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Sample records for mamey pouteria sapota

  1. In situ inactivation of polyphenol oxidase in mamey fruit (Pouteria sapota) by microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Palma-Orozco, Gisela; Sampedro, José G; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Nájera, Hugo

    2012-04-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is the enzyme responsible for quality loss in most fruits and vegetables. Quality loss is mainly because of oxidative chemical reactions which generate the darkening of tissues. Mamey fruit (Pouteria sapota) after harvesting suffers a rapid quality decay trough activation of PPO. However, PPO may be inactivated in situ by chemical or thermal treatment. In food processing, microwave treatment (MT) has been used recently as an alternative for PPO inactivation. In this study, it was observed that mamey fruit pulp subjected to a gently MT resulted in a higher PPO activity as the generated heat induced in situ the increase in PPO activity. In contrast, PPO was completely inactivated after long MT by using a high microwave power. Temperature in mamey pulp after MT reached a maximum of 79 °C; although PPO was active up to 60 °C. PPO was completely inactivated when conventional blanching treatment was performed but required a higher temperature (92 °C/300 s). The optimum energy intensity (E(opt)) for PPO inactivation by MT was 0.51 kJ/g or 937 W/165 s. Under this condition, the remaining PPO activity was inversely proportional to energy intensity (E). Interestingly, MT resulted in a negligible damage in microstructure of mamey pulp, although blanching treatment resulted in large damaging effects on tissue organization and shape. Therefore, MT is proposed as an effective way to completely inactivate PPO without causing any significant damage to fruit tissues and shape; as preservation of color, flavor, and taste would be favored.

  2. Purification and partial biochemical characterization of polyphenol oxidase from mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    PubMed

    Palma-Orozco, Gisela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Sampedro, José G; Nájera, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    While a long shelf life for fruit products is highly desired, enzymatic browning is the main cause of quality loss in fruits and is therefore a main problem for the food industry. In this study polyphenol oxidase (PPO), the main enzyme responsible for browning was isolated from mamey fruit (Pouteria sapota) and characterized biochemically. Two isoenzymes (PPO 1 and PPO 2) were obtained upon ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic and ion exchange chromatography; PPO 1 was purified up to 6.6-fold with 0.28% yield, while PPO 2 could not be characterized as enzyme activity was completely lost after 24 h of storage. PPO 1 molecular weight was estimated to be 16.1 and 18 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, respectively, indicating that the native state of the PPO 1 is a monomer. The optimum pH for PPO 1 activity was 7. The PPO 1 was determined to be maximum thermally stable up to 35°C. Kinetic constants for PPO 1 were K(m)=44 mM and K(m)=1.3 mM using catechol and pyrogallol as substrate, respectively. The best substrates for PPO 1 were pyrogallol, 4-methylcatechol and catechol, while ascorbic acid and sodium metabisulfite were the most effective inhibitors.

  3. Characterization of Mamey Sapote (Pouteria sapota [Jacq.] H.E. Moore & Stearn.) germplasm at the USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mamey sapote (Pouteria sapota [Jacq.] H.E. Moore & Stearn) is a tropical tree fruit in the Sapotaceae, which is native to Central America and southern Mexico. The tree is used for timber and shade; however it is the sweet, nutrient and vitamin rich fruit that is eaten out of hand, in milkshakes...

  4. Isolation of β-Cryptoxanthin-epoxides, Precursors of Cryptocapsin and 3'-Deoxycapsanthin, from Red Mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    PubMed

    Turcsi, Erika; Murillo, Enrique; Kurtán, Tibor; Szappanos, Ádám; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Gulyás-Fekete, Gergely; Agócs, Attila; Avar, Péter; Deli, József

    2015-07-01

    From an extract of red mamey (Pouteria sapota) β-cryptoxanthin-5,6-epoxide, β-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxide, 3'-deoxycapsanthin, and cryptocapsin were isolated and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). Epoxidation of β-cryptoxanthin delivered the β-(5'R,6'S)- and (5'S,6'R)-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxides, which were identified by HPLC-ECD analysis. These carotenoids among others are quite common in the fruits of Central America, and as they are natural provitamins A, they should play an important role in the diet of the mostly vitamin A deficient population of this region. PMID:26057604

  5. Isolation of β-Cryptoxanthin-epoxides, Precursors of Cryptocapsin and 3'-Deoxycapsanthin, from Red Mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    PubMed

    Turcsi, Erika; Murillo, Enrique; Kurtán, Tibor; Szappanos, Ádám; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Gulyás-Fekete, Gergely; Agócs, Attila; Avar, Péter; Deli, József

    2015-07-01

    From an extract of red mamey (Pouteria sapota) β-cryptoxanthin-5,6-epoxide, β-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxide, 3'-deoxycapsanthin, and cryptocapsin were isolated and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). Epoxidation of β-cryptoxanthin delivered the β-(5'R,6'S)- and (5'S,6'R)-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxides, which were identified by HPLC-ECD analysis. These carotenoids among others are quite common in the fruits of Central America, and as they are natural provitamins A, they should play an important role in the diet of the mostly vitamin A deficient population of this region.

  6. Deposition Form and Bioaccessibility of Keto-carotenoids from Mamey Sapote (Pouteria sapota), Red Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum), and Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) Filet.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Ordóñez, Tania; Esquivel, Patricia; Jiménez, Víctor M; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2016-03-01

    The ultrastructure and carotenoid-bearing structures of mamey sapote (Pouteria sapota) chromoplasts were elucidated using light and transmission electron microscopy and compared to carotenoid deposition forms in red bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Globular-tubular chromoplasts of sapote contained numerous lipid globules and tubules embodying unique provitamin A keto-carotenoids in a lipid-dissolved and presumably liquid-crystalline form, respectively. Bioaccessibility of sapotexanthin and cryptocapsin was compared to that of structurally related keto-carotenoids from red bell pepper and salmon. Capsanthin from bell pepper was the most bioaccessible pigment, followed by sapotexanthin and cryptocapsin esters from mamey sapote. In contrast, astaxanthin from salmon was the least bioaccessible keto-carotenoid. Thermal treatment and fat addition consistently enhanced bioaccessibility, except for astaxanthin from naturally lipid-rich salmon, which remained unaffected. Although the provitamin A keto-carotenoids from sapote were highly bioaccessible, their qualitative and quantitative in vivo bioavailability and their conversion to vitamin A remains to be confirmed.

  7. Deposition Form and Bioaccessibility of Keto-carotenoids from Mamey Sapote (Pouteria sapota), Red Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum), and Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) Filet.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Ordóñez, Tania; Esquivel, Patricia; Jiménez, Víctor M; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2016-03-01

    The ultrastructure and carotenoid-bearing structures of mamey sapote (Pouteria sapota) chromoplasts were elucidated using light and transmission electron microscopy and compared to carotenoid deposition forms in red bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Globular-tubular chromoplasts of sapote contained numerous lipid globules and tubules embodying unique provitamin A keto-carotenoids in a lipid-dissolved and presumably liquid-crystalline form, respectively. Bioaccessibility of sapotexanthin and cryptocapsin was compared to that of structurally related keto-carotenoids from red bell pepper and salmon. Capsanthin from bell pepper was the most bioaccessible pigment, followed by sapotexanthin and cryptocapsin esters from mamey sapote. In contrast, astaxanthin from salmon was the least bioaccessible keto-carotenoid. Thermal treatment and fat addition consistently enhanced bioaccessibility, except for astaxanthin from naturally lipid-rich salmon, which remained unaffected. Although the provitamin A keto-carotenoids from sapote were highly bioaccessible, their qualitative and quantitative in vivo bioavailability and their conversion to vitamin A remains to be confirmed. PMID:26888016

  8. Molecular markers developed for Pouteria sapota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tropical plant Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) is known for its edible fruits that contain unique carotenoids, and for the chemicals extracted from its bark, leaves and roots having fungitoxic, insecticidal, anti-inflamatory, anti-oxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. We reported high throughpu...

  9. Development of a Large Set of Microsatellite Markers in Zapote Mamey (Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore & Stearn) and Their Potential Use in the Study of the Species.

    PubMed

    Arias, Renée S; Martínez-Castillo, Jaime; Sobolev, Victor S; Blancarte-Jasso, Nasib H; Simpson, Sheron A; Ballard, Linda L; Duke, Mary V; Liu, Xiaofen F; Irish, Brian M; Scheffler, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Pouteria sapota is known for its edible fruits that contain unique carotenoids, as well as for its fungitoxic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. However, its genetics is mostly unknown, including aspects about its genetic diversity and domestication process. We did high-throughput sequencing of microsatellite-enriched libraries of P. sapota, generated 5223 contig DNA sequences, 1.8 Mbp, developed 368 microsatellites markers and tested them on 29 individuals from 10 populations (seven wild, three cultivated) from Mexico, its putative domestication center. Gene ontology BLAST analysis of the DNA sequences containing microsatellites showed potential association to physiological functions. Genetic diversity was slightly higher in cultivated than in the wild gene pool (HE = 0.41 and HE = 0.35, respectively), although modified Garza-Williamson Index and Bottleneck software showed evidence for a reduction in genetic diversity for the cultivated one. Neighbor Joining, 3D Principal Coordinates Analysis and assignment tests grouped most individuals according to their geographic origin but no clear separation was observed between wild or cultivated gene pools due to, perhaps, the existence of several admixed populations. The developed microsatellites have a great potential in genetic population and domestication studies of P. sapota but additional sampling will be necessary to better understand how the domestication process has impacted the genetic diversity of this fruit crop. PMID:26111173

  10. Genetic diversity and structure in Mamey [P. sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore & Stearn] by using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tropical plant Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) is known for its edible fruits that contain unique carotenoids, as well as for the fungitoxic, anti-inflamatory and anti-oxidant activity of extracts from its bark, leaves and roots, though its genetics is unknown. We did high-throughput sequencing of micr...

  11. Acute Toxicity and Dermal and Eye Irritation of the Aqueous and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of the Seeds of "Zapote" Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist.

