Science.gov

Sample records for mammalian gene pairs

  1. Targeted Myostatin Gene Editing in Multiple Mammalian Species Directed by a Single Pair of TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhao, Piming; Mariano, Andrew; Han, Renzhi

    2013-07-30

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Strategies to block myostatin signaling pathway have been extensively pursued to increase muscle mass in various disease settings including muscular dystrophy. Here, we report a new class of reagents based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to disrupt myostatin expression at the genome level. We designed a pair of MSTN TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the myostatin gene. We demonstrate that codelivery of these MSTN TALENs induce highly specific and efficient gene disruption in a variety of human, cattle, and mouse cells. Based upon sequence analysis, this pair of TALENs is expected to be functional in many other mammalian species. Moreover, we demonstrate that these MSTN TALENs can facilitate targeted integration of a mCherry expression cassette or a larger muscular dystrophy gene (dysferlin) expression cassette into the MSTN locus in mouse or human cells. Therefore, targeted editing of the myostatin gene using our highly specific and efficient TALEN pair would facilitate cell engineering, allowing potential use in translational research for cell-based therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e112; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.39; published online 30 July 2013.

  2. Mammalian Axoneme Central Pair Complex Proteins: Broader Roles Revealed by Gene Knockout Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Zhang, Zhibing; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    The axoneme genes, their encoded proteins, their functions and the structures they form are largely conserved across species. Much of our knowledge of the function and structure of axoneme proteins in cilia and flagella is derived from studies on model organisms like the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The core structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, which in most motile cilia and flagella contains a 9 + 2 configuration of microtubules. The two central microtubules are the scaffold of the central pair complex (CPC). Mutations that disrupt CPC genes in Chlamydomonas and other model organisms result in defects in assembly, stability and function of the axoneme, leading to flagellar motility defects. However, targeted mutations generated in mice in the orthologous CPC genes have revealed significant differences in phenotypes of mutants compared to Chlamydomonas. Here we review observations that support the concept of cell-type specific roles for the CPC genes in mice, and an expanded repertoire of functions for the products of these genes in cilia, including non-motile cilia, and other microtubule-associated cellular functions. PMID:26785425

  3. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gwatkin, R.B.L.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  4. A Unique Genetically Encoded FRET Pair in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amanda L; Addy, Partha Sarathi; Chin, Melissa A; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-03-16

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two suitable fluorophores is a powerful tool to monitor dynamic changes in protein structure in vitro and in vivo. The ability to genetically encode a FRET pair represents a convenient "labeling-free" strategy to incorporate them into target protein(s). Currently, the only genetically encoded FRET pairs available for use in mammalian cells use fluorescent proteins. However, their large size can lead to unfavorable perturbations, particularly when two are used at the same time. Additionally, fluorescent proteins are largely restricted to a terminal attachment to the target, which might not be optimal. Here, we report the development of an alternative genetically encoded FRET pair in mammalian cells that circumvents these challenges by taking advantage of a small genetically encoded fluorescent unnatural amino acid as the donor and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as the acceptor. The small size of Anap relative to fluorescent proteins, and the ability to co-translationally incorporate it into internal sites on the target protein, endows this novel FRET pair with improved versatility over its counterparts that rely upon two fluorescent proteins. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synthetic therapeutic gene circuits in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haifeng; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In the emerging field of synthetic biology, scientists are focusing on designing and creating functional devices, systems, and organisms with novel functions by engineering and assembling standardised biological building blocks. The progress of synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of functional gene networks that can reprogram metabolic activities in mammalian cells and provide new therapeutic opportunities for future gene- and cell-based therapies. In this review, we describe the most recent advances in synthetic mammalian gene networks designed for biomedical applications, including how these synthetic therapeutic gene circuits can be assembled to control signalling networks and applied to treat metabolic disorders, cancer, and immune diseases. We conclude by discussing the various challenges and future prospects of using synthetic mammalian gene networks for disease therapy. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthetic mammalian gene circuits for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haifeng; Aubel, Dominique; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic biology is the science of reassembling cataloged and standardized biological items in a systematic and rational manner to create and engineer functional biological designer devices, systems and organisms with novel and useful, preferably therapeutic functions. Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of complex genetic networks that can reprogram metabolic activities in mammalian cells and provide novel therapeutic strategies for future gene-based and cell-based therapies. Synthetic biology-inspired therapeutic strategies provide new opportunities for improving human health in the 21st century. This review covers the most recent synthetic mammalian circuits designed for therapy of diseases such as metabolic disorders, cancer, and immune disorders. We conclude by discussing current challenges and future perspectives for biomedical applications of synthetic mammalian gene networks.

  7. The Evolution of Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Issel-Tarver, L.; Rine, J.

    1997-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of four subfamilies of olfactory receptor genes first identified in the dog to assess changes in the gene family during mammalian evolution, and to begin linking the dog genetic map to that of humans. The human subfamilies were localized to chromosomes 7, 11, and 19. The two subfamilies that were tightly linked in the dog genome were also tightly linked in the human genome. The four subfamilies were compared in human (primate), horse (perissodactyl), and a variety of artiodactyls and carnivores. Some changes in gene number were detected, but overall subfamily size appeared to have been established before the divergence of these mammals 60-100 million years ago. PMID:9017400

  8. Transferring a synthetic gene circuit from yeast to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Zal, Tomasz; Balázsi, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology builds gene circuits for scientific, industrial and therapeutic needs. Adaptability of synthetic gene circuits across different organisms could enable a synthetic biology pipeline, where circuits are designed in silico, characterized in microbes and reimplemented in mammalian settings for practical usage. However, the processes affecting gene circuit adaptability have not been systematically investigated. Here we construct a mammalian version of a negative feedback-based 'linearizer' gene circuit previously developed in yeast. The first naïve mammalian prototype was non-functional, but a computational model suggested that we could recover function by improving gene expression and protein localization. After rationally developing and combining new parts as the model suggested, we regained function and could tune target gene expression in human cells linearly and precisely as in yeast. The steps we have taken should be generally relevant for transferring any gene circuit from yeast into mammalian cells.

  9. Timing of circadian genes in mammalian tissues

    PubMed Central

    Korenčič, Anja; Košir, Rok; Bordyugov, Grigory; Lehmann, Robert; Rozman, Damjana; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology. The cell-autonomous clock is governed by an interlocked network of transcriptional feedback loops. Hundreds of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) regulate tissue specific functions. Transcriptome studies reveal that different organs (e.g. liver, heart, adrenal gland) feature substantially varying sets of CCGs with different peak phase distributions. To study the phase variability of CCGs in mammalian peripheral tissues, we develop a core clock model for mouse liver and adrenal gland based on expression profiles and known cis-regulatory sites. ‘Modulation factors’ associated with E-boxes, ROR-elements, and D-boxes can explain variable rhythms of CCGs, which is demonstrated for differential regulation of cytochromes P450 and 12 h harmonics. By varying model parameters we explore how tissue-specific peak phase distributions can be generated. The central role of E-boxes and ROR-elements is confirmed by analysing ChIP-seq data of BMAL1 and REV-ERB transcription factors. PMID:25048020

  10. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L.; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector–cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 × 10−5 to 1.2 × 10−4 per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells. PMID:17062627

  11. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B; Ruley, H Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector-cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 x 10(-5) to 1.2 x 10(-4) per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells.

  12. Improving mammalian genome scaffolding using large insert mate-pair next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paired-tag sequencing approaches are commonly used for the analysis of genome structure. However, mammalian genomes have a complex organization with a variety of repetitive elements that complicate comprehensive genome-wide analyses. Results Here, we systematically assessed the utility of paired-end and mate-pair (MP) next-generation sequencing libraries with insert sizes ranging from 170 bp to 25 kb, for genome coverage and for improving scaffolding of a mammalian genome (Rattus norvegicus). Despite a lower library complexity, large insert MP libraries (20 or 25 kb) provided very high physical genome coverage and were found to efficiently span repeat elements in the genome. Medium-sized (5, 8 or 15 kb) MP libraries were much more efficient for genome structure analysis than the more commonly used shorter insert paired-end and 3 kb MP libraries. Furthermore, the combination of medium- and large insert libraries resulted in a 3-fold increase in N50 in scaffolding processes. Finally, we show that our data can be used to evaluate and improve contig order and orientation in the current rat reference genome assembly. Conclusions We conclude that applying combinations of mate-pair libraries with insert sizes that match the distributions of repetitive elements improves contig scaffolding and can contribute to the finishing of draft genomes. PMID:23590730

  13. Expression of myriapod pair rule gene orthologs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Segmentation is a hallmark of the arthropods; most knowledge about the molecular basis of arthropod segmentation comes from work on the fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this species a hierarchic cascade of segmentation genes subdivides the blastoderm stepwise into single segment wide regions. However, segmentation in the fly is a derived feature since all segments form virtually simultaneously. Conversely, in the vast majority of arthropods the posterior segments form one at a time from a posterior pre-segmental zone. The pair rule genes (PRGs) comprise an important level of the Drosophila segmentation gene cascade and are indeed the first genes that are expressed in typical transverse stripes in the early embryo. Information on expression and function of PRGs outside the insects, however, is scarce. Results Here we present the expression of the pair rule gene orthologs in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda). We find evidence that these genes are involved in segmentation and that components of the hierarchic interaction of the gene network as found in insects may be conserved. We further provide evidence that segments are formed in a single-segment periodicity rather than in pairs of two like in another myriapod, the centipede Strigamia maritima. Finally we show that decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation in Glomeris appears already at the level of the PRGs. Conclusions Although the pair rule gene network is partially conserved among insects and myriapods, some aspects of PRG interaction are, as suggested by expression pattern analysis, convergent, even within the Myriapoda. Conserved expression patterns of PRGs in insects and myriapods, however, may represent ancestral features involved in segmenting the arthropod ancestor. PMID:21352542

  14. Pairing call-response surveys and distance sampling for a mammalian carnivore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Sara J. K.; Frair, Jacqueline L.; Underwood, Harold B.; Gibbs, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Density estimates accounting for differential animal detectability are difficult to acquire for wide-ranging and elusive species such as mammalian carnivores. Pairing distance sampling with call-response surveys may provide an efficient means of tracking changes in populations of coyotes (Canis latrans), a species of particular interest in the eastern United States. Blind field trials in rural New York State indicated 119-m linear error for triangulated coyote calls, and a 1.8-km distance threshold for call detectability, which was sufficient to estimate a detection function with precision using distance sampling. We conducted statewide road-based surveys with sampling locations spaced ≥6 km apart from June to August 2010. Each detected call (be it a single or group) counted as a single object, representing 1 territorial pair, because of uncertainty in the number of vocalizing animals. From 524 survey points and 75 detections, we estimated the probability of detecting a calling coyote to be 0.17 ± 0.02 SE, yielding a detection-corrected index of 0.75 pairs/10 km2 (95% CI: 0.52–1.1, 18.5% CV) for a minimum of 8,133 pairs across rural New York State. Importantly, we consider this an index rather than true estimate of abundance given the unknown probability of coyote availability for detection during our surveys. Even so, pairing distance sampling with call-response surveys provided a novel, efficient, and noninvasive means of monitoring populations of wide-ranging and elusive, albeit reliably vocal, mammalian carnivores. Our approach offers an effective new means of tracking species like coyotes, one that is readily extendable to other species and geographic extents, provided key assumptions of distance sampling are met.

  15. Design factors that influence PCR amplification success of cross-species primers among 1147 mammalian primer pairs

    PubMed Central

    Housley, Donna JE; Zalewski, Zachary A; Beckett, Stephanie E; Venta, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background Cross-species primers have been used with moderate success to address a variety of questions concerning genome structure, evolution, and gene function. However, the factors affecting their success have never been adequately addressed, particularly with respect to producing a consistent method to achieve high throughput. Using 1,147 mammalian cross-species primer pairs (1089 not previously reported), we tested several factors to determine their influence on the probability that a given target will amplify in a given species under a single amplification condition. These factors included: number of mismatches between the two species (the index species) used to identify conserved regions to which the primers were designed, GC-content of the gene and amplified region, CpG dinucleotides in the primer region, degree of encoded protein conservation, length of the primers, and the degree of evolutionary distance between the target species and the two index species. Results The amplification success rate for the cross-species primers was significantly influenced by the number of mismatches between the two index species (6–8% decrease per mismatch in a primer pair), the GC-content within the amplified region (for the dog, GC ≥ 50%, 56.9% amplified; GC<50%, 74.2% amplified), the degree of protein conservation (R2 = 0.14) and the relatedness of the target species to the index species. For the dog, 598 products of 930 primer pairs (64.3%) (excluding primers in which dog was an index species) were sequenced and shown to be the expected product, with an additional three percent producing the incorrect sequence. When hamster DNA was used with the single amplification condition in a microtiter plate-based format, 510 of 1087 primer pairs (46.9%) produced amplified products. The primer pairs are spaced at an average distance of 2.3 Mb in the human genome and may be used to produce up to several hundred thousand bp of species-specific sequence. Conclusion The most

  16. Design factors that influence PCR amplification success of cross-species primers among 1147 mammalian primer pairs.

    PubMed

    Housley, Donna J E; Zalewski, Zachary A; Beckett, Stephanie E; Venta, Patrick J

    2006-10-09

    Cross-species primers have been used with moderate success to address a variety of questions concerning genome structure, evolution, and gene function. However, the factors affecting their success have never been adequately addressed, particularly with respect to producing a consistent method to achieve high throughput. Using 1,147 mammalian cross-species primer pairs (1089 not previously reported), we tested several factors to determine their influence on the probability that a given target will amplify in a given species under a single amplification condition. These factors included: number of mismatches between the two species (the index species) used to identify conserved regions to which the primers were designed, GC-content of the gene and amplified region, CpG dinucleotides in the primer region, degree of encoded protein conservation, length of the primers, and the degree of evolutionary distance between the target species and the two index species. The amplification success rate for the cross-species primers was significantly influenced by the number of mismatches between the two index species (6-8% decrease per mismatch in a primer pair), the GC-content within the amplified region (for the dog, GC > or = 50%, 56.9% amplified; GC<50%, 74.2% amplified), the degree of protein conservation (R2 = 0.14) and the relatedness of the target species to the index species. For the dog, 598 products of 930 primer pairs (64.3%) (excluding primers in which dog was an index species) were sequenced and shown to be the expected product, with an additional three percent producing the incorrect sequence. When hamster DNA was used with the single amplification condition in a microtiter plate-based format, 510 of 1087 primer pairs (46.9%) produced amplified products. The primer pairs are spaced at an average distance of 2.3 Mb in the human genome and may be used to produce up to several hundred thousand bp of species-specific sequence. The most important factors influencing the

  17. How difficult is inference of mammalian causal gene regulatory networks?

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Djordje; Yang, Andrian; Zadoorian, Armella; Rungrugeecharoen, Kevin; Ho, Joshua W K

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) play a central role in systems biology, especially in the study of mammalian organ development. One key question remains largely unanswered: Is it possible to infer mammalian causal GRNs using observable gene co-expression patterns alone? We assembled two mouse GRN datasets (embryonic tooth and heart) and matching microarray gene expression profiles to systematically investigate the difficulties of mammalian causal GRN inference. The GRNs were assembled based on > 2,000 pieces of experimental genetic perturbation evidence from manually reading > 150 primary research articles. Each piece of perturbation evidence records the qualitative change of the expression of one gene following knock-down or over-expression of another gene. Our data have thorough annotation of tissue types and embryonic stages, as well as the type of regulation (activation, inhibition and no effect), which uniquely allows us to estimate both sensitivity and specificity of the inference of tissue specific causal GRN edges. Using these unprecedented datasets, we found that gene co-expression does not reliably distinguish true positive from false positive interactions, making inference of GRN in mammalian development very difficult. Nonetheless, if we have expression profiling data from genetic or molecular perturbation experiments, such as gene knock-out or signalling stimulation, it is possible to use the set of differentially expressed genes to recover causal regulatory relationships with good sensitivity and specificity. Our result supports the importance of using perturbation experimental data in causal network reconstruction. Furthermore, we showed that causal gene regulatory relationship can be highly cell type or developmental stage specific, suggesting the importance of employing expression profiles from homogeneous cell populations. This study provides essential datasets and empirical evidence to guide the development of new GRN inference methods for

  18. Producing a Mammalian GFP Expression Vector Containing Neomycin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Manizheh; Abiri, Maryam; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) was originally isolated from the Jellyfish Aequorea Victoria that fluoresces green when exposed to blue light. GFP protein is composed of 238 amino acids with the molecular mass of 26.9 kD. The GFP gene is frequently used in cellular and molecular biology as a reporter gene. To date, many bacterial, yeast, fungal, plants, fly and mammalian cells, including human, have been created which express GFP. Martin Chalfie, Osamu Shimomura, and Roger Tsien were awarded the 2008 noble prize in chemistry for their discovery and development of GFP. In many studies on mammalian cells, GFP gene is introduced into cells using vector-based systems or a recombinant virus to track the location of a target protein or to study the expression level of the gene of interest, but in these studies there is no selection marker to normalize transfection. According to the importance of neomycin gene as a selection marker in mammalian cells, we aimed to produce a GFP expression vector that contains neomycin gene. GFP gene was separated from pEGFP-N1 vector and was inserted in the back-bone of pCDNA3.1/His/LacZ vector that contained the neomycin gene. The resulted vector contained GFP beside neomycin gene.

  19. Developmental gene expression profiling of mammalian, fetal orofacial tissue.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Greene, Robert M; Zacharias, Wolfgang; Weinrich, Martin C; Singh, Saurabh; Young, William W; Pisano, M Michele

    2004-12-01

    The embryonic orofacial region is an excellent developmental paradigm that has revealed the centrality of numerous genes encoding proteins with diverse and important biological functions in embryonic growth and morphogenesis. DNA microarray technology presents an efficient means of acquiring novel and valuable information regarding the expression, regulation, and function of a panoply of genes involved in mammalian orofacial development. To identify differentially expressed genes during mammalian orofacial ontogenesis, the transcript profiles of GD-12, GD-13, and GD-14 murine orofacial tissue were compared utilizing GeneChip arrays from Affymetrix. Changes in gene expression were verified by TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR. Cluster analysis of the microarray data was done with the GeneCluster 2.0 Data Mining Tool and the GeneSpring software. Expression of >50% of the approximately 12,000 genes and expressed sequence tags examined in this study was detected in GD-12, GD-13, and GD-14 murine orofacial tissues and the expression of several hundred genes was up- and downregulated in the developing orofacial tissue from GD-12 to GD-13, as well as from GD-13 to GD-14. Such differential gene expression represents changes in the expression of genes encoding growth factors and signaling molecules; transcription factors; and proteins involved in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, extracellular matrix synthesis, cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Following cluster analysis of the microarray data, eight distinct patterns of gene expression during murine orofacial ontogenesis were selected for graphic presentation of gene expression patterns. This gene expression profiling study identifies a number of potentially unique developmental participants and serves as a valuable aid in deciphering the complex molecular mechanisms crucial for mammalian orofacial development.

  20. A complementation method for functional analysis of mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Wang, Anan; Koehler, David R.; Martin, Bernard; Navab, Roya; Hu, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Our progress in understanding mammalian gene function has lagged behind that of gene identification. New methods for mammalian gene functional analysis are needed to accelerate the process. In yeast, the powerful genetic shuffle system allows deletion of any chromosomal gene by homologous recombination and episomal expression of a mutant allele in the same cell. Here, we report a method for mammalian cells, which employs a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector to synthesize small hairpin (sh) RNAs to knock-down the expression of an endogenous gene by targeting untranslated regions (UTRs). The vector simultaneously expresses an exogenous version of the same gene (wild-type or mutant allele) lacking the UTRs for functional analysis. We demonstrated the utility of the method by using PRPF3, which encodes the human RNA splicing factor Hprp3p. Recently, missense mutations in PRPF3 were found to cause autosomal-dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa, a form of genetic eye diseases affecting the retina. We knocked-down endogenous PRPF3 in multiple cell lines and rescued the phenotype (cell death) with exogenous PRPF3 cDNA, thereby creating a genetic complementation method. Because Ad vectors can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types, and many tissues in vivo, this method could have a wide application for gene function studies. PMID:15944448

  1. Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C.; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications. PMID:23625964

  2. Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-07-01

    The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications.

  3. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  4. Bursty gene expression in the intact mammalian liver

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Keren Bahar; Tanami, Sivan; Landen, Shanie; Chapal, Michal; Szlak, Liran; Hutzler, Anat; Nizhberg, Anna; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bursts of nascent mRNA have been shown to lead to substantial cell-cell variation in unicellular organisms, facilitating diverse responses to environmental challenges. It is unknown whether similar bursts and gene-expression noise occur in mammalian tissues. To address this, we combine single molecule transcript counting with dual-color labeling and quantification of nascent mRNA to characterize promoter states, transcription rates and transcript lifetimes in the intact mouse liver. We find that liver gene expression is highly bursty, with promoters stochastically switching between transcriptionally active and inactive states. Promoters of genes with short mRNA lifetimes are active longer, facilitating rapid response while reducing burst-associated noise. Moreover, polyploid hepatocytes exhibit less noise than diploid hepatocytes, suggesting a possible benefit to liver polyploidy. Thus temporal averaging and liver polyploidy dampen the intrinsic variability associated with transcriptional bursts. Our approach can be used to study transcriptional bursting in diverse mammalian tissues. PMID:25728770

  5. Synthetic RNA-based switches for mammalian gene expression control.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Fussenegger, Martin

    2017-04-04

    Synthetic ribonucleic acid (RNA)-based gene switches control RNA functions in a ligand-responsive manner. Key building blocks are aptamers that specifically bind to small molecules or protein ligands. Engineering approaches often combine rational design and high-throughput screening to identify optimal connection sites or sequences. In this report, we discuss basic principles and emerging design strategies for the engineering of RNA-based gene switches in mammalian cells. Their small size compared with those of transcriptional gene switches, together with advancements in design strategies and performance, may bring RNA-based switches to the forefront of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  6. DNA repair genes of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Fuscoe, J.C.; Weber, C.A.

    1985-09-27

    In the CHO cell line various mutations affecting DNA repair have been obtained. Mutants that belong to five genetic complementation groups for UV sensitivity and resemble the cells from individuals having the cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum were previously identified. Each mutant is defective in the incision step of nucleotide excision repair and hypersensitive to bulky DNA lesions. A sixth genetic complementation group for UV sensitivity has now been identified with UV27-1. These UV mutants can be divided into two subgroups; only Groups 2 and 4 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C and other DNA cross-linking agents. The clear-cut phenotypes of the CHO mutants have allowed us to construct hybrid cells by fusion with human lymphocytes and thereby identify which human chromosomes carry genes that correct the CHO mutations. The first two mutants analyzed, UV20 (excision-repair deficient; UV Group 2) and EM9, which has very high SCE, are both corrected by chromosome 19. 46 refs., 3 figs.

  7. The completion of the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Gary; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Rasooly, Rebekah; Feingold, Elise A.; Good, Peter J.; Robinson, Cristen; Mandich, Allison; Derge, Jeffrey G.; Lewis, Jeanne; Shoaf, Debonny; Collins, Francis S.; Jang, Wonhee; Wagner, Lukas; Shenmen, Carolyn M.; Misquitta, Leonie; Schaefer, Carl F.; Buetow, Kenneth H.; Bonner, Tom I.; Yankie, Linda; Ward, Ming; Phan, Lon; Astashyn, Alex; Brown, Garth; Farrell, Catherine; Hart, Jennifer; Landrum, Melissa; Maidak, Bonnie L.; Murphy, Michael; Murphy, Terence; Rajput, Bhanu; Riddick, Lillian; Webb, David; Weber, Janet; Wu, Wendy; Pruitt, Kim D.; Maglott, Donna; Siepel, Adam; Brejova, Brona; Diekhans, Mark; Harte, Rachel; Baertsch, Robert; Kent, Jim; Haussler, David; Brent, Michael; Langton, Laura; Comstock, Charles L.G.; Stevens, Michael; Wei, Chaochun; van Baren, Marijke J.; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Murray, Ryan R.; Ghamsari, Lila; Mello, Elizabeth; Lin, Chenwei; Pennacchio, Christa; Schreiber, Kirsten; Shapiro, Nicole; Marsh, Amber; Pardes, Elizabeth; Moore, Troy; Lebeau, Anita; Muratet, Mike; Simmons, Blake; Kloske, David; Sieja, Stephanie; Hudson, James; Sethupathy, Praveen; Brownstein, Michael; Bhat, Narayan; Lazar, Joseph; Jacob, Howard; Gruber, Chris E.; Smith, Mark R.; McPherson, John; Garcia, Angela M.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Wu, Jiaqian; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A.; Young, Alice C.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Mullikin, Jim; Green, Eric D.; Dickson, Mark C.; Rodriguez, Alex C.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M.; Hirst, Martin; Zeng, Thomas; Tse, Kane; Moksa, Michelle; Deng, Merinda; Ma, Kevin; Mah, Diana; Pang, Johnson; Taylor, Greg; Chuah, Eric; Deng, Athena; Fichter, Keith; Go, Anne; Lee, Stephanie; Wang, Jing; Griffith, Malachi; Morin, Ryan; Moore, Richard A.; Mayo, Michael; Munro, Sarah; Wagner, Susan; Jones, Steven J.M.; Holt, Robert A.; Marra, Marco A.; Lu, Sun; Yang, Shuwei; Hartigan, James; Graf, Marcus; Wagner, Ralf; Letovksy, Stanley; Pulido, Jacqueline C.; Robison, Keith; Esposito, Dominic; Hartley, James; Wall, Vanessa E.; Hopkins, Ralph F.; Ohara, Osamu; Wiemann, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide. PMID:19767417

  8. Molecular evolution of the mammalian ribosomal protein gene, RPS14.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D D; Roufa, D J

    1991-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S14 genes (RPS14) in eukaryotic species from protozoa to primates exhibit dramatically different intron-exon structures yet share homologous polypeptide-coding sequences. To recognize common features of RPS14 gene architectures in closely related mammalian species and to evaluate similarities in their noncoding DNA sequences, we isolated the intron-containing S14 locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell DNA by using a PCR strategy and compared it with human RPS14. We found that rodent and primate S14 genes are composed of identical protein-coding exons interrupted by introns at four conserved DNA sites. However, the structures of corresponding CHO and human RPS14 introns differ significantly. Nonetheless, individual intron splice donor, splice acceptor, and upstream flanking motifs have been conserved within mammalian S14 homologues as well as within RPS14 gene fragments PCR amplified from other vertebrate genera (birds and bony fish). Our data indicate that noncoding, intronic DNA sequences within highly conserved, single-copy ribosomal protein genes are useful molecular landmarks for phylogenetic analysis of closely related vertebrate species.

  9. Ex vivo mammalian prions are formed of paired double helical prion protein fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Cassandra; Wenborn, Adam; Gros, Nathalie; Sells, Jessica; Joiner, Susan; Hosszu, Laszlo L. P.; Tattum, M. Howard; Panico, Silvia; Clare, Daniel K.; Collinge, John; Saibil, Helen R.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian prions are hypothesized to be fibrillar or amyloid forms of prion protein (PrP), but structures observed to date have not been definitively correlated with infectivity and the three-dimensional structure of infectious prions has remained obscure. Recently, we developed novel methods to obtain exceptionally pure preparations of prions from mouse brain and showed that pathogenic PrP in these high-titre preparations is assembled into rod-like assemblies. Here, we have used precise cell culture-based prion infectivity assays to define the physical relationship between the PrP rods and prion infectivity and have used electron tomography to define their architecture. We show that infectious PrP rods isolated from multiple prion strains have a common hierarchical assembly comprising twisted pairs of short fibres with repeating substructure. The architecture of the PrP rods provides a new structural basis for understanding prion infectivity and can explain the inability to systematically generate high-titre synthetic prions from recombinant PrP. PMID:27249641

  10. Ex vivo mammalian prions are formed of paired double helical prion protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Terry, Cassandra; Wenborn, Adam; Gros, Nathalie; Sells, Jessica; Joiner, Susan; Hosszu, Laszlo L P; Tattum, M Howard; Panico, Silvia; Clare, Daniel K; Collinge, John; Saibil, Helen R; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian prions are hypothesized to be fibrillar or amyloid forms of prion protein (PrP), but structures observed to date have not been definitively correlated with infectivity and the three-dimensional structure of infectious prions has remained obscure. Recently, we developed novel methods to obtain exceptionally pure preparations of prions from mouse brain and showed that pathogenic PrP in these high-titre preparations is assembled into rod-like assemblies. Here, we have used precise cell culture-based prion infectivity assays to define the physical relationship between the PrP rods and prion infectivity and have used electron tomography to define their architecture. We show that infectious PrP rods isolated from multiple prion strains have a common hierarchical assembly comprising twisted pairs of short fibres with repeating substructure. The architecture of the PrP rods provides a new structural basis for understanding prion infectivity and can explain the inability to systematically generate high-titre synthetic prions from recombinant PrP.

  11. Generation of Stable Knockout Mammalian Cells by TALEN-Mediated Locus-Specific Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Barun; Biswas, Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    Precise and targeted genome editing using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Endonucleases (TALENs) has been widely used and proven to be an extremely effective and specific knockout strategy in both cultured cells and animal models. The current chapter describes a protocol for the construction and generation of TALENs using serial and hierarchical digestion and ligation steps, and using the synthesized TALEN pairs to achieve locus-specific targeted gene editing in mammalian cell lines using a modified clonal selection strategy in an easy and cost-efficient manner.

  12. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  13. Gene organization inside replication domains in mammalian genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the large-scale organization of human genes with respect to "master" replication origins that were previously identified as bordering nucleotide compositional skew domains. We separate genes in two categories depending on their CpG enrichment at the promoter which can be considered as a marker of germline DNA methylation. Using expression data in mouse, we confirm that CpG-rich genes are highly expressed in germline whereas CpG-poor genes are in a silent state. We further show that, whether tissue-specific or broadly expressed (housekeeping genes), the CpG-rich genes are over-represented close to the replication skew domain borders suggesting some coordination of replication and transcription. We also reveal that the transcription of the longest CpG-rich genes is co-oriented with replication fork progression so that the promoter of these transcriptionally active genes be located into the accessible open chromatin environment surrounding the master replication origins that border the replication skew domains. The observation of a similar gene organization in the mouse genome confirms the interplay of replication, transcription and chromatin structure as the cornerstone of mammalian genome architecture.

  14. Mammalian genes induce partially reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells in non-mammalian vertebrate and invertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Rosselló, Ricardo Antonio; Chen, Chun-Chun; Dai, Rui; Howard, Jason T; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Jarvis, Erich D

    2013-01-01

    Cells are fundamental units of life, but little is known about evolution of cell states. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are once differentiated cells that have been re-programmed to an embryonic stem cell-like state, providing a powerful platform for biology and medicine. However, they have been limited to a few mammalian species. Here we found that a set of four mammalian transcription factor genes used to generate iPSCs in mouse and humans can induce a partially reprogrammed pluripotent stem cell (PRPSCs) state in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms, in mammals, birds, fish, and fly, which span 550 million years from a common ancestor. These findings are one of the first to show cross-lineage stem cell-like induction, and to generate pluripotent-like cells for several of these species with in vivo chimeras. We suggest that the stem-cell state may be highly conserved across a wide phylogenetic range. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00036.001 PMID:24015354

  15. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  16. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  17. Simplified ontologies allowing comparison of developmental mammalian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Adele; Hofmann, Oliver; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hide, Winston

    2007-01-01

    Model organisms represent an important resource for understanding the fundamental aspects of mammalian biology. Mapping of biological phenomena between model organisms is complex and if it is to be meaningful, a simplified representation can be a powerful means for comparison. The Developmental eVOC ontologies presented here are simplified orthogonal ontologies describing the temporal and spatial distribution of developmental human and mouse anatomy. We demonstrate the ontologies by identifying genes showing a bias for developmental brain expression in human and mouse. PMID:17961239

  18. Regulation of mammalian horizontal gene transfer by apoptotic DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, B; Wang, H; Li, F; Li, C-Y

    2006-01-01

    Previously it was shown that horizontal DNA transfer between mammalian cells can occur through the uptake of apoptotic bodies, where genes from the apoptotic cells were transferred to neighbouring cells phagocytosing the apoptotic bodies. The regulation of this process is poorly understood. It was shown that the ability of cells as recipient of horizontally transferred DNA was enhanced by deficiency of p53 or p21. However, little is known with regard to the regulation of DNA from donor apoptotic cells. Here we report that the DNA fragmentation factor/caspase-activated DNase (DFF/CAD), which is the endonuclease responsible for DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, plays a significant role in regulation of horizontal DNA transfer. Cells with inhibited DFF/CAD function are poor donors for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) while their ability of being recipients of HGT is not affected. PMID:17146478

  19. Firefly luciferase gene: structure and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Wet, J R; Wood, K V; DeLuca, M; Helinski, D R; Subramani, S

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the luciferase gene from the firefly Photinus pyralis was determined from the analysis of cDNA and genomic clones. The gene contains six introns, all less than 60 bases in length. The 5' end of the luciferase mRNA was determined by both S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension. Although the luciferase cDNA clone lacked the six N-terminal codons of the open reading frame, we were able to reconstruct the equivalent of a full-length cDNA using the genomic clone as a source of the missing 5' sequence. The full-length, intronless luciferase gene was inserted into mammalian expression vectors and introduced into monkey (CV-1) cells in which enzymatically active firefly luciferase was transiently expressed. In addition, cell lines stably expressing firefly luciferase were isolated. Deleting a portion of the 5'-untranslated region of the luciferase gene removed an upstream initiation (AUG) codon and resulted in a twofold increase in the level of luciferase expression. The ability of the full-length luciferase gene to activate cryptic or enhancerless promoters was also greatly reduced or eliminated by this 5' deletion. Assaying the expression of luciferase provides a rapid and inexpensive method for monitoring promoter activity. Depending on the instrumentation employed to detect luciferase activity, we estimate this assay to be from 30- to 1,000-fold more sensitive than assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression. Images PMID:3821727

  20. Modular construction of mammalian gene circuits using TALE transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Weixi; Li, Zhihua; Weiss, Ron; Xie, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    An important goal of synthetic biology is the rational design and predictable implementation of synthetic gene circuits using standardized and interchangeable parts. However, engineering of complex circuits in mammalian cells is currently limited by the availability of well-characterized and orthogonal transcriptional repressors. Here, we introduce a library of 26 reversible transcription activator-like effector repressors (TALERs) that bind newly designed hybrid promoters and exert transcriptional repression through steric hindrance of key transcriptional initiation elements. We demonstrate that using the input-output transfer curves of our TALERs enables accurate prediction of the behavior of modularly assembled TALER cascade and switch circuits. We also show that TALER switches employing feedback regulation exhibit improved accuracy for microRNA-based HeLa cancer cell classification versus HEK293 cells. Our TALER library is a valuable toolkit for modular engineering of synthetic circuits, enabling programmable manipulation of mammalian cells and helping elucidate design principles of coupled transcriptional and microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:25643171

  1. Conservation of alternative polyadenylation patterns in mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Ara, Takeshi; Lopez, Fabrice; Ritchie, William; Benech, Philippe; Gautheret, Daniel

    2006-07-26

    Alternative polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism contributing to transcript diversity in eukaryotes. Over half of mammalian genes are alternatively polyadenylated. Our understanding of poly(A) site evolution is limited by the lack of a reliable identification of conserved, equivalent poly(A) sites among species. We introduce here a working definition of conserved poly(A) sites as sites that are both (i) properly aligned in human and mouse orthologous 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and (ii) supported by EST or cDNA data in both species. We identified about 4800 such conserved poly(A) sites covering one third of the orthologous gene set studied. Characteristics of conserved poly(A) sites such as processing efficiency and tissue-specificity were analyzed. Conserved sites show a higher processing efficiency but no difference in tissular distribution when compared to non-conserved sites. In general, alternative poly(A) sites are species-specific and involve minor, non-conserved sites that are unlikely to play essential roles. However, there are about 500 genes with conserved tandem poly(A) sites. A significant fraction of these conserved tandems display a conserved arrangement of major/minor sites in their 3' UTR, suggesting that these alternative 3' ends may be under selection. This analysis allows us to identify potential functional alternative poly(A) sites and provides clues on the selective mechanisms at play in the appearance of multiple poly(A) sites and their maintenance in the 3' UTRs of genes.

  2. Functional characterization of ecdysone receptor gene switches in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Panguluri, Siva K; Kumar, Prasanna; Palli, Subba R

    2006-12-01

    Regulated expression of transgene is essential in basic research as well as for many therapeutic applications. The main purpose of the present study is to understand the functioning of the ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene switch in mammalian cells and to develop improved versions of EcR gene switches. We utilized EcR mutants to develop new EcR gene switches that showed higher ligand sensitivity and higher magnitude of induction of reporter gene expression in the presence of ligand. We also developed monopartite versions of EcR gene switches with reduced size of the components that are accommodated into viral vectors. Ligand binding assays revealed that EcR alone could not bind to the nonsteroidal ligand, RH-2485. The EcR's heterodimeric partner, ultraspiracle, is required for efficient binding of EcR to the ligand. The essential role of retinoid X receptor (RXR) or its insect homolog, ultraspiracle, in EcR function is shown by RXR knockdown experiments using RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that VP16 (activation domain, AD):GAL4(DNA binding domain, DBD):EcR(ligand binding domain, LBD) or GAL4(DBD):EcR(LBD) fusion proteins can bind to GAL4 response elements in the absence of ligand. The VP16(AD) fusion protein of a chimera between human and locust RXR could heterodimerize with GAL4(DBD):EcR(LBD) in the absence of ligand but the VP16(AD) fusion protein of Homo sapiens RXR requires ligand for its heterodimerization with GAL4(DBD):EcR(LBD).

  3. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  4. Conservation of alternative polyadenylation patterns in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Takeshi; Lopez, Fabrice; Ritchie, William; Benech, Philippe; Gautheret, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternative polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism contributing to transcript diversity in eukaryotes. Over half of mammalian genes are alternatively polyadenylated. Our understanding of poly(A) site evolution is limited by the lack of a reliable identification of conserved, equivalent poly(A) sites among species. We introduce here a working definition of conserved poly(A) sites as sites that are both (i) properly aligned in human and mouse orthologous 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and (ii) supported by EST or cDNA data in both species. Results We identified about 4800 such conserved poly(A) sites covering one third of the orthologous gene set studied. Characteristics of conserved poly(A) sites such as processing efficiency and tissue-specificity were analyzed. Conserved sites show a higher processing efficiency but no difference in tissular distribution when compared to non-conserved sites. In general, alternative poly(A) sites are species-specific and involve minor, non-conserved sites that are unlikely to play essential roles. However, there are about 500 genes with conserved tandem poly(A) sites. A significant fraction of these conserved tandems display a conserved arrangement of major/minor sites in their 3' UTR, suggesting that these alternative 3' ends may be under selection. Conclusion This analysis allows us to identify potential functional alternative poly(A) sites and provides clues on the selective mechanisms at play in the appearance of multiple poly(A) sites and their maintenance in the 3' UTRs of genes. PMID:16872498

  5. Divergent transcription of long noncoding RNA/mRNA gene pairs in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Mullen, Alan C.; Molinie, Benoit; Gupta, Sumeet; Orlando, David A.; Guenther, Matthew G.; Almada, Albert E.; Lin, Charles; Sharp, Phillip A.; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Young, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) species have been identified in mammalian cells, but the genomic origin and regulation of these molecules in individual cell types is poorly understood. We have generated catalogs of lncRNA species expressed in human and murine embryonic stem cells and mapped their genomic origin. A surprisingly large fraction of these transcripts (>60%) originate from divergent transcription at promoters of active protein-coding genes. The divergently transcribed lncRNA/mRNA gene pairs exhibit coordinated changes in transcription when embryonic stem cells are differentiated into endoderm. Our results reveal that transcription of most lncRNA genes is coordinated with transcription of protein-coding genes. PMID:23382218

  6. Evolution of the mammalian embryonic pluripotency gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Tresguerres, Beatriz; Cañon, Susana; Rayon, Teresa; Pernaute, Barbara; Crespo, Miguel; Torroja, Carlos; Manzanares, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotency in the mouse is established and maintained by a gene-regulatory network under the control of a core set of transcription factors that include octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4; official name POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1, Pou5f1), sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box containing gene 2 (Sox2), and homeobox protein Nanog. Although this network is largely conserved in eutherian mammals, very little information is available regarding its evolutionary conservation in other vertebrates. We have compared the embryonic pluripotency networks in mouse and chick by means of expression analysis in the pregastrulation chicken embryo, genomic comparisons, and functional assays of pluripotency-related regulatory elements in ES cells and blastocysts. We find that multiple components of the network are either novel to mammals or have acquired novel expression domains in early developmental stages of the mouse. We also find that the downstream action of the mouse core pluripotency factors is mediated largely by genomic sequence elements nonconserved with chick. In the case of Sox2 and Fgf4, we find that elements driving expression in embryonic pluripotent cells have evolved by a small number of nucleotide changes that create novel binding sites for core factors. Our results show that the network in charge of embryonic pluripotency is an evolutionary novelty of mammals that is related to the comparatively extended period during which mammalian embryonic cells need to be maintained in an undetermined state before engaging in early differentiation events. PMID:21048080

  7. Evolution of the mammalian embryonic pluripotency gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Tresguerres, Beatriz; Cañon, Susana; Rayon, Teresa; Pernaute, Barbara; Crespo, Miguel; Torroja, Carlos; Manzanares, Miguel

    2010-11-16

    Embryonic pluripotency in the mouse is established and maintained by a gene-regulatory network under the control of a core set of transcription factors that include octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4; official name POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1, Pou5f1), sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box containing gene 2 (Sox2), and homeobox protein Nanog. Although this network is largely conserved in eutherian mammals, very little information is available regarding its evolutionary conservation in other vertebrates. We have compared the embryonic pluripotency networks in mouse and chick by means of expression analysis in the pregastrulation chicken embryo, genomic comparisons, and functional assays of pluripotency-related regulatory elements in ES cells and blastocysts. We find that multiple components of the network are either novel to mammals or have acquired novel expression domains in early developmental stages of the mouse. We also find that the downstream action of the mouse core pluripotency factors is mediated largely by genomic sequence elements nonconserved with chick. In the case of Sox2 and Fgf4, we find that elements driving expression in embryonic pluripotent cells have evolved by a small number of nucleotide changes that create novel binding sites for core factors. Our results show that the network in charge of embryonic pluripotency is an evolutionary novelty of mammals that is related to the comparatively extended period during which mammalian embryonic cells need to be maintained in an undetermined state before engaging in early differentiation events.

  8. Mammalian MicroRNAs: Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation in RNA Virus Infection and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    RNA silencing mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) is a recently discovered gene regulatory mechanism involved in various aspects of biology, such as development, cell differentiation and proliferation, and innate immunity against viral infections. miRNAs, which are a class of small (21–25 nucleotides) RNAs, target messenger RNA (mRNA) through incomplete base-pairing with their target sequences resulting in mRNA degradation or translational repression. Although studies of miRNAs have led to numerous sensational discoveries in biology, many fundamental questions about their expression and function still remain. In this review, we discuss the dynamics of the mammalian miRNA machinery and the biological function of miRNAs, focusing on RNA viruses and the various therapeutic applications of miRNAs against viral infections. PMID:21607080

  9. Recommended nomenclature for five mammalian carboxylesterase gene families: human, mouse, and rat genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Wright, Matthew W; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Cox, Laura A; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko; Ishibashi, Shun; Lehner, Richard; Miyazaki, Masao; Perkins, Everett J; Potter, Phillip M; Redinbo, Matthew R; Robert, Jacques; Satoh, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Yan, Bingfan; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Zechner, Rudolf; Maltais, Lois J

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES or Ces) genes encode enzymes that participate in xenobiotic, drug, and lipid metabolism in the body and are members of at least five gene families. Tandem duplications have added more genes for some families, particularly for mouse and rat genomes, which has caused confusion in naming rodent Ces genes. This article describes a new nomenclature system for human, mouse, and rat carboxylesterase genes that identifies homolog gene families and allocates a unique name for each gene. The guidelines of human, mouse, and rat gene nomenclature committees were followed and "CES" (human) and "Ces" (mouse and rat) root symbols were used followed by the family number (e.g., human CES1). Where multiple genes were identified for a family or where a clash occurred with an existing gene name, a letter was added (e.g., human CES4A; mouse and rat Ces1a) that reflected gene relatedness among rodent species (e.g., mouse and rat Ces1a). Pseudogenes were named by adding "P" and a number to the human gene name (e.g., human CES1P1) or by using a new letter followed by ps for mouse and rat Ces pseudogenes (e.g., Ces2d-ps). Gene transcript isoforms were named by adding the GenBank accession ID to the gene symbol (e.g., human CES1_AB119995 or mouse Ces1e_BC019208). This nomenclature improves our understanding of human, mouse, and rat CES/Ces gene families and facilitates research into the structure, function, and evolution of these gene families. It also serves as a model for naming CES genes from other mammalian species.

  10. Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells Using BacMam, a Modified Baculovirus System.

    PubMed

    Fornwald, James A; Lu, Quinn; Boyce, Frederick M; Ames, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    BacMams are modified baculoviruses that contain mammalian expression cassettes for gene delivery and expression in mammalian cells. BacMams have become an integral part of the recombinant mammalian gene expression toolbox in research labs worldwide. Construction of transfer vectors is straightforward using basic molecular biology protocols. Virus generation is based on common methods used with the baculovirus insect cell expression system. BacMam transduction of mammalian cells requires minimal modifications to familiar cell culture methods. This chapter highlights the BacMam transfer vector pHTBV.

  11. Control of mammalian gene expression by amino acids, especially glutamine.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Lavoinne, Alain; Husson, Annie

    2009-04-01

    Molecular data rapidly accumulating on the regulation of gene expression by amino acids in mammalian cells highlight the large variety of mechanisms that are involved. Transcription factors, such as the basic-leucine zipper factors, activating transcription factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein, as well as specific regulatory sequences, such as amino acid response element and nutrient-sensing response element, have been shown to mediate the inhibitory effect of some amino acids. Moreover, amino acids exert a wide range of effects via the activation of different signalling pathways and various transcription factors, and a number of cis elements distinct from amino acid response element/nutrient-sensing response element sequences were shown to respond to changes in amino acid concentration. Particular attention has been paid to the effects of glutamine, the most abundant amino acid, which at appropriate concentrations enhances a great number of cell functions via the activation of various transcription factors. The glutamine-responsive genes and the transcription factors involved correspond tightly to the specific effects of the amino acid in the inflammatory response, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and metabolic functions. Indeed, in addition to the major role played by nuclear factor-kappaB in the anti-inflammatory action of glutamine, the stimulatory role of activating protein-1 and the inhibitory role of C/EBP homology binding protein in growth-promotion, and the role of c-myc in cell survival, many other transcription factors are also involved in the action of glutamine to regulate apoptosis and intermediary metabolism in different cell types and tissues. The signalling pathways leading to the activation of transcription factors suggest that several kinases are involved, particularly mitogen-activated protein kinases. In most cases, however, the precise pathways from the entrance of the amino acid into the cell to the activation of gene

  12. A novel gene delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian; Duffy, Angela M; Gould Fogerite, Susan; Krause-Elsmore, Sara; Lu, Ruying; Shang, Gaofeng; Chen, Zi-Wei; Mannino, Raphael J; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Harmey, Judith H

    2004-01-01

    Although gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of both acquired and genetic diseases, its development has been limited by practical considerations. Non-viral efficacy of delivery remains quite poor. We are investigating the feasibility of a novel lipid-based delivery system, cochleates, to deliver transgenes to mammalian cells. Rhodamine-labelled empty cochleates were incubated with two cell-lines (4T1 adenocarcinoma and H36.12 macrophage hybridoma) and primary macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Cochleates containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression plasmid were incubated with 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. Cellular uptake of labelled cochleates or transgene GFP expression were visualised with fluorescence microscopy. 4T1 and H36.12 lines showed 39% and 23.1% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates, respectively. Human monocyte-derived macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages had 48+/-5.38% and 51.46+/-15.6% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates in vitro. In vivo 25.69+/-0.127% of peritoneal macrophages were rhodamine-positive after intra-peritoneal injection of rhodamine-cochleates. 19.49+/-10.12% of 4T1 cells expressed GFP. Cochleates may therefore be an effective, non-toxic and non-immunogenic method to introduce transgenes in vitro and in vivo.

  13. A yeast-based rapid prototype platform for gene control elements in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kathy Y; Chen, Yvonne Y; Smolke, Christina D

    2013-04-01

    Programming genetic circuits in mammalian cells requires flexible, tunable, and user-tailored gene-control systems. However, most existing control systems are either mechanistically specific for microbial organisms or must be laboriously re-engineered to function in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate a ribozyme-based device platform that can be directly transported from yeast to mammalian cells in a "plug-and-play" manner. Ribozyme switches previously prototyped in yeast are shown to regulate gene expression in a predictable, ligand-responsive manner in human HEK 293, HeLa, and U2OS cell lines without any change to device sequence nor further optimization. The ribozyme-based devices, which exhibit activation ratios comparable to the best RNA-based regulatory devices demonstrated in mammalian cells to-date, retain their prescribed functions (ON or OFF switch), tunability of regulatory stringency, and responsiveness to different small-molecule inputs in mammalian hosts. Furthermore, we observe strong correlations of device performance between yeast and all mammalian cell lines tested (R(2)  = 0.63-0.97). Our unique device architecture can therefore act as a rapid prototyping platform (RPP) based on a yeast chassis, providing a well-developed and genetically tractable system that supports rapid and high-throughput screens for generating gene-controllers with a broad range of functions in mammalian cells. This platform will accelerate development of mammalian gene-controllers for diverse applications, including cell-based therapeutics and cell-fate reprogramming.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Pax6 paired domain bound to the Pax6 gene enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Makoto Oyama, Takuji; Okazaki, Kenji; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-11-01

    The mammalian Pax6 paired domain has been cocrystallizaed with a 25 bp DNA fragment of the Pax6 gene enhancer. Pax6 is a member of the Pax family of transcription factors and is essential for eye development. Pax6 has two DNA-binding domains: the paired domain and the homeodomain. The Pax6 paired domain is involved in Pax6 gene autoregulation by binding to its enhancer. In this study, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the mammalian Pax6 paired domain in complex with the Pax6 gene enhancer was attempted. The Pax6 paired domain complexed with an optimized 25 bp DNA fragment was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracted synchrotron radiation to 3.0/3.7 Å resolution and belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.21, b = 70.69, c = 176.03 Å, β = 90.54°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.7 Å resolution.

