade level. Questions whether schools would improve if students were permitted to sue for educational malpractice. Identifies basic rights of students, teachers, parents, and administrators with regard to education.…

  4. Information Practice and Malpractice. . .Do We Need Malpractice Insurance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Anne P.

    1984-01-01

    Relates interview responses of seven information brokers on proper practice of information and extent of malpractice (e.g., industrial espionage, breaches of client or source confidentiality). Types of protection against malpractice--contracts, good educational background for entry-level positions, continuing education, personal values,…

  5. Medical malpractice in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Nick D; Moat, Diane; Lee, Donald H

    2014-01-01

    The rise in medical malpractice claims over the past few decades has altered physicians' practice patterns and has had a considerable financial impact on the medical community as a whole. While numerous studies have analyzed the content and effect of these claims, only a handful of articles have addressed specifically the issue of medical malpractice in hand surgery. This article outlines the available literature on malpractice in hand surgery, offers guidance to hand surgeons on managing medical malpractice claims, and discusses preventative measures they might take to limit such claims from being filed in the future. We conclude that the key measures one can take to protecting oneself legally are knowing and abiding by the standard of care, keeping patients informed and developing good relationships with them, and meticulously documenting. Although some malpractice claims are unavoidable, we believe that one can limit his or her exposure to them by incorporating these measures into their respective practices.

  6. Isaac Ray, malpractice defendant.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    Isaac Ray (1807-1881), founder of American forensic psychiatry, produced his classic Treatise on the Medical Jurisprudence of Insanity in 1838. He did not begin to practice asylum medicine, however, until 1841, when he became superintendent of the Maine Insane Hospital in Augusta. There, he treated a patient, Isaac Hunt, who later sued him for malpractice and then self-published a book, Astounding Disclosures! Three Years in a Mad House, detailing alleged abuses suffered at the doctor's hands. This article recalls the incident and tracks Ray's reactions to it, the public's perception of asylums, and the tension between paternalistic asylum medicine and an emerging consumer-rights movement.

  7. Nursing malpractice: cause for consideration.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-02-01

    Because so many factors influence a patient's health, it's difficult to know with certainty that a nurse's error actually caused the negative outcome. In nursing malpractice cases, causation can be a successful defense strategy.

  8. The Specter of Academic Malpractice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The concept of academic malpractice is discussed in terms of student gains in consumerism regarding institutional accountability, and in terms of faculty rights to academic freedom and relationships with administrators. (LBH)

  9. The Welfare Effects of Medical Malpractice Liability

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Seabury, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    We use variation in the generosity of local juries to identify the causal impact of medical malpractice liability on social welfare. Growth in malpractice payments contributed at most 5 percentage points to the 33% total real growth in medical expenditures from 1990-2003. On the other hand, malpractice leads to modest mortality reductions; the value of these more than likely exceeds the costs of malpractice liability. Therefore, reducing malpractice liability is unlikely to have a major impact on health care spending, and unlikely to be cost-effective over conventionally accepted values of a statistical life. PMID:23526860

  10. Will Educational Malpractice Be Revived?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurenas, Albert C.

    1992-01-01

    Predictions of death for educational malpractice may be premature. A shift in legal reasoning by the California Supreme Court and the Los Angeles School District's educational guarantee policy might influence future courts to look more favorably upon the claims of educationally impaired plaintiffs. (MLF)

  11. Liability for Malpractice in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loscalzo, Theresa E.

    1985-01-01

    Courts have not recognized claims of "educational malpractice," though they have held that such a claim could be formally pleaded with liability precluded by public policy considerations. A 1984 New York Court of Appeals decision in "Snow vs. State of New York" may be the initial breakdown to the barrier of public policy…

  12. Ethical issues in medical malpractice.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Robert C

    2006-08-01

    The interrelationships between biomedical ethics and the law are perhaps nowhere as starkly apparent as in the realm of medical malpractice. Although ethical and legal conduct and practices are often in harmony, in many areas ethical principles and the issues surrounding medical liability appear to come into conflict. Disclosure of errors; quality improvement activities; the practice of defensive medicine; dealing with patients who wish to leave against medical advice; provision of futile care at the insistence of patients or families; and the various protections of Good Samaritan laws are just a few of these. In addition, the ethical principles governing the conduct of physicians serving as expert witnesses in medical malpractice cases have become a subject of intense interest in recent years.

  13. Perspectives on medical malpractice self-insurance financial reporting.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C; Kitchen, Patrick J

    2012-11-01

    Financial reporting of medical malpractice self-insurance is evolving. The Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification Section 954-450-25 provides guidance for accounting and financial reporting for medical malpractice. Discounting of medical malpractice liabilities has been reassessed in recent years. Malpractice litigation reform efforts continue in several states. Accountable care organizations could increase the frequency of medical malpractice claims because of patients' heightened expectations regarding quality of care.

  14. Patient Safety and the Malpractice System.

    PubMed

    Swift, James Q

    2017-02-26

    The cost of health care in the United States and malpractice insurance has escalated greatly over the past 30 years. In an ideal world, the goals of the tort system would be aligned with efforts at improving safety. In fact, there is little evidence that the tort system and the processes of risk management and informed consent have improved patient safety. The article explores the disunion between patient safety and the malpractice system.

  15. 45 CFR 60.7 - Reporting medical malpractice payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting medical malpractice payments. 60.7... Information § 60.7 Reporting medical malpractice payments. (a) Who must report. Each entity, including an... practitioner for medical malpractice, must report information as set forth in paragraph (b) of this section...

  16. 45 CFR 60.7 - Reporting medical malpractice payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting medical malpractice payments. 60.7... Information § 60.7 Reporting medical malpractice payments. (a) Who must report. Each entity, including an... practitioner for medical malpractice, must report information as set forth in paragraph (b) of this section...

  17. Educational Malpractice. Liability of Educators, School Administrators, and School Officials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, John

    This treatise is a compilation of various educational malpractice cases as well as other references regarding educational malpractice and related malpractice cases from other professions, such as medicine, law and psychiatry, and is intended to serve as a source for understanding the complex and sensitive problems relating to educational…

  18. The physician's reaction to a malpractice suit.

    PubMed

    Lavery, J P

    1988-01-01

    A malpractice suit can have a devastating impact on a practitioner's professional and personal life. The physician's reaction to this event is profound, affecting his own life-style and that of family, colleagues, and patients. This commentary presents an analogy between the physician's reaction to a malpractice suit and the stages of grief described by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross: the sequence of denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Understanding the psychodynamics of this reaction can help physicians to cope with the problems inherent in a malpractice suit and to maintain a greater stability in their personal lives. Adverse effects on medical practice and private life-style, and on the legal proceedings, can be minimized.

  19. A look at Florida's malpractice crisis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, F C

    1985-08-01

    To solve the malpractice problem, the Florida Medical Association has attempted during the last decade to bring about tort reform through the legislative process, but early successes were declared unconstitutional or ignored by the courts. In 1984, the FMA organized a constitutional initiative campaign called REASON '84, and secured a record 630,000 signatures of registered Florida voters to place a constitutional amendment on the 1984 Florida General Election ballot. The Florida Supreme Court in October 1984 removed the Association's constitutional Amendment 9 from the ballot. Dr. Coleman, past president of the Florida Medical Association, wrote the following during his term as president about the malpractice problem and its grave implications.

  20. Tort law and medical malpractice insurance premiums.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Meredith L; Morrisey, Michael A; Nelson, Leonard J

    2006-01-01

    This paper estimated the effects of tort law and insurer investment returns on physician malpractice insurance premiums. Data were collected on tort law from 1991 through 2004, and multivariate regression models, including fixed effects for state and year, were used to estimate the effect of changes in tort law on medical malpractice premiums. The premium consequences of national policy changes were simulated. The analysis found that the introduction of a new damage cap lowered malpractice premiums for internal medicine, general surgery, and obstetrics/gynecology by 17.3%, 20.7%, and 25.5%, respectively. Lowering damage caps by dollar 100,000 reduced premiums by 4%. Statutes of repose also resulted in lower premiums. No other tort law changes had the effect of lowering premiums. Simulation results indicate that a national cap of dollar 250,000 on awards for noneconomic damages in all states would imply premium savings of dollar 16.9 billion. Extending a dollar 250,000 cap to all states that do not currently have them would save dollar 1.4 billion annually, or about 8% of the total. A negative effect on malpractice premiums was found for the Dow Jones industrial average, but not for bond prices; effects of the Nasdaq index were not significant for internal medicine, but were marginally significant for surgery and obstetrics premiums.

  1. Educational Malpractice and the Reading Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James B.

    Prompted by the increased possibility of teachers facing educational malpractice charges, this paper outlines the historical legal precedents through which plaintiffs have sought recognition for this new cause of action, the defenses established against it, and the rationale on which various courts have balanced their decisions. The paper also…

  2. How to Avoid an Educational Malpractice Suit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Arlene H.

    Increasing demands for professional accountability in education, coupled with a growing tendency in the American public to seek redress through the courts, have given rise to the educational malpractice suit, alleging that students have failed to learn because schools have been negligent in their duty to educate. This chapter provides guidelines…

  3. Examination Management and Examination Malpractice: The Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunji, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Examination malpractice or cheating has become a global phenomenon. In different countries of the world today, developed and developing, academic dishonesty especially cheating in examinations has heightened and taken frightening dimension. In many countries of the world this phenomenon has become a serious matter of concern that has left many…

  4. [Aspects of communication regarding medical malpractice suits].

    PubMed

    Pilling, János; Erdélyi, Kamilla

    2016-04-24

    Due to problems experienced in health care, there is an increased amount of malpractice suits nowadays. Nevertheless, some physicians are more likely to be sued, or more frequently sued, than others. Numerous studies indicate that this phenomenon fundamentally results from a lack of interpersonal and communication skills on the part of the sued doctor, namely, deficiencies in questioning the patient, listening, conveying information, etc. Communication is of pivotal importance in patient care vis-à-vis medical errors as well. The majority of physicians aim to conceal the error, albeit this may lead to further deterioration of the patient's condition. In institutions where open communication regarding errors was introduced within the medical team and toward the patient and their family alike, the number of malpractice suits decreased. It is crucial to establish a means of support for doctors, and to promote communication trainings, as well as a supportive legal environment.

  5. Actuarial considerations of medical malpractice evaluations in M&As.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    To best project an actuarial estimate for medical malpractice exposure for a merger and acquisition, a organization's leaders should consider the following factors, among others: How to support an unbiased actuarial estimation. Experience of the actuary. The full picture of the organization's malpractice coverage. The potential for future loss development. Frequency and severity trends.

  6. Avoiding Counselor Malpractice. ACA Legal Series, Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Robert L.

    The possibility of lawsuits is a general condition of citizenship; potential lawsuits based on allegations of malpractice is a routine part of professional practice. This monograph provides a guide for taking some reasonable precautions to avoid malpractice suits. The text provides an outline that counselors may use in developing a legal and…

  7. Medical Malpractice: A Framework for Action. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    At the request of Senator John Heinz and Representative John Edward Porter, the General Accounting Office (GAO) assessed the nature of increases in the costs of medical malpractice insurance over the years, how various states have tried to deal with medical malpractice problems, and what federal and state actions may be warranted. This report…

  8. Arbitration Agreements and Your Malpractice Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James R.

    1976-01-01

    With new legislation and favorable case law developments, many providers of health care services are turning to binding arbitration agreements as a partial solution to the medical malpractice crisis. Existing data indicate tremendous advantages can be gained from the use of such agreements, if they are carefully drawn to comply with new law, tailored to the particular situation in which they will be used and coupled with appropriate procedures to secure the intended benefits. Arbitration is not a substitute for insurance, but if a provider has taken the calculated risk of forgoing insurance he should not be without a carefully drawn binding arbitration agreement. PMID:969512

  9. Commentary: malpractice reform in policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Bovbjerg, Randall R

    2007-06-01

    Enacted caps on malpractice awards and proposed early offer reform address the sometimes excessive verdicts of conventional liability and its very high overhead costs. However, such reforms greatly benefit medical defendants while doing too little for claimants or patients in general. Caps and early offer only affect current claims; far broader reforms are therefore needed to improve the woeful performance of liability as a general promoter of patient safety and injury compensation. Broad reforms, however desirable, seldom surmount high political and practical hurdles. A good, more evenhanded start would seek to make claims resolution faster, more accurate, more predictable, and less expensive, while separately promoting medical quality and safety as well as greater transparency for law, medicine, and insurance.

  10. The Teacher and Malpractice: Ten Ways to Invite a Lawsuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essex, Nathan L.

    1987-01-01

    Comments on the emerging concept in education of teacher malpractice, and identifies ten ways that teachers can be assured of entertaining a lawsuit in situations involving academic injury to students. (NKA)

  11. Physicians' fears of malpractice lawsuits are not assuaged by tort reforms.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily R; Reschovsky, James D; Mello, Michelle M; Mayrell, Ralph C; Katz, David

    2010-09-01

    Physicians contend that the threat of malpractice lawsuits forces them to practice defensive medicine, which in turn raises the cost of health care. This argument underlies efforts to change malpractice laws through legislative tort reform. We evaluated physicians' perceptions about malpractice claims in states where more objective indicators of malpractice risk, such as malpractice premiums, varied considerably. We found high levels of malpractice concern among both generalists and specialists in states where objective measures of malpractice risk were low. We also found relatively modest differences in physicians' concerns across states with and without common tort reforms. These results suggest that many policies aimed at controlling malpractice costs may have a limited effect on physicians' malpractice concerns.

  12. [Radiological considerations of malpractice in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Lojacono, A; Balma, E

    1996-11-01

    Several branches of competence are needed to evaluate malpractice in dentistry: first a complete case history, secondly careful clinical observation and finally a correct procedure of radiographic documentation. This latter is able to prove existence of the treatment and its evolution, moreover it shows the bone, the dental components underneath the surface and the treatment becomes appraisable by different observers. In restorative dentistry, radiological findings allow us to demonstrate overcontoured restorations in approximal sites and, if necessary, identify the biological width. In endodontics the insufficient filling or the overfilling of the root channel can be demonstrated along with the material used for the filling and the presence of fractured instruments inside the channel. In prosthodontics, on the other hand, the quality of the abutments, fractured roots and/or prosthesis, symptoms of inadequate charge on the bone and overcontours with the subsequent periodontal damage can be seen. In orthodontics one can assess the appearance of infrabone pockets, reabsorptions and horizontal recessions. In extractive surgery it is again possible to identify through radiographic documentation small root fragments in the maxillary sinus (possible sinusitis associated) and maxillary fractures as a consequence of extractions. In the field of implantology, damage to noble structures due to inadequate case planning can be highlighted.

  13. Effects of Health Information Technology on Malpractice Insurance Premiums

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The widespread adoption of health information technology (IT) will help contain health care costs by decreasing inefficiencies in healthcare delivery. Theoretically, health IT could lower hospitals' malpractice insurance premiums (MIPs) and improve the quality of care by reducing the number and size of malpractice. This study examines the relationship between health IT investment and MIP using California hospital data from 2006 to 2007. Methods To examine the effect of hospital IT on malpractice insurance expense, a generalized estimating equation (GEE) was employed. Results It was found that health IT investment was not negatively associated with MIP. Health IT was reported to reduce medical error and improve efficiency. Thus, it may reduce malpractice claims from patients, which will reduce malpractice insurance expenses for hospitals. However, health IT adoption could lead to increases in MIPs. For example, we expect increases in MIPs of about 1.2% and 1.5%, respectively, when health IT and labor increase by 10%. Conclusions This study examined the effect of health IT investment on MIPs controlling other hospital and market, and volume characteristics. Against our expectation, we found that health IT investment was not negatively associated with MIP. There may be some possible reasons that the real effect of health IT on MIPs was not observed; barriers including communication problems among health ITs, shorter sample period, lower IT investment, and lack of a quality of care measure as a moderating variable. PMID:25995964

  14. Malpractice, tort reform, and you: an introduction to risk management.

    PubMed

    Feld, Andrew D; Walta, Douglas

    2004-02-01

    The current malpractice crisis has been called the "perfect storm". Doctors are finding practice costs unsustainable. Patients are finding access to care jeopardized. Cost of care is escalating. The system does not deter medical error, compensate most injured victims, produce any result quickly. These factors are creating enough of a crisis to urgently address and merit prompt solution. However, if history is any guide, the debate over malpractice will continue to rage. Reforms will likely be slow. Thus the practicing gastroenterologist, while working for or supporting efforts toward a solution, is well advised to keep up to date with the practice of gastroenterology, but also understand the medical legal matters and have a risk management strategy that will hopefully help keep the malpractice crisis a theoretical rather than personal concern. The following articles in this series are intended to help.

  15. Let's make a deal: trading malpractice reform for health reform.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M; Hyman, David A

    2014-01-01

    Physician leadership is required to improve the efficiency and reliability of the US health care system, but many physicians remain lukewarm about the changes needed to attain these goals. Malpractice liability-a sore spot for decades-may exacerbate physician resistance. The politics of malpractice have become so lawyer-centric that recognizing the availability of broader gains from trade in tort reform is an important insight for health policy makers. To obtain relief from malpractice liability, physicians may be willing to accept other policy changes that more directly improve access to care and reduce costs. For example, the American Medical Association might broker an agreement between health reform proponents and physicians to enact federal legislation that limits malpractice liability and simultaneously restructures fee-for-service payment, heightens transparency regarding the quality and cost of health care services, and expands practice privileges for other health professionals. There are also reasons to believe that tort reform can make ongoing health care delivery reforms work better, in addition to buttressing health reform efforts that might otherwise fail politically.

  16. Professional Malpractice: Are Educators at Risk? Policy Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha

    Although no lawsuits claiming educational malpractice have yet been successful, it is conceivable that educators and school systems will be held legally accountable for correctly diagnosing pupils' needs, placing them in appropriate instructional programs, and reporting their progress to parents or guardians. This bulletin briefly examines…

  17. Medical malpractice in perspective. I--The American experience.

    PubMed Central

    Quam, L; Dingwall, R; Fenn, P

    1987-01-01

    Concern over the possibility of an American style medical malpractice "crisis" in the United Kingdom has recently been voiced by members of both medical and legal professions. The validity of such fears is examined by reviewing the conditions that have given rise to the current American difficulties. It is argued that the rise in malpractice insurance premiums and associated restrictions in availability should be seen against the background of underwriting problems specific to medical liability in conjunction with a general decline in reinsurance cover. The evidence in relation to the clinical and resource implications of malpractice is analysed. In particular, arguments that increased litigation has influenced the practice of "defensive" medicine and the choice of specialty are critically examined. Medical malpractice claims and insurance are only part of a professional environment which is undergoing dramatic social and economic changes, many of which seem more plausible candidates to be treated as important influences on the nature and organisation of health care in the United States. Images p1532-a PMID:3111624

  18. Educational Malpractice: American Trends and Implications for Australian Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalley, P. W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Educational malpractice developments in America may affect legal accountability of Australian teachers and educational institutions. This paper discusses significant American cases and commentators' observations in the context of the Australian legal system. Teachers should embrace their widening legal responsibility in order to advance…

  19. Malpractice in Teacher Education: The Improbable Becomes Increasingly Possible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clear, Delbert

    1983-01-01

    In the past, the absence of performance standards for which teachers and teacher education institutions could be held accountable has helped protect teacher colleges from malpractice charges. As research identifies correlates between teacher behavior and student achievement, however, institutions which fail to teach minimum competencies may become…

  20. Evaluating the medical malpractice system and options for reform.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. medical malpractice liability system has two principal objectives: to compensate patients who are injured through the negligence of healthcare providers and to deter providers from practicing negligently. In practice, however, the system is slow and costly to administer. It both fails to compensate patients who have suffered from bad medical care and compensates those who haven't. According to opinion surveys of physicians, the system creates incentives to undertake cost-ineffective treatments based on fear of legal liability--to practice "defensive medicine." The failures of the liability system and the high cost of health care in the United States have led to an important debate over tort policy. How well does malpractice law achieve its intended goals? How large of a problem is defensive medicine and can reforms to malpractice law reduce its impact on healthcare spending? The flaws of the existing system have led a number of states to change their laws in a way that would reduce malpractice liability--to adopt "tort reforms." Evidence from several studies suggests that wisely chosen reforms have the potential to reduce healthcare spending significantly with no adverse impact on patient health outcomes.

  1. An improved accrual: reducing medical malpractice year-end adjustments.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Healthcare organizations can improve their year-end malpractice insurance accruals by taking the following steps: Maintain productive communication. Match accrual and accounting policies. Adjust amount of credit to own historical loss experience. Request more frequent analysis. Obtain a second opinion.

  2. An overview of medical malpractice litigation and the perceived crisis.

    PubMed

    Litvin, S Gerald

    2005-04-01

    In this overview of medical malpractice litigation in the United States, practical and philosophic aspects of the so-called malpractice litigation crisis are addressed. After reviewing the historical, legal rationale for compensating victims of negligent conduct by others, attention is focused on the plight of physicians who are charged with medical negligence and the oppressive insurance premiums that impose a heavy burden on all health care providers, particularly those in the surgical fields. A variety of political solutions advanced to "correct" the problem is reviewed. A historical prospective of malpractice litigation in the United States is presented together with an analysis of various legislative proposals--many of which have already been enacted in various states that will ostensibly "cure" the problems that concern clinicians. Consideration of the various legislative proposals includes: arbitrary limits on pain and suffering awards (caps); elimination of joint and several liability; regulation of attorneys fees; elimination of the collateral source rule; abrogation of punitive damages; proposals for periodic payments; and statutes of repose. Various procedural changes in the processing of malpractice claims are reviewed and analyzed from the perspective of both fairness and efficacy.

  3. 38 CFR 46.3 - Malpractice payment reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting VA entity— (i) Name and address of the reporting entity; (ii) Name, title and telephone number of... reporting. 46.3 Section 46.3 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Reporting § 46.3 Malpractice payment reporting. (a) VA will file a report with the National...

  4. Malpractice in Radiology: What Should You Worry About?

    PubMed Central

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Santoni, Mariangela; Mancarella, Paola; Passariello, Roberto; Arbarello, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years the professional role of the radiologist has been evolved due to the increasing involvement in the clinical management of the patient. Radiologists have thus been increasingly charged by new duties and liabilities, exposing them to higher risks of legal claims made against them. Malpractice lawsuits in radiology are commonly related to inappropriate medical care or to the poor physician-patient relationship. In the present paper, we provide overview of the basic principles of the medical malpractice law and the main legal issues and causes of legal actions against diagnostic and interventional radiologists. We also address some issues to help radiologists to reduce risks and consequences of malpractice lawsuits. These include (1) following the standard of care to the best of their ability, (2) cautious use of off-label devices, (3) better communication skills among healthcare workers and with the patient, and (4) ensuring being covered by adequate malpractice insurance. Lastly, we described definitions of some medicolegal terms and concepts that are thought to be useful for radiologists to know. PMID:23691316

  5. Controlling large malpractice claims: the unexpected impact of damage caps.

    PubMed

    Gronfein, W P; Kinney, E D

    1991-01-01

    Indiana's comprehensive malpractice reforms, inaugurated in 1975, include a cap on damages, a mandated medical review before trial, and a state insurance fund to pay claims equal to or greater than $100,000. We have found that the amount of compensation going to claimants with such large malpractice claims in Indiana is, on average, substantially higher than in Michigan and Ohio. Indiana's mean claim severity between 1977 and 1988 was $404,832, while the means for Michigan and Ohio were $290,022 and $303,220, respectively, with the difference between these three means being highly significant. Although data on claim and claimant characteristics reveal considerable interstate variation, the results of regression analyses show that Indiana claim payment amounts are higher than Michigan or Ohio payments, independent of the effect of factors such as sex, age, severity of injury, allegations of negligence, and year of settlement.

  6. Physician communication skills and malpractice claims. A complex relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, T E; Tschann, J M; Gullion, D S; Oppenberg, A A

    1989-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between patients' opinions about their physicians' communication skills and the physician's history of medical malpractice claims. The sample consisted of 107 physicians and 2,030 of their patients who had had an operation or a delivery. Although patients tended to give their physicians favorable ratings, they were least satisfied with the amount of explanations they received. Patients gave higher ratings to general surgeons and obstetrician-gynecologists and poorer ratings to orthopedists and anesthesiologists. Women and better-educated patients gave higher ratings on explanations and communication to physicians with fewer claims. Men and patients with less education, however, gave higher ratings on these dimensions to physicians with more claims. These findings suggest the need for physicians to tailor their communications to a patient's individual needs. Improved communication between physicians and patients may result in fewer nonmeritorious malpractice claims while leading to less costly resolution of meritorious claims. PMID:2735043

  7. Clinical psychopharmacology and medical malpractice: the four Ds.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2014-09-01

    The four Ds of medical malpractice are duty, dereliction (negligence or deviation from the standard of care), damages, and direct cause. Each of these four elements must be proved to have been present, based on a preponderance of the evidence, for malpractice to be found. The principles of psychopharmacology and the information in the package insert for a drug often play a central role in deciding whether dereliction and direct cause for damages were or were not applicable in a particular case. The author uses data from two cases in which patients were inadvertently fatally poisoned by medication to illustrate two ways in which such information can affect the outcome. In one case, the clinician should have known that he was giving a toxic dose to the patient, whereas that was not true in the other case.

  8. Malpractice insurance options: claims-made vs. occurrence coverage.

    PubMed

    Singer, P E

    1985-07-01

    Professional liability insurance is not the trivial matter it was once. Premium costs are significant, the threat of malpractice litigation is tangible, sources of coverage are diverse, and there has been a proliferation of insurance carriers of different genres. Such changes have elevated the choice of malpractice insurance policy to the status of a major decision about which practitioners must be well informed. Differences between claims-made and occurrence coverage are clarified, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type of coverage are canvassed. The benefits of insuring with a commercial carrier versus a physician-owned company are also discussed in the light of trends in the structure of the liability insurance industry.

  9. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Results Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6%) was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9%) was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7%) were ready to disclose their error

  10. Management of Re-Occurring Cases of Examination Malpractice in Plateau State Collage of Health Technology Pankshin, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusu, Paul Bot; Gotan, Anthony; Deshi, Jummai M.; Gambo, Barashe

    2016-01-01

    Nigeria's educational system is gradually degenerating, as the sanctity of education process has been affected by malpractice. The purpose of this paper was to assess re-occurring incidence of examination malpractice in Plateau State College of Health Technology Pankshin, Nigeria. It looked at cases of examination malpractice and students'…

  11. Factor Responsible for Examination Malpractices as Expressed by Undergraduates of Osun State University, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf; Adeoti, Florence; Olufunke, Yinusa Rasheedat; Ruth, Bamgbose Oluwayemisi

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated perception of undergraduates on factors responsible for examination malpractices. The study is a descriptive study; a sample of two hundred (200) undergraduates formed the participants for the study. A questionnaire titled: "Factor responsible for examination malpractices was used for data collection. Data collected…

  12. Prevalence of Teachers' Professional Malpractices in Tanzanian Public Secondary Schools: What Ought to Be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mfaume, Hamisi; Bilinga, Margareth

    2017-01-01

    This study explored stakeholders' views on preventive measures towards increasing teachers' malpractices in schools in Tanzania. Specifically, the study sought to identify prevalent forms of teachers' malpractices; explore factors for their occurrence; and explore views on how to forestall the problem. It draws on qualitative and quantitative data…

  13. Perspective: Malpractice in an academic medical center: a frequently overlooked aspect of professionalism education.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Mark S; Seib, Carolyn D; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra R; Pachter, H Leon

    2011-03-01

    Understanding how medical malpractice occurs and is resolved is important to improving patient safety and preserving the viability of a physician's career in academic medicine. Every physician is likely to be sued by a patient, and how the physician responds can change his or her professional life. However, the principles of medical malpractice are rarely taught or addressed during residency training. In fact, many faculty at academic medical centers know little about malpractice.In this article, the authors propose that information about the inciting causes of malpractice claims and their resolution should be incorporated into residency professionalism curricula both to improve patient safety and to decrease physician anxiety about a crucial aspect of medicine that is not well understood. The authors provide information on national trends in malpractice litigation and residents' understanding of malpractice, then share the results of their in-depth review of surgical malpractice claims filed during 2001-2008 against their academic medical center. The authors incorporated those data into an evidence-driven curriculum for residents, which they propose as a model for helping residents better understand the events that lead to malpractice litigation, as well as its process and prevention.

  14. Students Perception of the Role of Parents in Academia and Continued Examination Malpractice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofoegbu, Felicia I.

    2009-01-01

    The formal school system is bedeviled with many problems some of which have defied satisfactory solutions. One major problem plaguing the Nigerian education system is large scale examination malpractice. The aim of the study is to find out the role of parents in academia in perpetrating and perpetuating examination malpractice. The population of…

  15. External Quality Assurance in Higher Education: How Can It Address Corruption and Other Malpractices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Corruption and malpractices in higher education are today a major concern in nearly all higher education systems worldwide. It is a multifaceted phenomenon and has become particularly visible in the academic domain. This paper represents an exploration of the possible role that quality assurance can play in addressing corruption and malpractices.…

  16. Correlates of Examination Malpractice among Secondary School Students in Oyo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Animasahun, R. A.; Ogunniran, J. O.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlates of examination malpractice among secondary school students in Oyo State, Nigeria. The instrument used for the study was tagged Predisposing Factors towards Examination Malpractice Questionnaire (PFTEMQ). The instrument was administered to 300 students randomly selected from 20 multi staged…

  17. Development of a Composite Measure of State-Level Malpractice Environment

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeanette W; Sohn, Min-Woong; Merkow, Ryan P; Oh, Elissa H; Minami, Christina; Black, Bernard S; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a composite measure of state-level malpractice environment. Data Sources Public use data from the National Practitioner Data Bank, Medical Liability Monitor, the National Conference of State Legislatures, and the American Bar Association. Study Design Principal component analysis of state-level indicators (paid claims rate, malpractice premiums, lawyers per capita, average award size, and malpractice laws), with indirect validation of the composite using receiver-operating characteristic curves to determine how accurately the composite could identify states with high-tort activity and costs. Principal Findings A single composite accounted for over 73 percent of total variance in the seven indicators and demonstrated reasonable criterion validity. Conclusion An empirical composite measure of state-level malpractice risk may offer advantages over single indicators in measuring overall risk and may facilitate cross-state comparisons of malpractice environments. PMID:24117397

  18. The effect of medical malpractice liability on rate of referrals received by specialist physicians.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Spurr, Stephen J; Nan, Bin; Fendrick, A Mark

    2013-10-01

    Using nationally representative data from the United States, this paper analyzed the effect of a state’s medical malpractice environment on referral visits received by specialist physicians. The analytic sample included 12,839 ambulatory visits to specialist care doctors in office-based settings in the United States during 2003–2007. Whether the patient was referred for the visit was examined for its association with the state’s malpractice environment, assessed by the frequency and severity of paid medical malpractice claims, medical malpractice insurance premiums and an indicator for whether the state had a cap on non-economic damages. After accounting for potential confounders such as economic or professional incentives within practices, the analysis showed that statutory caps on non-economic damages of $250,000 were significantly associated with lower likelihood of a specialist receiving referrals, suggesting a potential impact of a state’s medical malpractice environment on physicians’ referral behavior.

  19. Forty years of litigation involving residents and their training: II. Malpractice issues.

    PubMed

    Helms, L B; Helms, C M

    1991-12-01

    The authors reviewed 136 cases of malpractice litigation involving residents or programs of graduate medical education that were reported from 1950 through 1989. Before 1970 malpractice constituted the only area of reported litigation for residents. The number of malpractice cases involving residents increased substantially after 1975, paralleling the growth of malpractice cases nationally. The regional pattern of reported cases involving residents also corresponded with previous findings. Questions of vicarious liability, the applicable standard of care, and residents' supervision were at issue in the great majority of cases. Questions related to judicial procedure, immunity from liability, breach or causation, and informed consent were also litigated. Residents were on the side of the prevailing party in 44% of the cases. Malpractice continues to be the key legal issue facing programs of residency training.

  20. Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Medical Malpractice among Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Che-Ming; Lien, Che-Hui; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Lin, Mau-Roung; Chang, Hui-Ru; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Our objective was to estimate the incidence of recent burnout in a large sample of Taiwanese physicians and analyze associations with job related satisfaction and medical malpractice experience. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey. Physicians were asked to fill out a questionnaire that included demographic information, practice characteristics, burnout, medical malpractice experience, job satisfaction, and medical error experience. There are about 2% of total physicians. Physicians who were members of the Taiwan Society of Emergency Medicine, Taiwan Surgical Association, Taiwan Association of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Taiwan Pediatric Association, and Taiwan Stroke Association, and physicians of two medical centers, three metropolitan hospitals, and two local community hospitals were recruited. Results: There is high incidence of burnout among Taiwan physicians. In our research, Visiting staff (VS) and residents were more likely to have higher level of burnout of the emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA). There was no difference in burnout types in gender. Married had higher-level burnout in EE. Physicians who were 20~30 years old had higher burnout levels in EE, those 31~40 years old had higher burnout levels in DP, and PA. Physicians who worked in medical centers had a higher rate in EE, DP, and who worked in metropolitan had higher burnout in PA. With specialty-in-training, physicians had higher-level burnout in EE and DP, but lower burnout in PA. Physicians who worked 13-17hr continuously had higher-level burnout in EE. Those with ≥41 times/week of being on call had higher-level burnout in EE and DP. Physicians who had medical malpractice experience had higher-level burnout in EE, DP, and PA. Physicians who were not satisfied with physician-patient relationships had higher-level burnout than those who were satisfied. Conclusion: Physicians in Taiwan face both burnout and a high risk

  1. Curb your premium: the impact of monitoring malpractice claims.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Garcia, Sofia; Grembi, Veronica

    2014-02-01

    We study a policy aimed at increasing the level of information on medical malpractice costs and the risk exposure of local public healthcare providers. The policy is based on enhanced monitoring of medical malpractice claims by the level of government that rules providers in a multilevel institutional setting. In particular, we implement a difference-in-differences strategy using Italian data at the provider level from 2001 to 2008 to evaluate the impact of monitoring claims on medical liability expenditures, measured as insurance premiums and legal expenditures, which was adopted by only some Regions. Our results show that this information-enhancing policy reduces paid premiums by around 15%. This reduced-form effect might arise by higher bargaining power on the demand side or increased competition on the supply side of the insurance market. Validity tests show that our findings are not driven by differential pre-policy trends between treated and control providers. Moreover, this policy could be cheaply implemented also in other institutional contexts with positive effects.

  2. Malpractice liability, technology choice and negative defensive medicine.

    PubMed

    Feess, Eberhard

    2012-04-01

    We extend the theoretical literature on the impact of malpractice liability by allowing for two treatment technologies, a safe and a risky one. The safe technology bears no failure risk, but leads to patient-specific disutility since it cannot completely solve the health problems. By contrast, the risky technology (for instance a surgery) may entirely cure patients, but fail with some probability depending on the hospital's care level. Tight malpractice liability increases care levels if the risky technology is chosen at all, but also leads to excessively high incentives for avoiding the liability exposure by adopting the safe technology. We refer to this distortion toward the safe technology as negative defensive medicine. Taking the problem of negative defensive medicine seriously, the second best optimal liability needs to balance between the over-incentive for the safe technology in case of tough liability and the incentive to adopt little care for the risky technology in case of weak liability. In a model with errors in court, we find that gross negligence where hospitals are held liable only for very low care levels outperforms standard negligence, even though standard negligence would implement the first best efficient care level.

  3. Medical malpractice in perspective. II--The implications for Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Quam, L; Fenn, P; Dingwall, R

    1987-01-01

    The "malpractice crisis" in the United States cannot be understood in isolation. Litigation is precipitated by features of the American health care and social security systems. Relative to the United Kingdom, there are fewer barriers of access to the courts, although the role of contingency fees has probably been exaggerated. Given the great institutional differences between the UK and the USA, the crisis seems unlikely to be replicated here unless there are further moves towards privatising both the costs of providing health care and the costs of its failures. It is concluded that a marginal change in the frequency or average cost of claims could have a serious impact on National Health Service resources, the medical defence societies, recruitment to specialties, and clinical practice. Debate over possible reforms is compromised by the dearth of good empirical data. Any changes, however, must address both the deterrence of bad practice and the compensation of injured patients. Images p1599-a PMID:3113546

  4. [Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice--the second victim].

    PubMed

    Wienke, A

    2013-04-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 [1]. Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decisions are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession and the actual requirements of the

  5. The Ecology of Defensive Medicine and Malpractice Litigation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using an evolutionary game, we show that patients and physicians can interact with predator-prey relationships. Litigious patients who seek compensation are the ‘predators’ and physicians are their ‘prey’. Physicians can adapt to the risk of being sued by performing defensive medicine. We find that improvements in clinical safety can increase the share of litigious patients and leave unchanged the share of physicians who perform defensive medicine. This paradoxical result is consistent with increasing trends in malpractice claims in spite of safety improvements, observed for example in empirical studies on anesthesiologists. Perfect cooperation with neither defensive nor litigious behaviors can be the Pareto-optimal solution when it is not a Nash equilibrium, so maximizing social welfare may require government intervention. PMID:26982056

  6. Malpractice liability, patient safety, and the personification of medical injury: opportunities for academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2006-09-01

    The political battle over trial lawyers and "tort reform" centers on whether or not to reduce incentives to sue for medical malpractice by capping damages in malpractice suits and limiting legal fees. But the current struggle mis-states the case for innovation in medical malpractice policy. Rather than focus exclusively on the financial consequences of legal claims, malpractice reform should move closer to the bedside, emphasizing error prevention, open communication, rapid compensation, and efficient insurance of the costs of injury. Academic health centers are well positioned to lead this effort in each of their three recognized missions: patient care, teaching, and research. Academic health centers enjoy greater institutional cohesiveness and research capacity than most other medical practice settings. Perhaps most important, their high visibility ensures that patients who suffer avoidable harm within their walls become salient to the public as individuals, not merely as dollar entries in a litigation ledger.

  7. A review of medical malpractice issues in Malaysia under tort litigation system.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Siti Naaishah; Khodapanahandeh, Solmaz

    2014-04-07

    Medical malpractice cases are a matter of much concern in many countries including Malaysia where several cases caught the attention of the public and authorities. Although comprehensive annual statistics on medical negligence claims are not available in Malaysia since such data are not collected systematically in this country there are indications of an upward trend. Medical malpractice cases have been publicized by the media, academic researchers and in government annual reports prompting government policy makers, oversight agencies and the medical profession itself to take appropriate action. The increasing dissatisfaction with the current tort litigation system requires exploring alternatives and new approaches for handling medical malpractice cases. This study aims to examine the difficulties inherent in the tort system in Malaysia for solving medical malpractice claims and evaluates the structure of this system from the perspective of effectiveness, fairness, compensation, accessibility, and accountability.

  8. Fewer Successful Malpractice Claims in U.S., but Higher Payouts

    MedlinePlus

    ... is medical director at The Doctors Company in Napa, Calif. -- the nation's largest physician-owned medical malpractice ... Troxel, M.D., medical director, The Doctors Company, Napa, Calif.; March 27, 2017, JAMA Internal Medicine , online ...

  9. The classic: Report of the Committee on Suits for Malpractice. 1879.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Eugene F

    2009-02-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by E. F. Sanger, Report of the Committee on Suits for Malpractice. An accompanying biographical sketch of E. F. Sanger, AM, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-008-0640-6 . The Classic Article is (c)1879 and is reprinted with courtesy from Sanger EF. Report of the Committee on Suits for Malpractice. Trans Maine Med Assoc.1879;6:1-22.

  10. Court Decisions on Medical Malpractice in China After the New Tort Liability Law.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Li, Yuan; Fan, Fei; Liu, Xin; Deng, Zhen-Hua

    2016-09-01

    A new Tort Law of the People's Republic of China became effective on July 1, 2010. We undertook an analysis of medical malpractice lawsuits brought before regional courts in Beijing districts after this new Tort Liability Law went into effect. In total, 726 cases eventuating in a final verdict were collected from the Beijing district courts from 2011 to 2013 in this retrospective study; 83.7% of the 726 alleged instances of medical malpractice were confirmed to be malpractice by the final verdict. The disciplines most frequently involved with claims of medical malpractice were obstetrics and gynecology, the most frequent outcomes was death, and the most common types of case associated with malpractice was surgery related. The average length of time between the occurrence of the injury and closure of the claim was 9.2 months, and the average payment was ¥163,000. Since the introduction of the new Tort Liability Law, the average time to complete a litigation was shortened, but it has made little apparent difference otherwise.

  11. Malpractice liability burden in midwifery: a survey of Michigan certified nurse-midwives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Lori, Jody R; Siefert, Kristine A; Jacobson, Peter D; Ransom, Scott B

    2008-01-01

    A statewide survey was conducted among 282 nurse-midwives in Michigan to examine the extent of their current medical liability burden. Two hundred ten responses were received for an adjusted response rate of 76.9%. Data from 145 certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) who were currently engaged in clinical practice in Michigan were used for this analysis. Sixty-nine percent of CNMs reported that liability concerns had a negative impact on their clinical decision making. Most CNMs (88.1%) acquired malpractice insurance coverage through an employer, whereas 4.9% were practicing "bare" due to difficulty in obtaining coverage. Thirty-five percent of the respondents had been named in a malpractice claim at least once in their career, and 15.5% had at least one malpractice payment of $30,000 or more made on their behalf. CNMs who purchased malpractice insurance coverage themselves or were going bare were significantly less likely to include obstetrics in their practice than their counterparts covered through an employer (70.6% versus 87.2%; P = .04). These findings among Michigan CNMs call for further investigation into the consequences of the current malpractice situation surrounding nurse-midwifery practice and its influence on obstetric care, particularly among women from disadvantaged populations.

  12. Present status of obstetrics in family practice and the effects of malpractice issues.

    PubMed

    Bredfeldt, R; Colliver, J A; Wesley, R M

    1989-03-01

    A survey of 800 active members of the American Academy of Family Physicians 1985-1987 membership directory was conducted for the purpose of determining the impact, over time, of malpractice issues upon the practice of obstetrics by family physicians. The survey response rate was 60.4 percent. Almost 20 percent of all respondents reported that they have never provided obstetric care of any type. Another 40 percent have provided obstetric care previously but have now discontinued this care, while the remaining 40 percent currently offer obstetric care to their patients. The proportion of respondents who discontinued the practice of obstetrics because of increased risk of malpractice litigation increased significantly over the years from 1947 to 1986 (P = .0084). The proportion of respondents who discontinued obstetric practice because of increased malpractice insurance costs also increased significantly from 1945 to 1986 (P = .0002). The proportion of those entering practice during the past five years who decided not to offer obstetric services because of malpractice risks was significantly greater than the proportion entering practice earlier (21.0 percent vs 2.0 percent, P = .0090). Although the current patterns of obstetric practice showed regional variation, the accelerating impact of malpractice risk and insurance cost on these patterns was similar throughout the nation.

  13. 20 CFR 30.609 - Is a settlement or judgment received as a result of allegations of medical malpractice in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... result of allegations of medical malpractice in treating an illness covered by EEOICPA a recovery that must be reported to OWCP? 30.609 Section 30.609 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of allegations of medical malpractice in treating an illness covered by EEOICPA a recovery that...

  14. Malpractice claims in gastrointestinal endoscopy: analysis of an insurance industry data base.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, P D; Plumeri, P A

    1993-01-01

    We investigated 610 endoscopy-associated and 486 gastroenterology-associated malpractice claim files of the Physicians Insurers Association of America data-sharing project. We determined the relative malpractice claim risk for each of the major types of endoscopic procedures by comparing claim frequencies with Medicare performance frequencies. Relative malpractice risks were 1.0 for sigmoidoscopy, 1.2 for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 1.6 for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and 1.7 for colonoscopy. "Improper performance" was alleged in 54% of claims and "diagnosis error" in 24% of claims. Of 121 claim files alleging a diagnostic error, 74 (61%) pertained to missed malignancies, of which 69% were colorectal. Of 147 claims alleging iatrogenic injury, 140 (95%) involved perforation or similar direct injury to the gastrointestinal tract. Problems with consent were alleged in 44% of 158 endoscopy-related claim files alleging additional associated issues.

  15. Commentary: Exploiting the overlap: using utilization management to reduce medical malpractice.

    PubMed

    Dulworth, Sherrie

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a practical way in which hospitals can reduce medical malpractice exposure that is related to omissions and delays in care. We illustrate our approach using the results of a risk/medical management study performed at an acute-care hospital. Traditional risk management (RM) often focuses retrospectively on adverse events and may miss opportunities to prevent errors related to omissions and delays in care. Close-to-real-time utilization management (UM) activity offers ready potential to improve quality and reduce medical malpractice--but only if UM can work synergistically with RM. It is our conclusion that hospitals can implement systematic processes to identify and intervene in patterns of omissions and delays and improve the communication and synergy among stakeholders and thereby improve patient safety and reduce their medical malpractice risks.

  16. Medical malpractice, murder and the academic community: trouble ahead.

    PubMed

    Coats, A J

    2001-06-01

    The morale of the medical professional is at an historic low in many countries. The recent case of a UK general practitioner being convicted of being a mass murderer, combined with increasing criticism of medical negligence and malpractice and an excessive influence of the large pharmaceutical companies has lead to the perception that the profession is under siege. Our professional leadership have not had sufficient public awareness to allay these concerns, and the resulting dip in morale is fast turning into a dangerous rout. We must review what has lead to this situation and what we should be doing now to put it right.Clinical research is under attack and the motives and ethics of large pharmaceutical company sponsorships of clinical trials is under increasing question. At this time there is a risk that medicine, and academic medicine in particular, will lose its attractiveness and the pace of achievements we have seen and benefited from in the last 2 decades may slow. The public debate should move on, it should move on to evaluate how much it would cost to reduce medical error rates to an acceptable level (to stop them altogether is impossible). It should move on to how we can get clinical trials designed and paid for by the public purse rather than merely grumbling that pharmaceutical companies take too much control of trials that they almost alone now appear to be sponsoring. And we should move on to debate about the role and status of the medical profession in the modern era. We can no longer do our best in secret and expect the public to trust us unquestioningly. The public wants and needs to be involved in our decision-making problems and errors. Only through informed debate will we improve health for the while population, now and in the future.