    PubMed

    Dutok, Carlos M S; Berenguer-Rivas, Clara Azalea; Rodríguez-Leblanch, Elizabeth; Pérez-Jackson, Liliana; Chil-Nuñez, Idelsy; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Reyes-Tur, Bernardo; Queiroz, Margareth M C

    2015-01-01

    The common use of Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist, "Mamey or Zapote," in food and ethnobotanic medicine shows its low or absent toxicity as fruit extracts prepared from seeds. However, it is essential to conduct security trials to scientifically support their use in drug therapy. This study evaluated the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extract (25%) Acute Oral Toxicity, obtained from the seeds of P. mammosa, in Sprague Dawley rats and dermal and eye irritability in New Zealand rabbits. The 404 and 405 acute dermal and eye irritation/corrosion guidelines were used, as well as the 423 Acute Oral Toxicity guideline, Acute Toxic Class Method of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The aqueous extract was located in the following category: not classified as toxic (CTA 5), while hydroalcoholic extract at 25% was classified as dangerous (CTA 4). Both extracts can be used without side reaction that irritates the skin which permitted classification as potentially not irritant. P. mammosa in the two extracts caused mild and reversible eye irritation, and it was classified as slightly irritating. PMID:26273696

  12. Acute Toxicity and Dermal and Eye Irritation of the Aqueous and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of the Seeds of “Zapote” Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist

    PubMed Central

    Dutok, Carlos M. S.; Berenguer-Rivas, Clara Azalea; Rodríguez-Leblanch, Elizabeth; Pérez-Jackson, Liliana; Chil-Nuñez, Idelsy; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Reyes-Tur, Bernardo; Queiroz, Margareth M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The common use of Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist, “Mamey or Zapote,” in food and ethnobotanic medicine shows its low or absent toxicity as fruit extracts prepared from seeds. However, it is essential to conduct security trials to scientifically support their use in drug therapy. This study evaluated the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extract (25%) Acute Oral Toxicity, obtained from the seeds of P. mammosa, in Sprague Dawley rats and dermal and eye irritability in New Zealand rabbits. The 404 and 405 acute dermal and eye irritation/corrosion guidelines were used, as well as the 423 Acute Oral Toxicity guideline, Acute Toxic Class Method of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The aqueous extract was located in the following category: not classified as toxic (CTA 5), while hydroalcoholic extract at 25% was classified as dangerous (CTA 4). Both extracts can be used without side reaction that irritates the skin which permitted classification as potentially not irritant. P. mammosa in the two extracts caused mild and reversible eye irritation, and it was classified as slightly irritating. PMID:26273696

  13. Sapodilla Plum (Achras sapota) Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cell Lines and Inhibits Tumor Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2014-01-01

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice. PMID:25142835

  14. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential of Pouteria campechiana on acetaminophen-induced hepatic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Sivasudha, T; Sasikumar, J M; Christabel, P Hephzibah; Jeyadevi, R; Ananth, D Arul

    2014-03-01

    Pouteria campechiana (Kunth) Baehni. is used as a remedy for coronary trouble, liver disorders, epilepsy, skin disease, and ulcer. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of polyphenolic-rich P. campechiana fruit extract against acetaminophen-intoxicated rats. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of egg fruit were estimated followed by the determination of antioxidant activities. Treatment with P. campechiana fruit extract effectively scavenged the free radicals in a concentration-dependent manner within the range of the given concentrations in all antioxidant models. The presence of polyphenolic compounds were confirmed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). The animals were treated with acetaminophen (250 mg/kg body weight; p.o.) thrice at the interval of every 5 days after the administration of P. campechiana aqueous extract and silymarin (50 mg/kg). Acetaminophen treatment was found to trigger an oxidative stress in liver, leading to an increase of serum marker enzymes. However, treatment with P. campechiana fruit extract significantly reduced the elevated liver marker enzymes (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase) and increased the antioxidant enzymes (viz., superoxide dismutase and catalase) and glutathione indicating the effect of the extract in restoring the normal functional ability of hepatocytes. These results strongly suggest that P. campechiana fruit extract has strong antioxidant and significant hepatoprotective effect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

  15. Weathering processes in the Rio Icacos and Rio Mameyes watersheds in Eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter I in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buss, Heather L.; White, Arthur F.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Streams draining watersheds of the two dominant lithologies (quartz diorite and volcaniclastic rock) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of eastern Puerto Rico have very high fluxes of bedrock weathering products. The Río Blanco quartz diorite in the Icacos watershed and the Fajardo volcaniclastic rocks in the Mameyes watershed have some of the fastest documented rates of chemical weathering of siliceous rocks in the world. Rapid weathering produces thick, highly leached saprolites in both watersheds that lie just below the soil and largely isolate subsurface biogeochemical and hydrologic processes from those in the soil. The quartz diorite bedrock in the Icacos watershed weathers spheroidally, leaving large, relatively unweathered corestones that are enveloped by slightly weathered rock layers called rindlets. The rindlets wrap around the corestones like an onionskin. Within the corestones, biotite oxidation is thought to induce the spheroidal fracturing that leads to development of rindlets; plagioclase in the rindlets dissolves, creating additional pore spaces. Near the rindlet-saprolite interface, the remaining plagioclase dissolves, hornblende dissolves to completion, and precipitation of kaolinite, gibbsite, and goethite becomes pervasive. In the saprolite, biotite weathers to kaolinite and quartz begins to dissolve. In the soil layer, both quartz and kaolinite dissolve. The volcaniclastic bedrock of the Mameyes watershed weathers even faster than the quartz diorite bedrock of the Icacos watershed, leaving thicker saprolites that are devoid of all primary minerals except quartz. The quartz content of volcaniclastic bedrock may help to control watershed geomorphology; high-quartz rocks form thick saprolites that blanket ridges. Hydrologic flow paths within the weathering profiles vary with total fluid flux, and they influence the chemistry of streams. Under low-flow conditions, the Río Icacos and its tributaries are fed by rainfall and by groundwater from

  16. Characterization of main primary and secondary metabolites and in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties in the mesocarp of three biotypes of Pouteria lucuma.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Claudia; Gálvez, Lena; Cobos, Ariel; Olaeta, José Antonio; Defilippi, Bruno G; Chirinos, Rosana; Campos, David; Pedreschi, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Pouteria lucuma is an Andean fruit from pre-Incas' times highly appreciated due to its characteristic flavor and taste in its homeland. We characterized the primary (e.g., sugars and organic acids), and secondary (e.g., phenolics and carotenoids) and in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties of Rosalia, Montero and Leiva 1 lucuma biotypes. Significant differences were found in these metabolites and functional properties related to biotype and ripeness stage. Results showed significant amounts of sugars (119.4-344 mg total sugars g(-1)DW) and organic acids (44.4-30.0 mg g(-1)DW) and functional associated compounds such as ascorbic acid (0.35-1.07 mg g(-1)DW), total phenolics (0.7-61.6 mg GAE g(-1)DW) and total carotenoids (0.22-0.50 mg β-carotene g(-1)DW). Important in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties were found and provide the base for the standardization of lucuma harvest and postharvest focused not only on the enhancement of sensory but functional properties. PMID:26212989

  17. Flavonoid Detection in Hydroethanolic Extract of Pouteria torta (Sapotaceae) Leaves by HPLC-DAD and the Determination of Its Mutagenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daryne L.M.G.; Rinaldo, Daniel; Varanda, Eliana A.; de Sousa, Juliana F.; Nasser, Ana L.M.; Silva, Ana C.Z.; Baldoqui, Débora C.; Vilegas, Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is well known that phytotherapy has grown in popularity in recent years. Because a drug cannot be administered without ensuring its effectiveness and safety, the standardization and regulation of phytotherapeutic drugs are required by the global market and governmental authorities. This article describes a simple and reliable high-performance liquid chromatography–diode array detection analysis method for the simultaneous detection of myricetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside, myricetin-3-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside, and myricetin-3-O-α-L-rhaminopyranoside present in the hydroethanolic extract (ethanol/H2O, 7:3, v/v) of Pouteria torta. The mutagenic activity of the extract was evaluated on Salmonella typhimurium and by an in vivo micronucleus test on the peripheral blood cells of Swiss mice. The linearity, sensitivity, selectivity, repeatability, accuracy, and precision of the assay were evaluated. The analytical curves were linear and exhibited good repeatability (with a deviation of less than 5%) and demonstrated good recovery (within the 83–107% range). The results demonstrate that the hydroethanolic extract exhibited a mutagenic activity in both assays, suggesting caution in the use of this plant in folk medicine. PMID:25055245

  18. Characterization of main primary and secondary metabolites and in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties in the mesocarp of three biotypes of Pouteria lucuma.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Claudia; Gálvez, Lena; Cobos, Ariel; Olaeta, José Antonio; Defilippi, Bruno G; Chirinos, Rosana; Campos, David; Pedreschi, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Pouteria lucuma is an Andean fruit from pre-Incas' times highly appreciated due to its characteristic flavor and taste in its homeland. We characterized the primary (e.g., sugars and organic acids), and secondary (e.g., phenolics and carotenoids) and in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties of Rosalia, Montero and Leiva 1 lucuma biotypes. Significant differences were found in these metabolites and functional properties related to biotype and ripeness stage. Results showed significant amounts of sugars (119.4-344 mg total sugars g(-1)DW) and organic acids (44.4-30.0 mg g(-1)DW) and functional associated compounds such as ascorbic acid (0.35-1.07 mg g(-1)DW), total phenolics (0.7-61.6 mg GAE g(-1)DW) and total carotenoids (0.22-0.50 mg β-carotene g(-1)DW). Important in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties were found and provide the base for the standardization of lucuma harvest and postharvest focused not only on the enhancement of sensory but functional properties.