  15. GLK gene pairs regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David W; Martin, David J; Copley, Martin J; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2002-09-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that requires close co-ordination between two genomes. Many of the proteins that accumulate in the chloroplast are encoded by the nuclear genome, and the developmental transition from proplastid to chloroplast is regulated by nuclear genes. Here we show that a pair of Golden 2-like (GLK) genes regulates chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. The GLK proteins are members of the GARP superfamily of transcription factors, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the maize, rice and Arabidopsis GLK gene pairs comprise a distinct group within the GARP superfamily. Further phylogenetic analysis suggests that the gene pairs arose through separate duplication events in the monocot and dicot lineages. As in rice, AtGLK1 and AtGLK2 are expressed in partially overlapping domains in photosynthetic tissue. Insertion mutants demonstrate that this expression pattern reflects a degree of functional redundancy as single mutants display normal phenotypes in most photosynthetic tissues. However, double mutants are pale green in all photosynthetic tissues and chloroplasts exhibit a reduction in granal thylakoids. Products of several genes involved in light harvesting also accumulate at reduced levels in double mutant chloroplasts. GLK genes therefore regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

  16. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  17. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  18. Application of automatic mutation-gene pair extraction to diseases.

    PubMed

    Erdogmus, Muge; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2007-12-01

    To have a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease development, knowledge of mutations and the genes on which the mutations occur is of crucial importance. Information on disease-related mutations can be accessed through public databases or biomedical literature sources. However, information retrieval from such resources can be problematic because of two reasons: manually created databases are usually incomplete and not up to date, and reading through a vast amount of publicly available biomedical documents is very time-consuming. In this paper, we describe an automated system, MuGeX (Mutation Gene eXtractor), that automatically extracts mutation-gene pairs from Medline abstracts for a disease query. Our system is tested on a corpus that consists of 231 Medline abstracts. While recall for mutation detection alone is 85.9%, precision is 95.9%. For extraction of mutation-gene pairs, we focus on Alzheimer's disease. The recall for mutation-gene pair identification is estimated at 91.3%, and precision is estimated at 88.9%. With automatic extraction techniques, MuGeX overcomes the problems of information retrieval from public resources and reduces the time required to access relevant information, while preserving the accuracy of retrieved information.

  19. Mel-18, a mammalian Polycomb gene, regulates angiogenic gene expression of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Choi, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Minhyung; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong-Won; Kim, Young-Myeong; Hwang, Daehee; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2010-10-01

    Mel-18 is a mammalian homolog of Polycomb group (PcG) genes. Microarray analysis revealed that Mel-18 expression was induced during endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) differentiation and correlates with the expression of EC-specific protein markers. Overexpression of Mel-18 promoted EPC differentiation and angiogenic activity of ECs. Accordingly, silencing Mel-18 inhibited EC migration and tube formation in vitro. Gene expression profiling showed that Mel-18 regulates angiogenic genes including kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), claudin 5, and angiopoietin-like 2. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Mel-18 plays a significant role in the angiogenic function of ECs by regulating endothelial gene expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Histone gene expression and chromatin structure in mammalian cell hybrids

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    DNA isolated from mammalian cell nuclear reveals discrete size patterns when partially digested with micrococcal nuclease. The DNA repeat lengths from different tissues within a species or from different species may vary. These differences have been attributed to the presence of different species of histone H1. To examine the nature of regulation of DNA repeat lengths and their possible relationship to histone H1, we have selected several mouse and human cell lines that differ in their DNA repeat lengths and examined them and their cell hybrids. 24 mouse X human and five mouse X mouse hybrid cell lines were analyzed. All the interspecific hybrids exhibited the repeat pattern characteristic of the murine parent. The mouse intraspecific hybrids had a repeat pattern of only one of the parents. We conclude that the partial human chromosome complements retained in the hybrids assume the repeat lengths exhibited by the mouse cells. Because H1 histones have been implicated in the determination of DNA repeat lengths, we also investigated the regulation of H1 histone expression in these cell hybrids. Purified H1 histones were radioactively labeled in vitro, and individual subfractions were subjected to proteolysis followed by gel electrophoresis. The resulting partial peptide maps off H1 histone subfractions A and B were distinguishable from one another and from different cell lines. In the mouse X human hybrids analyzed, only the mouse H1 histones were detected. These observations were extended to H2b by analysis of the hybrid cell histone by Triton-acid-urea gels. Neither the DNA repeat length nor histone expression is affected by the presence of any specific human chromosome. The fact that human genes are expressed in these hybrids suggests that the H1 histones of one species is able to interact with the chromatin of another species in a biologically funtional conformation. Analysis of the intraspecific PG19 X B82 (mouse X mouse) hybrids reveals the presence of H1

  1. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Bacteriophage Lambda (λ) Mediated Gene Transfer in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volcy, Ketna; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda vectors can transfer their genomes into mammalian cells, resulting in expression of phage-encoded genes. However, this process is inefficient. Experiments were therefore conducted to delineate the rate limiting step(s) involved, using a phage vector that contains a mammalian luciferase reporter gene cassette. The efficiency of phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells was quantitated, in the presence or absence of pharmacologic inhibitors of cell uptake and degradation pathways. Inhibitors of lysosomal proteases and proteasome inhibitors strongly enhanced phage-mediated luciferase expression, suggesting that these pathways contribute to the destruction of intracellular phage particles. In contrast, inhibition of endosome acidification had no effect on phage-mediated gene transfer, presumably because phage lambda is tolerant to extended exposure to low pH. These findings provide insights into the pathways by which phage vectors enter and transduce mammalian cells, and suggest that it may be possible to pharmacologically enhance the efficiency of phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells. Finally, the data also suggest that the proteasome complex may serve as an innate defense mechanism that restricts the infection of mammalian cells by diverse viral agents. PMID:19064273

  2. Mammalian cDNA Library from the NIH Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The MGC provides the research community full-length clones for most of the defined (as of 2006) human and mouse genes, along with selected clones of cow and rat genes. Clones were designed to allow easy transfer of the ORF sequences into nearly any type of expression vector. MGC provides protein ‘expression-ready’ clones for each of the included human genes. MGC is part of the ORFeome Collaboration (OC).

  3. Gene regulatory network analysis reveals differences in site-specific cell fate determination in mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Ertaylan, Gökhan; Okawa, Satoshi; Schwamborn, Jens C.; del Sol, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis—the generation of new neurons—is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC) identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a, and Nr3c1. We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report 31 candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar—Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2—Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact. Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis. PMID:25565969

  4. Control of mammalian gene expression by selective mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O; Laskey, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear export of mRNAs is a crucial step in the regulation of gene expression, linking transcription in the nucleus to translation in the cytoplasm. Although important components of the mRNA export machinery are well characterized, such as transcription-export complexes TREX and TREX-2, recent work has shown that, in some instances, mammalian mRNA export can be selective and can regulate crucial biological processes such as DNA repair, gene expression, maintenance of pluripotency, haematopoiesis, proliferation and cell survival. Such findings show that mRNA export is an unexpected, yet potentially important, mechanism for the control of gene expression and of the mammalian transcriptome.

  5. Chromosomal Redistribution of Male-Biased Genes in Mammalian Evolution with Two Bursts of Gene Gain on the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong E.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A. B.; Long, Manyuan

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution. PMID:20957185

  6. Chromosomal redistribution of male-biased genes in mammalian evolution with two bursts of gene gain on the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A B; Long, Manyuan

    2010-10-05

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution.

  7. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO-ISHINO, Tomoko; ISHINO, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is “mammalian-specific genomic functions”, a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of “mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons”, based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes. PMID:26666304

  8. Gene amplification during differentiation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike; Backes, Christina; Raslan, Abdulrahman; Keller, Andreas; Meier, Carola; Meese, Eckart

    2015-03-30

    In development of amphibians and flies, gene amplification is one of mechanisms to increase gene expression. In mammalian cells, gene amplification seems to be restricted to tumorigenesis and acquiring of drug-resistance in cancer cells. Here, we report a complex gene amplification pattern in mouse neural progenitor cells during differentiation with approximately 10% of the genome involved. Half of the amplified mouse chromosome regions overlap with amplified regions previously reported in human neural progenitor cells, indicating conserved mechanisms during differentiation. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we verified the amplification in single cells of primary mouse mesencephalon E14 (embryonic stage) neurosphere cells during differentiation. In vivo we confirmed gene amplifications of the TRP53 gene in cryosections from mouse embryos at stage E11.5. Gene amplification is not only a cancer-related mechanism but is also conserved in evolution, occurring during differentiation of mammalian neural stem cells.

  9. Modeling gene regulation from paired expression and chromatin accessibility data.

    PubMed

    Duren, Zhana; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Yong; Wong, Wing Hung

    2017-06-20

    The rapid increase of genome-wide datasets on gene expression, chromatin states, and transcription factor (TF) binding locations offers an exciting opportunity to interpret the information encoded in genomes and epigenomes. This task can be challenging as it requires joint modeling of context-specific activation of cis-regulatory elements (REs) and the effects on transcription of associated regulatory factors. To meet this challenge, we propose a statistical approach based on paired expression and chromatin accessibility (PECA) data across diverse cellular contexts. In our approach, we model (i) the localization to REs of chromatin regulators (CRs) based on their interaction with sequence-specific TFs, (ii) the activation of REs due to CRs that are localized to them, and (iii) the effect of TFs bound to activated REs on the transcription of target genes (TGs). The transcriptional regulatory network inferred by PECA provides a detailed view of how trans- and cis-regulatory elements work together to affect gene expression in a context-specific manner. We illustrate the feasibility of this approach by analyzing paired expression and accessibility data from the mouse Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and explore various applications of the resulting model.

  10. Odd-paired controls frequency doubling in Drosophila segmentation by altering the pair-rule gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erik; Akam, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila embryo transiently exhibits a double-segment periodicity, defined by the expression of seven 'pair-rule' genes, each in a pattern of seven stripes. At gastrulation, interactions between the pair-rule genes lead to frequency doubling and the patterning of 14 parasegment boundaries. In contrast to earlier stages of Drosophila anteroposterior patterning, this transition is not well understood. By carefully analysing the spatiotemporal dynamics of pair-rule gene expression, we demonstrate that frequency-doubling is precipitated by multiple coordinated changes to the network of regulatory interactions between the pair-rule genes. We identify the broadly expressed but temporally patterned transcription factor, Odd-paired (Opa/Zic), as the cause of these changes, and show that the patterning of the even-numbered parasegment boundaries relies on Opa-dependent regulatory interactions. Our findings indicate that the pair-rule gene regulatory network has a temporally modulated topology, permitting the pair-rule genes to play stage-specific patterning roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18215.001 PMID:27525481

  11. Odd-paired controls frequency doubling in Drosophila segmentation by altering the pair-rule gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Clark, Erik; Akam, Michael

    2016-08-15

    The Drosophila embryo transiently exhibits a double-segment periodicity, defined by the expression of seven 'pair-rule' genes, each in a pattern of seven stripes. At gastrulation, interactions between the pair-rule genes lead to frequency doubling and the patterning of 14 parasegment boundaries. In contrast to earlier stages of Drosophila anteroposterior patterning, this transition is not well understood. By carefully analysing the spatiotemporal dynamics of pair-rule gene expression, we demonstrate that frequency-doubling is precipitated by multiple coordinated changes to the network of regulatory interactions between the pair-rule genes. We identify the broadly expressed but temporally patterned transcription factor, Odd-paired (Opa/Zic), as the cause of these changes, and show that the patterning of the even-numbered parasegment boundaries relies on Opa-dependent regulatory interactions. Our findings indicate that the pair-rule gene regulatory network has a temporally modulated topology, permitting the pair-rule genes to play stage-specific patterning roles.

  12. Discovery of mammalian genes that participate in virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Organ, Edward L; Sheng, Jinsong; Ruley, H Earl; Rubin, Donald H

    2004-01-01

    Background Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely upon the host cell for different steps in their life cycles. The characterization of cellular genes required for virus infection and/or cell killing will be essential for understanding viral life cycles, and may provide cellular targets for new antiviral therapies. Results Candidate genes required for lytic reovirus infection were identified by tagged sequence mutagenesis, a process that permits rapid identification of genes disrupted by gene entrapment. One hundred fifty-one reovirus resistant clones were selected from cell libraries containing 2 × 105 independently disrupted genes, of which 111 contained mutations in previously characterized genes and functionally anonymous transcription units. Collectively, the genes associated with reovirus resistance differed from genes targeted by random gene entrapment in that known mutational hot spots were under represented, and a number of mutations appeared to cluster around specific cellular processes, including: IGF-II expression/signalling, vesicular transport/cytoskeletal trafficking and apoptosis. Notably, several of the genes have been directly implicated in the replication of reovirus and other viruses at different steps in the viral lifecycle. Conclusions Tagged sequence mutagenesis provides a rapid, genome-wide strategy to identify candidate cellular genes required for virus infection. The candidate genes provide a starting point for mechanistic studies of cellular processes that participate in the virus lifecycle and may provide targets for novel anti-viral therapies. PMID:15522117

  13. Fowlpox virus host range restriction: gene expression, DNA replication, and morphogenesis in nonpermissive mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, P; Frazier, J; Skinner, M A

    1993-11-01

    Fowlpox virus (FPV), type species of the Avipoxvirus genus, causes a slow-spreading pox disease of chickens. Following infection of mammalian cells there is no evidence of productive replication of FPV although cytopathic effects are induced and FPV recombinants have been shown to express foreign genes from vaccinia virus early/late promoters. Here we report results of a study to investigate the expression of FPV genes, the replication of FPV genomic DNA, and any ultrastructural changes in mammalian cells infected by wild-type virus, undertaken as a first step in elucidating the nature of the block (or blocks) to productive replication of FPV in mammalian cells. Early and late gene expression as well as genomic DNA replication was observed in fibroblast-like cell lines of monkey and human origin. Furthermore, viral morphogenesis was observed in monkey cells, with the production mainly of immature particles though smaller numbers of apparently mature virus particles were observed.

  14. Use of green fluorescent protein variants to monitor gene transfer and expression in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Linzhao; Fu, J.; Tsukamoto, A.; Hawley, R.G.

    1996-05-01

    Two mutants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), RSGFP4 and GFPS65T, have been recently created which differ from the wildtype GFP of A. victoria in their excitation maxima. Here we show that human fibroblasts transfected with either of the two mutant GFP genes emit a green fluorescence that is 18-fold brighter than the cells transfected with the wildtype GFP gene. Retroviral vectors expressing the improved GFP gene were also constructed to determine their suitability for stable gene transduction into mammalian cells. The inclusion of the RSGFP4 gene in a retroviral vector did not reduce the viral titer and resulted in a fluorescent signal in viable transduced cells detectable by both fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Therefore, the improved mutant GFP provides a vital marker for monitoring gene transfer and expression in mammalian cells. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Tenm, a Drosophila gene related to tenascin, is a new pair-rule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, S; Martin, D; Hagios, C; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe the molecular characterization of the Drosophila gene tenm, a large transcription unit spanning > 110 kb of DNA. tenm encodes a large extracellular protein of 2515 amino acids related to the extracellular matrix molecule tenascin. The Tenm protein is found in seven stripes during the blastoderm stage, and each stripe overlaps with the even-skipped stripes. tenm mutants show a phenotype resembling that of odd-paired (opa), a member of the pair-rule class of segmentation genes. Thus, Tenm is the first example of a pair-rule gene product acting from outside the cell. While the Tenm protein is under the control of fushi tarazu and even-skipped, but not of opa, at least two pair-rule genes, paired (prd) and sloppy paired (slp), and all segment-polarity genes analysed to date are under the control of tenm. Our data suggest that Tenm initiates a signal transduction cascade which acts, via or in concert with opa, on downstream targets such as prd, slp, gooseberry, engrailed and wingless, leading to an opa-like phenotype. Images PMID:8070401

  16. Phenotype- and gene-driven approaches to discovering the functions of mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dabney K

    2003-12-01

    All of us are involved in discovery science as we pursue the genes, networks, cellular processes and biophysical principles that govern our chosen biological question. For those of us who choose to proceed using plant or animal models to dissect the elements of our favorite biological system, there are many classical and newer approaches available for our use, including two complementary strategies by which the discovery process is proceeding at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ORNL has been known for six decades for its investigations of the effects of radiation and chemicals in inducing heritable mutations in mouse germ cells, and for using mouse mutations as tools for the cloning and characterization of mammalian genes. Our history and experience in making mouse models are being applied via these two complementary strategies: 1), a phenotype-driven approach, in which mice carrying random chemically-induced mutations are screened for abnormal phenotypes; and 2) a gene-driven approach in which heritable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in preselected genes already thought likely to influence a biological system of choice can be recovered in live mice. The SNP-carrying mice can then be phenotyped for alterations in one's target biology. Both approaches have value and are necessary; while we can use mutations in genes that we already know to be of interest in our favorite biology to discover gene function, we also know that biology is full of surprise genes whose effects on our favorite biology would not be predicted and which will be identified only through phenotype screening.

  17. The life history of retrocopies illuminates the evolution of new mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Francesco Nicola; Hayakawa, Takashi; Go, Yasuhiro; Imai, Hiroo; Warnefors, Maria; Kaessmann, Henrik

    2016-03-01

    New genes contribute substantially to adaptive evolutionary innovation, but the functional evolution of new mammalian genes has been little explored at a broad scale. Previous work established mRNA-derived gene duplicates, known as retrocopies, as models for the study of new gene origination. Here we combine mammalian transcriptomic and epigenomic data to unveil the processes underlying the evolution of stripped-down retrocopies into complex new genes. We show that although some robustly expressed retrocopies are transcribed from preexisting promoters, most evolved new promoters from scratch or recruited proto-promoters in their genomic vicinity. In particular, many retrocopy promoters emerged from ancestral enhancers (or bivalent regulatory elements) or are located in CpG islands not associated with other genes. We detected 88-280 selectively preserved retrocopies per mammalian species, illustrating that these mechanisms facilitated the birth of many functional retrogenes during mammalian evolution. The regulatory evolution of originally monoexonic retrocopies was frequently accompanied by exon gain, which facilitated co-option of distant promoters and allowed expression of alternative isoforms. While young retrogenes are often initially expressed in the testis, increased regulatory and structural complexities allowed retrogenes to functionally diversify and evolve somatic organ functions, sometimes as complex as those of their parents. Thus, some retrogenes evolved the capacity to temporarily substitute for their parents during the process of male meiotic X inactivation, while others rendered parental functions superfluous, allowing for parental gene loss. Overall, our reconstruction of the "life history" of mammalian retrogenes highlights retroposition as a general model for understanding new gene birth and functional evolution.

  18. The life history of retrocopies illuminates the evolution of new mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Francesco Nicola; Hayakawa, Takashi; Go, Yasuhiro; Imai, Hiroo; Warnefors, Maria; Kaessmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    New genes contribute substantially to adaptive evolutionary innovation, but the functional evolution of new mammalian genes has been little explored at a broad scale. Previous work established mRNA-derived gene duplicates, known as retrocopies, as models for the study of new gene origination. Here we combine mammalian transcriptomic and epigenomic data to unveil the processes underlying the evolution of stripped-down retrocopies into complex new genes. We show that although some robustly expressed retrocopies are transcribed from preexisting promoters, most evolved new promoters from scratch or recruited proto-promoters in their genomic vicinity. In particular, many retrocopy promoters emerged from ancestral enhancers (or bivalent regulatory elements) or are located in CpG islands not associated with other genes. We detected 88–280 selectively preserved retrocopies per mammalian species, illustrating that these mechanisms facilitated the birth of many functional retrogenes during mammalian evolution. The regulatory evolution of originally monoexonic retrocopies was frequently accompanied by exon gain, which facilitated co-option of distant promoters and allowed expression of alternative isoforms. While young retrogenes are often initially expressed in the testis, increased regulatory and structural complexities allowed retrogenes to functionally diversify and evolve somatic organ functions, sometimes as complex as those of their parents. Thus, some retrogenes evolved the capacity to temporarily substitute for their parents during the process of male meiotic X inactivation, while others rendered parental functions superfluous, allowing for parental gene loss. Overall, our reconstruction of the “life history” of mammalian retrogenes highlights retroposition as a general model for understanding new gene birth and functional evolution. PMID:26728716

  19. Gene regulation of mammalian long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Heeyoun

    2017-09-11

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcribes two classes of RNAs, protein-coding and non-protein-coding (ncRNA) genes. ncRNAs are also synthesized by RNA polymerases I and III (Pol I and III). In humans, the number of ncRNA genes exceeds more than twice that of protein-coding genes. However, the history of studying Pol II-synthesized ncRNA is relatively short. Since early 2000s, important biological and pathological functions of these ncRNA genes have begun to be discovered and intensively studied. And transcription mechanisms of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been recently reported. Transcription of lncRNAs utilizes some transcription factors and mechanisms shared in that of protein-coding genes. In addition, tissue specificity in lncRNA gene expression has been shown. LncRNAs play essential roles in regulating the expression of neighboring or distal genes through different mechanisms. This leads to the implication of lncRNAs in a wide variety of biological pathways and pathological development. In this review, the newly discovered transcription mechanisms, characteristics, and functions of lncRNA are discussed.

  20. Tissue-specific gene targeting by the multiprotein mammalian DREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Stephen; Beck, George R; Moran, Elizabeth

    2011-08-12

    The mammalian DP, RB-like, E2F, and MuvB-like proteins (DREAM) complex, whose key components include p130 and E2F4, plays a fundamental role in repression of cell cycle-specific genes during growth arrest. Mammalian DREAM is well conserved with Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans complexes that repress pivotal developmental genes, but the mammalian complex has been thought to exist only in quiescent cells and not to be linked with development. However, new findings here identify tissue-specific promoters repressed by DREAM in proliferating precursors, revealing a new connection between control of growth arrest and terminal differentiation. Mechanistically, tissue-specific promoter occupation by DREAM is dependent on the integrity of a repressor form of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex.

  1. The mouse male germ cell-specific gene Tpx-1: molecular structure, mode of expression in spermatogenesis, and sequence similarity to two non-mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, N; Sarapata, D E; Garcia-Sanz, J A; Kasahara, M

    1992-01-01

    Tpx-1 is a testis-specific gene that maps on mouse Chromosome (Chr) 17. The deduced TPX-1 protein shows 55% amino acid sequence similarity to acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), assumed to be involved in sperm maturation. In the present study, we determined the genomic structure of the mouse Tpx-1 gene and the cellular localization of its transcripts. The gene was found to contain ten exons, with an unusually large intron (approximately 17.0 kilobase pairs) between exons 8 and 9. In situ hybridization of testicular sections showed that Tpx-1 is transcribed abundantly by haploid male germ cells. A computer search of protein databases revealed that deduced TPX-1/AEG proteins have significant sequence similarity (approximately 30%) to two non-mammalian proteins: "pathogenesis-related" proteins 1 of tobaccos, and venom sac proteins of white-face hornets, known as Dol m V. Amino acid residues encoded by exon 10 of the Tpx-1 gene and most of those encoded by exon 9 were absent in the non-mammalian proteins. This result suggests that the ancestor of Tpx-1 acquired exons 9 and 10 after its divergence from the ancestors of the plant and insect proteins.

  2. Gene expression defines natural changes in mammalian lifespan.

    PubMed

    Fushan, Alexey A; Turanov, Anton A; Lee, Sang-Goo; Kim, Eun Bae; Lobanov, Alexei V; Yim, Sun Hee; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kim, Jong-So; Yang, Kap-Seok; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-06-01

    Mammals differ more than 100-fold in maximum lifespan, which can be altered in either direction during evolution, but the molecular basis for natural changes in longevity is not understood. Divergent evolution of mammals also led to extensive changes in gene expression within and between lineages. To understand the relationship between lifespan and variation in gene expression, we carried out RNA-seq-based gene expression analyses of liver, kidney, and brain of 33 diverse species of mammals. Our analysis uncovered parallel evolution of gene expression and lifespan, as well as the associated life-history traits, and identified the processes and pathways involved. These findings provide direct insights into how nature reversibly adjusts lifespan and other traits during adaptive radiation of lineages.

  3. Gene expression defines natural changes in mammalian lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Fushan, Alexey A; Turanov, Anton A; Lee, Sang-Goo; Kim, Eun Bae; Lobanov, Alexei V; Yim, Sun Hee; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kim, Jong-So; Yang, Kap-Seok; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-01-01

    Mammals differ more than 100-fold in maximum lifespan, which can be altered in either direction during evolution, but the molecular basis for natural changes in longevity is not understood. Divergent evolution of mammals also led to extensive changes in gene expression within and between lineages. To understand the relationship between lifespan and variation in gene expression, we carried out RNA-seq-based gene expression analyses of liver, kidney, and brain of 33 diverse species of mammals. Our analysis uncovered parallel evolution of gene expression and lifespan, as well as the associated life-history traits, and identified the processes and pathways involved. These findings provide direct insights into how nature reversibly adjusts lifespan and other traits during adaptive radiation of lineages. PMID:25677554

  4. Adaptive evolution of the STRA6 genes in mammalian.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianghong; Xiang, Hui; Qi, Yunxia; Yang, Ding; Wang, Xiaojuan; Sun, Hailian; Wang, Feng; Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated by retinoic acid 6 (STRA6) is the receptor for retinol binding protein and is relevant for the transport of retinol to specific sites such as the eye. The adaptive evolution mechanism that vertebrates have occupied nearly every habitat available on earth and adopted various lifestyles associated with different light conditions and visual challenges, as well as their role in development and adaptation is thus far unknown. In this work, we have investigated different aspects of vertebrate STRA6 evolution and used molecular evolutionary analyses to detect evidence of vertebrate adaptation to the lightless habitat. Free-ratio model revealed significant rate shifts immediately after the species divergence. The amino acid sites detected to be under positive selection are within the extracellular loops of STRA6 protein. Branch-site model A test revealed that STRA6 has undergone positive selection in the different phyla of mammalian except for the branch of rodent. The results suggest that interactions between different light environments and host may be driving adaptive change in STRA6 by competition between species. In support of this, we found that altered functional constraints may take place at some amino acid residues after speciation. We suggest that STRA6 has undergone adaptive evolution in different branch of vertebrate relation to habitat environment.

  5. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  6. A role for mammalian Sin3 in permanent gene silencing.

    PubMed

    van Oevelen, Chris; Wang, Jinhua; Asp, Patrik; Yan, Qin; Kaelin, William G; Kluger, Yuval; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2008-11-07

    The multisubunit Sin3 corepressor complex regulates gene transcription through deacetylation of nucleosomes. However, the full range of Sin3 activities and targets is not well understood. Here, we have investigated genome-wide binding of mouse Sin3 and RBP2 as well as histone modifications and nucleosome positioning as a function of myogenic differentiation. Remarkably, we find that Sin3 complexes spread immediately downstream of the transcription start site on repressed and transcribed genes during differentiation. We show that RBP2 is part of a Sin3 complex and that on a subset of E2F4 target genes, the coordinated activity of Sin3 and RBP2 leads to deacetylation, demethylation, and repositioning of nucleosomes. Our work provides evidence for coordinated binding of Sin3, chromatin modifications, and chromatin remodeling within discrete regulatory regions, suggesting a model in which spreading of Sin3 binding is ultimately linked to permanent gene silencing on a subset of E2F4 target genes.

  7. A role for mammalian Sin3 in permanent gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    van Oevelen, Chris; Wang, Jinhua; Asp, Patrik; Yan, Qin; Kaelin, William G.; Kluger, Yuval; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2011-01-01

    Summary The multi-subunit Sin3 co-repressor complex regulates gene transcription through deacetylation of nucleosomes. However, the full range of Sin3 activities and targets is not well understood. Here, we have investigated genome-wide binding of mouse Sin3 and RBP2 as well as histone modifications and nucleosome positioning as a function of myogenic differentiation. Remarkably, we find that Sin3 complexes spread immediately downstream of the transcription start site on repressed and transcribed genes during differentiation. We show that RBP2 is part of a Sin3 complex, and on a subset of E2F4 target genes, the coordinated activity of Sin3 and RBP2 leads to deacetylation, demethylation, and repositioning of nucleosomes. Our work provides evidence for coordinated binding of Sin3, chromatin modifications, and chromatin remodeling within discrete regulatory regions, suggesting a model in which spreading of Sin3 binding is ultimately linked to permanent gene silencing on a subset of E2F4 target genes. PMID:18995834

  8. Expression of pair rule gene orthologs in the blastoderm of a myriapod: evidence for pair rule-like mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A hallmark of Drosophila segmentation is the stepwise subdivision of the body into smaller and smaller units, and finally into the segments. This is achieved by the function of the well-understood segmentation gene cascade. The first molecular sign of a segmented body appears with the action of the pair rule genes, which are expressed as transversal stripes in alternating segments. Drosophila development, however, is derived, and in most other arthropods only the anterior body is patterned (almost) simultaneously from a pre-existing field of cells; posterior segments are added sequentially from a posterior segment addition zone. A long-standing question is to what extent segmentation mechanisms known from Drosophila may be conserved in short-germ arthropods. Despite the derived developmental modes, it appears more likely that conserved mechanisms can be found in anterior patterning. Results Expression analysis of pair rule gene orthologs in the blastoderm of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests that these genes are generally involved in segmenting the anterior embryo. We find that the Glomeris pairberry-1 ( pby-1) gene is expressed in a pair rule pattern that is also found in insects and a chelicerate, the mite Tetraynchus urticae. Other Glomeris pair rule gene orthologs are expressed in double segment wide domains in the blastoderm, which at subsequent stages split into two stripes in adjacent segments. Conclusions The expression patterns of the millipede pair rule gene orthologs resemble pair rule patterning in Drosophila and other insects, and thus represent evidence for the presence of an ancestral pair rule-like mechanism in myriapods. We discuss the possibilities that blastoderm patterning may be conserved in long-germ and short-germ arthropods, and that a posterior double segmental mechanism may be present in short-germ arthropods. PMID:22595029

  9. Acetylation of RNA polymerase II regulates growth-factor-induced gene transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S; Capra, John A; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2013-11-07

    Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes.

  10. Tempo and mode of gene duplication in mammalian ribosomal protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Asav P; Obla, Ajay; Gajdosik, Matthew D; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism.

  11. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  12. The mammalian cervical vertebrae blueprint depends on the T (brachyury) gene.

    PubMed

    Kromik, Andreas; Ulrich, Reiner; Kusenda, Marian; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M; Hellige, Maren; Dziallas, Peter; Hadlich, Frieder; Widmann, Philipp; Goldammer, Tom; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Rehage, Jürgen; Segelke, Dierck; Weikard, Rosemarie; Kühn, Christa

    2015-03-01

    A key common feature all but three known mammalian genera is the strict seven cervical vertebrae blueprint, suggesting the involvement of strong conserving selection forces during mammalian radiation. This is further supported by reports indicating that children with cervical ribs die before they reach reproductive age. Hypotheses were put up, associating cervical ribs (homeotic transformations) to embryonal cancer (e.g., neuroblastoma) or ascribing the constraint in cervical vertebral count to the development of the mammalian diaphragm. Here, we describe a spontaneous mutation c.196A > G in the Bos taurus T gene (also known as brachyury) associated with a cervical vertebral homeotic transformation that violates the fundamental mammalian cervical blueprint, but does not preclude reproduction of the affected individual. Genome-wide mapping, haplotype tracking within a large pedigree, resequencing of target genome regions, and bioinformatic analyses unambiguously confirmed the mutant c.196G allele as causal for this previously unknown defect termed vertebral and spinal dysplasia (VSD) by providing evidence for the mutation event. The nonsynonymous VSD mutation is located within the highly conserved T box of the T gene, which plays a fundamental role in eumetazoan body organization and vertebral development. To our knowledge, VSD is the first unequivocally approved spontaneous mutation decreasing cervical vertebrae number in a large mammal. The spontaneous VSD mutation in the bovine T gene is the first in vivo evidence for the hypothesis that the T protein is directly involved in the maintenance of the mammalian seven-cervical vertebra blueprint. It therefore furthers our knowledge of the T-protein function and early mammalian notochord development.

  13. The Mammalian Cervical Vertebrae Blueprint Depends on the T (brachyury) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kromik, Andreas; Ulrich, Reiner; Kusenda, Marian; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M.; Hellige, Maren; Dziallas, Peter; Hadlich, Frieder; Widmann, Philipp; Goldammer, Tom; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Rehage, Jürgen; Segelke, Dierck; Weikard, Rosemarie; Kühn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    A key common feature of all but three known mammalian genera is the strict seven cervical vertebrae blueprint, suggesting the involvement of strong conserving selection forces during mammalian radiation. This is further supported by reports indicating that children with cervical ribs die before they reach reproductive age. Hypotheses were put up, associating cervical ribs (homeotic transformations) to embryonal cancer (e.g., neuroblastoma) or ascribing the constraint in cervical vertebral count to the development of the mammalian diaphragm. Here, we describe a spontaneous mutation c.196A > G in the Bos taurus T gene (also known as brachyury) associated with a cervical vertebral homeotic transformation that violates the fundamental mammalian cervical blueprint, but does not preclude reproduction of the affected individual. Genome-wide mapping, haplotype tracking within a large pedigree, resequencing of target genome regions, and bioinformatic analyses unambiguously confirmed the mutant c.196G allele as causal for this previously unknown defect termed vertebral and spinal dysplasia (VSD) by providing evidence for the mutation event. The nonsynonymous VSD mutation is located within the highly conserved T box of the T gene, which plays a fundamental role in eumetazoan body organization and vertebral development. To our knowledge, VSD is the first unequivocally approved spontaneous mutation decreasing cervical vertebrae number in a large mammal. The spontaneous VSD mutation in the bovine T gene is the first in vivo evidence for the hypothesis that the T protein is directly involved in the maintenance of the mammalian seven-cervical vertebra blueprint. It therefore furthers our knowledge of the T-protein function and early mammalian notochord development. PMID:25614605

  14. Clock genes of Mammalian cells: practical implications in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Kaeffer, Bertrand; Pardini, Lissia

    2005-01-01

    The clock genes family is expressed by all the somatic cells driving central and peripheral circadian rhythms through transcription/translation feedback loops. The circadian clock provides a local time for a cell and a way to integrate the normal environmental changes to smoothly adapt the cellular machinery to new conditions. The central circadian rhythm is retained in primary cultures by neurons of the suprachiasmatic nuclei. The peripheral circadian rhythms of the other somatic cells are progressively dampened down up to loss unless neuronal signals of the central clock are provided for re-entrainment. Under typical culture conditions (obscurity, 37 +/- 1 degrees C, 5-7% CO(2)), freshly explanted peripheral cells harbor chaotic expression of clock genes for 12-14 h and loose, coordinated oscillating patterns of clock components. Cells of normal or cancerous phenotypes established in culture harbor low levels of clock genes idling up to the re-occurrence of new synchronizer signals. Synchronizers are physicochemical cues (like thermic oscillations, short-term exposure to high concentrations of serum or single medium exchange) able to re-induce molecular oscillations of clock genes. The environmental synchronizers are integrated by response elements located in the promoter region of period genes that drive the central oscillator complex (CLOCK:BMAL1 and NPAS2:BMAL1 heterodimers). Only a few cell lines from different species and lineages have been tested for the existence or the functioning of a circadian clockwork. The best characterized cell lines are the immortalized SCN2.2 neurons of rat suprachiasmatic nuclei for the central clock and the Rat-1 fibroblasts or the NIH/3T3 cells for peripheral clocks. Isolation methods of fragile cell phenotypes may benefit from research on the biological clocks to design improved tissue culture media and new bioassays to diagnose pernicious consequences for health of circadian rhythm alterations.

  15. Differential conservation of transcriptional domains of mammalian Prophet of Pit-1 proteins revealed by structural studies of the bovine gene and comparative functional analysis of the protein.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Aaron D; Smith, Timothy P L; Bennett, Gary L; Sloop, Kyle W; Whitsett, Julie A; Rhodes, Simon J

    2002-05-29

    The Prophet of Pit-1 (PROP1) gene encodes a paired class homeodomain transcription factor that is exclusively expressed in the developing mammalian pituitary gland. PROP1 function is essential for anterior pituitary organogenesis, and heritable mutations in the gene are associated with combined pituitary hormone deficiency in human patients and animals. By cloning the bovine PROP1 gene and by comparative analysis, we demonstrate that the homeodomains and carboxyl termini of mammalian PROP1 proteins are highly conserved while the amino termini are diverged. Whereas the carboxyl termini of the human and bovine PROP1 proteins contain potent transcriptional activation domains, the amino termini and homeodomains have repressive activities. The bovine PROP1 gene has four exons and three introns and maps to a region of chromosome seven carrying a quantitative trait locus affecting ovulation rate. Two alleles of the bovine gene were found that encode distinct protein products with different DNA binding and transcriptional activities. These experiments demonstrate that mammalian PROP1 genes encode proteins with complex regulatory capacities and that modest changes in protein sequence can significantly alter the activity of this pituitary developmental transcription factor.

  16. Gaining insights into the codon usage patterns of TP53 gene across eight mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    TP53 gene is known as the "guardian of the genome" as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB) is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution.

  17. Regulation of mammalian gene expression by exogenous microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongwei; Huang, Lei; Cao, Jingjing; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Communication between cells ensures coordination of behavior. In prokaryotes, this signaling is usually referred to as quorum sensing, while eukaryotic cells communicate through hormones. In recent years, a growing number of reports have shown that small signaling molecules produced by organisms from different kingdoms of nature can facilitate cross-talk, communication, or signal interference. This trans-kingdom communication (also termed as trans-kingdom signaling or inter-kingdom signaling) mediates symbiotic and pathogenic relationships between various organisms (e.g., microorganisms and their hosts). Strikingly, it has been discovered that microRNAs (miRNAs)--single-stranded noncoding RNAs with an average length of 22 nt--can be transmitted from one species to another, inducing posttranscriptional gene silencing in distant species, even in a cross-kingdom fashion. Here, we discuss several recent studies concerning miRNA-mediated cross-kingdom gene regulation.

  18. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three new genetically distinct DHFR−/− cell lines were generated. Each new line exhibited growth and functional properties consistent with the specific knockout of the DHFR gene. Importantly, target gene disruption is complete within 2–3 days of transient ZFN delivery, thus enabling the isolation of the resultant DHFR−/− cell lines within 1 month. These data demonstrate further the utility of ZFNs for rapid mammalian cell line engineering and establish a new method for gene knockout with application to reverse genetics, functional genomics, drug discovery, and therapeutic recombinant protein production. PMID:18359850

  19. Novel method to load multiple genes onto a mammalian artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Anna; Fodor, Katalin; Praznovszky, Tünde; Tubak, Vilmos; Udvardy, Andor; Hadlaczky, Gyula; Katona, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian artificial chromosomes are natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material in terms of both size and number. They are reasonably stable and segregate well in both mitosis and meiosis. A platform artificial chromosome expression system (ACEs) was earlier described with multiple loading sites for a modified lambda-integrase enzyme. It has been shown that this ACEs is suitable for high-level industrial protein production and the treatment of a mouse model for a devastating human disorder, Krabbe's disease. ACEs-treated mutant mice carrying a therapeutic gene lived more than four times longer than untreated counterparts. This novel gene therapy method is called combined mammalian artificial chromosome-stem cell therapy. At present, this method suffers from the limitation that a new selection marker gene should be present for each therapeutic gene loaded onto the ACEs. Complex diseases require the cooperative action of several genes for treatment, but only a limited number of selection marker genes are available and there is also a risk of serious side-effects caused by the unwanted expression of these marker genes in mammalian cells, organs and organisms. We describe here a novel method to load multiple genes onto the ACEs by using only two selectable marker genes. These markers may be removed from the ACEs before therapeutic application. This novel technology could revolutionize gene therapeutic applications targeting the treatment of complex disorders and cancers. It could also speed up cell therapy by allowing researchers to engineer a chromosome with a predetermined set of genetic factors to differentiate adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into cell types of therapeutic value. It is also a suitable tool for the investigation of complex biochemical pathways in basic science by producing an ACEs with several genes from a signal transduction pathway of interest.

  20. Novel Method to Load Multiple Genes onto a Mammalian Artificial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Anna; Fodor, Katalin; Praznovszky, Tünde; Tubak, Vilmos; Udvardy, Andor; Hadlaczky, Gyula; Katona, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian artificial chromosomes are natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material in terms of both size and number. They are reasonably stable and segregate well in both mitosis and meiosis. A platform artificial chromosome expression system (ACEs) was earlier described with multiple loading sites for a modified lambda-integrase enzyme. It has been shown that this ACEs is suitable for high-level industrial protein production and the treatment of a mouse model for a devastating human disorder, Krabbe’s disease. ACEs-treated mutant mice carrying a therapeutic gene lived more than four times longer than untreated counterparts. This novel gene therapy method is called combined mammalian artificial chromosome-stem cell therapy. At present, this method suffers from the limitation that a new selection marker gene should be present for each therapeutic gene loaded onto the ACEs. Complex diseases require the cooperative action of several genes for treatment, but only a limited number of selection marker genes are available and there is also a risk of serious side-effects caused by the unwanted expression of these marker genes in mammalian cells, organs and organisms. We describe here a novel method to load multiple genes onto the ACEs by using only two selectable marker genes. These markers may be removed from the ACEs before therapeutic application. This novel technology could revolutionize gene therapeutic applications targeting the treatment of complex disorders and cancers. It could also speed up cell therapy by allowing researchers to engineer a chromosome with a predetermined set of genetic factors to differentiate adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into cell types of therapeutic value. It is also a suitable tool for the investigation of complex biochemical pathways in basic science by producing an ACEs with several genes from a signal transduction pathway of interest. PMID:24454889

  1. A cytogenetic method for stacking gene pairs in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Riedel, E; Benabdelmouna, A; Armstrong, K

    2004-10-01

    The potential for non-reciprocal Robertsonian translocations of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to assist in the stacking of genes was assessed from a study of their cytological and genetic behaviour. To obtain translocations, a double monosomic (3B+5A; 2n=40=19ii+2i) was crossed reciprocally with a contrasting disomic. Individuals inheriting a broken monosome were identified from the loss of one arm-specific DNA marker coupled with retention of a marker for the opposite arm. No double breaks (potential translocations) were found in 180 cross progeny recovered from pollen of the double monosomic but two instances (loss of 5AL plus 3BS; loss of 5AL plus 3BL) were found in 251 progeny recovered from ovules. Meiotic pairing and multi-color genome-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (mcGISH) showed that each plant with a double break contained one translocated chromosome between the A and B genomes that had rejoined at the centromere and that formed a trivalent (19ii+ liii) in about 83% of PMC. Most trivalents (approximately 92%) aligned at metaphase in a 'V' configuration(alternate disjunction) while the rest aligned in linear 'I'(adjacent disjunction) or ambiguous 'L' configurations. Genetic analysis of a testcross of these 'fusion monosomics' showed that this preferential co-orientation of the trivalent influenced the assortment of the chromosome arms involved. Loci that were located in the hemizygous ends of the 'V' trivalent showed strong quasi-linkage in that most ovules from the female testcross carried relevant DNA markers either from both standard chromosomes or from neither. This shows that, in most cases, the two standard chromosomes assorted to the same pole while the fused monosome segregated to the opposite pole. For heterozygous loci (present both on the fusion monosome and the standard chromosomes) assortment was either independent or showed partial linkage to the hemizygous arm depending on the reported recombination distance from centromere

  2. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  3. A platform for rapid prototyping of synthetic gene networks in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Duportet, Xavier; Wroblewska, Liliana; Guye, Patrick; Li, Yinqing; Eyquem, Justin; Rieders, Julianne; Rimchala, Tharathorn; Batt, Gregory; Weiss, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian synthetic biology may provide novel therapeutic strategies, help decipher new paths for drug discovery and facilitate synthesis of valuable molecules. Yet, our capacity to genetically program cells is currently hampered by the lack of efficient approaches to streamline the design, construction and screening of synthetic gene networks. To address this problem, here we present a framework for modular and combinatorial assembly of functional (multi)gene expression vectors and their efficient and specific targeted integration into a well-defined chromosomal context in mammalian cells. We demonstrate the potential of this framework by assembling and integrating different functional mammalian regulatory networks including the largest gene circuit built and chromosomally integrated to date (6 transcription units, 27kb) encoding an inducible memory device. Using a library of 18 different circuits as a proof of concept, we also demonstrate that our method enables one-pot/single-flask chromosomal integration and screening of circuit libraries. This rapid and powerful prototyping platform is well suited for comparative studies of genetic regulatory elements, genes and multi-gene circuits as well as facile development of libraries of isogenic engineered cell lines. PMID:25378321

  4. Amino acid regulation of mammalian gene expression in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole G; Lavoinne, Alain M; Husson, Annie S

    2010-07-01

    Some amino acids exert a wide range of regulatory effects on gene expression via the activation of different signalling pathways and transcription factors, and a number of cis elements were shown to respond to changes in amino acid concentration. Particular attention has been paid to the effects of glutamine and arginine, which modulate a number of cell functions through the activation of various pathways in different tissues. In the intestine, appropriate concentrations of both arginine and/or glutamine contribute to facilitate cell proliferation, to limit the inflammatory response and apoptosis, and to modulate intermediary metabolism through specific transcription factors. Particularly, besides its role as a major fuel for enterocytes, the regulatory effects of glutamine have been extensively studied and the molecular mechanisms involved appear diversified and complex. Indeed, in addition to a major role of NF-kappaB in its anti-inflammatory action and a stimulatory role of AP-1 in its growth-promoting action and cell survival, the involvement of some other transcription factors, such as PPAR-gamma or HSF-1, was shown to maintain intestinal cell integrity. The signalling pathways leading to the activation of transcription factors imply several kinases, particularly MAP kinases in the effect of glutamine and p70 S6 kinase for those of arginine, but in most cases the precise pathways from the entrance of the aminoacid into the cell to the activation of gene transcription has remained elusive.

  5. Control Genes and Variability: Absence of Ubiquitous Reference Transcripts in Diverse Mammalian Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter D.; Sladek, Robert; Greenwood, Celia M.T.; Hudson, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Control genes, commonly defined as genes that are ubiquitously expressed at stable levels in different biological contexts, have been used to standardize quantitative expression studies for more than 25 yr. We analyzed a group of large mammalian microarray datasets including the NCI60 cancer cell line panel, a leukemia tumor panel, and a phorbol ester induction time course as well as human and mouse tissue panels. Twelve housekeeping genes commonly used as controls in classical expression studies (including GAPD, ACTB, B2M, TUBA, G6PD, LDHA, and HPRT) show considerable variability of expression both within and across microarray datasets. Although we can identify genes with lower variability within individual datasets by heuristic filtering, such genes invariably show different expression levels when compared across other microarray datasets. We confirm these results with an analysis of variance in a controlled mouse dataset, showing the extent of variability in gene expression across tissues. The results show the problems inherent in the classical use of control genes in estimating gene expression levels in different mammalian cell contexts, and highlight the importance of controlled study design in the construction of microarray experiments. [Supplemental material available online at http://genome.mcgill.ca/∼pdlee/control_genes and and http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11827948

  6. Regulation of mammalian ribosomal gene transcription by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Grummt, I

    1999-01-01

    All cells, from prokaryotes to vertebrates, synthesize vast amounts of ribosomal RNA to produce the several million new ribosomes per generation that are required to maintain the protein synthetic capacity of the daughter cells. Ribosomal gene (rDNA) transcription is governed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) assisted by a dedicated set of transcription factors that mediate the specificity of transcription and are the targets of the pleiotrophic pathways the cell uses to adapt rRNA synthesis to cell growth. In the past few years we have begun to understand the specific functions of individual factors involved in rDNA transcription and to elucidate on a molecular level how transcriptional regulation is achieved. This article reviews our present knowledge of the molecular mechanism of rDNA transcriptional regulation.

  7. Signaling and Gene Regulatory Networks in Mammalian Lens Development.

    PubMed

    Cvekl, Ales; Zhang, Xin

    2017-10-01

    Ocular lens development represents an advantageous system in which to study regulatory mechanisms governing cell fate decisions, extracellular signaling, cell and tissue organization, and the underlying gene regulatory networks. Spatiotemporally regulated domains of BMP, FGF, and other signaling molecules in late gastrula-early neurula stage embryos generate the border region between the neural plate and non-neural ectoderm from which multiple cell types, including lens progenitor cells, emerge and undergo initial tissue formation. Extracellular signaling and DNA-binding transcription factors govern lens and optic cup morphogenesis. Pax6, c-Maf, Hsf4, Prox1, Sox1, and a few additional factors regulate the expression of the lens structural proteins, the crystallins. Extensive crosstalk between a diverse array of signaling pathways controls the complexity and order of lens morphogenetic processes and lens transparency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The stumpy gene is required for mammalian ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Town, Terrence; Breunig, Joshua J.; Sarkisian, Matthew R.; Spilianakis, Charalampos; Ayoub, Albert E.; Liu, Xiuxin; Ferrandino, Anthony F.; Gallagher, A. Rachel; Li, Ming O.; Rakic, Pasko; Flavell, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Cilia are present on nearly all cell types in mammals and perform remarkably diverse functions. However, the mechanisms underlying ciliogenesis are unclear. Here, we cloned a previously uncharacterized highly conserved gene, stumpy, located on mouse chromosome 7. Stumpy was ubiquitously expressed, and conditional loss in mouse resulted in complete penetrance of perinatal hydrocephalus (HC) and severe polycystic kidney disease (PKD). We found that cilia in stumpy mutant brain and kidney cells were absent or markedly deformed, resulting in defective flow of cerebrospinal fluid. Stumpy colocalized with ciliary basal bodies, physically interacted with γ-tubulin, and was present along ciliary axonemes, suggesting that stumpy plays a role in ciliary axoneme extension. Therefore, stumpy is essential for ciliogenesis and may be involved in the pathogenesis of human congenital malformations such as HC and PKD. PMID:18287022

  9. Histidine pairing at the metal transport site of mammalian ZnT transporters controls Zn2+ over Cd2+ selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Eitan; Lin, Wei; Chai, Jin; Hershfinkel, Michal; Fu, Dax; Sekler, Israel

    2012-05-08

    Zinc and cadmium are similar metal ions, but though Zn(2+) is an essential nutrient, Cd(2+) is a toxic and common pollutant linked to multiple disorders. Faster body turnover and ubiquitous distribution of Zn(2+) vs. Cd(2+) suggest that a mammalian metal transporter distinguishes between these metal ions. We show that the mammalian metal transporters, ZnTs, mediate cytosolic and vesicular Zn(2+) transport, but reject Cd(2+), thus constituting the first mammalian metal transporter with a refined selectivity against Cd(2+). Remarkably, the bacterial ZnT ortholog, YiiP, does not discriminate between Zn(2+) and Cd(2+). A phylogenetic comparison between the tetrahedral metal transport motif of YiiP and ZnTs identifies a histidine at the mammalian site that is critical for metal selectivity. Residue swapping at this position abolished metal selectivity of ZnTs, and fully reconstituted selective Zn(2+) transport of YiiP. Finally, we show that metal selectivity evolves through a reduction in binding but not the translocation of Cd(2+) by the transporter. Thus, our results identify a unique class of mammalian transporters and the structural motif required to discriminate between Zn(2+) and Cd(2+), and show that metal selectivity is tuned by a coordination-based mechanism that raises the thermodynamic barrier to Cd(2+) binding.