  17. Malpractice and the National Practitioner Data Bank: what OR nurses need to know.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R S

    1991-08-01

    The National Practitioner Data Bank will record any payments made for any reason related to a malpractice suit in a central data bank available to a number of designated parties. Hospitals will be required to request this information to screen applicants and at least every 2 years for appointment renewals. The data bank may also be consulted by hospitals and state licensing boards as they deem necessary and by professional societies when reviewing membership applications. It is in the best interests of all malpractice defendants to insist on adequate representation of their personal, professional, and financial interests, which may necessitate insurance carriers providing each defendant with individual counsel.

  18. Health care providers and facilities: medical malpractice and tort reform--2005. End of Year Issue Brief.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Andrew

    2005-12-31

    As health care professionals continue to feel the crunch of rising malpractice insurance rates and increased jury awards, medical malpractice remains a priority for acute care professionals. Medical associations claim that rapidly increasing premiums and the declining number of insurers often lead physicians to stop practicing medicine or to relocate. This may lead to a shortage of physicians, particularly physicians who practice high-risk specialties such as neurology. The pressure to retain an adequate supply of health care professionals is particularly acute in rural areas. It is difficult to pinpoint the origins of the escalating cost of medical malpractice coverage. Insurers and physicians claim excessive litigation and overly generous jury awards have hardened the market. Trial lawyers and consumer advocacy groups assert insurance premium rates have not reflected increasing medical inflation or the payouts of jury awards during the last 30 years. The majority of states have some form of basic coverage requirement that medical malpractice insurers must offer. However, because of the complexities and variety of coverage plans, physicians often are unaware that gaps in coverage exist. As of May 2005, the American Medical Association (AMA) has declared a state

  19. Medical Malpractice Claims in Radiation Oncology: A Population-Based Study 1985-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Deborah C.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Fox, Dov; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine trends in radiation oncology malpractice claims and expenses during the last 28 years and to compare radiation oncology malpractice claims to those of other specialties. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of closed malpractice claims filed from 1985 to 2012, collected by a nationwide medical liability insurance trade association. We analyzed characteristics and trends among closed claims, indemnity payments (payments to plaintiff), and litigation expenses. We also compared radiation oncology malpractice claims to those of 21 other medical specialties. Time series dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation (2012 was the index year). Results: There were 1517 closed claims involving radiation oncology, of which 342 (22.5%) were paid. Average and median indemnity payments were $276,792 and $122,500, respectively, ranking fifth and eighth, respectively, among the 22 specialty groups. Linear regression modeling of time trends showed decreasing total numbers of claims (β = −1.96 annually, P=.003), increasing average litigation expenses paid (β = +$1472 annually, P≤.001), and no significant changes in average indemnity payments (β = −$681, P=.89). Conclusions: Medical professional liability claims filed against radiation oncologists are not common and have declined in recent years. However, indemnity payments in radiation oncology are large relative to those of many other specialties. In recent years, the average indemnity payment has been stable, whereas litigation expenses have increased.

  20. High physician concern about malpractice risk predicts more aggressive diagnostic testing in office-based practice.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily R; Reschovsky, James D; Katz, David A; Mello, Michelle M

    2013-08-01

    Despite widespread agreement that physicians who practice defensive medicine drive up health care costs, the extent to which defensive medicine increases costs is unclear. The differences in findings to date stem in part from the use of two distinct approaches for assessing physicians' perceived malpractice risk. In this study we used an alternative strategy: We linked physicians' responses regarding their levels of malpractice concern as reported in the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey to Medicare Parts A and B claims for the patients they treated during the study period, 2007-09. We found that physicians who reported a high level of malpractice concern were most likely to engage in practices that would be considered defensive when diagnosing patients who visited their offices with new complaints of chest pain, headache, or lower back pain. No consistent relationship was seen, however, when state-level indicators of malpractice risk replaced self-rated concern. Reducing defensive medicine may require approaches focused on physicians' perceptions of legal risk and the underlying factors driving those perceptions.

  1. Forty Years of Litigation Involving Residents and Their Training: II. Malpractice Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Lelia B.; Helms, Charles M.

    1991-01-01

    A review of 136 malpractice cases involving residents and resident programs 1950-83 found a substantial increase in cases after 1975. Most concerned vicarious liability, applicable standard of care, and resident supervision. Residents were on the side of the prevailing party in 44 percent of cases. (Author/MSE)

  2. The Educator and the Liability Law of Professional Malpractice: A Historical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, David G., Sr.

    The issue of whether educators and the education profession can be held liable for professional judgments that result in the failure of students to succeed academically is addressed. An overview of past educational malpractice claims is presented, with an outline of the fundamental legal questions in several case histories. Judicial decisions in…

  3. Donohue v. Copiague Union Free School District: New York Chooses Not to Recognize "Educational Malpractice."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cynthia A.

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes the court's opinion in the "Donohue" case and suggests that there was sufficient basis for the court to adopt an "educational malpractice" cause of action because the school district did not make means for remediation available to the plaintiff. Available from Albany Law School of Union University, 80 New Scotland…

  4. Insurance: Profitability of the Medical Malpractice and General Liability Lines. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report on the profitability of the property/casualty insurance industry and in particular of the medical malpractice insurance line was prepared at the request of Representatives Henry A. Waxman and James J. Florio and Senators Paul Simon, Daniel K. Inouye, Albert Gore, Jr., and Jay D. Rockefeller. Four different estimates of medical…

  5. Reformers, Batting Averages, and Malpractice: The Case for Caution in Value-Added Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The essay considers two analogies that help to reveal the limitations of value-added modeling: the first, a comparison with batting averages, shows that the model's reliability is quite limited even though year-to-year correlation figures may seem impressive; the second, a comparison between medical malpractice and so-called educational…

  6. Statutory caps: an involuntary contribution to the medical malpractice insurance crisis or a reasonable mechanism for obtaining affordable health care?

    PubMed

    Chupkovich, P J

    1993-01-01

    A medical malpractice insurance crisis occurred in the mid-1970s and mid-1980s evidenced by escalating malpractice insurance rates and increasing numbers of malpractice claims. Insurance companies maintained that the increase in insurance rates was necessary because of the sharp rise in the number of malpractice lawsuits, astronomical damage awards, and ineffective mechanisms to prevent and to eliminate nonmeritorious claims. Physicians responded by forming their own insurance companies, cancelling high-risk procedures, and orchestrating intensive legislative lobbying for tort reform. Insurance companies, physicians, and the legislature collaborated efforts to resolve this medical malpractice crisis. A national debate erupted regarding the proper way to address the medical malpractice insurance crisis. Insurance companies and physicians pressured state legislatures to reform liability laws that, in their opinion, permitted recovery of excessive damage awards by plaintiffs. Consumer groups and lawyers suggested tighter regulation of the insurance industry. State legislatures, in an attempt to remedy the perception that injured plaintiffs were overcompensated for their injuries, enacted "tort reform legislation," which included statutory caps on damages recoverable in medical malpractice actions. As a result of the extensive lobbying effort by physicians and insurance companies, twenty-seven states enacted statutes limiting recovery of damages in medical malpractice lawsuits. Lawyers responded by challenging state malpractice legislation on constitutional grounds, alleging violations of federal and state equal protection and due process clauses and the Seventh Amendment right to a jury trial. Opponents of the cap also asserted violations of state constitution provisions such as the "open courts" provision or the "special legislation" clause. To date, the state courts have held that statutory caps are unconstitutional. Statutory caps and other tort reform measures are

  7. An analysis of malpractice litigation related to the management of brain aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Raghav; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Moore, Justin M; Adeeb, Nimer; Patel, Apar S; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-12-23

    OBJECTIVE Given the highly complex and demanding clinical environment in which neurosurgeons operate, the probability of facing a medical malpractice claim is high. Recent emphasis on tort reform within the political sphere has brought this issue to the forefront of medical literature. Despite the widespread fear of litigation in the medical community, few studies have provided an analysis of malpractice litigation in the field. Here, the authors attempt to delineate the medicolegal factors that impel plaintiffs to file medical malpractice claims related to the management of brain aneurysms, and to better characterize the nature of these lawsuits. METHODS The online legal database WestLawNext was searched to find all medical malpractice cases related to brain aneurysms across a 30-year period. All state and federal jury verdicts and settlements relevant to the search criterion were considered. RESULTS Sixty-six cases were obtained. The average age of the patient was 46.7 years. Seventy-one percent were female. The cases were distributed across 16 states. The jury found in favor of the plaintiff in 40.9% of cases, with a mean payout of $8,765,405, and in favor of the defendant in 28.8% of the cases. A failure to diagnose and/or a failure to treat in a timely manner were the 2 most commonly alleged causes of malpractice. Settlements, which were reached in 25.8% of the cases, had a mean payout of $1,818,250. Neurosurgeons accounted for 6.7% of all defendants. CONCLUSIONS Unlike other medical specialties, a majority of the verdicts were not in the defendant's favor. The mean payouts were nearly 5-fold less in cases in which a settlement was reached, as opposed to a summary judgment. Neurosurgeons accounted for a small percentage of all codefendants.

  8. Limiting Exposure to Medical Malpractice Claims and Defamatory Cyber Postings via Patient Contracts

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    The documents patients sign on admission to a medical practice can constitute a legal contract. Medical practices around the country are attempting to use these documents as a prospective defense against medical malpractice claims. Protective contractual provisions are often attacked on grounds that they are legally void as a result of unconscionability. Widespread use of arbitration clauses have been met with mixed success. Arbitration clauses that limit damages available in medical negligence cases have been stricken in some states as having provisions that impose excessive entry costs on a patient starting the arbitration process. Other provisions relating to prequalification requirements for expert witnesses are now being used with increasing frequency. Clauses have even been placed in patient contracts that address cyber postings of adverse claims against physicians. Prospective patient contracts may be an effective means to limit exposure to medical malpractice lawsuits and to minimize defamatory cyber postings. PMID:19057975

  9. The flaws in state 'apology' and 'disclosure' laws dilute their intended impact on malpractice suits.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Anna C; Mello, Michelle M; Sommer, Shannon; Hardy, Mary; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2010-09-01

    Apologies are rare in the medical world, where health care providers fear that admissions of guilt or expressions of regret could be used by plaintiffs in malpractice lawsuits. Nevertheless, some states are moving toward giving health care providers legal protection so that they feel free to apologize to patients for a medical mistake. Advocates believe that these laws are beneficial for patients and providers. However, our analysis of "apology" and "disclosure" laws in thirty-four states and the District of Columbia finds that most of the laws have major shortcomings. These may actually discourage comprehensive disclosures and apologies and weaken the laws' impact on malpractice suits. Many could be resolved by improved statutory design and communication of new legal requirements and protections.

  10. The admissibility of scientific evidence in psychiatric malpractice: junk science and the Daubert case.

    PubMed

    Tancredi, L R; Giannini, A J

    1994-12-01

    The defence in malpractice cases has traditionally relied upon a commonly accepted body of knowledge. According to the American 'Frye rule', this knowledge could either have been accepted generally or by a 'respectable minority' of physicians. The US Supreme Court, however, has recently ruled in the Daubert case that conclusions not subject to peer review are acceptable in malpractice cases. The authors analyse the implications of the Daubert decision using the case-study method. Two alternative-scenarios of a hypothetical case are analysed. The potential effect of Daubert places the US psychiatrist-defendant in an untenable position. Either use or non-use of non-peer-reviewed studies in clinical practice could produce a finding of negligence. Furthermore, the responsibility to assess scientific acceptability in US courts has shifted from expert witnesses to judges who are usually without scientific training.

  11. Radiology medical malpractice suits in gastrointestinal radiology: prevalence, causes, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stephen R; Shah, Shivam; Ghosh, Shanchita; Castro, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence, causes, and outcomes of GI malpractice suits in a survey of 8,401 radiologists. The malpractice histories of 8,401 radiologists from 47 states were evaluated from credentialing data of all radiologists participating in the network of One Call Medical Inc. Thirty-two percent of radiologists were defendants in at least one malpractice suit. Of the 4,073 total claims, 346 (8.49 %) were related to the gastrointestinal system. The most frequent primary allegations were failure to diagnose, 65.9 %, and procedural complications, 17.1 %. The commonest missed diagnoses were malignancy, 31.6 %; pneumoperitoneum, 19.3 %; and appendicitis, 14.5 %. Payment to the plaintiff occurred in 75.8 % of claims pertinent to cancer, 73.2 % for missed pneumoperitoneum, and 62.5 % related to appendicitis. Of cases in which a ruling was made in favor of the plaintiff, median payments for pneumoperitoneum was $215,000, for primary cancer $200,000, and for appendicitis $60,000. Among procedurally related errors resulting in judgment against a defending radiologist, 78.6 % of claims regarding retained foreign body, 75 % of barium enema cases, and 62.5 % of liver biopsy resulted in a payment to the plaintiff. Among all resolved cases, the median award was $30,000 for unrecognized foreign body retention, $100,000 for barium enema complications, and $400,000 for liver biopsy complication. Of all GI malpractice claims, failure to diagnose was the most prevalent. Among them, approximately three fourths of claims related to either the diagnosis of primary cancer or for detection of a pneumoperitoneum.

  12. A medical malpractice understanding to FASB ASU no. 2010-24.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C; Kitchen, Patrick J

    2011-10-01

    FASB ASU No.2010-24, Healthcare Entities (Topic 954): Presentation of Insurance Claims and Related Insurance Recoveries changes how healthcare entities present medical malpractice liabilities on financial statements. Healthcare CFOs may need the assistance of their auditors and actuaries to ensure that ASU 2010-24 is appropriately implemented. Actuaries need to estimate the recoverable asset, using methods such as historical loss experience, increased limits factor, and commercial premium.

  13. Widespread hyoscine hydrobromide toxicity due to contract manufacturer malpractice : the travacalm episode.

    PubMed

    McEwen, John; Thompson, Barry R; Purcell, Patrick M; Kelly, Larry F; Krauss, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    An outbreak of hyoscine hydrobromide toxicity was detected through the Australian pharmacovigilance system. The unexpectedly wide variation in hyoscine hydrobromide content between individual tablets within single packets created difficulties in initially explaining the clinical experiences. Strict time requirements for review of incoming adverse drug reaction reports and close involvement of the highly skilled national drug regulatory laboratory resulted in early identification of the cause of the outbreak and led in turn to the identification of malpractice by the contract manufacturer.

  14. Abraham Lincoln loses a medical malpractice case, debates Stephen A. Douglas, and secures two murder acquittals.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2004-02-01

    An improperly healed fracture was the most common reason for the medical malpractice crisis between the 1830s and 1860s in the United States. As a practicing lawyer in Illinois, Abraham Lincoln defended physicians in medical malpractice law suits. One of these was Dr. Powers Ritchey, who was sued for malpractice in 1855. Lincoln agreed to represent Dr. Ritchey in 1858 as the case was appealed to the supreme court of Illinois. In the interim, Lincoln defended two indicted murderers and won acquittals for both. Between the two murder trials, Lincoln debated Stephen A. Douglas while running for U.S. Senator from Illinois. Lincoln believed that Ritchey's case was poorly represented in the lower court. Ritchey's prior attorneys did not file a bill of exceptions to the testimony of the plaintiff's expert medical witnesses. Lincoln attempted to rebut the allegation of a lack of reasonable medical care and diligence by Ritchey, and he sought to secure a new trial for his client. In its decision, the supreme court of Illinois did not find any error and affirmed the lower court's judgment.

  15. Errors and malpractice lawsuits in radiology: what the radiologist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Santurro, Alessandro; Zaami, Simona; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-09-01

    All medical specialties dealing with patients include an intrinsic risk in exposing them to issues resulting from human errors. Radiology is not spared from this risk since it includes "decision-making under conditions of uncertainty." In medical imaging, the line between the word "error" and misdiagnosis or discrepancy is very difficult to demarcate, mainly because the diagnostic process is not a binary relation and it is not always possible to establish if a pathological condition is present or not. The error in radiology is strongly related to the diagnostic process; hence, it can be defined as a "diagnostic error" which represents the most common cause of medical malpractice suits against radiologists. In this paper, the authors described the features of errors occurring in radiology, trying to establish their impact and prevalence. Secondly, some data coming from different countries were compared in order to highlight the most frequent causes leading to malpractice lawsuits in radiology and how the phenomenon of malpractice in this field is represented worldwide.

  16. Back to the future: Can conversation analysis be used to judge physicians' malpractice history?

    PubMed

    Frankel, Richard M; Levinson, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In its monograph Crossing the Quality Chasm, the Institute of Medicine asserted that 44,000 to 98,000 lives are lost every year due to avoidable medical errors, more than 80% of which involved breakdowns in communication. Medical malpractice claims also involve errors that cause harm, including death. Reasons for malpractice claims have been investigated using variables such as age, race, country of origin, and gender none of which are predictive. One promising area that has not systematically been studied is the role of face-to-face communication in malpractice claims. To better understand this phenomenon, we tape-recorded 125 doctors (divided equally between surgeons and primary care practitioners), each with 10 consecutive patients. Half of these doctors had been sued at least twice, while the rest had never been sued. We then did a qualitative analysis based on a single taped encounter per doctor using conversation analysis (CA), in order to try to identify which doctors had claims or no-claims histories. While we were able to identify two out of every three no-claims primary care doctors, we were much less successful in identifying those with claims. Surprisingly, in the surgeon group, predictions based on CA were worse than by chance probability. We discuss the implications of our findings for the field of outcome-based communication analysis.

  17. Delays in medical malpractice litigation in civil law jurisdictions: some evidence from the Italian Court of Cassation.

    PubMed

    Grembi, Veronica; Garoupa, Nuno

    2013-10-01

    Medical malpractice law and tort reform are contentious issues. In this paper, we focus on Italy as an example of a civil law jurisdiction. Italian medical malpractice law is essentially judge-made law. However, its effectiveness is likely to be curtailed by excessive delays in litigation. Several reforms have been enacted since the late 1980s to correct this situation. By making use of the decisions of the Italian Court of Cassation (which have shaped medical malpractice law) from 1970 to 2009, we show that these reforms had no general statistically significant impact on delays. Recent reduction of delays does not seem to be related to legal reforms but rather explained by other factors.

  18. Effects of the malpractice crisis on access to and incidence of high-risk procedures: evidence from Florida.

    PubMed

    Dranove, David; Gron, Anne

    2005-01-01

    There is much debate on how recent increases in medical malpractice premiums affect patients' access to care. We examined activity levels of neurosurgeons and obstetricians, as well as the incidence of high-risk surgery and patients' travel times in Florida, where malpractice insurance premiums have soared since 2000. Compared with 1997-2000, we found that during 2000-2003, many neurosurgeons cut back their volume of brain surgeries and that craniotomy patients traveled longer for care without any significant change in the overall incidence of craniotomies. Women undergoing high-risk deliveries did not see increases in travel times.

  19. An Analysis of the Number of Medical Malpractice Claims and Their Amounts

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Marco; Cirillo, Pasquale; Musile Tanzi, Paola; Trinchero, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Starting from an extensive database, pooling 9 years of data from the top three insurance brokers in Italy, and containing 38125 reported claims due to alleged cases of medical malpractice, we use an inhomogeneous Poisson process to model the number of medical malpractice claims in Italy. The intensity of the process is allowed to vary over time, and it depends on a set of covariates, like the size of the hospital, the medical department and the complexity of the medical operations performed. We choose the combination medical department by hospital as the unit of analysis. Together with the number of claims, we also model the associated amounts paid by insurance companies, using a two-stage regression model. In particular, we use logistic regression for the probability that a claim is closed with a zero payment, whereas, conditionally on the fact that an amount is strictly positive, we make use of lognormal regression to model it as a function of several covariates. The model produces estimates and forecasts that are relevant to both insurance companies and hospitals, for quality assurance, service improvement and cost reduction. PMID:27077661

  20. The disruptive orthopaedic surgeon: implications for patient safety and malpractice liability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranay; Robinson, Brooke S; Novicoff, Wendy M; Dunnington, Gary L; Brenner, Michael J; Saleh, Khaled J

    2011-11-02

    Disruptive physician behavior imperils patient safety, erodes the morale of other health care providers, and dramatically increases the risk of malpractice litigation. Increasing patient volume, decreasing physician reimbursement, malpractice litigation, elevated stress, and growing job dissatisfaction have been implicated in disruptive behavior, which has emerged as one of the major challenges in health care. Because the aging patient population relies increasingly on orthopaedic services to maintain quality of life, improving professionalism and eradicating disruptive behavior are urgent concerns in orthopaedic surgery. Although many steps have been taken by The Joint Commission to improve patient care and define disruptive behavior, there is further room for improvement by physicians. Barriers to eliminating disruptive behavior by orthopaedic surgeons include fear of retaliation, lack of awareness among the surgeon's peers, and financial factors. Surgeons have a duty to address patterns of negative peer behavior for the benefit of patient care. This manuscript addresses the causes and consequences of disruptive physician behavior as well as management strategies, especially in orthopaedic surgery.

  1. Analysis of Malpractice Claims Associated with Surgical Site Infection in the Field of Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative infections are rare after plastic surgery; however, when present, they can affect the aesthetic outcome. Currently, many malpractice lawsuits are associated with surgical site infection. The present study aimed to analyze malpractice claims associated with surgical site infection in the field of plastic surgery through a review of Korean precedents. We analyzed the type of procedure, associated complications, and legal judgment in these cases. Most claimants were women, and claims were most often related to breast surgery. The common complications related to surgical site infection were deformity, scar, and asymmetry. Among the 40 cases, 34 were won by the plaintiff, and the mean claim settlement was 2,832,654 KRW (USD 2,636.6). The reasons for these judgements were as follows: 1) immediate bacterial culture tests were not performed and appropriate antibiotics were not used; 2) patients were not transferred to a high-level hospital or the infection control department was not consulted; 3) surgical site infection control measures were not appropriate; and 4) surgical procedures were performed without preoperative explanation about surgical site infection. The number of claims owing to surgical site infection after surgery is increasing. Infection handling was one of the key factors that influenced the judgement, and preoperative explanation about the possibility of infection is important. The findings will help surgeons achieve high patient satisfaction and reduce liability concerns. PMID:27822936

  2. Medical malpractice reform: noneconomic damages caps reduced payments 15 percent, with varied effects by specialty.

    PubMed

    Seabury, Seth A; Helland, Eric; Jena, Anupam B

    2014-11-01

    The impact of medical malpractice reforms on the average size of malpractice payments in specific physician specialties is unknown and subject to debate. We analyzed a national sample of malpractice claims for the period 1985-2010, merged with information on state liability reforms, to estimate the impact of state noneconomic damages caps on average malpractice payment size for physicians overall and for ten different specialty categories. We then compared how the effects differed according to the restrictiveness of the cap ($250,000 versus $500,000). We found that, overall, noneconomic damages caps reduced average payments by $42,980 (15 percent), compared to having no cap at all. A more restrictive $250,000 cap reduced average payments by $59,331 (20 percent), and a less restrictive $500,000 cap had no significant effect, compared to no cap at all. The effect of the caps overall varied according to specialty, with the largest impact being on claims involving pediatricians and the smallest on claims involving surgical subspecialties and ophthalmologists.

  3. A Perception of Examination Malpractice and Pupil's Academic Performance in Primary Science in Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius-Ukpepi, Bernedette Umali; Enukoha, Obinna I.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine perception of examination malpractice and academic performance in Primary Science among sixth grade in Cross River State, Nigeria. In order to achieve the set objectives of this study, three hypotheses were formulated and tested. Two instruments were used for data collection. They were perception of…

  4. 20 CFR 10.717 - Is a settlement or judgment received as a result of allegations of medical malpractice in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... result of allegations of medical malpractice in treating an injury covered by the FECA a gross recovery that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? 10.717 Section 10.717 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... injury covered by the FECA a gross recovery that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? Since an injury...

  5. Educational Malpractice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Various theories are examined upon which a student might base a suit against a teacher, administrator, school, or school district for his failure to learn because of teacher negligence or incompetence. Outlines a broad range of arguments indicating strengths and weaknesses and appropriate situations for each.

  6. Malpractice claims and unintentional outcome of tonsil surgery and other standard procedures in otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Windfuhr, Jochen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Septoplasty, tonsillectomy (with and without adenoidectomy) and cervical lymph node excision are amongst the most common 50 inpatient operations in Germany. Intracapsular tonsillectomies (i.e. tonsillotomies) are increasingly performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate technical traps and pitfalls as well as alleged medical malpractice associated with tonsillectomy (TE), adenoidectomy (AE), tonsillotomy (TT), septoplasty (SP) and cervical lymph node excision (LN). Methods: A questionnaire was sent to the Regional Medical Conciliation Boards, Medical Services of the Health Insurance Companies (MDK) and Regional Institutes of Forensic Medicine in Germany to collect anonymized cases of complications following TE, TT, AE, LN and SP. The results were discussed in the light of the contemporary medical literature and published trials and verdicts in Germany. Results: The response rate of our survey was 55.9%. The Institutes of Forensic Medicine contributed nine cases, 49 cases were submitted by the Regional Conciliation Boards and none by MDK. All forensic cases were associated with exsanguinations following tonsillectomy including two children (5 and 8 years of age) and seven adults (aged 20 to 69 years). The fatal post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) had occurred 8.7 days on average; four patients experienced the bleeding episode at home (day 5, 8, 9 and 17, respectively). Repeated episodes of bleeding requiring surgical intervention had occurred in 6 patients. Three Conciliation Boards submitted decicions associated with TT (1), AE (4), LN (3), SP (16) and TE (25). Cases with lethal outcome were not registered. Only three of the 49 cases were assessed as surgical malpractice (6.1%) including lesion of the spinal accessory nerve, wrong indication for TE and dental lesion after insertion of the mouth gag. The review of the medico legal literature yielded 71 published verdicts after AE and TE (29), LN (28) and SP (14) of which 37 resulted in compensation

  7. Gene technology in medical diagnostics and criminal procedure and liability for malpractice in Germany.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, E; Füllmich, R; Poppe, H

    1990-01-01

    The increasing employment of gene technological procedures in medical diagnostics and criminal procedure has forced both the medical and the legal professions to focus their attention on the complex question of liability of physicians, lab technicians, and other personnel involved in applying these measures. This article gives an outline, by citing practical cases, of the major aspects of liability for malpractice that are relevant under German law. Bearing in mind that this article will be read predominantly by members of the Anglo-American common-law legal system, the legal aspects - even though they are German legal aspects - are viewed in the light of the common law. The article examines three major issues: (a) liability for diagnoses employing gene technological procedures: (b) liability for wrong testimony based on 'genetic finger-printing': and (c) the donor's rights concerning his or her DNA-probe.

  8. A better approach to medical malpractice claims? The University of Michigan experience.

    PubMed

    Boothman, Richard C; Blackwell, Amy C; Campbell, Darrell A; Commiskey, Elaine; Anderson, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The root causes of medical malpractice claims are deeper and closer to home than most in the medical community care to admit. The University of Michigan Health System's experience suggests that a response by the medical community more directly aimed at what drives patients to call lawyers would more effectively reduce claims, without compromising meritorious defenses. More importantly, honest assessments of medical care give rise to clinical improvements that reduce patient injuries. Using a true case example, this article compares the traditional approach to claims with what is being done at the University of Michigan. The case example illustrates how an honest, principle-driven approach to claims is better for all those involved-the patient, the healthcare providers, the institution, future patients, and even the lawyers.

  9. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident-An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina; Cristache, Corina Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur.

  10. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur. PMID:27672458

  11. Medical malpractice charges in Germany--role of the forensic pathologist in the preliminary criminal proceeding.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Egl, Monika; Madea, Burkhard

    2005-03-01

    Medical malpractice charges from 1989 to 2002 were evaluated. A rising number of cases during this period is evident. The charges of practice falling below the standard of care (n = 285) were surveyed to determine who informed the prosecution, which clinical subjects are involved, what kind of charges can be found and whether such allegations can be appropriately assessed by means of a forensic autopsy. Forensic pathologists were found to be useful for ascertainment and interpretation of autopsy findings. If special questions arise, an additional expert opinion should be suggested by the forensic pathologist. There was no relevant shift in the range of subjects involved compared to former studies. The investigated charges might represent only a small fraction of cases of medical practice falling below the standard of care.

  12. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice – the second victim

    PubMed Central

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  13. An analysis of causative factors in closed criminal medical malpractice cases of the Taiwan Supreme Court: 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuan-Han; Cheng, Shih-Yu; Yen, Yung-Lin; Wu, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Ta; Cheng, Fu-Jen

    2016-11-01

    Most medical malpractice in Taiwan leads to criminal prosecution. This study examined the epidemiologic factors and clinical errors that led to medical malpractice convictions in Taiwanese criminal prosecutions. A retrospective, 15-year population-based review of criminal Supreme Court judgments pertaining to medical malpractice against physicians and nurses was conducted. Eighty-four cases were reviewed, yielding data that included the number and specialty involved, accused hospitals, the diagnosis, the time interval between incidents to closure, result of adjudication, the origin of cases (private vs. public prosecution), the result of medical appraisal, and the primary error. Overall, the cases averaged 7.6years to achieve final adjudication. Seventy-five percent were settled in favor of the clinician; twenty-three physicians and three nurses were found guilty, but all of these avoided imprisonment via probation or replacement with forfeit. The single most risky specialty was emergency medicine (22.6% of the cases), with 36.8% of those resulting in guilty verdicts. The most common diagnosis groups were infectious diseases (23.8%), intracranial hemorrhages (10.7%), and acute coronary syndrome (9.5%). Public prosecutions had a 41.2% conviction rate; no guilty verdicts resulted from private prosecution. Nineteen (22.6%) cases were commuted, and 73.7% of those had a controversial appraisal result. The characteristics of criminal malpractice prosecution in Taiwan that could be improved to relieve the stress of frivolous lawsuits on the judicial process include lengthy jurisdiction process; low public-prosecution conviction rate; frequent commuted jurisdiction related to a controversial appraisal; and zero imprisonment rate for clinicians.

  14. The Legal Doctrine on 'Limitation of Liability' in the Precedent Analysis on Plastic Surgery Medical Malpractice Lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo Young; Pak, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Eun; Kang, So Ra

    2015-12-01

    This study intended to review the precedents on plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuits in lower-court trials, classify the reasons of 'limitation of liability' by type, and suggest a standard in the acknowledgement of limitation of liability ratio. The 30 lower-court's rulings on the cases bearing the medical negligence of the defendants acknowledged the liability ratio of the defendants between 30% and 100%. Ten cases ruled that the defendants were wholly responsible for the negligence or malpractice, while 20 cases acknowledged the limitation of liability principle. In the determination of damage compensation amount, the court considered the cause of the victim side, which contributed in the occurrence of the damage. The court also believed that it is against the idea of fairness to have the assailant pay the whole compensation, even there is no victim-side cause such as previous illness or physical constitution of the patient, and applies the legal doctrine on limitation of liability, which is an independent damage compensation adjustment system. Most of the rulings also limited the ratio of responsibility to certain extent. When considering that the legal doctrine on limitation of liability which supports concrete validity for the fair sharing of damage, the tangible classification of causes of limitation of liability suggested in this study would be a useful tool in forecasting the ruling of a plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuit.

  15. The Legal Doctrine on 'Limitation of Liability' in the Precedent Analysis on Plastic Surgery Medical Malpractice Lawsuits

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Ra

    2015-01-01

    This study intended to review the precedents on plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuits in lower-court trials, classify the reasons of 'limitation of liability' by type, and suggest a standard in the acknowledgement of limitation of liability ratio. The 30 lower-court's rulings on the cases bearing the medical negligence of the defendants acknowledged the liability ratio of the defendants between 30% and 100%. Ten cases ruled that the defendants were wholly responsible for the negligence or malpractice, while 20 cases acknowledged the limitation of liability principle. In the determination of damage compensation amount, the court considered the cause of the victim side, which contributed in the occurrence of the damage. The court also believed that it is against the idea of fairness to have the assailant pay the whole compensation, even there is no victim-side cause such as previous illness or physical constitution of the patient, and applies the legal doctrine on limitation of liability, which is an independent damage compensation adjustment system. Most of the rulings also limited the ratio of responsibility to certain extent. When considering that the legal doctrine on limitation of liability which supports concrete validity for the fair sharing of damage, the tangible classification of causes of limitation of liability suggested in this study would be a useful tool in forecasting the ruling of a plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuit. PMID:26713045

  16. Criminal law as a response to medical malpractice: pluses and minuses--comparing Italian and U.S. experiences.

    PubMed

    Di Landro, Andrea R

    2012-06-01

    The paper is divided into three parts. The first part sets out the comparative differences between the tort of malpractice in common law and the criminal negligence in civil law: while the common law takes for mens rea only the "gross" negligence, and rarely medical negligence, other law systems instead (and particularly Italian law) criminalize also ordinary negligence, frequently in medical malpractice cases. The second part of the paper addresses the pluses of using criminal law as response to medical malpractice: inadequate medical self-policing and "repeat offenders" problems are analysed, in the perspective of the patient, of the doctor, of the insurance company, and of the community. The third part addresses the minuses of the criminal law as response: medical "shame and blame" mentality, criminal stigma and culture of fear are disincentives to incident reporting and to system analysis (the most important means of prevention); "defensive medicine" and "courts-abiding medicine" are managed not yet in the patient's exclusive interest, but in the egoistic/utilitarian aim to avoid denunciations; finally, the uncertainty of the medicine, the accusatory system and the proof "beyond a reasonable doubt" seem hardly compatible with each other.

  17. Occlusion and temporomandibular disorders: a malpractice case with medical legal considerations.

    PubMed

    Bucci, M B; Aversa, M; Guarda-Nardini, L; Manfredini, D

    2011-01-01

    Occlusion and temporomandibular The issue of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) diagnosis and treatment has become a matter of increasing interest in the medical legal field in recent years. The old-fashioned theories based on the occlusal paradigm was proven to be erroneous, and clinicians who still provide irreversible treatments to TMD patients have to be conscious of the potential legal consequences of their behavior. The present paper described an illustrative case report of a patient to whom extensive and irreversible occlusal therapies were performed with the unique aim to provide relief from TMD symptoms. The treatment was unsuccessful and the dental practitioner was called into cause for a professional liability claim. The clinician was judged guilty of malpractice on the basis of the lack of scientific evidence of the irreversible occlusal approaches to TMD, which were erroneously used and did not give the patient any benefit, thus forcing him to a non necessary financial and biological cost. The failure to satisfy the contract with the patient, which is usually not covered by any insurance company, forced the practitioner to give the money back to the patient. The ethical and legal implications of such case were discussed, with particular focus on the concept that medical legal advices need to satisfy the highest standards of evidence and have to be strictly based on scientific knowledge.

  18. A Modified No-fault Malpractice System Can Resolve Multiple Healthcare System Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Sacopulos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Medical professional liability in the United States, as measured by total premiums paid by physicians and healthcare facilities, costs approximately $30 billion a year in direct expenses, less than 2% of the entire annual healthcare expenditures. Only a fraction of those dollars reach patients who are negligently injured. Nonetheless, the tort system has far-reaching effects that create substantial indirect costs. Medical malpractice litigation is pervasive and physicians practice defensively to avoid being named in a suit. Those extra expenditures provide little value to patients. Despite an elaborate existing tort system, patient safety remains a vexing problem. Many injured patients are denied access to timely, reasonable remedies. We propose a no-fault system supplemented by a variation of the traditional tort system whereby physicians are incentivized to follow evidence-based guidelines. The proposed system would guarantee a substantial decrease in, but not elimination of, litigation. The system would lower professional liability premiums. Injured patients would ordinarily be compensated with no-fault disability and life insurance proceeds. To the extent individual physicians pose a recurrent danger, their care would be reviewed on an administrative level. Savings would be invested in health information technology and purchase of insurance coverage for the uninsured. We propose a financial model based on publicly accessible sources. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0577-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18979149

  19. Onset of complications following cervical manipulation due to malpractice in osteopathic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cicconi, Michela; Mangiulli, Tatiana; Bolino, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to correlate cervical disc herniation with manipulation performed by a non-physician osteopath on a patient complaining of neck pain. The authors report a case in which a woman - treated with osteopathic spinal manipulation - developed cervical-brachial neuralgia following the cervical disc herniation. The patient then underwent surgery and was followed by physiotherapists. A clinical condition characterized by limitation of neck mobility, with pain and sensory deficit in the right arm and II-III fingers, still persists. The patient consulted the authors to establish whether cervical disc herniation could be attributed to manipulation. Adverse events or side effects of spinal manipulative therapy are relatively common and usually benign. Most of these side effects are mild or moderate, but sometimes they can be severe. Cervical manipulation can provoke complications less often than thoracic or lumbar manipulation. Furthermore, many diseases can be absolutely and relatively contraindicated to osteopathic treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of a patient's clinical conditions is essential before starting a manipulative treatment; otherwise the osteopath could be accused of malpractice. It is the authors' opinion that a cause-effect relationship exists between the manipulative treatment and the development of disc herniation.

  20. [Incomplete paraplegia after delayed diagnostics of motor function deficits. Severe malpractice?].

    PubMed

    Regauer, M; Neu, J

    2013-03-01

    A 72-year-old female patient was transferred to a rehabilitation centre after surgical stabilization of a subtrochanteric femoral fracture. However, adequate mobilization was not possible there and 5 days after transfer deficits in the motor function of both lower extremities were documented for the first time and an initial paraplegia was diagnosed the following day by a neurologist. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the suspicion of an unstable fracture of the seventh thoracic vertebral body 8 days after the initial symptoms, which was confirmed by computed tomography after another 3 days. Surgical decompression and stabilization were performed at a department for neurosurgery 4 days later but incomplete paraplegia persisted permanently. The patient complained about insufficient diagnostic measures at the rehabilitation centre. The expert opinion concluded that it would have been mandatory to investigate the matter of the newly occurring neurological symptoms immediately but this had only been performed after undue delay, which had to be interpreted as a case of medical malpractice. The expert pointed out that it was not possible to provide clear evidence that emergent diagnosis and surgery would have enabled a significantly better outcome.The arbitration board ascertained a lack of examination and argued that prompt and adequate diagnostic measures would have revealed the relevant pathological finding and thus surgery would have been performed immediately. According to the reversal of evidence in favor of the patient it could be assumed that no permanent neurological damage existed when the first neurological symptoms occurred and that emergent surgery at least had the potential to prevent permanent paraplegia. This opinion of the arbitration board is supported by numerous references in the literature.

  1. Urethral catheters and medical malpractice: a legal database review from 1965 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Chang, Helena; Gaither, Thomas W.; Alwaal, Amjad; Fox, Ryan; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Urethral catheters (UCs) are commonly used in medicine and are associated with complications such as urinary tract infections (UTIs) and trauma. Given UC complications and their ubiquitous usage in healthcare, there is a potential for liability risk. We aim to explore litigation involving UC-related complications. Methods The LexisNexis legal database was queried for all state and federal cases from January 1965 through October 2015 using the terms “urethral catheter” or “Foley catheter” in combination with “medical malpractice”, “negligence”, “medical error”, and “trauma”. Each case was reviewed for reported medical characteristics and legal aspects, including the outcome of the case. Results Our search yielded 29 cases. Urologists were the most common providers cited as defendants (21%), all of whom were successful in their defense. The most common malpractice claim was for traumatic insertion (48%). Pain was the most common type of damage claimed by plaintiffs (28%), followed by UTI (24%). Nineteen (66%) cases favored defendants, while 10 (34%) cases favored the plaintiffs, of which 2 (7%) were settled out of the court. In settled cases, the mean settlement received by plaintiffs was $55,750 (range, $25,000–$86,500). The mean award to plaintiffs for cases determined by the court was $112,991 (range, $4,000–$325,000). Conclusions Despite widespread usage of UC over a 50-year period, lawsuits centered on UC misuse are rare at the state and federal court levels. Of litigated cases, urologists are commonly involved yet have successful defenses. PMID:27785434

  2. [Medico-legal assessment in neurological malpractice based on casework material collected at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Białystok].

    PubMed

    Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Janica, Jerzy; Dopierała, Tomasz; Załuski, Janusz; Wardaszka, Zofia

    2007-01-01

    Medical malpractice results from inadequate professional knowledge, incompliance to the present state of medical knowledge or negligence and inattention. The aim of the paper was the analysis of medical malpractice cases based on material in the field of neurology. The cases were assessed according to the number and type in 32 medico-legal opinions issued by specialist teams of forensic medicine and neurology in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Białystok in the years 2001-2006. In 11 cases (34%) medical malpractice was concluded with reference to improper treatment after head injury or brain pathology, inadequate care at neurology unit, lacked or delayed diagnostics of head pathology and injury, non-referral to hospital by neurologists. In the material analysed diagnostic errors predominated. Majority of them originated from the open health care system. Incompetence of neurologists with regard to differential diagnostics resulting in misdiagnosis and improper therapy was noted. In one third of the overall cases medical malpractice was concluded. The most common causes included misinterpretation of disease signs and symptoms, misapplication of available diagnostic potential and unjustified delay before commencing diagnostics.

  3. Legal aspects of cruise medicine - can a non-US ship's doctor be sued for malpractice in Florida?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2014-01-01

    An English ship's doctor treated a non-US female patient for abdominal discomfort on a foreign-flagged cruise ship off the coast of Haiti. In Mexico the patient underwent abdominal surgery, followed by complications, for which her lawyers wanted to take the ship's doctor to court in Florida, USA. A trial court granted their wish, but this decision was reversed on appeal as the factors discussed were insufficient to establish Florida jurisdiction over the ship's doctor. The decision is not about whether malpractice occurred; it is about limiting the possibility of taking the ship's doctor to a court in a location preferred by the plaintiffs' lawyers. The appeal court ruling is important for non-US doctors working as independent contractors on cruise vessels that visit US ports, and it will hopefully prevent some of the more frivolous law suits from being filed in the future.

  4. Patient information on drug therapy. A problem of medical malpractice law: between product safety and user safety.

    PubMed

    Hart, Dieter

    2007-04-01

    Medicinal products are associated with risks as well as potential therapeutic benefits. This is reflected by the legal requirements for patient information on drug therapy which can be differentiated into general product information, regulated by pharmaceutical (i. e. product safety) law, and individual patient information on the treatment with the product, which is subject to medical malpractice law. The physician's duty to inform the patient comprises therapeutic information as well as information required for informed consent. Therapeutic information intends to empower the patient to comply with the requirements of treatment and to protect him/her against preventable danger and risk; it is part of the medical treatment, aimed at the individual patient and his/her personal situation. Information required for informed consent enables the patient to a self-determined decision on the treatment offered; it can be divided into information on the course of treatment and risk information. Product information and treatment information complement each other; the former should be the basis of individual information on the concrete treatment, provided by the physician in a mandatory oral conversation with the patient. Product information cannot replace the physician's individual information about the treatment.

  5. Orthopedic board certification and physician performance: an analysis of medical malpractice, hospital disciplinary action, and state medical board disciplinary action rates.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Mininder S; Dichtel, Laura; Kasser, James R; Gebhardt, Mark C; Katz, Jeffery N

    2008-02-01

    Specialty board certification status has become the de facto standard of competency by which the profession and the public recognize physician specialists. However, the relationship between orthopedic board certification and physician performance has not been established. Rates of medical malpractice claims, hospital disciplinary actions, and state medical board disciplinary actions were compared between 1309 board-certified (BC) and 154 non-board-certified (NBC) orthopedic surgeons in 3 states. There was no significant difference between BC and NBC surgeons in medical malpractice claim proportions (BC, 19.1% NBC, 16.9% P = .586) or in hospital disciplinary action proportions (BC, 0.9% NBC, 0.8% P = 1.000). There was a significantly higher proportion of state medical board disciplinary action for NBC surgeons (BC, 7.6% NBC, 13.0% P = .028). An association between board certification status and physician performance is necessary to validate its status as the de facto standard of competency. In this study, BC surgeons had lower rates of state medical board disciplinary action.

  6. The effect of threshold amounts for reporting malpractice payments to the National Practitioner Data Bank: analysis using the closed claims data base of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs).

    PubMed

    Metter, E J; Granville, R L; Kussman, M J

    1997-04-01

    The study determines the extent to which payment thresholds for reporting malpractice claims to the National Practitioner Data Bank identifies substandard health care delivery in the Department of Defense. Relevant data were available on 2,291 of 2,576 medical malpractice claims reported to the closed medical malpractice case data base of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs). Amount paid was analyzed as a diagnostic test using standard of care assessment from each military Surgeon General office as the criterion. Using different paid threshold amounts per claim as a positive test, the sensitivity of identifying substandard care declined from 0.69 for all paid cases to 0.41 for claims over $40,000. Specificity increased from 0.75 for all paid claims to 0.89 for claims over $40,000. Positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratio were similar at all thresholds. Malpractice case payment was of limited value for identifying substandard medical practice. All paid claims missed about 30% of substandard care, and reported about 25% of acceptable medical practice.

  7. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  8. [Suicide and malpractice].