  19. Grapefruit as a host for the West Indian fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Mangan, Robert L; Thomas, Donald B; Moreno, Aleena Tarshis; Robacker, David

    2011-02-01

    The most common hosts for the West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae) are fruit in the family Anacardiaceae (mango [Mangifera L.] and mombin [Spondias L.] species). However, similar to many of the tropical fruit flies of major economic importance, this species attacks several other families of crop fruit, including Annonaceae (cherimoya, Annona cherimola Mill.), Myrtaceae (guava, Psidium L.), Oxalidaceae (carambola, Averrhoa carambola L.), Passifloraceae (granadilla, Passiflora quadrangularis Mill.), and Sapotaceae [mamey sapote, Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H. E. Moore & Steam]. In the family Rutaceae the economically important genus Citrus has been reported and until recently considered a host for this fruit fly. In this study, we reviewed the taxonomy of A. obliqua, tested specific chemicals that may inhibit oviposition, compared egg-to-adult survival of A. obliqua on preferred hosts and on grapefruit (Citrus X paradisi Macfad.), and measured fruit tissue-specific developmental rates of A. obliqua and the known citrus breeding Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), from egg to pupae. Our literature review shows much confusion concerning the taxonomy of this and related Anastrepha species, including synonymies and confusion with other species. The deterrent effect of the highest concentration of flavonoids for oviposition, although significant, was not absolute. Experiments carried out under laboratory conditions showed 15-40 times greater survival of A. ludens (whose preferred hosts include Rutaceae) on grapefruit compared with A. obliqua for both tree attached and harvested fruit. Experiments of survival of developing stages over time showed that the two species oviposit into different tissues in the fruit, and mortality is much higher for the West Indian fruit fly in the flavedo and albedo of the fruit compared with the Mexican fruit fly.

  20. [Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) associated to host plants in the southern region of Bahia State].

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, M A L; da Silva, A C M; Silva, V E S; Bomfim, Z V; Guimarães, J A; de Souza Filho, M F; Araujo, E L

    2011-01-01

    The association among Anastrepha species, braconid parasitoids and host fruits in southern Bahia is recorded. Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti) was associated with A. serpentina (Wied.) in Pouteria caimito, A. bahiensis Lima in Helicostylis tomentosa, A. sororcula Zucchi in Eugenia uniflora, and A. obliqua (Macquart) in Spondias purpurea. Anatrepha obliqua was unique in fruits of Averrhoa carambola, but associated with D. areolatus, Asobara anastrephae (Muesebeck) and Utetes anastrephae (Viereck). In Achras sapota, A. serpentina was associated with A. anastrephae and D. areolatus, while in Psidium guajava, A. fraterculus (Wied.) and A. sororcula were associated with D. areolatus and U. anastrephae.

  1. Interactions between terrestrial mammals and the fruits of two neotropical rainforest tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Sanabria, Angela A.; Mendoza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian frugivory is a distinctive biotic interaction of tropical forests; however, most efforts in the Neotropics have focused on cases of animals foraging in the forest canopy, in particular primates and bats. In contrast much less is known about this interaction when it involves fruits deposited on the forest floor and terrestrial mammals. We conducted a camera-trapping survey to analyze the characteristics of the mammalian ensembles visiting fruits of Licania platypus and Pouteria sapota deposited on the forest floor in a well preserved tropical rainforest of Mexico. Both tree species produce large fruits but contrast in their population densities and fruit chemical composition. In particular, we expected that more species of terrestrial mammals would consume P. sapota fruits due to its higher pulp:seed ratio, lower availability and greater carbohydrate content. We monitored fruits at the base of 13 trees (P. sapota, n = 4 and L. platypus, n = 9) using camera-traps. We recorded 13 mammal species from which we had evidence of 8 consuming or removing fruits. These eight species accounted for 70% of the species of mammalian frugivores active in the forest floor of our study area. The ensemble of frugivores associated with L. platypus (6 spp.) was a subset of that associated with P. sapota (8 spp). Large body-sized species such as Tapirus bairdii, Pecari tajacu and Cuniculus paca were the mammals more frequently interacting with fruits of the focal species. Our results further our understanding of the characteristics of the interaction between terrestrial mammalian frugivores and large-sized fruits, helping to gain a more balanced view of its importance across different tropical forests and providing a baseline to compare against defaunated forests.

  2. Medicinal plants used for dogs in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Lans, C; Harper, T; Georges, K; Bridgewater, E

    2000-06-12

    This paper documents ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat dogs in Trinidad and Tobago. In 1995, a 4-stage process was used to conduct the research and document the ethnoveterinary practices. Twenty-eight ethnoveterinary respondents were identified using the school-essay method, which is a modified rapid rural appraisal (RRA) technique. Semi-structured interviews were held with these respondents as well as with 30 veterinarians, 27 extension officers and 19 animal-health assistants and/or agricultural officers, and the seven key respondents that they identified. The final step involved hosting four participatory workshops with 55 of the respondents interviewed to discuss the ethnoveterinary data generated from the interviews and to determine dosages for some of the plants mentioned. Supplementary interviews were conducted in 1997 and 1998. Seeds of Carica papaya, and leaves of Cassia alata, Azadirachta indica, Gossypium spp., Cajanus cajan and Chenopodium ambrosiodes are used as anthelmintics. The anthelmintics Gossypium spp. and Chenopodium ambrosiodes are the most frequently used species. Crescentia cujete pulp, Musa spp. stem exudate, the inside of the pods of Bixa orellana, leaves of Cordia curassavica and Eclipta alba plant tops are used for skin diseases. Musa spp. stem exudate, seeds of Manilkara zapota, Pouteria sapota and Mammea americana and leaves of Cordia curassavica, Scoparia dulcis and Nicotiana tabacum are used to control ectoparasites. Dogs are groomed with the leaves of Cordia curassavica, Bambusa vulgaris and Scoparia dulcis. Psidium guajava buds and leaves and the bark of Anacardium occidentale are used for diarrhoea. Owners attempt to achieve milk let-down with a decoction of the leaves of Stachytarpheta jamaicensis. The plant uses parallel those practised in human folk medicine in other Caribbean countries and in other tropical countries. PMID:10821961

  3. A new species of armored scale, Mycetaspis ailynaomi (Hemiptera, Diaspididae, Aspidiotinae), associated with Mammea americana L. (Malpighiales, Calophyllaceae) from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Dones, Ramón A.; Evans, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A new species of armored scale, Mycetaspis ailynaomi Dones and Evans is described and illustrated from specimens collected on mamey (Mammea americana) from Puerto Rico. A key to the species of Mycetaspis is provided. PMID:21852924

  4. 75 FR 28009 - Notice of Receipt of Several Pesticide Petitions Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... quantification of amisulbrom from grape field and grape processing (raisin, juice, and wine) data. The limit of..., papaya, star apple, black sapote, mango, sapodilla, canistel, and mamey sapote at 0.20 ppm; and tea at...

  5. 40 CFR 180.546 - Mefenoxam; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mefenoxam, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the table below. Compliance..., mamey 0.40 Spinach 10 Star apple 0.40 Starfruit 0.20 Sugar apple 0.20 (b) Section 18...

  6. 40 CFR 180.546 - Mefenoxam; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mefenoxam, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the table below. Compliance..., mamey 0.40 Spinach 10 Star apple 0.40 Starfruit 0.20 Sugar apple 0.20 (b) Section 18...

  7. 40 CFR 180.546 - Mefenoxam; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mefenoxam, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the table below. Compliance..., mamey 0.40 Spinach 10 Star apple 0.40 Starfruit 0.20 Sugar apple 0.20 (b) Section 18...

  8. [Biological evaluation of Cuban plants VI].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Misas, C A; Rojas Hernández, N M; López Abraham, A M

    1979-01-01

    The study of the antibacterial activity of plants growing in Cuba is pursued. Aqueous, alcoholic and ketonic extracts were prepared from five species, and it was found that the best inhibitions corresponded to the species Hamelia patens, Nephrolepis acuminata, Calocarpum sapota and Colocasia antiquorum.

  9. 75 FR 20841 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ..., papaya, star apple, black sapote, mango, sapodilla, canistel, mamey sapote. Contact: Autumn Metzger, (703) 305- 5314; metzger.autumn@epa.gov . 8. Registration Number: 59639-151. Docket Number: EPA-HQ-OPP-2010...; leaves of legume vegetables (subgroup 7A; excluding cowpea and lentils); and sweet corn....

  10. Healthful and nutritional components in select Florida tropical fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourteen tropical fruits from south Florida (red guava, white guava, carambola, red pitaya (red dragon), white pitaya (white dragon), mamey, sapodilla, lychee, longan, green mango, ripe mango, green papaya and ripe papaya) were evaluated for phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid (v...

  11. 7 CFR 1540.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... subheadings 0805.90.00, tamarinds and kiwi fruit of subheading 0810.90.20, and cashew apples, mameyes... citrus fruit juice provided for in subheadings 2009.11.00, 2009.19.40, 2009.20.40, 2009.30.20, and...

  12. 7 CFR 1540.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... subheadings 0805.90.00, tamarinds and kiwi fruit of subheading 0810.90.20, and cashew apples, mameyes... citrus fruit juice provided for in subheadings 2009.11.00, 2009.19.40, 2009.20.40, 2009.30.20, and...

  13. 7 CFR 1540.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subheadings 0805.90.00, tamarinds and kiwi fruit of subheading 0810.90.20, and cashew apples, mameyes... citrus fruit juice provided for in subheadings 2009.11.00, 2009.19.40, 2009.20.40, 2009.30.20, and...

  14. 7 CFR 1540.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... subheadings 0805.90.00, tamarinds and kiwi fruit of subheading 0810.90.20, and cashew apples, mameyes... citrus fruit juice provided for in subheadings 2009.11.00, 2009.19.40, 2009.20.40, 2009.30.20, and...

  15. 7 CFR 1540.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... subheadings 0805.90.00, tamarinds and kiwi fruit of subheading 0810.90.20, and cashew apples, mameyes... citrus fruit juice provided for in subheadings 2009.11.00, 2009.19.40, 2009.20.40, 2009.30.20, and...