  10. Tonicity-dependent regulation of osmoprotective genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Joan D; Burg, Maurice B

    2006-01-01

    Cells in the renal medulla are normally exposed to levels of NaCl that are extremely high and that vary with concentration of the urine. Such high levels of NaCl cause cellular perturbations, including increased DNA double-strand breaks, increased oxidation of DNA and proteins, and cytoskeletal alterations. Despite these perturbations the cells are able to survive and function because of osmoprotective responses that include accumulation of compatible organic osmolytes and increased abundance of heat shock proteins and water channels. Many of the responses are initiated by increased gene transcription, directed by the transcription factor TonEBP/OREBP. Here, we review the sensors of hypertonicity, the signaling pathways to TonEBP/OREBP, and the ways in which it is activated to increase transcription. Multiple signals are involved, including some that arise directly from the cellular perturbations caused by hypertonicity. Although the combination of these signals is necessary for full osmotic activation of TonEBP/OREBP, no one of them, alone, is sufficient. We conclude that hypertonicity profoundly alters the state of cells, providing numerous interrelated inputs to the osmoregulatory network.

  11. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. The expansion of amino-acid repeats is not associated to adaptive evolution in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The expansion of amino acid repeats is determined by a high mutation rate and can be increased or limited by selection. It has been suggested that recent expansions could be associated with the potential of adaptation to new environments. In this work, we quantify the strength of this association, as well as the contribution of potential confounding factors. Results Mammalian positively selected genes have accumulated more recent amino acid repeats than other mammalian genes. However, we found little support for an accelerated evolutionary rate as the main driver for the expansion of amino acid repeats. The most significant predictors of amino acid repeats are gene function and GC content. There is no correlation with expression level. Conclusions Our analyses show that amino acid repeat expansions are causally independent from protein adaptive evolution in mammalian genomes. Relaxed purifying selection or positive selection do not associate with more or more recent amino acid repeats. Their occurrence is slightly favoured by the sequence context but mainly determined by the molecular function of the gene. PMID:20021652

  13. MTD: a mammalian transcriptomic database to explore gene expression and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qianqian; Li, Xue; Xian, Feng; Sun, Manman; Fang, Wan; Chen, Meili; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa

    2017-01-01

    A systematic transcriptome survey is essential for the characterization and comprehension of the molecular basis underlying phenotypic variations. Recently developed RNA-seq methodology has facilitated efficient data acquisition and information mining of transcriptomes in multiple tissues/cell lines. Current mammalian transcriptomic databases are either tissue-specific or species-specific, and they lack in-depth comparative features across tissues and species. Here, we present a mammalian transcriptomic database (MTD) that is focused on mammalian transcriptomes, and the current version contains data from humans, mice, rats and pigs. Regarding the core features, the MTD browses genes based on their neighboring genomic coordinates or joint KEGG pathway and provides expression information on exons, transcripts and genes by integrating them into a genome browser. We developed a novel nomenclature for each transcript that considers its genomic position and transcriptional features. The MTD allows a flexible search of genes or isoforms with user-defined transcriptional characteristics and provides both table-based descriptions and associated visualizations. To elucidate the dynamics of gene expression regulation, the MTD also enables comparative transcriptomic analysis in both intraspecies and interspecies manner. The MTD thus constitutes a valuable resource for transcriptomic and evolutionary studies. The MTD is freely accessible at http://mtd.cbi.ac.cn. PMID:26822098

  14. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:25030908

  15. Bacteriophages as vehicles for gene delivery into mammalian cells: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-10-01

    The identification of more efficient gene delivery vehicles (GDVs) is essential to fulfill the expectations of clinical gene therapy. Bacteriophages, due to their excellent safety profile, extreme stability under a variety of harsh environmental conditions and the capability for being genetically manipulated, have drawn a flurry of interest to be applied as a newly arisen category of gene delivery platforms. The incessant evolutionary interaction of bacteriophages with human cells has turned them into a part of our body's natural ecosystem. However, these carriers represent several barriers to gene transduction of mammalian cells. The lack of evolvement of specialized machinery for targeted cellular internalization, endosomal, lysosomal and proteasomal escape, cytoplasmic entry, nuclear localization and intranuclear transcription poses major challenges to the expression of the phage-carried gene. In this review, we describe pros and cons of bacteriophages as GDVs, provide an insight into numerous barriers that bacteriophages face for entry into and subsequent trafficking inside mammalian cells and elaborate on the strategies used to bypass these barriers. Tremendous genetic flexibility of bacteriophages to undergo numerous surface modifications through phage display technology has proven to be a turning point in the uncompromising efforts to surmount the limitations of phage-mediated gene expression. The revelatory outcomes of the studies undertaken within the recent years have been promising for phage-mediated gene delivery to move from concept to reality.

  16. The birth of new genes by RNA- and DNA-mediated duplication during mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin; Ryvkin, Paul; Hemphill, Edward; Mandoiu, Ion; Nelson, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Gene duplication has long been recognized as a major force in genome evolution and has recently been recognized as an important source of individual variation. For many years, the origin of functional gene duplicates was assumed to be whole or partial genome duplication events, but recently retrotransposition has also been shown to contribute new functional protein coding genes and siRNA's. In this study, we utilize pseudogenes to recreate more complete gene family histories, and compare the rates of RNA and DNA-mediated duplication and new functional gene formation in five mammalian genomes. We find that RNA-mediated duplication occurs at a much higher and more variable rate than DNA-mediated duplication, and gives rise to many more duplicated sequences over time. We show that, while the chance of RNA-mediated duplicates becoming functional is much lower than that of their DNA-mediated counterparts, the higher rate of retrotransposition leads to nearly equal contributions of new genes by each mechanism. We also find that functional RNA-mediated duplicates are closer to neighboring genes than non-functional RNA-mediated copies, consistent with co-option of regulatory elements at the site of insertion. Overall, new genes derived from DNA and RNA-mediated duplication mechanisms are under similar levels of purifying selective pressure, but have broadly different functions. RNA-mediated duplication gives rise to a diversity of genes but is dominated by the highly expressed genes of RNA metabolic pathways. DNA-mediated duplication can copy regulatory material along with the protein coding region of the gene and often gives rise to classes of genes whose function are dependent on complex regulatory information. This mechanistic difference may in part explain why we find that mammalian protein families tend to evolve by either one mechanism or the other, but rarely by both. Supplementary Material has been provided (see online Supplementary Material at www.liebertonline.com ).

  17. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  18. A second lineage of mammalian major histocompatibility complex class I genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bahram, S; Bresnahan, M; Geraghty, D E; Spies, T

    1994-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes typically encode polymorphic peptide-binding chains which are ubiquitously expressed and mediate the recognition of intracellular antigens by cytotoxic T cells. They constitute diverse gene families in different species and include the numerous so-called nonclassical genes in the mouse H-2 complex, of which some have been adapted to variously modified functions. We have identified a distinct family of five related sequences in the human MHC which are distantly homologous to class I chains. These MIC genes (MHC class I chain-related genes) evolved in parallel with the human class I genes and with those of most if not all mammalian orders. The MICA gene in this family is located near HLA-B and is by far the most divergent mammalian MHC class I gene known. It is further distinguished by its unusual exon-intron organization and preferential expression in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. However, the presence of diagnostic residues in the MICA amino acid sequence translated from cDNA suggests that the putative MICA chain folds similarly to typical class I chains and may have the capacity to bind peptide or other short ligands. These results define a second lineage of evolutionarily conserved MHC class I genes. This implies that MICA and possibly other members in this family have been selected for specialized functions that are either ancient or derived from those of typical MHC class I genes, in analogy to some of the nonclassical mouse H-2 genes. Images PMID:8022771

  19. Sry and SoxE genes: How they participate in mammalian sex determination and gonadal development?

    PubMed

    She, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2017-03-01

    In mammals, sex determination defines the differentiation of the bipotential genital ridge into either testes or ovaries. Sry, the mammalian Y-chromosomal testis-determining gene, is a master regulator of male sex determination. It acts to switch the undifferentiated genital ridge towards testis development, triggering the adoption of a male fate. Sry initiates a cascade of gene networks through the direct regulation of Sox9 expression and promotes supporting cell differentiation, Leydig cell specification, vasculature formation and testis cord development. In the absence of Sry, alternative genetic cascades, including female sex-determining genes RSPO1, Wnt4/β-catenin and Foxl2, are involved in the formation of female genitalia and the maintenance of female ovarian development. The mutual antagonisms between male and female sex-determining pathways are crucial in not just the initiation but also the maintenance of the somatic sex of the gonad throughout the organism's lifetime. Any imbalances in above sex-determining genes can cause disorders of sex development in humans and mice. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of the expression profiles, biochemical properties and developmental functions of Sry and SoxE genes in embryonic testis development and adult gonadal development. We also briefly summarize the dedicate balances between male and female sex-determining genes in mammalian sex development, with particular highlights on the molecular actions of Sry and Sox9 transcription factors.

  20. Sorting out inherent features of head-to-head gene pairs by evolutionary conservation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A ‘head-to-head’ (h2h) gene pair is defined as a genomic locus in which two adjacent genes are divergently transcribed from opposite strands of DNA. In our previous work, this gene organization was found to be ancient and conserved, which subjects functionally related genes to transcriptional co-regulation. However, some of the biological features of h2h pairs still need further clarification. Results In this work, we assorted human h2h pairs into four sequentially inclusive sets of gradually incremental conservation, and examined whether those previously asserted features were conserved or sharpened in the more conserved h2h pair sets in order to identify the inherent features of the h2h gene organization. The features of TSS distance, expression correlation within h2h pairs and among h2h genes, transcription factor association and functional similarities of h2h genes were examined. Our conservation-based analyses found that the bi-directional promoters of h2h gene pairs are most likely shorter than 100 bp; h2h gene pairs generally have only significant positive expression correlation but not negative correlation, and remarkably high positive expression correlations exist among h2h genes, as well as between h2h pairs observed in our previous study; h2h paired genes tend to share transcription factors. In addition, expression correlation of h2h pairs is positively related with the TF-sharing and functional coordination, while not related with TSS distance. Conclusions Our findings remove the uncertainties of h2h genes about TSS distance, expression correlation and functional coordination, which provide insights into the study on the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of the transcriptional regulation based on this special gene organization. PMID:21172051

  1. Early Developmental and Evolutionary Origins of Gene Body DNA Methylation Patterns in Mammalian Placentas.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Diane I; Jayashankar, Kartika; Douglas, Kory C; Thirkill, Twanda L; York, Daniel; Dickinson, Pete J; Williams, Lawrence E; Samollow, Paul B; Ross, Pablo J; Bannasch, Danika L; Douglas, Gordon C; LaSalle, Janine M

    2015-08-01

    Over the last 20-80 million years the mammalian placenta has taken on a variety of morphologies through both divergent and convergent evolution. Recently we have shown that the human placenta genome has a unique epigenetic pattern of large partially methylated domains (PMDs) and highly methylated domains (HMDs) with gene body DNA methylation positively correlating with level of gene expression. In order to determine the evolutionary conservation of DNA methylation patterns and transcriptional regulatory programs in the placenta, we performed a genome-wide methylome (MethylC-seq) analysis of human, rhesus macaque, squirrel monkey, mouse, dog, horse, and cow placentas as well as opossum extraembryonic membrane. We found that, similar to human placenta, mammalian placentas and opossum extraembryonic membrane have globally lower levels of methylation compared to somatic tissues. Higher relative gene body methylation was the conserved feature across all mammalian placentas, despite differences in PMD/HMDs and absolute methylation levels. Specifically, higher methylation over the bodies of genes involved in mitosis, vesicle-mediated transport, protein phosphorylation, and chromatin modification was observed compared with the rest of the genome. As in human placenta, higher methylation is associated with higher gene expression and is predictive of genic location across species. Analysis of DNA methylation in oocytes and preimplantation embryos shows a conserved pattern of gene body methylation similar to the placenta. Intriguingly, mouse and cow oocytes and mouse early embryos have PMD/HMDs but their placentas do not, suggesting that PMD/HMDs are a feature of early preimplantation methylation patterns that become lost during placental development in some species and following implantation of the embryo.

  2. Combinatorial gene editing in mammalian cells using ssODNs and TALENs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strouse, Bryan; Bialk, Pawel; Niamat, Rohina A.; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene editing is being elucidated in mammalian cells and its potential as well as its limitations are becoming evident. ssODNs carry out gene editing by annealing to their complimentary sequence at the target site and acting as primers for replication fork extension. To effect a genetic change, a large amount of ssODN molecules must be introduced into cells and as such induce a Reduced Proliferation Phenotype (RPP), a phenomenon in which corrected cells do not proliferate. To overcome this limitation, we have used TAL-Effector Nucleases (TALENs) to increase the frequency, while reducing the amount of ssODN required to direct gene correction. This strategy resolves the problem and averts the serious effects of RPP. The efficiency of gene editing can be increased significantly if cells are targeted while they progress through S phase. Our studies define new reaction parameters that will help guide experimental strategies of gene editing.

  3. [Rapid and efficient expression of foreign genes in mammalian cells by baculovirus vectors].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tong; Xu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Ying-Bin; Chen, Min; Wu, Ting; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2003-09-01

    The baculovirus insect cell expression system has been used extensively for the expression of recombinant proteins in insect cells. Recently, reports have described that recombinant baculoviruses can transduce a broad spectrum of primary and established mammalian cells, which shows the baculoviruses could serve as a new gene-transfer vehicle for mammalian cells. In this report, we further research the modification of baculovirus vector and the way to deliver exogenous gene into mammalian cells. On the base of Bac-to-Bac baculovirus insect cell expression system, two recombinant baculoviruses (BacV-CMV-EGFPA, BacV-CMV-EGFPB) were constructed containing different direction of CMV promoters which controll the expression of a reporter gene (EGFP). We found that CMV promoter could direct expression of reporter gene in Sf9 cells with relatively low efficiency. The culture supernatant of Sf9 cells which have been infected by the recombinant baculoviruses for four days were collected and the titers of the viruses in culture supernatant were determined by plaque assay on Sf9 cells. The HepG2 cells, an human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, were directly incubated with the collected culture supernatant which contains the recombinant baculoviruses for 8 hours in 37 degrees C CO2 incubator (moi = 100). Twenty-four hours post transduction the efficiencies of gene-transfer and expression were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) which detect the green fluorescence of individual cells. Results show that these two recombinant baculoviruses have similar gene-transfer and expression efficiency in HepG2 cells, which means the direction of CMV promoters has no effects on reporter gene expression. The optimal transduction conditions of incubating the mammalian cells with the culture supernatant of Sf9 cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses for four days were determined by FCM assay in HepG2 cells. The HepG2 cells inoculated in 24-well plate (5 x 10(4)/well) were incubated with the

  4. Global gene expression by Bacillus anthracis during growth in mammalian blood.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Paul E; Bourgis, Alexandra E T; Hagan, Ada K; Hanna, Philip C

    2015-11-01

    During the late stages of systemic anthrax, Bacillus anthracis grows rapidly in the host bloodstream. To identify potential genes necessary for this observed rapid growth, we defined the transcriptional profile of B. anthracis during in vitro growth in bovine blood. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis indicated that B. anthracis undergoes significant changes in its transcriptome profile during growth in blood, including the differential regulation of genes associated both with metabolism and known virulence factors. Collectively, these data provide a framework for future studies identifying specific B. anthracis factors required for growth in the mammalian bloodstream.

  5. Direct transfer of the bacterial asparagine synthetase gene to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Waye, M M; Stanners, C P

    1983-01-01

    Using specific mutants as a means of identification, the bacterial protein for asparagine synthetase (Asn Syn) was shown to be antigenically and electrophoretically similar to its mammalian counterpart. This observation prompted us to attempt direct transfer of the cloned bacterial gene for the enzyme to mammalian cells. DNA from the replicative form of clone M13 OriC, containing the bacterial gene for Asn Syn, was shown to be capable of causing transformation of Jensen rat Asn Syn- cells to cells capable of growth in Asn-free medium; no prior modification of the bacterial gene was required. This relatively inefficient transformation (20 colonies/micrograms DNA/10(6) cells) was sensitive or insensitive to restriction enzyme digestion of the M13 OriC DNA in complete agreement with the known restriction map of the bacterial gene. Clones of transformed rat cells contained the bacterial DNA, which was amplified if increased levels of the enzyme were demanded and lost if selection was removed. The clones also contained polysomal bacterial RNA and a new protein with properties similar but not identical to those of the bacterial enzyme. The biological significance of this unusual degree of compatibility between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic Asn Syn gene systems is discussed.

  6. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pfender, Sybille; Kuznetsov, Vitaliy; Pasternak, Michał; Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-08-13

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here we develop high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNA interference within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated data set of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Ortells, M. Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R.; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses. PMID:22287635

  9. A gene network model accounting for development and evolution of mammalian teeth.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Jernvall, Jukka

    2002-06-11

    Generation of morphological diversity remains a challenge for evolutionary biologists because it is unclear how an ultimately finite number of genes involved in initial pattern formation integrates with morphogenesis. Ideally, models used to search for the simplest developmental principles on how genes produce form should account for both developmental process and evolutionary change. Here we present a model reproducing the morphology of mammalian teeth by integrating experimental data on gene interactions and growth into a morphodynamic mechanism in which developing morphology has a causal role in patterning. The model predicts the course of tooth-shape development in different mammalian species and also reproduces key transitions in evolution. Furthermore, we reproduce the known expression patterns of several genes involved in tooth development and their dynamics over developmental time. Large morphological effects frequently can be achieved by small changes, according to this model, and similar morphologies can be produced by different changes. This finding may be consistent with why predicting the morphological outcomes of molecular experiments is challenging. Nevertheless, models incorporating morphology and gene activity show promise for linking genotypes to phenotypes.

  10. Design of a Retrovirus-Derived Vector for Expression and Transduction of Exogenous Genes in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Archibald S.; Kirschmeier, Paul T.; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Weinstein, I. Bernard

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a transfection vector for animal cells that contains long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences to promote expression. Plasmid p101/101, a derivative of plasmid pBR322 containing the complete Moloney murine sarcoma virus genome, was cut with restriction enzymes and religated so that both the 5′ and 3′ LTRs were retained and all but about 700 base pairs of the intervening viral sequences were removed. To test this vector, the Escherichia coli gene gpt was cloned into a unique PstI site, between the two LTRs, with guanine and cytosine tailing, a method that can be generalized for insertion of any DNA segment into this vector. When DNA from recombinant plasmids in which the gpt gene was inserted in the same transcriptional polarity as the LTR sequences was transfected onto murine or rat fibroblast cultures, we obtained a high yield of Gpt+ colonies. However, plasmid constructs with the gpt gene in the opposite polarity were virtually devoid of activity. With gpt in the proper orientation, restriction enzyme cuts within the LTRs or between the 5′ LTR and the gpt gene reduced transfection by more than 98%, whereas a cut between the gpt gene and the 3′ LTR gave an 80% reduction in activity. Thus, both 5′ and 3′ LTR sequences are essential for optimal gpt expression, although the 5′ LTR appears to play a more important role. When the LTR-gpt plasmid was transfected onto murine leukemia virus-infected mouse fibroblasts, we obtained evidence that RNA copies became pseudotyped into viral particles which could transfer the Gpt+ phenotype into rodent cells with extremely high efficiency. This vector should prove useful for high-efficiency transduction of a variety of genes in mammalian cells. Images PMID:6308426

  11. Dishevelled genes mediate a conserved mammalian PCP pathway to regulate convergent extension during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Hamblet, Natasha S; Mark, Sharayne; Dickinson, Mary E; Brinkman, Brendan C; Segil, Neil; Fraser, Scott E; Chen, Ping; Wallingford, John B; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2006-05-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is conserved throughout evolution, but it mediates distinct developmental processes. In Drosophila, members of the PCP pathway localize in a polarized fashion to specify the cellular polarity within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the apicobasal axis of the cell. In Xenopus and zebrafish, several homologs of the components of the fly PCP pathway control convergent extension. We have shown previously that mammalian PCP homologs regulate both cell polarity and polarized extension in the cochlea in the mouse. Here we show, using mice with null mutations in two mammalian Dishevelled homologs, Dvl1 and Dvl2, that during neurulation a homologous mammalian PCP pathway regulates concomitant lengthening and narrowing of the neural plate, a morphogenetic process defined as convergent extension. Dvl2 genetically interacts with Loop-tail, a point mutation in the mammalian PCP gene Vangl2, during neurulation. By generating Dvl2 BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes and introducing different domain deletions and a point mutation identical to the dsh1 allele in fly, we further demonstrated a high degree of conservation between Dvl function in mammalian convergent extension and the PCP pathway in fly. In the neuroepithelium of neurulating embryos, Dvl2 shows DEP domain-dependent membrane localization, a pre-requisite for its involvement in convergent extension. Intriguing, the Loop-tail mutation that disrupts both convergent extension in the neuroepithelium and PCP in the cochlea does not disrupt Dvl2 membrane distribution in the neuroepithelium, in contrast to its drastic effect on Dvl2 localization in the cochlea. These results are discussed in light of recent models on PCP and convergent extension.

  12. Dishevelled genes mediate a conserved mammalian PCP pathway to regulate convergent extension during neurulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbo; Hamblet, Natasha S.; Mark, Sharayne; Dickinson, Mary E.; Brinkman, Brendan C.; Segil, Neil; Fraser, Scott E.; Chen, Ping; Wallingford, John B.; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is conserved throughout evolution, but it mediates distinct developmental processes. In Drosophila, members of the PCP pathway localize in a polarized fashion to specify the cellular polarity within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the apicobasal axis of the cell. In Xenopus and zebrafish, several homologs of the components of the fly PCP pathway control convergent extension. We have shown previously that mammalian PCP homologs regulate both cell polarity and polarized extension in the cochlea in the mouse. Here we show, using mice with null mutations in two mammalian Dishevelled homologs, Dvl1 and Dvl2, that during neurulation a homologous mammalian PCP pathway regulates concomitant lengthening and narrowing of the neural plate, a morphogenetic process defined as convergent extension. Dvl2 genetically interacts with Loop-tail, a point mutation in the mammalian PCP gene Vangl2, during neurulation. By generating Dvl2 BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes and introducing different domain deletions and a point mutation identical to the dsh1 allele in fly, we further demonstrated a high degree of conservation between Dvl function in mammalian convergent extension and the PCP pathway in fly. In the neuroepithelium of neurulating embryos, Dvl2 shows DEP domain-dependent membrane localization, a pre-requisite for its involvement in convergent extension. Intriguing, the Loop-tail mutation that disrupts both convergent extension in the neuroepithelium and PCP in the cochlea does not disrupt Dvl2 membrane distribution in the neuroepithelium, in contrast to its drastic effect on Dvl2 localization in the cochlea. These results are discussed in light of recent models on PCP and convergent extension. PMID:16571627

  13. Evolution and divergence of the mammalian SAMD9/SAMD9L gene family.

    PubMed

    Lemos de Matos, Ana; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Esteves, Pedro J

    2013-06-12

    The physiological functions of the human Sterile Alpha Motif Domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) gene and its chromosomally adjacent paralogue, SAMD9-like (SAMD9L), currently remain unknown. However, the direct links between the deleterious mutations or deletions in these two genes and several human disorders, such as inherited inflammatory calcified tumors and acute myeloid leukemia, suggest their biological importance. SAMD9 and SAMD9L have also recently been shown to play key roles in the innate immune responses to stimuli such as viral infection. We were particularly interested in understanding the mammalian evolutionary history of these two genes. The phylogeny of SAMD9 and SAMD9L genes was reconstructed using the Maximum Likelihood method. Furthermore, six different methods were applied to detect SAMD9 and SAMD9L codons under selective pressure: the site-specific model M8 implemented in the codeml program in PAML software and five methods available on the Datamonkey web server, including the Single Likelihood Ancestor Counting method, the Fixed Effect Likelihood method, the Random Effect Likelihood method, the Mixed Effects Model of Evolution method and the Fast Unbiased Bayesian AppRoximation method. Additionally, the house mouse (Mus musculus) genome has lost the SAMD9 gene, while keeping SAMD9L intact, prompting us to investigate whether this loss is a unique event during evolution. Our evolutionary analyses suggest that SAMD9 and SAMD9L arose through an ancestral gene duplication event after the divergence of Marsupialia from Placentalia. Additionally, selection analyses demonstrated that both genes have been subjected to positive evolutionary selection. The absence of either SAMD9 or SAMD9L genes from some mammalian species supports a partial functional redundancy between the two genes. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first study on the evolutionary history of mammalian SAMD9 and SAMD9L genes. We conclude that evolutionary selective pressure has

  14. Bacterial IMPDH gene used for the selection of mammalian cell transfectants.

    SciTech Connect

    Baccam, M.; Huberman, E.; Energy Systems

    2003-06-01

    Stable cell transfection is used for the expression of exogenous genes or cDNAs in eukaryotic cells. Selection of these transfectants requires a dominant selectable marker. A variety of such markers has been identified and is currently in use. However, many of these are not suitable for all cell types or require unique conditions. Here we describe a simple and versatile dominant selectable marker that involves bacterial IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme essential for the replication of mammalian and bacterial cells. Although IMPDH is evolutionarily conserved, the bacterial enzyme is orders of magnitude more resistant to the toxic effect of the drug mycophenolic acid, which is an IMPDH inhibitor. We have demonstrated that transfection of human, monkey or Chinese hamster cell lines with an expression vector containing bacterial IMPDH and mycophenolic acid treatment resulted in the selection of colonies with a strikingly increased resistance to mycophenolic acid toxicity. Analysis of cells derived from these colonies indicated that the acquisition of this resistance was associated with bacterial IMPDH protein expression. As a proof of principle, we showed that mammalian cell transfection with a hicistronic IMPDH/GFP expression vector and mycophenolic acid treatment can he used to successfully select transfectants that express the fluorescent protein. These results indicate that bacterial IMPDH is a practical dominant selectable marker that can be used for the selection of transfectants that express exogenous genes or cDNAs in mammalian cells.

  15. Rational design of aptazyme riboswitches for efficient control of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guocai; Wang, Haimin; Bailey, Charles C; Gao, Guangping; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to control mammalian gene expression with ligand-responsive riboswitches have been hindered by lack of a general method for generating efficient switches in mammalian systems. Here we describe a rational-design approach that enables rapid development of efficient cis-acting aptazyme riboswitches. We identified communication-module characteristics associated with aptazyme functionality through analysis of a 32-aptazyme test panel. We then developed a scoring system that predicts an aptazymes’s activity by integrating three characteristics of communication-module bases: hydrogen bonding, base stacking, and distance to the enzymatic core. We validated the power and generality of this approach by designing aptazymes responsive to three distinct ligands, each with markedly wider dynamic ranges than any previously reported. These aptayzmes efficiently regulated adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectored transgene expression in cultured mammalian cells and mice, highlighting one application of these broadly usable regulatory switches. Our approach enables efficient, protein-independent control of gene expression by a range of small molecules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18858.001 PMID:27805569

  16. Systematic analysis of gene properties influencing organ system phenotypes in mammalian perturbations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Worf, Karolina; Campillos, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Diseases and adverse drug reactions are frequently caused by disruptions in gene functionality. Gaining insight into the global system properties governing the relationships between genotype and phenotype is thus crucial to understand and interfere with perturbations in complex organisms such as diseases states. We present a systematic analysis of phenotypic information of 5047 perturbations of single genes in mice, 4766 human diseases and 1666 drugs that examines the relationships between different gene properties and the phenotypic impact at the organ system level in mammalian organisms. We observe that while single gene perturbations and alterations of nonessential, tissue-specific genes or those with low betweenness centrality in protein-protein interaction networks often show organ-specific effects, multiple gene alterations resulting e.g. from complex disorders and drug treatments have a more widespread impact. Interestingly, certain cellular localizations are distinctly associated to systemic effects in monogenic disease genes and mouse gene perturbations, such as the lumen of intracellular organelles and transcription factor complexes, respectively. In summary, we show that the broadness of the phenotypic effect is clearly related to certain gene properties and is an indicator of the severity of perturbations. This work contributes to the understanding of gene properties influencing the systemic effects of diseases and drugs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. In vivo interrogation of gene function in the mammalian brain using CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Swiech, Lukasz; Heidenreich, Matthias; Banerjee, Abhishek; Habib, Naomi; Li, Yinqing; Trombetta, John; Sur, Mriganka; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Probing gene function in the mammalian brain can be greatly assisted with methods to manipulate the genome of neurons in vivo. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be used to edit single or multiple genes in replicating eukaryotic cells, resulting in frame-shifting insertion/deletion (indel) mutations and subsequent protein depletion. Here, we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to target single (Mecp2) as well as multiple genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b) in the adult mouse brain in vivo. We characterized the effects of genome modifications in postmitotic neurons using biochemical, genetic, electrophysiological and behavioral readouts. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated SpCas9 genome editing can enable reverse genetic studies of gene function in the brain.

  18. In vivo interrogation of gene function in the mammalian brain using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Swiech, Lukasz; Heidenreich, Matthias; Banerjee, Abhishek; Habib, Naomi; Li, Yinqing; Trombetta, John; Sur, Mriganka; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Probing gene function in the mammalian brain can be greatly assisted with methods to manipulate the genome of neurons in vivo. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9)1 can be used to edit single or multiple genes in replicating eukaryotic cells, resulting in frame-shifting insertion/deletion (indel) mutations and subsequent protein depletion. Here, we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to target single (Mecp2) as well as multiple genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b) in the adult mouse brain in vivo. We characterized the effects of genome modifications in postmitotic neurons using biochemical, genetic, electrophysiological and behavioral readouts. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated SpCas9 genome editing can enable reverse genetic studies of gene function in the brain. PMID:25326897

  19. Orthogonal control of endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells using synthetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; McLachlan, Michael J; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-05-01

    Gene switches have wide utility in synthetic biology, gene therapy, and developmental biology, and multiple orthogonal gene switches are needed to construct advanced circuitry or to control complex phenotypes. Endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is crucial to angiogenesis, and it has been shown that multiple alternately spliced VEGF-A isoforms are necessary for proper blood vessel formation. Such a necessity limits the utility of direct transgene delivery, which can provide only one splice variant. To overcome this limitation, we constructed a gene switch that can regulate the (VEGF-A) locus in mammalian cells by combining an engineered estrogen receptor (ER) ligand-binding domain (LBD), a p65 activation domain, and an artificial zinc-finger DNA binding domain (DBD). Our gene switch is specifically and reversibly controlled by 4,4'-dyhydroxybenzil (DHB), a small molecule, non-steroid synthetic ligand, which acts orthogonally in a mammalian system. After optimization of the gene switch architecture, an endogenous VEGF-A induction ratio of >100-fold can be achieved in HEK293 cells at 1 µM DHB, which is the highest endogenous induction reported to date. In addition, induction has been shown to be reversible, repeatable, and sustainable. Another advantage is that the ligand response is tunable by varying the clonal composition of a stably integrated cell line. The integration of our findings with the technology to change ligand specificity and DNA binding specificity will provide the framework for generating a wide array of orthogonal gene switches that can control multiple genes with multiple orthogonal ligands. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transient and stable gene expression in mammalian cells transduced with a recombinant baculovirus vector

    PubMed Central

    Condreay, J. Patrick; Witherspoon, Sam M.; Clay, William C.; Kost, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses can serve as gene-transfer vehicles for transient expression of recombinant proteins in a wide range of mammalian cell types. Furthermore, by inclusion of a dominant selectable marker in the viral vector, cell lines can be derived that stably express recombinant genes. A virus was constructed containing two expression cassettes controlled by constitutive mammalian promoters: the cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer directing expression of green fluorescent protein and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter controlling neomycin phosphotransferase II. Using this virus, efficient gene delivery and expression was observed and measured in numerous cell types of human, primate, and rodent origin. In addition to commonly used transformed cell lines such as HeLa, CHO, Cos-7, and 293, this list includes primary human keratinocytes and bone marrow fibroblasts. In all cases, addition of butyrate or trichostatin A (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) to transduced cells markedly enhanced the levels of reporter protein expression observed. When transduced cells are put under selection with the antibiotic G418, cell lines can be obtained at high frequency that stably maintain the expression cassettes of the vector DNA and exhibit stable, high-level expression of the reporter gene. Stably transduced derivatives have been selected from a substantial number of different cell types, suggesting that stable lines can be derived from any cell type that exhibits transient expression. PMID:9874783

  1. Functional auditory hair cells produced in the mammalian cochlea by in utero gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Samuel. P.; Woessner, David W.; Mitchell, John C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Brigande, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert mechanical stimuli into electrical impulses that subserve audition1,2. Loss of hair cells and their innervating neurons is the most frequent cause of hearing impairment3. Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also known as Math1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor required for hair cell development4-6 and its misexpression in vitro7,8 and in vivo9,10 generates hair-cell-like cells. Atoh1-based gene therapy to ameliorate auditory10 and vestibular11 dysfunction has been proposed. However, the biophysical properties of putative hair cells induced by Atoh1 misexpression have not been characterized. Here we show that in utero gene transfer of Atoh1 produces functional supernumerary hair cells in the mouse cochlea. The induced hair cells display stereociliary bundles, attract neuronal processes, and express the ribbon synapse marker C-terminal binding protein 2 (Ctbp2)12,13. Moreover, the hair cells are capable of mechanoelectrical transduction1,2 and display basolateral conductances with age-appropriate specializations. Our results demonstrate that manipulation of cell fate by transcription factor misexpression produces functional sensory cells in the postnatal mammalian cochlea. We anticipate that our in utero gene transfer paradigm will enable the design and validation of gene therapies to ameliorate hearing loss in mouse models of human deafness14,15. PMID:18754012

  2. Mutation of the rice gene PAIR3 results in lack of bivalent formation in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenya; Li, Xingwang; Chang, Yuxiao; Wen, Ruoyu; Chen, Guoxing; Zhang, Qifa; Wu, Changyin

    2009-07-01

    Meiosis is essential for eukaryotic sexual reproduction and important for genetic diversity among individuals. Although a number of genes regulating homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis have been identified in the plant kingdom, their molecular basis remains poorly understood. In this study, we identified a novel gene, PAIR3 (HOMOLOGOUS PAIRING ABERRATION IN RICE MEIOSIS 3), required for homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis in rice. Two independent alleles, designated pair3-1 and pair3-2, were identified in our T-DNA insertional mutant library which could not form bivalents due to failure of homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis at diakinesis, resulting in sterility in both male and female gametes. Suppression of PAIR3 by RNAi produced similar results to the T-DNA insertion lines. PAIR3 encodes a protein that contains putative coiled-coil motifs, but does not have any close homologs in other organisms. PAIR3 is preferentially expressed in reproductive organs, especially in pollen mother cells and the ovule tissues during meiosis. Our results suggest that PAIR3 plays a crucial role in homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis in meiosis.

  3. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  4. Evolution of the pair rule gene network: Insights from a centipede.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack; Akam, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Comparative studies have examined the expression and function of homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster pair rule and segment polarity genes in a range of arthropods. The segment polarity gene homologues have a conserved role in the specification of the parasegment boundary, but the degree of conservation of the upstream patterning genes has proved more variable. Using genomic resources we identify a complete set of pair rule gene homologues from the centipede Strigamia maritima, and document a detailed time series of expression during trunk segmentation. We find supportive evidence for a conserved hierarchical organisation of the pair rule genes, with a division into early- and late-activated genes which parallels the functional division into primary and secondary pair rule genes described in insects. We confirm that the relative expression of sloppy-paired and paired with respect to wingless and engrailed at the parasegment boundary is conserved between myriapods and insects; suggesting that functional interactions between these genes might be an ancient feature of arthropod segment patterning. However, we find that the relative expression of a number of the primary pair rule genes is divergent between myriapods and insects. This corroborates suggestions that the evolution of upper tiers in the segmentation gene network is more flexible. Finally, we find that the expression of the Strigamia pair rule genes in periodic patterns is restricted to the ectoderm. This suggests that any direct role of these genes in segmentation is restricted to this germ layer, and that mesoderm segmentation is either dependent on the ectoderm, or occurs through an independent mechanism.

  5. Evolution of the pair rule gene network: Insights from a centipede☆

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jack; Akam, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Comparative studies have examined the expression and function of homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster pair rule and segment polarity genes in a range of arthropods. The segment polarity gene homologues have a conserved role in the specification of the parasegment boundary, but the degree of conservation of the upstream patterning genes has proved more variable. Using genomic resources we identify a complete set of pair rule gene homologues from the centipede Strigamia maritima, and document a detailed time series of expression during trunk segmentation. We find supportive evidence for a conserved hierarchical organisation of the pair rule genes, with a division into early- and late-activated genes which parallels the functional division into primary and secondary pair rule genes described in insects. We confirm that the relative expression of sloppy-paired and paired with respect to wingless and engrailed at the parasegment boundary is conserved between myriapods and insects; suggesting that functional interactions between these genes might be an ancient feature of arthropod segment patterning. However, we find that the relative expression of a number of the primary pair rule genes is divergent between myriapods and insects. This corroborates suggestions that the evolution of upper tiers in the segmentation gene network is more flexible. Finally, we find that the expression of the Strigamia pair rule genes in periodic patterns is restricted to the ectoderm. This suggests that any direct role of these genes in segmentation is restricted to this germ layer, and that mesoderm segmentation is either dependent on the ectoderm, or occurs through an independent mechanism. PMID:23810931

  6. Characterization of a novel gene product (mammalian tolloid-like) with high sequence similarity to mammalian tolloid/bone morphogenetic protein-1

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kazuhiko; Brevard, R.; Hoffman, G.G.; Greenspan, D.S.

    1996-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1), a metalloprotease isolated from osteogenic extracts of demineralized bone, is capable of cleaving the C-propeptides of procollagen types I, II, and III. A single mammalian gene produces alternatively spliced RNA transcripts for BMP-1 and for a second longer protein, designated mammalian tolloid (mTld) due to a domain structure identical to that of the Drosophilia dorsal-ventral patterning gene product tolloid (Tld). Here we report the use of a cDNA library, prepared from BMP-1/mTld-null mouse embryos, to solate cDNA clones for a novel mammalian protein with a domain structure identical to that of mTld. The new protein, designated mammalian tolloid-like (mTll), has 76% identity with mTld for amino acid residues in all domains downstream of, and including, the protease domain. In contrast, the N-terminal activation domains of the two proteins show little similarity. In situ hybridizations show the distribution of mTll RNA to overlap extensively that previously shown for the BMP-1 and mTld RNA forms. However, mTll shows additional strong expression in structures of the developing, neonatal, and adult brain in which expression of BMP-1 and mTld has not been observed. The murine mTl1 gene (Tll) is mapped to central chromosome 8, which is a different chromosomal location than that of the BMP-1/mTld gene. Loci for some developmental abnormalities map to the same general chromosomal location as Tll. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Allelic expression of mammalian imprinted genes in a matrotrophic lizard, Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Oliver W; Brandley, Matthew C; Belov, Katherine; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that results in the differential expression of genes depending on their parent of origin. It occurs in both plants and live-bearing mammals, with imprinted genes typically regulating the ability of an embryo to manipulate the maternal provision of nutrients. Genomic imprinting increases the potential for selection to act separately on paternally and maternally expressed genes, which increases the number of opportunities that selection can facilitate embryonic control over maternal nutrient provision. By looking for imprinting in an independent matrotrophic lineage, the viviparous lizard Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii (Scincidae), we test the hypothesis that genomic imprinting facilitates the evolution of substantial placental nutrient transport to embryos (matrotrophy). We sequenced transcriptomes from the embryonic component of lizard placentae to determine whether there are parent-of-origin differences in expression of genes that are imprinted in mammals. Of these genes, 19 had sufficiently high expression in the lizard to identify polymorphisms in transcribed sequences. We identified bi-allelic expression in 17 genes (including insulin-like growth factor 2), indicating that neither allele was imprinted. These data suggest that either genomic imprinting has not evolved in this matrotrophic skink or, if it has, it has evolved in different genes to mammals. We outline how these hypotheses can be tested. This study highlights important differences between mammalian and reptile pregnancy and the absence of any shared imprinting genes reflects fundamental differences in the way that pregnancy has evolved in these two lineages.

  8. Analyses of interactions among pair-rule genes and the gap gene Krüppel in Bombyx segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    In the short-germ insect Tribolium, a pair-rule gene circuit consisting of the Tribolium homologs of even-skipped, runt, and odd-skipped (Tc-eve, Tc-run and Tc-odd, respectively) has been implicated in segment formation. To examine the application of the model to other taxa, I studied the expression and function of pair-rule genes in Bombyx mori, together with a Bombyx homolog of Krüppel (Bm-Kr), a known gap gene. Knockdown embryos of Bombyx homologs of eve, run and odd (Bm-eve, Bm-run and Bm-odd) exhibited asegmental phenotypes similar to those of Tribolium knockdowns. However, pair-rule gene interactions were similar to those of both Tribolium and Drosophila, which, different from Tribolium, shows a hierarchical segmentation mode. Additionally, the Bm-odd expression pattern shares characteristics with those of Drosophila pair-rule genes that receive upstream regulatory input. On the other hand, Bm-Kr knockdowns exhibited a large posterior segment deletion as observed in short-germ insects. However, a detailed analysis of these embryos indicated that Bm-Kr modulates expression of pair-rule genes like in Drosophila, although the mechanisms appear to be different. This suggested hierarchical interactions between Bm-Kr and pair-rule genes. Based on these results, I concluded that the pair-rule gene circuit model that describes Tribolium development is not applicable to Bombyx.

  9. Synthetic neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II coding sequence for gene targeting in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Gi; Mann, Jeffrey R

    2005-07-01

    The bacterial neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II enzyme is encoded by the neo gene and confers resistance to aminoglycoside drugs such as neomycin and kanamycin-bacterial selection and G418-eukaryotic cell selection. Although widely used in gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells, the neo coding sequence contains numerous cryptic splice sites and has a high CpG content. At least the former can cause unwanted effects in cis at the targeted locus. We describe a synthetic sequence, sneo, which encodes the same protein as that encoded by neo. This synthetic sequence has no predicted splice sites in either strand, low CpG content, and increased mammalian codon usage. In mouse embryonic stem cells sneo expressability is similar to neo. The use of sneo in gene targeting experiments should substantially reduce the probability of unwanted effects in cis due to splicing, and perhaps CpG methylation, within the coding sequence of the selectable marker.

  10. Comparative molecular neuroanatomy of mammalian neocortex: what can gene expression tell us about areas and layers?

    PubMed

    Watakabe, Akiya

    2009-04-01

    It is over 100 years since Brodmann proposed the homology of layer and area structure of the cerebral cortex across species. His proposal was based on the extensive comparative analyses of various mammalian brains. Although such homology is now well accepted, the recent data in our laboratory showed striking variations of gene expression patterns across areas and species. Are cortical layers and areas really homologous? If they are, to what extent and how are they similar or different? We are trying to answer these questions by identifying the homologous neuronal types common to various areas and species. Toward this goal, we started to classify the cortical pyramidal neurons by expression of particular sets of genes. By using fluorescent double in situ hybridization combined with retrograde tracers, we are characterizing the gene expression phenotypes and projection specificity of cortical excitatory neuron types. In this review, I discuss the recent findings in our laboratory in light of the past and present knowledge about cortical cell types, which provides insight to the homology (and lack thereof) of the mammalian neocortical organization.

  11. R-loops induce repressive chromatin marks over mammalian gene terminators.

    PubMed

    Skourti-Stathaki, Konstantina; Kamieniarz-Gdula, Kinga; Proudfoot, Nicholas J

    2014-12-18

    The formation of R-loops is a natural consequence of the transcription process, caused by invasion of the DNA duplex by nascent transcripts. These structures have been considered rare transcriptional by-products with potentially harmful effects on genome integrity owing to the fragility of the displaced DNA coding strand. However, R-loops may also possess beneficial effects, as their widespread formation has been detected over CpG island promoters in human genes. Furthermore, we have previously shown that R-loops are particularly enriched over G-rich terminator elements. These facilitate RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pausing before efficient termination. Here we reveal an unanticipated link between R-loops and RNA-interference-dependent H3K9me2 formation over pause-site termination regions in mammalian protein-coding genes. We show that R-loops induce antisense transcription over these pause elements, which in turn leads to the generation of double-stranded RNA and the recruitment of DICER, AGO1, AGO2 and the G9a histone lysine methyltransferase. Consequently, an H3K9me2 repressive mark is formed and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ) is recruited, which reinforces Pol II pausing before efficient transcriptional termination. We predict that R-loops promote a chromatin architecture that defines the termination region for a substantial subset of mammalian genes.

  12. Dictyostelium discoideum has a single diacylglycerol kinase gene with similarity to mammalian theta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    De La Roche, Marc A; Smith, Janet L; Rico, Maribel; Carrasco, Silvia; Merida, Isabel; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the neutral lipid diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). In mammalian systems DGKs are a complex family of at least nine isoforms that are thought to participate in down-regulation of DG-based signalling pathways and perhaps activation of PA-stimulated signalling events. We report here that the simple protozoan amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum appears to contain a single gene encoding a DGK enzyme. This gene, dgkA, encodes a deduced protein that contains three C1-type cysteine-rich repeats, a DGK catalytic domain most closely related to the theta subtype of mammalian DGKs and a C-terminal segment containing a proline/glutamine-rich region and a large aspargine-repeat region. This gene corresponds to a previously reported myosin II heavy chain kinase designated myosin heavy chain-protein kinase C (MHC-PKC), but our analysis clearly demonstrates that this protein does not, as suggested by earlier data, contain a protein kinase catalytic domain. A FLAG-tagged version of DgkA expressed in Dictyostelium displayed robust DGK activity. Earlier studies indicating that disruption of this locus alters myosin II assembly levels in Dictyostelium raise the intriguing possibility that DG and/or PA metabolism may play a role in controlling myosin II assembly in this system. PMID:12296770

  13. Revised nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase gene family.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Coleman, Rosalind A; Berger, Johannes; Bernlohr, David A; Black, Paul; DiRusso, Concetta C; Farber, Steven A; Guo, Wen; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Khodiyar, Varsha; Kuypers, Frans A; Maltais, Lois J; Nebert, Daniel W; Renieri, Alessandra; Schaffer, Jean E; Stahl, Andreas; Watkins, Paul A; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Yamamoto, Tokuo T

    2004-10-01

    By consensus, the acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) community, with the advice of the human and mouse genome nomenclature committees, has revised the nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. ACS is the family root name, and the human and mouse genes for the long-chain ACSs are termed ACSL1,3-6 and Acsl1,3-6, respectively. Splice variants of ACSL3, -4, -5, and -6 are cataloged. Suggestions for naming other family members and for the nonmammalian acyl-CoA synthetases are made.

  14. Comparative Studies of Mammalian Acid Lipases: Evidence for a New Gene Family in Mouse and Rat (Lipo)

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S; Cox, Laura A; VandeBerg, John L

    2010-01-01

    At least six families of mammalian acid lipases (E.C. 3.1.1.-) catalyse the hydrolysis of triglycerides in the body, designated as LIPA (lysosomal), LIPF (gastric), LIPJ (testis) and LIPK, LIPM and LIPN (epidermal), which belong to the AB hydrolase superfamily. In this study, in silico methods were used to predict the amino acid sequences, secondary and tertiary structures, and gene locations for acid lipase genes and encoded proteins using data from several mammalian genome projects. Mammalian acid lipase genes were located within a gene cluster for each of the 8 mammalian genomes examined, including human (Homo sapiens), chimpanzee (Pons troglodytes), rhesus monkey (Macacca mulatta), mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), cow (Bos taurus), horse (Equus caballus) and dog (Canis familaris), with each containing 9 coding exons. Human and mouse acid lipases shared 44-87% sequence identity and exhibited sequence alignments and identities for key amino acid residues and conservation of predicted secondary and tertiary structures with those previously reported for human gastric lipase (LIPF) (Roussel et al., 1999). Evidence for a new family of acid lipase genes is reported for mouse and rat genomes, designated as Lipo. Mouse acid lipase genes are subject to differential mRNA tissue expression, with Lipa showing wide tissue expression, while others have a more restricted tissue expression in the digestive tract (Lipf), salivary gland (Lipo) and epidermal tissues (Lipk, Lipm and Lipn). Phylogenetic analyses of the mammalian acid lipase gene families suggested that these genes are products of gene duplication events prior to eutherian mammalian evolution and derived from an ancestral vertebrate LIPA gene, which is present in the frog, Xenopus tropicalis. PMID:20598663

  15. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  16. Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit (MRPS) genes: A putative role in human disease.

    PubMed

    Gopisetty, Gopal; Thangarajan, Rajkumar

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are prominently understood as power houses producing ATP the primary energy currency of the cell. However, mitochondria are also known to play an important role in apoptosis and autophagy, and mitochondrial dysregulation can lead to pathological outcomes. Mitochondria are known to contain 1500 proteins of which only 13 are coded by mitochondrial DNA and the rest are coded by nuclear genes. Protein synthesis in mitochondria involves mitochondrial ribosomes which are 55-60S particles and are composed of small 28S and large 39S subunits. A feature of mammalian mitoribosome which differentiate it from bacterial ribosomes is the increased protein content. The human mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) gene family comprises of 30 genes which code for mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit and 50 genes for the large subunit. The present review focuses on the mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit genes (MRPS), presents an overview of the literature and data gleaned from publicly available gene and protein expression databases. The survey revealed aberrations in MRPS gene expression patterns in varied human diseases indicating a putative role in their etiology.