    PubMed

    Catanesi, Roberto; Carabellese, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Some recent statements on the subject of psychiatrists' responsibility for suicide committed by patients have provoked lively discussions about the welfare duties of public psychiatric services, causing a widespread climate of alarm among medical institutions. The discussion is primarily about the extent of the psychiatrist's "posizione della garanzia", in particular the duty of protection and surveillance in relation to the risk of self-destructive behavior, referring to convictions not only in TSO cases but also in cases of voluntary hospitalization and valid consensus on treatment. The subject of suicide inevitably reminds us of the predictability of self-destructive behavior and, above all, of its prevention. The authors compare data from scientific literature on this subject - the organizational model of territorial psychiatry - with the principles ordered by the convictions, in particular the request for "ulterior and more rigorous protective rules", thus highlighting their complicated synthesis. In the authors' opinion, a possible literal interpretation of the legal indications would risk a profound change in the quality of the relationship between psychiatrist and patient. The authors, striving to adopt the psychiatrists' point of view, want to finally provide some operational advice with the objective to delimit good practice according to a medico-legal view.

  9. [Guideline to prevent claims due to medical malpractice, on how to act when they do occur and how to defend oneself through the courts].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, M; Arimany, J; Bruguera, R; Barberia, E; Ferrer, F; Sala, J; Pujol Robinat, A; Medallo Muñiz, J

    2012-04-01

    Claims due to presumed medical malpractice are increasing in all developed countries and many of them have no basis. To prevent legal complaints, the physicians should know the reasons why complaints are made by their patients and adopt the adequate preventive measures. In the case of a complaint, it is essential to follow the guidelines that allow for adequate legal defense and the action of the physician before the judge that inspires confidence and credibility. The risk of the claims can be reduced with adequate information to the patient, the following of the clinical guidelines, control of the risk factors and adoption of verification lists in each invasive procedure. In case of complication or serious adverse effect, explanations should be given to the patient and family and it should be reported to the facility where one works and to the insurance company. If the physician received a claim, he/she should report it to the insurance compare so that it can name a lawyer responsible for the legal defense who will advise the physician regarding the appearance in court before the judge.

  10. How do authors of systematic reviews deal with research malpractice and misconduct in original studies? A cross-sectional analysis of systematic reviews and survey of their authors

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Nadia; von Elm, Erik; Chatagner, Alexandra; Pöpping, Daniel M; Tramèr, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study whether systematic reviewers apply procedures to counter-balance some common forms of research malpractice such as not publishing completed research, duplicate publications, or selective reporting of outcomes, and to see whether they identify and report misconduct. Design Cross-sectional analysis of systematic reviews and survey of their authors. Participants 118 systematic reviews published in four journals (Ann Int Med, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet), and the Cochrane Library, in 2013. Main outcomes and measures Number (%) of reviews that applied procedures to reduce the impact of: (1) publication bias (through searching of unpublished trials), (2) selective outcome reporting (by contacting the authors of the original studies), (3) duplicate publications, (4) sponsors’ and (5) authors’ conflicts of interest, on the conclusions of the review, and (6) looked for ethical approval of the studies. Number (%) of reviewers who suspected misconduct are reported. The procedures applied were compared across journals. Results 80 (68%) reviewers confirmed their data. 59 (50%) reviews applied three or more procedures; 11 (9%) applied none. Unpublished trials were searched in 79 (66%) reviews. Authors of original studies were contacted in 73 (62%). Duplicate publications were searched in 81 (69%). 27 reviews (23%) reported sponsors of the included studies; 6 (5%) analysed their impact on the conclusions of the review. Five reviews (4%) looked at conflicts of interest of study authors; none of them analysed their impact. Three reviews (2.5%) looked at ethical approval of the studies. Seven reviews (6%) suspected misconduct; only 2 (2%) reported it explicitly. Procedures applied differed across the journals. Conclusions Only half of the systematic reviews applied three or more of the six procedures examined. Sponsors, conflicts of interest of authors and ethical approval remain overlooked. Research misconduct is sometimes identified, but rarely reported. Guidance on

  11. Kirit C. Shah, M.D. v. Stan Harris and Nancy Harris. "Construction of Legal Arguments, Statutes of Limitations, and Medical Malpractice." Lesson Plans for Secondary Teachers on How Lawyers Prepare Their Arguments. Courts in the Classroom: Curriculum Concepts and Other Information on Indiana's Courts for the K-12 Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Elizabeth

    Stan and Nancy Harris filed a complaint against Kirit C. Shah, M.D., for misdiagnosing Mr. Harris's illness, charging Dr. Shah with negligence and asking for damages. A medical malpractice action in Indiana is governed by a two year statute of limitations. Because the Harrises failed to bring their action against Dr. Shah within this two year…

  12. Educational Malpractice: Educate or Litigate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, William F.

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that educators be held accountable to their students for the quality and adequacy of the educational services they provide. Extension of liability to education can have a positive impact on the educational process. (Author/LMO)

  13. [Malpractice in health care teams].

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    To be successful, modern medical acts require the participation of several professionals and assistants and, as such, there has been a steady trend from individual medicine to the collective practice of the profession. This format raises issues in determining when a medical professional or other practitioner is liable for the acts of a colleague. This thesis proposes to resolve the problems involved in the collective practice of medicine by restricting liability to a physician responsible for another practitioner, only to those cases where he/she has been willingly introduced into the medical act.

  14. A Crack in the Educational Malpractice Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMitchell, Terri A.; DeMitchell, Todd A.

    2007-01-01

    As a former school law attorney and a former superintendent, the authors were constantly concerned about potential liability when a student's constitutional rights may have been violated or when a student was physically injured. While educators can be held liable for infringing on students' rights and for negligence that causes students physical…

  15. Marketing malpractice: the cause and the cure.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Clayton M; Cook, Scott; Hall, Taddy

    2005-12-01

    Ted Levitt used to tell his Harvard Business School students, "People don't want a quarter-inch drill--they want a quarter-inch hole." But 35 years later, marketers are still thinking in terms of products and ever-finer demographic segments. The structure of a market, as seen from customers' point of view, is very simple. When people need to get a job done, they hire a product or service to do it for them. The marketer's task is to understand what jobs periodically arise in customers' lives for which they might hire products the company could make. One job, the "I-need-to-send-this-from-here-to-there-with-perfect-certainty-as-fast-as-possible"job, has existed practically forever. Federal Express designed a service to do precisely that--and do it wonderfully again and again. The FedEx brand began popping into people's minds whenever they needed to get that job done. Most of today's great brands--Crest, Starbucks, Kleenex, eBay, and Kodak, to name a few-started out as just this kind of purpose brand. When a purpose brand is extended to products that target different jobs, it becomes an endorser brand. But, over time, the power of an endorser brand will surely erode unless the company creates a new purpose brand for each new job, even as it leverages the endorser brand as an overall marker of quality. Different jobs demand different purpose brands. New growth markets are created when an innovating company designs a product and then positions its brand on a job for which no optimal product yet exists. In fact, companies that historically have segmented and measured markets by product categories generally find that when they instead segment by job, their market is much larger (and their current share much smaller) than they had thought. This is great news for smart companies hungry for growth.

  16. Malpractice Issues in the Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ben A.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of legal issues in the academic medical center focuses on standards of care applicable to practitioners, special problems of patient care delivery, and the special status of public academic medical centers. Informed consent to care, relations with affiliated institutions, and private/non-private patient status are also considered.…

  17. Administrative Malpractice: The Limits of Common Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogue, E. Grady

    1978-01-01

    An administrator with a hybrid disposition, part scholar and part riverboat gambler, may serve more effectively than either model alone, suggests this executive of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. Many academic administrators try to live by common sense, which is often yesterday's heresy. (Author/LBH)

  18. Educational Best Practice or Malpractice? Our Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bockern, Steve; Wenger, Laurie

    1999-01-01

    Emerging research on the brain and learning is challenging long established notions about how children should be taught. The authors use this research as a basis for providing more powerful strategies for reaching all students, including those with learning and behavior problems that have led to educational failure. Suggests ideas and practical…

  19. Illiteracy: An Incurable Disease or Education Malpractice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Senate Republican Policy Committee, Washington, DC.

    The major theory examined in this paper is that the increasing problem of illiteracy in the United States may be due to a faulty method of teaching reading. The causes of the illiteracy problem and possible solutions are explored using evidence from reading research and classroom results. The following topics concerning the teaching of reading are…

  20. Hypertension and Cerebral Hemorrhage: A Malpractice Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Hunt, Marshall T.; Vogt, Thomas; Walsh, Gregory; Paglia, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    The plaintiff alleged that failure of the attending physician to manage her husband's hypertension properly resulted in his death from intracerebral hemorrhage. Four lines of evidence supported the defendant: (1) In 1970 to 1971 there was uncertainty in the medical community whether mild hypertension should be treated with drugs; this uncertainty still existed at the time of the trial. (2) Severe hypertension and advanced age are the two most important predisposing factors leading to intracerebral hemorrhage; the deceased patient had neither. (3) Hemorrhage into the cerebral cortex and underlying white matter is not typical of hypertensive intracerebral bleeding; more likely, rupture of an arteriovenous malformation occurred. (4) A diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is not one of exclusion but requires objective evidence of vascular change in the brain, heart and kidney; these changes were not found in the deceased patient. In conclusion, an expert witness should testify objectively rather than be the advocate of a lawyer's theory of liability. ImagesFig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 9.Fig. 10. PMID:7233893

  1. Moral Intelligence: An Antidote to Examination Malpractices in Nigerian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olusola, Olayiwola Idowu; Ajayi, Oluwagbemiga Samson

    2015-01-01

    Moral intelligence is the capacity to apply moral principles to one's own values, goals and actions (or the ability to see what is right and integrate it into one's life and actions) It is considered as the individual capacity to understand right from wrong, to have strong ethical convictions and to act on them to behave in the right and…

  2. 400K British Pounds for Educational Malpractice by University Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palfreyman, David

    2006-01-01

    The Canadian Supreme Court in "Young v. Bella" has approved the award of C$840K to Ms Young against the Memorial University of Newfoundland and also two of its academics. In this article, the author comments on the "Young v. Bella" case. Ms Young was a distance-learning student studying social work and hoped to get on a professional course and so…

  3. Episiotomy in modern obstetrics--necessity versus malpractice.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Jolanta; Taiwo, Bernice Folake

    2012-01-01

    Episiotomy is now one of the most common procedures performed in obstetrics. At the beginning of its existence, it was performed very carefully and used in exceptional circumstances. In the second half of the twentieth century, its use became so widespread that it was almost regarded as a standard procedure in labor rooms. Authors intend to provide answers to the question as to whether it was an appropriate move in this discussion. Undoubtedly, there are reasons for which an incision is an appropriate decision, sometimes necessary, but in recent years its usefulness and relevance, in particular its routine, too widespread use are starting to be increasingly questioned and subjected to doubt, both by various women's organizations, individuals interested in the issue, stakeholders, as well as professionals. Poland is still one of the few European countries where routine episiotomy is so far regarded as an important and recognized part of patient management during almost every childbirth taking place in a hospital setting. This topic currently causes broad discussion in the media, the press and among the public. Hence, the aim of this work is to discuss key issues on episiotomy, the arguments for and against episiotomy based on literature review and available studies and reports. It is also going to present the opinion of different authors and the existing differences in their views on the above issue.

  4. 45 CFR 60.7 - Reporting medical malpractice payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the payment is made— (i) Name, (ii) Work address, (iii) Home address, if known, (iv) Social Security... payment required to be reported under this section is subject to a civil money penalty not to exceed...

  5. Examination Malpractice in Nigeria: Causes and Effects on National Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyibe, C. O.; Uma, Uma U.; Ibina, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Education, being a process of teaching and learning is evaluated through examination at the end of the learning period. Examination not only serves as a feedback for the trainer to ascertain the level of knowledge acquisition but also serves as a measure of knowledge retention by the trainee. Any misconduct or irregularity distorts this feedback…

  6. Discounting medical malpractice claim reserves for self-insured hospitals.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard; Kitchen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The hospital CFO often works with the hospital's actuary and external auditor to calculate the reserves recorded in financial statements. Hospital management, usually the CFO, needs to decide the discount rate that is most appropriate. A formal policy addressing the rationale for discounting and the rationale for selecting the discount rate can be helpful to the CFO, actuary, and external auditor.

  7. [Medical malpractice in relation to its social political importance].

    PubMed

    Franzki, H

    1990-02-01

    Despite an unchanged legal basis the number of proceedings concerning medical practitioner's liability has increased substantially and medical law has developed into an independent field of law in the last 20 years. On one hand this is a result of modern medicine's extended possibilities to act and control, on the other hand it is caused by the patient's changed attitude towards both, his disease and his physician. Hereby the mass media exercise considerable influence with their commentaries, that are often exaggerated in their criticism and their representation. But this development gives no rise to concern. The jurisdiction in the field of medical practitioner's liability is--apart from a few exceptions--not overstated but necessary for the safeguarding of the patient's interests. It doesn't impede progress, doesn't give cause for a defensive medicine and doesn't burden our public health system. For the patient's wellbeing it often even accomplishes the important function of convincing the public health administration, that sometimes shows a tendency to act economically, of strict medical demands. There still is no room for the general conclusion, that the control of medicine by jurisdiction has undermined the confidential relationship between patient and physician. The recently published result of an opinion poll has shown, that physicians still enjoy a high reputation, while journalists--in spite of some contradictory statements--find themselves in the last ranks.

  8. Conflicts of Interest, Selective Inertia, and Research Malpractice in Randomized Clinical Trials: An Unholy Trinity

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vance W.

    2014-01-01

    Recently a great deal of attention has been paid to conflicts of interest in medical research, and the Institute of Medicine has called for more research into this important area. One research question that has not received sufficient attention concerns the mechanisms of action by which conflicts of interest can result in biased and/or flawed research. What discretion do conflicted researchers have to sway the results one way or the other? We address this issue from the perspective of selective inertia, or an unnatural selection of research methods based on which are most likely to establish the preferred conclusions, rather than on which are most valid. In many cases it is abundantly clear that a method that is not being used in practice is superior to the one that is being used in practice, at least from the perspective of validity, and that it is only inertia, as opposed to any serious suggestion that the incumbent method is superior (or even comparable), that keeps the inferior procedure in use, to the exclusion of the superior one. By focusing on these flawed research methods we can go beyond statements of potential harm from real conflicts of interest, and can more directly assess actual (not potential) harm. PMID:25150846

  9. [Medical error--professional liability for malpractice in Bosnia and Herzegovina].

    PubMed

    Pranjić, Nurka

    2009-01-01

    Medical care is frequently compared to aviation, as many of the factors which lead to errors in both fields are similar. In this article we review the literature on such events and discuss the ethical, legal and practical aspects of civil liability in the case of medical error. Ethics, professional policy and the law, as well as the relevant empirical literature, suggest that timely and candid disclosure should be standard practice. In harmonization to ethical codex, the physician is obliged to inform the patient about the origin of medical error. Civil liability is one of the most important parts of law that regulates health care service. Medical chambers could be having a very important role in alternative methods of medical error disciplinary screening proceedings. Guidelines for disclosure of medical error to patients, and their families if necessary, are proposed.

  10. 76 FR 10825 - Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) Medical Malpractice Program Regulations: Clarification of FTCA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... September 1995 Notice immunization example to include events to immunize individuals against infectious... regulatory text at 42 CFR 6.6(e). HRSA also proposes updating the ``Immunization Campaign'' example to... the community. (iv) Immunization Campaigns. Health center staff conduct an event to...

  11. Act first and look up the law afterward?: medical malpractice and the ethics of defensive medicine.

    PubMed

    De Ville, K

    1998-12-01

    This essay examines the so-called phenomenon of "defensive medicine" and the problematic aspects of attempting to maintain the safest legal position possible. While physicians face genuine litigation threats they frequently overestimate legal peril. Many defensive practices are benign, but others alter patient care and increase costs in ways that are ethically suspect. Physicians should learn to evaluate realistically the legal risks of their profession and weigh the emotional, physical, and financial costs to the patient before employing a defensive measure.

  12. 78 FR 58202 - Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) Medical Malpractice Program Regulations: Clarification of FTCA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... not limit coverage to childhood vaccinations; and (3) To add the following new example as subsection 6... history of the FSHCAA and is declining to adopt additional recommendations at this time, as these... statutory language, its regulatory implementation, and the legislative history of the FSHCAA and...

  13. Mandatory pre-suit mediation: local malpractice reform benefiting patients and healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Randall C; Warren, Lindsay A; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    The Florida Patient Safety and Pre-Suit Mediation Program (FLPSMP) was implemented as a pilot program to provide patients of healthcare providers and facilities associated with the University of Florida Health Science Center with timely and fair compensation when injured and to combat rising healthcare legal liability expenses. Prior to filing a formal lawsuit, participants of the FLPSMP join in a confidential and nonbinding pre-suit mediation conducted by a neutral third-party mediator. The process fosters confidential and candid communication between doctors and patients, saving thousands of dollars in legal expenses for both patients and providers.

  14. Educational Malpractice and Academic Negligence in Private Schools: Legal Implications for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Saman

    2009-01-01

    The current litigious climate in the United States has resulted in a notably high frequency of lawsuits being filed against the educational system. School administrators are routinely named in lawsuits filed by disgruntled parents and students against schools and their governing bodies. This dissertation reviewed litigious actions in both public…

  15. Educational Malpractice?: Higher Ed May Be Courting Trouble with Overpaid Execs and Restless Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert B.; Fleming, Dana L.

    2007-01-01

    The number and complexity of state and federal regulations governing U.S. colleges and universities is on the rise. Consumerism, soaring tuition costs, burgeoning student loan debt and the high expectations of parents are all converging to put higher education under increased scrutiny. Two related issues: students feeling like they do not get…

  16. "Diagnosis as Treatment: A Case of Educational Malpractice." On Behalf of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the tendency of schools to follow up poor standardized test scores with test-taking instruction, and the limitations of these standardized tests for providing authentic assessment of academic abilities. Suggests four prescriptions for educators, administrators, parents and policy makers for improving the administration and use of…

  17. Psychological Abuse of Children: Implications for Malpractice and Dismissals of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Patrick D.

    This article defines psychological abuse of students in school settings and describes legal aspects of the problem, particularly with respect to possible action in negligence. The following four categories of psychological abuse are examined: verbal abuse, refusal to communicate, physical acts (and sexual abuse) that cause psychological damage,…

  18. Educational Malpractice: Can the Judiciary Remedy the Growing Problem of Functional Illiteracy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alice J.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the viability of a negligence action for inadequate public school education. Explores the problems inherent in proving each element of negligence, the available defense, and the potential consequences for plaintiffs, defendants, and educational policy-making that would flow from judicial recognition of a cause of action. Journal…

  19. Educational Malpractice: California School District Held Not Liable for Negligence in Instruction in Academic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Susanne

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews a suit brought by a high school graduate against a public school district alleging negligence and misrepresentation in academic instruction. The complaint alleged that the plaintiff was unable to read or write above fifth grade level because of the school's failure to educate him. The case was dismissed. (Author/GC)

  20. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose: This study examined whether higher malpractice…

  1. Medical Malpractice Claims Against Military and Civilian Personnel of the Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-24

    Civilian Personnel of the Armed Forces References: (a) Public Law 94-464, & l(a), 90 Stat. 1985, Title 10, United States Code, SectionD TI 1089 (f)ELECTE (b...OF AUTHORITY 1. The authority vested in the Secretary of Defense by I, ’I Title 10, U.S. C., section 1089 (f) (reference (a)) to hold harm- /’i...Title 10, U.S. C., section 1089 (f) (reference (a)). D. PROCEDURES 1. In all cases under Title 10, U.S.C., section 1089 , medical per- sonnel shall be

  2. [Organisational responsibility versus individual responsibility: safety culture? About the relationship between patient safety and medical malpractice law].

    PubMed

    Hart, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    The contribution is concerned with the correlations between risk information, patient safety, responsibility and liability, in particular in terms of liability law. These correlations have an impact on safety culture in healthcare, which can be evaluated positively if--in addition to good quality of medical care--as many sources of error as possible can be identified, analysed, and minimised or eliminated by corresponding measures (safety or risk management). Liability influences the conduct of individuals and enterprises; safety is (probably) also a function of liability; this should also apply to safety culture. The standard of safety culture does not only depend on individual liability for damages, but first of all on strict enterprise liability (system responsibility) and its preventive effects. Patient safety through quality and risk management is therefore also an organisational programme of considerable relevance in terms of liability law.

  3. 20 CFR 10.717 - Is a settlement or judgment received as a result of allegations of medical malpractice in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? 10.717 Section 10.717 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... injury covered by the FECA a gross recovery that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? Since an injury caused... reported to OWCP or SOL....

  4. 20 CFR 10.717 - Is a settlement or judgment received as a result of allegations of medical malpractice in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? 10.717 Section 10.717 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... injury covered by the FECA a gross recovery that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? Since an injury caused... reported to OWCP or SOL....

  5. 20 CFR 10.717 - Is a settlement or judgment received as a result of allegations of medical malpractice in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? 10.717 Section 10.717 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... injury covered by the FECA a gross recovery that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? Since an injury caused... reported to OWCP or SOL....

  6. 20 CFR 10.717 - Is a settlement or judgment received as a result of allegations of medical malpractice in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? 10.717 Section 10.717 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... injury covered by the FECA a gross recovery that must be reported to OWCP or SOL? Since an injury caused... reported to OWCP or SOL....

  7. [Malpractice in neurology in the case material of the Forensic Medicine Department, Medical University of Białystok].

    PubMed

    Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Sackiewicz, Adam; Szeremeta, Michał; Okłota, Magdalena; Wardaszka, Zofia

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of legal opinions compiled by the Forensic Medicine Department, Medical University of Białystok in the years 2003-2008. The above-mentioned opinions addressed medical treatment in the area of neurology. During this period, opinions were given in 142 cases, the majority of them representing idiopathic diseases (such as strokes, cerebral aneurysms, cerebral infections), followed by falls from high altitudes and traffic road accidents, further followed by fights, medical treatment and work accidents. In sixteen (11.27%) of such cases, the employed medical procedures were found to be incorrect; what might be qualified as medical decisive errors, committed in emergency ambulances or in admission rooms. Incorrect medical treatment consisted in negligence to perform necessary diagnostic examinations. In ten of the analyzed cases, the patients ultimately died.

  8. 32 CFR 536.80 - Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical malpractice claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants... wrongful actions or omissions occurred during the performance of medical, dental, or related health...

  9. 32 CFR 536.80 - Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical malpractice claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants... wrongful actions or omissions occurred during the performance of medical, dental, or related health...

  10. 32 CFR 536.80 - Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical malpractice claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants... wrongful actions or omissions occurred during the performance of medical, dental, or related health...

  11. 32 CFR 536.80 - Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical malpractice claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants... wrongful actions or omissions occurred during the performance of medical, dental, or related health...

  12. 32 CFR 536.80 - Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical malpractice claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants... wrongful actions or omissions occurred during the performance of medical, dental, or related health...

  13. 75 FR 48994 - Records Schedules; Availability and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ..., stockholders suits, foreclosures, torts to land, medical malpractice, product liability, asbestos liability..., stockholders suits, foreclosures, torts to land, medical malpractice, product liability, asbestos...

  14. 45 CFR 60.2 - Applicability of these regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements applicable to hospitals; health care entities; Boards of Medical Examiners State licensing...) making payments as a result of medical malpractice actions or claims. They also establish procedures...

  15. Legal aspects of medication administration.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-01-01

    The author reviews several cases involving medication errors and advises that one way to make a malpractice case worse is to be accused of delay in informing the patient or family of the circumstances. If fraud or intentional concealment is established, punitive damages may be awarded--which are not covered by malpractice insurance policies since this is an intentional act.

  16. Medical Liability in the Light of New Hungarian Civil Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barzó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The number of medical malpractice lawsuits filed each year in Hungary has considerably increased since the change of regime. The judicial decisions and practices on determining and awarding wrongful damages recoverable for medical malpractices in the Hungarian civil law have been developing for decades.

  17. Reducing the Budget Deficit: The President’s Fiscal Commission and Other Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    numerous additional savings proposals from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, medical malpractice reform, and transforming the Federal Employees...accounts. In terms of health spending, the report recommended reforming the nation’s malpractice laws by limiting pain and suffering awards and...initiative/about. The task force comprised 19 members: former public officials representing all levels of government, academics , think tank experts, and

  18. A bill to amend chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code, (commonly referred to as the Federal Torts Claim Act) to extend medical malpractice coverage to free clinics and the officers, governing board members, employees, and contractors of free clinics in the same manner and extent as certain Federal officers and employees.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Leahy, Patrick J. [D-VT

    2009-08-05

    08/05/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S8867) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Health Care Technology Assessment. Hearing Before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on Examination of the Health Cost Containment Issue: Health Technology Assessment; General Cost Containment Strategies; and Cost Implications of Defensive Medicine and Medical Malpractice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This committee hearing was held to consider factors in federal suport of health care services, including the roles of professional organizations, insurance companies, and hospitals. The process of evaluating whether the use of medical technology, diagnostic tests, and therapeutic procedures are cost-effective and beneficial is identified as…

  20. How liability law affects medical productivity.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Daniel P; McClellan, Mark B

    2002-11-01

    Previous research suggests that "direct" reforms to the liability system-reforms designed to reduce the level of compensation to potential claimants-reduce medical expenditures without important consequences for patient health outcomes. We extend this research by identifying the mechanisms through which reforms affect the behavior of health care providers. Although we find that direct reforms improve medical productivity primarily by reducing malpractice claims rates and compensation conditional on a claim, our results suggest that other policies that reduce the time spent and the amount of conflict involved in defending against a claim can also reduce defensive practices substantially. In addition, we find that "malpractice pressure" has a more significant impact on diagnostic rather than therapeutic treatment decisions. Our results provide an empirical foundation for simulating the effects of untried malpractice reforms on health care expenditures and outcomes, based on their predicted effects on the malpractice pressure facing medical providers.

  1. Labor law update--Part 2.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1997-02-01

    As a nurse moves away from the patient's bedside, the liability exposure for malpractice decreases. However, the nurse who moves into a management position faces another kind of liability-one regarding disciplinary actions such as employee terminations.

  2. Iatrogenic death: A review of cases from 1990-2000 investigated at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Vienna.

    PubMed

    Paula, Pia; Pöttinger, Iris; Kordina, Nicole; Schneider, Barbara; Risser, Daniele U

    2011-09-01

    Medical malpractice is a global problem which can have considerable financial and legal consequences for the community as well as personal consequences for those involved. Austria does not record any statistical and epidemiological data concerning medical malpractice cases. Data from 7,211 autopsy cases from the Department of Forensic Medicine in Vienna covering the period from 1990 to 2000 were analyzed. Fifty-five autopsy reports that were filed as suspected medical malpractice were recorded and analyzed. Thirty cases were classified as surgical incidents, 19 cases as negligence, and 6 cases as medication incidents. Out of a total of 40 cases from available court files, 36 cases were dropped, there were 2 acquittals and only two resulted in convictions. The number of instances of medical malpractice leading to iatrogenic deaths in Austria seems to be very low in comparison to other countries. The possibility that many cases go unnoticed needs to be taken into consideration.

  3. 20 CFR 10.806 - How are the maximum fees defined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on a relative value scale that considers skill, labor, overhead, malpractice insurance and other related costs; and a monetary value assignment (conversion factor) for one unit of value in each of...

  4. Pacific Partners Wargame Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    such as medical qualifications and malpractice considerations, can be explored as part of interoperability. Partner nations are motivated to...specialized problems. Intellectual exchanges and fora involving experts from government, industry, academic and other institutions could be employed in

  5. Writing Teachers Should Be Prepared for Legal Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    1986-01-01

    Explores the nature of court litigation concerning academic accountability and malpractice. Discusses the implications of such litigation for writing instructors, and presents questions writing teachers should ask themselves in preparation for possible law suits. (HTH)

  6. [Responsibilities of the resident in anesthesiology and postoperative care].

    PubMed

    Barrios Flores, L F

    2004-01-01

    Among medical specialties, anesthesiology/postoperative care has one of the highest rates of malpractice claims. This article treats the responsibilities of interns and residents in anesthesiology, their supervisors, and the institutions where they practice and receive training.

  7. Reducing Risk with Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, F.L.; Feblowitz, J.; Samal, L.; Sato, L.; Wright, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Identify clinical opportunities to intervene to prevent a malpractice event and determine the proportion of malpractice claims potentially preventable by clinical decision support (CDS). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional review of closed malpractice claims over seven years from one malpractice insurance company and seven hospitals in the Boston area. For each event, clinical opportunities to intervene to avert the malpractice event and the presence or absence of CDS that might have a role in preventing the event, were assigned by a panel of expert raters. Compensation paid out to resolve a claim (indemnity), was associated with each CDS type. Results Of the 477 closed malpractice cases, 359 (75.3%) were categorized as substantiated and 195 (54%) had at least one opportunity to intervene. Common opportunities to intervene related to performance of procedure, diagnosis, and fall prevention. We identified at least one CDS type for 63% of substantiated claims. The 41 CDS types identified included clinically significant test result alerting, diagnostic decision support and electronic tracking of instruments. Cases with at least one associated intervention accounted for $40.3 million (58.9%) of indemnity. Discussion CDS systems and other forms of health information technology (HIT) are expected to improve quality of care, but their potential to mitigate risk had not previously been quantified. Our results suggest that, in addition to their known benefits for quality and safety, CDS systems within HIT have a potential role in decreasing malpractice payments. Conclusion More than half of malpractice events and over $40 million of indemnity were potentially preventable with CDS. PMID:25298814

  8. A Primary Care Workload Production Model for Estimating Relative Value Unit Output

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    that a similar future production capacity will be possible, as in the period studied. Significance of Study The academic body of knowledge...Conversion Factors (Adapted from AMA, 2010) To calculate payment amounts using the Medicare system, the practice expense, malpractice insurance and RVUs... Malpractice (PLI) RVU x PLI GPCI = Total RVU x CY 2011 Conversion Factor of $33.9764 = Payment Here, the Geographic Price

  9. Best Practices for Optimizing DoD Contractor Safety and Occupational Health Program Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    professionals who have advanced degrees in counseling or related academic disciplines and who meet all requirements for State licensure and board...Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), P.L. 104-191). (c) The government may subject itself to liability for malpractice ...allegation of malpractice , whether or not successful, would require costly efforts to defend against even unsupported allegations. Based on these

  10. Civil-Military Relations in Mexico: A Way Ahead

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    Academic scholarship on civil-military affairs has consistently identified three common elements that are generally required for democratic control of the...21. 50 Henry Garcia-Valderamma, Mexico’s Military Malpractice : Business as Usual or about Face?, Washington, DC: The Council on Hemispheric Affairs...2006. Garcia-Valderamma, Henry. Mexico’s Military Malpractice : Business as Usual or about- Face? Washington, DC: The Council on Hemispheric Affairs

  11. An Assessment of Health Literacy Rates in a Sample of Active-Duty Military Personnel at a Major Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    aeute care setting. Similarly, the concept of malpractice has been used to influence the theory and practice of risk management and along with it...failure to apply risk management techniques could adversely affect the clinical setting. In using the concept of malpractice, Roy (1996) was able to...demonstrate how nurses could identify risk management issues use this knowledge to further the use of risk management techniques in their own

  12. Cross-sectional survey on defensive practices and defensive behaviours among Israeli psychiatrists

    PubMed Central

    Reuveni, I; Pelov, I; Reuveni, H; Bonne, O; Canetti, L

    2017-01-01

    Objective Psychiatry is a low-risk specialisation; however, there is a steady increase in malpractice claims against psychiatrists. Defensive psychiatry (DP) refers to any action undertaken by a psychiatrist to avoid malpractice liability that is not for the sole benefit of the patient's mental health and well-being. The objectives of this study were to assess the scope of DP practised by psychiatrists and to understand whether awareness of DP correlated with defensive behaviours. Methods A questionnaire was administered to 213 Israeli psychiatry residents and certified psychiatrists during May and June 2015 regarding demographic data and experience with malpractice claims, medicolegal literature and litigation. Four clinical scenarios represented defensive behaviours and reactions (feelings and actions) to malpractice claims. Results Forty-four (20.6%) certified psychiatrists and four (1.9%) residents were directly involved in malpractice claims, while 132 (62.1%) participants admitted to practising DP. Residents acknowledged the practice of DP more than did senior psychiatrists (p=0.038). Awareness of DP correlated with unnecessary hospitalisation of suicidal patients, increased unnecessary follow-up visits and prescribing smaller drug dosages than required for pregnant women and elderly patients. Conclusions This study provides evidence that DP is well established in the routine clinical daily practice of psychiatrists. Further studies are needed to reveal whether DP effectively protects psychiatrists from malpractice suits or, rather, if it impedes providing quality psychiatric care and represents an economic burden that leads to more harm for the patient. PMID:28320795

  13. The approach of Bayesian model indicates media awareness of medical errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K.; Arulchelvan, S.

    2016-06-01

    This research study brings out the factors behind the increase in medical malpractices in the Indian subcontinent in the present day environment and impacts of television media awareness towards it. Increased media reporting of medical malpractices and errors lead to hospitals taking corrective action and improve the quality of medical services that they provide. The model of Cultivation Theory can be used to measure the influence of media in creating awareness of medical errors. The patient's perceptions of various errors rendered by the medical industry from different parts of India were taken up for this study. Bayesian method was used for data analysis and it gives absolute values to indicate satisfaction of the recommended values. To find out the impact of maintaining medical records of a family online by the family doctor in reducing medical malpractices which creates the importance of service quality in medical industry through the ICT.

  14. Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael H; Sandler, Lynne; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2005-01-01

    This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies. Thus, few academic medical centers have sufficiently integrated CAM services into conventional care by developing consensus-written policies governing credentialing, malpractice liability, and dietary supplement use.

  15. An Overview of Cyberbullying in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Edwina Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is a social problem. The proliferation of electronic technology has provided a new forum for bullies to harm victims. That is, bullies can transmit harmful text messages, photos, or video over the Internet and other digital communication devices to victims. This malpractice of technology-oriented phenomenon known as cyberbullying has…

  16. Why Licensing Is An Opportunity for Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Paul S.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that organizations representing professionals in the public relations field have a serious responsibility to define and elevate the practice. Urges licensing in addition to accreditation, claiming that codes of ethics and accreditation programs alone are insufficient for weeding out those who engage in "professional malpractice." (JD)

  17. Inpatient Obstetric Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital: A Study to Determine the Most Efficient Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Reese’s new birthing suites may curb maternity malpractice suits. Modern Healthcare, 16 (11), 48. Clark, L., & Stewart, R. (1982). Nurse- midwifery ...practice in an in-hospital birthing center: 2050 births. Journal of Nurse- Midwifery , 27 (3), 21-26. Cooper, R. & Schindler, P. (1998a). Design Strategies. In

  18. Major Health Issues for States: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landes, David

    Health care will continue to occupy a prominent place in state legislative deliberations, as indicated by the National Conference of State Legislatures' 1987 State Issues Survey. The survey addressed state actions in these health issue areas: (1) health care for the medically indigent; (2) medical malpractice; (3) certificate of need and health…

  19. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... settled or by regularly reducing the amount of medical care as not fair and reasonable; (ii) The local U.S... suit to create a written record of efforts to avoid suit. Personal contact with all parties is... malpractice cases, product liability cases, or other cases in which another tortfeasor may be involved....

  20. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... settled or by regularly reducing the amount of medical care as not fair and reasonable; (ii) The local U.S... suit to create a written record of efforts to avoid suit. Personal contact with all parties is... malpractice cases, product liability cases, or other cases in which another tortfeasor may be involved....

  1. 78 FR 47322 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... defending a claim against the Public Health Service based upon an individual's mental or physical condition... health care practitioner may be granted membership in a professional society, the conditions of such... malpractice action) to have information from the NPDB on a health care practitioner, under the conditions...

  2. The Prevalence and Special Educational Requirements of Dyscompetent Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Betsy W.

    2006-01-01

    Underperformance among physicians is not well studied or defined; yet, the identification and remediation of physicians who are not performing up to acceptable standards is central to quality care and patient safety. Methods for estimating the prevalence of dyscompetence include evaluating available data on medical errors, malpractice claims,…

  3. The Role of Mass Media in Health Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Donald J.; Quesada, Gustavo M.

    This paper reviews the research that has been done on mass media effects in health communication: breakthroughs in treatment, rising costs of medical care, innovations in the organization of health care, governmental involvement, the rise in malpractice litigation, and so on. The conceptual framework employed proposes a continuum of audience…

  4. The Problem of Open Cheating and Invigilator Compliance in the Lebanese Brevet and Baccalaureat Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Shehab, Saadeddine S.; Alameh, Sahar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study on examination room cheating during Lebanese Brevet and Baccalaureat examinations with a focus on "open cheating"--malpractices which are aided and abetted by examination invigilators. Findings suggest that the problem is widespread and is largely attributable to the empathy invigilators feel with candidates.…

  5. Teacher Education in Central Equatoria, South Sudan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahs Brinkley, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Without education, many South Sudanese will continue living in poverty. There are numerous factors that limit their educational opportunities including tribal warfare, colonialism, missionary malpractice, civil wars, a high illiteracy rate, low government funding, and threats of war. These factors have left a substantial deficiency in available…

  6. Crime and Crime Management in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adebanjo, Margaret Adewunmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines crime and its management in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Tertiary institutions today have become arenas for crime activities such as rape, cultism, murder, theft, internet fraud, drug abuse, and examination malpractices. This paper delves into what crime is, and its causes; and the positions of the law on crime management.…

  7. Gender Differences in Forestalling Anti-Social Behaviours among Student Fitness Aspirants and Recreationists in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okunbor, A. O.; Agwubike, E. O.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the research was quadrupled. It investigated the prevalence of anti-social behaviours in campuses of Nigerian universities. Several student fitness aspirants and recreationists perceived examination malpractices (85%), stealing (83%), armed robbery (81%), prostitution (82%), drunkenness (80%), smoking (79%), hard drug consumption…

  8. 20 CFR 10.807 - How are payments for particular services calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... develop and assign any RVUs that he or she considers appropriate. The geographic adjustment factor shall... factors for each category of service, and in doing so may adapt HCFA conversion factors as appropriate... malpractice insurance (M), and the dollar value assigned to one unit in that category of service (surgery)...

  9. 20 CFR 30.707 - How are payments for particular services calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... geographic adjustment factor shall be that designated by Geographic Practice Cost Indices for Metropolitan... conversion factors for each category of service, and in doing so may adapt CMS conversion factors as... malpractice insurance (M), and the dollar value assigned to one unit in that category of service (surgery)...

  10. 45 CFR 60.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Social Security Act. Medical malpractice action or claim means a written complaint or claim... Security Act (referred to as QIOs) and other organizations funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid..., dentist's or other health care practitioner's advertising or engaging in other competitive acts...

  11. Consensual medicine and the therapeutic partnership: reducing the costs of defensive medicine and litigation.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, S Marcel

    2009-01-01

    Marking the start of our 25th Anniversary Year, Marcel Frenkel, MD, MBA, Founder and Editor Emeritus of this Journal, returns with a prescription that has interest for all players in the healthcare system. Though he focuses on the costs of defensive medicine and malpractice litigation, he proposes a significant change in medicine's cultural approach that can bring universal rewards: empower the patient.

  12. 75 FR 12559 - Statement of Organization, Functions and Delegations of Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... professional organizations to promote quality assurance efforts and deter fraud and abuse by administering the... reports; (3) conducts audits to ensure validity of data in the banks; (4) develops programs of research on trends in data, quality assurance, risk management, medical liability and malpractice; (5) conducts...

  13. A case of stillbirth: the importance of placental investigation in medico-legal practice.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Daniela; Belviso, Maura; Fulcheri, Ezio

    2009-03-01

    The authors present a case of stillbirth in which histologic examination of the placenta provides the opportunity to make a definitive diagnosis of a death due to fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV). Establishing the etiology in cases of stillbirth may avoid medical malpractice litigation. The better knowledge of the cause of stillbirths also helped obstetricians to recognize factors that could have prejudiced future pregnancies.

  14. Health courts: an alternative to traditional tort law.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    The current adversarial tort-based system of adjudicating malpractice claims is flawed. Alternate methods of compensation for birth injuries related to oxygen deprivation or mechanical injury are being utilized in Virginia and Florida. Although utilization of both of these schemes is limited, and they are not without problems in application, both have been successful in reducing the number of malpractice claims in the tort system and in reducing malpractice premiums. While the Florida and Virginia programs are primarily focused on compensation, other models outside the US focus include compensation as well as enhanced dispute resolution and potential for clinical practice change through peer review. Experts in the fields of law and public policy in the United States have evaluated a variety of approaches and have proposed models for administrative health courts that would provide both compensation and dispute resolution for medical and nursing malpractice claims. These alternative models are based on transparency and disclosure, with just compensation for injuries, and opportunities for improvements in patient safety.

  15. Great Minds Think Differently: Sustaining a System of Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Margaret Curette; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    Should students only be exposed to basic content in schools? Of course not, an educator's job is to teach students how to become self-sufficient learners. In the medical profession, doctors lose their license for malpractice. In the legal profession, attorneys lose their ability to practice law for misconduct. Many times in the education…

  16. Instructional Activities of Staff Personnel in the Affective Domain in Selected Secondary Schools in Southern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olubor, R. O.; Ogonor, B. O.

    2007-01-01

    The tendency of restive secondary school graduates to be used in carrying out vices such as violence, examination malpractice, thuggery and cultism has necessitated this study. In total, 250 secondary school teachers undertaking part-time bachelor of education program in the University of Benin, formed the sample of this study. Simple percentage,…

  17. Legal issues related to vascular access devices and infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Masoorli, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Infusion therapies are being delivered in many healthcare settings including hospitals, homecare settings, long-term care facilities, occupational health facilities, outpatient units, and physician offices. Nurses who infuse medications must be properly educated to recognize vascular access complications and initiate the proper interventions. This article discusses the high-risk areas of nursing malpractice related to infusion therapies.

  18. A Note on Academic Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, David

    1993-01-01

    It is argued that academic plagiarism is not addressed as vigorously as needed because the university code of professional conduct is not fully evolved and does not consider plagiarism as malpractice. In treating the problem, it is suggested that one place to start is teaching proper use of citation and annotation. (MSE)

  19. The Emerging Legal Issue of Competency Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, David G.

    1979-01-01

    As more states adopt minimum competency testing (MCT) programs, MCT is becoming the subject of much debate among educators and in the courts. MCT has been attacked by those who claim it discriminates against Blacks and non-English-speaking minorities. Also raised in the MCT debate is the question of educational malpractice. (RLV)

  20. New Directions--In Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Doris

    1978-01-01

    Failure to become involved in the critical issues of our times is viewed as a critical malpractice for all ages of students. Discusses some promising practices designed to help students to see social problems from a world perspective and to help them relate to their own social and political world. (Author/RK)

  1. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  2. The Overreliance of Accreditors on Consensus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Frank B.

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the legitimacy of accreditation in teacher education is rooted in political consensus, power, and scholarship. Because these roots are fragile, there is no accepted concept of educational malpractice. The legitimacy of accreditation should be rooted in scholarly evidence that the program has fulfilled the claim that its graduates are…

  3. Psychological Factors Associated with Language in the Education of the African-American Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Asa G., III

    1983-01-01

    The effects of language in education are rarely accounted for in (1) measurement of intelligence; (2) diagnosis of language, speech, or learning pathology; (3) reading ability measurement; and (4) educator attitudes toward language variations. Educational malpractice in these areas may have negative effects on identity development among…

  4. Consumer Rights in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vago, Stephen

    1979-01-01

    Attempts in both academia and the legal arena to delineate the concepts of academic fraud and malpractice and to develop the positive implications of the student as a responsible consumer may lead to the establishment of a more appropriate student-institution relationship for today's highly diversified and demanding college learners. (Author/EB)

  5. Rebels without a Clause: Towards an Institutional Framework for Dealing with Plagiarism by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores why an institutional framework for dealing with plagiarism by students is necessary and it outlines the main ingredients of such a framework that has been developed at Lancaster University. It defines plagiarism as a form of academic malpractice and frames it as a breach of academic integrity. The framework places a strong…

  6. Postmodern Moonshine in English 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nan

    2006-01-01

    Theorists have usurped English composition. They have banished great literature as the residual oppression of dead white males. They control groups like the NCTE and MLA, which announce that exercises in grammar and the mechanics of writing are "deleterious" for students tantamount to "malpractice." Nan Miller reminds those…

  7. A Second Survey of Graduates of a Traditionally Black College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Davis G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A 1985-86 Howard University College of Medicine survey of graduates confirmed that the predominantly Black alumni were continuing to provide patient care to a substantial number of poor Blacks in urban areas. Findings included concerns about malpractice suits and physician impairment. (Author/MLW)

  8. A Common Law Remedy for the Educational Harms Caused by Incompetent or Careless Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elson, John

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the general policy considerations that will bear on a court's willingness to decide issues of educational negligence (malpractice) and sets forth alternative legal theories that could support such a cause of action and analyzes their relative probabilities of success. Available from Northwestern University School of Law, Chicago,…

  9. How Issues of Professional Liability Are Taught in U.S. Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 120 medical schools found 61 percent have curricula on professional liability. Many indicated students' training has been compromised or jeopardized by physicians' concerns about medicolegal issues, and many had students named in malpractice suits. Findings suggest issues of professional liability have significantly affected…

  10. Reinventing Education through School Improvement Research That Has Resulted in Student Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.; Nye, B. A.

    Some of the concern about educators' failures to build a strong educational foundation revolves around the idea of "professional" and its relationship to the concept of "malpractice." Educators usually claim that education is a profession of practice and thus ought to embody at least a generalized statement about professional…

  11. Improving Learner Achievement through Evaluation by Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Howard J.

    Evaluation techniques were designed to improve learner performance through use of pre-specified popular instructional objectives. Current curriculum planning and evaluation practices are examined. Two common evaluation malpractices are: (1) the tendency to treat the content of the program as the most important criterion for evaluation, (2) the…

  12. Medicolegal issues in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Loder, Elizabeth; Loder, John

    2004-04-01

    This paper identifies legal issues of relevance to the diagnosis and treatment of cluster headache, including areas of actual and potential malpractice liability. Legal topics that are relevant to cluster headache can be divided into five categories: diagnostic-related issues, risks inherent in the disease process, prescribing and treatment-related problems, research-related issues, and disability determination.