  16. Salt tolerances of some mainland tree species select as through nursery screening.

    PubMed

    Miah, Md Abdul Quddus

    2013-09-15

    A study of salt tolerance was carried out on germination, survival and height growth performance of important mesophytic species such as Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia hybrid, Artocarpus heterophyllus, Albizia procera, Albizia lebbeck, Acacia nilotica, Achras sapota, Casuarina equisetifolaia, Emblica officinalis, Leucaena leucocephala, Samania saman, Swetenia macrophylla, Terminalia arjuna, Tamarindus indica, Terminalia bellirica and Thespesia populnea in nursery stage using fresh water and salt (NaCl) solutions of 10, 15 and 20 ppm. Effect of salt on germination, survival performance and height growth performance were examined in this condition. Based on the observation, salt tolerance of these species has been determined Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia hybrid, Achras sapota, Casuarina equisetifolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Tamarindus indica has showed the best capacity to perform in different salinity conditions. Acacia nilotica, Emblica officinalis, Thespesia populnea has performed better. Albizia procera, Samania saman and Terminalia bellirica, germination and height performance showed good but when salinity increases survivability were decreases. PMID:24502152

  17. Salt tolerances of some mainland tree species select as through nursery screening.

    PubMed

    Miah, Md Abdul Quddus

    2013-09-15

    A study of salt tolerance was carried out on germination, survival and height growth performance of important mesophytic species such as Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia hybrid, Artocarpus heterophyllus, Albizia procera, Albizia lebbeck, Acacia nilotica, Achras sapota, Casuarina equisetifolaia, Emblica officinalis, Leucaena leucocephala, Samania saman, Swetenia macrophylla, Terminalia arjuna, Tamarindus indica, Terminalia bellirica and Thespesia populnea in nursery stage using fresh water and salt (NaCl) solutions of 10, 15 and 20 ppm. Effect of salt on germination, survival performance and height growth performance were examined in this condition. Based on the observation, salt tolerance of these species has been determined Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia hybrid, Achras sapota, Casuarina equisetifolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Tamarindus indica has showed the best capacity to perform in different salinity conditions. Acacia nilotica, Emblica officinalis, Thespesia populnea has performed better. Albizia procera, Samania saman and Terminalia bellirica, germination and height performance showed good but when salinity increases survivability were decreases.

  18. Antioxidant, anti-collagenase and anti-elastase activities of Phyllanthus emblica, Manilkara zapota and silymarin: an in vitro comparative study for anti-aging applications.

    PubMed

    Pientaweeratch, Sirinya; Panapisal, Vipaporn; Tansirikongkol, Anyarporn

    2016-09-01

    Context Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae) (amla), Manilkara zapota L.P. Royen (Sapotaceae) (sapota) and silymarin are reported to contain antioxidant effects. However, information on other biological activities relating to the anti-aging properties is limited. Objective To compare in vitro antioxidants, anti-collagenase (MMP-1 and MMP-2) and anti-elastase properties as well as the phenolic and flavonoid contents of amla, sapota and silymarin as potential anti-aging ingredients. Materials and methods The ethanol amla and sapota fruit extracts were prepared by three cycles of maceration with 24 h duration each. The total phenolic (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents were determined. The antioxidant capacity was evaluated by DPPH and ABTS assays. The effects of MMP-1, MMP-2 and elastase inhibitions were determined by using the EnzChek® assay kits (Molecular-Probes, Eugene, OR). Results Amla exhibited the highest in TPC (362.43 ± 11.2 mg GAE/g) while silymarin showed the highest in TFC (21.04 ± 0.67 mg QE/g). Results of antioxidant activity by DPPH and ABTS methods showed that amla possessed the most potent capacity with IC50 values of 1.70 ± 0.07 and 4.45 ± 0.10 μg/mL, respectively. Highest inhibitions against MMP-1, MMP-2 and elastase were detected for sapota with IC50 values of 89.61 ± 0.96, 86.47 ± 3.04 and 35.73 ± 0.61 μg/mL, respectively. Discussion and conclusion Test extracts offered anti-aging properties in different mechanisms. Amla showed the highest phenolic content and antioxidant property with moderate anti-collagenase. Silymarin exhibited measurable flavonoid content with anti-elastase effect. Sapota showed the highest collagenase and elastase inhibitions with moderate antioxidant effect. Thus, extracts might be added as a mixture to gain the overall anti-aging effects. PMID:26912420

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Mack, E Erin; Löffler, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9″, longitude -65°46'8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  20. 40 CFR 180.476 - Triflumizole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., calculated as stoichiometric equivalent of the parent compound. Commodity Parts per million Apple 0.5 Apple, dry pomace 2.0 Apple, wet pomace 2.0 Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 8.0 Brassica, leafy greens..., black 2.5 Sapote, mamey 2.5 Star apple 2.5 Strawberry 2.0 Swiss chard 18 Turnip, greens 40...

  1. 40 CFR 180.476 - Triflumizole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., calculated as stoichiometric equivalent of the parent compound. Commodity Parts per million Apple 0.5 Apple, dry pomace 2.0 Apple, wet pomace 2.0 Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 8.0 Brassica, leafy greens..., black 2.5 Sapote, mamey 2.5 Star apple 2.5 Strawberry 2.0 Swiss chard 18 Turnip, greens 40...

  2. 40 CFR 180.476 - Triflumizole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., calculated as stoichiometric equivalent of the parent compound. Commodity Parts per million Apple 0.5 Apple, dry pomace 2.0 Apple, wet pomace 2.0 Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 8.0 Brassica, leafy greens..., black 2.5 Sapote, mamey 2.5 Star apple 2.5 Strawberry 2.0 Swiss chard 18 Turnip, greens 40...

  3. Draft genome sequence of a strictly anaerobic dichloromethane-degrading bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin; Loffler, Frank E.

    2016-03-03

    Here, an anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9", longitude –65°46'8.4"). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21′43.9″, longitude −65°46′8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  5. Seasonal variation and processing of vascular plant organic matter in tropical montane catchments as reflected by riverine DOC compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernes, P.; Dyda, R. Y.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rivers are responsible for two thirds of global fluxes of terrigenous organic matter to the oceans, yet because of their remote locations relative to most industrialized countries, they are poorly studied compared to temperate and even Arctic rivers. This study measured lignin biomarkers on weekly samples from two Puerto Rican rivers, the Mameyes and the Rio Icacos, over the course of ~9 months in order to investigate watershed controls on organic matter export via rivers. In both rivers, carbon-normalized yields of lignin increased with discharge, indicating higher organic matter contributions from vascular plants and lower contributions from microbial sources. Lignin biomarkers can be used to distinguish between conifer and deciduous trees as well as woody and nonwoody tissues, and the source signatures of the two rivers were essentially the same, indicating similar vegetation and sources of organic materials to both rivers. Thus, differences in diagenetic lignin parameters can be attributed to differences in processing within the two watersheds. For example, the Rio Icacos is a much flashier system with much higher sediment loads during storm events, which can lead to significant exchange of organic matter between the dissolved and particulate phase. Acid to aldehyde ratios for vanillyl and syringyl lignin phenols, (Ad:Al)v and (Ad:Al)s, are commonly used indicators of degradation. Plots of (Ad:Al)s vs. (Ad:Al)v for the two rivers reveal a significantly steeper slope for the Mameyes, which could reflect differences in the mineralogy between the systems, as the Mameyes watershed is underlain by volcaniclastic materials while the Rio Icacos is underlain by granodiorite. It is a commonly held assumption that base materials and soils should exert a strong influence on riverine organic matter compositions, but paired watershed studies are comparatively rare even in temperate climates. Hence, measureable differences between the two systems studied here

  6. Total antioxidant activity and fiber content of select Florida-grown tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Mahattanatawee, Kanjana; Manthey, John A; Luzio, Gary; Talcott, Stephen T; Goodner, Kevin; Baldwin, Elizabeth A

    2006-09-20

    Fourteen tropical fruits from south Florida (red guava, white guava, carambola, red pitaya (red dragon), white pitaya (white dragon), mamey sapote, sapodilla, lychee, longan, green mango, ripe mango, green papaya, and ripe papaya) were evaluated for antioxidant activity, total soluble phenolics (TSP), total ascorbic acid (TAA), total dietary fiber (TDF), and pectin. ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, radical scavenging activity) assays were used to determine antioxidant activity. The TSP, ORAC, and DPPH ranged from 205.4 to 2316.7 g gallic acid equiv/g puree, <0.1 to 16.7 micromol Trolox equiv/g puree, and 2.1 to 620.2 microg gallic acid equiv/g puree, respectively. The TAA, TDF, and pectin ranged from 7.5 to 188.8 mg/100 g, 0.9 to 7.2 g/100 g, and 0.20 to 1.04 g/100 g, respectively. The antioxidant activities, TSP, TAA, TDF, and pectin were influenced by cultivar (papaya, guava, and dragon fruit) and ripening stage (papaya and/or mango). Antioxidant activity showed high correlations with levels of TSP compounds (r = 0.96) but low correlations with levels of ascorbic acid (r = 0.35 and 0.23 for ORAC and DPPH data, respectively). The antioxidant activities evaluated by both ORAC and DPPH showed similar trends where red guava and carambola exhibited the highest and sapodilla and green papaya exhibited the lowest levels. Guava and mamey sapote exhibited the highest TDF and pectin levels. Many of the tropical fruits were shown to contain an abundance of hydrolyzable tannins, ellagic acid conjugates, and flavone glycosides. Preliminary descriptions are given of the phenols in red/white pitaya (dragonfruit), lychee, and mamey sapote, these fruit being thus far uncharacterized in the literature.

  7. A capture-recapture model of amphidromous fish dispersal.

    PubMed

    Smith, W E; Kwak, T J

    2014-04-01

    Adult movement scale was quantified for two tropical Caribbean diadromous fishes, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor and mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, using passive integrated transponders (PITs) and radio-telemetry. Large numbers of fishes were tagged in Río Mameyes, Puerto Rico, U.S.A., with PITs and monitored at three fixed locations over a 2·5 year period to estimate transition probabilities between upper and lower elevations and survival probabilities with a multistate Cormack-Jolly-Seber model. A sub-set of fishes were tagged with radio-transmitters and tracked at weekly intervals to estimate fine-scale dispersal. Changes in spatial and temporal distributions of tagged fishes indicated that neither G. dormitor nor A. monticola moved into the lowest, estuarine reaches of Río Mameyes during two consecutive reproductive periods, thus demonstrating that both species follow an amphidromous, rather than catadromous, migratory strategy. Further, both species were relatively sedentary, with restricted linear ranges. While substantial dispersal of these species occurs at the larval stage during recruitment to fresh water, the results indicate minimal dispersal in spawning adults. Successful conservation of diadromous fauna on tropical islands requires management at both broad basin and localized spatial scales. PMID:24673127

  8. A capture-recapture model of amphidromous fish dispersal.

    PubMed

    Smith, W E; Kwak, T J

    2014-04-01

    Adult movement scale was quantified for two tropical Caribbean diadromous fishes, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor and mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, using passive integrated transponders (PITs) and radio-telemetry. Large numbers of fishes were tagged in Río Mameyes, Puerto Rico, U.S.A., with PITs and monitored at three fixed locations over a 2·5 year period to estimate transition probabilities between upper and lower elevations and survival probabilities with a multistate Cormack-Jolly-Seber model. A sub-set of fishes were tagged with radio-transmitters and tracked at weekly intervals to estimate fine-scale dispersal. Changes in spatial and temporal distributions of tagged fishes indicated that neither G. dormitor nor A. monticola moved into the lowest, estuarine reaches of Río Mameyes during two consecutive reproductive periods, thus demonstrating that both species follow an amphidromous, rather than catadromous, migratory strategy. Further, both species were relatively sedentary, with restricted linear ranges. While substantial dispersal of these species occurs at the larval stage during recruitment to fresh water, the results indicate minimal dispersal in spawning adults. Successful conservation of diadromous fauna on tropical islands requires management at both broad basin and localized spatial scales.