  17. Menzerath-Altmann law in mammalian exons reflects the dynamics of gene structure evolution.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Christoforos

    2014-12-01

    Genomic sequences exhibit self-organization properties at various hierarchical levels. One such is the gene structure of higher eukaryotes with its complex exon/intron arrangement. Exon sizes and exon numbers in genes have been shown to conform to a law derived from statistical linguistics and formulated by Menzerath and Altmann, according to which the mean size of the constituents of an entity is inversely related to the number of these constituents. We herein perform a detailed analysis of this property in the complete exon set of the mouse genome in correlation to the sequence conservation of each exon and the transcriptional complexity of each gene locus. We show that extensive linear fits, representative of accordance to Menzerath-Altmann law are restricted to a particular subset of genes that are formed by exons under low or intermediate sequence constraints and have a small number of alternative transcripts. Based on this observation we propose a hypothesis for the law of Menzerath-Altmann in mammalian genes being predominantly due to genes that are more versatile in function and thus, more prone to undergo changes in their structure. To this end we demonstrate one test case where gene categories of different functionality also show differences in the extent of conformity to Menzerath-Altmann law. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of a new mammalian centrin gene, more closely related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC31 gene

    PubMed Central

    Middendorp, Sandrine; Paoletti, Anne; Schiebel, Elmar; Bornens, Michel

    1997-01-01

    Among the numerous centrin isoforms identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in human cells, an acidic and slow-migrating isoform is particularly enriched in a centrosome fraction. We report here that this isoform specifically reacts with antibodies raised against Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc31p and is present, as other centrin isoforms, in the distal lumen of centrioles. It is encoded by a new centrin gene, which we propose to name HsCEN3 (Homo sapiens centrin gene 3). This gene is more closely related to the yeast CDC31 gene, and shares less identity with algae centrin than HsCEN1 and HsCEN2. A murine CDC31-related gene was also found that shows 98% identity and 100% similarity with HsCEN3, demonstrating a higher interspecies conservation than the murine centrin gene MmCEN1 (Mus musculus centrin gene 1) with either HsCEN1, or HsCEN2. Finally, immunological data suggest that a CDC31-related gene could exist in amphibians and echinoderms as well. All together, our data suggest the existence of two divergent protein subfamilies in the current centrin family, which might be involved in distinct centrosome-associated functions. The possible implication of this new mammalian centrin gene in centrosome duplication is discussed. PMID:9256449

  19. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  20. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  1. Sense-antisense gene pairs: sequence, transcription, and structure are not conserved between human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Emily J.; Chin-Inmanu, Kwanrutai; Jia, Hui; Lipovich, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Previous efforts to characterize conservation between the human and mouse genomes focused largely on sequence comparisons. These studies are inherently limited because they don't account for gene structure differences, which may exist despite genomic sequence conservation. Recent high-throughput transcriptome studies have revealed widespread and extensive overlaps between genes, and transcripts, encoded on both strands of the genomic sequence. This overlapping gene organization, which produces sense-antisense (SAS) gene pairs, is capable of effecting regulatory cascades through established mechanisms. We present an evolutionary conservation assessment of SAS pairs, on three levels: genomic, transcriptomic, and structural. From a genome-wide dataset of human SAS pairs, we first identified orthologous loci in the mouse genome, then assessed their transcription in the mouse, and finally compared the genomic structures of SAS pairs expressed in both species. We found that approximately half of human SAS loci have single orthologous locations in the mouse genome; however, only half of those orthologous locations have SAS transcriptional activity in the mouse. This suggests that high human-mouse gene conservation overlooks widespread distinctions in SAS pair incidence and expression. We compared gene structures at orthologous SAS loci, finding frequent differences in gene structure between human and orthologous mouse SAS pair members. Our categorization of human SAS pairs with respect to mouse conservation of expression as well as structure points to limitations of mouse models. Gene structure differences, including at SAS loci, may account for some of the phenotypic distinctions between primates and rodents. Genes in non-conserved SAS pairs may contribute to evolutionary lineage-specific regulatory outcomes. PMID:24133500

  2. ORA1, a Zebrafish Olfactory Receptor Ancestral to All Mammalian V1R Genes, Recognizes 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid, a Putative Reproductive Pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Maik; Frank, Oliver; Rawel, Harshadrai; Ahuja, Gaurav; Potting, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Korsching, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    The teleost v1r-related ora genes are a small, highly conserved olfactory receptor gene family of only six genes, whose direct orthologues can be identified in lineages as far as that of cartilaginous fish. However, no ligands for fish olfactory receptor class A related genes (ORA) had been uncovered so far. Here we have deorphanized the ORA1 receptor using heterologous expression and calcium imaging. We report that zebrafish ORA1 recognizes with high specificity and sensitivity 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The carboxyl group of this compound is required in a particular distance from the aromatic ring, whereas the hydroxyl group in the para-position is not essential, but strongly enhances the binding efficacy. Low concentrations of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid elicit increases in oviposition frequency in zebrafish mating pairs. This effect is abolished by naris closure. We hypothesize that 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid might function as a pheromone for reproductive behavior in zebrafish. ORA1 is ancestral to mammalian V1Rs, and its putative function as pheromone receptor is reminiscent of the role of several mammalian V1Rs as pheromone receptors. PMID:24831010

  3. Mammalian Reverse Genetics without Crossing Reveals Nr3a as a Short-Sleeper Gene.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Genshiro A; Sumiyama, Kenta; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Perrin, Dimitri; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Ukai, Hideki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shi, Shoi; Ohno, Rei-ichiro; Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Tone, Daisuke; Ode, Koji L; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-01-26

    The identification of molecular networks at the system level in mammals is accelerated by next-generation mammalian genetics without crossing, which requires both the efficient production of whole-body biallelic knockout (KO) mice in a single generation and high-performance phenotype analyses. Here, we show that the triple targeting of a single gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system achieves almost perfect KO efficiency (96%-100%). In addition, we developed a respiration-based fully automated non-invasive sleep phenotyping system, the Snappy Sleep Stager (SSS), for high-performance (95.3% accuracy) sleep/wake staging. Using the triple-target CRISPR and SSS in tandem, we reliably obtained sleep/wake phenotypes, even in double-KO mice. By using this system to comprehensively analyze all of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family members, we found Nr3a as a short-sleeper gene, which is verified by an independent set of triple-target CRISPR. These results demonstrate the application of mammalian reverse genetics without crossing to organism-level systems biology in sleep research.

  4. Evolutionary modification of development in mammalian teeth: Quantifying gene expression patterns and topography

    PubMed Central

    Jernvall, Jukka; Keränen, Soile V. E.; Thesleff, Irma

    2000-01-01

    The study of mammalian evolution often relies on detailed analysis of dental morphology. For molecular patterning to play a role in dental evolution, gene expression differences should be linkable to corresponding morphological differences. Because teeth, like many other structures, are complex and evolution of new shapes usually involves subtle changes, we have developed topographic methods by using Geographic Information Systems. We investigated how genetic markers for epithelial signaling centers known as enamel knots are associated with evolutionary divergence of molar teeth in two rodent species, mouse and vole. Our analysis of expression patterns of Fgf4, Lef1, p21, and Shh genes in relation to digital elevation models of developing tooth shapes shows that molecular prepatterns predict the lateral cusp topography more than a day in advance. A heterotopic shift in the molecular prepatterns can be implicated in the evolution of mouse molar, changing locations from which historically homologous cusps form. The subtle but measurable heterotopic shifts may play a large role in the evolution of tooth cusp topographies. However, evolutionary increase in the number of longitudinal cusps in vole molar has involved accelerated longitudinal growth and iterative addition of new cusps without changes in lateral cusp topography. The iterative addition of cusps after the establishment of lateral cusp topography may limit the independence of individual morphological features used in evolutionary studies. The diversity of mammalian molar patterns may largely result from the heterotopic and iterative processes. PMID:11121045

  5. Mammalian cell entry genes in Streptomyces may provide clues to the evolution of bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Clark, Laura C; Seipke, Ryan F; Prieto, Pilar; Willemse, Joost; van Wezel, Gilles P; Hutchings, Matthew I; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of virulence is key to appreciating the role specific loci play in pathogenicity. Streptomyces species are generally non-pathogenic soil saprophytes, yet within their genome we can find homologues of virulence loci. One example of this is the mammalian cell entry (mce) locus, which has been characterised in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To investigate the role in Streptomyces we deleted the mce locus and studied its impact on cell survival, morphology and interaction with other soil organisms. Disruption of the mce cluster resulted in virulence towards amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) and reduced colonization of plant (Arabidopsis) models, indicating these genes may play an important role in Streptomyces survival in the environment. Our data suggest that loss of mce in Streptomyces spp. may have profound effects on survival in a competitive soil environment, and provides insight in to the evolution and selection of these genes as virulence factors in related pathogenic organisms.

  6. A single dose of lysergic acid diethylamide influences gene expression patterns within the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have profound effects on humans including hallucinations and detachment from reality. These remarkable behavioral effects have many similarities to the debilitating symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The effects of hallucinogens are thought to be mediated by serotonin receptor activation; however, how these drugs elicit the unusual behavioral effects remains largely a mystery, despite much research. We have undertaken the first comprehensive analysis of gene expression influenced by acute LSD administration in the mammalian brain. These studies represent a novel approach to elucidate the mechanism of action of this class of drugs. We have identified a number of genes that are predicted to be involved in the processes of synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling and cytoskeletal architecture. Understanding these molecular events will lead to new insights into the etiology of disorders whose behavioral symptoms resemble the temporary effects of hallucinogenic drugs, and also may ultimately result in new therapies.

  7. Mammalian cell entry genes in Streptomyces may provide clues to the evolution of bacterial virulence

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Laura C.; Seipke, Ryan F.; Prieto, Pilar; Willemse, Joost; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Hoskisson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of virulence is key to appreciating the role specific loci play in pathogenicity. Streptomyces species are generally non-pathogenic soil saprophytes, yet within their genome we can find homologues of virulence loci. One example of this is the mammalian cell entry (mce) locus, which has been characterised in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To investigate the role in Streptomyces we deleted the mce locus and studied its impact on cell survival, morphology and interaction with other soil organisms. Disruption of the mce cluster resulted in virulence towards amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) and reduced colonization of plant (Arabidopsis) models, indicating these genes may play an important role in Streptomyces survival in the environment. Our data suggest that loss of mce in Streptomyces spp. may have profound effects on survival in a competitive soil environment, and provides insight in to the evolution and selection of these genes as virulence factors in related pathogenic organisms. PMID:23346366

  8. A yeast one-hybrid and microfluidics-based pipeline to map mammalian gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Gubelmann, Carine; Waszak, Sebastian M; Isakova, Alina; Holcombe, Wiebke; Hens, Korneel; Iagovitina, Antonina; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Raghav, Sunil K; Simicevic, Jovan; Deplancke, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive mapping of gene promoters and enhancers has significantly improved our understanding of how the mammalian regulatory genome is organized. An important challenge is to elucidate how these regulatory elements contribute to gene expression by identifying their trans-regulatory inputs. Here, we present the generation of a mouse-specific transcription factor (TF) open-reading frame clone library and its implementation in yeast one-hybrid assays to enable large-scale protein–DNA interaction detection with mouse regulatory elements. Once specific interactions are identified, we then use a microfluidics-based method to validate and precisely map them within the respective DNA sequences. Using well-described regulatory elements as well as orphan enhancers, we show that this cross-platform pipeline characterizes known and uncovers many novel TF–DNA interactions. In addition, we provide evidence that several of these novel interactions are relevant in vivo and aid in elucidating the regulatory architecture of enhancers. PMID:23917988

  9. Differential introduction of DNA damage and repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, J.H.; Wauthier, E.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have developed a general quantitative method for comparing the levels of drug-induced DNA crosslinking in specific mammalian genes. They observed a dramatic difference between the efficiency of the removal of both psoralen monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks from the rRNA genes and the efficiency of their removal from the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in cultured human and hamster cells. While 90% of the interstrand crosslinks were removed from the human DHFR gene in 48 h, less than 25% repair occurred in the rRNA genes. Similarly, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, 85% repair of interstrand crosslinks within 8 h in the DHFR gene versus only 20% repair in the rRNA genes. The preferential repair of the DHFR gene relative to that of the rRNA genes was also observed for psoralen monoadducts in cells from both mammalian species. In human-mouse hybrid cells, the active mouse rRNA genes were five times more susceptible to psoralen modification than are the silent rRNA human genes, but adduct removal was similarly inefficient for both classes. They conclude that the repair of chemical damage such as psoralen photadducts in an expressed mammalian gene may depend upon the class of transcription to which it belongs.

  10. POLRMT regulates the switch between replication primer formation and gene expression of mammalian mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Inge; Miranda, Maria; Posse, Viktor; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Siira, Stefan J.; Bonekamp, Nina A.; Neumann, Ulla; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital in providing cellular energy via their oxidative phosphorylation system, which requires the coordinated expression of genes encoded by both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). Transcription of the circular mammalian mtDNA depends on a single mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT). Although the transcription initiation process is well understood, it is debated whether POLRMT also serves as the primase for the initiation of mtDNA replication. In the nucleus, the RNA polymerases needed for gene expression have no such role. Conditional knockout of Polrmt in the heart results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction causing dilated cardiomyopathy in young mice. We further studied the molecular consequences of different expression levels of POLRMT and found that POLRMT is essential for primer synthesis to initiate mtDNA replication in vivo. Furthermore, transcription initiation for primer formation has priority over gene expression. Surprisingly, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) exists in an mtDNA-free pool in the Polrmt knockout mice. TFAM levels remain unchanged despite strong mtDNA depletion, and TFAM is thus protected from degradation of the AAA+ Lon protease in the absence of POLRMT. Last, we report that mitochondrial transcription elongation factor may compensate for a partial depletion of POLRMT in heterozygous Polrmt knockout mice, indicating a direct regulatory role of this factor in transcription. In conclusion, we present in vivo evidence that POLRMT has a key regulatory role in the replication of mammalian mtDNA and is part of a transcriptional mechanism that provides a switch between primer formation for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial gene expression. PMID:27532055

  11. miRNAome analysis of the mammalian neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Eric M; Casserly, Alison P; Scofield, Michael D; Mou, Zhongming; Zhao-Shea, Rubing; Johnson, Chris W; Tapper, Andrew R; Gardner, Paul D

    2014-12-01

    Nicotine binds to and activates a family of ligand-gated ion channels, neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Chronic nicotine exposure alters the expression of various nAChR subtypes, which likely contributes to nicotine dependence; however, the underlying mechanisms regulating these changes remain unclear. A growing body of evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be involved in nAChR regulation. Using bioinformatics, miRNA library screening, site-directed mutagenesis, and gene expression analysis, we have identified a limited number of miRNAs that functionally interact with the 3'-untranslated regions (3' UTRs) of mammalian neuronal nAChR subunit genes. In silico analyses revealed specific, evolutionarily conserved sites within the 3' UTRs through which the miRNAs regulate gene expression. Mutating these sites disrupted miRNA regulation confirming the in silico predictions. In addition, the miRNAs that target nAChR 3' UTRs are expressed in mouse brain and are regulated by chronic nicotine exposure. Furthermore, we show that expression of one of these miRNAs, miR-542-3p, is modulated by nicotine within the mesocorticolimbic reward pathway. Importantly, overexpression of miR-542-3p led to a decrease in the protein levels of its target, the nAChR β2 subunit. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that a number of the miRNAs play a general role in regulating cholinergic signaling. Our results provide evidence for a novel mode of nicotine-mediated regulation of the mammalian nAChR gene family.

  12. [Transgenic plant regeneration of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) haboring mammalian cyp2e1 gene].

    PubMed

    Li, Peihan; Xiang, Taihe; Xie, Jun; Feng, Ting; Lu, Wenyi

    2012-10-01

    CYP2E1 enzyme encoded by cyp2e1 gene plays an important role in metabolism of heterogeneous organics in mammalian liver cells. The transgenic plant with cyp2e1 can metabolize various low molecular weight organic pollutants. However, it is unclear the mechanism of expression control of cyp2e1 in transgenic plant. In this study, plasmid pSLD50-6 with cyp2e1 and pKH200 with gus as control were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 separately. Then, the cyp2e1 or gus genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and the transgenic plants were regenerated via Agrobacterium tumefaciens method. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the cyp2e1 gene expression. The expression of cyp2e1 in transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 decreased obviously treated by ethyl alcohol and reduced slightly by benzene and toluene, while it enhanced by acetone, formaldehyde and oxygen deficit in different levels. In addition, the gene expression of NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in the transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 were increased significantly treated by benzene, which showed that NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic tobacco have relation with CYP2E1 detoxication process. It suggested that the NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic plant formed the requirement in mammalian and participated in the electron transport chain of CYP2E1 enzyme catalytic process.

  13. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-09-15

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X-linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation.

  14. Survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells correlates with efficient DNA repair in an essential gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bohr, V.A.; Okumoto, D.S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1986-06-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells is not necessarily correlated with their overall capacity to carry out DNA repair. Human cells typically remove 80% of the pyrimidine dimers produced by a UV dose of 5 J/m2 within 24 hr. In contrast, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line survives UV irradiation equally well while removing only 15% of the dimers. Using a newly developed technique to measure dimer frequencies in single-copy specific sequences, we find that the CHO cells remove 70% of the dimers from the essential dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene but only 20% from sequences located 30 kilobases or more upstream from the 5' end of the gene in a 24-hr period. Repair-deficient human cells from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) are similar to the CHO cells in overall repair levels, but they are extremely sensitive to killing by UV irradiation. In the XPC cells, we find little or no repair in the DHFR gene; in contrast, in normal human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes, greater than 80% of the dimers induced in the gene by 20 J/m2 are removed in 24 hr. Since the CHO and normal human cells exhibit similar UV resistance, much higher than that of XPC cells, our findings suggest a correlation between efficient repair of essential genes and resistance to DNA-damaging agents such as UV light.

  15. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X–linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:26370379

  16. A genome-wide screen identifies genes that affect somatic homolog pairing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Jack R; Larschan, Erica; D'Souza, Ryan; Marshall, Lauren S; Dempsey, Kyle E; Johnson, Justine E; Mellone, Barbara G; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2012-07-01

    In Drosophila and other Dipterans, homologous chromosomes are in close contact in virtually all nuclei, a phenomenon known as somatic homolog pairing. Although homolog pairing has been recognized for over a century, relatively little is known about its regulation. We performed a genome-wide RNAi-based screen that monitored the X-specific localization of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, and we identified 59 candidate genes whose knockdown via RNAi causes a change in the pattern of MSL staining that is consistent with a disruption of X-chromosomal homolog pairing. Using DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we confirmed that knockdown of 17 of these genes has a dramatic effect on pairing of the 359 bp repeat at the base of the X. Furthermore, dsRNAs targeting Pr-set7, which encodes an H4K20 methyltransferase, cause a modest disruption in somatic homolog pairing. Consistent with our results in cultured cells, a classical mutation in one of the strongest candidate genes, pebble (pbl), causes a decrease in somatic homolog pairing in developing embryos. Interestingly, many of the genes identified by our screen have known roles in diverse cell-cycle events, suggesting an important link between somatic homolog pairing and the choreography of chromosomes during the cell cycle.

  17. Positive selection of co-opted mobile genetic elements in a mammalian gene

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Lucia F.; de Souza, Flavio S.J.; Low, Malcolm J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene encodes a prepropeptide with essential functions in the response to stress and energy balance, which is expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus of vertebrate animals. Neuronal expression of Pomc is controlled by two distal enhancers named nPE1 and nPE2. Using transgenic mice, we observed that both enhancers drive identical expression patterns in the mammalian hypothalamus, starting at embryonic day 10.5, when endogenous Pomc expression commences. This overlapping enhancer activity is maintained throughout hypothalamic development and into adulthood. We also found that nPE1 and nPE2 were exapted as neuronal enhancers into the POMC locus after the sequential insertion of two unrelated retroposons. Thus, nPE1 and nPE2 are functional analogs and represent an authentic first example of convergent molecular evolution of cell-specific transcriptional enhancers. In this Commentary we discuss the following questions that remain unanswered: (1) how does transcriptional control of POMC operate in hypothalamic neurons of non-mammalian vertebrates? (2) What evolutionary forces are maintaining two discrete neuronal POMC enhancers under purifying selection for the last ~100 million years in all placental mammals? (3) What is the contribution of MaLRs to genome evolution? PMID:22934245

  18. High variability and non-neutral evolution of the mammalian avpr1a gene

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Sabine; Excoffier, Laurent; Heckel, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Background The arginine-vasopressin 1a receptor has been identified as a key determinant for social behaviour in Microtus voles, humans and other mammals. Nevertheless, the genetic bases of complex phenotypic traits like differences in social and mating behaviour among species and individuals remain largely unknown. Contrary to previous studies focusing on differences in the promotor region of the gene, we investigate here the level of functional variation in the coding region (exon 1) of this locus. Results We detected high sequence diversity between higher mammalian taxa as well as between species of the genus Microtus. This includes length variation and radical amino acid changes, as well as the presence of distinct protein variants within individuals. Additionally, negative selection prevails on most parts of the first exon of the arginine-vasopressin receptor 1a (avpr1a) gene but it contains regions with higher rates of change that harbour positively selected sites. Synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates in the avpr1a gene are not exceptional compared to other genes, but they exceed those found in related hormone receptors with similar functions. Discussion These results stress the importance of considering variation in the coding sequence of avpr1a in regards to associations with life history traits (e.g. social behaviour, mating system, habitat requirements) of voles, other mammals and humans in particular. PMID:17900345

  19. Two Ancient Gene Families Are Critical for Maintenance of the Mammalian Skin Barrier in Postnatal Life.

    PubMed

    Cangkrama, Michael; Darido, Charbel; Georgy, Smitha R; Partridge, Darren; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Jane, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    The skin barrier is critical for mammalian survival in the terrestrial environment, affording protection against fluid loss, microbes, toxins, and UV exposure. Many genes indispensable for barrier formation in the embryo have been identified, but loss of these genes in adult mice does not induce barrier regression. We describe a complex regulatory network centered on two ancient gene families, the grainyhead-like (Grhl) transcription factors and the protein cross-linking enzymes (tissue transglutaminases [Tgms]), which are essential for skin permeability barrier maintenance in adult mice. Embryonic deletion of Grhl3 induces loss of Tgm1 expression, which disrupts the cornified envelope, thus preventing permeability barrier formation leading to neonatal death. However, gene deletion of Grhl3 in adult mice does not disrupt the preformed barrier, with cornified envelope integrity maintained by Grhl1 and Tgm5, which are up-regulated in response to postnatal loss of Grhl3. Concomitant deletion of both Grhl factors in adult mice induced loss of Tgm1 and Tgm5 expression, perturbation of the cornified envelope, and complete permeability barrier regression that was incompatible with life. These findings define the molecular safeguards for barrier function that accompany the transition from intrauterine to terrestrial life. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mammalian E-type cyclins control chromosome pairing, telomere stability and CDK2 localization in male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Martinerie, Laetitia; Manterola, Marcia; Chung, Sanny S W; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Weisbach, Melissa; Vasileva, Ana; Geng, Yan; Sicinski, Peter; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2014-02-01

    Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis.

  1. Mammalian E-type Cyclins Control Chromosome Pairing, Telomere Stability and CDK2 Localization in Male Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sanny S. W.; Panigrahi, Sunil K.; Weisbach, Melissa; Vasileva, Ana; Geng, Yan; Sicinski, Peter; Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis. PMID:24586195

  2. Comparative and evolutionary studies of mammalian arylsulfatase and sterylsulfatase genes and proteins encoded on the X-chromosome.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S

    2017-06-01

    At least 19 sulfatase genes have been reported on the human genome, including four arylsulfatase (ARS) genes (ARSD; ARSE; ARSF; ARSH) and a sterylsulfatase (STS) gene located together on the X-chromosome. Bioinformatic analyses of mammalian genomes were undertaken using known human STS and ARS amino acid sequences to study the evolution of these genes and proteins encoded on eutherian and marsupial genomes. Several domain regions and key residues were conserved including signal peptides, active site residues, metal (Ca(2+)) and substrate binding sequences, transmembranes and N-glycosylation sites. Phylogenetic analyses describe the relationships and potential origins of these genes during mammalian evolution. Primate ARSH enzymes lacked signal peptide sequences which may influence their biological functions. CpG117 and CpG92 were detected within the 5' region of the human STS and ARSD genes, respectively, and miR-205 within the 3'-UTR for the human STS gene, using bioinformatic methods A proposal is described for a primordial invertebrate STS-like gene serving as an ancestor for unequal cross over events generating the gene complex on the eutherian mammalian X-chromosome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A bacterial gene, mms6, as a new reporter gene for magnetic resonance imaging of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Robledo, Brenda N; Harris, Steven S; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for noninvasive, deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution, making it an attractive modality for in vivo cellular imaging. Since reporter genes can generate magnetic resonance (MR) contrast based on molecular activity, they offer a potentially powerful tool for cellular imaging. The mms6 gene was originally identified in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), which is known to play a key role in magnetic crystal formation. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using mms6 as an MR reporter gene. We established a transgenic mammalian cell line that stably expresses mms6. In vitro experiments show that mms6-expressing cells form clusters of nanoparticles within and outside membrane-enclosed structures and produce changes in MR contrast, most likely by increasing iron uptake of intracellular iron. Additionally, in vivo MRI experiments demonstrate that mms6-expressing tumors can be distinguished from parental tumors not expressing mms6, even in the absence of exogenous iron supplementation. Our results demonstrate that mms6 can function as an MR reporter gene with the potential to monitor gene expression and to visualize the proliferation, migration, and metastasis of tumor cells expressing it.

  4. Application of laser-assisted microdissection for gene expression analysis of mammalian germ cells.

    PubMed

    Kenngott, R; Al-Banaw, A; Vermehren, M; Wendl, J; Sinowatz, F

    2010-06-01

    Laser-assisted microdissection (LAM) is an important method to provide new significant insights into many embryological processes. To understand these processes, it is important to obtain specific populations of cells from complex tissue in an efficient and precise manner and to combine with many different molecular biological methods. During the last few years, the sophistication of the techniques of LAM has increased significantly and made the procedure easy to use. New micro-extraction protocols for DNA, RNA and proteins now allow broad downstream applications in the fields of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. In this review, we give a short overview of the application of LAM in combination with quantitative qPCR for the analysis of gene expression in mammalian germ cells.

  5. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic, random monoallelic gene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiaolin; Ramsköld, Daniel; Reinius, Björn; Sandberg, Rickard

    2014-01-10

    Expression from both alleles is generally observed in analyses of diploid cell populations, but studies addressing allelic expression patterns genome-wide in single cells are lacking. Here, we present global analyses of allelic expression across individual cells of mouse preimplantation embryos of mixed background (CAST/EiJ × C57BL/6J). We discovered abundant (12 to 24%) monoallelic expression of autosomal genes and that expression of the two alleles occurs independently. The monoallelic expression appeared random and dynamic because there was considerable variation among closely related embryonic cells. Similar patterns of monoallelic expression were observed in mature cells. Our allelic expression analysis also demonstrates the de novo inactivation of the paternal X chromosome. We conclude that independent and stochastic allelic transcription generates abundant random monoallelic expression in the mammalian cell.

  6. Differential gene expression of mammalian SPO11/TOP6A homologs during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M; Richardson, L; Christian, A; Handel, M A; Thelen, M P

    1999-12-03

    As the initiator of DNA double-strand breaks during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the SPO11 protein is essential for recombination. Similarity between SPO11 and archaebacterial TOP6A proteins points to evolutionary specialization of a DNA cleavage function for meiotic recombination. To determine whether this extends to mammals, we isolated and characterized mouse and human SPO11 cDNAs. Mammalian SPO11 genes were found to be expressed at high levels only in testis, wherein mouse Spo11 transcript is restricted primarily to meiotic germ cells and is maximally expressed at midpachynema. Mouse Spo11 is located near the distal end of chromosome 2, while human SPO11 is found in the homologous position of chromosome 20q13.2-13.3, a region that is amplified in some breast cancers. Sequence homology and differential expression together support a highly conserved role for SPO11 in the enzymatic cleavage of DNA that accompanies meiotic recombination.

  7. Gene expression profile during functional maturation of a central mammalian synapse.

    PubMed

    Körber, Christoph; Dondzillo, Anna; Eisenhardt, Gisela; Herrmannsdörfer, Frank; Wafzig, Oliver; Kuner, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Calyx of Held giant presynaptic terminals in the auditory brainstem form glutamatergic axosomatic synapses that have advanced to one of the best-studied synaptic connections of the mammalian brain. As the auditory system matures and adjusts to high-fidelity synaptic transmission, the calyx undergoes extensive structural and functional changes - in mice, it is formed at about postnatal day 3 (P3), achieves immature function until hearing onset at about P10 and can be considered mature from P21 onwards. This setting provides a unique opportunity to examine the repertoire of genes driving synaptic structure and function during postnatal maturation. Here, we determined the gene expression profile of globular bushy cells (GBCs), neurons giving rise to the calyx of Held, at different maturational stages (P3, P8, P21). GBCs were retrogradely labelled by stereotaxic injection of fluorescent cholera toxin-B, and their mRNA content was collected by laser microdissection. Microarray profiling, successfully validated with real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and nCounter approaches, revealed genes regulated during maturation. We found that mostly genes implicated in the general cell biology of the neuron were regulated, while most genes related to synaptic function were regulated around the onset of hearing. Among these, voltage-gated ion channels and calcium-binding proteins were strongly regulated, whereas most genes involved in the synaptic vesicle cycle were only moderately regulated. These results suggest that changes in the expression patterns of ion channels and calcium-binding proteins are a dominant factor in defining key synaptic properties during maturation of the calyx of Held.

  8. A testis-specific gene within a widely expressed gene: Contrasting evolutionary patterns of two differentially expressed mammalian proteins encoded by a single gene, CAMK4.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Abinash; Ma, Li

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the patterns of genetic variations within fertility-related genes and the evolutionary forces that shape such variations is crucial in predicting the fitness landscapes of subsequent generations. This study reports distinct evolutionary features of two differentially expressed mammalian proteins [CaMKIV (Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) and CaS (calspermin)] that are encoded by a single gene, CAMK4. The multifunctional CaMKIV, which is expressed in multiple tissues including testis and ovary, is evolving at a relatively low rate (0.46-0.64 × 10(-9) nucleotide substitutions/site/year), whereas the testis-specific CaS gene, which is predominantly expressed in post-meiotic cells, evolves at least three to four times faster (1.48-1.98 × 10(-9) substitutions/site/year). Concomitantly, maximum-likelihood-based selection analyses revealed that the ubiquitously expressed CaMKIV is constrained by intense purifying selection and, therefore, remained functionally highly conserved throughout the mammalian evolution, whereas the testis-specific CaS gene is under strong positive selection. The substitution rates of different mammalian lineages within both genes are positively correlated with GC content, indicating the possible influence of GC-biased gene conversion on the estimated substitution rates. The observation of such unusually high GC content of the CaS gene (≈74%), particularly in the lineage that comprises the bovine species, suggests the possible role of GC-biased gene conversion in the evolution of CaS that mimics positive selection.

  9. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes.

  10. Complementary DNA cloning, genomic characterization and expression analysis of a mammalian gene encoding histidine-rich calcium binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sunghee; Kim, Tae-Wan; Choi, Inchul; Woo, Jong-Min; Oh, Jungsu; Park, Woo Jin; Kim, Do Han; Cho, Chunghee

    2005-03-10

    A protein complex present at the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane is implicated in the Ca(2+) release process during muscle contraction. The histidine-rich Ca(2+)-binding protein (HRC) is an emerging component associated into the SR protein complex. We cloned cDNAs for rat and monkey HRCs, showing a conserved sequence organization in common with other mammalian HRCs. Genomic analysis revealed that each mammalian HRC gene is present as a single copy in the genome, consisting of 6 exons and 5 introns. Developmental expression analysis using mouse embryos and postnatal hearts demonstrated that Hrc transcription begins at 12.5 days postcoitum and its level increases gradually, reaching an adult level in the range 5-20 days after birth. Comparing the Hrc gene and other SR genes, we found that the timing and pattern of gene expression vary among the SR genes and the full-level expression of these genes is achieved in the heart after postnatal day 20. Collectively, our study provides comprehensive information about the structure and expression of the mammalian HRC gene, together with the comparative expression data of the related SR genes.

  11. Conditional control of mammalian gene expression by tetracycline-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Kim; Wittmann, Alexander; Grez, Manuel; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-05-15

    Robust synthetic devices are requisite for the construction of synthetic genetic circuits and important scientific and technological tools to control cellular processes. We developed tetracycline-dependent ribozymes, which can switch on gene expression up to 8.7-fold upon addition of tetracycline. A tetracycline aptamer was grafted onto the hammerhead ribozyme in such a way that ligand binding to the aptamers destroys a loop-loop interaction within the ribozyme thereby inhibiting ribozyme cleavage and allowing gene expression. The advantage of the presented regulatory system is its independence of any regulatory proteins. The stable integration of the ribozyme into the genome of HeLa cells indicates a low background activity in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the ligand concentration required to robustly flip the switch does not affect cell viability and therefore allows a long-term application of the system. These properties turn the tetracycline-dependent ribozymes into a very promising tool for conditional gene expression in mammalian cells.

  12. Drosophila and mammalian models uncover a role for the myoblast fusion gene TANC1 in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Avirneni-Vadlamudi, Usha; Galindo, Kathleen A.; Endicott, Tiana R.; Paulson, Vera; Cameron, Scott; Galindo, Rene L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignancy of muscle myoblasts, which fail to exit the cell cycle, resist terminal differentiation, and are blocked from fusing into syncytial skeletal muscle. In some patients, RMS is caused by a translocation that generates the fusion oncoprotein PAX-FOXO1, but the underlying RMS pathogenetic mechanisms that impede differentiation and promote neoplastic transformation remain unclear. Using a Drosophila model of PAX-FOXO1–mediated transformation, we show here that mutation in the myoblast fusion gene rolling pebbles (rols) dominantly suppresses PAX-FOXO1 lethality. Further analysis indicated that PAX-FOXO1 expression caused upregulation of rols, which suggests that Rols acts downstream of PAX-FOXO1. In mammalian myoblasts, gene silencing of Tanc1, an ortholog of rols, revealed that it is essential for myoblast fusion, but is dispensable for terminal differentiation. Misexpression of PAX-FOXO1 in myoblasts upregulated Tanc1 and blocked differentiation, whereas subsequent reduction of Tanc1 expression to native levels by RNAi restored both fusion and differentiation. Furthermore, decreasing human TANC1 gene expression caused RMS cancer cells to lose their neoplastic state, undergo fusion, and form differentiated syncytial muscle. Taken together, these findings identify misregulated myoblast fusion caused by ectopic TANC1 expression as a RMS neoplasia mechanism and suggest fusion molecules as candidates for targeted RMS therapy. PMID:22182840

  13. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, Alan E; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-12-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target. PMID:24013086

  15. Evolutionary analysis of the mammalian M1 aminopeptidases reveals conserved exon structure and gene death.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Karen Beasley; Smith, Shannon A; Davis, Anthony C; Trivette, Andrew; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2014-11-15

    The members of the M1 aminopeptidase family share conserved domains, yet show functional divergence within the family as a whole. In order to better understand this family, this study analyzed the mammalian members in depth at exon, gene, and protein levels. The twelve human members, eleven rat members, and eleven mouse members were first analyzed in multiple alignments to visualize both reported and unreported conserved domains. Phylogenetic trees were then generated for humans, rats, mice, and all mammals to determine how closely related the homologs were and to gain insight to the divergence in the family members. This produced three groups with similarity within the family. Next, a synteny study was completed to determine the present locations of the genes and changes that had occurred. It became apparent that gene death likely resulted in the lack of one member in mouse and rat. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the exon structure revealed that nine members of the human family and eight in mouse, are highly conserved within the exon structure. Taken together, these results indicate that the M1 aminopeptidase family is a divergent family with three subgroups and that genetic evidence mirrors categorization of the family by enzymatic function.

  16. Efficient gene delivery and selective transduction of astrocytes in the mammalian brain using viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merienne, Nicolas; Douce, Juliette Le; Faivre, Emilie; Déglon, Nicole; Bonvento, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are now considered as key players in brain information processing because of their newly discovered roles in synapse formation and plasticity, energy metabolism and blood flow regulation. However, our understanding of astrocyte function is still fragmented compared to other brain cell types. A better appreciation of the biology of astrocytes requires the development of tools to generate animal models in which astrocyte-specific proteins and pathways can be manipulated. In addition, it is becoming increasingly evident that astrocytes are also important players in many neurological disorders. Targeted modulation of protein expression in astrocytes would be critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Gene transfer is valuable to target a subpopulation of cells and explore their function in experimental models. In particular, viral-mediated gene transfer provides a rapid, highly flexible and cost-effective, in vivo paradigm to study the impact of genes of interest during central nervous system development or in adult animals. We will review the different strategies that led to the recent development of efficient viral vectors that can be successfully used to selectively transduce astrocytes in the mammalian brain. PMID:23847471

  17. Ranking novel cancer driving synthetic lethal gene pairs using TCGA data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Zhang, Xiuhua; Chen, Yunqin; Liu, Qi; Wei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) has emerged as a promising approach to cancer therapy. In contrast to the costly and labour-intensive genome-wide siRNA or CRISPR-based human cell line screening approaches, computational approaches to prioritize potential synthetic lethality pairs for further experimental validation represent an attractive alternative. In this study, we propose an efficient and comprehensive in-silico pipeline to rank novel SL gene pairs by mining vast amounts of accumulated tumor high-throughput sequencing data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), coupled with other protein interaction networks and cell line information. Our pipeline integrates three significant features, including mutation coverage in TCGA, driver mutation probability and the quantified cancer network information centrality, into a ranking model for SL gene pair identification, which is presented as the first learning-based method for SL identification. As a result, 107 potential SL gene pairs were obtained from the top 10 results covering 11 cancers. Functional analysis of these genes indicated that several promising pathways were identified, including the DNA repair related Fanconi Anemia pathway and HIF-1 signaling pathway. In addition, 4 SL pairs, mTOR-TP53, VEGFR2-TP53, EGFR-TP53, ATM-PRKCA, were validated using drug sensitivity information in the cancer cell line databases CCLE or NCI60. Interestingly, significant differences in the cell growth of mTOR siRNA or EGFR siRNA knock-down were detected between cancer cells with wild type TP53 and mutant TP53. Our study indicates that the pre-screening of potential SL gene pairs based on the large genomics data repertoire of tumor tissues and cancer cell lines could substantially expedite the identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs for cancer therapy. PMID:27438146

  18. Analysis of gene-environment interactions in postnatal development of the mammalian intestine.

    PubMed

    Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Kong, Yong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Subramanian, Sathish; Ahern, Philip P; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-02-17

    Unlike mammalian embryogenesis, which takes place in the relatively predictable and stable environment of the uterus, postnatal development can be affected by a multitude of highly variable environmental factors, including diet, exposure to noxious substances, and microorganisms. Microbial colonization of the intestine is thought to play a particularly important role in postnatal development of the gastrointestinal, metabolic, and immune systems. Major changes in environmental exposure occur right after birth, upon weaning, and during pubertal maturation into adulthood. These transitions include dramatic changes in intestinal contents and require appropriate adaptations to meet changes in functional demands. Here, we attempt to both characterize and provide mechanistic insights into postnatal intestinal ontogeny. We investigated changes in global intestinal gene expression through postnatal developmental transitions. We report profound alterations in small and large intestinal transcriptional programs that accompany both weaning and puberty in WT mice. Using myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) double knockout littermates, we define the role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor family member signaling in postnatal gene expression programs and select ontogeny-specific phenotypes, such as vascular and smooth muscle development and neonatal epithelial and mast cell homeostasis. Metaanalysis of the effect of the microbiota on intestinal gene expression allowed for mechanistic classification of developmentally regulated genes by TLR/IL-1R (TIR) signaling and/or indigenous microbes. We find that practically every aspect of intestinal physiology is affected by postnatal transitions. Developmental timing, microbial colonization, and TIR signaling seem to play distinct and specific roles in regulation of gene-expression programs throughout postnatal development.

  19. The mouse Enhancer trap locus 1 (Etl-1): a novel mammalian gene related to Drosophila and yeast transcriptional regulator genes.

    PubMed

    Soininen, R; Schoor, M; Henseling, U; Tepe, C; Kisters-Woike, B; Rossant, J; Gossler, A

    1992-11-01

    A novel mouse gene, Enhancer trap locus 1 (Etl-1), was identified in close proximity to a lacZ enhancer trap integration in the mouse genome showing a specific beta-galactosidase staining pattern during development. In situ analysis revealed a widespread but not ubiquitous expression of Etl-1 throughout development with particularly high levels in the central nervous system and epithelial cells. The amino acid sequence of the Etl-1 protein deduced from the cDNA shows strong similarity, over a stretch of 500 amino acids, to the Drosophila brahma protein involved in the regulation of homeotic genes and to the yeast transcriptional activator protein SNF2/SWI2 as well as to the RAD54 protein and the recently described helicase-related yeast proteins STH1 and MOT1. Etl-1 is the first mammalian member of this group of proteins that are implicated in gene regulation and/or influencing chromatin structure. The homology to the regulatory proteins SNF2/SWI2 and brahma and the expression pattern during embryogenesis suggest that Etl-1 protein might be involved in gene regulating pathways during mouse development.

  20. Bioinformatics Identification of Drug Resistance-Associated Gene Pairs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ze-Jia; Yang, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Ye

    2016-08-27

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Due to the extensive use of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the development of mutations, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is recognized as one of the most dangerous threats to global tuberculosis control. Some single mutations have been identified to be significantly linked with drug resistance. However, the prior research did not take gene-gene interactions into account, and the emergence of transmissible drug resistance is connected with multiple genetic mutations. In this study we use the bioinformatics software GBOOST (The Hong Kong University, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China) to calculate the interactions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) pairs and identify gene pairs associated with drug resistance. A large part of the non-synonymous mutations in the drug target genes that were included in the screened gene pairs were confirmed by previous reports, which lent sound solid credits to the effectiveness of our method. Notably, most of the identified gene pairs containing drug targets also comprise Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) family proteins, suggesting that PPE family proteins play important roles in the drug resistance of Mtb. Therefore, this study provides deeper insights into the mechanisms underlying anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, and the present method is useful for exploring the drug resistance mechanisms for other microorganisms.

  1. Codon optimization of genes for efficient protein expression in mammalian cells by selection of only preferred human codons.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko; Sato, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    A simple design method for codon optimization of genes to express a heterologous protein in mammalian cells is described. Codon optimization was performed by choosing only codons preferentially used in humans and with over 60% GC content, and the method was named the "preferred human codon-optimized method." To test our simple rule for codon optimization, the preferred human codon-optimized genes for six proteins containing photoproteins (aequorin and clytin II) and luciferases (Gaussia luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and firefly luciferases from Photinus pyralis and Luciola cruciata) were chemically synthesized and transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells. All preferred human codon-optimized genes showed higher luminescence activity than the corresponding wild-type genes. Our simple design method could be used to improve protein expression in mammalian cells efficiently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Suppresses RNA-Induced Gene Silencing in Mammalian Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zetang; Zhu, Yali; Bisaro, David M.; Parris, Deborah S.

    2009-01-01

    RNA-induced silencing is a potent innate antiviral defense strategy in plants, and suppression of silencing is a hallmark of pathogenic plant viruses. However, the impact of silencing as a mammalian antiviral defense mechanism and the ability of mammalian viruses to suppress silencing in natural host cells have remained controversial. The ability of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to suppress silencing was examined in a transient expression system that employed an imperfect hairpin to target degradation of transcripts encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). HSV-1 infection suppressed EGFP-specific silencing as demonstrated by increased EGFP mRNA levels and an increase in the EGFP mRNA half-life. The increase in EGFP mRNA stability occurred despite the well-characterized host macromolecular shutoff functions of HSV-1 that globally destabilize mRNAs. Moreover, mutant viruses defective in these functions increased the stability of EGFP mRNA even more than did the wild-type virus in silenced cells compared to results in control cells. The importance of RNA silencing to HSV-1 replication was confirmed by a significantly enhanced virus burst size in cells in which silencing was knocked down with small inhibitory RNAs directed to Argonaute 2, an integral component of the silencing complex. Given that HSV-1 encodes several microRNAs, it is possible that a dynamic equilibrium exists between silencing and silencing suppression that is capable of modulating viral gene expression to promote replication, to evade host defenses, and/or to promote latency. PMID:19369325

  3. ORTI: An Open-Access Repository of Transcriptional Interactions for Interrogating Mammalian Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiuquan; Burykin, Timur; James, David E.; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a fundamental role in coordinating biological processes in response to stimuli. Consequently, we often seek to determine the key TFs and their regulated target genes (TGs) amidst gene expression data. This requires a knowledge-base of TF-TG interactions, which would enable us to determine the topology of the transcriptional network and predict novel regulatory interactions. To address this, we generated an Open-access Repository of Transcriptional Interactions, ORTI, by integrating available TF-TG interaction databases. These databases rely on different types of experimental evidence, including low-throughput assays, high-throughput screens, and bioinformatics predictions. We have subsequently categorised TF-TG interactions in ORTI according to the quality of this evidence. To demonstrate its capabilities, we applied ORTI to gene expression data and identified modulated TFs using an enrichment analysis. Combining this with pairwise TF-TG interactions enabled us to visualise temporal regulation of a transcriptional network. Additionally, ORTI enables the prediction of novel TF-TG interactions, based on how well candidate genes co-express with known TGs of the target TF. By filtering out known TF-TG interactions that are unlikely to occur within the experimental context, this analysis predicts context-specific TF-TG interactions. We show that this can be applied to experimental designs of varying complexities. In conclusion, ORTI is a rich and publicly available database of experimentally validated mammalian transcriptional interactions which is accompanied with tools that can identify and predict transcriptional interactions, serving as a useful resource for unravelling the topology of transcriptional networks. PMID:27723773

  4. Recent Positive Selection in Genes of the Mammalian Epidermal Differentiation Complex Locus

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Zane A.; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is the most rapidly evolving locus in the human genome compared to that of the chimpanzee. Yet the EDC genes that are undergoing positive selection across mammals and in humans are not known. We sought to identify the positively selected genetic variants and determine the evolutionary events of the EDC using mammalian-wide and clade-specific branch- and branch-site likelihood ratio tests and a genetic algorithm (GA) branch test. Significant non-synonymous substitutions were found in filaggrin, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 genes across 14 mammals. By contrast, we identified recent positive selection in SPRR4 in primates. Additionally, the GA branch test discovered lineage-specific evolution for distinct EDC genes occurring in each of the nodes in the 14-mammal phylogenetic tree. Multiple instances of positive selection for FLG, TCHHL1, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 were noted among the primate branch nodes. Branch-site likelihood ratio tests further revealed positive selection in specific sites in SPRR4, LELP1, filaggrin, and repetin across 14 mammals. However, in addition to continuous evolution of SPRR4, site-specific positive selection was also found in S100A11, KPRP, SPRR1A, S100A7L2, and S100A3 in primates and filaggrin, filaggrin2, and S100A8 in great apes. Very recent human positive selection was identified in the filaggrin2 L41 site that was present in Neanderthal. Together, our results identifying recent positive selection in distinct EDC genes reveal an underappreciated evolution of epidermal skin barrier function in primates and humans. PMID:28119736

  5. Recent Positive Selection in Genes of the Mammalian Epidermal Differentiation Complex Locus.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Zane A; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is the most rapidly evolving locus in the human genome compared to that of the chimpanzee. Yet the EDC genes that are undergoing positive selection across mammals and in humans are not known. We sought to identify the positively selected genetic variants and determine the evolutionary events of the EDC using mammalian-wide and clade-specific branch- and branch-site likelihood ratio tests and a genetic algorithm (GA) branch test. Significant non-synonymous substitutions were found in filaggrin, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 genes across 14 mammals. By contrast, we identified recent positive selection in SPRR4 in primates. Additionally, the GA branch test discovered lineage-specific evolution for distinct EDC genes occurring in each of the nodes in the 14-mammal phylogenetic tree. Multiple instances of positive selection for FLG, TCHHL1, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 were noted among the primate branch nodes. Branch-site likelihood ratio tests further revealed positive selection in specific sites in SPRR4, LELP1, filaggrin, and repetin across 14 mammals. However, in addition to continuous evolution of SPRR4, site-specific positive selection was also found in S100A11, KPRP, SPRR1A, S100A7L2, and S100A3 in primates and filaggrin, filaggrin2, and S100A8 in great apes. Very recent human positive selection was identified in the filaggrin2 L41 site that was present in Neanderthal. Together, our results identifying recent positive selection in distinct EDC genes reveal an underappreciated evolution of epidermal skin barrier function in primates and humans.

  6. Dynamic gene expression for metabolic engineering of mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Le, Huong; Vishwanathan, Nandita; Kantardjieff, Anne; Doo, Inseok; Srienc, Michael; Zheng, Xiaolu; Somia, Nikunj; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant mammalian cells are the major hosts for the production of protein therapeutics. In addition to high expression of the product gene, a hyper-producer must also harbor superior phenotypic traits related to metabolism, protein secretion, and growth control. Introduction of genes endowing the relevant hyper-productivity traits is a strategy frequently used to enhance the productivity. Most of such cell engineering efforts have been performed using constitutive expression systems. However, cells respond to various environmental cues and cellular events dynamically according to cellular needs. The use of inducible systems allows for time dependent expression, but requires external manipulation. Ideally, a transgene's expression should be synchronous to the host cell's own rhythm, and at levels appropriate for the objective. To that end, we identified genes with different expression dynamics and intensity ranges using pooled transcriptome data. Their promoters may be used to drive the expression of the transgenes following the desired dynamics. We isolated the promoter of the Thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) gene and demonstrated its capability to drive transgene expression in concert with cell growth. We further employed this Chinese hamster promoter to engineer dynamic expression of the mouse GLUT5 fructose transporter in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, enabling them to utilize sugar according to cellular needs rather than in excess as typically seen in culture. Thus, less lactate was produced, resulting in a better growth rate, prolonged culture duration, and higher product titer. This approach illustrates a novel concept in metabolic engineering which can potentially be used to achieve dynamic control of cellular behaviors for enhanced process characteristics.