  13. Negligence in Academic Advising and Abortion Counseling: Courts Rulings and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Carolyn

    2002-01-01

    Presents two court cases to illuminate school counselors' legal responsibilities in academic advising and abortion counseling. The cases are presented to show how appellate court decisions can guide and inform future decision making in a variety of malpractice situations, and to equip professionals to exercise even greater care for their minor…

  14. Suicide and the Standard of Care: Optimal vs. Acceptable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L.; Cohen-Sandler, Roni

    1982-01-01

    Discusses accepted standards of care for suicidal patients from the perspectives of the law, malpractice insurance claims, the mental health professions, and the ideal. A review of decisions of professional liability provides guidelines for what the court considers to be adequate care, suggesting an acceptance of minimal standards. (JAC)

  15. Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in Family Therapy: A Graduate Level Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, Fred P.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1983-01-01

    Reports on the curricular components of a 16-week graduate course entitled "Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in Family Therapy." To aid in replication and assessment, selected teaching strategies are also presented. Course topics include feminism and hedonism, confidentiality, paradox, malpractice, court testimony, job hunting, private…

  16. The Course in Professionalism at the University of Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riser, Wayne H.

    1979-01-01

    A course to help students adjust to a practicing career as a veterinarian included sessions on: opportunities in the field, choosing a specialty and location; applying for jobs; women in practice; finances; improving professional skills; the veterinarian as hospital administrator; and malpractice and health insurance. (BH)

  17. A Quantitative Study of the Impact of an Empirically Validated Empathy Training Program on Pre-Med Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonnenkamp, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    Medical educators recognize the need for empathetic physicians, and empathy has been considered to be extremely important in medical education. Research has shown that empathy can lead to positive patient outcomes, greater patient satisfaction, and compliance, lower malpractice litigation, reduced cost of care and fewer medical errors. The purpose…

  18. Effective communication: a powerful risk management tool.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F

    1993-01-01

    Physicians can employ communication techniques to improve patient diagnoses, outcomes, and satisfaction and ultimately to decrease their risk of malpractice suit. The skills outlined in this article form the basis of the Miles Program for Physician-Patient Communication of which the author is a participant.

  19. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XIV: The External Environment and Research for Diagnostic Processes.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-09-01

    The work system in which diagnosis takes place is affected by the external environment, which includes requirements such as certification, accreditation, and regulations. How errors are reported, malpractice, and the system for payment are some other aspects of the external environment. Improving the external environment is expected to decrease errors in diagnosis. More research on improving the diagnostic process is needed.

  20. Managing 'tail liability'.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C; Weber, Ryan J

    2013-11-01

    To reduce and control their level of tail liability, hospitals should: Utilize a self-insurance vehicle; Consider combined limits between the hospital and physicians; Communicate any program changes to the actuary, underwriter, and auditor; Continue risk management and safety practices; Ensure credit is given to the organization's own medical malpractice program.

  1. Decline in Medical-School Applications Seen Damaging Quality of Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1988-01-01

    Factors related to the decline in applications for medical school include costs of medical education, student's desire to begin earning money quickly, publicity about the high cost of malpractice insurance and the increasingly bureaucratic nature of the medical professions, and the perception that there is a continuing overabundance of doctors.…

  2. Torts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Paul W.

    Chapter 5 of a book on school law, this chapter reports the cases decided during 1979 involving tort claims in the schools. The cases are organized according to headings including negligence (with an emphasis on student injuries), educational malpractice, negligence defenses (especially common law and statutory immunity), liability insurance,…

  3. Torts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    During 1978, cases pertaining to pupil injuries (mainly involving athletics) and employee injuries under workmen's compensation laws continued to dominate tort litigation in the educational sphere. Several noteworthy cases, however, were rendered in the emerging areas of educational malpractice and constitutional torts. The cases discussed are…

  4. Gerontology & Policies for Not Treating Terminally Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, William H.

    Proposals have been developed to clarify physician responsibility in withholding treatment to terminally ill patients. These proposals seek to provide a legal shield against malpractice proceedings and to reduce confusion over how to resolve high medical costs through standardizing procedures for withholding treatment. When first published,…

  5. Liability of College Faculty and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Patricia S.; Sarver, Lee

    2014-01-01

    According to a "Wall Street Journal"/NBC News poll, 59 percent of all adults consider education essential to getting ahead in life. At the same time, an increasing number of adults have begun to blame educators for their failure in life, claiming educational malpractice. Historically, education has been more of an issue at the state and…

  6. Ethics in Education: The Role of Teacher Codes. Canada and South Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nuland, Shirley; Khandelwal, B. P.

    2006-01-01

    To curb malpractice in the education sector, various countries have developed professional codes of conduct. Given the importance of this issue, the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) devoted this book to codes of conduct. This book includes three separate, though interrelated and complimentary parts. Section One of the report…

  7. Patient Power: Complex Issues Need Complex Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Carolyn; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses ethical and practical questions that arise in physician/patient interactions as a result of the rising prevalence of chronic illness, the growth of medical technology, and the increased differentiation of medical specialization. Issues considered include patients' rights, medical malpractice, informed consent, and the patient self-help…

  8. The legal and ethical context for knowing and using the latest child welfare research.

    PubMed

    Barsky, Allan E

    2009-01-01

    Many child welfare researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are embracing evidence-based practice as a means of promoting more effective services. This article explores the implications of this movement, including the potential for malpractice liability, limiting the discretion of child welfare professionals, complications with informed consent, and other legal and ethical risks.

  9. Emerging Issues in Special Education Tort Liability: Implications for Special Educators and Teacher Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Critical issues in tort liability that confront special educators and teacher trainers include malpractice (failure to learn), misdiagnosis, immunity, impact of a handicap on standard of care, confidentiality, access to emergency medical services, the use of aversive consequences, child abuse and corporal punishment, and school violence.…

  10. Quasi-Experiment Study on Effectiveness Evaluation of Health Communication Strategies.

    PubMed

    Song, Dae Jong; Choi, Jae Wook; Kim, Kyunghee; Kim, Min Soo; Moon, Jiwon Monica

    2016-07-01

    This experimental study examined differences in doctor-patient relationships according to the health communication strategies during cases of medical malpractices occurred at primary medical institution. A total of 116 subjects aged in their 20s-50s was sampled. The first medical malpractice scenario chosen was the medical malpractice case most frequently registered at the Korean Medical Association Mutual Aid and the second scenario was associated with materials and devices as the cause of malpractice. Four types of crisis communication strategy messages were utilized, consisting of denial, denial + ingratiation, apology, and apology + ingratiation. Subjects were classified into four research groups by crisis communication strategy to measure levels of trust, control mutuality, commitment, and satisfaction, before and after the occurrence of medical malpractice and application of communication strategies. The findings of this study revealed that the apology strategy, compared with the denial strategy, showed a smaller difference before and after the application of communication strategies in all variables of trust (F = 8.080, F = 5.768), control mutuality (F = 8.824, F = 9.081), commitment (F = 9.815, F = 8.301), and satisfaction (F = 8.723, F = 5.638). Further, a significant interaction effect was shown between variables. The apology strategy, compared with the denial strategy, was effective in the improvement of doctor-patient relationships in both Scenarios I and II. For Scenario I, the apology strategy without ingratiation boosted commitment and satisfaction, but for Scenario II, utilizing the apology strategy with ingratiation boosted the effectiveness of trust and commitment.

  11. Cross-Sectional Analysis of the 1039 U.S. Physicians Reported to the National Practitioner Data Bank for Sexual Misconduct, 2003–2013

    PubMed Central

    AbuDagga, Azza

    2016-01-01

    Background Little information exists on U.S. physicians who have been disciplined with licensure or restriction-of-clinical-privileges actions or have had malpractice payments because of sexual misconduct. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the number of these physicians and compare their age groups’ distribution with that of the general U.S. physician population; (2) compare the type of disciplinary actions taken against these physicians with actions taken against physicians disciplined for other offenses; (3) compare the characteristics and type of injury among victims of these physicians with those of victims in reports for physicians with other offenses in malpractice-payment reports; and (4) determine the percentages of physicians with clinical-privileges or malpractice-payment reports due to sexual misconduct who were not disciplined by medical boards. Methods and Results We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of physician reports submitted to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) from January 1, 2003, through September 30, 2013. A total of 1039 physicians had ≥ 1 sexual-misconduct–related reports. The majority (75.6%) had only licensure reports, and 90.1% were 40 or older. For victims in malpractice-payment reports, 87.4% were female, and “emotional injury only” was the predominant type of injury. We found a higher percentage of serious licensure actions and clinical-privileges revocations in sexual-misconduct–related reports than in reports for other offenses (89.0% vs 68.1%, P = < .001, and 29.3% vs 18.8%, P = .002, respectively). Seventy percent of the physicians with a clinical-privileges or malpractice-payment report due to sexual misconduct were not disciplined by medical boards for this problem. Conclusions A small number of physicians were reported to the NPDB because of sexual misconduct. It is concerning that a majority of the physicians with a clinical-privileges action or malpractice-payment report due to sexual misconduct

  12. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed.

  13. “Health Courts” and Accountability for Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Michelle M; Studdert, David M; Kachalia, Allen B; Brennan, Troyen A

    2006-01-01

    Proposals that medical malpractice claims be removed from the tort system and processed in an alternative system, known as administrative compensation or ‘health courts,’ attract considerable policy interest during malpractice ‘crises,’ including the current one. This article describes current proposals for the design of a health court system and the system's advantages for improving patient safety. Among these advantages are the cultivation of a culture of transparency regarding medical errors and the creation of mechanisms to gather and analyze data on medical injuries. The article discusses the experiences of foreign countries with administrative compensation systems for medical injury, including their use of claims data for research on patient safety; choices regarding the compensation system's relationship to physician disciplinary processes; and the proposed system's possible limitations. PMID:16953807

  14. ASSESSMENT OF PRACTICE AT RETAIL PHARMACIES IN PAKISTAN: EXTENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE PREVAILING DRUG LAW OF PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Hanif; Zada, Wahid; Khan, Muhammad Sona; Iqbal, Muhammad; Chohan, Osaam; Raza, Naeem; Khawaja, Naeem Raza; Abid, Syed Mobasher Ali; Murtazai, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the practice at retail pharmacies in Pakistan and to compare the same in rural and urban areas. The maintenance of pharmacy and drug inspectors' visit was also assessed. This cross sectional study was conducted in Abbottabad, Pakistan during October-November, 2012. A sample of 215 drug sellers or drug stores was selected by employing convenient sampling method. With a response rate of 91.6%, 197 drug sellers participated in this study. All the drug sellers were male. Overall, 35% (n = 197) of the drug sellers did not have any professional qualification. A majority of the drug sellers were involved in various malpractices like selling of medicines without prescription (80.7%), prescribing practice (60.9%), prescription intervention (62.4%) and selling of controlled substances (66%) without a license for selling it. These malpractices were significantly higher in rural area than that in urban area.

  15. LASERS and the LAW: what the dermatologist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2013-12-01

    Dermatologic laser surgery is a continuously evolving field of medicine. According to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, over 100 million laser and light source cosmetic procedures were performed by its members in 2003. Procedures, which include hair removal, nonablative treatments, as well as removal of pigmented lesions, tattoos, and unwanted vascular lesions, have revolutionized this field. With an increasing number of physicians and nonphysicians performing these procedures and with the availability of increasingly powerful laser technologies, the potential for problems and their legal consequences continue to increase. This article will address the concept of negligence and the potential for a resultant medical malpractice lawsuit that may arise in such a setting. Inherent in this issue are the associated problems that arise when these procedures are performed by physician extenders. An understanding of the basic principals of a cause of action in medical malpractice will likely protect a physician from losing such a case in a court of law.

  16. Unconstrained Respiration Measurement and Respiratory Arrest Detection Method by Dynamic Threshold in Transferring Patients by Stretchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kajiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    General anesthesia used for surgical operations may cause unstable conditions of the patients after the operations, which could lead to respiratory arrests. Under such circumstances, nurses could fail in finding the change of the conditions, and other malpractices could also occur. It is highly possible that such malpractices may occur while transferring a patient from ICU to the room using a stretcher. Monitoring the change in the blood oxygen saturation concentration and other vital signs to detect a respiratory arrest is not easy when transferring a patient on a stretcher. Here we present several noise reduction system and algorithm to detect respiratory arrests in transferring a patient, based on the unconstrained air pressure method that the authors presented previously. As the result, when the acceleration level of the stretcher noise was 0.5G, the respiratory arrest detection ratio using this novel method was 65%, while that with the conventional method was 0%.

  17. Negligence, genuine error, and litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, David H

    2013-01-01

    Not all medical injuries are the result of negligence. In fact, most medical injuries are the result either of the inherent risk in the practice of medicine, or due to system errors, which cannot be prevented simply through fear of disciplinary action. This paper will discuss the differences between adverse events, negligence, and system errors; the current medical malpractice tort system in the United States; and review current and future solutions, including medical malpractice reform, alternative dispute resolution, health courts, and no-fault compensation systems. The current political environment favors investigation of non-cap tort reform remedies; investment into more rational oversight systems, such as health courts or no-fault systems may reap both quantitative and qualitative benefits for a less costly and safer health system. PMID:23426783

  18. Errors in the radiological evaluation of the alimentary tract: part I.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Ylenia; Reginelli, Alfonso; Galasso, Rosario; Iacobellis, Francesca; Berritto, Daniela; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2012-08-01

    Physicians are subjected to an increasing number of medical malpractice claims, and radiology is one of the specialties most liable to claims of medical negligence The etiology of radiological error is multifactorial, deriving by poor technique, failures of perception, lack of knowledge, and misjudgments. Reducing errors will improve patient care, may reduce costs, and will improve the image of the hospital. The main reason for studying medical errors is to try to prevent them. This article focuses on the spectrum of diagnostic errors in radiology, including a classification of the errors, and highlights the malpractice issues in methods for functional alimentary tract examination: swallowing act study, 3-dimensional endoanal ultrasound, defecography, and defecography in magnetic resonance.

  19. Roots of the NCMIC: Loran M. Rogers and the National Chiropractic Association, 1930-1946.

    PubMed

    Keatin, J C

    2000-06-01

    Today's National Chiropractic Mutual Insurance Company (NCMIC) evolved from the legal protective services offered initially by the Universal Chiropractors' Association, and subsequently, by the National Chiropractic Association (NCA). At first these services focused on the criminal defence of chiropractors charged with unlicensed practice. However, as an increasing number of jurisdictions enacted chiropractic statutes, the NCA's legal program became ever more involved in civil litigation: suits for malpractice and negligence. Steering the NCA throughout its tumultuous voyage was its longtime secretary-treasurer, Loran M. Rogers, D.C. When the NCA spun off its legal services division in 1946, forming the National Chiropractic Insurance Company (predecessor of the NCMIC), Rogers continued his work as executive secretary-treasurer of the malpractice insurer.

  20. The spectrum of medical errors: when patients sue

    PubMed Central

    Kels, Barry D; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    Inarguably medical errors constitute a serious, dangerous, and expensive problem for the twenty-first-century US health care system. This review examines the incidence, nature, and complexity of alleged medical negligence and medical malpractice. The authors hope this will constitute a road map to medical providers so that they can better understand the present climate and hopefully avoid the “Scylla and Charybdis” of medical errors and medical malpractice. Despite some documented success in reducing medical errors, adverse events and medical errors continue to represent an indelible stain upon the practice, reputation, and success of the US health care industry. In that regard, what may be required to successfully attack the unacceptably high severity and volume of medical errors is a locally directed and organized initiative sponsored by individual health care organizations that is coordinated, supported, and guided by state and federal governmental and nongovernmental agencies. PMID:22924008

  1. Mobile health applications: the patchwork of legal and liability issues suggests strategies to improve oversight.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Silverman, Ross D

    2014-02-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technology has facilitated the transition of care beyond the traditional hospital setting to the homes of patients. Yet few studies have evaluated the legal implications of the expansion of mHealth applications, or "apps." Such apps are affected by a patchwork of policies related to medical licensure, privacy and security protection, and malpractice liability. For example, the privacy protections of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 may apply to only some uses of the apps. Similarly, it is not clear what a doctor's malpractice liability would be if he or she injured a patient as the result of inaccurate information supplied by the patient's self-monitoring health app. This article examines the legal issues related to the oversight of health apps, discusses current federal regulations, and suggests strategies to improve the oversight of these apps.

  2. Homicide committed by psychiatric patients: Psychiatrists' liability in Italian law cases.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Rocca, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Interest in psychiatrists' professional liability in Italy has increased in recent years because of the number of medical malpractice claims. Professional liability for failure to prevent violent behaviour by psychiatric patients is particularly debated. This study describes three Italian cases in which health professionals - physicians and nurses - were found guilty of manslaughter for murders committed by psychiatric patients. Examination of the cases focuses on claims of malpractice, patients' characteristics, the circumstances of the homicide and the reasons for the court's judgment. In particular, the predictability of violent behaviour and the concept of causal links are examined in detail. The cases provide an opportunity for a study of comparative jurisprudence. The topics discussed are relevant not only to practicing psychiatrists but also to experts assessing medical liability in cases of criminal acts committed by psychiatric patients.

  3. Personal protection: vicarious liability as applied to the various business structures.

    PubMed

    Winrow, Brian; Winrow, Amanda R

    2008-01-01

    Within the field of midwifery, the issue of vicarious liability has become an emerging issue. The doctrine of respondeat superior imputes liability to an employer without direct negligence. While the issue of vicarious liability has been explored in the past, those studies were focused on the vicarious liability of certified nurse-midwives/certified midwives (CNMs/CMs) for the negligence of their employees. This article explores the issue of vicarious liability under the doctrine of respondeat superior as applied within a practice consisting of two or more co-owners. This issue is of heightened importance, because CNMs/CMs increasingly enter into ventures with other CNMs/CMs in order to pool their resources. Many CNMs/CMs unsuspectingly assume the risks for the malpractice of their colleagues. This increased risk can be minimized by forming their practice as a limited liability entity, thus avoiding personal liability for the malpractice of their co-owner(s).

  4. Finance issue brief: insurer liability: year end report-2002.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Rachel; MacEachern, Lillian

    2002-12-31

    When a health plan denies payment for a procedure on grounds that it is not medically necessary or when it refuses a physician-ordered referral to a specialist, has it crossed the line from making an insurance judgment to practicing medicine? If the patient suffers harm as a result of the decision, is the plan liable for medical malpractice? Those were questions 35 states considered in 1999, and at least 32 states are grappling with this year as they seek to respond to physician and patient pressure to curb the power of the managed care industry. Traditionally, health insurers have been protected by state laws banning "the corporate practice of medicine," which means the patient's only recourse is to sue under a "vicarious liability" theory. Now, however, lawmakers are debating legislation to extend the scope of malpractice liability beyond individual practitioners to insurance carriers and plans themselves.

  5. Finance issue brief: insurer liability: year end report-2003.

    PubMed

    MacEachern, Lillian

    2003-12-31

    When a health plan denies payment for a procedure on grounds that it is not medically necessary or when it refuses a physician-ordered referral to a specialist, has it crossed the line from making an insurance judgment to practicing medicine? If the patient suffers harm as a result of the decision, is the plan liable for medical malpractice? Those were questions 35 states considered in 1999, and at least 32 states are grappling with this year as they seek to respond to physician and patient pressure to curb the power of the managed care industry. Traditionally, health insurers have been protected by state laws banning "the corporate practice of medicine," which means the patient's only recourse is to sue under a "vicarious liability" theory. Now, however, lawmakers are debating legislation to extend the scope of malpractice liability beyond individual practitioners to insurance carriers and plans themselves.

  6. Finance, providers issue brief: insurer liability.

    PubMed

    Rothouse, M

    1999-07-01

    When a health plan denies payment for a procedure on grounds that it is not medically necessary or when it refuses a physician-ordered referral to a specialist, has it crossed the line from making an insurance judgment to practicing medicine? If the patient suffers harm as a result of the decision, is the plan liable for medical malpractice? Those are questions 29 states considered in 1998, and at least 35 states are grappling with this year as they seek to respond to physician and patient pressure to curb the power of the managed care industry. Traditionally, health insurers have been protected by state laws banning "the corporate practice of medicine," which means the patient's only recourse is to sue under a "vicarious liability" theory. Now, however, lawmakers are debating legislation to extend the scope of malpractice liability beyond individual practitioners to insurance carriers and plans themselves.

  7. Finance, providers issue brief: insurer liability.

    PubMed

    Rothouse, M; Stauffer, M

    2000-05-24

    When a health plan denies payment for a procedure on grounds that it is not medically necessary or when it refuses a physician-ordered referral to a specialist, has it crossed the line from making an insurance judgment to practicing medicine? If the patient suffers harm as a result of the decision, is the plan liable for medical malpractice? Those were questions 35 states considered in 1999, and at least 32 states are grappling with this year as they seek to respond to physician and patient pressure to curb the power of the managed care industry. Traditionally, health insurers have been protected by state laws banning "the corporate practice of medicine," which means the patient's only recourse is to sue under a "vicarious liability" theory. Now, however, lawmakers are debating legislation to extend the scope of malpractice liability beyond individual practitioners to insurance carriers and plans themselves.

  8. Compensability of, and legal issues related to, coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Haley, Luann

    2007-09-01

    Legal issues that may develop when treating patients with coccidioidomycosis include allegations of medical malpractice, claims for workers' compensation benefits, and civil actions against business owners. In states where the disease is most prevalent, California recognizes cocci diodomycosis as a compensable condition, although Arizona does not. In civil actions, the state courts have not imposed liability on any business or institution for those that claim to have developed cocci diodomycosis on or near the premises of the business.

  9. Hospital Privileging Hearing: Striking a Balance between due Process and Quality of Care.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Part I of this paper will include a brief outline of the history of peer review , an explanation of how the process is currently applied, the efficacy...of peer review and a brief comparison of the relative merits of peer review vs. malpractice litigation. Part I will also include a discussion of...physicians’ attitudes toward peer review . Part II will argue for the merits of some degree of procedural protections even though physicians may find some

  10. [Perspectives in medical liability].

    PubMed

    Pizarro W, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The progressive increase of medical negligence law suits requires an updated analysis of the current situation of medical liability in Chile. The application of a new criminal procedure will avoid criminal prosecution of doctors, transferring to the civil courts the pecuniary sanctions for malpractice. Medical negligence and damage inflicted by doctors that require compensation are explained. The most likely evolution of medical liability is proposed, through an increase in civil liability insurance and the necessary standardization of rules applicable to professional liability.

  11. Is there Relevance for Classical French Counterinsurgency in Modern Counterinsurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-10

    secondary sources such as academic books and professional journals, all from soldiers, scholars, and politicians. Neither interviews nor surveys will...Counterinsurgency Tactics. On the academic side, many authors brought forth ideas concerning COIN theory. Retired US Marine Colonel Thomas Hammes and retired US...Insurgency as Malpractice ,” that FM 3-24’s “prescriptions are in the end of little use.”58 He does so for two reasons. First, the US is not interested in

  12. Afghanistan...Another Chance for Peace With Honor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    requirements of the Master of Strategic Studies Degree. The views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do... academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense...spending cuts; deep reductions in Medicare payments to doctors, less generous Medigap coverage and new limits on medical malpractice awards

  13. The Consequential Challenges of Climate Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-22

    of the Master of Strategic Studies Degree. The views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect...recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. The views expressed in this student academic ...multinational organization of science academies, showed no evidence of scientific malpractice .24 The science was shown to be sound, with problems based

  14. Responsible Transition of New Materiel Requirements into Programs of Record

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department...expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the...Acquisition Executive, Frank Kendall, called the program an example of “acquisition malpractice .”21 Again, all of these programs failed to demonstrate

  15. DoD Implementation of the National Practitioner Data Bank Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    payment personally made to settle a malpractice claim. Claims paid on behalf of a clinic, group , or hospital are also not reported to the NPDB. We have...to be reported, even those on behalf of clinics, groups , hospitals, and other corporations. In addition, the specific practitioner associated with the...Army, 71 Navy, and 111 Air Force) were made through the Judgment Group Fund, Department of Treasury.’ During that same period, an average of 52

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-Behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    in the English language b. Exclusion Criteria - (a) Currently undergoing psychotherapy for depression (b) គ or >65 years of age (c) Active...client attitudes,’’ ‘‘cli- ent satisfaction,’’ and ‘‘treatment.’’ Restrictions for all searches included the following: English language, publication...complaints and/or malpractice lawsuits. Due to the ethical and legal responsibilities mental health practitioners have toward patients, liability can

  17. The US Public Health Service “treating tobacco use and dependence clinical practice guidelines” as a legal standard of care

    PubMed Central

    Torrijos, Randy M; Glantz, Stanton A

    2006-01-01

    Background The important factors in evaluating the role of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in medical malpractice litigation have been discussed for several years, but have focused on broad policy implications rather than on a concrete example of how an actual guideline might be evaluated. There are four items that need to be considered in negligence torts: legal duty, a breach of that duty, causal relationship between breach and injury, and damages. Objective To identify the arguments related to legal duty. Results The Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence (revised 2000) CPG, sponsored by the US Public Health Service, recommends effective and inexpensive treatments for nicotine addiction, the largest preventable cause of death in the US, and can be used as an example to focus on important considerations about the appropriateness of CPGs in the judicial system. Furthermore, the failure of many doctors and hospitals to deal with tobacco use and dependence raises the question of whether this failure could be considered malpractice, given the Public Health Service guideline's straightforward recommendations, their efficacy in preventing serious disease and cost‐effectiveness. Conclusion Although each case of medical malpractice depends on a multitude of factors unique to individual cases, a court could have sufficient basis to find that the failure to adequately treat the main cause of preventable disease and death in the US qualifies as a violation of the legal duty that doctors and hospitals owe to patients habituated to tobacco use and dependence. PMID:17130373

  18. Liability for managed care decisions: the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and the uneven playing field.

    PubMed

    Mariner, W K

    1996-06-01

    As managed care organizations expand their programs of quality assurance and physician evaluation, more medical malpractice lawsuits may be brought against managed care organizations on the ground that, like hospitals, they are legally responsible for negligent corporate acts that injure patients. However, the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) shields managed care organizations from liability when they are part of an employee group health plan governed by ERISA. Unlike patients with other types of insurance, patients in ERISA health plans do not have a malpractice remedy for a managed care organization's negligence. A few federal appeals courts recently recognized that ERISA plans can be vicariously liable for their physicians' medical malpractice, but only if the physician is the plan's employee or agent. Yet ERISA still prohibits negligence claims against ERISA health plans for injuries resulting from denial of plan benefits, failure to use qualified physicians, utilization review, or improper plan administration. Current managed care operations do not neatly distinguish between administering benefits and controlling quality of care. Neither should the law. ERISA should be amended to provide employees with the same remedies that patients in non-ERISA plans enjoy.

  19. [Feeding venomous insects among the people and the measures to curb and control this addiction by the government in the Song Dynasty].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    Feeding venomous insects, a mystic witchcraft of producing poisonous materials to spoil other people has a long history which was still popular in the southern part of the Song Dynasty, aiming at revenge of one's enemy and the occupation of other's property. The Song government took a strict measures to tackle it, including enacting a decree to prohibiting it, encouraging people to report such malpractice, punishing heavily the person committing such criminal behavior and, at the same time, providing recipes and medicines to remedy its ensued disorders. All of these were helpful to the improvement of social morality.

  20. [Medical safety and the Japan Surgical Society].

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    Medical safety has been one of the most important issues addressed by the Japan Surgical Society (JSS), and the topic has been discussed at every annual meeting of the JSS since 2004. In 2008, the Medical Safety Committee was established under the JSS. The JSS is one of the principal founding members of the Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHR) and has placed many members on evaluation committees for a majority of malpractice cases. In cooperation with the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine and JCQHR, the JSS is trying to lead the Japanese medical community to create an official third-party organization for medical safety.

  1. [The contribution of N.I. Pirogov to the development of forensic medicine (on the occasion of his 200th birthday anniversary)].

    PubMed

    Isakov, V D; Tolmachev, I A; Ozeretskovskiĭ, L B; Tiurin, M V; Belousova, O D

    2011-01-01

    The main facets of professor N.I. Pirogov's professional activity are outlined. Forensic medicine (in the first place its organizational and practical aspects) was an integral component of his scientific and clinical work, along with applied anatomy and surgery. Landmark publications of N.I. Pirogov are listed with special reference to those concerned with forensic medical expertise of medical malpractice cases, postmortem inspection and intravital examination procedures, wound ballistics studies, the atlas of forensic pathology, etc. The surgeon and anatomist N.I. Pirogov can be justly regarded as a founder of forensic medicine in this country.

  2. Issues in physician contracting.

    PubMed

    Fanburg, John D; Leone, Alyson M

    2005-09-01

    Dermatologists will enter into a number of different contracts during their professional careers. It is important that in each agreement they enter, dermatologists reap the benefits that they aspire for and understand the consequences of each provision. This article addresses just a few of the different issues that arise in physician contracting, such as choosing the appropriate form of business entity; the importance of a writing; term and termination of the contract; compensation models; benefits, vacation and other time off included in the contract; malpractice insurance; and restrictive covenants. Each provision should be carefully analyzed to ensure that it will protect the best interests of the dermatologist in that situation.

  3. Evaluation and improvement of doctor–patient communication competence for emergency neurosurgeons: a standardized family model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Wang, Zhinong; Hong, Bo; Shen, Shengjuan; Guo, Yan; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Disease treatments have been significantly influenced by the communications between patients, their families, and doctors the lack of which may lead to malpractice allegations and complaints. In particular, inadequate communication may delay diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, for doctors communication and interpersonal skills, are as important as clinical skills and medical knowledge. In this study we intended to develop two detailed communication content checklists and a modified interpersonal skills inventory, aiming to evaluate their integrity in the midst of communication skills assessments, to provide feedback for some participants, and to observe their communication competence in both aspects PMID:25018623

  4. [Off-label use of drugs in paediatrics causes uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Hart, Dieter; Mühlbauer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The off-label use of drugs in paediatrics is a common practice casting doubts on the adequate safety of drug therapy. Regulatory initiatives of European and national legislators aim to address this paucity of clinical drug trials in paediatrics through clarifying regulations and incentives in pharmaceutical law, thereby promoting an increase in the approval of paediatric drugs, the improvement of drug and thus treatment safety. This paper describes the present situation in paediatrics and the legal status of off-label use in pharmaceutical law, medical malpractice law and statutory health insurance law.

  5. Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs when inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance, inadequate alertness, and deterioration in health. It is incompletely understood why humans need sleep, although some theories include energy conservation, restoration, and information processing. Sleep deprivation has many deleterious health effects. Residency programs have enacted strict work restrictions because of medically related errors due to sleep deprivation. Because obstetrics is an unpredictable specialty with long irregular hours, enacting a hospitalist program enhances patient safety, decreases malpractice risk, and improves the physician's quality of life by allowing obstetricians to get sufficient rest.

  6. Civil claims relating to pressure ulcers: a claimants' lawyer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Soloway, D N

    1998-02-01

    This article addresses attorneys' evolving views of civil claims against nursing homes, hospitals, nurses and doctors relating to pressure ulcers. The author describes measures that healthcare professionals may take to avoid becoming subject to claims, such as properly documenting assessments of patient risks and documenting consistent and appropriate care. Several issues of ethical consideration for nurses are presented relating to the role of nurses as patient advocates, including the issue of under what circumstances may or should a nurse recommend that a patient confer with an attorney. The article describes some common misconceptions about nursing and medical malpractice claims, and identifies ways that some proposed tort reforms appear borne of unsubstantiated fears.

  7. The Emerging Issue of Digital Empathy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Christopher; Cain, Jeff

    2016-05-25

    Empathy can have strong positive effects on patient outcomes, increase patient satisfaction, and reduce malpractice litigation. With modern advances in technology, however, the appropriate expression of empathy in today's age is being threatened, largely as a result of psychological processes that form online disinhibition. The digitization of health care and the corresponding decrease in the expression of empathy may be cause for concern. Because empathy is strongly correlated to positive health outcomes and is an important part of health professions in general, the construct of digital empathy should be considered for integration into health professions curricula.

  8. The impact of no-fault compensation on health care expenditures: an empirical study of OECD countries.

    PubMed

    Vandersteegen, Tom; Marneffe, Wim; Cleemput, Irina; Vereeck, Lode

    2015-03-01

    Around the world, governments are faced with spiralling health care expenditures. This raises the need for further insight in the determinants of these expenditures. Existing literature focuses primarily on income, ageing, health care financing and supply variables. This paper includes medical malpractice system characteristics as determinants of health spending in OECD countries. Estimates from our regression models suggest that no-fault schemes for medical injuries with decoupling of deterrence and compensation reduce health expenditures per capita by 0.11%. Furthermore, countries that introduced a no-fault system without decoupling of deterrence and compensation are found to have higher (+0.06%) health care spending.

  9. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  10. Making customer-service a priority in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Joshua; Persaud, David

    2008-01-01

    Improving customer-service in health care organizations has been linked to better patient care, satisfied staff, a reduction in preventable medical errors, fewer malpractice lawsuits and improved revenue. However, it has been observed that there is sometimes a gap between the level of customer-service provided by health care organizations and their clients' expectations. This paper integrates, synthesizes and extends theory and practice from existing literature to provide health care organizations with strategies for closing this gap. Methods are also outlined for creating, implementing and evaluating an organizational plan for improving customer-service.

  11. Solutions for reducing lawsuits in orthopedic surgery by using psychology and IT technology.

    PubMed

    Purcarea, V L; Cazac, C

    2015-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery is among the top 5 medical specialties with an increased risk of facing a lawsuit. A large part of medical malpractice claims are due to poor communication between physician and patient; therefore, by addressing this issue and implementing psychological methods as well as IT solutions, a reduction in the incidence of medical lawsuits can be achieved. Some of these solutions include implementing and applying psychometric tools such as the SF-36 and SCL-90R tests, creating virtual information hubs for the patient, and establishing efficient communication methods by using IT technology between physician and patient.

  12. [Paolo Zacchia--the spiritual father of forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Händel, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Paolo Zacchia (1584-1659) was the personal physician of the popes Innocent X and Alexander VII, legal advisor to the Rota Romana and head of the health system in the Papal States. His most important work, written in Latin, is entitled "Quaestiones Medico-Legales" and was published in 9 volumes between 1621 and 1651. Even after Zacchia's death comprehensive reprints were published at several places up to the late 18th century. Zacchia covered all the medicolegal issues of his time including the problem of "malpractice" and medical ethics. He is rightly considered an outstanding representative of his profession, whose "Quaestiones Medico-Legales" gave legal medicine its name.

  13. It Finally Happened to Me

    PubMed Central

    Kannai, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    It finally happened to me: I was sued for malpractice by the family of a patient who had died suddenly. My inner turmoil in the aftermath of this traumatic event affected me deeply. While I was an experienced family doctor dedicated to patient-centered medicine, the event challenged my customary approach to my patients. I share three vignettes from my practice that describe my inner dialogue both “preprosecution” and “postprosecution” and explain how I acted in each case. PMID:25201743

  14. The role of the expert witness.

    PubMed

    Jerrold, Laurance

    2007-08-01

    The role of expert witnesses in medical malpractice litigation is often misunderstood. Much maligned, the expert has been the subject of castigation by a range of people, from his professional colleagues to the jurists who preside over his testimony. From an academic perspective, the expert witness is a necessary evil, and his denigration is his own doing; for the expert is a neutral character who creates his own professional persona. This purpose of this article is to serve as a primer for those interested in understanding the role that the expert is supposed to play in litigation, and the factors surrounding his activities.

  15. The expert witness. Neither Frye nor Daubert solved the problem: what can be done?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H H

    2001-01-01

    Flawed expert scientific testimony has compromised truth finding in American litigation, including in medical malpractice and in product liability cases. The Federal Rules of Evidence and the Supreme Court in Daubert and other cases have established standards for testimony that include reliability and relevance, and established judges as gatekeepers. However, because of lack of understanding of scientific issues, judges have problems with this role, and juries have difficulties with scientific evidence. Professionals and the judiciary have made some advances, but a better system involving the court's use of neutral experts and a mechanism to hold experts accountable for improprieties is needed.

  16. CMPA not alone in pursuing huge reserves, CMAJ survey of US firms reveals.

    PubMed

    Korcok, M

    1996-06-15

    Although Canada and the US are two separate worlds when medical malpractice is considered, actuaries across North America are looking into their crystal balls in an attempt to set reserves for uncertain future claims. Given the relatively low rate of litigation in Canada, some feel the Canadian Medical Protective Association is hoarding cash as it continues to raise premiums even though it has close to $1 billion in reserves. However, some experts suggest that this is just a prudent way to do business in an unpredictable environment. Milan Korcok looks at the situation facing physicians on both sides of the border.

  17. Like marriage, without the romance

    PubMed Central

    Portmann, J.

    2000-01-01

    Physicians and philosophers have contributed to the field of medical ethics several different paradigms for the physician-patient relationship. Here I suggest another: marriage. Patients usually enter into relationships as we enter marriage: we allow our high hopes to obscure the possibility of deep disappointment. The argument of the essay encourages renewed focus on the contractual element of physician-patient relationships. Key Words: Relationship • malpractice • emotions • hope • fear • contract • covenant • marriage • expectations PMID:10860212

  18. Team Physicians, Sports Medicine, and the Law: An Update.

    PubMed

    Koller, Dionne L

    2016-04-01

    The recognition of sports medicine and promulgation of practice guidelines for team physicians will push general medical malpractice standards to evolve into a more specialized standard of care for those who practice in this area. To the extent that practicing medicine in the sports context involves calculations that do not arise in typical medical practice, the sports medicine community can help elucidate those issues and create appropriate guidelines that can serve to inform athlete-patients and educate courts. Doing so will help best set the terms by which those who practice sports medicine are judged.

  19. 'Over-servicing 'underservicing' and 'abandonment': What is the law?

    PubMed

    McQuoid-Mason, D J

    2015-03-01

    The Ethical Rules and Policy Document of the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) do not define 'over-servicing', 'underservicing' and 'abandonment. The HPCSA Guidelines on Over-servicing, Perverse Incentives and Related Matters define 'over-service' only. The converse of this definition can be used to define 'underservicing'. The courts do not refer to these concepts, but apply general rules regarding professional negligence and malpractice based on what a reasonably competent doctor in the same position would do. In deciding the standard to be adopted, the courts may consult the ethical rules of the medical profession, but are not bound to take them into account.

  20. The Emerging Issue of Digital Empathy

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Empathy can have strong positive effects on patient outcomes, increase patient satisfaction, and reduce malpractice litigation. With modern advances in technology, however, the appropriate expression of empathy in today’s age is being threatened, largely as a result of psychological processes that form online disinhibition. The digitization of health care and the corresponding decrease in the expression of empathy may be cause for concern. Because empathy is strongly correlated to positive health outcomes and is an important part of health professions in general, the construct of digital empathy should be considered for integration into health professions curricula. PMID:27293225

  1. [Genomics innovative teaching pattern based upon amalgamation between modern educational technology and constructivism studying theory].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xu-Fang; Peng, Jing; Zhou, Tian-Hong

    2007-04-01

    In order to overcome various malpractices in the traditional teaching methods, and also as part of the Guangdong province molecular biology perfect course project, some reforms were carried out to the teaching pattern of genomics. The reforms include using the foreign original teaching materials, bilingual teaching, as well as taking the constructivism-directed discussion teaching method and the multimedia computer-assisted instruction. To improve the scoring way and the laboratory course of the subject, we carried on a multiplex inspection systems and a self-designing experiments. Through the teaching reform on Genomics, we have gradually consummated the construction of molecular biology curriculum system.

  2. Avoiding the Legal “Blemish”

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Brent D.; Momin, Saira B.

    2009-01-01

    In today’s legal environment, it is unlikely that a physician will complete a medical career without being introduced to the legal system in some way. Despite this, medical education often does not incorporate a basic teaching of general legal principles, and many physicians are left unaware of some of the important legal aspects of practicing medicine. The purpose of this article is to provide a background of the essential legal principles of a malpractice action as well as review the fundamentals of the legal process, provide published caselaw of prior dermatological pitfalls, and ultimately, provide suggestions to better prepare the dermatologist to practice medicine. PMID:20725583

  3. Orotracheal Intubation Using the Retromolar Space: A Reliable Alternative Intubation Approach to Prevent Dental Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Sudip D.; Truong, Angela T.; Truong, Dam-Thuy

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in airway management, perianesthetic dental injury remains one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and cause for malpractice litigation against anesthesia providers. Recommended precautions for prevention of dental damage may not always be effective because these techniques involve contact and pressure exerted on vulnerable teeth. We describe a novel approach using the retromolar space to insert a flexible fiberscope for tracheal tube placement as a reliable method to achieve atraumatic tracheal intubation. Written consent for publication has been obtained from the patient. PMID:28116174

  4. Six things every plastic surgeon needs to know about teamwork training and checklists.

    PubMed

    Harden, Stephen W

    2013-03-01

    More than 20 years of teamwork, research, and experience in high-risk industries such as aviation, nuclear power, and military operations have clearly demonstrated that teamwork training and checklist usage can overcome the primary causes of adverse events. There is a growing body of evidence that checklist programs have the same error-reducing effect in operating rooms (OR) as in other industries. The benefits include documented improvements in patient safety and quality care; a better office, surgery center, or hospital in which to practice medicine; reduced exposure to malpractice risk; and increased efficiency in the OR.

  5. Don't lose your home in a lawsuit...or waste the equity.

    PubMed

    Mandell, David B

    2005-01-01

    Like most of us, a physician's home constitutes a major asset. Under normal circumstances, it is subject to attachment by creditors in a malpractice judgment or in any other litigation settlement that may exceed the limits of insurance coverage. This article describes the author's view of substandard options to shield a home from creditors. While some of these techniques have validity for certain planning purposes, they do not provide the optimal protection that physicians may desire. The author then proposes strategies that may be suitable for many individuals.

  6. Physician practice behavior and litigation risk: evidence and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Gerald B; Entman, Stephen S

    2008-12-01

    Malpractice risk bedevils obstetricians. Suits can be a nuisance or emotionally and financially devastating. In this chapter, we ask simple questions and provide empiric data to demonstrate that interpersonal factors trigger suits. A supportive relationship between the obstetrician, team members, and the patient can reduce the chance of being sued after an unexpected event. Collaboration between physician colleagues and others to promote teamwork reduces error and increases patient satisfaction. Physicians who disrupt the emotional ecosystem increase liability for themselves and team members. A method of identifying physicians at increased risk and a strategy for intervening to reverse the pattern is described.

  7. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  8. Grant award program partnerships with your professional liability insurance carrier: an innovative approach to loss prevention and improved patient safety.

    PubMed

    Cox, Phillip M; Rebstock, Jan; Jenkins, Randall C; Dewar, Marvin A; Gruber, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The financial success of a malpractice insurance program is directly influenced by how effectively the covered providers respond to risk. This article describes a University Self-Insurance Program partnership to provide small grants to providers who have the expertise and passion for a specific risk reduction activity that is cost effective and measurable and has a high probability of improving patient care and reducing claims or lawsuits. Implementation of this small grant concept can be tailored to become operational in virtually any setting from an independent medical practice to a multistate healthcare system.

  9. No-harm contracts: a review of what we know.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lisa McConnell

    2007-02-01

    Few events in the practice of a mental health clinician can be as devastating as the suicide of a client. Although suicide is a rare occurrence, clinicians face assessment of clients' risk for harming themselves on a regular basis. One well-accepted and widely practiced intervention for suicidal ideation is the use of no-harm contracts (NHC), although opinions about NHCs range from enthusiasm to apathy. The existing research does not support the use of such contracts as a method for preventing suicide, nor for protecting clinicians from malpractice litigation in the event of a client suicide.

  10. The broad field of forensic pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter D

    2012-02-01

    Forensic pharmacy is application of the sciences of drugs to legal issues. Forensic pharmacists engage in work relating to litigation, the regulatory process, and the criminal justice system. Forensic pharmacy overlaps with many other forensic fields. Pharmacists hold a variety of positions with local, state, and federal governments. Many pharmacists do freelance work as forensic litigation consultants. A forensic pharmacist can be a valuable resource in legal cases relating to malpractice, adverse drug reactions, drunk and drugged driving, health care fraud, poisoning, and numerous other types of civil and criminal cases.

  11. The value proposition of anesthesia information management systems.

    PubMed

    Egger Halbeis, Christoph B; Epstein, Richard H

    2008-12-01

    Anesthesia information management systems add value to the anesthesiologist and the hospital above that which is provided by manual anesthesia records. The more complete documentation and less biased recording of vital signs in this system, relative to manual records, provide data needed for quality initiatives and operating room management and for clinical research. The system can improve the ability to increase anesthesia charge capture, meet the requirements of pay-for-performance programs, and assist in the defense of malpractice allegations. Realization of value from the anesthesia information management systems requires additional expenditures of resources to adapt the systems to meet specific institutional requirements.

  12. Premises liability.

    PubMed

    Buckner, F

    2001-01-01

    Premises liability is an often-overlooked legal consideration. Financially destructive cases brought against practices by patients or visitors can be avoided by creating a safe work environment and clearly labeling potentially harmful locales in and around the office in which you work. This article discusses clear ways any physician or office manager can avoid major legal problems by paying close attention to the needs and rights of office invitees. The focus of any physician considering insurance should include not only malpractice insurance but also premises liability insurance.

  13. The "nuts & bolts" of becoming an aesthetic provider: part 2-building your aesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Part 2 of this three-part series of articles on becoming an aesthetic provider centers on the steps necessary to build an aesthetic practice. We will discuss the legal (e.g., licensure, scope of practice, malpractice, and documentation) and the business aspects (e.g., "your brand," staff development, networking, marketing, and revenue possibilities) of building a successful aesthetic practice. On the basis of years of experience, "pearls and pitfalls" will be discussed so novice, intermediate, and advanced aesthetic providers can minimize mistakes and maximize their success in this exciting and growing profession.