  9. A capture-recapture model of amphidromous fish dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult movement scale was quantified for two tropical Caribbean diadromous fishes, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor and mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, using passive integrated transponders (PITs) and radio-telemetry. Large numbers of fishes were tagged in Rio Mameyes, Puerto Rico, U.S.A., with PITs and monitored at three fixed locations over a 2-5 year period to estimate transition probabilities between upper and lower elevations and survival probabilities with a multistate Cormack-Jolly-Seber model. A sub-set of fishes were tagged with radio-transmitters and tracked at weekly intervals to estimate fine-scale dispersal. Changes in spatial and temporal distributions of tagged fishes indicated that neither G. dormitor nor A. monticola moved into the lowest, estuarine reaches of Rio Mameyes during two consecutive reproductive periods, thus demonstrating that both species follow an amphidromous, rather than catadromous, migratory strategy. Further, both species were relatively sedentary, with restricted linear ranges. While substantial dispersal of these species occurs at the larval stage during recruitment to fresh water, the results indicate minimal dispersal in spawning adults. Successful conservation of diadromous fauna on tropical islands requires management at both broad basin and localized spatial scales.

  10. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part VI. Mushrooms, tomatoes, minor fruits and vegetables, dried fruits, and nuts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.

    1988-01-01

    In this concluding article in the series on the technological feasibility of ionizing radiation treatment for shelf life improvement of fruits and vegetables, the present status of research on several commodities that have not been dealt with earlier is discussed. The commodities include mushrooms, tomatoes, pineapples, lychees, longans, rambutans, mangostenes, guavas, sapotas, loquats, ber, soursops, passion fruits, persimmons, figs, melons, cucumbers, aubergines, globe artichokes, endives, lettuce, ginger, carrots, beet roots, turnips, olives, dates, chestnuts, almonds, pistachios, and other dried fruits and nuts. Changes induced by irradiation on metabolism, chemical constituents, and organoleptic qualities are considered while evaluating the shelf life. The commodities have been grouped into those showing potential benefits and those not showing any clear advantages from radiation treatment. Shelf life improvement of mushrooms and insect disinfestation in dried fruits, nuts, and certain fresh fruits appears to have immediate potential for commercial application. 194 references.

  11. Potential fields and seismicity at northern La Hispaniola Island: useful constraints to determine the crustal structure of an oblique convergence area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, C.; García-Lobón, J. L.; Rey Moral, C.; Escuder-Viruete, J.

    2012-04-01

    The interpretation of aeromagnetic and gravity data together with petrophysical analysis allow characterize the tectonic domains and the determination of the crustal structure up to Moho levels. In order to compare the crustal structure deduced from the potential fields with the seismicity, a set of earthquakes events from the USGS database have been studied (hypocenters shallower than 40 km and magnitude greater than 3.5). This study is focused on the northern part of the La Hispaniola Island, where an oblique subduction and strike-slip collision is taking place since the Mesozoic. The Septentrional Fault Zone (SFZ), an almost WNW-ESE directed strike slip fault, is bounded by a set of earthquakes up to 6 in magnitude whose hypocenter is located from 20 to 30 km in depth, with some deeper events (up to 40 km) in places. Northward of this fault zone, there is an area of mainly shallower hypocenters (up to 20 km) characterized by events of comparatively higher magnitude (up to 7) that deepen slightly again towards offshore where the range of depths is 0 to 30 km clustering around what is believed to be the subduction zone. The Bouguer anomaly shows a sharp gradient that separates the Cibao Valley to the south, characterized by an elongated minimum, from the accretionary prism (Mamey group and Puerto Plata-Rio San Juan Complex) to the north, characterized by a set of relative maxima and minima of higher intensity. Moreover, the accretionary prism presents a well defined magnetic zonation over the Mamey Group and the igneous-metamorphic complexes of Puerto Plata and Rio San Juan. In this area, magnetic anomalies are an order of magnitude higher than in the Cibao Valley, where the magnetic fabric is rather uniform with the exception of three prominent anomalies that can be associated to igneous rocks emplaced to the northern border of La Hispaniola Fault Zone. The Camú Fault, that separates Mamey Group from Puerto Plata Complex, constitutes another clear magnetic

  12. Influence of Soil Erosion and Landslide Occurrence on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Loss in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, Y. G.; Bastola, S.; Bras, R. L.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Silver, W. L.; Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests play a significant role in the global carbon (C) cycle. The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in Puerto Rico is characterized by intense erosion and landslide occurrence, which have been historically influenced by human activity and land use change, and drive the redistribution and burial of soil organic C (SOC) across the landscape. Estimates of regional C budgets do not systematically account for linkages between hydrological, geomorphological, and biogeochemical processes, which control the fate of eroded SOC. We quantify the impacts of erosion and rainfall-triggered landslides on SOC oxidation and accumulation at the Mameyes and Icacos watersheds. We developed and calibrated a spatially-explicit model of SOC dynamics, i.e. tRIBS-ECO (Triangulated Irregular Network-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator-Erosion and Carbon Oxidation), based on a coupled physically-based hydro-geomorphic model. The model inputs we used include measurements of SOC content at different horizons, and SOC oxidation and production rates derived from SOC turnover characteristics. We demonstrate the extent to which depth-dependent SOC oxidation and production are altered at eroding hillslopes and at landslide locations, and how this is being moderated by management practices. We estimated the SOC deposition rates at the floodplains of Mameyes and Icacos rivers, part of which is fluvially transported out of the system. The contrasting lithology of the two watersheds leads to different hydro-geomorphological behavior which controls the redistribution and storage of SOC. Results showed that topography and heterogeneity of tropical vegetation lead to significant spatial variability of the erosion-induced soil CO2 flux to the atmosphere. We highlight the importance of the representation of SOC redistribution driven by local variation in lithological and geomorphological characteristics and hydroclimatic conditions in attempts to quantify watershed-scale soil C

  13. Landslides and sediment budgets in four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter F in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    The low-latitude regions of the Earth are undergoing profound, rapid landscape change as forests are converted to agriculture to support growing population. Understanding the effects of these land-use changes requires analysis of watershed-scale geomorphic processes to better inform and manage this usually disorganized process. The investigation of hillslope erosion and the development of sediment budgets provides essential information for resource managers. Four small, montane, humid-tropical watersheds in the Luquillo Experimental Forest and nearby Río Grande de Loíza watershed, Puerto Rico (18° 20' N., 65° 45' W.), were selected to compare and contrast the geomorphic effects of land use and bedrock geology. Two of the watersheds are underlain largely by resistant Cretaceous volcaniclastic rocks but differ in land use and mean annual runoff: the Mameyes watershed, with predominantly primary forest cover and runoff of 2,750 millimeters per year, and the Canóvanas watershed, with mixed secondary forest and pasture and runoff of 970 millimeters per year. The additional two watersheds are underlain by relatively erodible granitic bedrock: the forested Icacos watershed, with runoff of 3,760 millimeters per year and the agriculturally developed Cayaguás watershed, with a mean annual runoff of 1,620 millimeters per year. Annual sediment budgets were estimated for each watershed using landslide, slopewash, soil creep, treethrow, suspended sediment, and streamflow data. The budgets also included estimates of sediment storage in channel beds, bars, floodplains, and in colluvial deposits. In the two watersheds underlain by volcaniclastic rocks, the forested Mameyes and the developed Canóvanas watersheds, landslide frequency (0.21 and 0.04 landslides per square kilometer per year, respectively), slopewash (5 and 30 metric tons per square kilometer per year), and suspended sediment yield (325 and 424 metric tons per square kilometer per year), were lower than in the

  14. Stable isotope (δ18O and δ2H) data for precipitation, stream water, and groundwater in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha A.; Torres-Sanchez, Angel; Rosario-Torres, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Puerto Rico is located in the northeastern Caribbean Sea (18.2 °N, 66.3 °W), with the Atlantic Ocean on its northern coast. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program study area in which most of these data were collected comprises the El Yunque National Forest and surrounding area of eastern Puerto Rico. Samples were collected in two forested watersheds, the Rio Mameyes and the Rio Icacos/Rio Blanco, on opposite sides of a ridge in the Luquillo Mountains on the eastern end of the island (fig. 1). Elevation in both watersheds ranges from sea level to approximately 1,000 meters (m). Near sea level, land use is mixed pasture, moist forest, and residential, grading to completely forested within the boundaries of El Yunque National Forest. Forest type changes with elevation from tabonuco to palo colorado to sierra palm to cloud forest above approximately 950 m (Murphy and others, 2012). The Rio Mameyes watershed is oriented north-northeast, and the basin is underlain by volcaniclastic bedrock (basaltic to andesitic volcanic sandstone/mudstone/conglomerate/breccia). The Rio Icacos/Rio Blanco watershed is oriented south-southeast. The Rio Icacos is one of the headwaters of the Rio Blanco and is underlain by quartz diorite. The lower Rio Blanco basin is underlain by andesitic volcaniclastic bedrock. This report also contains a long-term rain isotope dataset from the San Agustin site, in north-central Puerto Rico (fig. 1). Puerto Rico has a tropical climate dominated by easterly trade winds, and seasonal climate patterns affect the hydrology of the study area. The summer wet season is characterized by convective precipitation from tropical easterly waves, troughs, and cyclonic low-pressure systems, including tropical storms and hurricanes; in contrast, the drier winter season is characterized by trade-wind showers and frontal systems. The highest single-event rainfall totals tend to be associated with tropical storms

  15. Evaluation of antihyperglycemia and antihypertension potential of native Peruvian fruits using in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Marcia Da Silva; Ranilla, Lena Galvez; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Genovese, Maria Inés; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-04-01

    Local food diversity and traditional crops are essential for cost-effective management of the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and associated complications of hypertension. Water and 12% ethanol extracts of native Peruvian fruits such as Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma), Pacae (Inga feuille), Papayita arequipeña (Carica pubescens), Capuli (Prunus capuli), Aguaymanto (Physalis peruviana), and Algarrobo (Prosopis pallida) were evaluated for total phenolics, antioxidant activity based on 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay, and functionality such as in vitro inhibition of alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) relevant for potential management of hyperglycemia and hypertension linked to type 2 diabetes. The total phenolic content ranged from 3.2 (Aguaymanto) to 11.4 (Lucuma fruit) mg/g of sample dry weight. A significant positive correlation was found between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity for the ethanolic extracts. No phenolic compound was detected in Lucuma (fruit and powder) and Pacae. Aqueous extracts from Lucuma and Algarrobo had the highest alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Papayita arequipeña and Algarrobo had significant ACE inhibitory activities reflecting antihypertensive potential. These in vitro results point to the excellent potential of Peruvian fruits for food-based strategies for complementing effective antidiabetes and antihypertension solutions based on further animal and clinical studies.