  7. Gene therapy rescues cilia defects and restores olfactory function in a mammalian ciliopathy model.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Jeremy C; Davis, Erica E; Joiner, Ariell; Williams, Corey L; Tsai, I-Chun; Jenkins, Paul M; McEwen, Dyke P; Zhang, Lian; Escobado, John; Thomas, Sophie; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Johnson, Colin A; Beales, Philip L; Green, Eric D; Mullikin, James C; Sabo, Aniko; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Yoder, Bradley K; Reed, Randall R; Katsanis, Nicholas; Martens, Jeffrey R

    2012-09-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles that are crucial for diverse biological functions, including motility, cell signaling and sensory perception. In humans, alterations in the formation and function of cilia manifest clinically as ciliopathies, a growing class of pleiotropic genetic disorders. Despite the substantial progress that has been made in identifying genes that cause ciliopathies, therapies for these disorders are not yet available to patients. Although mice with a hypomorphic mutation in the intraflagellar transport protein IFT88 (Ift88Tg737Rpw mice, also known as ORPK mice)5 have been well studied, the relevance of IFT88 mutations to human pathology is unknown. We show that a mutation in IFT88 causes a hitherto unknown human ciliopathy. In vivo complementation assays in zebrafish and mIMCD3 cells show the pathogenicity of this newly discovered allele. We further show that ORPK mice are functionally anosmic as a result of the loss of cilia on their olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Notably, adenoviral-mediated expression of IFT88 in mature, fully differentiated OSNs of ORPK mice is sufficient to restore ciliary structures and rescue olfactory function. These studies are the first to use in vivo therapeutic treatment to reestablish cilia in a mammalian ciliopathy. More broadly, our studies indicate that gene therapy is a viable option for cellular and functional rescue of the complex ciliary organelle in established differentiated cells.

  8. Prediction of human miRNA target genes using computationally reconstructed ancestral mammalian sequences

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Mickael; Diallo, Abdoulaye Baniré; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are short single-stranded RNA molecules derived from hairpin-forming precursors that play a crucial role as post-transcriptional regulators in eukaryotes and viruses. In the past years, many microRNA target genes (MTGs) have been identified experimentally. However, because of the high costs of experimental approaches, target genes databases remain incomplete. Although several target prediction programs have been developed in the recent years to identify MTGs in silico, their specificity and sensitivity remain low. Here, we propose a new approach called MirAncesTar, which uses ancestral genome reconstruction to boost the accuracy of existing MTGs prediction tools for human miRNAs. For each miRNA and each putative human target UTR, our algorithm makes uses of existing prediction tools to identify putative target sites in the human UTR, as well as in its mammalian orthologs and inferred ancestral sequences. It then evaluates evidence in support of selective pressure to maintain target site counts (rather than sequences), accounting for the possibility of target site turnover. It finally integrates this measure with several simpler ones using a logistic regression predictor. MirAncesTar improves the accuracy of existing MTG predictors by 26% to 157%. Source code and prediction results for human miRNAs, as well as supporting evolutionary data are available at http://cs.mcgill.ca/∼blanchem/mirancestar. PMID:27899600

  9. Master regulators in development: Views from the Drosophila retinal determination and mammalian pluripotency gene networks.

    PubMed

    Davis, Trevor L; Rebay, Ilaria

    2017-01-15

    Among the mechanisms that steer cells to their correct fate during development, master regulatory networks are unique in their sufficiency to trigger a developmental program outside of its normal context. In this review we discuss the key features that underlie master regulatory potency during normal and ectopic development, focusing on two examples, the retinal determination gene network (RDGN) that directs eye development in the fruit fly and the pluripotency gene network (PGN) that maintains cell fate competency in the early mammalian embryo. In addition to the hierarchical transcriptional activation, extensive positive transcriptional feedback, and cooperative protein-protein interactions that enable master regulators to override competing cellular programs, recent evidence suggests that network topology must also be dynamic, with extensive rewiring of the interactions and feedback loops required to navigate the correct sequence of developmental transitions to reach a final fate. By synthesizing the in vivo evidence provided by the RDGN with the extensive mechanistic insight gleaned from the PGN, we highlight the unique regulatory capabilities that continual reorganization into new hierarchies confers on master control networks. We suggest that deeper understanding of such dynamics should be a priority, as accurate spatiotemporal remodeling of network topology will undoubtedly be essential for successful stem cell based therapeutic efforts.

  10. Contrasted patterns of selective pressure in three recent paralogous gene pairs in the Medicago genus (L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplications are a molecular mechanism potentially mediating generation of functional novelty. However, the probabilities of maintenance and functional divergence of duplicated genes are shaped by selective pressures acting on gene copies immediately after the duplication event. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates in protein-coding sequences provides a means to investigate selective pressures based on genic sequences. Three molecular signatures can reveal early stages of functional divergence between gene copies: change in the level of purifying selection between paralogous genes, occurrence of positive selection, and transient relaxed purifying selection following gene duplication. We studied three pairs of genes that are known to be involved in an interaction with symbiotic bacteria and were recently duplicated in the history of the Medicago genus (Fabaceae). We sequenced two pairs of polygalacturonase genes (Pg11-Pg3 and Pg11a-Pg11c) and one pair of auxine transporter-like genes (Lax2-Lax4) in 17 species belonging to the Medicago genus, and sought for molecular signatures of differentiation between copies. Results Selective histories revealed by these three signatures of molecular differentiation were found to be markedly different between each pair of paralogs. We found sites under positive selection in the Pg11 paralogs while Pg3 has mainly evolved under purifying selection. The most recent paralogs examined Pg11a and Pg11c, are both undergoing positive selection and might be acquiring new functions. Lax2 and Lax4 paralogs are both under strong purifying selection, but still underwent a temporary relaxation of purifying selection immediately after duplication. Conclusions This study illustrates the variety of selective pressures undergone by duplicated genes and the effect of age of the duplication. We found that relaxation of selective constraints immediately after duplication might promote adaptive divergence. PMID

  11. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by other FcγR family members (FcγRIIA, FcγRIIB and FcγRIII). Studies using chlorpromazine and latrunculin A revealed an important role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (chlorpromazine) and actin filaments (latrunculin A) in antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. This was confirmed by experiments using inhibitors of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, monensin) and by immunocytochemical colocalization of internalized phage particles with early endosome-associated protein-1 (EAA1) . In contrast, microtubule-targeting agents (nocodazole, taxol) increased the efficiency of antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. These results reveal an unexpected antibody-dependent, FcγRI-mediated enhancement of phage transduction in mammalian cells, and suggest new approaches to improve bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer. PMID:18191979

  12. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Schlesinger, Jacob J; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-04-10

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcgammaRI, but not its associated gamma-chain, and was not supported by other FcgammaR family members (FcgammaRIIA, FcgammaRIIB, and FcgammaRIII). Studies using chlorpromazine and latrunculin A revealed an important role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (chlorpromazine) and actin filaments (latrunculin A) in antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. This was confirmed by experiments using inhibitors of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, monensin) and by immunocytochemical colocalization of internalized phage particles with early endosome-associated protein-1 (EAA1). In contrast, microtubule-targeting agents (nocodazole, taxol) increased the efficiency of antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. These results reveal an unexpected antibody-dependent, FcgammaRI-mediated enhancement of phage transduction in mammalian cells, and suggest new approaches to improve bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer.

  13. Functional similarities between pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk: induction of immune gene expression and modification of the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Meagan J; Stanley, Dragana; Chen, Honglei; Donald, John A; Nicholas, Kevin R; Moore, Robert J; Crowley, Tamsyn M

    2012-01-01

    Pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon 'milk'. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon 'milk' on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT) and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon 'milk' had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon 'milk', as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon 'milk'. Our results demonstrate that pigeon 'milk' has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon 'lactation' and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products.

  14. Functional Similarities between Pigeon ‘Milk’ and Mammalian Milk: Induction of Immune Gene Expression and Modification of the Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Meagan J.; Stanley, Dragana; Chen, Honglei; Donald, John A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Moore, Robert J.; Crowley, Tamsyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Pigeon ‘milk’ and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon ‘milk’. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon ‘milk’ on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT) and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon ‘milk’ had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon ‘milk’-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon ‘milk’-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon ‘milk’, as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon ‘milk’. Our results demonstrate that pigeon ‘milk’ has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon ‘lactation’ and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products. PMID:23110233

  15. DNA methylation differences in monozygotic twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia identifies psychosis related genes and networks.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Christina A; Laufer, Benjamin I; Melka, Melkaye G; Diehl, Eric J; O'Reilly, Richard L; Singh, Shiva M

    2015-05-06

    Despite their singular origin, monozygotic twin pairs often display discordance for complex disorders including schizophrenia. It is a common (1%) and often familial disease with a discordance rate of ~50% in monozygotic twins. This high discordance is often explained by the role of yet unknown environmental, random, and epigenetic factors. The involvement of DNA methylation in this disease appears logical, but remains to be established. We have used blood DNA from two pairs of monozygotic twins discordant for schizophrenia and their parents in order to assess genome-wide methylation using a NimbleGen Methylation Promoter Microarray. The genome-wide results show that differentially methylated regions (DMRs) exist between members representing discordant monozygotic twins. Some DMRs are shared with parent(s) and others appear to be de novo. We found twenty-seven genes affected by DMR changes that were shared in the affected member of two discordant monozygotic pairs from unrelated families. Interestingly, the genes affected by pair specific DMRs share specific networks. Specifically, this study has identified two networks; "cell death and survival" and a "cellular movement and immune cell trafficking". These two networks and the genes affected have been previously implicated in the aetiology of schizophrenia. The results are compatible with the suggestion that DNA methylation may contribute to the discordance of monozygotic twins for schizophrenia. Also, this may be accomplished by the direct effect of gene specific methylation changes on specific biological networks rather than individual genes. It supports the extensive genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic heterogeneity implicated in schizophrenia.

  16. Evolution of paired domains: Isolation and sequencing of jellyfish and hydra Pax genes related to Pax-5 and Pax-6

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongmin; Rodin, Andrei; Zhou, Yihong; Dickinson, Douglas P.; Harper, Donald E.; Hewett-Emmett, David; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    1997-01-01

    Pax proteins are a family of transcription factors with a highly conserved paired domain; many members also contain a paired-type homeodomain and/or an octapeptide. Nine mammalian Pax genes are known and classified into four subgroups: Pax-1/9, Pax-2/5/8, Pax-3/7, and Pax-4/6. Most of these genes are involved in nervous system development. In particular, Pax-6 is a key regulator that controls eye development in vertebrates and Drosophila. Although the Pax-4/6 subgroup seems to be more closely related to Pax-2/5/8 than to Pax-3/7 or Pax-1/9, its evolutionary origin is unknown. We therefore searched for a Pax-6 homolog and related genes in Cnidaria, which is the lowest phylum of animals that possess a nervous system and eyes. A sea nettle (a jellyfish) genomic library was constructed and two pax genes (Pax-A and -B) were isolated and partially sequenced. Surprisingly, unlike most known Pax genes, the paired box in these two genes contains no intron. In addition, the complete cDNA sequences of hydra Pax-A and -B were obtained. Hydra Pax-B contains both the homeodomain and the octapeptide, whereas hydra Pax-A contains neither. DNA binding assays showed that sea nettle Pax-A and -B and hydra Pax-A paired domains bound to a Pax-5/6 site and a Pax-5 site, although hydra Pax-B paired domain bound neither. An alignment of all available paired domain sequences revealed two highly conserved regions, which cover the DNA binding contact positions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Pax-A and especially Pax-B were more closely related to Pax-2/5/8 and Pax-4/6 than to Pax-1/9 or Pax-3/7 and that the Pax genes can be classified into two supergroups: Pax-A/Pax-B/Pax-2/5/8/4/6 and Pax-1/9/3/7. From this analysis and the gene structure, we propose that modern Pax-4/6 and Pax-2/5/8 genes evolved from an ancestral gene similar to cnidarian Pax-B, having both the homeodomain and the octapeptide. PMID:9144207

  17. Camptothecin enhances the frequency of oligonucleotide-directed gene repair in mammalian cells by inducing DNA damage and activating homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Luciana; Kmiec, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anticancer drug that promotes DNA breakage at replication forks and the formation of lesions that activate the processes of homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining. We have taken advantage of the CPT-induced damage response by coupling it to gene repair directed by synthetic oligonucleotides, a process in which a mutant base pair is converted into a wild-type one. Here, we show that pretreating DLD-1 cells with CPT leads to a significant stimulation in the frequency of correction of an integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein gene. The stimulation is dose-dependent and coincident with the formation of double-strand DNA breaks. Caffeine, but not vanillin, blocks the enhancement of gene repair suggesting that, in this system, HR is the pathway most responsible for elevating the frequency of correction. The involvement of HR is further proven by studies in which wortmannin was seen to inhibit gene repair at high concentrations but not at lower levels that are known to inhibit DNA-PK activity. Taken together, our results suggest that DNA damage induced by CPT activates a cellular response that stimulates gene repair in mammalian cells.

  18. Identification from diverse mammalian poxviruses of host-range regulatory genes functioning equivalently to vaccinia virus C7L.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Chao, Jie; Xiang, Yan

    2008-03-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) C7L is a host-range gene that regulates cellular tropism of VACV. Distantly related C7L homologues are encoded by nearly all mammalian poxviruses, but whether they are host-range genes functioning similar to VACV C7L has not been determined. Here, we used VACV as a model system to analyze five different C7L homologues from diverse mammalian poxviruses for their abilities to regulate poxvirus cellular tropism. Three C7L homologues (myxoma virus M63R, M64R and cowpox virus 020), when expressed with an epitope tag and from a VACV mutant lacking the host-range genes K1L and C7L (vK1L-C7L-), failed to support productive viral replication in human and murine cells. In nonpermissive cells, these viruses did not synthesize viral late proteins, expressed a reduced level of the early protein E3L, and were defective at suppressing cellular PKR activation. In contrast, two other C7L homologues, myxoma virus (MYXV) M62R and yaba-like disease virus (YLDV) 67R, when expressed with an epitope tag and from vK1L(-)C7L(-), supported normal viral replication in human and murine cells and restored the ability of the virus to suppress PKR activation. Furthermore, M62R rescued the defect of vK1L(-)C7L(-) at replicating and disseminating in mice following intranasal inoculation. These results show that MYXV M62R and YLDV 67R function equivalently to C7L at supporting VACV replication in mammalian hosts and suggest that a C7L-like host-range gene is essential for the replication of many mammalian poxviruses in mammalian hosts.

  19. Identification from Diverse Mammalian Poxviruses of Host-range Regulatory Genes Functioning Equivalently to Vaccinia Virus C7L

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Chao, Jie; Xiang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) C7L is a host-range gene that regulates cellular tropism of VACV. Distantly related C7L homologues are encoded by nearly all mammalian poxviruses, but whether they are host-range genes functioning similar to VACV C7L has not been determined. Here, we used VACV as a model system to analyze five different C7L homologues from diverse mammalian poxviruses for their abilities to regulate poxvirus cellular tropism. Three C7L homologues (myxoma virus M63R, M64R and cowpox virus 020), when expressed with an epitope tag and from a VACV mutant lacking the host-range genes K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−), failed to support productive viral replication in human and murine cells. In nonpermissive cells, these viruses did not synthesize viral late proteins, expressed a reduced level of the early protein E3L, and were defective at suppressing cellular PKR activation. In contrast, two other C7L homologues, myxoma virus (MYXV) M62R and Yaba-like disease virus (YLDV) 67R, when expressed with an epitope tag and from vK1L−C7L−, supported normal viral replication in human and murine cells and restored the ability of the virus to suppress PKR activation. Furthermore, M62R rescued the defect of vK1L−C7L− at replicating and disseminating in mice following intranasal inoculation. These results show that MYXV M62R and YLDV 67R function equivalently to C7L at supporting VACV replication in mammalian hosts and suggest that a C7L-like host-range gene is essential for the replication of many mammalian poxviruses in mammalian hosts. PMID:18054061

  20. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  1. An internal ribosome entry site (IRES) mutant library for tuning expression level of multiple genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Esther Y C; Ho, Steven C L; Mariati; Song, Zhiwei; Bi, Xuezhi; Bardor, Muriel; Yang, Yuansheng

    2013-01-01

    A set of mutated Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements with varying strengths is generated by mutating the translation initiation codons of 10(th), 11(th), and 12(th) AUG to non-AUG triplets. They are able to control the relative expression of multiple genes over a wide range in mammalian cells in both transient and stable transfections. The relative strength of each IRES mutant remains similar in different mammalian cell lines and is not gene specific. The expressed proteins have correct molecular weights. Optimization of light chain over heavy chain expression by these IRES mutants enhances monoclonal antibody expression level and quality in stable transfections. Uses of this set of IRES mutants can be extended to other applications such as synthetic biology, investigating interactions between proteins and its complexes, cell engineering, multi-subunit protein production, gene therapy, and reprogramming of somatic cells into stem cells.

  2. Mutation and gene transfer of neutral amino acid transport System L genes in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gewely, M.R.; Collarini, E.J.; Campbell, G.S.; Oxender, D.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors are attempting to clone the genes coding for amino acid transport System L. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants that are temperature sensitive in their leucyl-tRNA synthetase show temperature-dependent regulation of System L. Temperature resistant mutants isolated from these cells have constitutively derepressed System L activity. Somatic cell fusion studies using these mutants have suggested that a trans-acting element controls regulation of System L. Mutants with reduced transport activity were isolated by a TH-suicide selection. The growth of these mutant cells is limited by the transport defect. CHO mutants were transformed with a human cosmid library, followed by selection at high temperatures and low leucine concentrations. Some transformants have increased levels of System L activity, suggesting that human genes coding for leucine transport have been incorporated into the CHO genome. Human sequences were rescued by a lambda in vitro packaging system. These sequences hybridize to vector and total human DNA. Experiments are being done to confirm that these sequences indeed code for transport System L. They are also attempting to label membrane components of amino acid transporters by group-specific modifying reagents.

  3. The Evolution and Expression Pattern of Human Overlapping lncRNA and Protein-coding Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Qianqian; Li, Yixue; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Songwen; Sun, Hong; Yu, Guangjun

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA overlapping with protein-coding gene (lncRNA-coding pair) is a special type of overlapping genes. Protein-coding overlapping genes have been well studied and increasing attention has been paid to lncRNAs. By studying lncRNA-coding pairs in human genome, we showed that lncRNA-coding pairs were more likely to be generated by overprinting and retaining genes in lncRNA-coding pairs were given higher priority than non-overlapping genes. Besides, the preference of overlapping configurations preserved during evolution was based on the origin of lncRNA-coding pairs. Further investigations showed that lncRNAs promoting the splicing of their embedded protein-coding partners was a unilateral interaction, but the existence of overlapping partners improving the gene expression was bidirectional and the effect was decreased with the increased evolutionary age of genes. Additionally, the expression of lncRNA-coding pairs showed an overall positive correlation and the expression correlation was associated with their overlapping configurations, local genomic environment and evolutionary age of genes. Comparison of the expression correlation of lncRNA-coding pairs between normal and cancer samples found that the lineage-specific pairs including old protein-coding genes may play an important role in tumorigenesis. This work presents a systematically comprehensive understanding of the evolution and the expression pattern of human lncRNA-coding pairs. PMID:28344339

  4. Gene Expression Noise Enhances Robust Organization of the Early Mammalian Blastocyst

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qixuan; Du, Huijing; Peng, Tao; Chiang, Michael; Cinquin, Olivier; Cho, Ken

    2017-01-01

    A critical event in mammalian embryo development is construction of an inner cell mass surrounded by a trophoectoderm (a shell of cells that later form extraembryonic structures). We utilize multi-scale, stochastic modeling to investigate the design principles responsible for robust establishment of these structures. This investigation makes three predictions, each supported by our quantitative imaging. First, stochasticity in the expression of critical genes promotes cell plasticity and has a critical role in accurately organizing the developing mouse blastocyst. Second, asymmetry in the levels of noise variation (expression fluctuation) of Cdx2 and Oct4 provides a means to gain the benefits of noise-mediated plasticity while ameliorating the potentially detrimental effects of stochasticity. Finally, by controlling the timing and pace of cell fate specification, the embryo temporally modulates plasticity and creates a time window during which each cell can continually read its environment and adjusts its fate. These results suggest noise has a crucial role in maintaining cellular plasticity and organizing the blastocyst. PMID:28114387

  5. Introduction and recovery of a selectable bacterial gene from the genome of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breitman, M.L.; Tsui, L.C.; Buchwald, M.; Siminovitch, L.

    1982-08-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40)-pBR322 recombinant, pSV2, carrying the origin of SV40 replication and the gpt gene of Escherichia coli, has been stably introduced into Chinese hamster ovary hprt/sup -/ cells. All gpt-transformed cell lines were found to contain one or more insertions of pSV2 sequences exclusively associated with high-molecular-weight DNA. Upon fusion with COS-1 cells, a simian cell line permissive for autonomous pSV2 replication, most gpt-transformed cell lines produced low-molecular-weight DNA molecules related to pSV2. The majority of these replicating DNAs were indistinguishable from the original transfecting plasmid in both size and restriction enzyme cleavage pattern. In addition, the recovered DNA molecules were able to confer ampicillin resistance to E. coli and to transform mouse L cells and Gpt/sup -/ E. coli to a Gpt/sup +/ phenotype. These studies indicate that all of the genetic information carried by this SV40-plasmid recombinant can be introduced into and retrieved from the genome of mammalian cells.

  6. Identification of novel mammalian caspases reveals an important role of gene loss in shaping the human caspase repertoire.

    PubMed

    Eckhart, Leopold; Ballaun, Claudia; Hermann, Marcela; VandeBerg, John L; Sipos, Wolfgang; Uthman, Aumaid; Fischer, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin

    2008-05-01

    Proteases of the caspase family play central roles in apoptosis and inflammation. Recently, we have described a new gene encoding caspase-15 that has been inactivated independently in different mammalian lineages. To determine the dynamics of gene duplication and loss in the entire caspase gene family, we performed a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of mammalian caspases. By comparative genomics and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses, we identified 3 novel mammalian caspase genes, which we tentatively named caspases-16 through -18. Caspase-16, which is most similar in sequence to caspase-14, has been conserved in marsupials and placental mammals, including humans. Caspase-17, which is most similar to caspase-3, has been conserved among fish, frog, chicken, lizard, and the platypus but is absent from marsupials and placental mammals. Caspase-18, which is most similar to caspase-8, has been conserved among chicken, platypus, and opossum but is absent from placental mammals. These gene distribution patterns suggest that, in the evolutionary lineage leading to humans, caspase-17 was lost after the split of protherian and therian mammals and caspase-18 was lost after the split of marsupials and placental mammals. In the canine genome, the number of caspases has been reduced by the fusion of the neighboring genes caspases-1 and -4, resulting in a single coding region. Further lineage-specific gene inactivations were found for caspase-10 in murine rodents and caspase-12 in humans, rabbit, and cow. Lineage-specific gene duplications were found for caspases-1, -3, and -12 in opossum and caspase-4 in primates. Other caspases were generally conserved in all mammalian species investigated. Using the positions of introns as stable characters during recent vertebrate evolution, we define 3 phylogenetic clades of caspase genes: caspases-1/-2/-4/-5/-9/-12/-14/-15/-16 (clade I), caspases-3/-6/-7/-17 (clade II), and caspases-8/-10/-18/CFLAR (clade III). We

  7. A red/far-red light-responsive bi-stable toggle switch to control gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Metzger, Stéphanie; Schulz, Simon; Kämpf, Michael M.; Busacker, Moritz; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Ehrbar, Martin; Nagy, Ferenc; Timmer, Jens; Zubriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of multicellular systems is orchestrated by spatially restricted gene expression programs in specialized subpopulations. The targeted manipulation of such processes by synthetic tools with high-spatiotemporal resolution could, therefore, enable a deepened understanding of developmental processes and open new opportunities in tissue engineering. Here, we describe the first red/far-red light-triggered gene switch for mammalian cells for achieving gene expression control in time and space. We show that the system can reversibly be toggled between stable on- and off-states using short light pulses at 660 or 740 nm. Red light-induced gene expression was shown to correlate with the applied photon number and was compatible with different mammalian cell lines, including human primary cells. The light-induced expression kinetics were quantitatively analyzed by a mathematical model. We apply the system for the spatially controlled engineering of angiogenesis in chicken embryos. The system’s performance combined with cell- and tissue-compatible regulating red light will enable unprecedented spatiotemporally controlled molecular interventions in mammalian cells, tissues and organisms. PMID:23355611

  8. Differential regulation of polo-like kinase 1, 2, 3, and 4 gene expression in mammalian cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Winkles, Jeffrey A; Alberts, Gregory F

    2005-01-10

    The four mammalian polo-like kinase (Plk) family members are critical regulators of cell cycle progression, mitosis, cytokinesis, and the DNA damage response. Research conducted to date has primarily investigated the expression patterns, structural features, substrates, and subcellular distribution of these important serine-threonine kinases. Here, we review the published data describing the regulation of Plk1, 2, 3, or 4 gene expression either during mammalian cell cycle progression or in tissue samples. These studies have demonstrated that the Plk family genes are differentially expressed following growth factor stimulation of quiescent fibroblasts. Furthermore, although Plk1 and Plk2 mRNA and protein levels are coordinately regulated during cell cycle progression, this is not the case for Plk3. In addition, the Plk1, 2 and 4 proteins have relatively short intracellular half-lives, but Plk3 is very stable. The Plk family genes are also differentially regulated in stressed cells; for example, when DNA-damaging agents are added to cycling cells, Plk1 expression decreases, but Plk2 and Plk3 expression increases. Finally, Plk1, 2, 3, and 4 are expressed to varying degrees in different human tissue types and it has been reported that Plk1 expression is increased and Plk3 expression is decreased in tumor specimens. These results indicate that the differential regulation of Plk family member gene expression is one cellular strategy for controlling Plk activity in mammalian cells.

  9. Unique expression patterns of multiple key genes associated with the evolution of mammalian flight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Dai, Mengyao; Wang, Yao; Cooper, Kimberly L; Zhu, Tengteng; Dong, Dong; Zhang, Junpeng; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-05-22

    Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Critical adaptations for flight include a pair of dramatically elongated hands with broad wing membranes. To study the molecular mechanisms of bat wing evolution, we perform genomewide mRNA sequencing and in situ hybridization for embryonic bat limbs. We identify seven key genes that display unique expression patterns in embryonic bat wings and feet, compared with mouse fore- and hindlimbs. The expression of all 5'HoxD genes (Hoxd9-13) and Tbx3, six known crucial transcription factors for limb and digit development, is extremely high and prolonged in the elongating wing area. The expression of Fam5c, a tumour suppressor, in bat limbs is bat-specific and significantly high in all short digit regions (the thumb and foot digits). These results suggest multiple genetic changes occurred independently during the evolution of bat wings to elongate the hand digits, promote membrane growth and keep other digits short. Our findings also indicate that the evolution of limb morphology depends on the complex integration of multiple gene regulatory networks and biological processes that control digit formation and identity, chondrogenesis, and interdigital regression or retention.

  10. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach.

  11. Human ribosomal RNA gene: nucleotide sequence of the transcription initiation region and comparison of three mammalian genes.

    PubMed Central

    Financsek, I; Mizumoto, K; Mishima, Y; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    The transcription initiation site of the human ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) was located by using the single-strand specific nuclease protection method and by determining the first nucleotide of the in vitro capped 45S preribosomal RNA. The sequence of 1,211 nucleotides surrounding the initiation site was determined. The sequenced region was found to consist of 75% G and C and to contain a number of short direct and inverted repeats and palindromes. By comparison of the corresponding initiation regions of three mammalian species, several conserved sequences were found upstream and downstream from the transcription starting point. Two short A + T-rich sequences are present on human, mouse, and rat ribosomal RNA genes between the initiation site and 40 nucleotides upstream, and a C + T cluster is located at a position around -60. At and downstream from the initiation site, a common sequence, T-AG-C-T-G-A-C-A-C-G-C-T-G-T-C-C-T-CT-T, was found in the three genes from position -1 through +18. The strong conservation of these sequences suggests their functional significance in rDNA. The S1 nuclease protection experiments with cloned rDNA fragments indicated the presence in human 45S RNA of molecules several hundred nucleotides shorter than the supposed primary transcript. The first 19 nucleotides of these molecules appear identical--except for one mismatch--to the nucleotide sequence of the 5' end of a supposed early processing product of the mouse 45S RNA. Images PMID:6954460

  12. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer’s vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer’s vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of ‘heart jogging’ and the direction of ‘heart looping’.  ‘Heart jogging’ is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward ‘jog’. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish ‘heart jogging orthologs’ are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  13. Cooperative gene regulation by microRNA pairs and their identification using a computational workflow

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Ulf; Lai, Xin; Winter, Felix; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an integral part of gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been shown that pairs of miRNAs can repress the translation of a target mRNA in a cooperative manner, which leads to an enhanced effectiveness and specificity in target repression. However, it remains unclear which miRNA pairs can synergize and which genes are target of cooperative miRNA regulation. In this paper, we present a computational workflow for the prediction and analysis of cooperating miRNAs and their mutual target genes, which we refer to as RNA triplexes. The workflow integrates methods of miRNA target prediction; triplex structure analysis; molecular dynamics simulations and mathematical modeling for a reliable prediction of functional RNA triplexes and target repression efficiency. In a case study we analyzed the human genome and identified several thousand targets of cooperative gene regulation. Our results suggest that miRNA cooperativity is a frequent mechanism for an enhanced target repression by pairs of miRNAs facilitating distinctive and fine-tuned target gene expression patterns. Human RNA triplexes predicted and characterized in this study are organized in a web resource at www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/triplexrna/. PMID:24875477

  14. The mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase genome shows several gene duplications and gene losses resulting in a large set of different enzymes including pseudoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Östberg, Linus J; Persson, Bengt; Höög, Jan-Olov

    2015-06-05

    Mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is a protein family divided into six classes and the number of known family members is increasing rapidly. Several primate genomes are completely analyzed for the ADH region, where higher primates (human and hominoids) have seven genes of classes ADH1-ADH5. Within the group of non-hominoids apes there have been further duplications and species with more than the typical three isozymic forms for ADH1 are present. In contrast there are few completely analyzed ADH genomes in the non-primate group of mammals, where an additional class has been identified, ADH6, that has been lost during the evolution of primates. In this study 85 mammalian genomes with at least one ADH gene have been compiled. In total more than 500 ADH amino acid sequences were analyzed for patterns that distinguish the different classes. For ADH1-ADH4 intensive investigations have been performed both at the functional and at structural levels. However, a corresponding functional protein to the ADH5 gene, which is found in most ADH genomes, has never been detected. The same is true for ADH6, which is only present in non-primates. The entire mammalian ADH family shows a broad spectrum of gene duplications and gene losses where the numbers differ from six genes (most non-primate mammals) up to ten genes (vole). Included in these sets are examples of pseudogenes and pseudoenzymes.

  15. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  16. OTEX, an androgen-regulated human member of the paired-like class of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Geserick, Christoph; Weiss, Bertram; Schleuning, Wolf-Dieter; Haendler, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    paired genes emerged early in evolution and code for homeobox transcription factors, having fundamental roles in various biological processes. We identified a novel human member of the paired-like class, which we named OTEX. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that OTEX belonged to the recently defined PEPP subfamily of paired-like homeobox genes. It was organized into three introns and, like the other PEPP genes, it was mapped to chromosome X. Its transcripts were detected mainly in the ovary, testis and epididymis, but also in the prostate and mammary gland. In the PC-3/ARwt prostate cell line, OTEX expression was stimulated dramatically following androgen treatment. Immunofluorescence studies revealed an exclusively nuclear localization of the OTEX protein. Mutation of the RARCRRHQRE amino acid sequence present at the C-terminus of the OTEX homeodomain resulted in a mainly cytoplasmic localization, indicating that this motif harboured the nuclear localization signal. No inherent transactivation function was seen for OTEX using the one-hybrid assay, and no homodimer formation was observed in the two-hybrid assay, suggesting that additional partners were needed for this activity. Taken together, the data show that OTEX represents a novel, androgen-regulated, paired-like homeobox protein, with possibly an important role in human reproduction. PMID:11980563

  17. The efficiency of genetic transformation of mammalian cells by transfection and microinjection depends on the transferred gene.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Kiessling, U; Zavision, B A; Povitza, O N; Tikhonenko, T I; Geissler, E

    1983-01-01

    The efficiency of genetic transformation of mammalian cells was analysed with respect to the kind of the transferred gene and the selective system. Plasmids pAGO and pAG60 harboring the thymidine kinase gene of Herpes simplex virus type 1 and the bacterial neomycin resistance gene, respectively, were compared concerning their ability to transform mouse Ltk-aprt- cells. Using the calcium phosphate technique the neomycin resistance gene transformed at least ten times more efficiently than the thymidine kinase gene (3 X 10(-3) versus 2 X 10(-4] whereas the difference is even more impressive following microinjection of the plasmids into the nuclei (2 X 10(-1) versus 2.5 X 10(-3]. The neomycin system also proved to be more effective in secondary gene transfer experiments and, thus, seems to be the most convenient marker for cotransfer experiments.

  18. Identification of Genes That Promote or Antagonize Somatic Homolog Pairing Using a High-Throughput FISH–Based Screen

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Eric F.; Williams, Benjamin R.; Xie, Tiao; Wu, C.-ting

    2012-01-01

    The pairing of homologous chromosomes is a fundamental feature of the meiotic cell. In addition, a number of species exhibit homolog pairing in nonmeiotic, somatic cells as well, with evidence for its impact on both gene regulation and double-strand break (DSB) repair. An extreme example of somatic pairing can be observed in Drosophila melanogaster, where homologous chromosomes remain aligned throughout most of development. However, our understanding of the mechanism of somatic homolog pairing remains unclear, as only a few genes have been implicated in this process. In this study, we introduce a novel high-throughput fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technology that enabled us to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors involved in the robust somatic pairing observed in Drosophila. We identified both candidate “pairing promoting genes” and candidate “anti-pairing genes,” providing evidence that pairing is a dynamic process that can be both enhanced and antagonized. Many of the genes found to be important for promoting pairing are highly enriched for functions associated with mitotic cell division, suggesting a genetic framework for a long-standing link between chromosome dynamics during mitosis and nuclear organization during interphase. In contrast, several of the candidate anti-pairing genes have known interphase functions associated with S-phase progression, DNA replication, and chromatin compaction, including several components of the condensin II complex. In combination with a variety of secondary assays, these results provide insights into the mechanism and dynamics of somatic pairing. PMID:22589731

  19. Light-induced phase-shifts in the circadian expression rhythm of mammalian period genes in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K; Ishida, N

    2000-11-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanism that regulates circadian rhythms in mammalian peripheral tissues, we examined the phase shifts evoked by light exposure in the circadian mRNA expression rhythms of mammalian Period genes (mPer1, mPer2 and mPer3) and a clock-controlled gene Dbp, in the mouse heart, by Northern blot analysis. The light pulse did not induce any acute mRNA expression of mPer in the heart, but the pulse gave rise to phase shifts in the circadian mRNA rhythms. On the first day after the exposure, only mPer1 mRNA showed a phase shift, whereas obvious phase shifts were not observed in the rhythms of mPer2, mPer3 and Dbp mRNAs. On the second day, phase shifts occurred to a similar extent in the mRNA rhythms of all four genes examined. The rhythm of mPer1 mRNA shifted fastest among those of the three mPers. Therefore mPer1 seems to play an important role in phase resetting of mammalian peripheral oscillators. Immediate responses to light pulses in mRNA expression of mPers may not be required for phase shifting of peripheral circadian oscillators. Our findings suggest that mammals require more than one day to have peripheral oscillators entrained to a new daily schedule.

  20. Artificial control of gene expression in mammalian cells by modulating RNA interference through aptamer–small molecule interaction

    PubMed Central

    An, Chung-Il; Trinh, Vu B.; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered extensive presence and functions of small noncoding RNAs in gene regulation in eukaryotes. In particular, RNA interference (RNAi) has been the subject of significant investigations for its unique role in post-transcriptional gene regulation and utility as a tool for artificial gene knockdown. Here, we describe a novel strategy for post-transcriptional gene regulation in mammalian cells in which RNAi is specifically modulated through RNA aptamer–small molecule interaction. Incorporation of an RNA aptamer for theophylline in the loop region of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) designed to silence fluorescent reporter genes led to dose-dependent inhibition of RNAi by theophylline. shRNA cleavage experiments using recombinant Dicer demonstrated that theophylline inhibited cleavage of an aptamer-fused shRNA by Dicer in vitro. Inhibition of siRNA production by theophylline was also observed in vivo. The results presented here provide the first evidence of specific RNA–small molecule interaction affecting RNAi, and a novel strategy to regulate mammalian gene expression by small molecules without engineered proteins. PMID:16606868

  1. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-06-27

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1 Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1 Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them.

  2. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  3. Intrinsic and Regulated Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Gene Transcription in Mammalian Pituitary Gonadotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Janjic, Marija M.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Bjelobaba, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), acting via its receptors (GnRHRs) expressed in pituitary gonadotrophs, represents a critical molecule in control of reproductive functions in all vertebrate species. GnRH-activated receptors regulate synthesis of gonadotropins in a frequency-dependent manner. The number of GnRHRs on the plasma membrane determines the responsiveness of gonadotrophs to GnRH and varies in relation to age, sex, and physiological status. This is achieved by a complex control that operates at transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. This review aims to overview the mechanisms of GnRHR gene (Gnrhr) transcription in mammalian gonadotrophs. In general, Gnrhr exhibits basal and regulated transcription activities. Basal Gnrhr transcription appears to be an intrinsic property of native and immortalized gonadotrophs that secures the presence of a sufficient number GnRHRs to preserve their functionality independently of the status of regulated transcription. On the other hand, regulated transcription modulates GnRHR expression during development, reproductive cycle, and aging. GnRH is crucial for regulated Gnrhr transcription in native gonadotrophs but is ineffective in immortalized gonadotrophs. In rat and mouse, both basal and GnRH-induced Gnrhr transcription rely primarily on the protein kinase C signaling pathway, with subsequent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. Continuous GnRH application, after a transient stimulation, shuts off regulated but not basal transcription, suggesting that different branches of this signaling pathway control transcription. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, but not activins, contributes to the regulated transcription utilizing the protein kinase A signaling pathway, whereas a mechanisms by which steroid hormones modulate Gnrhr transcription has not been well characterized.

  4. BRAF gene alterations and enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in gangliogliomas.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Majumdar, Atreye; Pathak, Pankaj; Kumar, Anupam; Kumari, Kalpana; Tripathi, Manjari; Sharma, Mehar C; Suri, Vaishali; Tandon, Vivek; Chandra, Sarat P; Sarkar, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    Gangliogliomas (GGs) are slow-growing glioneuronal tumors seen in children and young adults. They are associated with intractable epilepsy, and have recently been found to harbor BRAF (B- rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma) gene mutations. However, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, downstream of BRAF, has not been evaluated extensively in GGs. GG cases were retrieved, clinical data obtained, and histopathological features reviewed. Sequencing for BRAF V600E mutation, analysis of BRAF copy number by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway markers p-S6 and p-4EBP1 were performed. Sixty-four cases of GG were identified (0.9% of central nervous system tumors). Of these, 28 had sufficient tumor tissue for further evaluation. Mixed glial and neuronal morphology was the commonest (64%) type. Focal cortical dysplasia was identified in the adjacent cortex (6 cases). BRAF V600E mutation was identified in 30% of GGs; BRAF copy number gain was observed in 50% of them. p-S6 and p-4EBP1 immunopositivity was seen in 57% cases each. Thus, mTOR pathway activation was seen in 81% cases, and was independent of BRAF alterations. 87% patients had Engel grade I outcome, while 13% had Engel grade II outcome. Both the Engel grade II cases analyzed showed BRAF V600E mutation. BRAF V600E mutation is frequent in GGs, as is BRAF gain; the former may serve as a target for personalized therapy in patients with residual tumors, necessitating its assessment in routine pathology reporting of these tumors. Evidence of mTOR pathway activation highlights similarities in the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying GG and focal cortical dysplasia, and suggests that mTOR inhibitors may be of utility in GG patients with persistent seizures after surgery.

  5. Paired hormone response elements predict caveolin-1 as a glucocorticoid target gene.

    PubMed

    van Batenburg, Marinus F; Li, Hualing; Polman, J Annelies; Lachize, Servane; Datson, Nicole A; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Meijer, Onno C

    2010-01-21

    Glucocorticoids act in part via glucocorticoid receptor binding to hormone response elements (HREs), but their direct target genes in vivo are still largely unknown. We developed the criterion that genomic occurrence of paired HREs at an inter-HRE distance less than 200 bp predicts hormone responsiveness, based on synergy of multiple HREs, and HRE information from known target genes. This criterion predicts a substantial number of novel responsive genes, when applied to genomic regions 10 kb upstream of genes. Multiple-tissue in situ hybridization showed that mRNA expression of 6 out of 10 selected genes was induced in a tissue-specific manner in mice treated with a single dose of corticosterone, with the spleen being the most responsive organ. Caveolin-1 was strongly responsive in several organs, and the HRE pair in its upstream region showed increased occupancy by glucocorticoid receptor in response to corticosterone. Our approach allowed for discovery of novel tissue specific glucocorticoid target genes, which may exemplify responses underlying the permissive actions of glucocorticoids.

  6. Two novel human members of an emerging mammalian gene family related to mono-ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Braren, R.

    1997-02-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is one of the posttranslational protein modifications regulating cellular metabolism, e.g., nitrogen fixation, in prokaryotes. Several bacterial toxins mono-ADP-ribosylate and inactivate specific proteins in their animal hosts. Recently, two mammalian GPI-anchored cell surface enzymes with similar activities were cloned (designated ART1 and ART2). We have now identified six related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the public database and cloned the two novel human genes from which these are derived (designated ART3 and ART4). The deduced amino acid sequences of the predicted gene products show 28% sequence identity to one another and 32-41% identity vs the muscle and T cell enzymes. They contain signal peptide sequences characteristic of GPI anchorage. Southern Zoo blot analyses suggest the presence of related genes in other mammalian species. By PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and by in situ hybridization, we have mapped the two genes to human chromosomes 4p14-p15.l and 12q13.2- q13.3. Northern blot analyses show that these genes are specifically expressed in testis and spleen, respectively. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences reveals a conserved exon/intron structure, with an unusually large exon encoding the predicted mature membrane proteins. Secondary structure prediction analyses indicate conserved motifs and amino acid residues consistent with a common ancestry of this emerging mammalian enzyme family and bacterial mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. It is possible that the four human gene family members identified so far represent the {open_quotes}tip of an iceberg,{close_quote} i.e., a larger family of enzymes that influences the function of target proteins via mono-ADP-ribosylation. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  7. TABASCO: A single molecule, base-pair resolved gene expression simulator

    PubMed Central

    Kosuri, Sriram; Kelly, Jason R; Endy, Drew

    2007-01-01

    Background Experimental studies of gene expression have identified some of the individual molecular components and elementary reactions that comprise and control cellular behavior. Given our current understanding of gene expression, and the goals of biotechnology research, both scientists and engineers would benefit from detailed simulators that can explicitly compute genome-wide expression levels as a function of individual molecular events, including the activities and interactions of molecules on DNA at single base pair resolution. However, for practical reasons including computational tractability, available simulators have not been able to represent genome-scale models of gene expression at this level of detail. Results Here we develop a simulator, TABASCO , which enables the precise representation of individual molecules and events in gene expression for genome-scale systems. We use a single molecule computational engine to track individual molecules interacting with and along nucleic acid polymers at single base resolution. Tabasco uses logical rules to automatically update and delimit the set of species and reactions that comprise a system during simulation, thereby avoiding the need for a priori specification of all possible combinations of molecules and reaction events. We confirm that single molecule, base-pair resolved simulation using TABASCO (Tabasco) can accurately compute gene expression dynamics and, moving beyond previous simulators, provide for the direct representation of intermolecular events such as polymerase collisions and promoter occlusion. We demonstrate the computational capacity of Tabasco by simulating the entirety of gene expression during bacteriophage T7 infection; for reference, the 39,937 base pair T7 genome encodes 56 genes that are transcribed by two types of RNA polymerases active across 22 promoters. Conclusion Tabasco enables genome-scale simulation of transcription and translation at individual molecule and single base-pair

  8. TABASCO: A single molecule, base-pair resolved gene expression simulator.

    PubMed

    Kosuri, Sriram; Kelly, Jason R; Endy, Drew

    2007-12-19

    Experimental studies of gene expression have identified some of the individual molecular components and elementary reactions that comprise and control cellular behavior. Given our current understanding of gene expression, and the goals of biotechnology research, both scientists and engineers would benefit from detailed simulators that can explicitly compute genome-wide expression levels as a function of individual molecular events, including the activities and interactions of molecules on DNA at single base pair resolution. However, for practical reasons including computational tractability, available simulators have not been able to represent genome-scale models of gene expression at this level of detail. Here we develop a simulator, TABASCO http://openwetware.org/wiki/TABASCO, which enables the precise representation of individual molecules and events in gene expression for genome-scale systems. We use a single molecule computational engine to track individual molecules interacting with and along nucleic acid polymers at single base resolution. Tabasco uses logical rules to automatically update and delimit the set of species and reactions that comprise a system during simulation, thereby avoiding the need for a priori specification of all possible combinations of molecules and reaction events. We confirm that single molecule, base-pair resolved simulation using TABASCO (Tabasco) can accurately compute gene expression dynamics and, moving beyond previous simulators, provide for the direct representation of intermolecular events such as polymerase collisions and promoter occlusion. We demonstrate the computational capacity of Tabasco by simulating the entirety of gene expression during bacteriophage T7 infection; for reference, the 39,937 base pair T7 genome encodes 56 genes that are transcribed by two types of RNA polymerases active across 22 promoters. Tabasco enables genome-scale simulation of transcription and translation at individual molecule and single base-pair

  9. Dynamics of the mammalian nucleus: can microscopic movements help us to understand our genes?

    PubMed

    Sleeman, Judith E

    2004-12-15

    The cell is the basic building block of human life. Each of us has existed as a single cell--the fertilized egg--and each of us is made up of billions of cells specialized in many different ways to form our tissues and organs. The nucleus of the cell, described as far back as 1682, is known to be the site of storage of chromosomes that carry the essential and unique DNA blueprint for life. With the recent publication of the entire human genome, our knowledge of exactly what our genes say has increased immeasurably. This, however, is only a small part of the story. In order for the chromosomal genes to function correctly, a complex cellular machinery must rewrite (or transcribe) the genetic instructions of the DNA into a temporary messenger molecule, messenger RNA (mRNA), rearrange (or splice) this message into a readable format and then produce a protein that accurately represents the DNA code. It is these protein molecules that are the functional result of the genetic information. This whole process is termed 'gene expression'. Both transcription and splicing of the mRNA message are carried out in the nucleus. These events must be performed accurately and efficiently in a minute volume already full of highly packaged DNA. An ever-increasing number of sub-nuclear structures have been described, from the nucleolus (first described in 1835) to newly discovered 'paraspeckles' and 'clastosomes'. In fact, as increasing numbers of molecular probes become available, so the complexity of nuclear structure appears to expand. The functions of some of these structures are currently unknown. Those whose functions are, at least partly, understood play roles in gene expression. Interestingly, alterations in nuclear structure are associated with human diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy and promyelocytic leukaemia, suggesting that the control of nuclear organization may be vital to health. The dynamic nature of the structure of the mammalian nucleus has come under increasing

  10. Regulatory Regions of the Homeotic Gene Proboscipedia Are Sensitive to Chromosomal Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Kapoun, A. M.; Kaufman, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have identified regulatory regions of the homeotic gene proboscipedia that are capable of repressing a linked white minigene in a manner that is sensitive to chromosomal pairing. Normally, the eye color of transformants containing white in a P-element vector is affected by the number of copies of the transgene; homozygous flies have darker eyes than heterozygotes. However, we found that flies homozygous for select pb DNA-containing transgenes had lighter eyes than heterozygotes. Several pb DNA fragments are capable of causing this pairing sensitive (PS) negative regulation of white. Two fragments in the upstream DNA of pb, 0.58 and 0.98 kb, are PS; additionally, two PS sites are located in the second intron, including a 0.5-kb region and 49-bp sequence. This phenotype is not observed when two PS sites are located at different chromosomal insertion sites (in trans-heterozygous transgenic animals), indicating that the pb-DNA-mediated repression of white is dependent on the pairing or proximity of the PS regions. The observed phenomenon is similar to transvection in which certain alleles of a gene can complement each other, but only when homologous chromosomes are paired. Interestingly, the intronic PS regions contain positive regulatory sequences for pb, whereas the upstream PS sites contain pb negative regulatory elements. PMID:7498743

  11. Effects of deletion of the ac109 gene of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus on interactions with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Victoria; Amalfi, Sabrina; López, María Gabriela; Taboga, Oscar

    2017-03-01

    Baculoviruses are able to enter into mammalian cells, where they can express a transgene that is placed under an appropriate promoter, without producing infectious progeny. ORF109 encodes an essential baculovirus protein that participates in the interaction of the baculovirus with mammalian cells. To date, the mechanisms underlying this interaction are not yet known. We demonstrated that although a Ac109 knock out virus maintained its ability to enter into BHK-21 cells, there was a marked reduction in the expression efficiency of the nuclear transgene. Moreover, the amount of free cytoplasmic viral DNA, which was detected by transcription of a reporter gene, was severely diminished. These results suggest Ac109 could be involved in maintaining the integrity of the viral nucleic acid.