  14. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  15. [Situation of legal conflicts in criminal proceedings].

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniel M

    2003-11-01

    Criminal proceedings against physicians involving an alleged professional malpractice usually represent a complex problem raising issues in various (potential) areas of conflict. In many cases such proceedings are accompanied by liability actions in civil courts, occasionally proceedings have been initiated by the Medical Board in order to clarify a case of professional misconduct. Often, a medical malpractice insurance is involved. In order to protect the physician's interests in the best possible way, any action in the various matters needs concerted efforts. No statement or comment regarding the allegations should be rendered to the prosecution before access to the investigation file has been granted. No negative conclusions may be drawn from the use of the right to refuse testimony. The preparation of a written statement requires a thorough legal and factual analysis of the allegations as well as the evidence they are based on. In this respect professional legal assistance is essential. It does not constitute a breach of the doctor-patient confidentiality if the physician discloses information in order to defend himself against criminal allegations. If several physicians are charged with an offense it is recommendable in most cases to coordinate defense activities.

  16. When patients are harmed, but are not wronged: ethics, law, and history.

    PubMed

    Klaas, Paul B; Berge, Keith H; Klaas, Kelsey M; Klaas, James P; Larson, Annalise Noelle

    2014-09-01

    Iatrogenic injury-injury caused unintentionally by medical treatment-breaks the oldest and most famous rule of medical ethics: primum non nocere, or above all, do no harm. Medical malpractice law, however, focuses on whether an injury was caused by negligence, not on whether an injury was iatrogenic. Iatrogenic injury inflicted without negligence is a common pattern in medical malpractice lawsuits; it is likely the pattern of Jacobs v Cross (Minnesota, 1872), in which Dr W. W. Mayo testified as an expert witness. As a matter of law, the doctor defendants should win all those lawsuits, for iatrogenic injury inflicted without negligence is not a legal wrong in the United States and has not been considered a legal wrong for hundreds of years. However, the medical ethics applicable to doctors' duties to report incompetence in colleagues, including those who inflict excessive iatrogenic injury, have developed dramatically over time. In 1872, the ethical codes in the United States exhorted doctors not to criticize another doctor, even if incompetent. Today, doctors in the United States are ethically required to report an incompetent colleague.

  17. [Cases from the expert commission of the North Rhine medical council: expert commissions and arbitration boards by medical councils].

    PubMed

    Hannappel, J; Weber, B; Smentkowski, U

    2012-11-01

    Following a description of the structure and function of the expert commission for medical malpractice of the North Rhine medical council, important legal technical terms and the consequences, such as the definition of accusable medical malpractice and severe (in legal terms gross) negligence will be presented. The article reports on the legal consequences of the lack of informed consent, on the significance of insufficient informed consent and under which conditions a transfer of liability becomes valid. From the statistical information in the archives of the expert commission it can be seen that in processes against urologists approximately 31% of urologists in private practice were affected compared to 69% of hospital urologists. Approximately 20% involved accusations of false diagnosis and 80% involved accusations of false treatment. Of the processes involving urological diagnostic errors prostate cancer was at the forefront, followed by processes involving delayed or falsely diagnosed bladder cancer. For processes due to operative treatment errors prostate cancer also occupied first place, followed by accusations of treatment errors involving penile and urethral operations. A differentiated presentation of processes involving non-operative treatment errors revealed an accumulation of accusations for mistakes in the treatment of urolithiasis, in medicinal treatment and also in tumor therapy. Following a description of typical individual cases, indications for avoidance of legal proceedings will be given.

  18. No-fault compensation for medical injuries: the prospect for error prevention.

    PubMed

    Studdert, D M; Brennan, T A

    2001-07-11

    Leading patient safety proposals promote the design and implementation of error prevention strategies that target systems used to deliver care and eschew individual blame. They also call for candor among practitioners about the causes and consequences of medical injury. Both goals collide with fundamental tenets of the medical malpractice system. Thus, the challenge of addressing error in medicine demands a thorough reconsideration of the legal mechanisms currently used to deal with harms in health care. In this article, we describe an alternative to litigation that does not predicate compensation on proof of practitioner fault, suggest how it might be operationalized, and argue that there is a pressing need to test its promise. We tackle traditional criticisms of "no-fault" compensation systems for medical injury-specifically, concerns about their cost and the presumption that eliminating liability will dilute incentives to deliver high-quality care. Our recent empirical work suggests that a model designed around avoidable or preventable injuries, as opposed to negligent ones, would not exceed the costs of current malpractice systems in the United States. Implementation of such a model promises to promote quality by harmonizing injury compensation with patient safety objectives, especially if it is linked to reforms that make institutions, rather than individuals, primarily answerable for injuries.

  19. Medicolegal implications of surgical errors and complications in neck surgery: A review based on the Italian current legislation

    PubMed Central

    Polistena, Andrea; Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Buccelli, Claudio; Conzo, Giovanni; Conti, Adelaide; Niola, Massimo; Avenia, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim of the present paper is the review of the principal complications associated to endocrine neck surgery considering how expertise, full adoption of guidelines, appropriate technology and proper informed consent may limit the medicolegal claims at the light of the incoming new regulation of the medical professional legal responsibility. A literature search, using the Medline/PubMed database for full-length papers, was used. Postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy and hypoparathy-roidism remain the principal causes of surgical malpractice claims . In the procedure of neck lymphadenctomy intra-operative haemorrhage, thoracic duct injury, injuries to loco-regional nerves can be observed and can be source of claims. After many years of increased medicolegal litigations, the Italian government is proposing a drastic change in the regulations of supposed medical malpractice in order to guarantee the patient’s right to a safe treatment and in the meantime to defend clinicians from often unmotivated and prejudicial legal cases. Surgical errors and complications in neck surgery are a relevant clinical issue. Only the combination of surgical and clinical expertise, application of guidelines, appropriate technology and a routinely use of specific informed consent can contain potential medicolegal implications. PMID:28352812

  20. Pathologists and the judicial process: how to avoid it.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J I

    2001-04-01

    This review article covers the full range of issues concerning malpractice as it relates to pathologists. Following a brief summary as to the incidence and general statistics on the outcome of lawsuits as well as common pathology misdiagnoses resulting in lawsuits, the definition of malpractice is discussed. These include duty, breech of standard of care, proximal cause, and damage. Details are provided as to what a pathologist should do from the initial threat of a lawsuit, to the initial lawsuit, and through the initial physician/lawyer meeting. An in-depth analysis as to how pathologists should handle themselves through the discovery process and, in particular, deposition is provided. Plaintiff attorneys' goals at deposition are covered in depth. These goals include: 1) education about the pathologist's case and strategies; 2) impeachment of the pathologist's credibility; and 3) judgment as to how effective a witness the pathologist will be at trial. Various types of plaintiff's attorney at deposition are summarized. Also discussed is the post-deposition meeting with the legal representative, whether to settle, and specific issues relating to trial. Finally, general tips on how to avoid a lawsuit in pathology are reviewed.

  1. Challenges in contemporary academic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, the ideal academic neurosurgeon has been a "quadruple threat," with excellence in clinical work, teaching, research, and administration. This tradition was best exemplified in Harvey Cushing, who developed the field of neurosurgery 90 years ago. This paradigm will probably have to change as academic neurosurgeons face major challenges. In patient care, these include increasing regulatory control, increasing malpractice costs, consolidation of expensive care in academic centers, and decreasing reimbursement; in resident teaching, work hour limitations and a changing resident culture; in research, the increasing dominance of basic scientists in governmental funding decisions and decreased involvement of neurosurgeons in scientific review committees; and in administration, problems of relationships in the workplace, patient safety, and employment compliance in an increasingly bureaucratic system. To meet these challenges, the new academic neurosurgeon will probably not be a quadruple threat personally but will be part of a quadruple threat in a department and institution. Neurosurgeons in such a setting will have to work with hospital, medical school, and national and international groups to address malpractice, reimbursement, subspecialization, and training problems; find supplemental sources of income through grants, development funds, and hospital support; lead in the development of multidisciplinary centers for neuroscience, brain tumor, spine, and other initiatives; and focus on training leaders for hospital, regional, and national groups to reconfigure neurosurgery. Collaboration, flexibility, and leadership will be characteristic of the academic neurosurgeon in this new era.

  2. A Large-Scale Analysis of Impact Factor Biased Journal Self-Citations

    PubMed Central

    Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Based on three decades of citation data from across scientific fields of science, we study trends in impact factor biased self-citations of scholarly journals, using a purpose-built and easy to use citation based measure. Our measure is given by the ratio between i) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in the last two years, and ii) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in preceding years. A ratio higher than one suggests that a journal’s impact factor is disproportionally affected (inflated) by self-citations. Using recently reported survey data, we show that there is a relation between high values of our proposed measure and coercive journal self-citation malpractices. We use our measure to perform a large-scale analysis of impact factor biased journal self-citations. Our main empirical result is, that the share of journals for which our measure has a (very) high value has remained stable between the 1980s and the early 2000s, but has since risen strongly in all fields of science. This time span corresponds well with the growing obsession with the impact factor as a journal evaluation measure over the last decade. Taken together, this suggests a trend of increasingly pervasive journal self-citation malpractices, with all due unwanted consequences such as inflated perceived importance of journals and biased journal rankings. PMID:27560807

  3. The medical liability climate and prospects for reform.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M; Studdert, David M; Kachalia, Allen

    2014-11-26

    For many physicians, the prospect of being sued for medical malpractice is a singularly disturbing aspect of modern clinical practice. State legislatures have enacted tort reforms, such as caps on damages, in an effort to reduce the volume and costs of malpractice litigation. Attempts to introduce similar traditional reform measures at the federal level have so far failed. Much less prominent, but potentially more important, are proposed alternative approaches for resolving medical injuries; a number of these efforts are currently being tested in federally sponsored demonstration projects. These nontraditional reforms have considerable promise for addressing some of the system's most challenging issues, including high costs and barriers to accessing compensation. In this Special Communication, we review recent national trends in medical liability claims and costs, which indicate a sharp reduction in the rate of paid claims and flat or declining levels in compensation payments and liability insurance costs over the last 7 to 10 years. We discuss a number of nontraditional reform approaches--communication-and-resolution programs, presuit notification and apology laws, safe harbor legislation, judge-directed negotiation, and administrative compensation systems--and we conclude by describing several forces likely to shape change in the medical liability environment over the next decade.

  4. Restructuring of the jurisprudence course taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College

    PubMed Central

    Gleberzon, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The process by which the jurisprudence course was restructured at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College is chronicled. Method: A Delphi process used to restructure the course is described, and the results of a student satisfaction survey are presented. Results: When asked “I think this material was clinically relevant,” over 81% of the 76 students who respondents strongly agreed or agreed with this statement; 100% of students agreed or strongly agreed that scope of practice; marketing, advertising and internal office promotion; record keeping; fee schedules; malpractice issues and; professional malpractice issues and negligence was clinically relevant. When asked “I think this material was taught well,” a minimum of 89% of students agreed or strongly agreed with this statement. Discussion: This is the first article published that described the process by which a jurisprudence course was developed and assessed by student survey. Summary: Based on a survey of student perceptions, restructuring of the jurisprudence course was successful in providing students with clinically relevant information in an appropriate manner. This course may serve as an important first step in development a ‘model curriculum’ for chiropractic practice and the law courses in terms of content, format and assessment strategies. PMID:20195427

  5. [Risk management in health care systems: the new legislative orientations in medical civil responsibility].

    PubMed

    Tomassini, A; Signorelli, C; Colzani, E

    2004-01-01

    The recent radical change in the relationships between physicians and patients has increased the frequency of malpractice. Consequently, on one hand, many physicians got used to avoiding any possible risk of denunciation by applying the so called "defensive medicine", while on the other hand, the insurance companies raised the prices of their premiums for policies concerning civil responsibility of health operators. In order to avoid this "vicious circle", some health structures created Units for the Risk Management related to malpractice, while others took advantage of the collaboration of Associations for Patients' Rights to create database about the most frequent medical mistakes. The need for a legislative change has been accepted by the Parliament which expects with the proposal n.108 (approved in spring 2002 by the Commission for Hygiene and Health of the Senate) to attribute the civil responsibility of the physicians to the hospitals (both private and public) for which they work, to constitute a Register of experts and to accelerate the legal disputes. The problem is complex and still to be solved, but it seems that time for a strong intervention in order to improve the situation has to come.

  6. [An analysis of insurance claims of civil responsibility in radiology. The first Italian data].

    PubMed

    Fileni, A; Magnavita, N

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide information to Italian radiologists regarding claims and patient injuries in medical malpractice claims. The assurance claims of Italian radiologists over a two-year period (1994-95) were anonymously analyzed, based on pertinent data provided by the Insurance Company of the Italian Society of Medical Radiology. The incidence risk-rate of claims was 9.1 per thousand person/year. Alleged malpractice accounted for more than 85% of the claims. In nearly one-half of the cases (44.4%), the plaintiff's argument was based on a . The most common misdiagnosis was failure to diagnose fracture or dislocation. The second most common claim category (40.7%) were complications, most commonly occurring during interventional radiology and contrast media injection. The third claim category (14.8%) was patient's accidents occurring during the diagnostic procedure. The most frequent types of injuries experienced by patients were death (6 cases), loss of chance for survival and permanent disability. Claims were more frequent in public health services, and mostly related to emergency examinations and interventional procedures. Misdiagnoses almost exclusively involved public health radiologists. Private health care, on the other hand, had a higher rate of fatal injuries, mostly related to technical complications.

  7. A Large-Scale Analysis of Impact Factor Biased Journal Self-Citations.

    PubMed

    Chorus, Caspar; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Based on three decades of citation data from across scientific fields of science, we study trends in impact factor biased self-citations of scholarly journals, using a purpose-built and easy to use citation based measure. Our measure is given by the ratio between i) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in the last two years, and ii) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in preceding years. A ratio higher than one suggests that a journal's impact factor is disproportionally affected (inflated) by self-citations. Using recently reported survey data, we show that there is a relation between high values of our proposed measure and coercive journal self-citation malpractices. We use our measure to perform a large-scale analysis of impact factor biased journal self-citations. Our main empirical result is, that the share of journals for which our measure has a (very) high value has remained stable between the 1980s and the early 2000s, but has since risen strongly in all fields of science. This time span corresponds well with the growing obsession with the impact factor as a journal evaluation measure over the last decade. Taken together, this suggests a trend of increasingly pervasive journal self-citation malpractices, with all due unwanted consequences such as inflated perceived importance of journals and biased journal rankings.

  8. Avoid costly litigation: ten steps to implementing lawful hiring practices.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Judith H

    2004-01-01

    A malpractice claim or suit can have a devastating effect on a physician's practice and personal life. What is often overlooked is that an employment-related suit or EEOC charge also can extract a heavy toll, personally, professionally, and financially. The number of employment-related suits and claims has risen dramatically in the last few years. According to recent enforcement and litigation statistics released by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) (1), the total discrimination charges filed by individuals against their employers increased last year to 80,840--the highest level since the mid-1990's. According to the EEOC data, in 2001, employers paid $248 million in connection with charges of discrimination filed with the EEOC by job applicants, employees, and former employees. Employers paid an additional $47 million to the EEOC in connection with lawsuits filed against employers by the EEOC (2). This does not include the millions of dollars employers were forced to pay in settlements, judgments, costs, and attorney's fees incurred in connection with employment-related lawsuits filed in state and federal courts during the same period of time. Employment-related litigation is on the rise, and the healthcare industry is not immune. Physicians as employers can be a target for a wide range of employment-related claims and suits, such as breach of contract, invasion of privacy, sex, race, age, religious and age discrimination, and negligent hiring, just to name a few. The number of jury verdicts rendered against employers is increasing and the verdict awards are often staggering. In addition, defending these suits can be as expensive as defending a complicated malpractice suit. Even worse, employment discrimination suits and charges are generally not covered by malpractice, D & O, or general liability insurance policies, leaving the physician to cope with the financial burden of judgments, settlements, attorney's fees and litigation costs. Most

  9. Orientation to the patient as a marketing strategy in the Romanian healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Coculescu, BI; Coculescu, EC; Purcărea, VL

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the European political and socio-economic changes of the early 90s, health care reform in Romania has become inevitable, both for patients and for health professionals in the system. The first stage of the health care reform in Romania is focused on decentralization and improving primary health care. The Romanian medical system is currently in the process of changing the mentality, which requires time, patience, and perseverance, despite the unforeseeable or resistance inevitably faced. It is a commonly known and recognized fact that in this painful period of transition, Romanian medicine, like other fields too, has traveled a winding road, with obstacles (medical malpractices, scandals in the press related to the misappropriation of funds or underfunding of the public health system, etc.) often hard to overcome. PMID:27974940

  10. Post-mortem in the Victorian asylum: practice, purpose and findings at the Littlemore County Lunatic Asylum, 1886-7.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Lynsey T

    2017-04-01

    This article examines the purpose of the post-mortem in the late Victorian asylum and discusses what the findings reveal about contemporary understanding of mental health. By examining the practice at the Littlemore Asylum of Oxford, the definition of the asylum post-mortem will be questioned and issues of consent and ownership of the dead body explored. It will be argued that the purpose of the examination was partly to appease the demands of the Commissioners in Lunacy, to protect the asylum against accusations of malpractice, and to appease the resident assistant medical officer's own morbid curiosity. The examinations would therefore be better defined as dissections. This article will challenge understanding of institutional death, the legal processes required for dissection, and mental healthcare.

  11. Keyhole concept in cerebral aneurysm clipping and tumor removal by the supraciliary lateral supraorbital approach

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    The keyhole concept in neurosurgery is designed to minimize the craniotomy needed for the access route to deep intracranial pathologies. Such keyhole surgeries cause less trauma and can be less invasive than conventional surgical techniques. Among the various types of keyhole mini-craniotomy, supraorbital or lateral supraorbital mini-craniotomy is the standard and basic keyhole approaches. The lateral supraorbital keyhole provides adequate working space in the suprasellar to parasellar areas and planum sphenoidale area including the anterior communicating artery complex. Despite the development of neuro-endoscopic techniques and intra-operative assistant methods, the limited working angle to manipulate and observe deeply situated pathologies is a major disadvantage of the keyhole approaches. Neurosurgeons should understand that keyhole mini-craniotomy surgeries aim at “minimally invasive neurosurgery” but still carry the risks of malpractice unless we understand the advantages and disadvantages of these keyhole concepts and strategies. PMID:24891885

  12. [Information guided technology and procedure in neurosurgical field].

    PubMed

    Iseki, Hiroshi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Nanbu, Kyojiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2007-01-01

    Translational Research is the research to apply and mediate a fundamental research result to the clinical field effectively. The integration of the diagnosis and the treatment is an important item in the life science field from the viewpoint of quality of therapy and minimally invasive therapy. The standardization of mechanical interface of the medicine related machine, system and a medical information system are important from the viewpoint such as prevention of medical malpractice. A high function operating robot (manipulator) as an endoscopic robot and image-guided minimally invasive device are important in the point of view of the development of a medical device shown with a medical device industry vision. We describe an outline of our ongoing development of endoscope system, intraoperative MRI (intelligent operating theater) and robot surgery system in neurosurgical field.

  13. Cutaneous foetal injuries related to amniocentesis.

    PubMed

    Papi, L; Farusi, F; Teti, G; Dini, V; Romanelli, M

    2013-10-01

    Amniocentesis is one of the most important prenatal diagnostic procedures available to assess congenital abnormalities. It is performed worldwide due to its simplicity of execution and lack of risk. The most frequent known accidents in amniocentesis are abortion, oligohydramnios, amniositis and placental abruption, while direct fetal injuries produced by contact with the needle are rarely seen. The injuries produced are extremely variable in severity, but the most frequent is skin wounds, which usually heal as small, round depressed scars. The cases we describe concern the occurrence of iatrogenic cutaneous wound lesions to a fetus during amniocentesis. The medical-legal analysis of the cases required dermatological expertise in order to exclude a different pathogenesis for the skin injuries to the child and were assigned by the court, in order to assess the administrative compensation due to the parents of the child as a result of medical malpractice.

  14. M@TIC. Medicine Assisted by Information and Communication Technology: conflicts, responsibility and liability.

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Guevara, R

    2006-09-01

    The term M@TIC, is that which encompasses all Medicine Assisted by Technology on Information and Communication. The development of these techniques brings up many ethical and legal conflicts, mainly because medical science has developed much faster than the law. Justice cannot be properly served if we do not have the regulations to help mankind to avoid aberrant behavior by medical practitioners in this field. M@TIC is still regarded as an experimental research procedure. Not all that is technically feasible is ethically acceptable. There are many potential risks associated with M@TIC and it is largely considered, and so it is understood by doctors, that any damage to the patient would be the fault of the system, never the responsibility of the doctor. It frightens one to think that this fact may be used, in the future, as a shield to protect negligent medical doctors from malpractice suits.

  15. Immunomodulatory potential of shatavarins produced from Asparagus racemosus tissue cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pise, Mashitha Vinod; Rudra, Jaishree Amal; Upadhyay, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal properties of Asparagus racemosus (vernacular name: Shatavari) are attributed to its steroidal saponins called shatavarins. This plant is facing the threat of being endangered due to several developmental, seasonal constrains and malpractices involved in its collection and storage. To support its conservation, a tissue culture protocol is standardized which produces 20 fold higher levels of shatavarin. Here we evaluate the bioactivity and immunomodulatory potential of in vitro produced shatavarins from cell cultures of AR using human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vitro produced shatavarin stimulated immune cell proliferation and IgG secretion in a dose dependent manner. It stimulated interleukin (IL)-12 production and inhibited production of IL-6. It also had strong modulatory effects on Th1/Th2 cytokine profile, indicating its potential application for immunotherapies where Th1/Th2 balance is envisaged. Our study demonstrating the bioactivity of tissue cultured AR extracts supports further in vivo evaluation of its immunomodulatory efficacy. PMID:26283842

  16. Immunomodulatory potential of shatavarins produced from Asparagus racemosus tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Pise, Mashitha Vinod; Rudra, Jaishree Amal; Upadhyay, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal properties of Asparagus racemosus (vernacular name: Shatavari) are attributed to its steroidal saponins called shatavarins. This plant is facing the threat of being endangered due to several developmental, seasonal constrains and malpractices involved in its collection and storage. To support its conservation, a tissue culture protocol is standardized which produces 20 fold higher levels of shatavarin. Here we evaluate the bioactivity and immunomodulatory potential of in vitro produced shatavarins from cell cultures of AR using human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vitro produced shatavarin stimulated immune cell proliferation and IgG secretion in a dose dependent manner. It stimulated interleukin (IL)-12 production and inhibited production of IL-6. It also had strong modulatory effects on Th1/Th2 cytokine profile, indicating its potential application for immunotherapies where Th1/Th2 balance is envisaged. Our study demonstrating the bioactivity of tissue cultured AR extracts supports further in vivo evaluation of its immunomodulatory efficacy.

  17. An electronic patient risk communication board.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A; Benoit, Angela N; Breydo, Eugene M; Carroll, Diane L; Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W; Dykes, John S; Dykes, Patricia C

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient's bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient's key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB.

  18. Simplifying the negotiating process with physicians: critical elements in negotiating from private practice to employed physician.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, Armen; Deutsch, Thomas; Youngquist, Jaymie

    2013-01-01

    The authors attempt to simplify the key elements to the process of negotiating successfully with private physicians. From their experience, the business elements that have resulted in the most discussion center on the compensation including the incentive plan. Secondarily, how the issue of malpractice is handled will also consume a fair amount of time. What the authors have also learned is that the intangible issues can often be the reason for an unexpectedly large amount of discussion and therefore add time to the negotiation process. To assist with this process, they have derived a negotiation checklist, which seeks to help hospital leaders and administrators set the proper framework to ensure successful negotiation conversations. More importantly, being organized and recognizing these broad issues upfront and remaining transparent throughout the process will help to ensure a successful negotiation.

  19. When lawyers call clinicians.

    PubMed

    Reid, William H

    2010-07-01

    Every psychiatrist, psychologist, and psychotherapist gets calls from attorneys from time to time, often with a request involving a patient. Patients sometimes ask their clinicians to become involved in their legal matters. Such calls and requests may sound straightforward, but they are often misleading, incomplete, or misunderstood. One should avoid being reflexively "helpful" when a lawyer calls or a patient makes such a special request. There may be no obligation to respond, or to respond immediately, although subpoenas must not be ignored; promptly contacting an appropriate supervisor, facility risk manager, malpractice insurance carrier, or one's own attorney is often the best course of action. Office staff such as secretaries and receptionists should also be trained and cautioned regarding the principles discussed here.

  20. Revisions to direct fee payment rules. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2015-01-06

    We are adopting, with two revisions, our interim final rules that implemented amendments to the Social Security Act (Act) made by the Social Security Disability Applicants' Access to Professional Representation Act of 2010 (PRA). The interim final rules made permanent the direct fee payment rules for eligible non-attorney representatives under titles II and XVI of the Act and for attorney representatives under title XVI of the Act. They also revised some of our eligibility policies for non-attorney representatives under titles II and XVI of the Act. Based on public comment and subsequent inquiries, we are revising our rules to clarify that an eligible non-attorney representative's liability insurance policy must include malpractice coverage. We are also reaffirming that a business entity legally permitted to provide the required insurance in the States in which the non-attorney representative conducts business must underwrite the policies.

  1. Retrospective analysis of survey data relating to the employment conditions of Canadian veterinary graduates for the years 2008 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Lissemore, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Six years of survey data generated from the “Annual New Graduate Survey” were collated and analyzed for trends. Canadian veterinary colleges graduated 14.9% more veterinarians in 2013 than 2008; 79.3% of graduates were female and this percentage was similar across all colleges (P = 0.51). The average base salary for new graduates remained constant at ~$69 000/annum for the years 2011 to 2013. However, the mean base salary of those employed in western Canada and Ontario was higher than that of employees in Quebec and the Maritimes (P < 0.001). There were no differences in the base salaries paid to males and females (P = 0.18) nor in what small animal, food animal, and equine practices were paying new graduates (P = 0.94). The 3 most common employee benefits were: a continuing education allowance, paid licensing fees, and paid malpractice insurance premiums. PMID:26483581

  2. Neonatal euthanasia: A claim for an immoral law

    PubMed Central

    Martinovici, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Active ending of the life of a newborn baby is a crime. Yet its clandestine practise is a reality in several European countries. In this paper, we defend the necessity to institute a proper legal frame for what we define as active neonatal euthanasia. The only legal attempt so far, the Dutch Groningen protocol, is not satisfactory. We critically analyse this protocol, as well as several other clinical practises and philosophical stances. Furthermore, we have tried to integrate our opinions as clinicians into a law project, with the purpose of pinpointing several issues, specific of perinatality that should be addressed by such a law. In conclusion, we argue that the legalisation of neonatal euthanasia under exceptional circumstances is the only way to avoid all the “well-intentioned” malpractices associated with ending life at the very dawn of it. PMID:24068880

  3. Sudden death due to catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia following negative stress-test outcome: genetics and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, Cristian; Carnevale, Aldo; Grassi, Vincenzo M; Rosato, Enrica; Del Olmo, Bernat; Coll, Monica; Campuzano, Oscar; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Oliva, Antonio

    2017-04-13

    This paper discusses the case of a young boy who died suddenly during a football match. The victim's personal and family medical histories were negative for cardiac events. He had undergone a cardiological investigation some months before his death, enabling him to participate in competitive sports. Only post-mortem molecular analysis allowed for a clearer determination of the most plausible cause of death, which was identified as inherited arrhythmogenic heart disease, known as catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. It was possible to detect a novel, previously undescribed, variant in the RYR2 gene. This case report highlights the importance of a meaningful forensic multidisciplinary investigation in such cases, and also discusses possible medical malpractice claims.

  4. SOAP to SNOCAMP: improving the medical record format.

    PubMed

    Larimore, W L; Jordan, E V

    1995-10-01

    Not since the development of the SOAP note in the problem-oriented medical record has there been a significant need to alter the format of medical record documentation. With the intrusion of third-party audits, malpractice attorney subpoenas, medical guidelines, and reimbursement code criteria into the practice of medicine, there is a need to expand the traditional SOAP note. This article proposes a new acronym, "SNOCAMP," for medical record documentation. SNOCAMP retains the SOAP format, which includes subjective, objective, assessment, and plan of treatment, with the addition of nature of the presenting complaint, counseling, and medical decision-making. It is hoped that this new, more explicit format will prove successful in meeting the divergent needs of practicing physicians, the patients they serve, and the inquiring minds that look over their shoulders.

  5. [Medical quality assurance today].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Both the quality and performance of health systems are strongly influenced by the number and the qualification of the professional staff. Quality assurance programs help to analyse causalities which are responsible for medical malpractice. On the basis of the experiences gained by the performance of established Quality Assurance Programs (QAP) in the North Rhine area since 1982 various aspects of the efficiency of these programs will be discussed. The implementation of legal regulations making these programs mandatory is criticised not only for its bureaucratic effect but also for the attempt to exclude professional experts from the interpretation of results. It is recommended to liberalize these regulations in order to facilitate improvement of methods and participation of the medical profession.

  6. Overcoming language barriers for non-English speaking patients.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M M; Alexander, A

    1999-10-01

    Although some of the resources or services listed may seem expensive, it is cheaper to use these than to face a malpractice suit for failure to provide patients with limited English access to services equal to those provided to English speakers. The University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), one of the top three ranking research hospitals in the U.S., had a suit filed against it by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) claiming failure to provide adequate translation services for the patient population. The university is now a participant in a statewide effort to provide access to well-trained translator services to the patient population. This effort and the development of an in-house interpreter services department has contributed to a competitive edge for UCSF in the area of patient services and satisfaction as well as attracting more Medicaid patients, which increases their revenues.

  7. [Ethical conflicts in the authorship of scientific papers].

    PubMed

    von Oetinger, Astrid; Sadarangani, Kabir P; Salas, Sofía P

    2016-11-01

    The frequency of conflicts about authorship of publications has increased along with the increase in the number of people involved in scientific work. Some of the factors that strongly influence the generation of conflicts and malpractices in authorship definition of scientific publications are the pressure of academia, economic incentives from the pharmaceutical industry in the field of biomedicine and authors’ wishes and expectations of recognition, among other factors. The article analyzes this problem, increasingly common in the field of medicine and related areas. Special attention is devoted to the prevailing laws in our country and international guidelines related to intellectual property and authorship of scientific publications, respectively. However, the ethical commitment, intellectual honesty and truthfulness of each of the authors about what is reported seems to be the decisive factor for the solution to these authorship conflicts.

  8. Management of a fire in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan David; Kolinsky, Daniel; Urman, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    Operating room (OR) fires remain a significant source of liability for anesthesia providers and injury for patients, despite existing practice guidelines and other improvements in operating room safety. Factors contributing to OR fires are well understood and these occurrences are generally preventable. OR personnel must be familiar with the fire triad which consists of a fuel supply, an oxidizing agent, and an ignition source. Existing evidence shows that OR-related fires can result in significant patient complications and malpractice claims. Steps to reduce fires include taking appropriate safety measures before a patient is brought to the OR, taking proper preventive measures during surgery, and effectively managing fire and patient complications when they occur. Decreasing the incidence of fires should be a team effort involving the entire OR personnel, including surgeons, anesthesia providers, nurses, scrub technologists, and administrators. Communication and coordination among members of the OR team is essential to creating a culture of safety.

  9. Administrative compensation of medical injuries: a hardy perennial blooms again.

    PubMed

    Barringer, Paul J; Studdert, David M; Kachalia, Allen B; Mello, Michelle M

    2008-08-01

    Periods in which the costs of personal injury litigation and liability insurance have risen dramatically have often provoked calls for reform of the tort system, and medical malpractice is no exception. One proposal for fundamental reform made during several of these volatile periods has been to relocate personal injury disputes from the tort system to an alternative, administrative forum. In the medical injury realm, a leading incarnation of such proposals in recent years has been the idea of establishing specialized administrative "health courts." Despite considerable stakeholder and policy-maker interest, administrative compensation proposals have tended to struggle for broad political acceptance. In this article, we consider the historical experience of administrative medical injury compensation proposals, particularly in light of comparative examples in the context of workplace injuries, automobile injuries, and vaccine injuries. We conclude by examining conditions that may facilitate or impede progress toward establishing demonstration projects of health courts.

  10. The Prevention of Positioning Injuries during Gynecologic Operations. Guideline of DGGG (S1-Level, AWMF Registry No. 015/077, February 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Fleisch, M. C.; Bremerich, D.; Schulte-Mattler, W.; Tannen, A.; Teichmann, A. T.; Bader, W.; Balzer, K.; Renner, S. P.; Römer, T.; Roth, S.; Schütz, F.; Thill, M.; Tinneberg, H.; Zarras, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Official guideline published and coordinated by the German Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG). Positioning injuries after lengthy gynecological procedures are rare, but the associated complications can be potentially serious for patients. Moreover, such injuries often lead to claims of malpractice and negligence requiring detailed medical investigation. To date, there are no binding evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of such injuries. Methods: This S1-guideline is the work of an interdisciplinary group of experts from a range of different professions who were commissioned by DGGG to carry out a systematic literature search of positioning injuries. Members of the participating scientific societies develop a consensus in an informal procedure. Afterwards the directorate of the scientific society approves the consensus. The recommendations cover: PMID:26365999

  11. Informed consent in medical research.

    PubMed

    Evans, John Grimley; Beck, Peter

    2002-01-01

    That people should only be enrolled in medical research if they have given free and informed consent is now an unquestioned principle of research ethics. It is however a recent innovation. Prior to the prominence given to consent to participation in research in the condemnation of German doctors arraigned at Nuremberg in 1945, informed consent had appeared in American litigation, but only as an issue in clinical malpractice suits. Informed consent as an ethical requirement in medical research had arisen in some earlier European contexts. Despite the Nuremberg judgement, informed consent by participants in research was not widely recognised as ethically mandatory until the early 1970s. This delay seems to have been due in part to scepticism about the practicability of truly informed consent, but medical paternalism and the circumstances surrounding military research during the Cold War period may have contributed.

  12. ["Is there a doctor on board?" - legal aspects of medical care in emergency situations during spare time].

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christina; Lindner, Gregor; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2013-12-11

    Medical emergencies on international flights are not uncommon. In these situations the question often arises whether physicians are obliged to render first aid and whether omission leads to legal consequences. The general obligation to aid those in need applies to everyone, not only to physicians. Evading this duty makes liable to prosecution for omittance of defence of a third person in line with Art. 128 of the Swiss Penal Code, punishable by custodial sentence up to three years or an equivalent punitive fine. Vocational and professional law extend the duty to aid for physicians to urgent cases. Although resulting from the performance of a legal obligation, malpractice occurred in the course of first aid can lead to claims for compensation - even from foreign patients, and that according to their own domestic law.

  13. [The doctor in a vise between health and the law: What to do?

    PubMed

    Akbaba, Murat; Davutoğlu, Vedat

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between patients and physicians has maintained its importance throughout human history because of special features of the medical profession. This relationship engendered true loyalty of patients to their physicians as well as serious legal conflicts. Medical malpractice has gained importance among physicians and ignited discussion because of new articles added to the Turkish Penal Code in 2005. In a very short time, the penalties mandated had a chilling, negative effect on doctors, resulting in loss of affection for the profession, hesitation to intervene, and burnout syndrome. Cardiologists work in an environment where the line between life and death is very thin. The aim of the present study was to raise awareness and avoid possible grievances by informing them of their responsibilities under the law.

  14. Contribution of patient and hospital characteristics to adverse patient incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Elnicki, R A; Schmitt, J P

    1980-01-01

    The 1974 medical malpractice "crisis" brought about extensive legislation and insurance regulation in the United States. Hospitals in many states are now required to support risk management programs that include investigation and systematic analyses of adverse patient incidents. However, no research supports the hypothesis that systematic analysis of adverse patient incidents can identify contributory factors. In this study, a simple prediction model was used to estimate relationships between adverse incidents and selected patient and environmental characteristics in a large hospital. While some of the incident-characteristic relationships were significant, none of the estimated equations yielded results that could be logically translated into policy recommendations for the hospital. These results point to the need for further research. The benefits that positive research results would have for patients, hospitals, an the bill-paying public are obvious. Additional negative results would suggest that many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies were presumptions in requiring hospitals to conduct analyses of incidents. PMID:7461973

  15. The Course Syllabus: Legal Contract or Operator's Manual?

    PubMed

    Rumore, Martha M

    2016-12-25

    A course syllabus provides a roadmap for pharmacy students to achieve course learning objectives and develop lifelong learning skills. For several decades the literature has referred to syllabi as legal documents and/or contracts between students and professors. A review of the legal precedents reveals that syllabi are not considered contracts because the courts refuse thus far to recognize educational malpractice or breach of contract as a cause of action. Syllabi do, however, represent a triggering agent for instructional dissent and grade appeals, may be binding in student appeal proceedings, and are used in judicial hearings. Pharmacy faculty members should review their syllabi and follow process improvement strategies to construct legally sound syllabi that can both enhance learning and minimize risks of student grievances and appeals.

  16. The Course Syllabus: Legal Contract or Operator’s Manual?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A course syllabus provides a roadmap for pharmacy students to achieve course learning objectives and develop lifelong learning skills. For several decades the literature has referred to syllabi as legal documents and/or contracts between students and professors. A review of the legal precedents reveals that syllabi are not considered contracts because the courts refuse thus far to recognize educational malpractice or breach of contract as a cause of action. Syllabi do, however, represent a triggering agent for instructional dissent and grade appeals, may be binding in student appeal proceedings, and are used in judicial hearings. Pharmacy faculty members should review their syllabi and follow process improvement strategies to construct legally sound syllabi that can both enhance learning and minimize risks of student grievances and appeals. PMID:28179726

  17. Simultaneous shoulder and elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Cobanoğlu, Mutlu; Yumrukcal, Feridun; Karataş, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih

    2014-05-23

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow dislocation is very rare and only six articles are present in the literature mentioning this kind of a complex injury. With this presentation we aim to emphasise the importance of assessing the adjacent joints in patients with trauma in order not to miss any accompanying pathologies. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with ipsilateral right shoulder and elbow dislocation treated conservatively. The patient reported elbow pain when first admitted to emergency service but she was diagnosed with simultaneous ipsilateral shoulder and elbow injury and treated conservatively. As a more painful pathology may mask the additional ones, one should hasten to help before performing a complete evaluation. Any harm caused to the patient due to this reason would not be a complication but a malpractice.

  18. Simultaneous shoulder and elbow dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Çobanoğlu, Mutlu; Yumrukcal, Feridun; Karataş, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow dislocation is very rare and only six articles are present in the literature mentioning this kind of a complex injury. With this presentation we aim to emphasise the importance of assessing the adjacent joints in patients with trauma in order not to miss any accompanying pathologies. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with ipsilateral right shoulder and elbow dislocation treated conservatively. The patient reported elbow pain when first admitted to emergency service but she was diagnosed with simultaneous ipsilateral shoulder and elbow injury and treated conservatively. As a more painful pathology may mask the additional ones, one should hasten to help before performing a complete evaluation. Any harm caused to the patient due to this reason would not be a complication but a malpractice. PMID:24859563

  19. Watermarking as a traceability standard.

    PubMed

    Coatrieux, Gouenou; Quantin, Catherine; Allaert, François-André

    2012-01-01

    The exponential increase in the number of electronic document exchanges in healthcare has considerably increased the risk of document drop-out or address errors. It may therefore be important to know to whom the information belongs and who produced it. This becomes a major concern when the document has been involved in processes leading to the choice of therapy and eventually in cases where patients seek damages for medical malpractice. Watermarking, which is the embedding of security elements, such as a digital signature, within a document, can help to ensure that a digital document is reliable. However, at the same time, questions arise about the validity of watermarking-based evidence. In this paper, beyond the technical aspects, we discuss the worldwide legal acceptability of watermarking and the need for its recognition as a standard according to technical characteristics that the CEN and ISO need to agree on.

  20. Pediatric Chiropractic Care: The Subluxation Question And Referral Risk.

    PubMed

    Homola, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Chiropractors commonly treat children for a variety of ailments by manipulating the spine to correct a 'vertebral subluxation' or a 'vertebral subluxation complex' alleged to be a cause of disease. Such treatment might begin soon after a child is born. Both major American chiropractic associations - the International Chiropractic Association and the American Chiropractic Association - support chiropractic care for children, which includes subluxation correction as a treatment or preventive measure. I do not know of any credible evidence to support chiropractic subluxation theory. Any attempt to manipulate the immature, cartilaginous spine of a neonate or a small child to correct a putative chiropractic subluxation should be regarded as dangerous and unnecessary. Referral of a child to a chiropractor for such treatment should not be considered lest a bad outcome harms the child or leads to a charge of negligence or malpractice.

  1. Social media in the health-care setting: benefits but also a minefield of compliance and other legal issues.

    PubMed

    Moses, Richard E; McNeese, Libra G; Feld, Lauren D; Feld, Andrew D

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the past 20 years, the rising use of social media has revolutionized health care as well as other businesses. It allows large groups of people to create and share information, ideas, and experiences through online communications, and develop social and professional contacts easily and inexpensively. Our Gastroenterology organizations, among others, have embraced this technology. Although the health-care benefits may be many, social media must be viewed through a legal lens, recognizing the accompanying burdens of compliance, ethical, and litigation issues. Theories of liability and risk continue to evolve as does the technology. Social media usage within the medical community is fraught with potential legal issues, requiring remedial responses to meet patients' needs and comply with current laws, while not exposing physicians to medical malpractice and other tort risks.

  2. A Blast of Mistakes: Undiagnosed Cervical Spondylolisthesis Following a Bomb Explosion

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Riccardo; Marrocco, Luigi; Piccione, Emanuele; Wierzbicki, Venceslao

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 20 Final Diagnosis: Cervical spondylolisthesis Symptoms: Cervical pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery with cervical traction and circumferential arthrodesis Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Patient complains/malpractice Background: A case of spinal trauma had an unusual clinical course due to medical mistakes, from which we can learn some important lessons. Case Report: We report a case of spondylolisthesis following a bomb explosion, which went undiagnosed for a long time because of a series of mistakes that are highlighted in this article. What makes this case unique is that the spondylolisthesis developed during hospital stay, but the patient had no loss of mobility, strength, or sensitivity. Conclusions: This case shows that establishing the conditions of an organ or a body part upon admission to hospital may not be enough when a patient has suffered extensive and serious trauma, and that it is necessary to carry out more checkups over time, especially if there are new clues and symptoms.

  3. Awareness: practice, standards, and the law.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher D; Domino, Karen B

    2007-09-01

    Increased attention in recent years in both the academic literature and general media on awareness during general anaesthesia has raised the spectre of an increase in the liability burden of anaesthesia awareness. Liability will be different around the world, largely influenced by factors such as the presence of no-fault compensation systems for medical complications in some countries and the characteristics of the common law tort systems in others, such as the United States. A review of the largest single source for liability data, the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Closed Claims database, found the proportion of anaesthesia malpractice claims and claim payment amounts for awareness did not increase during the 1990s. However, due to the time lag to settlement of claims, this data predates recent attention to awareness and electroencephalographic monitoring, factors that may increase liability for awareness in the future.

  4. Attitudes towards academic cheating during nursing studies.

    PubMed

    Balik, C; Sharon, D; Kelishek, S; Tabak, N

    2010-12-01

    Nursing Student cheating is a cause for concern. Research to examine the attitudes of nursing students to academic cheating and what this may predict for their professional practice after graduation was conducted. A convenience sample of 228 students found a strong tendency to see academic dishonesty as normative. The most compelling factor in the decision to plagiarize or not is the 'survival instinct'. This does not necessarily mean that the student perceives copying as ethical. Correlations were found between personal characteristics and attitude towards cheating. It is recommended: (a) To raise awareness of the frequency of academic dishonesty and its implications for professional malpractice. (b) To institute a policy promoting academic integrity by ensuring all involved, including the students become partners in rule enforcement. (c) To establish a policy of penalties sufficiently strong to deter all, students and staff, from dishonest practices.

  5. Submitting a manuscript for peer review – integrity, integrity, integrity

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean P.; Bulman, Christopher; Shariati, Behnam; Hausmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Publication of a flawed manuscript has significant consequences for the progress of science. When this proves to be intentional, science is brought into disrepute and this puts even more pressure on the shrinking resources that society is prepared to invest in research. All scientific journals, including the Journal of Neurochemistry, have witnessed a marked increase in the number of corrections and retractions of published papers over the last 10 years, and uncovered a depressingly large number of fabrications amongst submitted manuscripts. The increase in number of ‘spoiled’ manuscripts reflects not only the improved methods that journals employ to detect plagiarism in its many forms, but also suggests a measurable change in the behavior of authors. The increased policing of submissions by reviewers, editors and publishers expends time and money. The sanctions imposed by journal editors on authors found guilty of malpractice are transparent and severe. PMID:24410543

  6. Cervical Cancer Along with Unknown Cirrhosis: A Misdiagnosed Case

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Mahmoudzadeh, Fatemeh; Maghsoudnia, Andisheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Vaginal bleeding and vaginal discharge are the most common symptoms. Although ascites has been reported in cases with cervical cancer, it is due to other causes such as ovarian metastasis. Case Presentation: A 78-year-old diabetic woman who presented with ascites and abdominopelvic mass was misdiagnosed with ovarian cancer and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical hysterectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. However, pathology confirmed locally advanced cervical cancer stage IV in this patient. She was discharged from the hospital three weeks after surgery with no serious complications. Discussion: Considering all signs and symptoms to reach a verdict would reduce such malpractices and consequently lead to select the best management and treatment. PMID:26913238

  7. Factitious disorders: potential litigation risks for plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Eisendrath, Stuart J; Telischak, Katherine S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with factitious physical disorders can present with a myriad of signs and symptoms. Common presentations include persistent wounds and abscesses that are often treated by plastic surgeons. Because these individuals are surreptitiously trying to maintain their illness, rather than recover, adverse outcomes are common, particularly when the plastic surgeon has not detected the factitious etiology. Well-meaning plastic surgeons trying to help difficult-to-treat patients may be at high risk for poor outcomes with factitious disorder patients. When these outcomes occur, these patients may focus their underlying anger or other feelings on their plastic surgeons and may initiate litigation. This article discusses 2 cases in which plastic surgeons were sued for malpractice by factitious disorder patients. We outline clues to the recognition of factitious disorders and steps the plastic surgeon can take to initiate appropriate treatment, which may reduce the risk of litigation.