  16. Effect of logging on rodent scatter-hoarding dynamics in tropical forests: implications for plant recruitment.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Granados, Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that logging affects the scatter-hoarding behavior of rodents, which, in turn, negatively affects the quantity and quality of Pouteria campechiana (Sapotaceae) seed dispersal. A series of seed stations was established in logged and unlogged forests of ejido Señor, Yucatan Peninsula, and comparisons were made between logged and unlogged forests in terms of: (i) seed removal; (ii) number of seeds hoarded; (iii) hoarding distance; and (iv) the number of recruits and the survival of hoarded seeds. The number of both hoarded and removed seeds was significantly higher in unlogged sites. Furthermore, the mean distance of hoarding was greater in unlogged compared with logged sites. Although recruitment and survival were present in both logged and unlogged sites, there were more surviving seedlings in unlogged sites. The data indicate that both the quantity and quality of seed dispersal are negatively affected by logging because of a change in the rodent scatter-hoarding dynamics. These changes suggest that plant-animal interactions are crucial to the understanding of the ecology and conservation of managed tropical forests.

  17. Antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid and total phenol of exotic fruits occurring in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Sandra Aparecida; Vellosa, José Carlos Rebuglio; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço; Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Leite, Kátia Maria da Silva Cerqueira; Martins, Antonio Baldo Geraldo; Oliveira, Olga Maria Mascarenhas de Faria

    2009-08-01

    The antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid and phenolic content were studied in 10 exotic fruits from Brazil: abiu, acerola, wax jambu, cashew, mamey sapote, carambola or star fruit, Surinam cherry, longan, sapodilla and jaboticaba. The ascorbic acid was determined by 2,6-dichloroindophenol titrimetic methods and total phenols were measured colorimetrically using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. The antioxidant activity was investigated with three different methods: hypochlorous acid scavenging activity, 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation decolorization assay, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging method. The highest content of vitamin C (1,525.00 mg/100 g pulp) occurred in acerola. The total phenol content was higher in abiu, acerola, Surinam cherry and sapodilla. In relation to antioxidant activity, acerola has showed the great values in all three different methods tested. It was found that the fruits have a significant antioxidant effect when tested by each method, respectively, and these antioxidant capacities are promising. The sample concentration also influenced its antioxidant power.

  18. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of fruit residues.

    PubMed

    Tadtong, Sarin; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Lourith, Nattaya

    2013-11-01

    Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn., Sapindaceae) and salacca (Salacca edulis Reinw., Arecaceae) pericarp, and sapodilla (Achras sapota L., Sapotaceae) and tamarind Srichompu cultivar (Tamarindus indica L., Caesalpiniaceae) seed coat extracts were evaluated on cultured cholinergic P19-derived neurons. All the extracts, at a very low concentration (1 ng/mL of litchi and salacca pericarp extracts, 10 ng/mL of sapodilla and 100 ng/mL of tamarind seed coat extracts), enhanced the survival of cultured neurons (% viability more than 100%) by XTT reduction assay. The extracts were further evaluated for their neuritogenicity by observing cell morphology by phase-contrast microscopy and neuroprotective activity in serum deprivation and pre- and co-administration of hydrogen peroxide models. The phase-contrast micrographs displayed that all of the extracts possessed neurogenic activity by promoting the neurite outgrowth of the cultured neurons. Moreover, these extracts can protect neurons from oxidative stress-caused cell death in a serum deprivation model, and prevent and protect neuron cells from the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. In this study we assured that the neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of these extracts derived from the phenolic components and flavonoids contained in the extracts by acting as signaling molecules to enhance neuron survival and promote neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that all of the extracts are potentially sources of neuritogenic and neuroprotective components which might be used either as pharmaceutical products or dietary supplements for neurodegenerative disorder patients, for example, those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24427947

  19. Performance of seedlings of a shade-tolerant tropical tree species after moderate addition of N and P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárate Tandalla, Daisy; Leuschner, Christoph; Homeier, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen deposition to tropical forests is predicted to increase in future in many regions due to agricultural intensification. We conducted a seedling transplantation experiment in a tropical premontane forest in Ecuador with a locally abundant late-successional tree species (Pouteria torta, Sapotaceae) aimed at detecting species-specific responses to moderate N and P addition and to understand how increasing nutrient availability will affect regeneration. From locally collected seeds, 320 seedlings were produced and transplanted to the plots of the Ecuadorian Nutrient Manipulation Experiment (NUMEX) with three treatments (moderate N addition: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1, moderate P addition: 10 kg P ha-1 yr-1 and combined N and P addition) and a control (80 plants per treatment). After 12 months, mortality, relative growth rate, leaf nutrient content and leaf herbivory rate were measured. N and NP addition significantly increased the mortality rate (70 % vs. 54 % in the control). However, N and P addition also increased the diameter growth rate of the surviving seedlings. N and P addition did not alter foliar nutrient concentrations and leaf N:P ratio, but N addition decreased the leaf C:N ratio and increased SLA. P addition (but not N addition) resulted in higher leaf area loss to herbivore consumption and also shifted carbon allocation to root growth. This fertilization experiment with a common rainforest tree species conducted in old-growth forest shows that already moderate doses of added N and P are affecting seedling performance which most likely will have consequences for the competitive strength in the understory and the recruitment success of P. torta. Simultaneous increases in growth, herbivory and mortality rates make it difficult to assess the species' overall performance and predict how a future increase in nutrient deposition will alter the abundance of this species in the Andean tropical montane forests.

  20. Water quality and mass transport in four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter E in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, Robert F.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Water quality of four small watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico has been monitored since 1991 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets program. These watersheds represent a montane, humid-tropical environment and differ in geology and land cover. Two watersheds are located on granitic rocks, and two are located on volcaniclastic rock. For each bedrock type, one watershed is covered with mature rainforest in the Luquillo Mountains, and the other watershed is undergoing reforestation after being affected by agricultural practices typical of eastern Puerto Rico. A subwatershed of the Icacos watershed, the Guabá, was also monitored to examine scaling effects. The water quality of the rivers draining forest, in the Icacos and Guabá (granitic watersheds) and Mameyes (a volcaniclastic watershed), show little contamination by human activities. The water is well oxygenated and has a nearly neutral pH, and nutrient concentrations are low. Concentrations of nutrients in the disturbed watersheds, the Cayaguás (granitic rock) and Canóvanas (volcaniclastic rock), are greater than in the forested watersheds, indicating some inputs from human activities. High in-stream productivity in the Canóvanas watershed leads to occasional oxygen and calcite supersaturation and carbon dioxide undersaturation. Suspended sediment concentrations in all watersheds are low, except during major storms. Most dissolved constituents derived from bedrock weathering or atmospheric deposition (including sodium, magnesium, calcium, silica, alkalinity, and chloride) decrease in concentration with increasing runoff, reflecting dilution from increased proportions of overland or near-surface flow. Strongly bioactive constituents (dissolved organic carbon, potassium, nitrate, ammonium ion, and phosphate) commonly display increasing concentration with increasing runoff, regardless of their ultimate origin (bedrock or atmosphere). The concentrations of many of the

  1. River Suspended Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Transport in Two Montane Catchments in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory of Puerto Rico over 25 years: 1989 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; Plante, A. F.; Willenbring, J. K.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Gonzalez, G.; Stallard, R. F.; Murphy, S. F.; Vann, D. R.; Leon, M.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Physical erosion in mountain catchments mobilizes large amounts of sediment, while exporting carbon and nutrients from forest ecosystems. This study expands from previous studies quantifying river suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon loads in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, in Puerto Rico. We evaluate the influences on river suspended load due to i) underlying basin geology, ii) hillslope debris and biomass supply, and iii) hurricanes and large storms. In the Mameyes and Icacos catchments of the Luquillo Mountains, we estimate suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon yields over a 25-year period using streamflow discharge determined from stage measurements at 15-intervals, with estimates of discharge replacing gaps in data, and over 3000 suspended sediment samples. We estimate variation in suspended sediment loads over time, and examine variation in particulate organic carbon loads. Mass spectrometry was used to determine organic carbon concentrations. We confirm that higher suspended sediment fluxes occurred i) in the highly weathered quartz diorite catchment rather than the predominantly volcaniclastic catchment, ii) on the rising limb of the hydrograph once a threshold discharge had been reached, and iii) during hurricanes and other storm events, and we explore these influences on particulate organic carbon transport. Transport of suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon in the rivers shows considerable hysteresis, and we evaluate the extent to which hysteresis affects particulate fluxes over time and between catchments. Because particulate organic carbon is derived from the critical zone and transported during high flow, our research highlights the role of major tropical storms in controlling carbon storage in the critical zone and the coastal ocean.