  12. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  13. Gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data from Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque), a non-mammalian model organism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methods for gene-class testing, such as Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), incorporate biological knowledge into the analysis and interpretation of microarray data by comparing gene expression patterns to pathways, systems and emergent phenotypes. However, to use GSEA to its full capability with non-mammalian model organisms, a microarray platform must be annotated with human gene symbols. Doing so enables the ability to relate a model organism's gene expression, in response to a given treatment, to potential human health consequences of that treatment. We enhanced the annotation of a microarray platform from a non-mammalian model organism, and then used the GSEA approach in a reanalysis of a study examining the biological significance of acute and chronic methylmercury exposure on liver tissue of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Using GSEA, we tested the hypothesis that fathead livers, in response to methylmercury exposure, would exhibit gene expression patterns similar to diseased human livers. Results We describe an enhanced annotation of the fathead minnow microarray platform with human gene symbols. This resource is now compatible with the GSEA approach for gene-class testing. We confirmed that GSEA, using this enhanced microarray platform, is able to recover results consistent with a previous analysis of fathead minnow exposure to methylmercury using standard analytical approaches. Using GSEA to compare fathead gene expression profiles to human phenotypes, we also found that fathead methylmercury-treated livers exhibited expression profiles that are homologous to human systems & pathways and results in damage that is similar to those of human liver damage associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis B. Conclusions This study describes a powerful resource for enabling the use of non-mammalian model organisms in the study of human health significance. Results of microarray gene expression studies involving fathead minnow, typically

  14. Complex Evolutionary History of the Mammalian Histone H1.1-H1.5 Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Inma; Romero, Devani; Yero, Daniel; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2017-01-18

    H1 is involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. H1 has a tripartite structure. The central domain is stably folded in solution, while the N- and C-terminal domains are intrinsically disordered. The terminal domains are encoded by DNA of low sequence complexity, and are thus prone to short insertions/deletions (indels). We have examined the evolution of the H1.1-H1.5 gene family from 27 mammalian species. Multiple sequence alignment has revealed a strong preferential conservation of the number and position of basic residues among paralogs, suggesting that overall H1 basicity is under a strong purifying selection. The presence of a conserved pattern of indels, ancestral to the splitting of mammalian orders, in the N- and C-terminal domains of the paralogs, suggests that slippage may have favored the rapid divergence of the subtypes and that purifying selection has maintained this pattern because it is associated with function. Evolutionary analyses have found evidences of positive selection events in H1.1, both before and after the radiation of mammalian orders. Positive selection ancestral to mammalian radiation involved changes at specific sites that may have contributed to the low relative affinity of H1.1 for chromatin. More recent episodes of positive selection were detected at codon positions encoding amino acids of the C-terminal domain of H1.1, which may modulate the folding of the CTD. The detection of putative recombination points in H1.1-H1.5 subtypes suggests that this process may has been involved in the acquisition of the tripartite H1 structure.

  15. The mammalian single-minded (SIM) gene: Mouse cDNA structure and diencephalic expression indicate a candidate gene for Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Akiko |; Kudoh, Jun; Shindoh, Nobuaki

    1996-07-01

    We have recently isolated a human homolog (hSIM) of the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene from the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21 using the exon trapping method. The Drosophila sim gene encodes a transcription factor that regulates the development of the central nervous system midline cell lineage. To elucidate the structure of the mammalian SIM protein, we have isolated cDNA clones from a mouse embryo cDNA library. The cDNA clones encode a polypeptide of 657 amino acids with a bHLH (basic-helix-loop-helix) domain, characteristic of a large family of transcription factors, and a PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain in the amino-terminal half region. Both of these domains have striking sequence homology with human SIM and Drosophila SIM proteins. In contrast, the carboxy-terminal half of the mouse SIM protein consists of a proline-rich region with no sequence homology to the Drosophila SIM provator domain of a number of transcription factors. Whole-mount embryo in situ hybridization experiments revealed that the SIM mRNA is expressed prominently in the diencephalon during embryogenesis strongly suggest that the newly isolated mammalian SIM homolog may play a critical role in the development of the mammalian central nervous system. We propose that the human SIM gene may be one of the pathogenic genes of Down syndrome. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Regulated expression of mammalian histone H4 genes in vivo requires a trans-acting transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, O; Heintz, N

    1985-01-01

    Mouse L cells containing integrated copies of a human histone H4 gene have been obtained by cotransfection with the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene. Nuclease S1 assays of RNA from several independent cell lines show that the expression of the introduced H4 gene is regulated during the cell cycle. One of these cell lines (line 6-8) contains more than 60 human H4 gene copies per haploid genome and does not express the endogenous mouse histone H4 mRNA. In contrast, the expression of the mouse H2a and H3 mRNAs in this cell line is not perturbed. In cell revertants that have lost the majority of the human H4 gene copies, the expression of the mouse H4 mRNA is restored, demonstrating that the mouse genes remain functional although not expressed. The rate of transcription of the histone H4 genes in clone 6-8 is at least 10-fold greater than that of the parental cell line and it is regulated during traversal of the cell cycle. These results show that the expression of mammalian histone H4 genes involves both a trans-acting transcriptional regulatory factor and an H4-specific activity. We propose that cell cycle regulation of histone gene expression may be effected through subtype-specific transcriptional regulatory proteins. Images PMID:3862085

  17. Efficient implementation of a generalized pair hidden Markov model for comparative gene finding.

    PubMed

    Majoros, W H; Pertea, M; Salzberg, S L

    2005-05-01

    The increased availability of genome sequences of closely related organisms has generated much interest in utilizing homology to improve the accuracy of gene prediction programs. Generalized pair hidden Markov models (GPHMMs) have been proposed as one means to address this need. However, all GPHMM implementations currently available are either closed-source or the details of their operation are not fully described in the literature, leaving a significant hurdle for others wishing to advance the state of the art in GPHMM design. We have developed an open-source GPHMM gene finder, TWAIN, which performs very well on two related Aspergillus species, A.fumigatus and A.nidulans, finding 89% of the exons and predicting 74% of the gene models exactly correctly in a test set of 147 conserved gene pairs. We describe the implementation of this GPHMM and we explicitly address the assumptions and limitations of the system. We suggest possible ways of relaxing those assumptions to improve the utility of the system without sacrificing efficiency beyond what is practical. Available at http://www.tigr.org/software/pirate/twain/twain.html under the open-source Artistic License.

  18. [Using the operonic gene pairs for establishing the treshold for correlation coefficient of differently expressed genes].

    PubMed

    Hedge, Sh; Klimova, E Iu; Mande, Sh; Medvedeva, Iu A; Makeev, V Iu; Permina, E A

    2011-01-01

    We developed an approach for effective estimating the correlations in the noise component of gene expression data. An efficent noise reduction technique has been suggested. The resulting technique has been applied to E. coli microarray data and tested on SOS response modulated genes.

  19. 8-Methoxypsoralen induced mutations are highly targeted at crosslinkable sites of photoaddition on the non-transcribed strand of a mammalian chromosomal gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sage, E; Drobetsky, E A; Moustacchi, E

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the mutational specificity of 8-methoxypsoralen photoaddition at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of Chinese hamster ovary cells hemizygous for this locus. In addition, the distribution of 8-methoxypsoralen photo-adducts was resolved in vitro at the DNA sequence level, and compared with the observed site specificity for mutation. Among 27 mutants characterized, all were single base changes at AT base pairs: 16 A:T-->T:A, six A:T-->C:G, four A:T-->G:C and one -T frameshift. All these vents were targeted to potential sites of photoaddition. The vast majority of these sites were also detectable in vitro, suggesting that 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA-induced mutational hotspots may be damage hotspots. Furthermore 26/27 mutations occurred at crosslinkable 5'TpA sites, supporting the notion that 8-methoxypsoralen biadducts rather than monoadducts are major premutagenic lesions in mammalian cells. Since 90% of our mutation collection could have resulted from damage on the non-transcribed strand, it appears that photoadducted thymine residues on the transcribed strand of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene may be preferentially repaired. We therefore suggest a model for mutagenesis, induced by psoralen biadducts, based on the preferential incision of biadducts followed by translesion synthesis past modified T bases persisting on the non-transcribed strand. Images PMID:8440233

  20. Low X/Y divergence in four pairs of papaya sex-linked genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qingyi; Hou, Shaobin; Feltus, F Alex; Jones, Meghan R; Murray, Jan E; Veatch, Olivia; Lemke, Cornelia; Saw, Jimmy H; Moore, Richard C; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Liu, Lei; Moore, Paul H; Alam, Maqsudul; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants, in contrast to those in animals, evolved relatively recently and only a few are heteromorphic. The homomorphic sex chromosomes of papaya show features of incipient sex chromosome evolution. We investigated the features of paired X- and Y-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and estimated the time of divergence in four pairs of sex-linked genes. We report the results of a comparative analysis of long contiguous genomic DNA sequences between the X and hermaphrodite Y (Y(h)) chromosomes. Numerous chromosomal rearrangements were detected in the male-specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY), including inversions, deletions, insertions, duplications and translocations, showing the dynamic evolutionary process on the MSY after recombination ceased. DNA sequence expansion was documented in the two regions of the MSY, demonstrating that the cytologically homomorphic sex chromosomes are heteromorphic at the molecular level. Analysis of sequence divergence between four X and Y(h) gene pairs resulted in a estimated age of divergence of between 0.5 and 2.2 million years, supporting a recent origin of the papaya sex chromosomes. Our findings indicate that sex chromosomes did not evolve at the family level in Caricaceae, and reinforce the theory that sex chromosomes evolve at the species level in some lineages.

  1. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene targeting enables rapid and precise genetic manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Dewari, Pooran Singh; Kalantzaki, Maria; Gangoso, Ester; Matjusaitis, Mantas; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Blin, Carla; Grant, Vivien; Bulstrode, Harry; Gogolok, Sabine; Skarnes, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cell (NSC) lines provide a tractable model for discovery across stem cell and developmental biology, regenerative medicine and neuroscience. They can be derived from foetal or adult germinal tissues and continuously propagated in vitro as adherent monolayers. NSCs are clonally expandable, genetically stable, and easily transfectable – experimental attributes compatible with targeted genetic manipulations. However, gene targeting, which is crucial for functional studies of embryonic stem cells, has not been exploited to date in NSC lines. Here, we deploy CRISPR/Cas9 technology to demonstrate a variety of sophisticated genetic modifications via gene targeting in both mouse and human NSC lines, including: (1) efficient targeted transgene insertion at safe harbour loci (Rosa26 and AAVS1); (2) biallelic knockout of neurodevelopmental transcription factor genes; (3) simple knock-in of epitope tags and fluorescent reporters (e.g. Sox2-V5 and Sox2-mCherry); and (4) engineering of glioma mutations (TP53 deletion; H3F3A point mutations). These resources and optimised methods enable facile and scalable genome editing in mammalian NSCs, providing significant new opportunities for functional genetic analysis. PMID:28096221

  2. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene targeting enables rapid and precise genetic manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Dewari, Pooran Singh; Kalantzaki, Maria; Gangoso, Ester; Matjusaitis, Mantas; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Blin, Carla; Grant, Vivien; Bulstrode, Harry; Gogolok, Sabine; Skarnes, William C; Pollard, Steven M

    2017-02-15

    Mammalian neural stem cell (NSC) lines provide a tractable model for discovery across stem cell and developmental biology, regenerative medicine and neuroscience. They can be derived from foetal or adult germinal tissues and continuously propagated in vitro as adherent monolayers. NSCs are clonally expandable, genetically stable, and easily transfectable - experimental attributes compatible with targeted genetic manipulations. However, gene targeting, which is crucial for functional studies of embryonic stem cells, has not been exploited to date in NSC lines. Here, we deploy CRISPR/Cas9 technology to demonstrate a variety of sophisticated genetic modifications via gene targeting in both mouse and human NSC lines, including: (1) efficient targeted transgene insertion at safe harbour loci (Rosa26 and AAVS1); (2) biallelic knockout of neurodevelopmental transcription factor genes; (3) simple knock-in of epitope tags and fluorescent reporters (e.g. Sox2-V5 and Sox2-mCherry); and (4) engineering of glioma mutations (TP53 deletion; H3F3A point mutations). These resources and optimised methods enable facile and scalable genome editing in mammalian NSCs, providing significant new opportunities for functional genetic analysis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Mammalian homologues of the Polycomb-group gene Enhancer of zeste mediate gene silencing in Drosophila heterochromatin and at S. cerevisiae telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Laible, G; Wolf, A; Dorn, R; Reuter, G; Nislow, C; Lebersorger, A; Popkin, D; Pillus, L; Jenuwein, T

    1997-01-01

    Gene silencing is required to stably maintain distinct patterns of gene expression during eukaryotic development and has been correlated with the induction of chromatin domains that restrict gene activity. We describe the isolation of human (EZH2) and mouse (Ezh1) homologues of the Drosophila Polycomb-group (Pc-G) gene Enhancer of zeste [E(z)], a crucial regulator of homeotic gene expression implicated in the assembly of repressive protein complexes in chromatin. Mammalian homologues of E(z) are encoded by two distinct loci in mouse and man, and the two murine Ezh genes display complementary expression profiles during mouse development. The E(z) gene family reveals a striking functional conservation in mediating gene repression in eukaryotic chromatin: extra gene copies of human EZH2 or Drosophila E(z) in transgenic flies enhance position effect variegation of the heterochromatin-associated white gene, and expression of either human EZH2 or murine Ezh1 restores gene repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that are impaired in telomeric silencing. Together, these data provide a functional link between Pc-G-dependent gene repression and inactive chromatin domains, and indicate that silencing mechanism(s) may be broadly conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:9214638

  4. Mammalian cytochrome CYP2E1 triggered differential gene regulation in response to trichloroethylene (TCE) in a transgenic poplar

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Won; Wilkerson, Hui-Wen; Farin, Federico M.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Strand, Stuart E.

    2011-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an important environmental contaminant of soil, groundwater, and air. Studies of the metabolism of TCE by poplar trees suggest that cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved. Using poplar genome microarrays, we report a number of putative genes that are differentially expressed in response to TCE. In a previous study, transgenic hybrid poplar plants expressing mammalian cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) had increased metabolism of TCE. In the vector control plants for this construct, 24 h following TCE exposure, 517 genes were upregulated and 650 genes were downregulated over 2-fold when compared with the non-exposed vector control plants. However, in the transgenic CYP2E1 plant, line 78, 1,601 genes were upregulated and 1,705 genes were downregulated over 2-fold when compared with the non-exposed transgenic CYP2E1 plant. It appeared that the CYP2E1 transgenic hybrid poplar plants overexpressing mammalian CYP2E1 showed a larger number of differentially expressed transcripts, suggesting a metabolic pathway for TCE to metabolites had been initiated by activity of CYP2E1 on TCE. These results suggest that either the over-expression of the CYP2E1 gene or the abundance of TCE metabolites from CYP450 2E1 activity triggered a strong genetic response to TCE. Particularly, cytochrome p450s, glutathione S-transferases, glucosyltransferases, and ABC transporters in the CYP2E1 transgenic hybrid poplar plants were highly expressed compared with in vector controls. PMID:20213342

  5. Sense-antisense gene-pairs in breast cancer and associated pathological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grinchuk, Oleg V.; Motakis, Efthymios; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Tang, Zhiqun; Yarmishyn, Aliaksandr A.; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of human protein-coding genes form hereditary complex genome architectures composed of sense-antisense (SA) gene pairs (SAGPs) transcribing their RNAs from both strands of a given locus. Such architectures represent important novel components of genome complexity contributing to gene expression deregulation in cancer cells. Therefore, the architectures might be involved in cancer pathways and, in turn, be used for novel drug targets discovery. However, the global roles of SAGPs in cancer pathways has not been studied. Here we investigated SAGPs associated with breast cancer (BC)-related pathways using systems biology, prognostic survival and experimental methods. Gene expression analysis identified 73 BC-relevant SAGPs that are highly correlated in BC. Survival modelling and metadata analysis of the 1161 BC patients allowed us to develop a novel patient prognostic grouping method selecting the 12 survival-significant SAGPs. The qRT-PCR-validated 12-SAGP prognostic signature reproducibly stratified BC patients into low- and high-risk prognostic subgroups. The 1381 SAGP-defined differentially expressed genes common across three studied cohorts were identified. The functional enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the GABPA gene network, including BC-relevant SAGPs, specific gene sets involved in cell cycle, spliceosomal and proteasomal pathways. The co-regulatory function of GABPA in BC cells was supported using siRNA knockdown studies. Thus, we demonstrated SAGPs as the synergistically functional genome architectures interconnected with cancer-related pathways and associated with BC patient clinical outcomes. Taken together, SAGPs represent an important component of genome complexity which can be used to identify novel aspects of coordinated pathological gene networks in cancers. PMID:26517092

  6. A synthetic cGMP-sensitive gene switch providing Viagra(®)-controlled gene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Folcher, Marc; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a universal second messenger that is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and hydrolyzed into guanosine monophosphate (GMP) by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Small-molecule drugs that induce high cGMP levels in specialized tissues by boosting GC activity or inhibiting PDE activity have become the predominant treatment strategy for a wide range of medical conditions, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis-based claudication and erectile dysfunction. By fusing the cGMP receptor protein (CRP) of Rhodospirillum centenum to the Herpes simplex-derived transactivation domain VP16, we created a novel synthetic mammalian cGMP-sensing transcription factor (GTA) that activates synthetic promoters (PGTA) containing newly identified GTA-specific operator sites in a concentration-dependent manner. In cell lines expressing endogenous natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) (HeLa), GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression was induced by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; Nesiritide(®)) in a concentration-dependent manner, which activated NPR-A׳s intracellular GC domain and triggered a corresponding cGMP surge. Ectopic expression of NPR-A in NPR-A-negative cell lines (HEK-293T) produced high cGMP levels and mediated maximum GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression, which was suppressed by co-expression of PDEs (PDE-3A, PDE-5A and PDE-9A) and was re-triggered by the corresponding PDE inhibitor drugs (Pletal(®), Perfan(®), Primacor(®) (PDE-3A), Viagra(®), Levitra(®), Cialis(®) (PDE-5A) and BAY73-6691 (PDE-9A)). Mice implanted with microencapsulated designer cells co-expressing the GTA/PGTA device with NPR-A and PDE-5A showed control of blood SEAP levels through administration of sildenafil (Viagra(®)). Designer cells engineered for PDE inhibitor-modulated transgene expression may provide a cell-based PDE-targeting drug discovery platform and enable drug-adjusted gene- and cell

  7. Enrichment of brain-related genes on the mammalian X chromosome is ancient and predates the divergence of synapsid and sauropsid lineages.

    PubMed

    Kemkemer, Claus; Kohn, Matthias; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Fundele, Reinald H; Hameister, Horst

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed an enrichment of reproduction- and brain-related genes on the human X chromosome. In the present study, we investigated the evolutionary history that underlies this functional specialization. To do so, we analyzed the orthologous building blocks of the mammalian X chromosome in the chicken genome. We used Affymetrix chicken genome microarrays to determine tissue-selective gene expression in several tissues of the chicken, including testis and brain. Subsequently, chromosomal distribution of genes with tissue-selective expression was determined. These analyzes provided several new findings. Firstly, they showed that chicken chromosomes orthologous to the mammalian X chromosome exhibited an increased concentration of genes expressed selectively in brain. More specifically, the highest concentration of brain-selectively expressed genes was found on chicken chromosome GGA12, which shows orthology to the X chromosomal regions with the highest enrichment of non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (MRX) genes. Secondly, and in contrast to the first finding, no enrichment of testis-selective genes could be detected on these chicken chromosomes. These findings indicate that the accumulation of brain-related genes on the prospective mammalian X chromosome antedates the divergence of sauropsid and synapsid lineages 315 million years ago, whereas the accumulation of testis-related genes on the mammalian X chromosome is more recent and due to adaptational changes.

  8. Functional screening of mammalian mechanosensitive genes using Drosophila RNAi library– Smarcd3/Bap60 is a mechanosensitive pro-inflammatory gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Jang, In-hwan; Kim, Chan Woo; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Won Jae; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed blood flow (d-flow) induces atherosclerosis by altering the expression of mechanosensitive genes in the arterial endothelium. Previously, we identified >580 mechanosensitive genes in the mouse arterial endothelium, but their role in endothelial inflammation is incompletely understood. From this set, we obtained 84 Drosophila RNAi lines that silences the target gene under the control of upstream activation sequence (UAS) promoter. These lines were crossed with C564-GAL4 flies expressing GFP under the control of drosomycin promoter, an NF-κB target gene and a marker of pathogen-induced inflammation. Silencing of psmd12 or ERN1 decreased infection-induced drosomycin expression, while Bap60 silencing significantly increased the drosomycin expression. Interestingly, knockdown of Bap60 in adult flies using temperature-inducible Bap60 RNAi (C564ts-GAL4-Bap60-RNAi) enhanced drosomycin expression upon Gram-positive bacterial challenge but the basal drosomycin expression remained unchanged compared to the control. In the mammalian system, smarcd3 (mammalian ortholog of Bap60) expression was reduced in the human- and mouse aortic endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear in vitro as well as in the d-flow regions of mouse arterial endothelium in vivo. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of smarcd3 induced endothelial inflammation. In summary, we developed an in vivo Drosophila RNAi screening method to identify flow-sensitive genes that regulate endothelial inflammation. PMID:27819340

  9. Reconstructing Mammalian Phylogenies: A Detailed Comparison of the Cytochrome b and Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I Mitochondrial Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Shanan S.; Kitchener, Andrew C.; Linacre, Adrian M. T.

    2010-01-01

    The phylogeny and taxonomy of mammalian species were originally based upon shared or derived morphological characteristics. However, genetic analyses have more recently played an increasingly important role in confirming existing or establishing often radically different mammalian groupings and phylogenies. The two most commonly used genetic loci in species identification are the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) and the cytochrome b gene (cyt b). For the first time this study provides a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of these two loci in reconstructing the phylogeny of mammals at different levels of the taxonomic hierarchy in order to provide a basis for standardizing methodologies in the future. Interspecific and intraspecific variation is assessed and for the first time, to our knowledge, statistical confidence is applied to sequence comparisons. Comparison of the DNA sequences of 217 mammalian species reveals that cyt b more accurately reconstructs their phylogeny and known relationships between species based on other molecular and morphological analyses at Super Order, Order, Family and generic levels. Cyt b correctly assigned 95.85% of mammal species to Super Order, 94.31% to Order and 98.16% to Family compared to 78.34%, 93.36% and 96.93% respectively for COI. Cyt b also gives better resolution when separating species based on sequence data. Using a Kimura 2-parameter p-distance (x100) threshold of 1.5–2.5, cyt b gives a better resolution for separating species with a lower false positive rate and higher positive predictive value than those of COI. PMID:21152400

  10. Finding of a highly efficient ZFN pair for Aqpep gene functioning in murine zygotes

    PubMed Central

    FUJII, Wataru; ONUMA, Asuka; YOSHIOKA, Shin; NAGASHIMA, Keisuke; SUGIURA, Koji; NAITO, Kunihiko

    2015-01-01

    The generation efficiencies of mutation-induced mice when using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been generally 10 to 20% of obtained pups in previous studies. The discovery of high-affinity DNA-binding modules can contribute to the generation of various kinds of novel artificial chromatin-targeting tools, such as zinc-finger acetyltransferases, zinc-finger histone kinases and so on, as well as improvement of reported zinc-finger recombinases and zinc-finger methyltransferases. Here, we report a novel ZFN pair that has a highly efficient mutation-induction ability in murine zygotes. The ZFN pair induced mutations in all obtained mice in the target locus, exon 17 of aminopeptidase Q gene, and almost all of the pups had biallelic mutations. This high efficiency was also shown in the plasmid DNA transfected in a cultured human cell line. The induced mutations were inherited normally in the next generation. The zinc-finger modules of this ZFN pair are expected to contribute to the development of novel ZF-attached chromatin-targeting tools. PMID:26460691

  11. Linkage of the VNTR/insulin-gene and type I diabetes mellitus: Increased gene sharing in affected sibling pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Owerbach, D.; Gabbay, K.H. )

    1994-05-01

    Ninety-six multiplex type I diabetic families were typed at the 5' flanking region of the insulin gene by using a PCR assay that better resolves the VNTR into multiple alleles. Affected sibling pairs shared 2, 1, and 0 VNTR alleles - identical by descent - at a frequency of .47, .45, and .08, respectively, a ratio that deviated from the expected 1:2:1 ratio (P<.001). These results confirm linkage of the chromosome 11p15.5 region with type I diabetes mellitus susceptibility. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Self-recognition in social amoebae is mediated by allelic pairs of tiger genes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shigenori; Benabentos, Rocio; Ho, Hsing-I; Kuspa, Adam; Shaulsky, Gad

    2011-07-22

    Free-living cells of the social amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can aggregate and develop into multicellular fruiting bodies in which many die altruistically as they become stalk cells that support the surviving spores. Dictyostelium cells exhibit kin discrimination--a potential defense against cheaters, which sporulate without contributing to the stalk. Kin discrimination depends on strain relatedness, and the polymorphic genes tgrB1 and tgrC1 are potential components of that mechanism. Here, we demonstrate a direct role for these genes in kin discrimination. We show that a matching pair of tgrB1 and tgrC1 alleles is necessary and sufficient for attractive self-recognition, which is mediated by differential cell-cell adhesion. We propose that TgrB1 and TgrC1 proteins mediate this adhesion through direct binding. This system is a genetically tractable ancient model of eukaryotic self-recognition.

  13. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-04-14

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type-specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments.

  14. A novel plasmid for delivering genes into mammalian cells with noninvasive food and commensal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Ji, Xin; Jin, Ling; Spear, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Using food and commensal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as vehicles for DNA delivery into epithelial cells is a new strategy for vaccine delivery or gene therapy. However, present methods for DNA delivery with LAB have suffered low efficiency. Our goal was to develop a new system to deliver DNA into epithelial cells with high efficiency using food and commensal LAB. An Escherichia coli-LAB shuttle plasmid, pLKV1, for DNA delivery into eukaryotic cells was constructed. Two reporter plasmids with green and red fluorescent protein genes were also constructed to monitor the uptake of protein and DNA, respectively. Bacteria delivering these reporter plasmids into Caco-2 cells were monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Several methods that weaken the bacterial cell wall prior to co-culture with Caco-2 cells were evaluated for their role in the improvement of gene transfer efficiency. Treating Streptococcus gordonii with penicillin and lysozyme greatly increased its rate of gene delivery to mammalian cells compared to untreated control bacteria, while glycine pretreatment promoted the highest gene transfer rate for Lactococcus lactis. Uptake of green fluorescent bacteria by Caco-2 cells showed that the cell wall-weakening treatment promoted the internalization of the noninvasive bacteria into Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, we have developed a noninvasive system using LAB as a vehicle for vaccine delivery or gene therapy, and tested this system in vitro with Caco-2 cells.

  15. Specific targeted gene repair using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides at an endogenous locus in mammalian cells uses homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Fernandez, Serena; Helleday, Thomas; Bryant, Helen E

    2009-12-03

    The feasibility of introducing point mutations in vivo using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssON) has been demonstrated but the efficiency and mechanism remain elusive and potential side effects have not been fully evaluated. Understanding the mechanism behind this potential therapy may help its development. Here, we demonstrate the specific repair of an endogenous non-functional hprt gene by a ssON in mammalian cells, and show that the frequency of such an event is enhanced when cells are in S-phase of the cell cycle. A potential barrier in using ssONs as gene therapy could be non-targeted mutations or gene rearrangements triggered by the ssON. Both the non-specific mutation frequencies and the frequency of gene rearrangements were largely unaffected by ssONs. Furthermore, we find that the introduction of a mutation causing the loss of a functional endogenous hprt gene by a ssON occurred at a similarly low but statistically significant frequency in wild type cells and in cells deficient in single strand break repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. However, this mutation was not induced in XRCC3 mutant cells deficient in homologous recombination. Thus, our data suggest ssON-mediated targeted gene repair is more efficient in S-phase and involves homologous recombination.

  16. A novel plasmid for delivering genes into mammalian cells with noninvasive food and commensal lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Ji, Xin; Jin, Ling; Spear, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Using food and commensal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as vehicles for DNA delivery into epithelial cells is a new strategy for vaccine delivery or gene therapy. However, present methods for DNA delivery with LAB have suffered low efficiency. Our goal was to develop a new system to deliver DNA into epithelial cells with high efficiency using food and commensal LAB. An Escherichia coli-LAB shuttle plasmid, pLKV1, for DNA delivery into eukaryotic cells was constructed. Two reporter plasmids with green and red fluorescent protein genes were also constructed to monitor the uptake of protein and DNA, respectively. Bacteria delivering these reporter plasmids into Caco-2 cells were monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Several methods that weaken the bacterial cell wall prior to co-culture with Caco-2 cells were evaluated for their role in the improvement of gene transfer efficiency. Treating Streptococcus gordonii with penicillin and lysozyme greatly increased its rate of gene delivery to mammalian cells compared to untreated control bacteria, while glycine pretreatment promoted the highest gene transfer rate for Lactococcus lactis. Uptake of green fluorescent bacteria by Caco-2 cells showed that the cell wall-weakening treatment promoted the internalization of the noninvasive bacteria into Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, we have developed a noninvasive system using LAB as a vehicle for vaccine delivery or gene therapy, and tested this system in vitro with Caco-2 cells. PMID:20832422

  17. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain

    PubMed Central

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J.; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-01-01

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type–specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments. PMID:25825760

  18. Trap(Seq): An RNA Sequencing-Based Pipeline for the Identification of Gene-Trap Insertions in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Mayor-Ruiz, Cristina; Dominguez, Orlando; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    The development of haploid mammalian cell lines, coupled to next-generation sequencing, has recently facilitated forward genetic screenings in mammals. For mutagenesis, retrovirus- or transposon-based gene traps are frequently used. Current methods to map gene-trap insertions are based on inverse or splinkerette PCR, which despite their efficacy are prone to artifacts and do not provide information on expression of the targeted gene. Here, we describe a new RNA sequencing-based method (Trap(Seq)) to map gene-trap insertions. By recognizing chimeric mRNAs containing gene-trap sequences spliced to an exon, our method identifies insertions that lead to productive trapping. When applied to individual mutant clones, our method provides a fast and cost-effective way that not only identifies the insertion site but also reveals its impact on the expression of the trapped gene. As proof of principle, we conducted two independent screenings for resistance against 6-thioguanine and an ATR inhibitor, which identified mutations known to provide resistance to these reagents and revealed ECT2 as a novel determinant for the sensitivity to ATR inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of a non-mammalian leptin-like gene: characterization and expression in the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum).

    PubMed

    Boswell, Timothy; Dunn, Ian C; Wilson, Peter W; Joseph, Nerine; Burt, David W; Sharp, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Leptin is well established as a multifunctional cytokine in mammals. However, little is known about the evolution of the leptin gene in other vertebrates. A recently published set of ESTs from the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) contains a sequence sharing 56% nucleotide sequence identity with the human leptin cDNA. To confirm that the EST is naturally expressed in the salamander, a 409bp cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR of salamander testis and stomach mRNAs. The coding sequence of the cDNA is predicted to encode 169 amino acids, and the mature peptide to consist of 146 residues, as in mammals. Although the overall amino acid identity with mammalian leptins is only 29%, the salamander and mammalian peptides share common structural features. An intron was identified between coding exons providing evidence that the sequence is present in the salamander genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed a rate of molecular divergence consistent with the accepted view of vertebrate evolution. The pattern of tissue expression of the leptin-like cDNA differed between metamorphosed adult individuals of different sizes suggesting possible developmental regulation. Expression was most prominent in the skin and testis, but was also detected in tissues in which leptin mRNA is present in mammals, including the fat body, stomach, and muscle. The characterization of a salamander leptin-like gene provides a basis for understanding how the structure and functions of leptin have altered during the evolution of tetrapod vertebrates.

  20. Translational efficiency of polycistronic mRNAs and their utilization to express heterologous genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, R J; Murtha, P; Davies, M V

    1987-01-01

    The translation of polycistronic mRNAs in mammalian cells was studied. Transcription units, constructed to contain one, two or three open reading frames (ORFs), were introduced stably into Chinese hamster ovary cells and transiently into COS monkey cells. The analysis of mRNA levels and protein synthesis in these cells demonstrated that the mRNAs transcribed were translated to generate multiple proteins. The efficiency of translation was reduced approximately 40- to 300-fold by the insertion of an upstream ORF. The results support a modified 'scanning' model for translation initiation which allows for translation initiation at internal AUG codons. High-level expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor was achieved utilizing a vector that contains a polycistronic transcription unit encoding an amplifiable dihydrofolate reductase marker gene in its 3' end. Thus, polycistronic expression vectors can be exploited to obtain high-level expression of foreign genes in mammalian cells. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3582359

  1. In-depth Characterization of Firefly Luciferase as a Reporter of Circadian Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Kevin A.; Putker, Marrit; Brancaccio, Marco; O’Neill, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (Fluc) is frequently used to report circadian gene expression rhythms in mammalian cells and tissues. During longitudinal assays it is generally assumed that enzymatic substrates are in saturating excess, such that total bioluminescence is directly proportional to Fluc protein level. To test this assumption, we compared the enzyme kinetics of purified luciferase with its activity in mammalian cells. We found that Fluc activity in solution has a lower Michaelis constant (Km) for luciferin, lower temperature dependence, and lower catalytic half-life than Fluc in cells. In consequence, extracellular luciferin concentration significantly affects the apparent circadian amplitude and phase of the widely used PER2::LUC reporter in cultured fibroblasts, but not in SCN, and we suggest that this arises from differences in plasma membrane luciferin transporter activity. We found that at very high concentrations (>1 mM), luciferin lengthens circadian period, in both fibroblasts and organotypic SCN slices. We conclude that the amplitude and phase of circadian gene expression inferred from bioluminescence recordings should be treated with some caution, and we suggest that optimal luciferin concentration should be determined empirically for each luciferase reporter and cell type. PMID:28112045

  2. Comparative Analysis of Noncoding Regions of 77 Orthologous Mouse and Human Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Jareborg, Niclas; Birney, Ewan; Durbin, Richard

    1999-01-01

    A data set of 77 genomic mouse/human gene pairs has been compiled from the EMBL nucleotide database, and their corresponding features determined. This set was used to analyze the degree of conservation of noncoding sequences between mouse and human. A new alignment algorithm was developed to cope with the fact that large parts of noncoding sequences are not alignable in a meaningful way because of genetic drift. This new algorithm, DNA Block Aligner (DBA), finds colinear-conserved blocks that are flanked by nonconserved sequences of varying lengths. The noncoding regions of the data set were aligned with DBA. The proportion of the noncoding regions covered by blocks >60% identical was 36% for upstream regions, 50% for 5′ UTRs, 23% for introns, and 56% for 3′ UTRs. These blocks of high identity were more or less evenly distributed across the length of the features, except for upstream regions in which the first 100 bp upstream of the transcription start site was covered in up to 70% of the gene pairs. This data set complements earlier sets on the basis of cDNA sequences and will be useful for further comparative studies. [This paper contains supplementary data that can be found at http://www.genome.com.] PMID:10508839

  3. Quantitative genetic-interaction mapping in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Roguev, Assen; Talbot, Dale; Negri, Gian Luca; Shales, Michael; Cagney, Gerard; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Panning, Barbara; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-01-01

    Mapping genetic interactions (GIs) by simultaneously perturbing pairs of genes is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological phenomena. Here we describe an experimental platform for generating quantitative GI maps in mammalian cells using a combinatorial RNA interference strategy. We performed ~11,000 pairwise knockdowns in mouse fibroblasts, focusing on 130 factors involved in chromatin regulation to create a GI map. Comparison of the GI and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data revealed that pairs of genes exhibiting positive GIs and/or similar genetic profiles were predictive of the corresponding proteins being physically associated. The mammalian GI map identified pathways and complexes but also resolved functionally distinct submodules within larger protein complexes. By integrating GI and PPI data, we created a functional map of chromatin complexes in mouse fibroblasts, revealing that the PAF complex is a central player in the mammalian chromatin landscape. PMID:23407553

  4. Quantitative genetic-interaction mapping in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Roguev, Assen; Talbot, Dale; Negri, Gian Luca; Shales, Michael; Cagney, Gerard; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Panning, Barbara; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-05-01

    Mapping genetic interactions (GIs) by simultaneously perturbing pairs of genes is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological phenomena. Here we describe an experimental platform for generating quantitative GI maps in mammalian cells using a combinatorial RNA interference strategy. We performed ∼11,000 pairwise knockdowns in mouse fibroblasts, focusing on 130 factors involved in chromatin regulation to create a GI map. Comparison of the GI and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data revealed that pairs of genes exhibiting positive GIs and/or similar genetic profiles were predictive of the corresponding proteins being physically associated. The mammalian GI map identified pathways and complexes but also resolved functionally distinct submodules within larger protein complexes. By integrating GI and PPI data, we created a functional map of chromatin complexes in mouse fibroblasts, revealing that the PAF complex is a central player in the mammalian chromatin landscape.

  5. A simple gene set-based method accurately predicts the synergy of drug pairs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Ching; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Yidong; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chuang, Eric Y

    2016-08-26

    The advance in targeted therapy has greatly increased the effectiveness of clinical cancer therapy and reduced the cytotoxicity of treatments to normal cells. However, patients still suffer from cancer relapse due to the occurrence of drug resistance. It is of great need to explore potential combinatorial drug therapy since individual drug alone may not be sufficient to inhibit continuous activation of cancer-addicted genes or pathways. The DREAM challenge has confirmed the potentiality of computational methods for predicting synergistic drug combinations, while the prediction accuracy can be further improved. Based on previous reports, we hypothesized the similarity in biological functions or genes perturbed by two drugs can determine their synergistic effects. To test the feasibility of the hypothesis, we proposed three scoring systems: co-gene score, co-GS score, and co-gene/GS score, measuring the similarities in genes with significant expressional changes, enriched gene sets, and significantly changed genes within an enriched gene sets between a pair of drugs, respectively. Performances of these scoring systems were evaluated by the probabilistic c-index (PC-index) devised by the DREAM consortium. We also applied the proposed method to the Connectivity Map dataset to explore more potential synergistic drug combinations. Using a gold standard derived by the DREAM consortium, we confirmed the prediction power of the three scoring systems (all P-values < 0.05). The co-gene/GS score achieved the best prediction of drug synergy (PC-index = 0.663, P-value < 0.0001), outperforming all methods proposed during DREAM challenge. Furthermore, a binary classification test showed that co-gene/GS scoring was highly accurate and specific. Since our method is constructed on a gene set-based analysis, in addition to synergy prediction, it provides insights into the functional relevance of drug combinations and the underlying mechanisms by which drugs achieve synergy

  6. GCORE-sib: An efficient gene-gene interaction tool for genome-wide association studies based on discordant sib pairs.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Ting; Hsiung, Chao A; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-07-08

    A computationally efficient tool is required for a genome-wide gene-gene interaction analysis that tests an extremely large number of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) interaction pairs in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Current tools for GWAS interaction analysis are mainly developed for unrelated case-control samples. Relatively fewer tools for interaction analysis are available for complex disease studies with family-based design, and these tools tend to be computationally expensive. We developed a fast gene-gene interaction test, GCORE-sib, for discordant sib pairs and implemented the test into an efficient tool. We used simulations to demonstrate that the GCORE-sib has correct type I error rates and has comparable power to that of the regression-based interaction test. We also showed that the GCORE-sib can run more than 10 times faster than the regression-based test. Finally, the GCORE-sib was applied to a GWAS dataset with approximately 2,000 discordant sib pairs, and the GCORE-sib finished testing 19,368,078,382 pairs of SNPs within 6 days. An efficient gene-gene interaction tool for discordant sib pairs was developed. It will be very useful for genome-wide gene-gene interaction analysis in GWAS using discordant sib pairs. The tool can be downloaded for free at http://gcore-sib.sourceforge.net .

  7. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods.

  8. Characterization of porcine ASB6 gene and transcripts-comparison of mammalian transcripts.

    PubMed

    Robic, Annie; Faraut, Thomas; Liaubet, Laurence; Riquet, Juliette; Milan, Denis; Lobjois, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    A member of the porcine Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) Box protein family (ASB), designed as ASB6, was sequenced and the genomic organization of the six exons was determined. We present here a detailed analysis of ASB6 transcripts in pigs. We demonstrate the existence of an alternative transcript resulting from intron retention. This secondary transcript, if functional, encodes a protein without SOCS box. A comparison of mammalian ASB6 transcripts is performed to demonstrate the importance of transcripts encoding for a truncated ASB6 protein.

  9. A repressor-response regulator gene pair controlling jadomycin B production in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Han, L; He, J; Wang, L; Vining, L C

    2001-11-28

    A second regulatory gene (jadR(1)) is located immediately upstream of the putative repressor gene (jadR(2)) in the jad cluster for biosynthesis of the antibiotic jadomycin B in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. It encodes a 234-amino acid polypeptide with a sequence resembling those of response regulator proteins in two-component control systems. Features in the conserved C-terminal domain of JadR(1) place the protein in the OmpR-PhoB subfamily of response regulators. In mutants where jadR(1) was deleted or disrupted, jadomycin B was not produced, implying that the gene has an essential role in biosynthesis of the antibiotic. Cloning jadR(1) from S. venezuelae in pJV73A, and introducing additional copies of the gene into the wild-type parent by plasmid transformation gave unstable strains with pJV73A integrated into the chromosome. The transformants initially showed increased production of jadomycin B but gave lower titers as excess copies of jadR(1) were lost; mature cultures stabilized with a wild-type level of antibiotic production. The mutant from which jadR(1) had been deleted could not be transformed with pJV73A. Altering the composition of jadR genes in the chromosome by integration of vectors carrying intact and disrupted copies of jadR(1) and jadR(2) provided evidence that the two genes form a regulatory pair different in function from previously reported two-component systems controlling antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomycetes.

  10. Control of Secreted Protein Gene Expression and the Mammalian Secretome by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G

    2017-01-06

    Secreted proteins serve pivotal roles in the development of multicellular organisms, acting as structural matrix, extracellular enzymes, and signal molecules. However, how the secretome is regulated remains incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate, unexpectedly, that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), a critical transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, functions to down-regulate the expression of diverse genes encoding secreted molecules and extracellular matrix components to modulate the secretome. Using cell lines, primary cells, and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding secreted molecules. Mechanistically, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression analysis are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins. Interestingly, PGC-1α requires the central heat shock response regulator heat shock factor protein 1 (HSF1) to affect some of its targets, and both factors co-reside on several target genes encoding secreted molecules in cells. Finally, using a mass spectrometric analysis of secreted proteins, we demonstrate that PGC-1α modulates the secretome of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our results define a link between a key pathway controlling metabolic regulation and the regulation of the mammalian secretome.

  11. Interferon-Induced Genes of the Expanded IFIT Family Show Conserved Antiviral Activities in Non-Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Costa, Maria M.; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are involved in the protective response to viral infection, although the precise mechanism of IFITs for reducing viral proliferation is currently unknown. The interaction with the translation initiation factor eIF-3 or viral proteins and the sequestering of viral RNA have been proposed as potential antiviral functions for these proteins. In humans, four members of this family have been characterized. Nevertheless, information about these proteins in fish is almost non-existent. Exploiting the conservation of synteny between human and zebrafish genomes, we have identified ten members of the IFIT family located on four different chromosomes. The induction of these genes was examined both in vitro and in vivo after interferon (IFN) administration and rhabdovirus challenge. Whereas an induction of IFIT genes was observed after interferon treatments (IFNΦ1, IFNΦ2 and IFNΦ3), the viral infection did not affect these IFN-induced genes in vitro, and even reduced the IFN-induced expression of these genes. The response was largely different in vivo, with a broad up-regulation of IFIT genes after viral challenge. In addition, three selected IFITs were cloned in an expression vector and microinjected into zebrafish larvae to examine the protective effect of IFITs upon viral infection. Reduction in the mortality rate was observed confirming a conserved antiviral function in non-mammalian species. PMID:24950240

  12. Retrotransposition of gene transcripts leads to structural variation in mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Retroposed processed gene transcripts are an important source of material for new gene formation on evolutionary timescales. Most prior work on gene retrocopy discovery compared copies in reference genome assemblies to their source genes. Here, we explore gene retrocopy insertion polymorphisms (GRIPs) that are present in the germlines of individual humans, mice, and chimpanzees, and we identify novel gene retrocopy insertions in cancerous somatic tissues that are absent from patient-matched non-cancer genomes. Results Through analysis of whole-genome sequence data, we found evidence for 48 GRIPs in the genomes of one or more humans sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project and The Cancer Genome Atlas, but which were not in the human reference assembly. Similarly, we found evidence for 755 GRIPs at distinct locations in one or more of 17 inbred mouse strains but which were not in the mouse reference assembly, and 19 GRIPs across a cohort of 10 chimpanzee genomes, which were not in the chimpanzee reference genome assembly. Many of these insertions are new members of existing gene families whose source genes are highly and widely expressed, and the majority have detectable hallmarks of processed gene retrocopy formation. We estimate the rate of novel gene retrocopy insertions in humans and chimps at roughly one new gene retrocopy insertion for every 6,000 individuals. Conclusions We find that gene retrocopy polymorphisms are a widespread phenomenon, present a multi-species analysis of these events, and provide a method for their ascertainment. PMID:23497673

  13. Combinatory microarray and SuperSAGE analyses identify pairing-dependently transcribed genes in Schistosoma mansoni males, including follistatin.

    PubMed

    Leutner, Silke; Oliveira, Katia C; Rotter, Björn; Beckmann, Svenja; Buro, Christin; Hahnel, Steffen; Kitajima, Joao P; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Winter, Peter; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2013-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a disease of world-wide importance and is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. These parasites exhibit a unique reproduction biology as the female's sexual maturation depends on a constant pairing-contact to the male. Pairing leads to gonad differentiation in the female, and even gene expression of some gonad-associated genes is controlled by pairing. In contrast, no morphological changes have been observed in males, although first data indicated an effect of pairing also on gene transcription in males. To investigate the influence of pairing on males, we performed a combinatory approach applying SuperSAGE and microarray hybridization, generating the most comprehensive data-set on differential transcription available to date. Of 6,326 sense transcripts detected by both analyses, 29 were significantly differentially transcribed. Besides mutual confirmation, the two methods complemented each other as shown by data comparison and real-time PCR, which revealed a number of genes with consistent regulation across all methods. One of the candidate genes, follistatin of S. mansoni (SmFst) was characterized in more detail by in situ hybridization and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction analyses with potential binding partners. Beyond confirming previously hypothesized differences in metabolic processes between pairing-experienced (EM) and pairing-unexperienced males (UM), our data indicate that neuronal processes are involved in male-female interaction but also TGFβ-signaling. One candidate revealing significant down-regulation in EM was the TGFβ-pathway controlling molecule follistatin (SmFst). First functional analyses demonstrated SmFst interaction with the S. mansoni TGFβ-receptor agonists inhibin/activin (SmInAct) and bone morphogenic protein (SmBMP), and all molecules colocalized in the testes. This indicates a yet unknown role of the TGFβ-pathway for schistosome biology leading to male competence and a possible influence of

  14. The functional diversity of essential genes required for mammalian cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Clowes, Christopher; Boylan, Michael G S; Ridge, Liam A; Barnes, Emma; Wright, Jayne A; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-08-01

    Genes required for an organism to develop to maturity (for which no other gene can compensate) are considered essential. The continuing functional annotation of the mouse genome has enabled the identification of many essential genes required for specific developmental processes including cardiac development. Patterns are now emerging regarding the functional nature of genes required at specific points throughout gestation. Essential genes required for development beyond cardiac progenitor cell migration and induction include a small and functionally homogenous group encoding transcription factors, ligands and receptors. Actions of core cardiogenic transcription factors from the Gata, Nkx, Mef, Hand, and Tbx families trigger a marked expansion in the functional diversity of essential genes from midgestation onwards. As the embryo grows in size and complexity, genes required to maintain a functional heartbeat and to provide muscular strength and regulate blood flow are well represented. These essential genes regulate further specialization and polarization of cell types along with proliferative, migratory, adhesive, contractile, and structural processes. The identification of patterns regarding the functional nature of essential genes across numerous developmental systems may aid prediction of further essential genes and those important to development and/or progression of disease.

  15. Modulated contact frequencies at gene-rich loci support a statistical helix model for mammalian chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its critical role for mammalian gene regulation, the basic structural landscape of chromatin in living cells remains largely unknown within chromosomal territories below the megabase scale. Results Here, using the 3C-qPCR method, we investigate contact frequencies at high resolution within interphase chromatin at several mouse loci. We find that, at several gene-rich loci, contact frequencies undergo a periodical modulation (every 90 to 100 kb) that affects chromatin dynamics over large genomic distances (a few hundred kilobases). Interestingly, this modulation appears to be conserved in human cells, and bioinformatic analyses of locus-specific, long-range cis-interactions suggest that it may underlie the dynamics of a significant number of gene-rich domains in mammals, thus contributing to genome evolution. Finally, using an original model derived from polymer physics, we show that this modulation can be understood as a fundamental helix shape that chromatin tends to adopt in gene-rich domains when no significant locus-specific interaction takes place. Conclusions Altogether, our work unveils a fundamental aspect of chromatin dynamics in mammals and contributes to a better understanding of genome organization within chromosomal territories. PMID:21569291

  16. Identification of Core Alpha 1,3-Fucosyltransferase Gene From Silkworm: An Insect Popularly Used to Express Mammalian Proteins.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Sachi; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Nakaso, Yuzuru; Tomita, Masahiro; Takahisa, Manabu; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2015-01-01

    Silkworm has great potential as production system of recombinant mammalian proteins. When the protein products are used for medical purpose, it is required to reduce the risk of an allergy, the content of core alpha 1,3-fucosyl residue attached to the N-glycan of proteins, for example. We isolated the gene of an enzyme responsible for the transfer of core alpha 1,3-fucosyl residue, core alpha 1,3-fucosyltransferase (Fuc-T C3), from silkworm. A candidate cDNA for silkworm Fuc-T C3 was isolated as a homolog of the fruit fly enzyme gene fucTA. The gene was located on chromosome 7 of the silkworm genome and was composed of seven exons, which spanned approximately 10 kb on the genome. The coding region of the gene was 1,350 bp and encoded a 450-amino acid protein with a molecular mass of 52.2 kDa. Deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region showed one transmembrane domain in its N-terminal and typical motifs common to fucosyltransferases including Fuc-T C3s of other organisms in its C-terminal. The extract of CHO cells transfected with the cDNA showed Fuc-T C3 activity using GDP-fucose and DABS-GnGn peptide as substrates. These results showed this cDNA clone actually encodes silkworm Fuc-T C3.