  8. Conscious awareness and memory during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, K

    1994-10-01

    Conscious awareness is an infrequent complication of general anesthesia. All methods of anesthesia have been implicated, and no method guarantees amnesia. This article examines implicit and explicit memory and discusses factors associated with awareness. Common methods of detection are unreliable, and symptoms resembling post-traumatic stress disorder may result if awareness goes unrecognized and untreated. Patients who experience awareness may sue on grounds of malpractice, breach of contract, and lack of consent. Overhearing negative stimuli may affect patient outcome, because learning and language comprehension can occur during what appears to be clinically adequate anesthesia. Strategies to block threatening auditory stimuli include use of earphones, music tapes, white noise, reassuring statements, or positive suggestion. Behavioral anesthesia decreases patient stress to enhance recovery. Evidence of patient benefit resulting from therapeutic suggestion is inconclusive.

  9. The Family Physician in the Witness Box

    PubMed Central

    Emson, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The doctor appearing in court must learn a new language and be prepared to deal with the legal profession, which is quite different from his own. Adequate preparation for a court case can make it less confusing; this article gives guidelines for doctors occasionally called to give evidence, or who are accused of malpractice. Doctors called as witnesses must consult with lawyers early, to determine exactly what information the court wants and the form a report should take. Physicians should carefully study and summarize all their evidence in non-technical language before a court appearance. By learning some legal language, they can also understand and adequately answer lawyers' questions. A physician accused of negligence must make no admissions before the case and have no contact with the plaintiff other than to formally acknowledge the charge. The Canadian Medical Protective Association should be contacted as soon as possible. PMID:21283283

  10. Contrasting Medical and Legal Standards of Evidence: A Precision Medicine Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Gary E.; Scheckel, Kathryn; Campos-Outcalt, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Precis As the health care system transitions to a precision medicine approach that tailors clinical care to the genetic profile of the individual patient, there is a potential tension between the clinical uptake of new technologies by providers and the legal system’s expectation of the standard of care in applying such technologies. We examine this tension by comparing the type of evidence that physicians and courts are likely to rely on in determining a duty to recommend pharmacogenetic testing of patients prescribed the oral anti-coagulant drug warfarin. There is a large body of inconsistent evidence and factors for and against such testing, but physicians and courts are likely to weigh this evidence differently. The potential implications for medical malpractice risk are evaluated and discussed. PMID:27256135

  11. Facilitating the transition to practice: a weekend retreat curriculum for business-of-medicine education of United States anesthesiology residents.

    PubMed

    Holak, Elena J; Kaslow, Olga; Pagel, Paul S

    2010-10-01

    Anesthesiology residents in the United States (US) not only must develop the clinical skills needed to provide independent patient care, but also are required to become familiar with the business aspects of the modern health care system. Unfortunately, practice management education may be inadequate during anesthesiology residency training. The authors describe the design and implementation of a weekend retreat curriculum in business-of-medicine education for anesthesiology residents. Experts were recruited to discuss interviewing skills, contract law and negotiation, billing and reimbursement, insurance, malpractice, and financial planning. A strict lecture didactic format was avoided, and presentations were designed to encourage speaker-audience interaction. The program was relatively simple to design and implement, satisfied several Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies for US anesthesiology education, may be altered as practice management evolves, and may be adapted to accommodate the needs of programs in other countries.

  12. The assessment and prevention of suicide for the 21st century: the Air Force's community awareness training model.

    PubMed

    Staal, M A

    2001-03-01

    Professional practice standards and ethical obligations in the realm of suicide and risk management have been discussed for the last several decades. In the civilian sector, this discussion has taken the form of malpractice case law, the development of numerous assessment tools and practice guidelines for clinicians, and some attempts to describe possible models of prevention. In the Air Force, concern regarding suicide and risk management has evolved into a formalized program of community awareness and education that has been testing the boundaries of suicidal risk detection, assessment, and support facilitation. This article briefly describes this program, its success, and its implications for both active duty and civilian populations. Guidelines for mental health practice standards in risk management and suicide assessment are also discussed.

  13. Invited article: professionalism in neurology: the role of law.

    PubMed

    Larriviere, Dan; Beresford, H Richard

    2008-10-14

    Professionalism may be defined as the obligation of the physician to uphold the primacy of patients' interests, to achieve and maintain medical competency, and to abide by high ethical standards. Recent commentary has suggested that medical professionalism is being threatened by commercialism and the legal system. Consideration of judicial rulings centered on primacy of patients' interests (informed consent, end-of-life care, and conflicts of interest), medical competence (standard of care in medical malpractice cases, medical futility cases, and confidentiality of peer review), and enforcement of ethical standards (peer review by professional organizations) demonstrates that the law generally defers to standards set by the medical profession, but competing views over what health care model is operative may generate non-deferential outcomes.

  14. Nursing error: an integrated review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Mohaddeseh; Hosseini, Mohammadali; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Shahboulaghi, Farahnaz Mohammadi; Khankeh, Hamidreza

    2016-12-05

    Nursing errors are complex and take place frequently in the care of patients. However, despite their significance, they have not been properly defined or addressed in the literature. This integrative review of the literature explored the concept of nursing error, explained its definitions and described its attributes and measurements. The databases of Medline, CINAHL, Google Scholar and SID were searched using a number of keywords, including malpractice, adverse events and mistake, with and without the word nurse. The aim was to determine the definition of nursing error, regardless of the contextual aspects, in various scientific systems. After reviewing the relevant literature, content analysis (in MAXQDA) was applied to classify the definitions, attributes and measurements obtained on the basis of their similarities and differences. Ultimately, a definition was established for the concept of nursing error.

  15. Utilizing social networks, blogging and YouTube in allergy and immunology practices.

    PubMed

    Dimov, Ves; Eidelman, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks are used to connect with friends and family members, and increasingly, to stay up-to-date with the latest news and developments in allergy and immunology. As communication is a central part of healthcare delivery, the utilization of such networking channels in allergy and immunology will continue to grow. There are inherent risks to online social networks related to breaches of patient confidentiality, professionalism and privacy. Malpractice and liability risks should also be considered. There is a paucity of information in the literature on how social network interventions affect patient outcomes. The allergy and immunology community should direct future studies towards investigating how the use of social networks and other technology tools and services can improve patient care.

  16. Contemporary practice in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini; Agnihotri, Archana; Chandra, Akhilesh; Gupta, Om Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Forensic odontology plays a major role in the identification of those individuals who cannot be identified visually or by other means. The unique nature of dental anatomy and placement of custom restorations ensure accuracy when the techniques are correctly employed. It is evident that identification of victims in accidents and natural calamities is of utmost importance and is a challenging task. The teeth may also be used as weapons and under certain circumstances; they may provide information regarding the identity of the biter. Dental professionals play a major role in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize malpractices, negligence, fraud child abuse and also, identify an individual. In this article, we will discuss such evolvement of the subject. PMID:25328306

  17. To sign or not to sign: Physician participation in Medicare, 1984

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Janet B.; Rosenbach, Margo L.; Cromwell, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Factors leading physicians to sign the 1984 Medicare participation agreement are assessed in this study. The decision was highly sensitive to Medicare reimbursement levels. A 10-percent increase in the Medicare reasonable charge increased average participation rates by 9.5 percent, or 3.2 percentage points (around the mean of 34 percent). Higher collection costs associated with obtaining that payment from Medicare discouraged participation, and physicians with large Medicare caseloads were more likely to participate. Although board-certified physicians were no less likely to participate, graduates from non-English speaking non-Western European medical schools were more likely to sign. Physicians in more liberal States and in areas with greater health maintenance organization activity were significantly more likely to participate, as were those with lower malpractice costs and weaker private demand. PMID:10312818

  18. Criminal prosecutions of physicians providing palliative or end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Kollas, Chad D; Boyer-Kollas, Beth; Kollas, James W

    2008-03-01

    Although medical malpractice suits commonly occur in medical practice, few physicians experienced criminal prosecution related to adverse clinical outcomes before 1990. Criminal prosecutions of physicians increased in frequency early in that decade, however, including a handful of cases involving palliative or end-of-life care. Reviews published around the end of the 1990s examined those prosecutions, listing causative factors and offering recommendations to prevent further cases. In this paper, we provide an updated review of criminal prosecutions of physicians providing palliative or end-of-life care, presenting three cases that occurred after 1998. We summarize these newer cases' chronologies and outcomes, comparing them to cases described in past reviews. Our analysis suggests that important factors not described in earlier reviews, especially conflicting views of the standard of care in hospice and palliative medicine, contributed to the development of these prosecutions.

  19. Contemporary practice in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shalini; Agnihotri, Archana; Chandra, Akhilesh; Gupta, Om Prakash

    2014-05-01

    Forensic odontology plays a major role in the identification of those individuals who cannot be identified visually or by other means. The unique nature of dental anatomy and placement of custom restorations ensure accuracy when the techniques are correctly employed. It is evident that identification of victims in accidents and natural calamities is of utmost importance and is a challenging task. The teeth may also be used as weapons and under certain circumstances; they may provide information regarding the identity of the biter. Dental professionals play a major role in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize malpractices, negligence, fraud child abuse and also, identify an individual. In this article, we will discuss such evolvement of the subject.

  20. Conflicts of interest in the management of silent ischemia.

    PubMed

    Graboys, T B

    1989-04-14

    Nonclinical factors that may pressure physicians to intervene when a patient presents with so-called silent ischemia, and that may compel a management course not necessarily in the patient's best interest, are explored. These factors include the public's "obsession" with cardiac health, the enormous potential market for pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the funding of ischemia research by drug and medical device companies, the growth of "interventional cardiology" as a subspecialty, the increasingly entrepreneurial approach to medical care on the part of physicians and hospitals, and the fear of malpractice litigation. Given the financial advantage to health facilities and practitioners in recommending an interventionist rather than a conservative approach to silent ischemia, Graboys questions whether studies to determine the optimal management of this condition will ever be undertaken.

  1. Risk management in surgery

    PubMed Central

    MESSANO, G.A.; SPAZIANI, E.; TURCHETTA, F.; CECI, F.; CORELLI, S.; CASCIARO, G.; MARTELLUCCI, A.; COSTANTINO, A.; NAPOLEONI, A.; CIPRIANI, B.; NICODEMI, S.; DI GRAZIA, C.; MOSILLO, R.; AVALLONE, M.; ORSINI, S.; TUDISCO, A.; AIUTI, F.; STAGNITTI, F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Malpractice is the responsible for the greatest number of legal claims. At the present time, legal actions against physicians in Italy are 15,000 per year, and a stunning increase about costs to refund patients injured by therapeutic and diagnostic errors is expected. The method for the medical prevention is “Risk Management”, that is the setting-up of organizational instruments, methods and actions that enable the measurement or estimation of medical risk; it allows to develop strategies to govern and reduce medical error. In the present work, the reconstruction about the history of risk management in Italy was carried out. After then the latest initiatives undertaken by Italy about the issue of risk management were examined. PMID:24091181

  2. Forensic odontology: the roles and responsibilities of the dentist.

    PubMed

    Avon, Sylvie Louise

    2004-01-01

    Dentistry has much to offer law enforcement in the detection and solution of crime or in civil proceedings. Forensic dental fieldwork requires an interdisciplinary knowledge of dental science. Most often the role of the forensic odontologist is to establish a person's identity. Teeth, with their physiologic variations, pathoses and effects of therapy, record information that remains throughout life and beyond. The teeth may also be used as weapons and, under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Forensic odontology has an important role in the recognition of abuse among persons of all ages. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize malpractice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identify unknown humans.

  3. [Carbon monoxide poisoning caused by medical error. Fatalities in connection with medical measures in Leipzig and Hannover].

    PubMed

    Hunger, H; Tröger, H D; Urban, R

    1990-01-01

    There are significant differences in the frequency of CO intoxication and its relation to other not natural causes of death between the autopsy cases of Leipzig (DDR) and Hannover (BRD). While the percentage of all autopsies in Leipzig runs up to 7.6%, in Hannover it runs up to only 1.5%. Beside the well-known cases of not recognized CO intoxication at the autopsy with or without following intoxication of other persons, two concrete cases of not recognized CO intoxication with the survival of the victims discussed. The not noticed CO intoxication followed by the death of the victim is usually considered in medicolegal opinious as "medical malpractice". In cases of survived not noticed CO intoxications this opinion ist only supposed in special cases with longer anamnesis and a typical seasonal rythmic of symptoms.

  4. Failures of foreseeability: Risk management considerations in reducing allegations of sexual violence in psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Banja, John D

    2017-01-01

    This article begins with a brief discussion of findings on causal factors leading to allegations of sexual violence in health care facilities and then offers the author's account of 4 such cases that he reviewed, 3 of which occurred in psychiatric units. These cases show remarkably similar variables, especially involving decisions to allow male and female patients to commingle, the inadequate physical layout of the units, poor or absent video surveillance, and staff unacquainted with institutional policies on patient safety or refusing to enforce relevant rules. These variables arguably amount to "failures of foreseeability" that reasonably cautious health care personnel should recognize as facilitating or enabling sexual violence. As such, the proactive message of this article for health care risk management urges critical and robust attention paid to a unit's environmental/physical design as well as to performance factors among personnel so as to prevent sexual attacks and diminish the probability of malpractice actions.

  5. Orientation to the patient as a marketing strategy in the Romanian healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Coculescu, B I; Coculescu, E C; Purcărea, V L

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the European political and socio-economic changes of the early 90s, health care reform in Romania has become inevitable, both for patients and for health professionals in the system. The first stage of the health care reform in Romania is focused on decentralization and improving primary health care. The Romanian medical system is currently in the process of changing the mentality, which requires time, patience, and perseverance, despite the unforeseeable or resistance inevitably faced. It is a commonly known and recognized fact that in this painful period of transition, Romanian medicine, like other fields too, has traveled a winding road, with obstacles (medical malpractices, scandals in the press related to the misappropriation of funds or underfunding of the public health system, etc.) often hard to overcome.

  6. Diagnosis and prevention of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or odontostomatognathic (OSG) injury in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, R A

    1990-04-01

    Malpractice lawsuit cases due to temporomandibular joint/soft tissue injuries following dental therapy are increasing. Therefore, dentists and their staffs must know how to recognize, document and avoid any possible aggravation or precipitation of TMJ disorder. TMJ anatomy, biomechanics and mechanisms of TMJ injuries are presented. Etiological factors such as psychological factors, parafunctional activities, malocclusion, trauma, iatrogenic causes, systemic conditions, developmental disorders, neoplastic growth or medications are discussed. Preventive measures addressed include: history-taking, patient examination, complete records, the assessment of the patient's general condition, documentation of pre-existing findings, informing and educating the patient, performing only the necessary procedures, modifying appointments, selecting less traumatic dental techniques, avoiding sudden occlusal alterations and preparedness to handle unwanted complications.

  7. Fibular nerve palsy after hip replacement: Not only surgeon responsibility. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) a rare cause of nerve liability.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, G; Del Tedesco, F; Cambise, C; Coraci, D; Donati, F; Santilli, V; Padua, L

    2016-06-01

    Mononeuropathy after surgery may occur and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a possible pathological condition related to paresis after hip surgery. We present a case of 66-year-old man presenting severe weakness at inferior limb muscles after hip prosthesis revision. Clinic and electrophysiology showed severe right fibular nerve damage and ultrasound found a marked enlargement of the same nerve, associated with focal enlargements in other nerves. A diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was suspected and confirmed by genetic test. The patient gradually recovered returning to a normal daily active life. Ultrasound was crucial for diagnosis. The suspicion and diagnosis of latent neuropathy, which can occur after surgical intervention, may lead to a better understand of the risks of the surgery, specific for the patient, and avoid the wrong attribution to surgical malpractice.

  8. Policy for therapeutic acupuncture in an academic health center: a model for standard policy development.

    PubMed

    Myklebust, Monica; Colson, James; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Winsauer, Jeffery; Zhang, Yu Quin; Harris, Richard E

    2006-12-01

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic modality offers multiple applications. Its effectiveness coupled with its general acceptance by conventional health care professionals makes it one of the first complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities to be incorporated in an integrative approach to care. However, few centers that offer acupuncture have written standard policies to regulate its use. This lack of standard policies may impede provision of quality care, serve as a barrier to cross-institutional data collection and clinical application of that data, and may put health care professionals and institutions at risk when credentialing or malpractice liability has not been clearly addressed. Here we present a policy for acupuncture, created by a diverse group of health care professionals at the University of Michigan Health System. It may function as a generalizable template for standard policy development by institutions incorporating acupuncture.

  9. Temporomandibular disorders assessment: medicolegal considerations in the evidence-based era.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, D; Bucci, M B; Montagna, F; Guarda-Nardini, L

    2011-02-01

    Summary  Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a frequent finding in cases of facial trauma or dental malpractice, and legal claims for TMD damage have been increased over the years. Temporomandibular disorders assessment in the medical legal setting is complicated by the peculiarities of these disorders, whose symptoms are heterogeneous, fluctuant, and recognise a multifactorial origin. A systematic Medline search in the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database pointed out that, despite the medical legal aspects of the dental profession are gaining a growing attention, there is a paucity of literature dealing with patients with TMD assessment. For these reasons, evidence-based knowledge in the field of TMD diagnosis and treatment was summarised in this article with the aim of providing useful suggestions for a medical legal approach to TMD.

  10. RVU costing in a medical group practice.

    PubMed

    Berlin, M F; Faber, B P; Berlin, L M

    1997-10-01

    As risk-and-reward reimbursement arrangements proliferate, medical group practices should use cost accounting to measure costs of services delivered by physicians. The resource-based relative value scale (RBRVS) is a method of determining physicians' fees on the basis of the various resources used to provide procedures or services. Two cost-per-procedure methods can be used in RBRVS cost accounting. One method uses relative value units (RVUs), and the other uses component RVUs, which comprise work, practice, and malpractice costs. Though the two methods produce different calculated costs, using both together can produce a cost range medical practice administrators can use to ensure that the costs of delivering services are reimbursed adequately.

  11. Breakdowns in communication of radiological findings: an ethical and medico-legal conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel R.; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    Communication problems in diagnostic testing have increased in both number and importance in recent years. The medical and legal impact of failure of communication is dramatic. Over the past decades, the courts have expanded and strengthened the duty imposed on radiologists to timely communicate radiologic abnormalities to referring physicians and perhaps the patients themselves in certain situations. The need to communicate these findings goes beyond strict legal requirements: there is a moral imperative as well. The Code of Medical Ethics of the American Medical Association points out that “Ethical values and legal principles are usually closely related, but ethical obligations typically exceed legal duties.” Thus, from the perspective of the law, radiologists are required to communicate important unexpected findings to referring physicians in a timely fashion, or alternatively to the patients themselves. From a moral perspective, radiologists should want to effect such communications. Practice standards, moral values, and ethical statements from professional medical societies call for full disclosure of medical errors to patients affected by them. Surveys of radiologists and non-radiologic physicians reveal that only few would divulge all aspects of the error to the patient. In order to encourage physicians to disclose errors to patients and assist in protecting them in some manner if malpractice litigation follows, more than 35 states have passed laws that do not allow a physician’s admission of an error and apologetic statements to be revealed in the courtroom. Whether such disclosure increases or decreases the likelihood of a medical malpractice lawsuit is unclear, but ethical and moral considerations enjoin physicians to disclose errors and offer apologies. PMID:27006891

  12. Integrating risk management data in quality improvement initiatives within an academic neurosurgery department.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Garrett, Matthew C; Emami, Leila; Foss, Sarah K; Klohn, Johanna L; Martin, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT While malpractice litigation has had many negative impacts on health care delivery systems, information extracted from lawsuits could potentially guide toward venues to improve care. The authors present a comprehensive review of lawsuits within a tertiary academic neurosurgical department and report institutional and departmental strategies to mitigate liability by integrating risk management data with quality improvement initiatives. METHODS The Comprehensive Risk Intelligence Tool database was interrogated to extract claims/suits abstracts concerning neurosurgical cases that were closed from January 2008 to December 2012. Variables included demographics of the claimant, type of procedure performed (if any), claim description, insured information, case outcome, clinical summary, contributing factors and subfactors, amount incurred for indemnity and expenses, and independent expert opinion in regard to whether the standard of care was met. RESULTS During the study period, the Department of Neurosurgery received the most lawsuits of all surgical specialties (30 of 172), leading to a total incurred payment of $4,949,867. Of these lawsuits, 21 involved spinal pathologies and 9 cranial pathologies. The largest group of suits was from patients with challenging medical conditions who underwent uneventful surgeries and postoperative courses but filed lawsuits when they did not see the benefits for which they were hoping; 85% of these claims were withdrawn by the plaintiffs. The most commonly cited contributing factors included clinical judgment (20 of 30), technical skill (19 of 30), and communication (6 of 30). CONCLUSIONS While all medical and surgical subspecialties must deal with the issue of malpractice and liability, neurosurgery is most affected both in terms of the number of suits filed as well as monetary amounts awarded. To use the suits as learning tools for the faculty and residents and minimize the associated costs, quality initiatives addressing the

  13. Litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Adinma, JIB

    2016-01-01

    The expectation of obstetrics is a perfect outcome. Obstetrics malpractice can cause morbidity and mortality that may engender litigation. Globally, increasing trend to litigation in obstetrics practice has resulted in high indemnity cost to the obstetrician with consequent frustration and overall danger to the future of obstetrics practice. The objective was to review litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice, highlighting medical ethics, federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO’s) ethical responsibility guideline on women's sexual and reproductive health and right; examine the relationship between medical ethics and medical laws; X-ray medical negligence and litigable obstetrics malpractices; and make recommendation towards the improvement of obstetrics practices to avert misconduct that would lead to litigation. Review involves a literature search on the internet in relevant journals, textbooks, and monographs. Knowledge and application of medical ethics are important to the obstetricians to avert medical negligence that will lead to litigation. A medical negligence can occur in any of the three triads of medicare viz: Diagnosis, advice/counseling, and treatment. Lawsuits in obstetrics generally center on errors of omission or commission especially in relation to the failure to perform caesarean section or to perform the operation early enough. Fear of litigation, high indemnity cost, and long working hours are among the main reasons given by obstetricians for ceasing obstetrics practice. Increasing global trend in litigation with high indemnity cost to the obstetrician is likely to jeopardize the future of obstetrics care especially in countries without medical insurance coverage for health practitioners. Litigation in obstetrics can be prevented through the Obstetrician's mindfulness of its possibility; acquainting themselves of the medical laws and guidelines related to their practice; ensuring adequate communication with, and consent of

  14. Investigation on Legal Problems Encountered by Emergency Medicine Physicians in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kayipmaz, Afsin Emre; Giray, Tufan Akin; Yesilagac, Hasan; Ozel, Betul Akbuga; Celikel, Elif; Karagun, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicine is a profession that carries certain risks. One risky area of practice is the emergency department. Emergency physicians diagnose and treat a high volume of patients, and are also responsible for preparing reports for forensic cases. In this study, we aim to investigate emergency physicians’ legal-administrative problems and reveal their level of understanding on forensic cases. Methods An electronic questionnaire form was prepared after the approval of an ethical committee. This form was sent to the residents, specialists and academicians of emergency medicine by e-mail. The physicians were asked to fill out the form online. All the gathered data was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were presented as frequency percentages with mean and standard deviation. Chi-square tests were used to compare the groups. Correlation between number of complaint cases and age, sex, career, institution, and duration of service in emergency department were investigated. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 294 physicians participated in the questionnaire. According to the questionnaire, 170 of the physicians were reported to the patient communication units due to medical malpractice. Mean number of compliant reports was 3.20±3.5. 29 of the physicians received administrative penalties. 42 of the physicians were judged in the court for medical malpractice. 1 physician was fined 5000 Turkish Liras as a result of these judgments. Conclusion We found that the number of complaint reports is negatively correlated with duration of service in emergency medicine and age. There was a significant difference between number of complaint reports and career (p<0.05). The physicians’ level of awareness on forensic cases was found to be insufficient. Lack of legislation knowledge may be an important cause of complaint reports concerning emergency physicians, who have a high load of patients. Thus, we think that increasing the frequency of post

  15. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part II: Methodological guidance for a better practice

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie; Bernstad, Anna; Bakas, Ioannis; Niero, Monia; Gentil, Emmanuel; Christensen, Thomas H.; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • We perform a critical review of 222 LCA studies of solid waste management systems. • We analyse the past LCA practice against the ISO standard and ILCD Handbook guidance. • Malpractices exist in many methodological aspects with large variations among studies. • Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. • We provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs.

  16. The PRONE score: an algorithm for predicting doctors’ risks of formal patient complaints using routinely collected administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Spittal, Matthew J; Bismark, Marie M; Studdert, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicolegal agencies—such as malpractice insurers, medical boards and complaints bodies—are mostly passive regulators; they react to episodes of substandard care, rather than intervening to prevent them. At least part of the explanation for this reactive role lies in the widely recognised difficulty of making robust predictions about medicolegal risk at the individual clinician level. We aimed to develop a simple, reliable scoring system for predicting Australian doctors’ risks of becoming the subject of repeated patient complaints. Methods Using routinely collected administrative data, we constructed a national sample of 13 849 formal complaints against 8424 doctors. The complaints were lodged by patients with state health service commissions in Australia over a 12-year period. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of subsequent complaints, defined as another complaint occurring within 2 years of an index complaint. Model estimates were then used to derive a simple predictive algorithm, designed for application at the doctor level. Results The PRONE (Predicted Risk Of New Event) score is a 22-point scoring system that indicates a doctor's future complaint risk based on four variables: a doctor's specialty and sex, the number of previous complaints and the time since the last complaint. The PRONE score performed well in predicting subsequent complaints, exhibiting strong validity and reliability and reasonable goodness of fit (c-statistic=0.70). Conclusions The PRONE score appears to be a valid method for assessing individual doctors’ risks of attracting recurrent complaints. Regulators could harness such information to target quality improvement interventions, and prevent substandard care and patient dissatisfaction. The approach we describe should be replicable in other agencies that handle large numbers of patient complaints or malpractice claims. PMID:25855664

  17. Current coding practices and patterns of code use of registered dietitian nutritionists: the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 2013 coding survey.

    PubMed

    Parrott, J Scott; White, Jane V; Schofield, Marsha; Hand, Rosa K; Gregoire, Mary B; Ayoob, Keith T; Pavlinac, Jessie; Lewis, Jaime Lynn; Smith, Karen

    2014-10-01

    Coding, coverage, and reimbursement for nutrition services are vital to the dietetics profession, particularly to registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) who provide clinical care. The objective of this study was to assess RDN understanding and use of the medical nutrition therapy (MNT) procedure codes in the delivery of nutrition services. Its design was an Internet survey of all RDNs listed in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy)/Commission on Dietetics Registration database as of September 2013 who resided in the United States and were not retired. Prior coding and coverage surveys provided a basis for survey development. Parameters assessed included knowledge and use of existing MNT and/or alternative procedure codes, barriers to code use, payer reimbursement patterns, complexity of the patient population served, time spent in the delivery of initial and subsequent care, and practice demographics and management. Results show that a majority of respondents were employed by another and provided outpatient MNT services on a part-time basis. MNT codes were used for the provision of individual services, with minimal use of the MNT codes for group services and subsequent care. The typical patient carries two or more diagnoses. The majority of RDNs uses internal billing departments and support staff in their practices. The payer mix is predominantly Medicare and private/commercial insurance. Managers and manager/providers were more likely than providers to carry malpractice insurance. Results point to the need for further education regarding the full spectrum of Current Procedural Terminology codes available for RDN use and the business side of ambulatory MNT practice, including the need to carry malpractice insurance. This survey is part of continuing Academy efforts to understand the complex web of relationships among clinical practice, coverage, MNT code use, and reimbursement so as to further support nutrition services codes revision and/or expansion.

  18. Medical error reduction and tort reform through private, contractually-based quality medicine societies.

    PubMed

    MacCourt, Duncan; Bernstein, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The current medical malpractice system is broken. Many patients injured by malpractice are not compensated, whereas some patients who recover in tort have not suffered medical negligence; furthermore, the system's failures demoralize patients and physicians. But most importantly, the system perpetuates medical error because the adversarial nature of litigation induces a so-called "Culture of Silence" in physicians eager to shield themselves from liability. This silence leads to the pointless repetition of error, as the open discussion and analysis of the root causes of medical mistakes does not take place as fully as it should. In 1993, President Clinton's Task Force on National Health Care Reform considered a solution characterized by Enterprise Medical Liability (EML), Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), some limits on recovery for non-pecuniary damages (Caps), and offsets for collateral source recovery. Yet this list of ingredients did not include a strategy to surmount the difficulties associated with each element. Specifically, EML might be efficient, but none of the enterprises contemplated to assume responsibility, i.e., hospitals and payers, control physician behavior enough so that it would be fair to foist liability on them. Likewise, although ADR might be efficient, it will be resisted by individual litigants who perceive themselves as harmed by it. Finally, while limitations on collateral source recovery and damages might effectively reduce costs, patients and trial lawyers likely would not accept them without recompense. The task force also did not place error reduction at the center of malpractice tort reform -a logical and strategic error, in our view. In response, we propose a new system that employs the ingredients suggested by the task force but also addresses the problems with each. We also explicitly consider steps to rebuff the Culture of Silence and promote error reduction. We assert that patients would be better off with a system where

  19. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  20. Identification of a Herbal Powder by Deoxyribonucleic Acid Barcoding and Structural Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Bhavisha P.; Thaker, Vrinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Authentic identification of plants is essential for exploiting their medicinal properties as well as to stop the adulteration and malpractices with the trade of the same. Objective: To identify a herbal powder obtained from a herbalist in the local vicinity of Rajkot, Gujarat, using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding and molecular tools. Materials and Methods: The DNA was extracted from a herbal powder and selected Cassia species, followed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the rbcL barcode locus. Thereafter the sequences were subjected to National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis, followed by the protein three-dimension structure determination of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder and Cassia species namely Cassia fistula, Cassia tora and Cassia javanica (sequences obtained in the present study), Cassia Roxburghii, and Cassia abbreviata (sequences retrieved from Genbank). Further, the multiple and pairwise structural alignment were carried out in order to identify the herbal powder. Results: The nucleotide sequences obtained from the selected species of Cassia were submitted to Genbank (Accession No. JX141397, JX141405, JX141420). The NCBI BLAST analysis of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder showed an equal sequence similarity (with reference to different parameters like E value, maximum identity, total score, query coverage) to C. javanica and C. roxburghii. In order to solve the ambiguities of the BLAST result, a protein structural approach was implemented. The protein homology models obtained in the present study were submitted to the protein model database (PM0079748-PM0079753). The pairwise structural alignment of the herbal powder (as template) and C. javanica and C. roxburghii (as targets individually) revealed a close similarity of the herbal powder with C. javanica. Conclusion: A strategy as used here, incorporating the integrated use of DNA

  1. [Efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulants in frail elderly patients with atrial fibrillation: an unsolved problem].

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Stucci, Nicola; Cojocaru, Elena; Ungar, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    At present, the efficacy and safety of anticoagulants, warfarin, or new oral anticoagulants in frail patients remain unknown, as these patients have largely been excluded from both randomized trials and "real-world" studies; as a result, the guidelines do not provide guidance for the management of this population. Frail patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are significantly less likely to receive oral anticoagulants compared to their nonfrail counterparts; is that an expression of reasonable prudence or malpractice? In this regard, some aspects of physical frailty should be considered: (i) increased vulnerability to stressors, including pharmacological agents with potential severe adverse effects; (ii) frail elderly patients are at high risk of falls and, therefore, of severe traumatic hemorrhages on oral anticoagulation; (iii) frail patients are more likely to have complications during intercurrent affections, potentially responsible for hemorrhages. Prospective "real-world" studies including frail AF patients are necessary. Waiting for more evidence, the doubt whether to prescribe or not an oral anticoagulant to frail AF patients remains legitimate.

  2. A conceptual model of emergency physician decision making for head computed tomography in mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Probst, Marc A; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Schriger, David L

    2014-06-01

    The use of computed tomographic scanning in blunt head trauma has increased dramatically in recent years without an accompanying rise in the prevalence of injury or hospital admission for serious conditions. Because computed tomography is neither harmless nor inexpensive, researchers have attempted to optimize utilization, largely through research that describes which clinical variables predict intracranial injury, and use this information to develop clinical decision instruments. Although such techniques may be useful when the benefits and harms of each strategy (neuroimaging vs observation) are quantifiable and amenable to comparison, the exact magnitude of these benefits and harms remains unknown in this clinical scenario. We believe that most clinical decision instrument development efforts are misguided insofar as they ignore critical, nonclinical factors influencing the decision to image. In this article, we propose a conceptual model to illustrate how clinical and nonclinical factors influence emergency physicians making this decision. We posit that elements unrelated to standard clinical factors, such as personality of the physician, fear of litigation and of missed diagnoses, patient expectations, and compensation method, may have equal or greater impact on actual decision making than traditional clinical factors. We believe that 3 particular factors deserve special consideration for further research: fear of error/malpractice, financial incentives, and patient engagement. Acknowledgement and study of these factors will be essential if we are to understand how emergency physicians truly make these decisions and how test-ordering behavior can be modified.

  3. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  4. Economic incentives to promote innovation in healthcare delivery.

    PubMed

    Luft, Harold S

    2009-10-01

    Economics influences how medical care is delivered, organized, and progresses. Fee-for-service payment encourages delivery of services. Fee-for-individual-service, however, offers no incentives for clinicians to efficiently organize the care their patients need. Global capitation provides such incentives; it works well in highly integrated practices but not for independent practitioners. The failures of utilization management in the 1990s demonstrated the need for a third alternative to better align incentives, such as bundling payment for an episode of care. Building on Medicare's approach to hospital payment, one can define expanded diagnosis-related groups that include all hospital, physician, and other costs during the stay and appropriate preadmission and postdischarge periods. Physicians and hospitals voluntarily forming a new entity (a care delivery team) would receive such bundled payments along with complete flexibility in allocating the funds. Modifications to gainsharing and antikickback rules, as well as reforms to malpractice liability laws, will facilitate the functioning of the care delivery teams. The implicit financial incentives encourage efficient care for the patient; the episode focus will facilitate measuring patient outcomes. Payment can be based on the resources used by those care delivery teams achieving superior outcomes, thereby fostering innovation improving outcomes and reducing waste.

  5. With patient satisfaction under increasing scrutiny, consider patient callbacks.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Under the final rules for Medicare's value-based purchasing program, one-third of the funding that is set aside to reward quality will be based on how patients rate their hospital experience. However, some EDs are already working to maximize patient satisfaction by implementing programs or policies whereby patients who have been discharged are routinely called to make sure their recovery is going well, as well as to intervene if there is an opportunity for service recovery. There are benefits to having ED clinicians make the follow-up calls themselves, but some health care organizations are also reaping benefits by having non-clinicians collect feedback on individual clinicians as well as specific facilities. In addition to potentially boosting quality and customer service, experts say callbacks are useful in curbing malpractice litigation. To avoid pushback among staff, consider beginning a program of patient callbacks by asking clinicians to call back just two patients per shift worked, and to share their experiences with colleagues. For maximum value, experts recommend that patient callbacks be made within one to four days of discharge.

  6. Ondine's Curse - Genetic and Iatrogenic Central Hypoventilation as Diagnostic Options in Forensic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Susło, Robert; Trnka, Jakub; Siewiera, Jacek; Drobnik, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    In the Nordic mythology a man lost his ability to breathe without remembering it after he was cursed by water nymph - referred to as 'Ondine's curse' - and then he died as soon as he fell asleep. Family medicine specialists are familiar with many sleeping disorders that their patients commonly call by the term Ondine's Curse. In medical sciences this term is historically related to the group of conditions that have as the common denominator seemingly spontaneous onset of life-threatening hypoventilation. The physiology and genetics specialists focus mainly on congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), which was proven to be linked to several genetic mutations. Anesthesiologists tend to be more interested in similarly manifesting iatrogenic condition. Typically, patients that were previously subjected to general anesthesia, after temporarily waking up and regaining the spontaneous respiratory drive, later fall back into unconsciousness and develop hypoventilation. Anesthesiologists also call it Ondine's curse because of the sudden and unexpected sleep onset. The iatrogenic Ondine's curse is proven to be precipitated by delayed anesthetics release from patients' fat tissue - where it was deposited at the time general anesthesia was administered - back into bloodstream. Forensic medicine has to consider the latter form of Ondine's curse called scenario more often, as they investigate sudden deaths related to surgery and general anesthesia in the post-operational care period. These cases may also fall into the category of medical malpractice-related deaths.

  7. Neglect of the elderly: forensic entomology cases and considerations.

    PubMed

    Benecke, Mark; Josephi, Eberhard; Zweihoff, Ralf

    2004-12-02

    Wounds of living persons are a potential target for the same flies that live, or feed early on corpses. This can lead to complications in estimation of PMI but also allows to determine additional information that might be valuable in a trial, or during the investigations [e.g., M. Benecke, R. Lessig, Child neglect and forensic entomology, Forensic Sci. Int. 120 (2001) 155-159]. With forensic entomology, and forensic entomologists being more and more present, even lower profile cases like the neglect of elderly people (without violence being used against them; i.e., natural death) comes to our attention. Furthermore, much more people grow older than in the past years which leads to increased awareness of malpractice of caregivers in the professional, and personal environment [DPA (German Press Agency), Studie an 17000 Leichen: Jeder Siebte vor Tod falsch gepflegt (Every seventh elderly person not cared for sufficiently), German Press Agency dpa # 051402, Jan 3, Jan 5, 2003] . We briefly sketch three cases in which forensic entomology helped to better understand the circumstances of death, and the type and intensity of neglect before death.

  8. A review of medical image watermarking requirements for teleradiology.

    PubMed

    Nyeem, Hussain; Boles, Wageeh; Boyd, Colin

    2013-04-01

    Teleradiology allows medical images to be transmitted over electronic networks for clinical interpretation and for improved healthcare access, delivery, and standards. Although such remote transmission of the images is raising various new and complex legal and ethical issues, including image retention and fraud, privacy, malpractice liability, etc., considerations of the security measures used in teleradiology remain unchanged. Addressing this problem naturally warrants investigations on the security measures for their relative functional limitations and for the scope of considering them further. In this paper, starting with various security and privacy standards, the security requirements of medical images as well as expected threats in teleradiology are reviewed. This will make it possible to determine the limitations of the conventional measures used against the expected threats. Furthermore, we thoroughly study the utilization of digital watermarking for teleradiology. Following the key attributes and roles of various watermarking parameters, justification for watermarking over conventional security measures is made in terms of their various objectives, properties, and requirements. We also outline the main objectives of medical image watermarking for teleradiology and provide recommendations on suitable watermarking techniques and their characterization. Finally, concluding remarks and directions for future research are presented.

  9. A Clinical Communication Strategy to Enhance Effectiveness and CAHPS Scores: The ALERT Model

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, James T; Kasper, Ilene K

    2008-01-01

    The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) program is a national annual report that surveys patients and rates health plans on a variety of metrics, including claims processing, customer service, office staff helpfulness, and ability to get needed care. Although physicians may feel they have no immediate control over many aspects of this questionnaire, there is an important area of the survey where they do have direct control: “how well the doctor communicates.” It is well established that effective physician–patient communication has beneficial effects not only on physician and patient satisfaction but also on adherence to medical advice, diagnostic accuracy, and malpractice risk. The creators of the CAHPS survey developed and incorporated four questions seeking to ascertain the patient's impression of the physician's communication skills. These questions assess how well the physician listened carefully to the patient, how often the physician explained things understandably, how often the physician showed respect for what the patient said, and how often the physician spent enough time with the patient. Many excellent clinical communication models exist that touch on aspects of the CAHPS topics, but it behooves physicians to be mindful of the exact survey questions. The ALERT model of communication was developed to facilitate physicians' recall of these measures. By incorporating key verbal and nonverbal communication skills, clinicians can address and improve their scores on this important area of the CAHPS survey. PMID:21331215

  10. The new genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroff, L.

    1991-01-01

    Knowing the location and make-up of each of the 50,000 to 100,000 human genes will revolutionize the practice of medicine. This knowledge will lead to tailor-made therapies not only for treating disease but also for preventing it - in short, to a new concept of patient care. The Human Genome Project, a 15-year, $3 billion quest to determine the nucleotide sequence of the entire human genome, will make this possible. In The New Genetics, Leon Jaroff recounts the long path of discovery thatt has led to this huge new scientific venture - from the theory of heredity put forth by Aristotle more than 2,000 years ago to the current attempts to treat adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency and malignant melanoma via gene therapy. Against this background, the geneticists, molecular biologists, clinicians, and ethicists involved in the Human Genome Project describe their work and how it will provide physicians with ever more precise and effective tools to treat human disease. Jaroff also reveals the other, more problematic side of the story. Patients with an undesirable genetic profile may be subject to discrimination by private insurers. Physicians who fail to recommend genetic screening may find themselves victims of malpractice or wrongful-life suits. Indeed, these issues and others have already begun to affect physicians. The New Genetics makes it abundantly clear tha a revolution has arrived, and that physicians must be prepared to cope with the new order.

  11. Disclosure-and-resolution programs that include generous compensation offers may prompt a complex patient response.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Lindsey; Gallagher, Thomas H; Andrew, Penny; Mello, Michelle M

    2012-12-01

    Under "disclosure-and-resolution" programs, health systems disclose adverse events to affected patients and their families; apologize; and, where appropriate, offer compensation. Early adopters of this approach have reported reduced liability costs, but the extent to which these results stem from effective disclosure and apology practices, versus compensation offers, is unknown. Using survey vignettes, we examined the effects of different compensation offers on individuals' responses to disclosures of medical errors compared to explanation and apology alone. Our results show that although two-thirds of these individuals desired compensation offers, increasing the offer amount did not improve key outcomes. Full-compensation offers did not decrease the likelihood of seeking legal advice and increased the likelihood that people perceived the disclosure and apology as motivated by providers' desire to avoid litigation. Hospitals, physicians, and malpractice insurers should consider this complex interplay as they implement similar initiatives. They may benefit from separating disclosure conversations and compensation offers and from excluding physicians from compensation discussions.

  12. [Professional responsibility in surgery and informed consent. Reflections of a clinical surgeon.

    PubMed

    Picardi, Nicola

    2012-09-05

    The medico-legal conflict especially against the surgical profession is reaching ever higher levels, such as to make consider threatened the choice for surgery of the future generations. Surgery is an Art characterized by enthusiasm and entrepreneurship chosen on the basis of a genuine vocation, but nowadays becomes increasingly prey to indirect interests, with profound negative influence on the serenity of its operators. The current legislation, for civil controversies exposes the surgeons to a presumptive judgment of guilt unless the demonstration with proofs of wrong claims, and even from television screens come daily suggestions and incitements to carry out claims also if related to the last ten years of treatments received, if someone suspects or considers to have been object of "malpractice", and particularly without payment for promoters of the shares for lawyers and medico-legal specialists. We try to analyze the situation as objectively as possible, highlighting the inconsistencies and illusions for the rules alleged to protect both the patient and the surgeon, emphasizing instead the responsibilities of different professional groups, while not denying the need for full commitment of surgeons to operate with prudence, diligence and competence.

  13. Evaluating awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Mohanty, Vikrant; Mahajan, Ananya; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral hygiene is intimated in health of all parts of the body including oral cavity. The understanding of actual practices in keeping the oral heath at standard based on patient's perceptions of oral health care is vital. Understanding the effect of gender on oral health would facilitate the development of successful attitude and behavior modification approach towards sustainable oral health. Purpose of Study: To evaluate awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis. Materials and Methods: A survey was conducted among 250 patients attending the department of periodontology, Maulana Azad institute of dental sciences for oral prophylaxis. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information regarding practices and perception about oral hygiene. Results: Majority of the patients (60.4%) felt that oral hygiene is mandatory for overall health of the body. The use of toothpaste and toothbrush (83.6%) was the most preferred cleaning aid among the study population in the present study. The major constraint for avoiding dental examination was no felt need (41.2%) followed by cost of dental treatment (26.8%) and time constraints (24.0%). Conclusions: Professional plaque removal and regular follow-up combined with oral hygiene instructions to the patients can minimize the level of gingival inflammation and swelling. The poor resources for dental care, common malpractices and nonavailability of professional care are the main barriers in seeking optimum oral hygiene. PMID:25024553

  14. Composition of commercial truffle flavored oils with GC-MS analysis and discrimination with an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, Giovanni; Cerretani, Lorenzo; Procida, Giuseppe; Cichelli, Angelo

    2014-03-01

    Truffles are among the most expensive foods and their quality depends on their unique aroma, composed of complex mixtures of lipophilic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). There are many foods flavored with truffle, and oils are particularly common. Using DHS-GC-MS and an electronic nose (MOS), 18 samples of olive oil flavored with white and black truffles from the Italian market were subjected to a blind analysis. Qualitative and quantitative analysis with DHS-GC-MS detected the presence of 63 VOCs, 32 of which can be attributed to olive oil, also defective, and 19 to truffles, while 12 foreign compounds are of dubious origin (synthesis and/or demolition). The data obtained with the electronic nose (MOS), processed statistically, was able to discriminate the aromas coincident with the three species of truffle declared on the label (the white truffle Tuber magnatum and the black truffles Tuber melanosporum and Tuber aestivum), demonstrating the potential and reliability of this technique, confirming the established malpractice of the use of bismethyl(dithio)methane in black truffles flavorings.