  2. The tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Imbert Formation, northern Dominican Republic: a record of syn-collisional basin development and ophiolite emplacement during Caribbean island arc-North America continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, J.; Suárez-Rodríguez, Á.; Gabites, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2015-12-01

    Located in northern Dominican Republic, the Imbert Formation (Fm) has been interpreted as an orogenic mélange originally deposited as trench-fill sediments, an accretionary complex formed above a SW-dipping subduction zone, or the sedimentary result of the early oblique collision of the Caribbean plate with the Bahama Platform in the middle Eocene. However, new stratigraphical, structural, geochemical and geochronological data indicate that the Imbert Fm constitutes a coarsening-upward tectono-stratigraphic sequence that records the transition of the sedimentation from a pre-collisional forearc to a syn-collisional piggy-back basin during the Caribbean island arc-North America continent collision. The Imbert Fm unconformably overlies different structural levels of the Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism, including a supra-subduction zone ophiolite (the Puerto Plata complex) and a serpentinite subduction channel (the Río San Juan complex), and consists of three laterally discontinuous units that record the exhumation of the underlying basement. The distal turbiditic lower unit includes the latest volcanic activity of the Caribbean island arc; the more proximal turbiditic intermediate unit is moderately affected by syn-sedimentary faulting; and the upper unit is a (chaotic) olistostromic unit, composed of serpentinite-rich polymictic breccias, conglomerates and sandstones, strongly deformed by syn-sedimentary faulting, slumping and sliding processes. The Imbert Fm is followed by subsidence and turbiditic deposition of the overlying El Mamey Group. The 40Ar/39Ar plagioclase plateau ages obtained in gabbroic rocks from the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex indicate its exhumation at ~45-40 Ma (lower-to-middle Eocene), contemporaneously to the sedimentation of the overlying Imbert Fm. These cooling ages imply the uplift to the surface and submarine erosion of the complex to be the source of the ophiolitic fragments in the Imbert Fm, during of shortly after the

  3. Integration of a Physically based Distributed Hydrological Model with a Model of Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling: A Case Study at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastola, S.; Dialynas, Y. G.; Bras, R. L.; Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of carbon and nitrogen cycles, increasingly influenced by human activities, are the key to the functioning of ecosystems. These cycles are influenced by the composition of the substrate, availability of nitrogen, the population of microorganisms, and by environmental factors. Therefore, land management and use, climate change, and nitrogen deposition patterns influence the dynamics of these macronutrients at the landscape scale. In this work a physically based distributed hydrological model, the tRIBS model, is coupled with a process-based multi-compartment model of the biogeochemical cycle to simulate the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen (CN) in the Mameyes River basin, Puerto Rico. The model includes a wide range of processes that influence the movement, production, alteration of nutrients in the landscape and factors that affect the CN cycling. The tRIBS integrates geomorphological and climatic factors that influence the cycling of CN in soil. Implementing the decomposition module into tRIBS makes the model a powerful complement to a biogeochemical observation system and a forecast tool able to analyze the influences of future changes on ecosystem services. The soil hydrologic parameters of the model were obtained using ranges of published parameters and observed streamflow data at the outlet. The parameters of the decomposition module are based on previously published data from studies conducted in the Luquillio CZO (budgets of soil organic matter and CN ratio for each of the dominant vegetation types across the landscape). Hydrological fluxes, wet depositon of nitrogen, litter fall and its corresponding CN ratio drive the decomposition model. The simulation results demonstrate a strong influence of soil moisture dynamics on the spatiotemporal distribution of nutrients at the landscape level. The carbon in the litter pool and the nitrate and ammonia pool respond quickly to soil moisture content. Moreover, the CN ratios of the plant litter have

  4. Assessment of Concentrations of Heavy Metals and Phthalates in Two Urban Rivers of the Northeast of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Colón, Ana I; Piñero-Santiago, Luis E; Rivera, Nilsa M; Sosa, María A

    2016-01-01

    Urbanization adjacent to rivers has increased in recent years and is considered a source of environmental contamination. The resulting increase in number of urban rivers in highly populated areas, such as the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico, has led to the appearance of synthetic as well as naturally occurring chemicals not previously observed nor regularly monitored in freshwater habitats. Some of these chemicals, such as heavy metals and plasticizers, have been shown to affect endocrine, respiratory, and nervous system function in animals and humans, even at relatively low concentrations. The purpose of this study was to measure concentrations of such emergent contaminants on rivers of urbanized areas on the northeast of Puerto Rico, as one element in the assessment of the impact of urbanism on water quality in these communities. To accomplish this, we used Inductively Coupled Plasma and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry to measure amounts of heavy metals and phthalates, respectively, in superficial water of three rivers of Puerto Rico: Mameyes (non-urban), Río Piedras (urban river without a dam), and La Plata (urban river with a dam). The urban rivers had significantly higher concentrations of heavy metals arsenic, barium, cadmium, manganese, and antimony, when compared with the reference non-urban river. Manganese was the only metal found in concentrations higher than limits established by the EPA for drinking water. Of eight phthalates amenable to measurement with the chosen protocol and instrumentation, only dibutyl phthalate was detected, only in the La Plata river, and at concentrations ranging from 3 to 8 parts-per-billion. These findings suggest that urbanism close to rivers of Puerto Rico is likely having an impact on water quality and thus further study to identify the potential sources, as well as the inclusion of these emergent contaminants on the list of chemicals regularly monitored by government agencies is justified. PMID:27148470

  5. Droplets to Deluges: Combining Stable-Isotope and Meteorological Data to Resolve Climate Controls on Recharge and Runoff in Tropical Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Determining which rain-producing weather patterns contribute most to water supply is important in areas where climate change is expected to influence large-scale atmospheric parameters controlling precipitation. Tropical mountain watersheds receive high rainfall, but their resilience to drought conditions is not well understood. Their hydrology may include extremely frequent small precipitation events as well as infrequent events with extreme amounts. Isotope hydrology studies in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico (LUQ) and the Hawaiian Islands compared rain, cloud water, stream and groundwater measurements to build understanding of the climate patterns that contribute to recharge and baseflow. Despite small annual fluctuation in land surface temperature, precipitation stable isotope composition varied seasonally, had a large range (δ 18O = -0.73 to -20.4‰, δ 2H = +12 to -154‰) and correlated with cloud altitude (atmospheric temperature) and storm history in both places. Permeability, storage capacity and antecedent moisture control how rainfall is partitioned into overland flow, plant-available soil moisture, and shallow and deep groundwater pathways on its way to the stream channel. In LUQ, orographic rain and cloud water were more important than convective rainfall in maintaining baseflow; a significant proportion of convective rainfall became runoff. In contrast, stream isotopic composition showed that a large storm supplied baseflow for 18 months in Hawaiian volcanic terrane. Over 3 years in LUQ, seasonal variation in deuterium excess indicated runoff in the 1780 ha Mameyes basin was about 25% quickflow (transit time < 7 days) and 75% groundwater. In a 1.5 ha headwater catchment, nightly cloud water deposition sustained stream water levels, and cloud water contribution to streamflow was evident in isotopic samples. Further research linking weather patterns, precipitation, and subsurface flow partitioning will help with water management in a changing

  6. Decomposition dynamics of mixed litter in a seasonally flooded forest near the Orinoco river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianoni, Alessia; Chacón, Noemí; Méndez, Carlos L.; Flores, Saúl

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the decomposition of a litter mixture in the seasonally flooded forest of a tributary of the Orinoco river. This mixture was prepared using three litter species, based on the litter fall rate observed over a complete hydro-period (2012-2013). The mixture loading ratio was 0.46 of Pouteria orinocoensis (Sapotaceae), 0.38 of Alibertia latifolia (Rubiaceae) and 0.16 of Acosmium nitens (Fabaceae). The initial chemical composition of each single litter species was also determined. Litterbags (20 × 20 cm, 2 mm opening) containing either each single species or the mixture, were deployed on the flooded forest soil and sampled after 30, 240, 270, 300 and 330 days. There were differences in initial total N and P concentrations, with A. nitens (AN) showing the highest nutrient concentrations (%NAN = 1.86 ± 0.19; %PAN = 0.058 ± 0.008) and P. orinocoensis (PO) and A. latifolia (AL) the lowest (%NPO = 0.92 ± 0.06; %NAL = 1.04 ± 0.04; %PPO = 0.029 ± 0.005; %PAL = 0.032 ± 0.001). Litter from AN showed the greatest mass loss (55%) and fastest decomposition rate (k = 0.00185 ± 0.00028) while litter from AL and the mixture showed the smallest mass loss (24% and 27% respectively) and the slowest decomposition rate (kAL = 0.00078 ± 0.00012 and kMIX = 0.00077 ± 0.00006). Decomposition rates were significantly and positively correlated with initial N (r = 0.556, p < 0.05) and P concentrations (r = 0.482, p < 0.05). Nevertheless, there were no significant differences between the expected decomposition rate and the observed decomposition rate of the mixture (additive response). To test the nature of the additivity, an enhancement factor (f) on decomposition rates for each single species was calculated. The species with the highest and smallest value of f were AN and AL, respectively. The fact that two out of the three species had values significantly different from 1, suggests that the additivity detected in our mixture was a consequence of the counterbalancing of

  7. Quantification soil production and erosion using isotopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, Anthony; Suresh, P. O.