  17. Learning about mammalian gene regulation from functional enhancer assays in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nord, Alex S

    2015-09-01

    Enhancer biology is emerging as a critical area of research that informs studies of evolution, development, and disease. From early experiments that defined and mapped the first enhancers to recent enhancer models of human disease, functional experiments in the mouse have played a central role in revealing enhancer biology. Three decades of in vivo enhancer studies in mouse have laid the groundwork for the current understanding of mammalian enhancers, demonstrating the developmental and tissue-specific activity of enhancers and illuminating general features of enhancer evolution and function. Recent studies offer an emerging perspective on the importance of chromosomal context, combinatorial enhancer activity, and the functional consequences of enhancer sequence variation. This review describes the basic principles of functional testing in mouse, summarizes the contributions these studies have made to our understanding of enhancer biology, and describes limitations and future outlook of in vivo mouse enhancer studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Digital Signal Processing Reveals Circadian Baseline Oscillation in Majority of Mammalian Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Zvonic, Sanjin; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, circadian periodicity has been described for gene expression in the hypothalamus and multiple peripheral tissues. It is accepted that 10%–15% of all genes oscillate in a daily rhythm, regulated by an intrinsic molecular clock. Statistical analyses of periodicity are limited by the small size of datasets and high levels of stochastic noise. Here, we propose a new approach applying digital signal processing algorithms separately to each group of genes oscillating in the same phase. Combined with the statistical tests for periodicity, this method identifies circadian baseline oscillation in almost 100% of all expressed genes. Consequently, circadian oscillation in gene expression should be evaluated in any study related to biological pathways. Changes in gene expression caused by mutations or regulation of environmental factors (such as photic stimuli or feeding) should be considered in the context of changes in the amplitude and phase of genetic oscillations. PMID:17571920

  19. Identification of an NF-κB-Dependent Gene Network in Cells Infected by Mammalian Reovirus†

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Sean M.; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Pierce, Janene M.; Tian, Bing; Watson, Melissa J.; Chari, Ravi S.; Ballard, Dean W.; Brasier, Allan R.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2006-01-01

    Reovirus infection activates NF-κB, which leads to programmed cell death in cultured cells and in the murine central nervous system. However, little is known about how NF-κB elicits this cellular response. To identify host genes activated by NF-κB following reovirus infection, we used HeLa cells engineered to express a degradation-resistant mutant of IκBα (mIκBα) under the control of an inducible promoter. Induction of mIκBα inhibited the activation of NF-κB and blocked the expression of NF-κB-responsive genes. RNA extracted from infected and uninfected cells was used in high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to examine the expression of constitutively activated genes and reovirus-stimulated genes in the presence and absence of an intact NF-κB signaling axis. Comparison of the microarray profiles revealed that the expression of 176 genes was significantly altered in the presence of mIκBα. Of these genes, 64 were constitutive and not regulated by reovirus, and 112 were induced in response to reovirus infection. NF-κB-regulated genes could be grouped into four distinct gene clusters that were temporally regulated. Gene ontology analysis identified biological processes that were significantly overrepresented in the reovirus-induced genes under NF-κB control. These processes include the antiviral innate immune response, cell proliferation, response to DNA damage, and taxis. Comparison with previously identified NF-κB-dependent gene networks induced by other stimuli, including respiratory syncytial virus, Epstein-Barr virus, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and heart disease, revealed a number of common components, including CCL5/RANTES, CXCL1/GRO-α, TNFAIP3/A20, and interleukin-6. Together, these results suggest a genetic program for reovirus-induced apoptosis involving NF-κB-directed expression of cellular genes that activate death signaling pathways in infected cells. PMID:16414985

  20. Stochastic Resonance Reveals “Pilot Light” Expression in Mammalian Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarrays are widely used for estimation of expression of thousands of genes in a biological sample. The resolution ability of this method is limited by the background noise. Low expressed genes are detected with insufficient reliability and expression of many genes is never detected at all. Methodology/Principal Findings We have applied the principles of stochastic resonance to detect expression of genes from microarray signals below the background noise level. We report the periodic pattern detected in genes called “Absent” by traditional analysis. The pattern is consistent with expression of the conventionally detected genes and specific to the tissue of origin. This effect is corroborated by the analysis of oscillating gene expression in mouse (M.musculus) and yeast (S. cerevisae). Conclusion/Significance Most genes usually considered silent are in fact expressed at a very low level. Stochastic resonance can be applied to detect changes in expression pattern of low-expressed genes as well as for the validation of the probe performance in microarrays. PMID:18365000

  1. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26119090

  2. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-10-10

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  3. Uterine Gene Expression in the Live-Bearing Lizard, Chalcides ocellatus, Reveals Convergence of Squamate Reptile and Mammalian Pregnancy Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Brandley, Matthew C.; Young, Rebecca L.; Warren, Dan L.; Thompson, Michael B.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2012-01-01

    Although the morphological and physiological changes involved in pregnancy in live-bearing reptiles are well studied, the genetic mechanisms that underlie these changes are not known. We used the viviparous African Ocellated Skink, Chalcides ocellatus, as a model to identify a near complete gene expression profile associated with pregnancy using RNA-Seq analyses of uterine transcriptomes. Pregnancy in C. ocellatus is associated with upregulation of uterine genes involved with metabolism, cell proliferation and death, and cellular transport. Moreover, there are clear parallels between the genetic processes associated with pregnancy in mammals and Chalcides in expression of genes related to tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, immune system regulation, and nutrient provisioning to the embryo. In particular, the pregnant uterine transcriptome is dominated by expression of proteolytic enzymes that we speculate are involved both with remodeling the chorioallantoic placenta and histotrophy in the omphaloplacenta. Elements of the maternal innate immune system are downregulated in the pregnant uterus, indicating a potential mechanism to avoid rejection of the embryo. We found a downregulation of major histocompatability complex loci and estrogen and progesterone receptors in the pregnant uterus. This pattern is similar to mammals but cannot be explained by the mammalian model. The latter finding provides evidence that pregnancy is controlled by different endocrinological mechanisms in mammals and reptiles. Finally, 88% of the identified genes are expressed in both the pregnant and the nonpregnant uterus, and thus, morphological and physiological changes associated with C. ocellatus pregnancy are likely a result of regulation of genes continually expressed in the uterus rather than the initiation of expression of unique genes. PMID:22333490

  4. Comparative genomics and experimental promoter analysis reveal functional liver-specific elements in mammalian hepatic lipase genes

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, Diederik; Botma, Gert-Jan; Jansen, Hans; Verhoeven, Adrie JM

    2007-01-01

    Background Mammalian hepatic lipase (HL) genes are transcribed almost exclusively in hepatocytes. The basis for this liver-restricted expression is not completely understood. We hypothesized that the responsible cis-acting elements are conserved among mammalian HL genes. To identify these elements, we made a genomic comparison of 30 kb of 5'-flanking region of the rat, mouse, rhesus monkey, and human HL genes. The in silico data were verified by promoter-reporter assays in transfected hepatoma HepG2 and non-hepatoma HeLa cells using serial 5'-deletions of the rat HL (-2287/+9) and human HL (-685/+13) promoter region. Results Highly conserved elements were present at the proximal promoter region, and at 14 and 22 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site. Both of these upstream elements increased transcriptional activity of the human HL (-685/+13) promoter region 2–3 fold. Within the proximal HL promoter region, conserved clusters of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) were identified at -240/-200 (module A), -80/-40 (module B), and -25/+5 (module C) by the rVista software. In HepG2 cells, modules B and C, but not module A, were important for basal transcription. Module B contains putative binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factors HNF1α. In the presence of module B, transcription from the minimal HL promoter was increased 1.5–2 fold in HepG2 cells, but inhibited 2–4 fold in HeLa cells. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that searching for conserved non-coding sequences by comparative genomics is a valuable tool in identifying candidate enhancer elements. With this approach, we found two putative enhancer elements in the far upstream region of the HL gene. In addition, we obtained evidence that the -80/-40 region of the HL gene is responsible for enhanced HL promoter activity in hepatoma cells, and for silencing HL promoter activity in non-liver cells. PMID:17428321

  5. Transcriptional regulation of bidirectional gene pairs by 17-β-estradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S A B; Nagai, M A

    2011-02-01

    Using cDNA microarray analysis, we previously identified a set of differentially expressed genes in primary breast tumors based on the status of estrogen and progesterone receptors. In the present study, we performed an integrated computer-assisted and manual search of potential estrogen response element (ERE) binding sites in the promoter region of these genes to characterize their potential to be regulated by estrogen receptors (ER). Publicly available databases were used to annotate the position of these genes in the genome and to extract a 5'flanking region 2 kb upstream to 2 kb downstream of the transcription start site for transcription binding site analysis. The search for EREs and other binding sites was performed using several publicly available programs. Overall, approximately 40% of the genes analyzed were potentially able to be regulated by estrogen via ER. In addition, 17% of these genes are located very close to other genes organized in a head-to-head orientation with less than 1.0 kb between their transcript units, sharing a bidirectional promoter, and could be classified as bidirectional gene pairs. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we further investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol and antiestrogens on the expression of the bidirectional gene pairs in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that some of these gene pairs, such as TXNDC9/EIF5B, GALNS/TRAPPC2L, and SERINC1/PKIB, are modulated by 17β-estradiol via ER in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Here, we also characterize the promoter region of potential ER-regulated genes and provide new information on the transcriptional regulation of bidirectional gene pairs.

  6. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Y. Chuang

    2006-08-31

    It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose γ-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

  7. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers: three mammalian gene families control Ca2+ transport.

    PubMed

    Lytton, Jonathan

    2007-09-15

    Mammalian Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are members of three branches of a much larger family of transport proteins [the CaCA (Ca2+/cation antiporter) superfamily] whose main role is to provide control of Ca2+ flux across the plasma membranes or intracellular compartments. Since cytosolic levels of Ca2+ are much lower than those found extracellularly or in sequestered stores, the major function of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers is to extrude Ca2+ from the cytoplasm. The exchangers are, however, fully reversible and thus, under special conditions of subcellular localization and compartmentalized ion gradients, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers may allow Ca2+ entry and may play more specialized roles in Ca2+ movement between compartments. The NCX (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger) [SLC (solute carrier) 8] branch of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers comprises three members: NCX1 has been most extensively studied, and is broadly expressed with particular abundance in heart, brain and kidney, NCX2 is expressed in brain, and NCX3 is expressed in brain and skeletal muscle. The NCX proteins subserve a variety of roles, depending upon the site of expression. These include cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, neuronal signalling and Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. The NCKX (Na2+/Ca2+-K+ exchanger) (SLC24) branch of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers transport K+ and Ca2+ in exchange for Na+, and comprises five members: NCKX1 is expressed in retinal rod photoreceptors, NCKX2 is expressed in cone photoreceptors and in neurons throughout the brain, NCKX3 and NCKX4 are abundant in brain, but have a broader tissue distribution, and NCKX5 is expressed in skin, retinal epithelium and brain. The NCKX proteins probably play a particularly prominent role in regulating Ca2+ flux in environments which experience wide and frequent fluctuations in Na+ concentration. Until recently, the range of functions that NCKX proteins play was generally underappreciated. This situation is now changing rapidly as evidence emerges for roles including photoreceptor

  8. Role of a new mammalian gene family in the biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Tvrdik, P; Westerberg, R; Silve, S; Asadi, A; Jakobsson, A; Cannon, B; Loison, G; Jacobsson, A

    2000-05-01

    Whereas the physiological significance of microsomal fatty acid elongation is generally appreciated, its molecular nature is poorly understood. Here, we describe tissue-specific regulation of a novel mouse gene family encoding components implicated in the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids. The Ssc1 gene appears to be ubiquitously expressed, whereas Ssc2 and Cig30 show a restricted expression pattern. Their translation products are all integral membrane proteins with five putative transmembrane domains. By complementing the homologous yeast mutants, we found that Ssc1 could rescue normal sphingolipid synthesis in the sur4/elo3 mutant lacking the ability to synthesize cerotic acid (C(26:0)). Similarly, Cig30 reverted the phenotype of the fen1/elo2 mutant that has reduced levels of fatty acids in the C(20)-C(24) range. Further, we show that Ssc1 mRNA levels were markedly decreased in the brains of myelin-deficient mouse mutants known to have very low fatty acid chain elongation activity. Conversely, the dramatic induction of Cig30 expression during brown fat recruitment coincided with elevated elongation activity. Our results strongly implicate this new mammalian gene family in tissue-specific synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and sphingolipids.

  9. The Status, Quality, and Expansion of the NIH Full-Length cDNA Project: The Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5′-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline. PMID:15489334

  10. Insight into pattern of codon biasness and nucleotide base usage in serotonin receptor gene family from different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Sudandiradoss, C

    2012-07-15

    5-HT (5-Hydroxy-tryptamine) or serotonin receptors are found both in central and peripheral nervous system as well as in non-neuronal tissues. In the animal and human nervous system, serotonin produces various functional effects through a variety of membrane bound receptors. In this study, we focus on 5-HT receptor family from different mammals and examined the factors that account for codon and nucleotide usage variation. A total of 110 homologous coding sequences from 11 different mammalian species were analyzed using relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), correspondence analysis (COA) and hierarchical cluster analysis together with nucleotide base usage frequency of chemically similar amino acid codons. The mean effective number of codon (ENc) value of 37.06 for 5-HT(6) shows very high codon bias within the family and may be due to high selective translational efficiency. The COA and Spearman's rank correlation reveals that the nucleotide compositional mutation bias as the major factors influencing the codon usage in serotonin receptor genes. The hierarchical cluster analysis suggests that gene function is another dominant factor that affects the codon usage bias, while species is a minor factor. Nucleotide base usage was reported using Goldman, Engelman, Stietz (GES) scale reveals the presence of high uracil (>45%) content at functionally important hydrophobic regions. Our in silico approach will certainly help for further investigations on critical inference on evolution, structure, function and gene expression aspects of 5-HT receptors family which are potential antipsychotic drug targets.

  11. Mammalian RAP1 controls telomere function and gene expression through binding to telomeric and extra-telomeric sites

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Paula; Thanasoula, Maria; Carlos, Ana R.; Gómez, Gonzalo; Tejera, Agueda M.; Schoeftner, Stefan; Dominguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G.; Tarsounas, Madalena; Blasco, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Shelterin binds and protects mammalian telomeres. Here, we generated cells and mice conditionally deleted for the shelterin component RAP1. We find that Rap1 deficiency is dispensable for telomere capping but leads to increased telomere recombination and fragility. Mice with Rap1 deletion in stratified epithelia are viable but have shorter telomeres and develop skin hyperpigmentation at aduldhood. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with ultra-highthroughput sequencing, we find that RAP1 binds to telomeres and to extra-telomeric sites through the (TTAGGG)2 consensus motif. Extra-telomeric RAP1 binding sites are enriched at subtelomeric regions, in agreement with preferential deregulation of subtelomeric genes in Rap1-deficient cells. More than 70% of extra-telomeric RAP1 binding sites are at the vicinity of genes and 31% of the genes deregulated in Rap1-null cells contain RAP1 binding sites, suggesting a role of RAP1 in transcriptional control. These findings place a shelterin component at the interface between telomere function and transcriptional regulation. PMID:20622869

  12. Simple and efficient vectors for retrofitting BACs and PACs with mammalian neoR and EGFP marker genes.

    PubMed

    Kaname, T; Huxley, C

    2001-03-21

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and P1 artificial chromosomes (PACs) are widely used to investigate the functions of genes and genomes in mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a series of vectors which can simply and efficiently be retrofitted onto BACs or PACs. These vectors carry a neoR gene for selection in cells in tissue culture, including ES cells, and also an EGFP gene driven by the strong CAG promoter for quick detection of the DNA in cells. All the plasmids are retrofitted using the loxP site and Cre recombinase and some carry the gamma origin of plasmid R6K which does not function in commonly used bacteria such as DH10B. Retrofitting of PACs and BACs carrying alphoid DNA was very efficient with almost no rearrangement of the highly repetitive alphoid DNA. Following transfer into HT1080 cells and mouse oocytes in tissue culture the DNA could easily be monitored by the EGFP fluorescence.

  13. Inactivation of an integrated antibiotic resistance gene in mammalian cells to re-enable antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peiling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    Removing an antibiotic resistance gene allows the same antibiotic to be re-used in the next round of genetic manipulation. Here we applied the CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the puromycin resistance gene in an engineered mouse embryonic stem cell line and then re-used puromycin selection in the resulting cells to establish stable reporter cell lines. With the CRISPR/Cas system, pre-engineered sequences, such as loxP or FRT, are not required. Thus, this technique can be used to disrupt antibiotic resistance genes that cannot be removed by the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems.

  14. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  15. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R.; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J.; Ott, Troy L.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P.

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type “neo-ESF” in contrast to “paleo-ESF” which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  16. Sex and hedgehog: roles of genes in the hedgehog signaling pathway in mammalian sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Franco, Heather L; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2012-01-01

    The chromosome status of the mammalian embryo initiates a multistage process of sexual development in which the bipotential reproductive system establishes itself as either male or female. These events are governed by intricate cell-cell and interorgan communication that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. The hedgehog signaling pathway was originally identified for its key role in the development of Drosophila, but is now recognized as a critical developmental regulator in many species, including humans. In addition to its developmental roles, the hedgehog signaling pathway also modulates adult organ function, and misregulation of this pathway often leads to diseases, such as cancer. The hedgehog signaling pathway acts through its morphogenetic ligands that signal from ligand-producing cells to target cells over a specified distance. The target cells then respond in a graded manner based on the concentration of the ligands that they are exposed to. Through this unique mechanism of action, the hedgehog signaling pathway elicits cell fate determination, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and cellular homeostasis. Here, we review current findings on the roles of hedgehog signaling in the sexually dimorphic development of the reproductive organs with an emphasis on mammals and comparative evidence in other species.

  17. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Synthetic Mammalian Therapeutic Gene Circuit for Sensing and Suppressing Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Smole, Anže; Lainšček, Duško; Bezeljak, Urban; Horvat, Simon; Jerala, Roman

    2017-01-04

    Inflammation, which is a highly regulated host response against danger signals, may be harmful if it is excessive and deregulated. Ideally, anti-inflammatory therapy should autonomously commence as soon as possible after the onset of inflammation, should be controllable by a physician, and should not systemically block beneficial immune response in the long term. We describe a genetically encoded anti-inflammatory mammalian cell device based on a modular engineered genetic circuit comprising a sensor, an amplifier, a "thresholder" to restrict activation of a positive-feedback loop, a combination of advanced clinically used biopharmaceutical proteins, and orthogonal regulatory elements that linked modules into the functional device. This genetic circuit was autonomously activated by inflammatory signals, including endogenous cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced inflammation in mice and serum from a systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sIJA) patient, and could be reset externally by a chemical signal. The microencapsulated anti-inflammatory device significantly reduced the pathology in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced acute murine colitis, demonstrating a synthetic immunological approach for autonomous anti-inflammatory therapy.

  19. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d) major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I)-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b). Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d) was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Suppression of MHC H2-K(d)-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d)-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells. PMID:26670279

  20. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D K; McWilliams, M J; Lapis, P; Lautenberger, J A; Schweinfest, C W; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, we have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is greater than 95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published findings indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains. PMID:2847145

  1. Expression of miR-98 in myocarditis and its influence on transcription of the FAS/FASL gene pair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B Y; Zhao, Z; Jin, Z

    2016-06-03

    Myocarditis is a common cardiovascular disease and frequently occurs in children and teenagers. It is believed to be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, among which FAS/FASL gene pair-induced cell apoptosis is a major mechanism of myocardial cell injury. A previous study has detected low expression of microRNA (miR)-98 in myocarditis patients. Therefore, in this study we investigated the functional implications of miR-98 with respect to the disease. We carried out a case-control study including 50 myocarditis patients and 50 healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood plasma. Expression levels of miR-98 and the FAS/FASL gene pair were determined by real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The interaction between miR-98 and the FAS/FASL pair was visualized by dual-luciferase reporter assay. The expression of the FAS/FASL gene pair was further detected by transfecting with an miR-98 mimic or an miR-98 inhibitor. The content of miR-98 in the peripheral blood of the myocarditis patients was significantly lower than in the healthy individuals. However, the FAS/FASL genes were upregulated by 1.68-fold in the myocarditis patients. miR-98 was shown to interact with the 3'-untranslated region of the FAS/FASL gene pair. The inhibition/facilitation of miR-98 expression in myocardial cells can modulate apoptosis. miR-98 was downregulated in the peripheral blood of myocarditis patients. It may interact with the FAS/FASL gene pair to further modulate cell apoptosis.

  2. Identification of mammalian orthologs using local synteny

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate determination of orthology is central to comparative genomics. For vertebrates in particular, very large gene families, high rates of gene duplication and loss, multiple mechanisms of gene duplication, and high rates of retrotransposition all combine to make inference of orthology between genes difficult. Many methods have been developed to identify orthologous genes, mostly based upon analysis of the inferred protein sequence of the genes. More recently, methods have been proposed that use genomic context in addition to protein sequence to improve orthology assignment in vertebrates. Such methods have been most successfully implemented in fungal genomes and have long been used in prokaryotic genomes, where gene order is far less variable than in vertebrates. However, to our knowledge, no explicit comparison of synteny and sequence based definitions of orthology has been reported in vertebrates, or, more specifically, in mammals. Results We test a simple method for the measurement and utilization of gene order (local synteny) in the identification of mammalian orthologs by investigating the agreement between coding sequence based orthology (Inparanoid) and local synteny based orthology. In the 5 mammalian genomes studied, 93% of the sampled inter-species pairs were found to be concordant between the two orthology methods, illustrating that local synteny is a robust substitute to coding sequence for identifying orthologs. However, 7% of pairs were found to be discordant between local synteny and Inparanoid. These cases of discordance result from evolutionary events including retrotransposition and genome rearrangements. Conclusions By analyzing cases of discordance between local synteny and Inparanoid we show that local synteny can distinguish between true orthologs and recent retrogenes, can resolve ambiguous many-to-many orthology relationships into one-to-one ortholog pairs, and might be used to identify cases of non-orthologous gene

  3. An H3-H4 histone gene pair in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus, contains an intergenic dyad symmetry element.

    PubMed

    Porter, D; Brown, D; Wells, D

    1991-01-01

    Histone genes are one of the most widely studied multigene families in eucaryotes. Over 200 histone genes have been sequenced, primarily in vertebrates, echinoderms, fungi and plants. We present here the structure and genomic orientation of an H3-H4 histone gene pair from the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. These histone gene sequences are the first to be determined for the class Crustacea and among the first to be determined for protostomes. The H4 and H3 genes in Tigriopus are shown to be adjacent, to have opposite polarity, and to contain a 26 bp region of dyad symmetry centrally located within the spacer region between the two genes. A similarly located dyad element has been found in yeast which contributes to the coordinated cell cycle control of the adjacent histone genes. The Tigriopus H3-H4 histone gene pair is clustered with one H2A and two H2B histone genes on a 15 kb genomic Bam H1 fragment. The H4 gene sequence predicts an H4 protein with an unusual serine to threonine substitution at the amino terminal residue. The H3 gene sequence predicts an H3 protein which is identical to the vertebrate H3.2 histone.

  4. Gene network activity in cultivated primary hepatocytes is highly similar to diseased mammalian liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Patricio; Widera, Agata; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Campos, Gisela; Meyer, Christoph; Cadenas, Cristina; Reif, Raymond; Stöber, Regina; Hammad, Seddik; Pütter, Larissa; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Marchan, Rosemarie; Ghallab, Ahmed; Edlund, Karolina; Nüssler, Andreas; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Weiss, Thomas S; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta; Gebhardt, Rolf; Chaudhari, Umesh; Meganathan, Kesavan; Sachinidis, Agapios; Kelm, Jens; Hofmann, Ute; Zahedi, René P; Guthke, Reinhard; Blüthgen, Nils; Dooley, Steven; Hengstler, Jan G

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that isolation and cultivation of primary hepatocytes cause major gene expression alterations. In the present genome-wide, time-resolved study of cultivated human and mouse hepatocytes, we made the observation that expression changes in culture strongly resemble alterations in liver diseases. Hepatocytes of both species were cultivated in collagen sandwich and in monolayer conditions. Genome-wide data were also obtained from human NAFLD, cirrhosis, HCC and hepatitis B virus-infected tissue as well as mouse livers after partial hepatectomy, CCl4 intoxication, obesity, HCC and LPS. A strong similarity between cultivation and disease-induced expression alterations was observed. For example, expression changes in hepatocytes induced by 1-day cultivation and 1-day CCl4 exposure in vivo correlated with R = 0.615 (p < 0.001). Interspecies comparison identified predominantly similar responses in human and mouse hepatocytes but also a set of genes that responded differently. Unsupervised clustering of altered genes identified three main clusters: (1) downregulated genes corresponding to mature liver functions, (2) upregulation of an inflammation/RNA processing cluster and (3) upregulated migration/cell cycle-associated genes. Gene regulatory network analysis highlights overrepresented and deregulated HNF4 and CAR (Cluster 1), Krüppel-like factors MafF and ELK1 (Cluster 2) as well as ETF (Cluster 3) among the interspecies conserved key regulators of expression changes. Interventions ameliorating but not abrogating cultivation-induced responses include removal of non-parenchymal cells, generation of the hepatocytes' own matrix in spheroids, supplementation with bile salts and siRNA-mediated suppression of key transcription factors. In conclusion, this study shows that gene regulatory network alterations of cultivated hepatocytes resemble those of inflammatory liver diseases and should therefore be considered and exploited as disease models.

  5. High sequence similarity within ras exons 1 and 2 in different mammalian species and phylogenetic divergence of the ras gene family.

    PubMed

    Watzinger, F; Mayr, B; Haring, E; Lion, T

    1998-03-01

    We have determined the canine and feline N-, K-, and H-ras gene sequences from position +23 to +270 covering exons I and II which contain the mutational hot spot codons 12, 13, and 61. The results were used to assess the degree of similarity between ras gene DNA regions containing the critical domains affected in neoplastic disorders in different mammalian species. The comparative analyses performed included human, canine, feline, murine, rattine, and, whenever possible, bovine, leporine (rabbit), porcelline (guinea pig), and mesocricetine (hamster) ras gene sequences within the region of interest. Comparison of feline and canine nucleotide sequences with the corresponding regions in human DNA revealed a sequence similarity greater than 85% to the human sequence. Contemporaneous analysis of previously published ras DNA sequences from other mammalian species showed a similar degree of homology to human DNA. Most nucleotide differences observed represented synonymous changes without effect on the amino acid sequence of the respective proteins. For assessment of the phylogenetic evolution of ras gene family, a maximum parsimony dendrogram based on multiple sequence alignment of the common region of exons I and II in the N-, K-, and H-ras genes was constructed. Interestingly, a higher substitution rate among the H-ras genes became apparent, indicating accelerated sequence evolution within this particular clade. The most parsimonious tree clearly shows that the duplications giving rise to the three ras genes must have occurred before the mammalian radiation.

  6. Meta-analysis of transcriptomic datasets identifies genes enriched in the mammalian circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laurence A; Williams, John; Taylor, Lewis; Thomson, Ross J; Nolan, Patrick M; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2017-09-29

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) which regulate physiology and behaviour, as well as coordinating peripheral clocks throughout the body. Investigating the function of the SCN has often focused on the identification of rhythmically expressed genes. However, not all genes critical for SCN function are rhythmically expressed. An alternative strategy is to characterize those genes that are selectively enriched in the SCN. Here, we examined the transcriptome of the SCN and whole brain (WB) of mice using meta-analysis of publicly deposited data across a range of microarray platforms and RNA-Seq data. A total of 79 microarrays were used (24 SCN and 55 WB samples, 4 different microarray platforms), alongside 17 RNA-Seq data files (7 SCN and 10 WB). 31 684 MGI gene symbols had data for at least one platform. Meta-analysis using a random effects model for weighting individual effect sizes (derived from differential expression between relevant SCN and WB samples) reliably detected known SCN markers. SCN-enriched transcripts identified in this study provide novel insights into SCN function, including identifying genes which may play key roles in SCN physiology or provide SCN-specific drivers. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Gene expression in mammalian cells after exposure to 95 MeV/amu argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, Andrea; Hellweg, Christine E.; Meier, Matthias M.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    High LET radiations, such as heavy ions or neutrons, have an increased biological effectiveness compared to X-rays for gene mutation, genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Estimating the biological risks from space radiation encountered by cosmonauts will continue to influence long term duration in space, such as the planned mission to Mars. The human radiation responsive genes CDKN1A (p21/WAF), GADD45α (GADD45), GADD45β (MyD118), RRM2b (p53R2) and BRCA2 (FancD1), involved in cell cycle control or damage repair, were screened for gene expression changes in MCF-7 cells by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay, using cDNA obtained from total RNA isolated at various time points after irradiation with accelerated doses of 36-argon ions and X-rays. Examination of the expression profiles 2 and 12 h after exposure reveals a pattern consistent with a population of cells in the early response to DNA damage and invoking cell stress responses. Interesting new data showing different expression patterns according to the gene and the type of ionizing radiation used could be obtained. Results show, that the signaling and repair activities induced after heavy ion or X-ray exposure are not the same and gene expression patterns may become useful indicators for distinguishing different types of radiation in relation to their biological effects.

  8. High-throughput mapping of the promoters of the mouse olfactory receptor genes reveals a new type of mammalian promoter and provides insight into olfactory receptor gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Clowney, E. Josephine; Magklara, Angeliki; Colquitt, Bradley M.; Pathak, Nidhi; Lane, Robert P.; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) genes are the largest mammalian gene family and are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion in olfactory neurons. Using a high-throughput approach, we mapped the transcription start sites of 1085 of the 1400 murine OR genes and performed computational analysis that revealed potential transcription factor binding sites shared by the majority of these promoters. Our analysis produced a hierarchical model for OR promoter recognition in which unusually high AT content, a unique epigenetic signature, and a stereotypically positioned O/E site distinguish OR promoters from the rest of the murine promoters. Our computations revealed an intriguing correlation between promoter AT content and evolutionary plasticity, as the most AT-rich promoters regulate rapidly evolving gene families. Within the AT-rich promoter category the position of the TATA-box does not correlate with the transcription start site. Instead, a spike in GC composition might define the exact location of the TSS, introducing the concept of “genomic contrast” in transcriptional regulation. Finally, our experiments show that genomic neighborhood rather than promoter sequence correlates with the probability of different OR genes to be expressed in the same olfactory cell. PMID:21705439

  9. Chitosan nanoparticles as a potential nonviral gene delivery for HPV-16 E7 into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tabarraei, Alijan; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Dinarvand, Meshkat; Kelishadi, Mishar; Ghaemi, Amir; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) were prepared as a carrier for Human papillomavirus type 16 HPV-16) E7 gene and their gene transfection ability were evaluated in vitro. The plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) was used as a reporter gene. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated full binding of CS NPs with the pDNA. The transfection of CS-pEGFP NPs was efficient in CHO cells and the expression of green fluorescent proteins was well observed. The expression of E7 proteins was confirmed under SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis. As a conclusion CS NPs may serve as an effective nonviral carrier for delivery of nucleotides into eukaryotic cells.

  10. Vector Integration Sites Identification for Gene-Trap Screening in Mammalian Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian; Ciaudo, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Forward genetic screens using retroviral (or transposon) gene-trap vectors in a haploid genome revolutionized the investigation of molecular networks in mammals. However, the sequencing data generated by Phenotypic interrogation followed by Tag sequencing (PhiT-seq) were not well characterized. The analysis of human and mouse haploid screens allowed us to describe PhiT-seq data and to define quality control steps. Moreover, we identified several blind spots in both haploid genomes where gene-trap vectors can hardly integrate. Integration of transcriptomic data improved the performance of candidate gene identification. Furthermore, we experimented with various statistical tests to account for biological replicates in PhiT-seq and investigated the effect of normalization methods and other parameters on the performance. Finally, we developed: VISITs, a dedicated pipeline for analyzing PhiT-seq data (https://sourceforge.net/projects/visits/). PMID:28303933

  11. [Structure and evolution of mammalian maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase genes].

    PubMed

    Naumov, D G

    2007-01-01

    Maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase are two human glycosidases responsible for starch digestion. We have performed a comparative analysis of their amino acid sequences from several species of mammals and their orthologues from other chordates. This allowed us to determine the evolutionary history of the enzymes. Both glycosidases are paralogues and contain GH31 family catalytic domains. The common evolutionary precursor of these genes has arisen by a tandem duplication. As a consequence, sucrase-isomaltase consists of two homologous parts. The maltase-glucoamylase gene was a subject of several additional duplications, which number was not the same in different mammals. The locus, containing this gene, consists of 4-7 tandem repeats. The amino acid sequence, encoded by each of them, is similar to both parts of sucrase-isomaltase.

  12. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Brenda; Owen, Nichole; Stevense, Michelle; Smith, Helen; Nagaoka, So; Hassold, Terry; McKay, Michael; Xu, Huiling; Fu, Jun; Revenkova, Ekaterina; Jessberger, Rolf; Hunt, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  13. A First Look at ARFome: Dual-Coding Genes in Mammalian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wen-Yu; Wadhawan, Samir; Szklarczyk, Radek; Pond, Sergei Kosakovsky; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Coding of multiple proteins by overlapping reading frames is not a feature one would associate with eukaryotic genes. Indeed, codependency between codons of overlapping protein-coding regions imposes a unique set of evolutionary constraints, making it a costly arrangement. Yet in cases of tightly coexpressed interacting proteins, dual coding may be advantageous. Here we show that although dual coding is nearly impossible by chance, a number of human transcripts contain overlapping coding regions. Using newly developed statistical techniques, we identified 40 candidate genes with evolutionarily conserved overlapping coding regions. Because our approach is conservative, we expect mammals to possess more dual-coding genes. Our results emphasize that the skepticism surrounding eukaryotic dual coding is unwarranted: rather than being artifacts, overlapping reading frames are often hallmarks of fascinating biology. PMID:17511511

  14. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  15. Optimisations and evolution of the mammalian respiratory system : A suggestion of possible gene sharing in evolution.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, Bernard; Filoche, Marcel

    2013-09-01

    The respiratory system of mammalians is made of two successive branched structures with different physiological functions. The upper structure, or bronchial tree, is a fluid transportation system made of approximately 15 generations of bifurcations leading to the order of about 2(15) = 30, 000 terminal bronchioles with a diameter of approximately 0.5mm in the human lung. The branching pattern continues up to generation 23 but the structure and function of each of the subsequent structures, called acini, is different. Each acinus consists in a branched system of ducts surrounded by alveoli and plays the role of a diffusion cell where oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged with blood across the alveolar membrane. We show here that the bronchial tree simultaneously presents several different optimal properties. It is first energy efficient, second, it is space filling and third it is also "rapid". This physically based multi-optimality suggests that, in the course of evolution, an organ selected against one criterion could have been used later for a totally different purpose. For example, once selected for its energetic efficiency for the transport of a viscous fluid like blood, the same genetic material could have been used for its optimized rapidity. This would have allowed the emergence of atmospheric respiration made of inspiration-expiration cycles. For this phenomenon to exist, rapidity is essential as fresh air has to reach the gas exchange organs, the pulmonary acini, before the beginning of expiration. We finally show that the pulmonary acinus is optimized in the sense that the acinus morphology is directly related to the notion of a "best possible" extraction of entropic energy by a diffusion exchanger that has to feed oxygen efficiently from air to blood across a membrane of finite permeability.

  16. Characterization of orderly spatiotemporal patterns of clock gene activation in mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Nicholas C.; Tong, Tina Y.; Foley, Duncan; LeSauter, Joseph; Welsh, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Because we can observe oscillation within individual cells and in the tissue as a whole, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) presents a unique system in the mammalian brain for the analysis of individual cells and the networks of which they are a part. While dispersed cells of the SCN sustain circadian oscillations in isolation, they are unstable oscillators that require network interactions for robust cycling. Using cluster analysis to assess bioluminescence in acute brain slices from PERIOD2∷Luciferase (PER2∷LUC) knockin mice, and immunochemistry of SCN from animals harvested at various circadian times, we assessed the spatiotemporal activation patterns of PER2 to explore the emergence of a coherent oscillation at the tissue level. The results indicate that circadian oscillation is characterized by a stable daily cycle of PER2 expression involving orderly serial activation of specific SCN subregions, followed by a silent interval, with substantial symmetry between the left and right side of the SCN. The biological significance of the clusters identified in living slices was confirmed by co-expression of LUC and PER2 in fixed, immunochemically stained brain sections, with the spatiotemporal pattern of LUC expression resembling that revealed in the cluster analysis of bioluminescent slices. We conclude that the precise timing of PER2 expression within individual neurons is dependent on their location within the nucleus, and that small groups of neurons within the SCN give rise to distinctive and identifiable subregions. We propose that serial activation of these subregions is the basis of robustness and resilience of the daily rhythm of the SCN. PMID:21488990

  17. Ambient temperature-mediated changes in hepatic gene expression of a mammalian herbivore (Neotoma lepida).

    PubMed

    Connors, Patrice Kurnath; Malenke, Jael R; Dearing, M Denise

    2017-08-01

    Herbivores regularly ingest natural toxins produced by plants as a defence against herbivory. Recent work suggests that compound toxicity is exacerbated at higher ambient temperatures. This phenomenon, known as temperature-dependent toxicity (TDT), is the likely result of decreased liver function at warmer temperatures; however, the underlying cause of TDT remains speculative. In the present study, we compared the effects of temperature and dietary plant toxins on differential gene expression in the liver of an herbivorous rodent (Neotoma lepida), using species-specific microarrays. Expression profiles revealed a greater number of differentially expressed genes at an ambient temperature below the thermal neutral zone for N. lepida (22°C) compared to one within (27°C). Genes and pathways upregulated at 22°C were related to growth and biosynthesis, whereas those upregulated at 27°C were associated with gluconeogenesis, apoptosis and protein misfolding, suggestive of a stressed state for the liver. Additionally, few genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism were induced when woodrats ingested plant toxins compared to nontoxic diets, regardless of temperature. Taken together, the results highlight the important role of ambient temperature on gene expression profiles in the desert woodrat. Temperatures just below the thermal neutral zone might be a favourable state for liver metabolism. Furthermore, the reduction in the number of genes expressed at a temperature within the thermal neutral zone indicates that liver function may be reduced at temperatures that are not typically considered as thermally stressful. Understanding how herbivorous mammals will respond to ambient temperature is imperative to accurately predict the impacts of climate change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Genes and Conditions Controlling Mammalian Pre- and Post-implantation Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Anifandis, G.; Messini, C.I.; Dafopoulos, K.; Messinis, I.E.

    2015-01-01

    Embryo quality during the in vitro developmental period is of great clinical importance. Experimental genetic studies during this period have demonstrated the association between specific gene expression profiles and the production of healthy blastocysts. Although the quality of the oocyte may play a major role in embryo development, it has been well established that the post – fertilization period also has an important and crucial role in the determination of blastocyst quality. A variety of genes (such as OCT, SOX2, NANOG) and their related signaling pathways as well as transcription molecules (such as TGF-β, BMP) have been implicated in the pre- and post-implantation period. Furthermore, DNA methylation has been lately characterized as an epigenetic mark since it is one of the most important processes involved in the maintenance of genome stability. Physiological embryo development appears to depend upon the correct DNA methylation pattern. Due to the fact that soon after fertilization the zygote undergoes several morphogenetic and developmental events including activation of embryonic genome through the transition of the maternal genome, a diverse gene expression pattern may lead to clinically important conditions, such as apoptosis or the production of a chromosomically abnormal embryo. The present review focused on genes and their role during pre-implantation embryo development, giving emphasis on the various parameters that may alter gene expression or DNA methylation patterns. The pre-implantation embryos derived from in vitro culture systems (in vitro fertilization) and the possible effects on gene expression after the prolonged culture conditions are also discussed. PMID:25937812

  19. Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells After Exposure to 95 MeV Argon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Cell response to genotoxic agents is complex and involves the participation of different classes of genes (DNA repair, cell cycle control, signal transduction, apoptosis and oncogenesis). The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) which present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to X-rays for cell death induction, gene mutation, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis. The tumour suppressor gene p53 plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the genome. The p53 protein acts as a transcription factor that mediates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by binding to DNA and activating transcription of specific genes. It is also though to be involved in damage repair by transcriptional activation of the newly identified p53 dependent ribonuclease subunit R2 (p53R2) that is directly involved in the p53 cell cycle checkpoint for repair of damaged DNA. In that case it is responsible for nucleotide delivery for DNA repair synthesis. DNA damages of cultured human cells (e.g. MCF-7, AGS, A549) exposed to accelerated argon ions at the French heavy ion facility GANIL were analysed for expression levels of certain damage- and apoptosis-relevant genes. RNA was extracted from cells exposed to different particle fluences after various recovery times. A real-time QRT-PCR assay was applied, which employs both relative and absolute quantification of a candidate mRNA biomarker. The expressions of different DNA damage inducible genes (e.g. p53R2, GADD45, p21) were analysed. A reproducible up-regulation representing a twofold to fourfold change in p53R2 gene expression level was confirmed for X-irradiated and Ar-ion exposed cells dependent on dose. Kinetics of p

  20. Codon usage in mammalian genes is biased by sequence slippage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bains, W

    1993-01-01

    The codons for some conserved amino acids are found to be the same between homologous genes from different species when the statistics of codon usage would suggest that they should be different. I examine whether this 'coincidence' of codon usage could be due to genetic mechanisms homogenising the DNA around specific sites. This paper describes the further analysis of the coincident codons in 19 genes (a total of 96 homologues) for slippage. Coincident codons arise in contexts of increased sequence simplicity, and have a high chance of occurring within sequences similar to the recombination-prone minisatellite 'core' sequence. This suggests a role of genetic homogenisation in their generation.

  1. 40 CFR 799.9530 - TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... deletions) not detected at the HPRT locus on X-chromosomes (For a discussion see the references in..., non-genotoxic mechanisms or mechanisms absent in bacterial cells. (e) Test method—(1) Principle. (i... damage typically ranges in scale from the losses of the entire gene to karyotypically visible chromosome...

  2. Epigenetic gene regulation in the adult mammalian brain: multiple roles in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Farah D

    2011-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the life-span and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic.

  3. microRNA-1 regulates sarcomere formation and suppresses smooth muscle gene expression in the mammalian heart

    PubMed Central

    Heidersbach, Amy; Saxby, Chris; Carver-Moore, Karen; Huang, Yu; Ang, Yen-Sin; de Jong, Pieter J; Ivey, Kathryn N; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    microRNA-1 (miR-1) is an evolutionarily conserved, striated muscle-enriched miRNA. Most mammalian genomes contain two copies of miR-1, and in mice, deletion of a single locus, miR-1-2, causes incompletely penetrant lethality and subtle cardiac defects. Here, we report that deletion of miR-1-1 resulted in a phenotype similar to that of the miR-1-2 mutant. Compound miR-1 knockout mice died uniformly before weaning due to severe cardiac dysfunction. miR-1-null cardiomyocytes had abnormal sarcomere organization and decreased phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chain-2 (MLC2), a critical cytoskeletal regulator. The smooth muscle-restricted inhibitor of MLC2 phosphorylation, Telokin, was ectopically expressed in the myocardium, along with other smooth muscle genes. miR-1 repressed Telokin expression through direct targeting and by repressing its transcriptional regulator, Myocardin. Our results reveal that miR-1 is required for postnatal cardiac function and reinforces the striated muscle phenotype by regulating both transcriptional and effector nodes of the smooth muscle gene expression network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01323.001 PMID:24252873

  4. Space and time-resolved gene expression experiments on cultured mammalian cells by a single-cell electroporation microarray.

    PubMed

    Vassanelli, S; Bandiera, L; Borgo, M; Cellere, G; Santoni, L; Bersani, C; Salamon, M; Zaccolo, M; Lorenzelli, L; Girardi, S; Maschietto, M; Dal Maschio, M; Paccagnella, A

    2008-06-01

    Single-cell experiments represent the next frontier for biochemical and gene expression research. Although bulk-scale methods averaging populations of cells have been traditionally used to investigate cellular behavior, they mask individual cell features and can lead to misleading or insufficient biological results. We report on a single-cell electroporation microarray enabling the transfection of pre-selected individual cells at different sites within the same culture (space-resolved), at arbitrarily chosen time points and even sequentially to the same cells (time-resolved). Delivery of impermeant molecules by single-cell electroporation was first proven to be finely tunable by acting on the electroporation protocol and then optimized for transfection of nucleic acids into Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO-K1) cells. We focused on DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and DNA plasmid vectors, thus providing a versatile and easy-to-use platform for time-resolved gene expression experiments in single mammalian cells.

  5. The role of the innate immune response regulatory gene ABCF1 in mammalian embryogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sara M; Arora, Hitesh; Munro, Lonna; Xin, Jian; Fenninger, Franz; Johnson, Laura A; Pfeifer, Cheryl G; Choi, Kyung Bok; Hou, Juan; Hoodless, Pamela A; Jefferies, Wilfred A

    2017-01-01

    ABCF1 is an ABC transporter family protein that has been shown to regulate innate immune response and is a risk gene for autoimmune pancreatitis and arthritis. Unlike other members of ABC transporter family, ABCF1 lacks trans-membrane domains and is thought to function in translation initiation through an interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2). To study ABCF1 expression and function in development and disease, we used a single gene trap insertion in the Abcf1 gene in murine embryonic stem cells (ES cells) that allowed lineage tracing of the endogenous Abcf1 promoter by following the expression of a β-galactosidase reporter gene. From the ES cells, heterozygous mice (Abcf1+/-) were produced. No live born Abcf1-/- progeny were ever generated, and the lethality was not mouse strain-specific. Thus, we have determined that Abcf1 is an essential gene in development. Abcf1-/- mice were found to be embryonic lethal at 3.5 days post coitum (dpc), while Abcf1+/- mice appeared developmentally normal. Abcf1+/- mice were fertile and showed no significant differences in their anatomy when compared with their wild type littermates. The Abcf1 promoter was found to be active in all organs in adult mice, but varies in levels of expression in specific cell types within tissues. Furthermore, we observed high promoter activity in the blastocysts and embryos. Overall, Abcf1 expression in embryos is required for development and its expression in adults was highly correlated with actively proliferating and differentiating cell types.

  6. DNA methylation analysis of chromosome 21 gene promoters at single base pair and single allele resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Rohde, Christian; Tierling, Sascha; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Bock, Christoph; Santacruz, Diana; Ragozin, Sergey; Reinhardt, Richard; Groth, Marco; Walter, Jörn; Jeltsch, Albert

    2009-03-01

    Differential DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic signal for gene regulation, development, and disease processes. We mapped DNA methylation patterns of 190 gene promoter regions on chromosome 21 using bisulfite conversion and subclone sequencing in five human cell types. A total of 28,626 subclones were sequenced at high accuracy using (long-read) Sanger sequencing resulting in the measurement of the DNA methylation state of 580427 CpG sites. Our results show that average DNA methylation levels are distributed bimodally with enrichment of highly methylated and unmethylated sequences, both for amplicons and individual subclones, which represent single alleles from individual cells. Within CpG-rich sequences, DNA methylation was found to be anti-correlated with CpG dinucleotide density and GC content, and methylated CpGs are more likely to be flanked by AT-rich sequences. We observed over-representation of CpG sites in distances of 9, 18, and 27 bps in highly methylated amplicons. However, DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to predict an amplicon's DNA methylation status, since 43% of all amplicons are differentially methylated between the cell types studied here. DNA methylation in promoter regions is strongly correlated with the absence of gene expression and low levels of activating epigenetic marks like H3K4 methylation and H3K9 and K14 acetylation. Utilizing the single base pair and single allele resolution of our data, we found that i) amplicons from different parts of a CpG island frequently differ in their DNA methylation level, ii) methylation levels of individual cells in one tissue are very similar, and iii) methylation patterns follow a relaxed site-specific distribution. Furthermore, iv) we identified three cases of allele-specific DNA methylation on chromosome 21. Our data shed new light on the nature of methylation patterns in human cells, the sequence dependence of DNA methylation, and its function as epigenetic signal in gene regulation

  7. Large-scale screen for genes controlling mammalian embryogenesis, using high-throughput gene expression analysis in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Neidhardt, L; Gasca, S; Wertz, K; Obermayr, F; Worpenberg, S; Lehrach, H; Herrmann, B G

    2000-11-01

    We have adapted the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique to perform high-throughput gene expression analysis in mouse embryos. A large-scale screen for genes showing specific expression patterns in the mid-gestation embryo was carried out, and a large number of genes controlling development were isolated. From 35760 clones of a 9.5 d.p.c. cDNA library, a total of 5348 cDNAs, enriched for rare transcripts, were selected and analyzed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Four hundred and twenty-eight clones revealed specific expression patterns in the 9.5 d.p.c. embryo. Of 361 tag-sequenced clones, 198 (55%) represent 154 known mouse genes. Thirty-nine (25%) of the known genes are involved in transcriptional regulation and 33 (21%) in inter- or intracellular signaling. A large number of these genes have been shown to play an important role in embryogenesis. Furthermore, 24 (16%) of the known genes are implicated in human disorders and three others altered in classical mouse mutations. Similar proportions of regulators of embryonic development and candidates for human disorders or mouse mutations are expected among the 163 new mouse genes isolated. Thus, high-throughput gene expression analysis is suitable for isolating regulators of embryonic development on a large-scale, and in the long term, for determining the molecular anatomy of the mouse embryo. This knowledge will provide a basis for the systematic investigation of pattern formation, tissue differentiation and organogenesis in mammals.