  15. [Development of medical tourism in Georgia. Problems and prospectiv (review)].

    PubMed

    Gerzmava, O; Lomtadze, L; Kitovani, D; Kadjrishvili, M

    2011-10-01

    Medical tourism is the movement of patients through a global network of health services. Medical tourists seek affordable healthcare on a timely basis in a variety of destination nations. The expansion of global medical services has sparked immense economic growth in developing nations and has created a new market for advertising access to care. Beyond offering a unique untapped market of services, medical tourism has invited a host of liability, malpractice and ethical concerns. The explosion of off-shore "mini-surgical" vacations will surely incite global unification and increased access, quality and affordability of care. Medical tourism is a dynamic subset of global health care that incorporates a variety of services, procedures and venues of care. Health insurance coverage, the impact on domestic and global markets, and the use of international standards of care will be examined in combination with quality, access and cost parameters. The global nature of medical tourism invites a variety of legal and ethical issues and calls for an organizational body to monitor this new phenomenon. Finally, the future implications of the globalization of health services and systems will be discussed.

  16. An Electronic Patient Risk Communication Board

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A.; Benoit, Angela N.; Breydo, Eugene M.; Carroll, Diane L.; Keohane, Carol A.; Bates, David W.; Dykes, John S.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient’s bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient’s key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB. PMID:24199109

  17. Vaginal birth after cesarean delivery: views from the private practitioner.

    PubMed

    Wells, C Edward

    2010-10-01

    This survey was conducted to assess physician opinion regarding vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) and to examine how physician and hospital characteristics influence the private obstetrical provider's decision to offer or not to offer trial of labor after cesarean delivery. A confidential postal survey of private practicing obstetricians in the Dallas-Ft. Worth Region (n = 774) of North Texas. Of 774 obstetrician-gynecologists, 458 completed and returned the survey for a response rate of 59%. The survey revealed that 52% of respondents offer VBAC to their patients and indicated that the most common reasons for declining use or discontinuation of VBAC were maternal-fetal safety concerns associated with uterine rupture followed by medico-legal liability concerns. Factors associated with physicians not providing VBAC for their patients were physicians in obstetrical practice <10 years, a physician's previous involvement in the care of women with uterine rupture complicated by maternal or neonatal complications, and a physician's previous involvement in cesarean delivery-related medical malpractice litigation.

  18. Greatest impact of safe harbor rule may be to improve patient safety, not reduce liability claims paid by physicians.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Allen; Little, Alison; Isavoran, Melissa; Crider, Lynn-Marie; Smith, Jeanene

    2014-01-01

    "Safe harbor" legislation that provides liability protection to physicians when they follow designated guidelines is often proposed as a way to reform the malpractice system while improving patient safety. However, published evidence provides little policy guidance on implementing safe harbors. With the support of an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality planning grant, we conducted an empirical analysis of closed liability claims in Oregon to determine the potential effects of hypothetical safe harbor legislation. We found that such legislation would have changed the liability outcome in favor of the physician defendant in only 1 percent of 266 claims from the period 2002-09 that we reviewed. Nevertheless, if safe harbors can induce greater physician adherence to care guidelines, they have the potential to improve patient safety. Implementing safe harbor legislation, however, requires overcoming a number of hurdles, including selecting and updating approved guidelines, obtaining broad stakeholder support, and withstanding challenges to the legal validity of the legislation. More experimentation with safe harbors is needed to determine their effects on the performance of the liability system and on health care quality and costs.

  19. A new method to guard inpatient medication safety by the implementation of RFID.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pei Ran; Wang, Bo Han; Wu, Fan

    2008-08-01

    Since life is invaluable, the patient safety is always an important issue. How to reduce the malpractices and advance the patient safety is the primary goal of many countries. The current problem is that the hospitals cannot quickly and precisely identify the name of medicine, the position of patient and staff and the servicing time and dosage taken by patients. The application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is rocketing in popularity as varieties of expanded uses. However, due to the investment consideration, there are few cases that practically implement such a technology in healthcare industries. This paper presents a Wisely Aware RFID Dosage (WARD) system, which based on an integration of barcodes and RFID tags, to demonstrate effective and safe patient care environment, for preventing the risk of medication error. Finally, through an evaluation of users' satisfaction, a reliability of 0.92 and a criterion-related validity of 0.82 show that this system is able to effectively construct the patient-safety-centric environment.

  20. Identification of radiolucent foreign bodies in tissue using optoacoustic spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Leland; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2011-03-01

    One of the leading causes of medical malpractice claims in emergency medicine is the misdiagnosis of the presence of foreign bodies. Radiolucent foreign bodies are especially difficult to differentiate from surrounding soft tissue, gas, and bone using existing clinical imaging modalities. Because many radiolucent foreign bodies have sufficient contrast for imaging in the optical domain, we are exploring the use of laser-induced optoacoustic imaging for the detection of foreign bodies, especially in orbital and craniofacial injuries, in which the foreign bodies are likely to lie within the penetration depth of visible and near infrared wavelengths. In order to evaluate the performance of optoacoustic imaging for clinical detection and characterization, common foreign bodies have been scanned over a range of visible and near infrared wavelengths to obtain the spectroscopic properties of the materials commonly associated with these foreign bodies. The foreign bodies are also being embedded in realistic ex vivo tissue phantoms to evaluate the changes that may occur in the spectroscopic absorption of the materials due to the interaction with tissue absorbers. Ultimately, we anticipate that spectroscopic characterization will help identify specific wavelengths to be used for imaging foreign bodies that will provide useful diagnostic data about the material properties of the object, thereby enabling the characterization, as well as the location, of the objects. This information will aid the clinician in choosing the optimal treatment course for the patient.

  1. The need to add motor evoked potential monitoring to somatosensory and electromyographic monitoring in cervical spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM), utilizing somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and electromyography (EMG), was introduced to cervical spine surgery in the late 1980's. However, as SEP only provided physiological data regarding the posterior cord, new motor deficits were observed utilizing SEP alone. This prompted the development of motor evoked potential monitoring (MEP) which facilitated real-time assessment of the anterior/anterolateral spinal cord. Although all three modalities, SEP, EMG, and MEP, are routinely available for IONM of cervical spine procedures, MEP are not yet routinely employed. The purpose of this review is to emphasize that MEP should now routinely accompany SEP and EMG when performing IONM of cervical spine surgery. Interestingly, one of the most common reasons for malpractice suits involving the cervical spine, is quadriparesis/quadriplegia following a single level anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF). Previously, typical allegations in these suits included; negligent surgery, lack of informed consent, failure to diagnose/treat, and failure to brace. Added to this list, perhaps, as the 5th most reason for a suit will be failure to monitor with MEP. This review documents the value of MEP monitoring in addition to SEP and EMG monitoring in cervical spine surgery. The addition of MEP0 should minimize major motor injuries, and more accurately and reliably detect impending anterior cord deterioration that may be missed with SEP monitoring alone. PMID:24340237

  2. Who owns the image? Archiving and retention issues in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Mezrich, Jonathan L; Siegel, Eliot

    2014-04-01

    Patients are often confused with respect to the ownership of radiologic images and the extent to which they may exert rights over their own imaging. In general, a facility that generates imaging maintains "ownership" rights. Patients have a right to inspect their images and obtain copies but they may not have the images or reports modified or stricken. Facilities may use images not only for treatment purposes but also have rights to use images with respect to educational training, quality control, and research, subject to HIPAA requirements. A facility has statutory obligations with respect to record retention and may face financial penalty and malpractice consequences for failure to retain images. Bankruptcy and state laws address issues of transfer of ownership of a patient's images in cases in which a facility goes out of business. Future questions remain as to whether the length of time a facility maintains images should increase as digital storage media improve and whether the use of inter-facility image sharing via "cloud" technology should alter obligations with respect to which facility must retain the images.

  3. Medicine beyond borders: the legal and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Puteri Nemie J

    2009-09-01

    The ease and affordability of international travel has contributed to the rapid growth of the healthcare industry where people from all around the world are traveling to other countries to obtain medical, dental, and surgical care while at the same time touring, vacationing and fully experiencing the attractions of the countries that they are visiting. A combination of many factors has led to the recent increase in popularity of medical tourism such as exorbitant costs of healthcare in industrialized nations, favorable currency exchange rates in the global economy, rapidly improving technology in many countries of the world and most importantly proven safety of healthcare in selected foreign nations. Nevertheless, the development of medical tourism has certainly awakened many ethical and legal issues, which must be addressed. Issues pertaining to malpractice, consumer protection, organ trafficking, alternative medicine and telemedicine need comprehensive legal regulatory framework to govern them. Ethical issues are also been raised by the promotion of medical tourism in particular those pertaining to doctor and patient relationship. A future, where medical law is subsumed into various legal and ethical dimensions, poses serious challenges for the practice and ethics of medicine.

  4. Expert Witness: A system for developing expert medical testimony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Raymond; Perkins, David; Leasure, David

    1994-01-01

    Expert Witness in an expert system designed to assist attorneys and medical experts in determining the merit of medical malpractice claims in the area of obstetrics. It substitutes the time of the medical expert with the time of a paralegal assistant guided by the expert system during the initial investigation of the medical records and patient interviews. The product of the system is a narrative transcript containing important data, immediate conclusions from the data, and overall conclusions of the case that the attorney and medical expert use to make decisions about whether and how to proceed with the case. The transcript may also contain directives for gathering additional information needed for the case. The system is a modified heuristic classifier and is implemented using over 600 CLIPS rules together with a C-based user interface. The data abstraction and solution refinement are implemented directly using forward chaining production and matching. The use of CLIPS and C is essential to delivering a system that runs on a generic PC platform. The direct implementation in CLIPS together with locality of inference ensures that the system will scale gracefully. Two years of use has revealed no errors in the reasoning.

  5. The conceptual neutering of gender and the criminalization of sex.

    PubMed

    Money, J

    1985-06-01

    Thirty years ago the term gender was borrowed from philology for use in sexological psychology in a paper on hermaphroditism (Money, 1955). As originally defined, gender role consists of both introspective and the extraspective manifestations of the concept. In general usage, the introspective manifestations soon became separately known as gender identity. The acronym, G-I/R, being singular, restores the unity of the concept. Without this unity, gender role has become a socially transmitted acquisition, divorced from the biology of sex and the brain. Sex and gender have been partitioned between body and mind, respectively. The desexualization of gender is in accord with the Zeitgeist of contemporary sexual politics together with victimology and an expanding criminalization of sex. The funding of sexological research is being diverted to victimology, which is, de facto, a branch of law enforcement. Victimologists--and sexological professionals among them--are vulnerable to a backlash of being themselves criminalized. This happens as a result of false accusations of various types of malpractice, including sexual abuse of clients, especially children. Under Hitler, there was an historical parallel when the destruction of sexology was effected by the application of the theory of social eugenics and racial purity with sexologists had endorsed. They were among the first of Hitler's victims.

  6. Challenges in ethics, safety, best practices, and oversight regarding HIT vendors, their customers, and patients: a report of an AMIA special task force.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Kenneth W; Berner, Eta S; Dente, Mark A; Kaplan, Bonnie; Koppel, Ross; Rucker, Donald; Sands, Daniel Z; Winkelstein, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The current commercial health information technology (HIT) arena encompasses a number of competing firms that provide electronic health applications to hospitals, clinical practices, and other healthcare-related entities. Such applications collect, store, and analyze patient information. Some vendors incorporate contract language whereby purchasers of HIT systems, such as hospitals and clinics, must indemnify vendors for malpractice or personal injury claims, even if those events are not caused or fostered by the purchasers. Some vendors require contract clauses that force HIT system purchasers to adopt vendor-defined policies that prevent the disclosure of errors, bugs, design flaws, and other HIT-software-related hazards. To address this issue, the AMIA Board of Directors appointed a Task Force to provide an analysis and insights. Task Force findings and recommendations include: patient safety should trump all other values; corporate concerns about liability and intellectual property ownership may be valid but should not over-ride all other considerations; transparency and a commitment to patient safety should govern vendor contracts; institutions are duty-bound to provide ethics education to purchasers and users, and should commit publicly to standards of corporate conduct; and vendors, system purchasers, and users should encourage and assist in each others' efforts to adopt best practices. Finally, the HIT community should re-examine whether and how regulation of electronic health applications could foster improved care, public health, and patient safety.

  7. Cross-border issues in the development of medical tourism in Malaysia: legal challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nemie, Puteri; Kassim, Jahn

    2009-08-01

    Strategically located at the crossroads of Asia, Malaysia has become one of the key players in the fast-growing and lucrative market for health care services in Asia. Medical travel across international boundaries has been made possible through affordable airfares and the favourable exchange rates of the Malaysian ringgit has contributed to the rise of the "medical tourism phenomenon" where medical travel is combined with visiting popular tourist destinations in Malaysia. Further, competitive medical fees and modern medical facilities have also made Malaysia a popular destination for medical tourists. Nevertheless, the increased number of foreign patients has opened up possibilities of Malaysian health care providers being subjected to malpractice claims and triggering a myriad of cross-border legal issues. Presently, there is no internationally accepted legal framework to regulate medical tourism and issues of legal redress in relation to unsatisfactory provision of treatment across international boundaries. The economic benefits of medical tourism must be based upon a solid legal regulatory framework and strong ethical standards as well as upon high-quality medical and health care services. It is therefore important to assess the existing legal framework affecting the development of medical tourism in Malaysia in order to explore the gaps, deficiencies and possibilities for legal and regulatory reform.

  8. Why a "dental surgeon" for identification in forensic science?

    PubMed

    Sukul, Biswajit; Deb, Uttam; Ghosh, Supratim

    2010-11-01

    Dentistry has much to offer law enforcement in the detection and solution of crime or in civil proceedings. Forensic dental fieldwork requires an interdisciplinary knowledge of dental science and forensic science. Most often the role of the forensic odontologist is to establish a person's identity. Teeth, with their physiologic variations, pathoses and effects of therapy, record information that remains throughout life and beyond. The teeth may also be used as weapons and, under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the culprit. Forensic odontology has an important role in the recognition of abuse among persons of all ages. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognise malpractice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identify unknown human. Forensic odontology involves the management, examination, evaluation and presentation of dental evidence in criminal or civil proceedings, all in the interest of justice. The forensic odontologist assists legal authorities by examining dental evidence in different situations.

  9. [Penal liability from retained foreign body inside the surgical site].

    PubMed

    Angiò, L G; Ventura Spagnolo, E; Pirrone, G; Cardia, G

    2011-03-01

    The Authors focus on the liability of the surgery team members in the case they inadvertently forget behind in the patient's body a foreign object, which causes injuries and/or death. The Authors underline that, according to the current case law regarding medical malpractice, both the main surgeon and their assistant/subordinate are liable for engaging in a markedly imprudent and/or negligent conduct, such as not double-checking scrupulously the surgical site before its closure in order to highlight forgotten foreign bodies. As well, the Authors underline that either the circulator nurse or the theatre nurse can be considered punishable by law when that medical error occurs, even if they are responsible for the count of the instruments used in the course of the surgery. Conversely, the main surgeon and his or her assistant are always directly responsible, due to the fact that the nurses' count procedure represents merely an additional control measure, without substituting at all the check the surgeons must obligatory conduct on the surgical site. Finally, the Authors point out that, as the count procedure is performed by the members of a surgical team, where a hierarchy-based relationship rules, the main surgeon is the liable for any preventable and avoidable adverse event provoked by the nursing staff as a consequence of the objective responsibility due to culpa in eligendo and culpa in vigilando.

  10. Preventing medico-legal issues in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Raveesh, Bevinahalli N.; Nayak, Ragavendra B.; Kumbar, Shivakumar F.

    2016-01-01

    The medical profession is considered to be one of the noblest professions in the world. The practice of medicine is capable of rendering noble service to humanity provided due care, sincerity, efficiency, and professional skill is observed by the doctors. However, today, the patient–doctor relationship has almost diminished its fiduciary character and has become more formal and structured. Doctors are no longer regarded as infallible and beyond questioning. Corporatization of health care has made it like any other business, and the medical profession is increasingly being guided by the profit motive rather than that of service. On the other hand, a well-publicized malpractice case can ruin the doctor's career and practice. The law, like medicine, is an inexact science. One cannot predict with certainty an outcome of cases many a time. It depends on the particular facts and circumstances of the case, and also the personal notions of the judge concerned who is hearing the case. The axiom “you learn from your mistakes” is too little honored in healthcare. The best way to handle medico-legal issues is by preventing them, and this article tries to enumerate the preventive measures in safeguarding the doctor against negligence suit. PMID:27891020

  11. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  12. Tipping the scales.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  13. Misdescription of packaged foods: a case study from the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Premanandh, J; Sabbagh, Aman; Maruthamuthu, M

    2013-01-01

    Food misdescription has become of paramount importance as consumers come into contact daily with a great variety of foods. The controversies surrounding genetically modified organism (GMO) labelling and malpractices in the food chain have forced regulatory authorities to authenticate food from production to consumption. This paper reports the results of a surveillance programme conducted in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) market to assess the status of food misdescription and authenticity. A DNA test was used to screen random samples of processed meat products bought from supermarkets in the UAE. A total of 246 samples were analysed from different geographical locations. The majority of samples showed a high standard of legal compliance, with over 95% confirmed for authenticity. However, 5% of samples were found to contain undeclared species. In conclusion, this study confirms the presence of undeclared food in the UAE market. Regular surveillance and monitoring programmes along with strict implementation of the Food and Adulteration Act may alleviate misdescription issues to a greater extent.

  14. Use of the isabel decision support system to improve diagnostic accuracy of pediatric nurse practitioner and family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    John, Rita Marie; Hall, Elizabeth; Bakken, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is a priority for healthcare today. Despite a large proportion of malpractice claims the result of diagnostic error, the use of diagnostic decision support to improve diagnostic accuracy has not been widely used among healthcare professionals. Moreover, while the use of diagnostic decision support has been studied in attending physicians, residents, medical students and advanced practice nurses, the use of decision support among Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) students has not been studied. The authors have implemented the Isabel diagnostic decision support system into the curriculum and are evaluating its impact. The goals of the evaluation study are to describe the diagnostic accuracy and self-reported confidence levels of Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) and Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) students over the course of their programs, to examine changes in diagnostic accuracy and self-reported confidence levels over the study period, and to evaluate differences between FNP and PNP students in diagnostic accuracy and self-reported confidence levels for pediatric cases. This paper summarizes establishment of the academic/industry collaboration, case generation, integration of Isabel into the curriculum, and evaluation design.

  15. A Secure RFID Tag Authentication Protocol with Privacy Preserving in Telecare Medicine Information System.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) based solutions are widely used for providing many healthcare applications include patient monitoring, object traceability, drug administration system and telecare medicine information system (TMIS) etc. In order to reduce malpractices and ensure patient privacy, in 2015, Srivastava et al. proposed a hash based RFID tag authentication protocol in TMIS. Their protocol uses lightweight hash operation and synchronized secret value shared between back-end server and tag, which is more secure and efficient than other related RFID authentication protocols. Unfortunately, in this paper, we demonstrate that Srivastava et al.'s tag authentication protocol has a serious security problem in that an adversary may use the stolen/lost reader to connect to the medical back-end server that store information associated with tagged objects and this privacy damage causing the adversary could reveal medical data obtained from stolen/lost readers in a malicious way. Therefore, we propose a secure and efficient RFID tag authentication protocol to overcome security flaws and improve the system efficiency. Compared with Srivastava et al.'s protocol, the proposed protocol not only inherits the advantages of Srivastava et al.'s authentication protocol for TMIS but also provides better security with high system efficiency.

  16. Preventing medico-legal issues in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Raveesh, Bevinahalli N; Nayak, Ragavendra B; Kumbar, Shivakumar F

    2016-10-01

    The medical profession is considered to be one of the noblest professions in the world. The practice of medicine is capable of rendering noble service to humanity provided due care, sincerity, efficiency, and professional skill is observed by the doctors. However, today, the patient-doctor relationship has almost diminished its fiduciary character and has become more formal and structured. Doctors are no longer regarded as infallible and beyond questioning. Corporatization of health care has made it like any other business, and the medical profession is increasingly being guided by the profit motive rather than that of service. On the other hand, a well-publicized malpractice case can ruin the doctor's career and practice. The law, like medicine, is an inexact science. One cannot predict with certainty an outcome of cases many a time. It depends on the particular facts and circumstances of the case, and also the personal notions of the judge concerned who is hearing the case. The axiom "you learn from your mistakes" is too little honored in healthcare. The best way to handle medico-legal issues is by preventing them, and this article tries to enumerate the preventive measures in safeguarding the doctor against negligence suit.

  17. Resource-based relative value units: a primer for academic family physicians.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah E; Newton, Warren P

    2002-03-01

    The Resource-based Relative Value Scale (RBRVS) is the prevailing model used to reimburse physician services today. Based on empirical research, relative value units (RVUs) quantify the relative work, practice expense, and malpractice costs for specific physician services to appropriately establish payment. The fee schedule, implemented by the Health Care Financing Administration in 1992, dramatically affected physician reimbursement, with the goal of correcting disparities across disciplines. In the first 6 years, Medicare payments to family physicians increased by 36%, while payments to specialists decreased by as much as 18%. Recent changes include new practice expense estimates and adjustment of payment based on facility type. The impact of RVUs is even more widespread as many private payers use the fee schedule to set payment rates and as RVUs become the yardstick for physician productivity measures. Despite the initial successes, the ability of RVUs to capture the work done by primary care providers is still limited. Primary care services today are not as easily quantified as surgical procedures, and coding limitations hinder documentation of services. Rapid changes in health care make comparisons to work done 2 decades ago difficult. Understanding the strengths and limitations of RVUs as they apply to family physicians is fundamental to safeguarding the role of primary care.

  18. The Function of a Medical Director in Healthcare Institutions: A Master or a Servant

    PubMed Central

    Kossaify, Antoine; Rasputin, Boris; Lahoud, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms “medical director” and “director”, and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system. PMID:25114566

  19. The function of a medical director in healthcare institutions: a master or a servant.

    PubMed

    Kossaify, Antoine; Rasputin, Boris; Lahoud, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms "medical director" and "director", and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system.

  20. As CMS makes another policy change, policy makers distinguish between different forms of care.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    As observation care continues to draw fire from critics who charge that the designation ends up costing hospitals money while also sticking patients with exorbitant fees, the medical directors of dedicated observation units counter that the kind of care delivered by their specialized units actually saves money and gets patients out of the hospital sooner. They note that the problem is that only about one-third of hospitals actually have dedicated observation units, so patients placed on observation typically wind up in inpatient beds, where they may only be evaluated once a day. CMS has just released a new policy rule on observation that should help patients avoid excessive charges, but many experts would like to see the agency take steps to incentivize the kind of quality care that is delivered in dedicated units. The new CMS rule for 2014 caps observation stays at 48 hours. Patients who remain in the hospital beyond this point become inpatients, as long as they meet inpatient criteria. Proponents of observation care contend that the average length-of-stay in a dedicated observation unit is just 15 hours--typically much shorter than the LOS of patients who are placed on observation in inpatient beds. Care in a dedicated observation unit is generally driven by protocol in an emergency medicine environment where there is continuous rounding. Discharges can occur at any time of the day or night. Experts note that observation patients account for the largest portion of both misdiagnoses and malpractice lawsuits stemming from emergency settings.

  1. The Impact of Health Care Economics on Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Just like the world economy in 2012, health care is in a state of flux. The current economic environment will impact not only current colorectal surgery residents, but also future generations of surgical trainees. To understand the economic impact of the current health care environment on colorectal surgery residencies, we need to know the basics of graduate medical education (GME) funding for all residents. Since the 1960s with the initiation of Medicare, the federal government through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been the largest source of GME funding. There are two types of costs associated with GME. Direct GME (DME) funding covers costs directly attributed to the training of residents. These costs include residents' stipends, salaries, and benefits; cost of supervising faculty; direct program administration costs; overhead; and malpractice coverage. Indirect GME (IME) costs are payments to hospitals as an additional or add-on payment for the increased cost of care that is generally found in teaching hospitals. In 2010, President Barak Obama signed into law H.R. 3200, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). In 2011, the Supreme Court held that the majority of the PPACA is constitutional. Although the true impact of this bill is unknown, it will change the formula for Medicare GME reimbursement as well as shift unused residency positions to primary care. PMID:23997674

  2. Survey of Preferences in Patients Scheduled for Carpal Tunnel Release Using Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan Lim; Kim, Jin Sam; Lee, Jun Bum; Kim, Sun Hwa; Min, Dong-Uk

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the preferences of patients scheduled for carpal tunnel release using conjoint analysis and also introduce an example of how to apply a conjoint analysis to the medical field. The use of conjoint analysis in this study is new to the field of orthopedic surgery. Methods A total of 97 patients scheduled for carpal tunnel release completed the survey. The following four attributes were predefined: board certification status, distance from the patient's residency, medical costs, and waiting time for surgery. Two plausible levels for each attribute were assigned. Based on these attributes and levels, 16 scenarios were generated (2 × 2 × 2 × 2). We employed 8 scenarios using a fractional factorial design (orthogonal plan). Preferences for scenarios were then evaluated by ranking: patients were asked to list the 8 scenarios in their order of preference. Outcomes consisted of two results: the average importance of each attribute and the utility score. Results The most important attribute was the physician's board certificate, followed by distance from the patient's residency to the hospital, waiting time, and costs. Utility estimate findings revealed that patients had a greater preference for a hand specialist than a general orthopedic surgeon. Conclusions Patients considered the physician's expertise as the most important factor when choosing a hospital for carpal tunnel release. This suggests that patients are increasingly seeking safety without complications as interest in medical malpractice has increased. PMID:28261434

  3. Key legal principles for hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Alpers, A

    2001-12-21

    In a hospitalist system, when a patient leaves the hospital, he or she will return to a primary care provider (PCP) for follow-up and continuing care. The hand-off after discharge can compromise communication with the PCP. Physicians have a legal duty to provide follow-up care to patients with whom they have a relationship. The obligation to provide follow-up care endures even when the patient misses a scheduled appointment or does not adhere to the follow-up regimen. In general, the physician who began the care must fulfill that obligation. An essential component of follow-up care includes educating the patient about what symptoms require follow-up care and why it is important. The duty to provide adequate follow-up care is shared by the hospitalist and the PCP. Virtually no malpractice case law considers the obligations and practices of hospitalists. This article uses cases involving follow-up care for patients treated in an emergency department and general cases regarding liability for follow-up care to examine the potential legal obligations of both hospitalists and PCPs for follow-up care, including circumstances involving pending test results and incidental findings.

  4. Key legal principles for hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Ann

    2002-04-01

    In a hospitalist system, when a patient leaves the hospital, he or she will return to a primary care provider (PCP) for follow-up and continuing care. The hand-off after discharge can compromise communication with the PCP. Physicians have a legal duty to provide follow-up care to patients with whom they have a relationship. The obligation to provide follow-up care endures even when the patient misses a scheduled appointment or does not adhere to the follow-up regimen. In general, the physician who began the care must fulfill that obligation. An essential component of follow-up care includes educating the patient about what symptoms require follow-up care and why it is important. The duty to provide adequate follow-up care is shared by the hospitalist and the PCP. Virtually no malpractice case law considers the obligations and practices of hospitalists. This article uses cases involving follow-up care for patients treated in an emergency department and general cases regarding liability for follow-up care to examine the potential legal obligations of both hospitalists and PCPs for follow-up care, including circumstances involving pending test results and incidental findings.

  5. Nurse-midwives in federally funded health centers: understanding federal program requirements and benefits.

    PubMed

    Carter, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Midwives are working in federally funded health centers in increasing numbers. Health centers provide primary and preventive health care to almost 20 million people and are located in every US state and territory. While health centers serve the entire community, they also serve as a safety net for low-income and uninsured individuals. In 2010, 93% of health center patients had incomes below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 38% were uninsured. Health centers, including community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless programs, and public housing primary care programs, receive grant funding and enjoy other benefits due to status as federal grantees and designation as federally qualified health centers. Clinicians working in health centers are also eligible for financial and professional benefits because of their willingness to serve vulnerable populations and work in underserved areas. Midwives, midwifery students, and faculty working in, or interacting with, health centers need to be aware of the regulations that health centers must comply with in order to qualify for and maintain federal funding. This article provides an overview of health center regulations and policies affecting midwives, including health center program requirements, scope of project policy, provider credentialing and privileging, Federal Tort Claims Act malpractice coverage, the 340B Drug Pricing Program, and National Health Service Corps scholarship and loan repayment programs.

  6. The debate on no-fault compensation in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Dute, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    In the Netherlands the total number of liability claims per year is about 2500, 100 of which are taken to court. Over the years these figures appear to be rather constant. It has been estimated that introducing a no-fault compensation system would lead to three to six times as many claims and would push up the costs of medical malpractice claims by a factor of three or even seven. When considering the introduction of a no-fault compensation system the main question to be answered is which problem has to be solved. Is it the improvement of the patients' possibility to recover? Is the main goal to put a stop to the progress of increasing costs of liability claims? Is saving doctors from the threat of being sued the main issue? Or is there a problem of the insurance companies that has to be solved? No-fault compensation is not a panacea. In the end improving the liability system may turn out to be a better solution.

  7. Discussing harm-causing errors with patients: an ethics primer for plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Vercler, Christian J; Buchman, Steven R; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-02-01

    Plastic surgery is a field that demands perfection, yet despite our best efforts errors occur every day. Most errors are minor, but occasionally patients are harmed by our mistakes. Although there is a strong ethical requirement for full disclosure of medical errors, data suggest that surgeons have a difficult time disclosing errors and apologizing. "Conventional wisdom" has been to avoid frank discussion of errors with patients. This concept is fueled by the fear of litigation and the notion that any expression of apology leads to malpractice suits. Recently, there has been an increase in the literature pointing to the inadequacy of this approach. Policies that require disclosure of harm-causing medical errors to the patient and the family, apology, and an offer of compensation cultivate the transparency necessary for quality improvement efforts as well as the positive moral development of trainees. There is little published in the plastic surgery literature regarding error disclosure to provide guidance to practitioners. In this article, we will review the ethical, therapeutic, and practical issues involved in discussing the error with the patient and apologizing by presenting a representative case. This primer will provide an understanding of the definition of medical error, the ethical support of error disclosure, the barriers to disclosure, and how to overcome those barriers.

  8. A national registry of haemoglobinopathies in Greece: deducted demographics, trends in mortality and affected births.

    PubMed

    Voskaridou, Ersi; Ladis, Vasilis; Kattamis, Antonis; Hassapopoulou, Eleni; Economou, Marina; Kourakli, Alexandra; Maragkos, Konstantinos; Kontogianni, Kalliopi; Lafioniatis, Stilianos; Vrettou, Eleni; Koutsouka, Freideriki; Papadakis, Alexandros; Mihos, Andreas; Eftihiadis, Eftihios; Farmaki, Kallistheni; Papageorgiou, Ourania; Tapaki, Georgia; Maili, Polixeni; Theohari, Maria; Drosou, Marouso; Kartasis, Zafeiris; Aggelaki, Maria; Basileiadi, Artemis; Adamopoulos, Ioannis; Lafiatis, Ioannis; Galanopoulos, Athanasios; Xanthopoulidis, Georgios; Dimitriadou, Efthimia; Mprimi, Agapi; Stamatopoulou, Maria; Haile, Elanso Damba; Tsironi, Maria; Anastasiadis, Athanasios; Kalmanti, Maria; Papadopoulou, Margarita; Panori, Evaggelia; Dimoxenou, Peristera; Tsirka, Antigoni; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Drandrakis, Pantelis; Dionisopoulou, Dionisia; Ntalamaga, Androniki; Davros, Ioannis; Karagiorga, Markisia

    2012-09-01

    Haemoglobinopathies are the most common hereditary disorders in Greece. Although there is a successful national prevention program, established 35 years ago, there is lack of an official registry and collection of epidemiological data for haemoglobinopathies. This paper reports the results of the first National Registry for Haemoglobinopathies in Greece (NRHG), recently organized by the Greek Society of Haematology. NRHG records all patients affected by thalassaemia major (TM), thalassaemia intermedia (TI), "H" Haemoglobinopathy (HH) and sickle cell disease (SCD). Moreover, data about the annual rate of new affected births along with deaths, between 2000 and 2010, are reported. A total of 4,506 patients are registered all over the country while the number of affected newborns was significantly decreased during the last 3 years. Main causes for still having affected births are: (1) lack of medical care due to financial reasons or low educational level; (2) unawareness of time limitations for prenatal diagnosis (PD); due either to obstetricians' malpractice or to delayed demand of medical care of couples at risk; and (3) religious, social or bioethical reasons. Cardiac and liver disorders consist main causes for deaths while life expectancy of patients lengthened after 2005 (p < 0.01). The NRHG of patients affected by haemoglobinopathies in Greece provides useful data about the haemoglobinopathies in the Greek population and confirms the efficacy of the National Thalassaemia Prevention Program on impressively decreasing the incidence of TM and sickle cell syndromes.

  9. It is time to wash the linen.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Rajiv

    2007-01-01

    The unethical practice of commissions in private healthcare requires an open debate since it leads to expensive and hazardous healthcare. Doctors are accused of being sales agents and law breakers, private hospitals resemble luxury hotels, the consumer has become fair game whenever he/she has money, and our profession and society are rendered insensitive to human suffering. At the root of this malaise is the unplanned promotion of healthcare as a free market product. This very complex product, which is required in times of stress and vulnerability, has been institutionalized as a business for profiteering in the absence of adequate checks and balances. The product is inherently unsuited for the free market because the consumer cannot be king unless he is empowered to choose wisely. Not enough has been done to address this deficiency. Efforts are required to strengthen non-profit health facilities; to make the consumer wise and minimize her/his exposure to doctored health information. The present unethical practices of our profession are not the fault of doctors or the Medical Council of India, and punitive measures would be inappropriate. We should start with the creation of a government health website which educates the public about modern healthcare, and by regulating advertisement of health products. Since health personnel, officials and news media are directly benefited by the present malpractices, corrective will require consumer participation.

  10. Identification of a person with the help of bite mark analysis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anoop K.; Kumar, Sachil; Bhattacharya, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Background Forensic dentistry is an essential part of Forensic science, mainly involves the identification of an assailant by comparing a record of their dentition (set of teeth) with a record of a bite mark left on a victim. Other uses in law for dentists include the identification of human remains, medico-legal assessment of trauma to oral tissues, and testimony about dental malpractice. While the practice of human identification is well established, validated and proven to be accurate, the practice of bite mark analysis is less well accepted. The principle of identifying an injury as a bite mark is complex and, depending on severity and anatomical location, highly subjective. Following the identification of an injury as a bite mark, the comparison of the pattern produced to a suspect's dentition is even more contentious and an area of great debate within contemporary odontological practice. Like fingerprints and DNA, bite marks are unique to an individual – such as distance and angles between teeth, missing teeth, fillings and dental work. This type of impression evidence can be left in the skin of a victim and also can be in food, chewing gum and other miscellaneous items such as pens and pencils. The advent of DNA analysis and its recovery from bite marks has offered an objective method of bite mark analysis. PMID:25737891

  11. The Legal Past, Present and Future of Prenatal Genetic Testing: Professional Liability and Other Legal Challenges Affecting Patient Access to Services.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Deborah; Ilijic, Katie

    2014-12-15

    This chapter is an overview of the current status of the law in the United States regarding prenatal genetic testing with an emphasis on issues related to professional liability and other challenges affecting patient access to prenatal genetic testing. The chapter discusses the roles that federal regulations, promulgated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), play in the regulation of prenatal genetic tests. The chapter discusses tort litigation based on allegations of malpractice in the provision of prenatal genetic testing and how courts have analyzed issues related to causation, damages and mitigation of damages. The chapter provides reference information regarding how individual states address causes of action under the tort theories of wrongful birth and wrongful life. The chapter concludes with a discussion of future legal issues that may affect clinical prenatal genetic testing services arising from the continued expansion of prenatal genetic testing, legal restrictions on access to abortion and the potential development of embryonic treatments.

  12. Medical tourism: the trend toward outsourcing medical procedures to foreign countries.

    PubMed

    York, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The rising costs of medical treatment in the United States are fueling a movement to outsource medical treatment. Estimates of the number of Americans traveling overseas for treatment range from 50,000 to 500,000. Charges for common procedures such as heart bypass can be $11,000 in Thailand compared to $130,000 in the United States. Knee replacement in the United States can cost $40,000 compared to $13,000 in Singapore.A new industry, medical tourism, has been created to advise patients on the appropriate facility in the right country for their condition, handle all travel arrangements, teleconference with physicians, and send medical records. To respond to the growth in medical travel, the Joint Commission (formerly the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations) initiated the Joint Commission International (JCI) to accredit hospitals worldwide. Although outcome statistics from hospitals outside the United States are rare, first-person reports on quality are numerous. Making surgery possible for uninsured and underinsured individuals or self-insured state, municipal, and private entities is a major benefit of medical tourism. Mitigating against medical travel are the lack of legal remedies in place for malpractice and the possibility that travel itself can impose risk to patients. For example, lengthy air flights where the patient is in a fixed position for hours at a time can cause embolisms. If the trend toward medical tourism continues, continuing education, credentialing, and certification services may be required to help assure patient safety.

  13. Incidence and costs of defensive medicine among orthopedic surgeons in the United States: a national survey study.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manish K; Obremskey, William T; Natividad, Hazel; Mir, Hassan R; Jahangir, A Alex

    2012-02-01

    Defensive medicine is defined as medical practices that may exonerate physicians from liability without significant benefit to patients. No study has evaluated the United States national incidence of defensive medicine in the field of orthopedic surgery. In the study reported here, we investigated the practice of defensive medicine and the resultant financial implications of such behavior by orthopedic surgeons in the US. A Web-based survey was sent to 2000 orthopedic surgeons in the US. Of the 1214 respondents, 1168 (96%) reported having practiced defensive medicine by ordering imaging, laboratory tests, specialist referrals, or hospital admissions mainly to avoid possible malpractice liability. On average, 24% of all ordered tests were for defensive reasons. Mean national Medicare payment information was used to calculate the cost of defensive medicine per respondent: approximately $100,000 per year. With there being 20,400 practicing orthopedic surgeons in the US, we estimated that the national cost of defensive medicine for the specialty of orthopedic surgery is $2 billion annually. Orthopedic surgeons' defensive medicine is a significant factor in health care costs and is of marginal benefit to patients. Policies aimed at managing liability risk may be useful in containing such practices.

  14. Psychopharmacology of lycanthropy.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, W M; Wellwuff, H G; Garew, L; Kydd, O U

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop pharmacotherapies for the orphan disease lycanthropy through the pursuit of the etiologic hypothesis of a genetically determined hypersecretion of endogenous lycanthropogens. DESIGN: Quadruple-blind, Rubik's Cube matrix analysis. SETTING: Community practice and malpractice. PARTICIPANTS: Subjects selected from inbred Ruficolla populations in Mississippi, Georgia, North Carolina and Minnesota. All who entered the study finished it. INTERVENTIONS: Chemical screening of blood samples over a hypothesized secretory cycle of lycanthropogen peaking on the day of maximum lunar illumination. Administration of synthetic lycanthropogens for behavioural testing. Experimental lycosomatization through the illumination method of Kirschbaum. OUTCOME MEASURES: None were post hoc, but some are still in hock. MAIN RESULTS: Two putative lycanthropogens were isolated from the blood samples. Structural elucidation and synthesis permitted animal and clinical trials; in each of these, behavioural dysfunction was observed. Antilycanthropogen strategies included application of the principle of caged compounds and generation of a therapeutic immunoglobulin. The effects of a newly developed antihirsutic agent seemed promising. An interaction of the lycanthropogen-secretion system and ethanol was noted, which may explain behavioural aspects of alcoholism. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of lycomania in North America is underestimated. Soon-to-be-available pharmacotherapies should promote its early detection and treatment. Full control may depend upon advances in gene therapy. PMID:1555146

  15. The effect of information provision on reduction of errors in intravenous drug preparation and administration by nurses in ICU and surgical wards.

    PubMed

    Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Zareh-Toranposhti, Samaneh; Hassani, Abdollah; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Azizian, Homa; Panahi, Yunes

    2012-01-01

    Malpractice in preparation and administration of intravenous (IV) medications has been reported frequently. Inadequate knowledge of nurses has been reported as a cause of such errors. We aimed to evaluate the role of nurses' education via installation of wall posters and giving informative pamphlets in reducing the errors in preparation and administration of intravenous drugs in 2 wards (ICU and surgery) of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. A trained observer stationed in 2 wards in different work shifts. He recorded the nurses' practice regarding the preparation and administration of IV drugs and scored them before and after the education process. 400 observations were evaluated. Of them, 200 were related to before education and 200 were related to after education. On a 0-10 quality scale, mean ± SD scores of before and after education were determined. Mean ± SD scores of before and after education at the 2 wards were 4.51 (± 1.24) and 6.15 (± 1.23) respectively. There was a significant difference between the scores before and after intervention in ICU (P<0.001), surgery (P<0.001), and total two wards (P<0.001). Nurses' education by using wall poster and informative pamphlets regarding the correct preparation and administration of IV drugs can reduce the number of errors.

  16. Effective communication about the use of complementary and integrative medicine in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) is becoming an increasingly popular and visible component of oncology care. Many patients affected by cancer and their family members are looking for informed advice and desire communication with their physicians about CIM use. Patients affected by cancer come to discuss CIM use with intense emotions and are experiencing an existential crisis that cannot be ignored. Effective communication is crucial in establishing trust with these patients and their families. Communication is now recognized as a core clinical skill in medicine, including cancer care, and is important to the delivery of high-quality care. The quality of communication affects patient satisfaction, decision-making, patient distress and well-being, compliance, and even malpractice litigation. The communication process about CIM use requires a very sensitive approach that depends on effective communication skills, such as experience in listening, encouraging hope, and ability to convey empathy and compassion. This process can be divided into two parts: the "how" and the "what". The "how" relates to the change in clinician attitude, the process of gathering information, addressing patients' unmet needs and emotions, and dealing with uncertainty. The "what" relates to the process of information exchange while assisting patients in decisions about CIM use by using reliable information sources, leading to informed decision-making.

  17. Social media in disaster risk reduction and crisis management.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David E

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews the actual and potential use of social media in emergency, disaster and crisis situations. This is a field that has generated intense interest. It is characterised by a burgeoning but small and very recent literature. In the emergencies field, social media (blogs, messaging, sites such as Facebook, wikis and so on) are used in seven different ways: listening to public debate, monitoring situations, extending emergency response and management, crowd-sourcing and collaborative development, creating social cohesion, furthering causes (including charitable donation) and enhancing research. Appreciation of the positive side of social media is balanced by their potential for negative developments, such as disseminating rumours, undermining authority and promoting terrorist acts. This leads to an examination of the ethics of social media usage in crisis situations. Despite some clearly identifiable risks, for example regarding the violation of privacy, it appears that public consensus on ethics will tend to override unscrupulous attempts to subvert the media. Moreover, social media are a robust means of exposing corruption and malpractice. In synthesis, the widespread adoption and use of social media by members of the public throughout the world heralds a new age in which it is imperative that emergency managers adapt their working practices to the challenge and potential of this development. At the same time, they must heed the ethical warnings and ensure that social media are not abused or misused when crises and emergencies occur.

  18. Surgical streams in the flow of health care financing. The role of surgery in national expenditures: what costs are controllable?

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F D

    1985-01-01

    The dollar flow in United States medical care has been analyzed in terms of a six-level model; this model and the gross 1981 flow data are set forth. Of the estimated $310 billion expended in 1981, it is estimated that $85-$95 billion was the "surgical stream", i.e., that amount expended to take care of surgical patients at a variety of institutional types and including ambulatory care and surgeons' fees. Some of the determinants of surgical flow are reviewed as well as controllable costs and case mix pressures. Surgical complications, when severe, increase routine operative costs by a factor of 8 to 20. Maintenance of high quality in American surgery, despite new manpower pressures, is the single most important factor in cost containment. By voluntary or imposed controls on fees, malpractice premiums, case mix selection, and hospital utilization, a saving of $2.0-$4.0 billion can be seen as reachable and practical. This is five per cent of the surgical stream and is a part of the realistic "achievable" savings of total flow estimated to be about +15 billion or 5 per cent. PMID:3918514

  19. Visibility enhancement of common bile duct for laparoscopic cholecystectomy by vivid fiber-optic indication: a porcine experiment trial

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Shy, Shannon; Chang, Yu-Chung; Chui, Hsiang-Chen; Yu, Tsung-Chih; Chang, Chih-Han

    2012-01-01

    Bile duct injury (BDI) is the most serious iatrogenic complication during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and occurs easily in inexperienced surgeons since the position of common bile duct (CBD) and its related ductal junctions are hard to precisely identify in the hepatic anatomy during surgery. BDI can be devastating, leading to chronic morbidity, high mortality, and prolonged hospitalization. In addition, it is the most frequent injury resulting in litigation and the most likely injury associated with a successful medical malpractice claim against surgeons. This study introduces a novel method for conveniently and rapidly indicating the anatomical location of CBD during LC by the direct fiber-optic illumination of 532-nm diode-pumped solid state laser through a microstructured plastic optical fiber to avoid the wrong identification of CBD and the injury from mistakenly cutting the CBD that can lead to permanent and even life threatening consequences. Six porcine were used for preliminary intra-CBD illumination experiments via laparotomy and direct duodenal incision to insert the invented CBD illumination laser catheter with nonharmful but satisfactory visual optical density. PMID:23024892

  20. Part-time careers in academic internal medicine: a report from the association of specialty professors part-time careers task force on behalf of the alliance for academic internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Linzer, Mark; Warde, Carole; Alexander, R Wayne; Demarco, Deborah M; Haupt, Allison; Hicks, Leroi; Kutner, Jean; Mangione, Carol M; Mechaber, Hilit; Rentz, Meridith; Riley, Joanne; Schuster, Barbara; Solomon, Glen D; Volberding, Paul; Ibrahim, Tod

    2009-10-01

    To establish guidelines for more effectively incorporating part-time faculty into departments of internal medicine, a task force was convened in early 2007 by the Association of Specialty Professors. The task force used informal surveys, current literature, and consensus building among members of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine to produce a consensus statement and a series of recommendations. The task force agreed that part-time faculty could enrich a department of medicine, enhance workforce flexibility, and provide high-quality research, patient care, and education in a cost-effective manner. The task force provided a series of detailed steps for operationalizing part-time practice; to do so, key issues were addressed, such as fixed costs, malpractice insurance, space, cross-coverage, mentoring, career development, productivity targets, and flexible scheduling. Recommendations included (1) increasing respect for work-family balance, (2) allowing flexible time as well as part-time employment, (3) directly addressing negative perceptions about part-time faculty, (4) developing policies to allow flexibility in academic advancement, (5) considering part-time faculty as candidates for leadership positions, (6) encouraging granting agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and Veterans Administration, to consider part-time faculty as eligible for research career development awards, and (7) supporting future research in "best practices" for incorporating part-time faculty into academic departments of medicine.