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a critical resource, especially in the context of a rapidly growing world's population. Thus, it is crucial to be able to quantify how soil resources evolve with time and how fast they become depleted. Over the past few years, the application of cosmogenic isotopes has permitted to constrain rates of soil denudation. By assuming constant soil thickness, it is also possible to use these denudation rates to infer soil production rates (Heimsath et al. 1997). However, in this case, it is not possible to discuss any imbalance between erosion and production, which is the core question when interested in soil resource sustainability. Recently, the measurement of uranium-series isotopes in soils has been used to quantify the residence time of soil material in the weathering profile and to infer soil production rates (Dequincey et al. 2002; Dosseto et al. 2008). Thus, the combination of U-series and cosmogenic isotopes can be used to discuss how soil resources evolve with time, whether they are depleting, increasing or in steady-state. Recent work has been undertaken in temperate southeastern Australia where a several meters thick saprolite is developed over a graniodioritc bedrock and underlains a meter or less of soil (Dosseto et al., 2008) and in tropical Puerto Rico, also in a granitic catchment. Results show that in an environment where human activity is minimal, soil and saprolite are renewed as fast as they are destroyed through denudation. Further work is investigating these processes at other sites in southeastern Australia (Frogs Hollow; Heimsath et al. 2001) and Puerto Rico (Rio Mameyes catchment; andesitic bedrock). Results will be presented and a review of the quantification of the rates of soil evolution using isotopic techniques will be given. Dequincey, O., F. Chabaux, et al. (2002). Chemical mobilizations in laterites: Evidence from trace elements and 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66(7): 1197-1210. Dosseto, A., S. P

  8. Approaches to stream solute load estimation for solutes with varying dynamics from five diverse small watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.; Burns, Douglas A.; Shanley, James B.; Yanai, Ruth D.; Bae, Kikang; Wild, Adam; Yang, Yang; Yi, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Estimating streamwater solute loads is a central objective of many water-quality monitoring and research studies, as loads are used to compare with atmospheric inputs, to infer biogeochemical processes, and to assess whether water quality is improving or degrading. In this study, we evaluate loads and associated errors to determine the best load estimation technique among three methods (a period-weighted approach, the regression-model method, and the composite method) based on a solute's concentration dynamics and sampling frequency. We evaluated a broad range of varying concentration dynamics with stream flow and season using four dissolved solutes (sulfate, silica, nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon) at five diverse small watersheds (Sleepers River Research Watershed, VT; Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH; Biscuit Brook Watershed, NY; Panola Mountain Research Watershed, GA; and Río Mameyes Watershed, PR) with fairly high-frequency sampling during a 10- to 11-yr period. Data sets with three different sampling frequencies were derived from the full data set at each site (weekly plus storm/snowmelt events, weekly, and monthly) and errors in loads were assessed for the study period, annually, and monthly. For solutes that had a moderate to strong concentration–discharge relation, the composite method performed best, unless the autocorrelation of the model residuals was <0.2, in which case the regression-model method was most appropriate. For solutes that had a nonexistent or weak concentration–discharge relation (modelR2 < about 0.3), the period-weighted approach was most appropriate. The lowest errors in loads were achieved for solutes with the strongest concentration–discharge relations. Sample and regression model diagnostics could be used to approximate overall accuracies and annual precisions. For the period-weighed approach, errors were lower when the variance in concentrations was lower, the degree of autocorrelation in the concentrations was

  9. The Imbert Formation of northern Hispaniola: a tectono-sedimentary record of arc-continent collision and ophiolite emplacement in the northern Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, J.; Suárez-Rodríguez, Á.; Gabites, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2016-01-01

    In northern Hispaniola, the Imbert Formation (Fm) has been interpreted as an orogenic "mélange" originally deposited as trench-fill sediments, an accretionary (subduction) complex formed above a SW-dipping subduction zone, or the sedimentary result of the early oblique collision of the Caribbean plate with the Bahama Platform in the middle Eocene. However, new stratigraphical, structural, geochemical and geochronological data from northern Hispaniola indicate that the Imbert Fm constitutes a coarsening-upward stratigraphic sequence that records the transition of the sedimentation from a pre-collisional forearc to a syn-collisional basin. This basin was transported on top of the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex slab and structurally underlying accreted units of the Rio San Juan complex, as it was emplaced onto the North America continental margin units.

    The Imbert Fm unconformably overlies different structural levels of the Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism, including a supra-subduction zone ophiolite, and consists of three laterally discontinuous units that record the exhumation of the underlying basement. The distal turbiditic lower unit includes the latest volcanic activity of the Caribbean island arc; the more proximal turbiditic intermediate unit is moderately affected by syn-sedimentary faulting; and the upper unit is a (chaotic) olistostromic unit, composed of serpentinite-rich polymictic breccias, conglomerates and sandstones, strongly deformed by syn-sedimentary faulting, slumping and sliding processes. The Imbert Fm is followed by subsidence and turbiditic deposition of the overlying El Mamey Group.

    The 40Ar / 39Ar plagioclase plateau ages obtained in gabbroic rocks from the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex indicate its exhumation at ˜ 45-40 Ma (lower-to-middle Eocene), contemporaneously to the sedimentation of the overlying Imbert Fm. These cooling ages imply the uplift to the surface and submarine erosion of the complex to

  10. The Imbert Formation of northern Hispaniola: a tectono-sedimentary record of arc-continent collision and ophiolite emplacement in the northern Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, J.; Suárez-Rodríguez, A.; Gabites, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2015-06-01

    In northern Hispaniola, the Imbert Formation (Fm) has been interpreted as an orogenic "mélange" originally deposited as trench-fill sediments, an accretionary (subduction) complex formed above a SW-dipping subduction zone, or the sedimentary result of the early oblique collision of the Caribbean plate with the Bahama Platform in the middle Eocene. However, new stratigraphical, structural, geochemical and geochronological data from northern Hispaniola indicate that the Imbert Fm constitutes a coarsening-upward stratigraphic sequence that records the transition of the sedimentation from a pre-collisional forearc to a syn-collisional piggy-back basin. This piggy-back basin was transported on top of the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex slab and structurally underlying accreted units of the Rio San Juan complex, as it was emplaced onto the North America continental margin units. The Imbert Fm unconformably overlies different structural levels of the Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism, including a supra-subduction zone ophiolite, and consists of three laterally discontinuous units that record the exhumation of the underlying basement. The distal turbiditic lower unit includes the latest volcanic activity of the Caribbean island arc; the more proximal turbiditic intermediate unit is moderately affected by syn-sedimentary faulting; and the upper unit is a (caotic) olistostromic unit, composed of serpentinite-rich polymictic breccias, conglomerates and sandstones, strongly deformed by syn-sedimentary faulting, slumping and sliding processes. The Imbert Fm is followed by subsidence and turbiditic deposition of the overlying El Mamey Group. The 40Ar / 39Ar plagioclase plateau ages obtained in gabbroic rocks from the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex indicate its exhumation at ∼ 45-40 Ma (lower-to-middle Eocene), contemporaneously to the sedimentation of the overlying Imbert Fm. These cooling ages imply the uplift to the surface and submarine erosion of the complex to

  11. The Relative Importance of Convective and Trade-wind Orographic Precipitation to Streamflow in the Luquillo Mountains, Eastern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Occhi, M.; Scatena, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Like many mountainous areas in the tropics, watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico (18.3° N) have abundant rainfall and stream discharge, but relatively little storage capacity. Therefore, the water supply is vulnerable to drought and water availability may be affected by projected changes in regional temperature and atmospheric dynamics due to global warming. To help determine the links between climate and water availability, precipitation patterns were analyzed, and stable-isotope signatures of precipitation from different seasonal weather systems were established to identify those that are most important in maintaining streamflow and groundwater recharge. Stable isotope data include cloud water, rainfall, throughfall, streamflow, and groundwater from the Rio Mameyes and Rio Icacos/ Rio Blanco watersheds. Precipitation inputs have a wide range of stable isotope values, from fog/cloud water with δ2H and δ18O averaging +3.2‰, -1.74‰ respectively, to tropical storm rain with values as low as -154‰, -20.4‰. Spatial and temporal patterns of water isotopic values on this Caribbean island are different than higher latitude, continental watersheds. The data exhibit a 'reverse seasonality', with higher isotopic values in winter and lower values in summer; and stable isotope values of stream water do not decrease as expected with increasing altitude, because of cloud water input. Rain isotopic values vary predictably with local and mesoscale weather patterns and correlate strongly with cloud altitude. This correlation allows us to assign isotopic signatures to different sources of precipitation, and to investigate which climate patterns contribute to streamflow and groundwater recharge. At a measurement site at 615 m in the Luquillo Mountains, the average length of time between rain events was 15 h, and 45% of the rain events were <2 mm, reflecting the frequent small rain events of the trade-wind orographic rainfall weather pattern. Long

  12. Stable Isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) Help to Delineate Flow Paths and the Importance of Different Climate Patterns in Watersheds of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Scatena, F. N.

    2009-12-01

    altitudes in the Icacos and Mameyes watersheds suggests that the low-intensity trade-wind showers contribute a greater proportion of stream baseflow than do high-intensity rain events. High-intensity rain events run off quickly and may not effectively infiltrate the saturated tropical soils. The seasonal cycle of rain isotopic composition is also reflected in the streams and can be utilized to estimate contributions from shallow and deep flow paths for both watersheds.

  13. How does a single precipitation event erode a landscape? Clues from meteoric 7Be and 10Be analysis of suspended sediments and soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhi, M.; Willenbring, J. K.; Kaste, J. M.; Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Stream sediment contains a history recorded in isotopes that cling to suspended particles. In this study we exploit this recorded history in order to understand how a single precipitation event erodes the landscape at two watershed sites (Bisley I and Mameyes) within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. We use fallout cosmogenic radionuclides Beryllium-7 (7Be) and Beryllium-10 (10Be) to determine the provenance of suspended sediment at various stages of a hydrograph. Sediments from source areas within the watersheds, such as stable ridge crests and active landslide scars, were also sampled and analyzed. Exploiting the large difference in half-life, the 10Be/7Be ratio of suspended sediments coupled with the concentration and nature of organic material present show original depth of mobilized stream sediment in the hillslope. The storm hydrographs of a one-month recurrence interval storm on June 7th, 2011 were sampled at both watersheds. In the small watershed (0.067 km2), storm discharge and total suspended solids (TSS) show short lag times between the initiation of precipitation and the initial rise of the hydrograph and no lag time between peak discharge and peak TSS. The larger site (17.8 km2) had a lag time of approximately 30 minutes between the initiation of precipitation and a rise in discharge and had a 15-minute lag between peak stage (which occurred first) and peak TSS, highlighting the longer travel distances that particles must take to reach the stream sampling point in the larger basin. We compare fallout 7Be nuclide concentration in source sediments and assume a simple, two end-member model to mix these sources in the stream. Soil sediments collected from stable ridge crests ('old') have relatively high average 7Be concentrations of 2.7x106 atoms/g±10% and sediments collected from active landslide scars ('new') have relatively low 7Be concentrations of 4.0x104 atoms/g±15%. Suspended sediments had an average 7Be concentration of 7.2x