  1. The medicolegal importance of enhancing timeliness of documentation when using an anesthesia information system and the response to automated feedback in an academic practice.

    PubMed

    Vigoda, Michael M; Lubarsky, David A

    2006-07-01

    Documentation should ideally occur in real time immediately after completion of a service. Although electronic records often do not print the time that documentation notes were entered on the medical record, automated anesthesia record keeping systems store an audit trail that time stamps events entered by all anesthesia providers. As more lawyers become aware of this fact and requisition audit trails, prospective charting of necessary documentation may undermine the integrity of an anesthesia care team accused of malpractice, with potentially significant medicolegal consequences. We changed existing documentation practices of a large academic practice via a three-step process. Educational sessions increased the percentage of cases with correct timing of emergence documentation from 25% to 60% over a 2-mo period. Automated email performance feedback further increased correct note timing to 70%. When combined with personal contact by a member of the billing office and email copy notification of the chair, the percentage increased to >99.5%. The behavioral change was seen in all individuals, as 95% of attendings had < or = 2 records/mo with untimely documentation at the end of the study period. Once the habits were ingrained, further input was rarely necessary over the next 9 mo. This suggests physician behavioral change related to work process flow, unlike that related to patient care, is easily sustained.

  2. The Fundamentals of Resident Dismissal.

    PubMed

    Schenarts, Paul J; Langenfeld, Sean

    2017-02-01

    Residents have the rights and responsibilities of both students and employees. Dismissal of a resident from a training program is traumatic and has lasting repercussions for the program director, the faculty, the dismissed resident, and the residency. A review of English language literature was performed using PUBMED and OVID databases, using the search terms, resident dismissal, resident termination, student dismissal, student and resident evaluation, legal aspects of education, and remediation. The references of each publication were also reviewed to identify additional appropriate citations. If the Just Cause threshold has been met, educators have the absolute discretion to evaluate academic and clinical performance. Legal opinion has stated that it is not necessary to wait until a patient is harmed to dismiss a resident. Evaluations should be standard and robust. Negative evaluations are not defamatory as the resident gave consent to be evaluated. Provided departmental and institutional polices have been followed, a resident can be dismissed without a formal hearing. Residencies are entitled to modify academic requirements and dismissal is not considered a breach of contract. Although there is anxiety regarding resident dismissal, the courts have uniformly supported faculty having this role. When indicated, failure to dismiss a resident also places the program director and the faculty at risk for educational malpractice.

  3. Perspective: Academic obstetrics-gynecology departments in the city of Philadelphia: are the wheels coming off?

    PubMed

    Croft, Damien J

    2011-03-01

    Maternity care in Philadelphia is in an unprecedented and precarious situation, as all the community hospitals that once provided maternity care services have either closed completely or stopped providing maternity services. Six academic medical centers (AMCs) in the city of Philadelphia now provide care to a population of 1.5 million requiring increasingly complex and expensive maternity care, at the same time as insurance premiums and the malpractice crisis in Pennsylvania peaked. The AMCs are able to continue providing maternity care to this population that includes a large proportion of poor, minority, and un- or underinsured patients thanks to government subsidization of resident education, the services provided by resident physicians, and the influx of government and industry research funds, but the financial outlook of academic obstetrics-gynecology departments in this city is dire. Obstetric academic medicine in Philadelphia has come to more closely resemble a "big wheel" tricycle than Flexner's "three-legged stool." Clinical medicine is the driver (the large front wheel and pedal) pulling along education and research, the two smaller wheels in the back. A maternity care alliance is needed in Philadelphia allowing area AMCs to pool and trade resources, reduce costs, improve quality and innovation, and share risks. Philadelphia may serve as an early warning for other cities and AMCs around the country and has the opportunity to serve as a model for how to overcome these serious challenges.

  4. Abortion.

    PubMed

    1993-05-01

    The Alan Guttmacher Institute's State Reproductive Health Monitor "Legislative Proposals and Actions" provides US legislative information on abortion. The listing contains information on pending bills: the state, the identifying legislative number, the sponsor, the committee, the date the bill was introduced, a description of the bill, and when available the bill's status. The bills cover: 1) clinic licensing, e.g., requiring outpatient health care facilities in which abortions are performed, to have malpractice liability insurance; 2) comprehensive statues, which require parental notification before minor may obtain abortions, mandate abortion counseling to all women 24 hours before the abortion can be performed and prohibit disciplining or discharging a state employee for refusing to provide abortion counseling; 3) fetal personhood and rights, e.g. providing that life is vested in each person at fertilization; 4) fetal research and remains; 5) gender of fetus, which regulate abortions relative to sex selection in pregnancies; 6) harassment regulation; 7) informed consent and waiting periods detailing the risks and alternatives to abortion, and the 24-hour waiting period; 8) insurance coverage, e.g., eliminating language banning the coverage of abortions for state workers, and prohibiting disclosure by a health insurance carrier to the employer of a claimant that the claimant had a surgical abortion; 9) legality of abortion, urging Congress to reject he Freedom of Choice Act; 10) parental consent and notification; 11) postviability requirements; 12) public funding; 13) reporting requirements; 14) reproductive rights, and 15) spousal and paternal consent and notification.

  5. Declaration of patent applications as financial interests: a survey of practice among authors of papers on molecular biology in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, S

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether authors of scientific publications in molecular biology declare patents and other potential financial interests. Design Survey of a 6‐month sample of papers related to molecular biology in Nature. Methods The esp@cenet worldwide patent search engine was used to search for patents applied for by the authors of scientific papers in Nature that were related to molecular biology and genetics, between January and June 2005. Results Of the 79 papers considered, four had declared that certain authors had competing financial interests. Seven papers in which no financial interests were declared had authors with patent applications that were based on the research in the paper or were closely related to it. Another paper had two authors with connections to biotechnology companies that were not disclosed. Conclusion Two thirds of the papers in which authors had patent applications or company affiliations that might be considered to be competing financial interests did not disclose them. Failure to disclose such information may have negative implications on the perception of science in society and on its quality if the possible bias is hidden. Journals should make greater efforts to ensure full disclosure, and scientific institutions should consider failure to disclose financial interests as an example of scientific malpractice. Establishing a register of interests for scientists is one way to increase transparency and openness. PMID:17074824

  6. The Legal Past, Present and Future of Prenatal Genetic Testing: Professional Liability and Other Legal Challenges Affecting Patient Access to Services

    PubMed Central

    Pergament, Deborah; Ilijic, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the current status of the law in the United States regarding prenatal genetic testing with an emphasis on issues related to professional liability and other challenges affecting patient access to prenatal genetic testing. The chapter discusses the roles that federal regulations, promulgated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), play in the regulation of prenatal genetic tests. The chapter discusses tort litigation based on allegations of malpractice in the provision of prenatal genetic testing and how courts have analyzed issues related to causation, damages and mitigation of damages. The chapter provides reference information regarding how individual states address causes of action under the tort theories of wrongful birth and wrongful life. The chapter concludes with a discussion of future legal issues that may affect clinical prenatal genetic testing services arising from the continued expansion of prenatal genetic testing, legal restrictions on access to abortion and the potential development of embryonic treatments. PMID:26237611

  7. Evolving medical service in the information age: a legal analysis of applying telemedicine programs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing-Hao

    2008-12-01

    In the face of the information age, Internet and telecommunication technologies have been widely applied in various settings. These innovational technologies have been used in the areas of e-commerce, long distance learning programs, entertainment, e-government, and so on. In recent years, the evolution of Internet technology is also pervading the health care industry. This dramatic trend may significantly alter traditional medical practice as well as the means of delivery of health care. The idea of telemedicine is to use modern information technology as a means or platform to deliver health care service in remote areas and to manage medical information in digitalized forms. The progress of developing telemedicine, however, is rather slow. The main reason for this slow progress is not technological but rather legal. Health care providers are reluctant to promote this innovation in medical service mainly due to uncertain legal consequences and ethical concerns. Although there are many legal challenges surrounding telemedicine, this note will examine major legal issues including licensure, malpractice liability, and privacy protection. Furthermore, I will discuss the potential of applying telemedicine programs in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Program (hereinafter referred to as NHI).

  8. [Selected legal aspects of the protection of the unborn child in the light of the draft amendment to the Polish Penal Code].

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, Moniak; Spaczyński, Robert Z

    2015-10-01

    Criminal Law Codification Commission, acting at the Ministry of Justice prepared proposals for amendments in the Polish Penal Code, related to offenses against life and health that were presented to the public in 2013. The draft provides for the protection of the child in the prenatal stage, introducing a new category of the entity to be protected, which is "unborn child" and "unborn child able to live outside the mother's body". These regulations provide for mothers criminal liability and responsibility of the medical staff (a doctor), as well as the child's father to the extent in which he is obliged to take steps aimed at rescuing the fetus. It is doctor's responsibility to show particular care for human health and life since a doctor has special medical knowledge and that is regulated by art. 30 of the act on professions of doctor and dentist. The proposed rule changes were not brought before the legislature in the current term of the Sejm (2011-2015), but due to the development of medicine, including obstetrical ultrasound, which enables visualization of a child that moves in the womb and is treated as a separate entity with distinct personal features the grounds are given for the opinion that the issue of the legal status of the unborn child, particularly in the context of causing death of a child in the last phase before birth as a result of medical malpractice or other external factors will be back in the public discussion.

  9. Unconscious fantasy as a special class of mental representation: a contribution to a model of mind.

    PubMed

    Erreich, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Philosophers of mind and cognitive psychologists have proposed that "mind" consists of myriad mental representations, namely, conscious and unconscious representations of belief/desire intentions. It is argued here that unconscious fantasies constitute a subset of the domain of mental representations, those concerned with conflicting wishes, affects, and defensive maneuvers. This proposal anchors the unconscious fantasy construct in a model of mind that accords with contemporary academic views in cognitive and developmental psychology and philosophy of mind, thus allowing psychoanalysts to enter into dialogue with those disciplines. Given this formulation, unconscious fantasy might well serve as a theoretical construct that applies to a large group of theories that share certain criteria regarding mentation. An analyst would then be at liberty to commingle insights from a menu of different theories without committing metatheoretical malpractice, resulting in a principled version of theoretical pluralism. Published case material from Kleinian, close process monitoring, and self psychological perspectives demonstrates how this redefined unconscious fantasy construct can encompass two major types of interventions that analysts make: content and process interpretations.

  10. Development of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy monitoring of fuel markers to prevent fraud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Timothy; Clarkson, John; White, Peter C.; Meakin, Nicholas; McDonald, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Governments often tax fuel products to generate revenues to support and stimulate their economies. They also subsidize the cost of essential fuel products. Fuel taxation and subsidization practices are both subject to fraud. Oil marketing companies also suffer from fuel fraud with loss of legitimate sales and additional quality and liability issues. The use of an advanced marking system to identify and control fraud has been shown to be effective in controlling illegal activity. DeCipher has developed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as its lead technology for measuring markers in fuel to identify and control malpractice. SERS has many advantages that make it highly suitable for this purpose. The SERS instruments are portable and can be used to monitor fuel at any point in the supply chain. SERS shows high specificity for the marker, with no false positives. Multiple markers can also be detected in a single SERS analysis allowing, for example, specific regional monitoring of fuel. The SERS analysis from fuel is also quick, clear and decisive, with a measurement time of less than 5 minutes. We will present results highlighting our development of the use of a highly stable silver colloid as a SERS substrate to measure the markers at ppb levels. Preliminary results from the use of a solid state SERS substrate to measure fuel markers will also be presented.

  11. Challenges in ethics, safety, best practices, and oversight regarding HIT vendors, their customers, and patients: a report of an AMIA special task force

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Eta S; Dente, Mark A; Kaplan, Bonnie; Koppel, Ross; Rucker, Donald; Sands, Daniel Z; Winkelstein, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The current commercial health information technology (HIT) arena encompasses a number of competing firms that provide electronic health applications to hospitals, clinical practices, and other healthcare-related entities. Such applications collect, store, and analyze patient information. Some vendors incorporate contract language whereby purchasers of HIT systems, such as hospitals and clinics, must indemnify vendors for malpractice or personal injury claims, even if those events are not caused or fostered by the purchasers. Some vendors require contract clauses that force HIT system purchasers to adopt vendor-defined policies that prevent the disclosure of errors, bugs, design flaws, and other HIT-software-related hazards. To address this issue, the AMIA Board of Directors appointed a Task Force to provide an analysis and insights. Task Force findings and recommendations include: patient safety should trump all other values; corporate concerns about liability and intellectual property ownership may be valid but should not over-ride all other considerations; transparency and a commitment to patient safety should govern vendor contracts; institutions are duty-bound to provide ethics education to purchasers and users, and should commit publicly to standards of corporate conduct; and vendors, system purchasers, and users should encourage and assist in each others' efforts to adopt best practices. Finally, the HIT community should re-examine whether and how regulation of electronic health applications could foster improved care, public health, and patient safety. PMID:21075789

  12. Feasibility of streamlining an interactive Bayesian-based diagnostic support tool designed for clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Hao; Botzolakis, Emmanuel; Mohan, Suyash; Bryan, R. N.; Cook, Tessa

    2016-03-01

    In radiology, diagnostic errors occur either through the failure of detection or incorrect interpretation. Errors are estimated to occur in 30-35% of all exams and contribute to 40-54% of medical malpractice litigations. In this work, we focus on reducing incorrect interpretation of known imaging features. Existing literature categorizes cognitive bias leading a radiologist to an incorrect diagnosis despite having correctly recognized the abnormal imaging features: anchoring bias, framing effect, availability bias, and premature closure. Computational methods make a unique contribution, as they do not exhibit the same cognitive biases as a human. Bayesian networks formalize the diagnostic process. They modify pre-test diagnostic probabilities using clinical and imaging features, arriving at a post-test probability for each possible diagnosis. To translate Bayesian networks to clinical practice, we implemented an entirely web-based open-source software tool. In this tool, the radiologist first selects a network of choice (e.g. basal ganglia). Then, large, clearly labeled buttons displaying salient imaging features are displayed on the screen serving both as a checklist and for input. As the radiologist inputs the value of an extracted imaging feature, the conditional probabilities of each possible diagnosis are updated. The software presents its level of diagnostic discrimination using a Pareto distribution chart, updated with each additional imaging feature. Active collaboration with the clinical radiologist is a feasible approach to software design and leads to design decisions closely coupling the complex mathematics of conditional probability in Bayesian networks with practice.

  13. Utilization of intrauterine contraceptive devices by patients of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

    PubMed

    Burnhill, M S

    1996-12-01

    Since 1988, IUD use by patients at Planned Parenthood of America clinics has remained constant at 0.7% of the approximately 1.8 million patients receiving contraception each year. In the past 7 years, only 18 perforations, 60 infections, and 27 difficult removals have been reported from these clinics. Moreover, there has been no evidence that the IUD poses health risks to acceptors or a major expense to the provider's malpractice insurance company. In large part, Planned Parenthood's excellent safety record associated with IUD use reflects implementation of a uniform set of IUD guidelines. These guidelines permit Planned Parenthood clinicians to provide prophylactic antibiotics in cases where an acceptor considered at low current risk of sexually transmitted diseases has a past history of pelvic inflammatory disease, gonorrhea, chlamydia infection, or mucopurulent cervicitis. Implementation of these guidelines is augmented by careful physical examination and explanation of the risks and benefits of IUD use. Planned Parenthood also distributes forms outlining the risk associated with pregnancy with an IUD in place. Finally, Planned Parenthood, unlike most other clinics, makes IUDs available to nulliparous women who clearly understand the risks.

  14. A joint FED watermarking system using spatial fusion for verifying the security issues of teleradiology.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, P; Krishna, P Venkata

    2014-05-01

    Teleradiology allows transmission of medical images for clinical data interpretation to provide improved e-health care access, delivery, and standards. The remote transmission raises various ethical and legal issues like image retention, fraud, privacy, malpractice liability, etc. A joint FED watermarking system means a joint fingerprint/encryption/dual watermarking system is proposed for addressing these issues. The system combines a region based substitution dual watermarking algorithm using spatial fusion, stream cipher algorithm using symmetric key, and fingerprint verification algorithm using invariants. This paper aims to give access to the outcomes of medical images with confidentiality, availability, integrity, and its origin. The watermarking, encryption, and fingerprint enrollment are conducted jointly in protection stage such that the extraction, decryption, and verification can be applied independently. The dual watermarking system, introducing two different embedding schemes, one used for patient data and other for fingerprint features, reduces the difficulty in maintenance of multiple documents like authentication data, personnel and diagnosis data, and medical images. The spatial fusion algorithm, which determines the region of embedding using threshold from the image to embed the encrypted patient data, follows the exact rules of fusion resulting in better quality than other fusion techniques. The four step stream cipher algorithm using symmetric key for encrypting the patient data with fingerprint verification system using algebraic invariants improves the robustness of the medical information. The experiment result of proposed scheme is evaluated for security and quality analysis in DICOM medical images resulted well in terms of attacks, quality index, and imperceptibility.

  15. Emergency room coverage: an evolving crisis.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steven P

    2004-08-01

    Historically, a newly graduated plastic surgeon in the United States could build a practice from his or her emergency room coverage. The historical cliche was for the surgeon to be affable, able, and available, and from that basis one's practice would grow. Emergency room exposure was an avenue for starting a practice, developing recognition, and, after that, building a referral pattern. Recently, the cross-shifting influence of management care, rising malpractice insurance costs, and risk ratio are changing this cliche to a crisis. An evaluation of a 2 1/2-year exposure to emergency room coverage has revealed a completely different profile. A total of 300 patient visits resulting in 69 surgical operations were evaluated for insurance and remuneration history. The findings indicated a significant remuneration dilemma for emergency room coverage. Interestingly, a remuneration problem exists in a market different from what one would expect. In this study, a sample from a suburban hospital, rather than an inner-city university hospital, is the greater problem.

  16. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems--part II: methodological guidance for a better practice.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie; Bernstad, Anna; Bakas, Ioannis; Niero, Monia; Gentil, Emmanuel; Christensen, Thomas H; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2014-03-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs.

  17. Administrative "health courts" for medical injury claims: the federal constitutional issues.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E Donald; Narayan, Sanjay A; Nasmith, Moneen S

    2008-08-01

    Our article analyzes whether the federal government may constitutionally supplant a traditional system of common-law trials before state judges and juries with new federal institutions designed by statute for compensating victims of medical injuries. Specifically, this article examines the federal constitutional issues raised by various proposals to replace traditional medical malpractice litigation in state courts with a federal system of administrative "health courts." In doing so, we address the following constitutional issues: 1. Is there federal authority to preempt state law (the commerce clause and spending clause issues)? 2. May jurisdiction be created in non-article 3 tribunals, and may claims be decided without trial by jury (the separation of powers and Seventh Amendment issues)? 3. Would pilot programs that require some claims to be pursued in a federal administrative forum while other claimants are left to pursue traditional state tort law remedies be constitutional (the equal protection issue)? The article concludes that a federal compensation system through administrative health courts should be constitutional provided the statute is appropriately drafted and that appropriate factual findings are made concerning the benefits to patients and the public as well as to doctors and their insurers.

  18. Development of online quality assurance automation tool "SmartQC" for radiotherapy clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaks, Daniel

    Radiotherapy has existed as a clinical medical procedure since as early as 1900, and has become an essential component of modern hospitals. It is predicted that, sometime between the years 2010 and 2020, the number of patients receiving radiation therapy during their initial treatment is expected to rise by 22% from 470,000 per year to 575,000 per year Due to the potential for harm in radiotherapy, quality assurance is an essential element at every stage of modern clinical workflow. The quality and use of time in QA procedures and checks is an important issue that has significant impact on both practice and research in the field of radiotherapy. This thesis documents the results of development and results of tools addressing that question. While the motivation for radiotherapy QA is principally about improving quality of patient care, and developing radiotherapy research tools, we also discuss the relevance of QA to radiotherapy malpractice lawsuits and related financial costs. We show that in the treatment plan check performed by the medical physicist---also known as the second check or physics check---a substantial fraction (~33%) of the average time is spent on non-physics related analysis. We also demonstrate the development and implementation of a web-based system, referred to as PlanTracker within this thesis, to track the status of the plan. This thesis concludes with further developments being considered as an outgrowth of this system.

  19. Professional dental and oral surgery liability in Italy: a comparative analysis of the insurance products offered to health workers

    PubMed Central

    Paternoster, Mariano; Nugnes, Mariarosaria; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Graziano, Vincenzo; Niola, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction In Italy there has been an increase in claims for damages for alleged medical malpractice. A study was therefore conducted that aimed at assessing the content of the coverage of insurance policy contracts offered to oral health professionals by the insurance market. Material and methods The sample analysed composed of 11 insurance policy contracts for professional dental liability offered from 2010 to 2015 by leading insurance companies operating in the Italian market. Results The insurance products analysed are structured on the “claims made” clause. No policy contract examined covers the damage due to the failure to acquire consent for dental treatment and, in most cases, damage due to unsatisfactory outcomes of treatment of an aesthetic nature and the failure to respect regulatory obligations on privacy. Discussion On entering into a professional liability insurance policy contract, the dentist should pay particular attention to the period covered by the guarantee, the risks both covered and excluded, as well as the extent of the limit of liability and any possible fixed/percentage excess. Conclusions When choosing a professional liability contract, a dentist should examine the risks in relation to the professional activity carried out before signing. PMID:28352805

  20. [Criminal law problems in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Schneider, V

    1998-10-01

    This paper first goes into cases of medical malpractice proceeding from the definition of the subject (forensic medicine). Among the material examined by the author lapses were to be assumed in 6.9% of the cases. A forensic autopsy can, however, also be of significance in countering false accusations. Forensic autopsies are regulated by Sect. 87 of the German Code of Criminal Procedure. Clinical autopsies are performed in Berlin in conformity with the Autopsy Act of 1996. Therapeutic removal of tissue is, moreover, also regulated by the Autopsy Act. Last year's Grafting Act, on the other hand, is Federal Law. Another act promulgated in 1997 has likewise provoked considerable controversial debate: viz. the Criminal Proceedings Amendment Act--keyword: DNA analysis/genetic fingerprint. And, finally, the paper also goes somewhat deeper into the introduction of breath-alcohol tests as evidence admitted in court. Further points discussed: reports prepared in connection with trials involving shootings along the Berlin wall, reports drawn up in connection with matters involving the abuse of anabolic substances by competitive athletes in the German Democratic Republic, reports on former GDR functionaries pertaining to their fitness to plead in court or to undergo detention. To conclude with, the question, whether evidence obtained by coerced vomiting can be used in court, is also discussed (drug couriers).

  1. The systems approach for applying artificial intelligence to space station automation (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, Vernon L.

    1985-12-01

    The progress of technology is marked by fragmentation -- dividing research and development into ever narrower fields of specialization. Ultimately, specialists know everything about nothing. And hope for integrating those slender slivers of specialty into a whole fades. Without an integrated, all-encompassing perspective, technology becomes applied in a lopsided and often inefficient manner. A decisionary model, developed and applied for NASA's Chief Engineer toward establishment of commercial space operations, can be adapted to the identification, evaluation, and selection of optimum application of artificial intelligence for space station automation -- restoring wholeness to a situation that is otherwise chaotic due to increasing subdivision of effort. Issues such as functional assignments for space station task, domain, and symptom modules can be resolved in a manner understood by all parties rather than just the person with assigned responsibility -- and ranked by overall significance to mission accomplishment. Ranking is based on the three basic parameters of cost, performance, and schedule. This approach has successfully integrated many diverse specialties in situations like worldwide terrorism control, coal mining safety, medical malpractice risk, grain elevator explosion prevention, offshore drilling hazards, and criminal justice resource allocation -- all of which would have otherwise been subject to "squeaky wheel" emphasis and support of decision-makers.

  2. Telehealth Regulatory and Legal Considerations: Frequently Asked Questions

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Jana; Brannon, Janice A.

    2011-01-01

    As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions: Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located), before engaging in telehealth?Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations) in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model within the professions of occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology and audiology. PMID:25945185

  3. Assessment, origin, and implementation of breath volatile cancer markers

    PubMed Central

    Haick, Hossam; Broza, Yoav Y.; Mochalski, Pawel; Ruzsanyi, Vera; Amann, Anton

    2016-01-01

    A new non-invasive and potentially inexpensive frontier in the diagnosis of cancer relies on the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath samples. Breath can be sampled and analyzed in real-time, leading to fascinating and cost-effective clinical diagnostic procedures. Nevertheless, breath analysis is a very young field of research and faces challenges, mainly because the biochemical mechanisms behind the cancer-related VOCs are largely unknown. In this review, we present a list of 115 validated cancer-related VOCs published in the literature during the past decade, and classify them with respect to their “fat-to-blood” and “blood-to-air” partition coefficients. These partition coefficients provide an estimation of the relative concentrations of VOCs in alveolar breath, in blood and in the fat compartments of the human body. Additionally, we try to clarify controversial issues concerning possible experimental malpractice in the field, and propose ways to translate the basic science results as well as the mechanistic understanding to tools (sensors) that could serve as point-of-care diagnostics of cancer. We end this review with a conclusion and a future perspective. PMID:24305596

  4. Prevention and treatment of demineralisation during fixed appliance therapy: a review of current methods and future applications.

    PubMed

    Chambers, C; Stewart, S; Su, B; Sandy, J; Ireland, A

    2013-11-01

    Orthodontic treatment, like all aspects of dentistry, exposes the clinician to the risk of malpractice and litigation. Demineralisation of tooth enamel is still one of the main complications of orthodontic treatment and it is essential patients are made aware of this risk during the consent process. There are a variety of fluoride delivery systems (mouthrinse, varnish, bonding system, and elastics), which can be used to prevent white spot lesion (WSL) formation. Glass-ionomer bonding cements (GIC) have also been shown to reduce WSL formation and have the benefit of not relying on patient compliance. However, these materials have not found widespread acceptance, possibly due to handling characteristics. A number of new technologies, principally fillers and coatings, have recently become available with potential antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties. Coatings can be applied to brackets and wires, which prevent bacterial adhesion. However, the longevity of these coatings is questionable. There are a number of methods available aimed at reducing the incidence of WSL, but they all have limitations. Capitalising on technological advances will enable the production of tailor made orthodontic brackets and adhesive systems, which provide long-term protection against WSL without relying on patient compliance.

  5. Why can Taiwan utilize criminal law to discipline physicians?

    PubMed

    Ger, Jiin

    2009-04-01

    Modern medicine was first introduced into Taiwan by missionary hospitals in 1865. However, Japanese governors following Japan's medical reform applied modern medicine as the standard of practice in the year 1896. They also imported 150 doctors from Japan to promote public hygiene and control infectious diseases, such as malaria, plague, cholera, dysentery, etc. The reasons that the Courts started to use criminal law to deal with medical malpractice during 1950-1960s may be attributed to the following: costly and ineffective civil actions, chaotic medical licensing, a period of upheaval during the 1947 massacre (228 incident), Chinese Civil War (1947-1949), political unrest, "White Terror" and "Espionage Act" during the period of martial law (1949-1987), social injustice and economic depression. The general environment for medical practice in Taiwan has changed greatly in the past 60years. It is time for us to look around the world to set up standards of negligence for both clinical and criminal cases as soon as possible. In the mean time, the Department of Health should consider adopting the Good Medical Practice guidelines from the United Kingdom to strengthen the administrative power to regulate physicians' behaviors.

  6. Human Reliability and the Cost of Doing Business

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Most businesses recognize that people will make mistakes and assume errors are just part of the cost of doing business, but does it need to be? Companies with high risk, or major consequences, should consider the effect of human error. In a variety of industries, Human Errors have caused costly failures and workplace injuries. These have included: airline mishaps, medical malpractice, administration of medication and major oil spills have all been blamed on human error. A technique to mitigate or even eliminate some of these costly human errors is the use of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). Various methodologies are available to perform Human Reliability Assessments that range from identifying the most likely areas for concern to detailed assessments with human error failure probabilities calculated. Which methodology to use would be based on a variety of factors that would include: 1) how people react and act in different industries, and differing expectations based on industries standards, 2) factors that influence how the human errors could occur such as tasks, tools, environment, workplace, support, training and procedure, 3) type and availability of data and 4) how the industry views risk & reliability influences ( types of emergencies, contingencies and routine tasks versus cost based concerns). The Human Reliability Assessments should be the first step to reduce, mitigate or eliminate the costly mistakes or catastrophic failures. Using Human Reliability techniques to identify and classify human error risks allows a company more opportunities to mitigate or eliminate these risks and prevent costly failures.

  7. Crossing boundaries: a comprehensive survey of medical licensing laws and guidelines regulating the interstate practice of pathology.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, Matthew C; Leung, Stanley T; Park, Jason Y

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, recent judicial interpretation of interstate licensure laws has found pathologists guilty of malpractice and, more importantly, the criminal practice of medicine without a license. These judgments against pathologists highlight the need for a timely and comprehensive survey of licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. For all 50 states, each state medical practice act and state medical board website was reviewed. In addition, each medical board was directly contacted by electronic mail, telephone, or US registered mail for information regarding specific legislation or guidelines related to the interstate practice of pathology. On the basis of this information, states were grouped according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. This comprehensive survey has determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of the geographic location of the patient at the time of surgery or phlebotomy. The majority of states (n=32) and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with the specific state license. Several states (n=5) prohibit physicians from consultation without a license for the specific state. Overall, these results reveal the heterogeneity of licensure requirements between states. Pathologists who either practice in multiple states, send cases to out-of-state consultants, or serve as consultants themselves should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they receive or send cases.

  8. Prevention and management of accidental foreign body ingestion and aspiration in orthodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Umesan, Uday Kumar; Chua, Kui Lay; Balakrishnan, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Among the myriad emergencies that could arise in the dental clinical setting there are a few that occur occasionally despite being entirely preventable. Ingestion or aspiration of dental materials, appliances, or instruments comprises this category. Regardless of incidence, foreign body ingestion or aspiration episodes are recognized as potential complications in the specialty of orthodontics. Despite their infrequent occurrence, the morbidity from a single incident and the amount of specialty medical care that may be needed to manage such incidents is too high to ignore. There is also the associated risk of malpractice litigation given the fact that these incidents are preventable. At present, no clear guidelines exist regarding prevention of this emergency in practice. This article attempts to review relevant literature and aims to formulate certain recommendations based on best available evidence to minimize the incidence of such events, while also suggesting guidelines toward making their management more effective. A flow chart outlining management options and strategies to aid the clinician in the event of such an emergency is also presented.

  9. Hereditary breast and gynecological tumors: Italian legal issues.

    PubMed

    DI Vella, Giancarlo

    2016-10-01

    The availability of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that lower the risk for developing hereditary family-related tumors is weighed against Italian ethical and legal provisions. The healthcare environment in which a professional works should require that he possess specific technical, relational and medical competencies based upon legal orientation in addition to scientific evidence. Particular emphasis is attributed to the doctor-patient relationship, with explicit reference to the following: 1) all of the information at hand that is required to achieve a "therapeutic alliance" that combines the best interests of the patient with treatment options; 2) the completeness and intelligibility of health records, as they are likely to explain the background logic and the following of scientific clinical procedure; 3) the observance of guidelines and protocols, and their relevance to the legal responsibility of the individual and health care companies; 4) the need of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of these patients and the obligation of the team to have malpractice insurance. Advances on "provisions concerning liability of health personnel", which is currently awaiting approval, allows the professional to protect the patient's health without the fear of being unnecessarily censured, and unjustified from a penal or civil point of view which can deteriorate the relationship of trust and cooperation established.

  10. Accidental aspiration/ingestion of foreign bodies in dentistry: A clinical and legal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Yadav, Hemant Kumar; Chandra, Anil; Yadav, Simith; Verma, Promila; Shakya, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The potential of foreign body aspiration or ingestion is a worldwide health problem in dentistry. The general dental practitioners should be extremely attentive in handling of minor instruments during any intervention related to the oral cavity, especially in the supine or semi-recumbent position of the patient. Aspiration cases are usually more critical and less common than ingestion. We report a case of iatrogenic aspiration of an endodontic broach, which gets disclosed during the recording of past dental history of the patient. The patient was asymptomatic during that time. A quick posterior-anterior chest radiograph was taken which revealed the presence of broach in the lower lobe of the left lung. The patient was immediately referred to the pulmonary medicine department where the fiberoptic bronchoscope retrieval was planned, and the same was carried out successfully under local anesthesia. Although such accidents have rare occurrence, the associated risks and morbidity are too high to be overlooked, especially from the viewpoint of special care, resources, and the associated financial cost required for their management. Moreover, practitioners are also liable for malpractice litigation given the fact that such cases are avoidable. This article also discusses relevant review literature, risk factors, symptoms, and management of such iatrogenic accidents along with drawing attention to the significance of preventive measures and their role in avoiding meritorious legal and ethical issues. PMID:27390487

  11. Prevention and management of accidental foreign body ingestion and aspiration in orthodontic practice

    PubMed Central

    Umesan, Uday Kumar; Chua, Kui Lay; Balakrishnan, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Among the myriad emergencies that could arise in the dental clinical setting there are a few that occur occasionally despite being entirely preventable. Ingestion or aspiration of dental materials, appliances, or instruments comprises this category. Regardless of incidence, foreign body ingestion or aspiration episodes are recognized as potential complications in the specialty of orthodontics. Despite their infrequent occurrence, the morbidity from a single incident and the amount of specialty medical care that may be needed to manage such incidents is too high to ignore. There is also the associated risk of malpractice litigation given the fact that these incidents are preventable. At present, no clear guidelines exist regarding prevention of this emergency in practice. This article attempts to review relevant literature and aims to formulate certain recommendations based on best available evidence to minimize the incidence of such events, while also suggesting guidelines toward making their management more effective. A flow chart outlining management options and strategies to aid the clinician in the event of such an emergency is also presented. PMID:22701326

  12. The unintended consequences of portfolios in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Alisa; Andolsek, Kathryn; Padmore, Jamie S

    2009-11-01

    Portfolios have emerged in graduate medical education despite lack of consensus on their definition, purpose, or usefulness. Portfolios can be used as a tool for residents to record their accomplishments, reflect on their experiences, and gain formative feedback. This exercise may help prepare physicians for lifelong learning as well as enhance patient care. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has endorsed and may soon require the use of portfolios as an assessment tool to evaluate resident competence. However, using portfolios for summative evaluation purposes such as making high-stakes decisions on resident promotion or matriculation may deter resident candidness. In addition, the use of portfolios in clinical settings raises issues unique to the health care setting such as patient privacy, disclosure of clinical information, and professional liability exposure of physicians. It is not clear that peer-review statutes that sometimes protect educational materials used in teaching and evaluation of residents would also bar disclosure and/or evidentiary use of portfolio contents. Is the teaching institution, resident, or graduate vulnerable to requests and subpoenas for the portfolio contents? If so, then a resident's documentation of insecurities, suboptimal performance, or bad outcomes would be ripe for discovery in a medical malpractice lawsuit. If embraced too quickly and without sufficient reflection on the nuances of implementation, this well-intentioned initiative may present unintended legal consequences.

  13. Assisted reproduction on treacherous terrain: the legal hazards of cross-border reproductive travel.

    PubMed

    Storrow, Richard F

    2011-11-01

    The growing phenomenon of cross-border reproductive travel has four significant legal dimensions. First, laws that ban or inhibit access to assisted reproductive procedures in one country lead patients and physicians to travel to other countries to acquire, to contribute to or to provide assisted reproductive services. Such laws may include provisions that criminalize those who assist or advise patients to undertake such travel. Second, the law may expressly criminalize crossing borders to obtain, to be a donor for or to perform certain procedures. Third, the law may interfere with the ultimate goal of reproductive travellers by refusing to recognize them as the parents of the child they have crossed borders to conceive. Finally, facilitating cross-border reproductive travel may expose physicians, attorneys and brokers to malpractice or other civil liability. This article explores these legal dimensions of cross-border reproductive care and uses the legal doctrines of proportionality, extraterritoriality and comity to assess the legality and normative validity of governmental efforts to curb or limit assisted reproductive practices.

  14. [The circulation of anesthetic agents at Edouard-Herriot Hospital].

    PubMed

    Chamouard, V; Polosse, M; Nageotte, A; Claveranne, J P; Mercatello, A

    1999-03-01

    In order to improve quality, practice evaluation is a major tool for hospital management. For many years anaesthesia has been monitored by some form of quality assurance programme. However, despite the improvement in anaesthetic techniques, major problems persist, particularly with the use of anaesthetic agents. Drug administration is the first cause for malpractice and death in anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to analyse drug circuits in anaesthesia, with special reference to French regulations. In 13 theatres, doctors and nurse anaesthetists were interviewed by a pharmacist with a focus on following items: prescription, preparation, administration, management, storage, conservation, information, and regulations. Results demonstrated that practice organisation and information transfers were mainly by oral route. The low proportion of written information, especially for preoperative prescription, did not comply with regulations. Nurse anaesthetists were the main actors in drug handling. Common practice patterns throughout the hospital were non existing. In each theatre, a storage of usual drugs for four weeks was found, whereas in pharmacies drugs were stocked for a 2-week period only. Standardised and written procedures, as well as pharmaceutical practice guidelines, are essential for decreasing the risk and improving quality. Such a procedure requires the full participation of anaesthetists and nurses.

  15. [Surgeons' hope: expanding the professional role of co-medical staff and introducing the nurse practitioner/physician assistant and team approach to the healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Maehara, Tadaaki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2010-07-01

    The healthcare system surrounding surgeons is collapsing due to Japan's policy of limiting health expenditure, market fundamentalism, shortage of healthcare providers, unfavorable working environment for surgeons, increasing risk of malpractice suits, and decreasing number of those who desire to pursue the surgery specialty. In the USA, nonphysician and mid-level clinicians such as nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have been working since the 1960s, and the team approach to medicine which benefits patients is functioning well. One strategy to avoid the collapse of the Japanese surgical healthcare system is introducing the NP/PA system. The division of labor in medicine can provide high-quality, safe healthcare and increase the confidence of the public by contributing to: reduced postoperative complications; increased patient satisfaction; decreased length of postoperative hospital stay: and economic benefits. We have requested that the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare establish a Japanese NP/PA system to care for patients more efficiently perioperatively. The ministry has decided to launch a trial profession called "tokutei (specifically qualified) nurse" in February 2010. These nurses will be trained and educated at the Master's degree level and allowed to practice several predetermined skill sets under physician supervision. We hope that all healthcare providers will assist in transforming the tokutei nurse system into a Japanese NP/PA system.

  16. The impact of health care economics on surgical education.

    PubMed

    Margolin, David A

    2012-09-01

    Just like the world economy in 2012, health care is in a state of flux. The current economic environment will impact not only current colorectal surgery residents, but also future generations of surgical trainees. To understand the economic impact of the current health care environment on colorectal surgery residencies, we need to know the basics of graduate medical education (GME) funding for all residents. Since the 1960s with the initiation of Medicare, the federal government through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been the largest source of GME funding. There are two types of costs associated with GME. Direct GME (DME) funding covers costs directly attributed to the training of residents. These costs include residents' stipends, salaries, and benefits; cost of supervising faculty; direct program administration costs; overhead; and malpractice coverage. Indirect GME (IME) costs are payments to hospitals as an additional or add-on payment for the increased cost of care that is generally found in teaching hospitals. In 2010, President Barak Obama signed into law H.R. 3200, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). In 2011, the Supreme Court held that the majority of the PPACA is constitutional. Although the true impact of this bill is unknown, it will change the formula for Medicare GME reimbursement as well as shift unused residency positions to primary care.

  17. Prevention and acute management of biliary injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Expert consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Abbasoğlu, Osman; Tekant, Yaman; Alper, Aydın; Aydın, Ünal; Balık, Ahmet; Bostancı, Birol; Coker, Ahmet; Doğanay, Mutlu; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Hamaloğlu, Erhan; Kapan, Metin; Karademir, Sedat; Karayalçın, Kaan; Kılıçturgay, Sadık; Şare, Mustafa; Tümer, Ali Rıza; Yağcı, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone disease is very common and laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures all over the world. Parallel to the increase in the number of laparoscopic cholecystectomies, bile duct injuries also increased. The reported incidence of bile duct injuries ranges from 0.3% to 1.4%. Many of the bile duct injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy are not due to inexperience, but are the result of basic technical failures and misinterpretations. A working group of expert hepatopancreatobiliary surgeons, an endoscopist, and a specialist of forensic medicine study searched and analyzed the publications on safe cholecystectomy and biliary injuries complicating laparoscopic cholecystectomy under the organization of Turkish Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery Association. After a series of e-mail communications and two conferences, the expert panel developed consensus statements for safe cholecystectomy, management of biliary injuries and medicolegal issues. The panel concluded that iatrogenic biliary injury is an overwhelming complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and an important issue in malpractice claims. Misidentification of the biliary system is the major cause of biliary injuries. To avoid this, the “critical view of safety” technique should be employed in all the cases. If biliary injury is identified intraoperatively, reconstruction should only be performed by experienced hepatobiliary surgeons. In the postoperative period, any deviation from the expected clinical course of recovery should alert the surgeon about the possibility of biliary injury. PMID:28149133

  18. A second survey of graduates of a traditionally black college of medicine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Lloyd, S M; Miller, R L

    1989-02-01

    To update and expand upon its 1975-76 survey of 729 graduates of seven classes, Howard University College of Medicine (HUCM) conducted a longer survey in 1985-86 of 1,985 graduates spanning 49 classes. Replies of the 728 respondents to the second survey confirm that HUCM's predominantly black alumni were continuing to provide patient care to a substantial number of poor blacks in urban areas. Fifty-six percent of all HUCM alumni were in primary care, compared with 46% of all alumni of U.S. medical schools who were in primary care. New findings included concerns about malpractice suits and physician impairment. Regarding physician supply in their own communities, 53% of respondents believed that there were too many physicians overall, but 63% believed there were too few black physicians. For the 1940-1969 graduates, loans financed 10% of their medical education, and indebtedness influenced the types of practice chosen by 4%; comparable figures for the 1970-1980 graduates were 25% and 11%.

  19. Medicare physician payment systems: impact of 2011 schedule on interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Caraway, David L; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-01-01

    is based on 3 components: physician work, practice expense (PE), and malpractice expense that are used to determine a value ranking for each service to which it is applied. On average, the work component represents 53.5% of a service's relative value, the fee component represents 43.6%, and the malpractice component represents 3.9%. The final schedule for physician payment was issued on November 24, 2010. This was based on a total cut of 30.8% with 24.9% of the cut attributed to SGR. However, as usual, with patchwork efficiency, Congress passed a one-year extension of the 0% update, effective through December 2011. Consequently, CMS issued an emergency update of the 2011 Medicare fee schedule, with multiple revisions, resulting in a reduction of the conversion factor of $36.8729 from December 2010 to $33.9764 for 2011.

  20. The use of midwives as first assistants in cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Marks; Thacher; Camargo

    1998-07-01

    Introduction: In 1997, medical insurance gives limited financial reimbursement to physicians who first assist cesarean sections. Therefore, a formal program was developed at our community teaching hospital using midwives in place of physicians as first assistant in cesarean section. Midwives on the midwifery service were taught the principles and procedures of obstetrical anesthesia, anatomy, and physiology of the gravid abdomen.A team approach using obstetrician/gynecologist, anesthesiologist, midwives, and operating nurses performed the tracking in a 1-day course. A 28-minute video was developed to depict the role of the midwife as first assistant. Additionally, the principles of operation room set-up and instrumentation were taught.Result: All 24 midwives on the midwifery service were involved in the teaching of first assisting an attending obstetrician. After taking the course, nurse-midwives received formal certification from the department of obstetrics and gynecology and were approved by risk management. They also received clinical privileges outlining these guidelines. Their malpractice rates have not increased. The time to complete a cesarean section has not increased for the physician, and an emergency cesarean section is no longer delayed by waiting for an assistant to arrive. Patient satisfaction has increased because of decreased waiting time for a cesarean section and increased familiarity with the entire operating team.Discussion: Midwives can be trained to first assist the obstetrician/gynecologist in a cesarean section. Since the duration of a cesarean section is not prolonged, the patient will not experience increased blood loss or infection secondary to a prolonged procedure. The patient is more relaxed since they know that their provider during labor is also one of their surgeons for the cesarean section.