  8. Chromosomal double-strand breaks induce gene conversion at high frequency in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Taghian, D G; Nickoloff, J A

    1997-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) stimulate chromosomal and extrachromosomal recombination and gene targeting. Transcription also stimulates spontaneous recombination by an unknown mechanism. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-SceI to stimulate recombination between neo direct repeats in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell chromosomal DNA. One neo allele was controlled by the dexamethasone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and inactivated by an insertion containing an I-SceI site at which DSBs were introduced in vivo. The other neo allele lacked a promoter but carried 12 phenotypically silent single-base mutations that create restriction sites (restriction fragment length polymorphisms). This system allowed us to generate detailed conversion tract spectra for recipient alleles transcribed at high or low levels. Transient in vivo expression of I-SceI increased homologous recombination 2,000- to 10,000-fold, yielding recombinants at frequencies as high as 1%. Strikingly, 97% of these products arose by gene conversion. Most products had short, bidirectional conversion tracts, and in all cases, donor neo alleles (i.e., those not suffering a DSB) remained unchanged, indicating that conversion was fully nonreciprocal. DSBs in exogenous DNA are usually repaired by end joining requiring little or no homology or by nonconservative homologous recombination (single-strand annealing). In contrast, we show that chromosomal DSBs are efficiently repaired via conservative homologous recombination, principally gene conversion without associated crossing over. For DSB-induced events, similar recombination frequencies and conversion tract spectra were found under conditions of low and high transcription. Thus, transcription does not further stimulate DSB-induced recombination, nor does it appear to affect the mechanism(s) by which DSBs induce gene conversion. PMID:9343400

  9. A comparison between mammalian and avian fast skeletal muscle alkali myosin light chain genes: regulatory implications.

    PubMed Central

    Daubas, P; Robert, B; Garner, I; Buckingham, M

    1985-01-01

    A single locus in the mouse, rat and chicken encodes both alkali myosin light chains, MLC1F and MLC3F. This gene has two distinct promoters and gives rise to two different primary transcripts, which are processed by alternative and different modes of splicing to form MLC1F and MLC3F mRNAs. The MLC1F/MLC3F gene is very similar between mouse, rat and chicken, in terms of its overall structure, the length and location of the introns, and the splice site consensus sequences. Nucleotide sequences of coding regions are very conserved but 3' and 5' non coding regions of the mRNAs have diverged. In the MLC1F promoter regions, several blocks of nucleotides are highly conserved (more than 70% homology), especially a sequence of about 70 nucleotides, located between positions -80 and -150 relative to the Cap site. Conserved blocks of homology are also found in the MLC3F promoter regions, although the common sequences are shorter. The presence of such highly conserved nucleotide sequences in the 5' flanking regions suggests that these sequences are functionally important in initiation of transcription and regulation of expression of this complex gene. Primer extension experiments indicate multiple cap sites for MLC3F mRNA. Images PMID:4022770

  10. Phylogenetic relationships within mammalian order Carnivora indicated by sequences of two nuclear DNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Li, Qing-wei; Ryder, O A; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2004-12-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among 37 living species of order Carnivora spanning a relatively broad range of divergence times and taxonomic levels were examined using nuclear sequence data from exon 1 of the IRBP gene (approximately 1.3 kb) and first intron of the TTR gene (approximately 1 kb). These data were used to analyze carnivoran phylogeny at the family and generic level as well as the interspecific relationships within recently derived Felidae. Phylogenetic results using a combined IRBP+TTR dataset strongly supported within the superfamily Califormia, the red panda as the closest lineage to procyonid-mustelid (i.e., Musteloidea) clade followed by pinnipeds (Otariidae and Phocidae), Ursidae (including the giant panda), and Canidae. Four feliform families, namely the monophyletic Herpestidae, Hyaenidae, and Felidae, as well as the paraphyletic Viverridae were consistently recovered convincingly. The utilities of these two gene segments for the phylogenetic analyses were extensively explored and both were found to be fairly informative for higher-group associations within the order Carnivora, but not for those of low level divergence at the species level. Therefore, there is a need to find additional genetic markers with more rapid mutation rates that would be diagnostic at deciphering relatively recent relationships within the Carnivora.

  11. The Mammalian Adult Neurogenesis Gene Ontology (MANGO) Provides a Structural Framework for Published Information on Genes Regulating Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Kempermann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes) to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. Conclusions/Significance The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a ‘bottom-up’ community effort complementing the already successful

  12. The mammalian adult neurogenesis gene ontology (MANGO) provides a structural framework for published information on genes regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Overall, Rupert W; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Kempermann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes) to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a 'bottom-up' community effort complementing the already successful 'top-down' approach of the Gene Ontology.

  13. Efficient inversions and duplications of mammalian regulatory DNA elements and gene clusters by CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhuan; Shou, Jia; Guo, Ya; Tang, Yuanxiao; Wu, Yonghu; Jia, Zhilian; Zhai, Yanan; Chen, Zhifeng; Xu, Quan; Wu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    The human genome contains millions of DNA regulatory elements and a large number of gene clusters, most of which have not been tested experimentally. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) programed with a synthetic single-guide RNA (sgRNA) emerges as a method for genome editing in virtually any organisms. Here we report that targeted DNA fragment inversions and duplications could easily be achieved in human and mouse genomes by CRISPR with two sgRNAs. Specifically, we found that, in cultured human cells and mice, efficient precise inversions of DNA fragments ranging in size from a few tens of bp to hundreds of kb could be generated. In addition, DNA fragment duplications and deletions could also be generated by CRISPR through trans-allelic recombination between the Cas9-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) on two homologous chromosomes (chromatids). Moreover, junctions of combinatorial inversions and duplications of the protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters induced by Cas9 with four sgRNAs could be detected. In mice, we obtained founders with alleles of precise inversions, duplications, and deletions of DNA fragments of variable sizes by CRISPR. Interestingly, we found that very efficient inversions were mediated by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) through short inverted repeats. We showed for the first time that DNA fragment inversions could be transmitted through germlines in mice. Finally, we applied this CRISPR method to a regulatory element of the Pcdhα cluster and found a new role in the regulation of members of the Pcdhγ cluster. This simple and efficient method should be useful in manipulating mammalian genomes to study millions of regulatory DNA elements as well as vast numbers of gene clusters. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.

  14. Efficient inversions and duplications of mammalian regulatory DNA elements and gene clusters by CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhuan; Shou, Jia; Guo, Ya; Tang, Yuanxiao; Wu, Yonghu; Jia, Zhilian; Zhai, Yanan; Chen, Zhifeng; Xu, Quan; Wu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome contains millions of DNA regulatory elements and a large number of gene clusters, most of which have not been tested experimentally. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) programed with a synthetic single-guide RNA (sgRNA) emerges as a method for genome editing in virtually any organisms. Here we report that targeted DNA fragment inversions and duplications could easily be achieved in human and mouse genomes by CRISPR with two sgRNAs. Specifically, we found that, in cultured human cells and mice, efficient precise inversions of DNA fragments ranging in size from a few tens of bp to hundreds of kb could be generated. In addition, DNA fragment duplications and deletions could also be generated by CRISPR through trans-allelic recombination between the Cas9-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) on two homologous chromosomes (chromatids). Moreover, junctions of combinatorial inversions and duplications of the protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters induced by Cas9 with four sgRNAs could be detected. In mice, we obtained founders with alleles of precise inversions, duplications, and deletions of DNA fragments of variable sizes by CRISPR. Interestingly, we found that very efficient inversions were mediated by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) through short inverted repeats. We showed for the first time that DNA fragment inversions could be transmitted through germlines in mice. Finally, we applied this CRISPR method to a regulatory element of the Pcdhα cluster and found a new role in the regulation of members of the Pcdhγ cluster. This simple and efficient method should be useful in manipulating mammalian genomes to study millions of regulatory DNA elements as well as vast numbers of gene clusters. PMID:25757625

  15. An insulator element located at the cyclin B1 interacting protein 1 gene locus is highly conserved among mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Wataru; Tomikawa, Junko; Inaki, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Onodera, Masafumi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Insulators are cis-elements that control the direction of enhancer and silencer activities (enhancer-blocking) and protect genes from silencing by heterochromatinization (barrier activity). Understanding insulators is critical to elucidate gene regulatory mechanisms at chromosomal domain levels. Here, we focused on a genomic region upstream of the mouse Ccnb1ip1 (cyclin B1 interacting protein 1) gene that was methylated in E9.5 embryos of the C57BL/6 strain, but unmethylated in those of the 129X1/SvJ and JF1/Ms strains. We hypothesized the existence of an insulator-type element that prevents the spread of DNA methylation within the 1.8 kbp segment, and actually identified a 242-bp and a 185-bp fragments that were located adjacent to each other and showed insulator and enhancer activities, respectively, in reporter assays. We designated these genomic regions as the Ccnb1ip1 insulator and the Ccnb1ip1 enhancer. The Ccnb1ip1 insulator showed enhancer-blocking activity in the luciferase assays and barrier activity in the colony formation assays. Further examination of the Ccnb1ip1 locus in other mammalian species revealed that the insulator and enhancer are highly conserved among a wide variety of species, and are located immediately upstream of the transcriptional start site of Ccnb1ip1. These newly identified cis-elements may be involved in transcriptional regulation of Ccnb1ip1, which is important in meiotic crossing-over and G2/M transition of the mitotic cell cycle.

  16. An Insulator Element Located at the Cyclin B1 Interacting Protein 1 Gene Locus Is Highly Conserved among Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Wataru; Tomikawa, Junko; Inaki, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Onodera, Masafumi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Insulators are cis-elements that control the direction of enhancer and silencer activities (enhancer-blocking) and protect genes from silencing by heterochromatinization (barrier activity). Understanding insulators is critical to elucidate gene regulatory mechanisms at chromosomal domain levels. Here, we focused on a genomic region upstream of the mouse Ccnb1ip1 (cyclin B1 interacting protein 1) gene that was methylated in E9.5 embryos of the C57BL/6 strain, but unmethylated in those of the 129X1/SvJ and JF1/Ms strains. We hypothesized the existence of an insulator-type element that prevents the spread of DNA methylation within the 1.8 kbp segment, and actually identified a 242-bp and a 185-bp fragments that were located adjacent to each other and showed insulator and enhancer activities, respectively, in reporter assays. We designated these genomic regions as the Ccnb1ip1 insulator and the Ccnb1ip1 enhancer. The Ccnb1ip1 insulator showed enhancer-blocking activity in the luciferase assays and barrier activity in the colony formation assays. Further examination of the Ccnb1ip1 locus in other mammalian species revealed that the insulator and enhancer are highly conserved among a wide variety of species, and are located immediately upstream of the transcriptional start site of Ccnb1ip1. These newly identified cis-elements may be involved in transcriptional regulation of Ccnb1ip1, which is important in meiotic crossing-over and G2/M transition of the mitotic cell cycle. PMID:26110280

  17. [The effective method of gene transfer into mammalian cells cultured in vitro].

    PubMed

    Vorontsova, N I; Evgrafov, O V; Makarov, V B

    1990-10-01

    Efficiency of transformation by a number of vectors with the different selective markers of a set of cell lines has been studied for three different methods based on using calcium phosphate, polybrene, or electroporation. Electroporation is shown to be the most efficient one. Using this method with the system rat2k-cells-pAGO vector we have obtained the frequencies of transformation up to 2-3.10(-3). We suggest to use this system as a model for investigation of homologous recombination in the framework of the gene therapy project.

  18. Fusion of SpCas9 to E. coli Rec A protein enhances CRISPR-Cas9 mediated gene knockout in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Petersen, Trine Skov; Jensen, Kristopher Torp; Bolund, Lars; Kühn, Ralf; Luo, Yonglun

    2017-04-10

    Mammalian cells repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) by a range of different pathways following DSB induction by the engineered clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein Cas9. While CRISPR-Cas9 thus enables predesigned modifications of the genome, applications of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing are frequently hampered by the unpredictable and varying pathways for DSB repair in mammalian cells. Here we present a strategy of fusing Cas9 to recombinant proteins for fine-tuning of the DSB repair preferences in mammalian cells. By fusing Streptococcus Pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) to the recombinant protein A (Rec A, NP_417179.1) from Escherichia coli, we create a recombinant Cas9 protein (rSpCas9) which enhances the generation of indel mutations at DSB sites in mammalian cells, increases the frequency of DSB repair by homology-directed single-strand annealing (SSA), and represses homology-directed gene conversion by approximately 33%. Our study thus proves for the first time that fusing SpCas9 to recombinant proteins can influence the balance between DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. This approach may form the basis for further investigations of the applications of recombinant Cas9 proteins to fine-tuning DSB repair pathways in eukaryotic cells.

  19. Control by osmotic pressure of voltage-induced permeabilization and gene transfer in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Golzio, M; Mora, M P; Raynaud, C; Delteil, C; Teissié, J; Rols, M P

    1998-01-01

    Cells can be transiently permeabilized by a membrane potential difference increase induced by the application of high electric pulses. This was shown to be under the control of the pulsing buffer osmotic pressure, when short pulses were applied. In this paper, the effects of buffer osmotic pressure during electric treatment and during the following 10 min were investigated in Chinese hamster ovary cells subjected to long (ms) square wave pulses, a condition needed to mediate gene transfer. No effect on cell permeabilization for a small molecule such as propidium iodide was observed. The use of a hypoosmolar buffer during pulsation allows more efficient loading of cells with beta-galactosidase, a tetrameric protein, but no effect of the postpulse buffer osmolarity was observed. The resulting expression of plasmid coding for beta-galactosidase was strongly controlled by buffer osmolarity during as well as after the pulse. The results, tentatively explained in terms of the effect of osmotic pressure on cell swelling, membrane organization, and interaction between molecules and membrane, support the existence of key steps in plasmid-membrane interaction in the mechanism of cell electrically mediated gene transfer. PMID:9635756

  20. Polyplexes and lipoplexes for mammalian gene delivery: from traditional to microarray screening.

    PubMed

    How, S E; Yingyongnarongkul, B; Fara, M A; Díaz-Mochón, J J; Mittoo, S; Bradley, M

    2004-08-01

    Gene therapy requires the development of non-toxic and highly efficient delivery systems for DNA and RNAi. Polycations, especially dendrimers, have shown enormous potential as gene transfer vehicles, displaying minimal toxicity with a broad range of cell lines. In this paper, a total of 13 dendrimers, up to G3.0, were constructed from AB(3) type isocyanate monomers using solid phase methodology and evaluated for transfection activity. Among the library of compounds prepared, a G3.0 dendrimer displayed comparable activity to Superfect. Gel retardation assays demonstrated that all of the compounds completely bound plasmid DNA, indicating the efficient formation of complexes between DNA and the dendrimers. A "transfection microarray" approach was developed for screening these compounds as well as a panel of lipoplexes (complexes of DNA with cationic lipids) and polyplexes (complexes of DNA with synthetic polycationic polymers), in 3D solution like micro-assay). Five cationic lipids with a cholesterol tail showed stronger or comparable transfection activity relative to Effectene. The new, micro-array screening method was rapid and miniaturized, offering the potential of high throughput screening of large libraries of transfection candidates, with thousands of library members per array, and the ability to rapidly screen a broad range of cell types.

  1. A synthetic AAV vector enables safe and efficient gene transfer to the mammalian inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Landegger, Lukas D.; Pan, Bifeng; Askew, Charles; Wassmer, Sarah; Gluck, Sarah; Galvin, Alice; Taylor, Ruth; Forge, Andrew; Stankovic, Konstantina M.; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to develop gene therapies for hearing loss have been hampered by the lack of safe, efficient, and clinically relevant delivery modalities1, 2. Here we demonstrate the safety and efficiency of Anc80L65, a rationally designed synthetic vector3, for transgene delivery to the mouse cochlea. Cochlear explants incubated with Anc80L65 encoding eGFP demonstrated high level transduction of inner and outer hair cells (60–100%). Injection of Anc80L65 through the round window membrane resulted in highly efficient transduction of inner and outer hair cells, a substantial improvement over conventional adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Anc80L65 round window injection was well tolerated, as indicated by sensory cell function, hearing and vestibular function, and immunologic parameters. The ability of Anc80L65 to target outer hair cells at high rates, a requirement for restoration of complex auditory function, may enable future gene therapies for hearing and balance disorders. PMID:28165475

  2. Characterization of the placenta specific bovine mammalian achaete scute-like homologue 2 (Mash2) gene.

    PubMed

    Arnold, D R; Lefebvre, R; Smith, L C

    2006-01-01

    Mash2, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, stimulates mononucleate trophoblast cell proliferation and inhibits giant/binucleate cell formation. In mice, Mash2 is a maternally expressed imprinted gene. Regulation of bovine Mash2 is unclear due to limited genetic knowledge. Our objectives were to clone and characterize bovine Mash2 and evaluate its imprinting status by utilizing Bos taurus taurus and Bos taurus indicus interspecies crossing. Bovine Mash2 mRNA shares 78% and 70% homology with human and mouse Mash2, with the DNA binding domain (88%) and bHLH region (95%) being highly conserved. Expression of Mash2 mRNA was seen exclusively in cotyledonary areas of the placenta. The greatest abundance of Mash2 mRNA was in day 17 filamentous embryos, during the time of rapid trophoblast proliferation. Reduction in Mash2 mRNA abundance was detected in day 8 parthenogenetic blastocysts suggesting paternal regulation of gene expression. Prior to implantation (days 8 and 17), Mash2 mRNA appears to have biallelic expression, but is paternally silenced after implantation (days 40 and 60). In conclusion, the Mash2 is highly conserved across species and is specifically expressed in the bovine placenta. Bovine Mash2 appears to be maternally expressed after implantation, but the paternal genome plays a role in regulating expression.

  3. Excision of an 11-kilobase-pair DNA element from within the nifD gene in anabaena variabilis heterocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Brusca, J S; Hale, M A; Carrasco, C D; Golden, J W

    1989-01-01

    The 3' region of the Anabaena variabilis nifD gene contains an 11-kilobase-pair element which is excised from the chromosome during heterocyst differentiation. We have sequenced the recombination sites which border the element in vegetative cells and the rearranged heterocyst sequences. In vegetative cells, the element was flanked by 11-base-pair direct repeats which were identical to the repeats present at the ends of the nifD element in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 (Anabaena strain 7120). Although Anabaena strain 7120 and A. variabilis are quite distinct in many ways, the overall sequence similarity between the two strains for the regions sequenced was 96%. Like the Anabaena strain 7120 element, the A. variabilis element was excised in heterocysts to produce a functional nifD gene and a free circularized element which was neither amplified nor degraded. The Anabaena strain 7120 xisA gene is located at the nifK-proximal end of the nifD element and is required for excision of the element in heterocysts. The A. variabilis element also contained an xisA gene which could complement a defective Anabaena strain 7120 xisA gene. A. variabilis did not contain the equivalent of the Anabaena strain 7120 fdxN 55-kilobase-pair element. Images PMID:2502534

  4. Possible peptide chain termination mutants in thymide kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Summers, W P; Wagner, M; Summers, W C

    1975-10-01

    Mutations in the viral gene coding for the thymidine kinase (ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.75) induced by herpes simplex virus have been obtained by selection of virus resistant to bromodeoxyuridine when grown in thymidine-kinase-deficient LMTK- mouse cells. Proteins labeled after infection of Vero (monkey) cells with herpes simplex virus were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and one protein of about 40,000 daltons was consistently altered in a number of thymidine-kinase-deficient mutants. Many viral mutants lacked this peptide and one class of these mutants induced the synthesis of new shorter peptides. Revertant virus could be selected which simultaneously regained the ability to induce thymidine kinase activity, regained the intact thymidine kinase peptide, and lost the ability to synthesize the shorter peptide fragment. These mutants comprise a class of animal virus mutants which have the properties expected of peptide chain termination mutants.

  5. Possible peptide chain termination mutants in thymide kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, W P; Wagner, M; Summers, W C

    1975-01-01

    Mutations in the viral gene coding for the thymidine kinase (ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.75) induced by herpes simplex virus have been obtained by selection of virus resistant to bromodeoxyuridine when grown in thymidine-kinase-deficient LMTK- mouse cells. Proteins labeled after infection of Vero (monkey) cells with herpes simplex virus were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and one protein of about 40,000 daltons was consistently altered in a number of thymidine-kinase-deficient mutants. Many viral mutants lacked this peptide and one class of these mutants induced the synthesis of new shorter peptides. Revertant virus could be selected which simultaneously regained the ability to induce thymidine kinase activity, regained the intact thymidine kinase peptide, and lost the ability to synthesize the shorter peptide fragment. These mutants comprise a class of animal virus mutants which have the properties expected of peptide chain termination mutants. Images PMID:172894

  6. SV40 vector with early gene replacement efficient in transducing exogenous DNA into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Asano, M; Iwakura, Y; Kawade, Y

    1985-12-09

    An early replacement SV40 vector, SV40-Mu beta, was constructed by replacing part of the early genes of the virus with mouse interferon-beta (IFN-beta) cDNA. Upon transfection of COS-7 cells with this DNA, transducing viral particles were produced, which could infect various cells and cause efficient production of mouse IFN-beta. The viral stock contained no detectable wild-type SV40. The IFN production after the virus infection was very high in monkey kidney cells, but less so in human epithelial cells, and low in mouse, pig, hamster cells and in human lymphocytes. The efficiency of introduction of the DNA to monkey kidney cells was compared with that by the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and the viral vector was found to be more efficient by a factor of several tens to hundreds.

  7. Methylglyoxal induces G:C to C:G and G:C to T:A transversions in the supF gene on a shuttle vector plasmid replicated in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Murata-Kamiya, N; Kamiya, H; Kaji, H; Kasai, H

    2000-07-10

    We previously reported that the majority of base-pair substitutions induced by an endogenous mutagen, methylglyoxal, were G:C-->T:A transversions and G:C-->A:T transitions in wild-type and nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient (uvrA or uvrC) Escherichia coli strains. To investigate the mutation spectrum of methylglyoxal in mammalian cells and to compare the spectrum with those detected in other experimental systems, we analyzed mutations in a bacterial suppressor tRNA (supF) gene in the shuttle vector plasmid pMY189. We treated pMY189 with methylglyoxal and immediately transfected it into simian COS-7 cells. The cytotoxicity and the mutation frequency (MF) increased according to the dose of methylglyoxal. In the mutants induced by methylglyoxal, multi-base deletions were predominant (50%), followed by base-pair substitutions (35%), in which 89% of the substitutions occurred at G:C sites. Among them, G:C-->C:G and G:C-->T:A transversions were predominant. The overall distribution of methylglyoxal-induced mutations detected in the supF gene was different from that for the spontaneous mutations. These results suggest that methylglyoxal may take part in causing G:C-->C:G and G:C-->T:A transversions in vivo.

  8. Rapid down-regulation of mammalian Period genes during behavioral resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Maywood, E. S.; Mrosovsky, N.; Field, M. D.; Hastings, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    The pervasive role of circadian clocks in regulating physiology and behavior is widely recognized. Their adaptive value is their ability to be entrained by environmental cues such that the internal circadian phase is a reliable predictor of solar time. In mammals, both light and nonphotic behavioral cues can entrain the principal oscillator of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, although light can advance or delay the clock during circadian night, behavioral events trigger phase advances during the subjective day, when the clock is insensitive to light. The recent identification of Period (Per) genes in mammals, homologues of dperiod, which encodes a core element of the circadian clockwork in Drosophila, now provides the opportunity to explain circadian timing and entrainment at a molecular level. In mice, expression of mPer1 and mPer2 in the SCN is rhythmic and acutely up-regulated by light. Moreover, the temporal relations between mRNA and protein cycles are consistent with a clock based on a transcriptional/translational feedback loop. Here we describe circadian oscillations of Per1 and Per2 in the SCN of the Syrian hamster, showing that PER1 protein and mRNA cycles again behave in a manner consistent with a negative-feedback oscillator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nonphotic resetting has the opposite effect to light: acutely down-regulating these genes. Their sensitivity to nonphotic resetting cues supports their proposed role as core elements of the circadian oscillator. Moreover, this study provides an explanation at the molecular level for the contrasting but convergent effects of photic and nonphotic cues on the clock. PMID:10611364

  9. Circadian organization of the mammalian retina: from gene regulation to physiology and diseases.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Douglas G; Iuvone, P Michael; Tosini, Gianluca

    2014-03-01

    The retinal circadian system represents a unique structure. It contains a complete circadian system and thus the retina represents an ideal model to study fundamental questions of how neural circadian systems are organized and what signaling pathways are used to maintain synchrony of the different structures in the system. In addition, several studies have shown that multiple sites within the retina are capable of generating circadian oscillations. The strength of circadian clock gene expression and the emphasis of rhythmic expression are divergent across vertebrate retinas, with photoreceptors as the primary locus of rhythm generation in amphibians, while in mammals clock activity is most robust in the inner nuclear layer. Melatonin and dopamine serve as signaling molecules to entrain circadian rhythms in the retina and also in other ocular structures. Recent studies have also suggested GABA as an important component of the system that regulates retinal circadian rhythms. These transmitter-driven influences on clock molecules apparently reinforce the autonomous transcription-translation cycling of clock genes. The molecular organization of the retinal clock is similar to what has been reported for the SCN although inter-neural communication among retinal neurons that form the circadian network is apparently weaker than those present in the SCN, and it is more sensitive to genetic disruption than the central brain clock. The melatonin-dopamine system is the signaling pathway that allows the retinal circadian clock to reconfigure retinal circuits to enhance light-adapted cone-mediated visual function during the day and dark-adapted rod-mediated visual signaling at night. Additionally, the retinal circadian clock also controls circadian rhythms in disk shedding and phagocytosis, and possibly intraocular pressure. Emerging experimental data also indicate that circadian clock is also implicated in the pathogenesis of eye disease and compelling experimental data

  10. Lactococcal bacteriophage p2 receptor-binding protein structure suggests a common ancestor gene with bacterial and mammalian viruses.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Silvia; Desmyter, Aline; Verrips, C Theo; de Haard, Hans J W; Moineau, Sylvain; Cambillau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium used extensively by the dairy industry for the manufacture of fermented milk products. The double-stranded DNA bacteriophage p2 infects specific L. lactis strains using a receptor-binding protein (RBP) located at the tip of its noncontractile tail. We have solved the crystal structure of phage p2 RBP, a homotrimeric protein composed of three domains: the shoulders, a beta-sandwich attached to the phage; the neck, an interlaced beta-prism; and the receptor-recognition head, a seven-stranded beta-barrel. We used the complex of RBP with a neutralizing llama VHH domain to identify the receptor-binding site. Structural similarity between the recognition-head domain of phage p2 and those of adenoviruses and reoviruses, which invade mammalian cells, suggests that these viruses, despite evolutionary distant targets, lack of sequence similarity and the different chemical nature of their genomes (DNA versus RNA), might have a common ancestral gene.

  11. How transient alterations of organelles in mammalian cells submitted to electric field may explain some aspects of gene electrotransfer process.

    PubMed

    Phez, Emilie; Gibot, Laure; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Electric pulses can be used to transiently permeabilize the cell plasma membrane. This method is nowadays employed as a safe and efficient means to deliver therapeutic molecules into target cells and tissues. Despite the large bulk of literature on this topic, there is a lack of knowledge about the mechanism(s) of molecule delivery. The behavior of the cells both while the field is on and after its application is indeed not well described. Questions about cell organelle alterations remain unanswered. We report here evidence for a number of ultrastructural alterations in mammalian cells exposed to electric pulses. Specifically, CHO cells were subjected to trains of 10 pulses lasting 5ms using an electric field of 800V/cm, i.e. under conditions leading both to membrane permeabilization, gene transfer and expression. Cells were observed to undergo morphological alterations of the mitochondria and nucleus. These modifications, detected in the minutes following pulse delivery, were transient. They may have direct consequences on molecule delivery and therefore may explain various aspects of the mechanisms of DNA electrotransfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene-Chemical Interactions in the Developing Mammalian Nervous System: Effects on Proliferation, Neurogenesis and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Donald A.; Opanashuk, Lisa; Zharkovsky, Aleksander; Weiss, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    The orderly formation of the nervous system requires a multitude of complex, integrated and simultaneously occurring processes. Neural progenitor cells expand through proliferation, commit to different cell fates, exit the cell cycle, generate different neuronal and glial cell types, and new neurons migrate to specified areas and establish synaptic connections. Gestational and perinatal exposure to environmental toxicants, pharmacological agents and drugs of abuse produce immediate, persistent or late-onset alterations in behavioral, cognitive, sensory and/or motor functions. These alterations reflect the disruption of the underlying processes of CNS formation and development. To determine the neurotoxic mechanisms that underlie these deficits it is necessary to analyze and dissect the complex molecular processes that occur during the proliferation, neurogenesis and differentiation of cells. This symposium will provide a framework for understanding the orchestrated events of neurogenesis, the coordination of proliferation and cell fate specification by selected genes, and the effects of well-known neurotoxicants on neurogenesis in the retina, hippocampus and cerebellum. These three tissues share common developmental profiles, mediate diverse neuronal activities and function, and thus provide important substrates for analysis. This paper summarizes four invited talks that were presented at the 12th International Neurotoxicology Association meeting held in Jerusalem, Israel during the summer of 2009. Donald A. Fox described the structural and functional alterations following low-level gestational lead exposure in children and rodents that produced a supernormal electroretinogram and selective increases in neurogenesis and cell proliferation of late-born retinal neurons (rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells), but not Müller glia cells, in mice. Lisa Opanashuk discussed how dioxin [TCDD] binding to the arylhydrocarbon receptor [AhR], a transcription factor that

  13. Gene expression profiling of lymphoblasts from autistic and nonaffected sib pairs: altered pathways in neuronal development and steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Valerie W; Nguyen, AnhThu; Kim, Kyung Soon; Steinberg, Mara E; Sarachana, Tewarit; Scully, Michele A; Soldin, Steven J; Luu, Truong; Lee, Norman H

    2009-06-03

    Despite the identification of numerous autism susceptibility genes, the pathobiology of autism remains unknown. The present "case-control" study takes a global approach to understanding the molecular basis of autism spectrum disorders based upon large-scale gene expression profiling. DNA microarray analyses were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines from over 20 sib pairs in which one sibling had a diagnosis of autism and the other was not affected in order to identify biochemical and signaling pathways which are differentially regulated in cells from autistic and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics and gene ontological analyses of the data implicate genes which are involved in nervous system development, inflammation, and cytoskeletal organization, in addition to genes which may be relevant to gastrointestinal or other physiological symptoms often associated with autism. Moreover, the data further suggests that these processes may be modulated by cholesterol/steroid metabolism, especially at the level of androgenic hormones. Elevation of male hormones, in turn, has been suggested as a possible factor influencing susceptibility to autism, which affects approximately 4 times as many males as females. Preliminary metabolic profiling of steroid hormones in lymphoblastoid cell lines from several pairs of siblings reveals higher levels of testosterone in the autistic sibling, which is consistent with the increased expression of two genes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Global gene expression profiling of cultured cells from ASD probands thus serves as a window to underlying metabolic and signaling deficits that may be relevant to the pathobiology of autism.

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Lymphoblasts from Autistic and Nonaffected Sib Pairs: Altered Pathways in Neuronal Development and Steroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Valerie W.; Nguyen, AnhThu; Kim, Kyung Soon; Steinberg, Mara E.; Sarachana, Tewarit; Scully, Michele A.; Soldin, Steven J.; Luu, Truong; Lee, Norman H.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the identification of numerous autism susceptibility genes, the pathobiology of autism remains unknown. The present “case-control” study takes a global approach to understanding the molecular basis of autism spectrum disorders based upon large-scale gene expression profiling. DNA microarray analyses were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines from over 20 sib pairs in which one sibling had a diagnosis of autism and the other was not affected in order to identify biochemical and signaling pathways which are differentially regulated in cells from autistic and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics and gene ontological analyses of the data implicate genes which are involved in nervous system development, inflammation, and cytoskeletal organization, in addition to genes which may be relevant to gastrointestinal or other physiological symptoms often associated with autism. Moreover, the data further suggests that these processes may be modulated by cholesterol/steroid metabolism, especially at the level of androgenic hormones. Elevation of male hormones, in turn, has been suggested as a possible factor influencing susceptibility to autism, which affects ∼4 times as many males as females. Preliminary metabolic profiling of steroid hormones in lymphoblastoid cell lines from several pairs of siblings reveals higher levels of testosterone in the autistic sibling, which is consistent with the increased expression of two genes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Global gene expression profiling of cultured cells from ASD probands thus serves as a window to underlying metabolic and signaling deficits that may be relevant to the pathobiology of autism. PMID:19492049

  15. Ancient Exaptation of a CORE-SINE Retroposon into a Highly Conserved Mammalian Neuronal Enhancer of the Proopiomelanocortin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bumaschny, Viviana F; Low, Malcolm J; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    The proopiomelanocortin gene (POMC) is expressed in the pituitary gland and the ventral hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates, producing several bioactive peptides that function as peripheral hormones or central neuropeptides, respectively. We have recently determined that mouse and human POMC expression in the hypothalamus is conferred by the action of two 5′ distal and unrelated enhancers, nPE1 and nPE2. To investigate the evolutionary origin of the neuronal enhancer nPE2, we searched available vertebrate genome databases and determined that nPE2 is a highly conserved element in placentals, marsupials, and monotremes, whereas it is absent in nonmammalian vertebrates. Following an in silico paleogenomic strategy based on genome-wide searches for paralog sequences, we discovered that opossum and wallaby nPE2 sequences are highly similar to members of the superfamily of CORE-short interspersed nucleotide element (SINE) retroposons, in particular to MAR1 retroposons that are widely present in marsupial genomes. Thus, the neuronal enhancer nPE2 originated from the exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon in the lineage leading to mammals and remained under purifying selection in all mammalian orders for the last 170 million years. Expression studies performed in transgenic mice showed that two nonadjacent nPE2 subregions are essential to drive reporter gene expression into POMC hypothalamic neurons, providing the first functional example of an exapted enhancer derived from an ancient CORE-SINE retroposon. In addition, we found that this CORE-SINE family of retroposons is likely to still be active in American and Australian marsupial genomes and that several highly conserved exonic, intronic and intergenic sequences in the human genome originated from the exaptation of CORE-SINE retroposons. Together, our results provide clear evidence of the functional novelties that transposed elements contributed to their host genomes throughout evolution. PMID:17922573

  16. End-targeting proteomics of isolated chromatin segments of a mammalian ribosomal RNA gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Satoru; Dejardin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The unbiased identification of proteins associated with specific loci is crucial for understanding chromatin-based processes. The proteomics of isolated chromatin fragment (PICh) method has previously been developed to purify telomeres and identify associated proteins. This approach is based on the affinity capture of endogenous chromatin segments by hybridization with oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acids. However, PICh is only efficient with highly abundant genomic targets, limiting its applicability. Here we develop an approach for identifying factors bound to the promoter region of the ribosomal RNA genes that we call end-targeting PICh (ePICh). Using ePICh, we could specifically enrich the RNA polymerase I pre-initiation complex, including the selectivity factor 1. The high purity of the ePICh material allowed the identification of ZFP106, a novel factor regulating transcription initiation by targeting RNA polymerase I to the promoter. Our results demonstrate that ePICh can uncover novel proteins controlling endogenous regulatory elements in mammals. PMID:25812914

  17. The expression of human H2A-H2B histone gene pairs is regulated by multiple sequence elements in their joint promoters.

    PubMed

    Trappe, R; Doenecke, D; Albig, W

    1999-09-03

    The majority of human H2A and H2B histone genes are organized as gene pairs: 14 H2A-H2B gene pairs, one solitary H2A gene and three solitary H2B genes have been described. Two of the H2A genes and two of the H2B genes arranged within gene pairs are pseudogenes. The gene pairs are organized with divergent transcriptional orientation, and the coding regions of the respective H2A and H2B genes are separated by about 320 nucleotide pairs that form overlapping promoter regions. Comparison of promoters of H2A-H2B gene pairs has previously shown that these belong to two different groups (groups I and II) which are characterized by specific patterns of conserved sequence elements. We have constructed a reporter gene vector that allows the simultaneous analysis of both genes regulated by the divergent promoters belonging to group I or II, respectively. Firefly-luciferase and beta-galactosidase genes were taken as reporter genes. Site directed mutagenesis performed at individual promoter elements revealed that individual sequence elements within both groups of promoters functionally depend on each other and may contribute to a coordinate expression of paired H2A and H2B genes through assembly of their joint promoter into a mutually dependent promoter complex. Group II promoters are characterized by the presence of an E2F binding site upstream of the H2A gene-proximal TATA box. Immediately upstream of the E2F element, we have identified a highly conserved octanucleotide CACAGCTT (RT-1) that exists in all human group II H2A-H2B gene promoters. Protein binding studies at the RT-1 element indicate factor binding to this sequence. Site directed mutagenesis indicates that both the E2F element and the RT-1 motif are essential for full promoter activity.

  18. The mammalian Crx genes are highly divergent representatives of the Otx5 gene family, a gnathostome orthology class of orthodenticle-related homeogenes involved in the differentiation of retinal photoreceptors and circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Germot, Agnès; Le Mentec, Chantal; Cabana, Thérèse; Harrison, Gavan; Pieau, Claude; Sire, Jean-Yves; Véron, Géraldine; Mazan, Sylvie

    2003-04-01

    The mammalian Crx genes are highly divergent orthodenticle (otd)-related homeogenes that play important roles in the differentiation of retinal photoreceptors and the circadian entrainment. However, their evolutionary origin and orthological relationships with other otd-related genes remain unclear. An orthology relationship of these genes with the highly conserved Otx5 genes identified in fish and amphibians, and also expressed in the eye and epiphysis, has been proposed previously but remains controversial. To test this hypothesis, we have identified Crx genes in a wide range of mammals, including three marsupials, and Otx5-related genes in a lizard, a turtle, and two archosaurs (crocodile and chick), as well as in the pufferfish. Phylogenetic analyses of the coding sequences show that the mammalian Crx genes are orthologous to the Otx5-related genes isolated in other gnathostomes. They also indicate that a duplication event has taken place in actinopterygians, after the splitting of the Cladistia, and that a relaxation of the structural constraints acting on the gene coding region has occurred early in the mammalian lineage. This process may be linked not only to the loss of ancestral Otx5/Crx functions during gastrulation or in the retinal pigmented epithelium, but also to the evolution of photic entrainment mechanisms in mammals.

  19. DNA sequence of 15 base pairs is sufficient to mediate both glucocorticoid and progesterone induction of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Straehle, U.; Klock, G.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-11-01

    To define the recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor and its relationship with that of the progesterone receptor, oligonucleotides derived from the glucocorticoid response element of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene were tested upstream of a heterologous promoter for their capacity to mediate effects of these two steroids. The authors show that a 15-base-pair sequence with partial symmetry is sufficient to confer glucocorticoid inducibility on the promoter of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. The same 15-base-pair sequence mediates induction by progesterone. Point mutations in the recognition sequence affect inducibility by glucocorticoids and progesterone similarly. Together with the strong conservation of the sequence of the DNA-binding domain of the two receptors, these data suggest that both proteins recognize a sequence that is similar, if not the same.

  20. Connectivity of vertebrate genomes: Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) genes in spotted gar, basal teleosts, and tetrapods□

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Guiguen, Yann; Loker, Ryan; Letaw, John H.; Ferrara, Allyse; Bobe, Julien; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish are important models for human biology, health, and disease. Because genome duplication in a teleost ancestor (TGD) impacts the evolution of teleost genome structure and gene repertoires, we must discriminate gene functions that are shared and ancestral from those that are lineage-specific in teleosts or tetrapods to accurately apply inferences from teleost disease models to human health. Generalizations must account both for the TGD and for divergent evolution between teleosts and tetrapods after the likely two rounds of genome duplication shared by all vertebrates. Progress in sequencing techniques provides new opportunities to generate genomic and transcriptomic information from a broad range of phylogenetically informative taxa that facilitate detailed understanding of gene family and gene function evolution. We illustrate here the use of new sequence resources from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a rayfin fish that diverged from teleosts before the TGD, as well as RNA-Seq data from gar and multiple teleost lineages to reconstruct the evolution of the Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) transcription factor gene family, which is involved in the development of mesoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. We show that for Prrx genes, the spotted gar genome and gene expression patterns mimic mammals better than teleosts do. Analyses force the seemingly paradoxical conclusion that regulatory mechanisms for the limb expression domains of Prrx genes existed before the evolution of paired appendages. Detailed evolutionary analyses like those reported here are required to identify fish species most similar to the human genome to optimally connect fish models to human gene functions in health and disease. PMID:24486528

  1. DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in adipose tissue differ significantly within young adult monozygotic BMI-discordant twin pairs.

    PubMed

    Pietiläinen, K H; Ismail, K; Järvinen, E; Heinonen, S; Tummers, M; Bollepalli, S; Lyle, R; Muniandy, M; Moilanen, E; Hakkarainen, A; Lundbom, J; Lundbom, N; Rissanen, A; Kaprio, J; Ollikainen, M

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about epigenetic alterations associated with subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in obesity. Our aim was to study genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression differences in SAT in monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs who are discordant for body mass index (BMI). This design completely matches lean and obese groups for genetic background, age, gender and shared environment. 14We analyzed DNA methylome and gene expression from SAT, together with body composition (magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy) and glucose tolerance test, lipids and C-reactive protein from 26 rare BMI-discordant (intrapair difference in BMI ⩾3 kg m(-2)) MZ twin pairs identified from 10 birth cohorts of young adult Finnish twins. We found 17 novel obesity-associated genes that were differentially methylated across the genome between heavy and lean co-twins. Nine of them were also differentially expressed. Pathway analyses indicated that dysregulation of SAT in obesity includes a paradoxical downregulation of lipo/adipogenesis and upregulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. Furthermore, CpG sites whose methylation correlated with metabolically harmful fat depots (intra-abdominal and liver fat) also correlated with measures of insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and low-grade inflammation, thus suggesting that epigenetic alterations in SAT are associated with the development of unhealthy obesity. This is the first study in BMI-discordant MZ twin pairs reporting genome-wide DNA methylation and expression profiles in SAT. We found a number of novel genes and pathways whose methylation and expression patterns differ within the twin pairs, suggesting that the pathological adaptation of SAT to obesity is, at least in part, epigenetically regulated.

  2. Myeloproliferative defects following targeting of the Drf1 gene encoding the mammalian diaphanous related formin mDia1.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Kitchen, Susan M; West, Richard A; Sigler, Robert; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Alberts, Arthur S

    2007-08-15

    Rho GTPase-effector mammalian diaphanous (mDia)-related formins assemble nonbranched actin filaments as part of cellular processes, including cell division, filopodia assembly, and intracellular trafficking. Whereas recent efforts have led to thorough characterization of formins in cytoskeletal remodeling and actin assembly in vitro, little is known about the role of mDia proteins in vivo. To fill this knowledge gap, the Drf1 gene, which encodes the canonical formin mDia1, was targeted by homologous recombination. Upon birth, Drf1+/- and Drf1-/- mice were developmentally and morphologically indistinguishable from their wild-type littermates. However, both Drf1+/- and Drf1-/- developed age-dependent myeloproliferative defects. The phenotype included splenomegaly, fibrotic and hypercellular bone marrow, extramedullary hematopoiesis in both spleen and liver, and the presence of immature myeloid progenitor cells with high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios. Analysis of cell surface markers showed an age-dependent increase in the percentage of CD11b+-activated and CD14+-activated monocytes/macrophages in both spleen and bone marrow in Drf1+/- and Drf1-/- animals. Analysis of the erythroid compartment showed a significant increase in the proportion of splenic cells in S phase and an expansion of erythroid precursors (TER-119+ and CD71+) in Drf1-targeted mice. Overall, knocking out mDia1 expression in mice leads to a phenotype similar to human myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). These observations suggest that defective DRF1 expression or mDia1 function may contribute to myeloid malignancies and point to mDia1 as an attractive therapeutic target in MDS and MPS.

  3. Dual mode of embryonic development is highlighted by expression and function of Nasonia pair-rule genes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Miriam I; Brent, Ava E; Payre, François; Desplan, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic anterior–posterior patterning is well understood in Drosophila, which uses ‘long germ’ embryogenesis, in which all segments are patterned before cellularization. In contrast, most insects use ‘short germ’ embryogenesis, wherein only head and thorax are patterned in a syncytial environment while the remainder of the embryo is generated after cellularization. We use the wasp Nasonia (Nv) to address how the transition from short to long germ embryogenesis occurred. Maternal and gap gene expression in Nasonia suggest long germ embryogenesis. However, the Nasonia pair-rule genes even-skipped, odd-skipped, runt and hairy are all expressed as early blastoderm pair-rule stripes and late-forming posterior stripes. Knockdown of Nv eve, odd or h causes loss of alternate segments at the anterior and complete loss of abdominal segments. We propose that Nasonia uses a mixed mode of segmentation wherein pair-rule genes pattern the embryo in a manner resembling Drosophila at the anterior and ancestral Tribolium at the posterior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01440.001 PMID:24599282

  4. Yeast ribosomal proteins: XIII. Saccharomyces cerevisiae YL8A gene, interrupted with two introns, encodes a homolog of mammalian L7.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, K; Hashimoto, T; Otaka, E

    1992-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced a gene, YL8A, encoding ribosomal protein YL8 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is one of the two duplicated genes encoding YL8 and is located on chromosome VII while the other is on chromosome XVI. The haploid strains carrying disrupted YL8A grew more slowly than the parent strain. The open reading frame is interrupted with two introns. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals that yeast YL8 is a homolog of mammalian ribosomal protein L7, E.coli L30 and others. Images PMID:1549461

  5. Wacław Szybalski's contribution to immunotherapy: HGPRT mutation & HAT selection as first steps to gene therapy and hybrid techniques in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bigda, Jacek J; Koszałka, Patrycja

    2013-08-10

    In this report we describe Wacław Szybalski's fundamental contribution to gene therapy and immunotherapy. His 1962 PNAS paper (Szybalska and Szybalski, 1962) documented the first successful gene repair in mammalian cells. Furthermore, this was also the first report on the HAT selection method used later in many applications. Most importantly, somatic cell fusion and HAT selection were subsequently used to develop monoclonal antibody technology, which contributed significantly to the progress of today's medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Focusing on RISC assembly in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Junmei; Wei Na; Chalk, Alistair; Wang Jue; Song, Yutong; Yi Fan; Qiao Renping; Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; Wahlestedt, Claes; Liang Zicai Du, Quan

    2008-04-11

    RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) is a central protein complex in RNAi, into which a siRNA strand is assembled to become effective in gene silencing. By using an in vitro RNAi reaction based on Drosophila embryo extract, an asymmetric model was recently proposed for RISC assembly of siRNA strands, suggesting that the strand that is more loosely paired at its 5' end is selectively assembled into RISC and results in target gene silencing. However, in the present study, we were unable to establish such a correlation in cell-based RNAi assays, as well as in large-scale RNAi data analyses. This suggests that the thermodynamic stability of siRNA is not a major determinant of gene silencing in mammalian cells. Further studies on fork siRNAs showed that mismatch at the 5' end of the siRNA sense strand decreased RISC assembly of the antisense strand, but surprisingly did not increase RISC assembly of the sense strand. More interestingly, measurements of melting temperature showed that the terminal stability of fork siRNAs correlated with the positions of the mismatches, but not gene silencing efficacy. In summary, our data demonstrate that there is no definite correlation between siRNA stability and gene silencing in mammalian cells, which suggests that instead of thermodynamic stability, other features of the siRNA duplex contribute to RISC assembly in RNAi.

  7. Transcriptional co-regulation of evolutionarily conserved microRNA/cone opsin gene pairs: implications for photoreceptor subtype specification.

    PubMed

    Daido, Yutaka; Hamanishi, Sakurako; Kusakabe, Takehiro G

    2014-08-01

    The vertebrate retina contains two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which use distinct types of opsins and phototransduction proteins. Cones can be further divided into several subtypes with differing wavelength sensitivity and morphology. Although photoreceptor development has been extensively studied in a variety of vertebrate species, the mechanism by which photoreceptor subtypes are established is still largely unknown. Here we report two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-726 and miR-729, which are potentially involved in photoreceptor subtype specification. In the medaka Oryzias latipes, the genes encoding miR-726 and miR-729 are located upstream of the red-sensitive opsin gene LWS-A and the UV-sensitive opsin gene SWS1, respectively, and are transcribed in the opposite direction from the respective opsin genes. The miR-726/LWS pair is conserved between teleosts and tetrapods, and the miR-729/SWS1 pair is conserved among teleosts. in situ hybridization analyses and fluorescence reporter assays suggest that these miRNAs are co-expressed with the respective opsins in specific cone subtypes. Potential targets of miR-726 and miR-729 predicted in silico include several transcription factors that regulate photoreceptor development. Functional analyses of cis-regulatory sequences in vivo suggest that transcription of the paired microRNA and opsin genes is co-regulated by common cis-regulatory modules. We propose an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that controls photoreceptor subtype identity through coupling between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Short communication: phylodynamics analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope gene in mother and child pairs.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciane Amorim; Gray, Rebecca R; Monteiro-Cunha, Joana Paixão; Strazza, Evandra; Kashima, Simone; Santos, Edson de Souza; Araújo, Thessika Hialla Almeida; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Salemi, Marco; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior

    2015-09-01

    Characterizing the impact of HIV transmission routes on viral genetic diversity can improve the understanding of the mechanisms of virus evolution and adaptation. HIV vertical transmission can occur in utero, during delivery, or while breastfeeding. The present study investigated the phylodynamics of the HIV-1 env gene in mother-to-child transmission by analyzing one chronically infected pair from Brazil and three acutely infected pairs from Zambia, with three to five time points. Sequences from 25 clones from each sample were obtained and aligned using Clustal X. ML trees were constructed in PhyML using the best evolutionary model. Bayesian analyses testing the relaxed and strict molecular clock were performed using BEAST and a Bayesian Skyline Plot (BSP) was construed. The genetic variability of previously described epitopes was investigated and compared between each individual time point and between mother and child sequences. The relaxed molecular clock was the best-fitted model for all datasets. The tree topologies did not show differentiation in the evolutionary dynamics of the virus circulating in the mother from the viral population in the child. In the BSP, the effective population size was more constant in time in the chronically infected patients while in the acute patients it was possible to detect bottlenecks. The genetic variability within viral epitopes recognized by the human immune system was considerably higher among the chronically infected pair in comparison with acutely infected pairs. These results contribute to a better understanding of HIV-1 evolutionary dynamics in mother-to-child transmission.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Four Bacteria-Specific Primer Pairs for 16S rRNA Gene Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Sofie; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Beckers, Bram; Truyens, Sascha; Stevens, Vincent; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomic community analyses using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and high-throughput sequencing has become a cornerstone in microbiology research. To reliably detect the members, or operational taxonomic units (OTUs), that make up bacterial communities, taxonomic surveys rely on the use of the most informative PCR primers to amplify the broad range of phylotypes present in up-to-date reference databases. However, primers specific for the domain Bacteria were often developed some time ago against database versions that are now out of date. Here we evaluated the performance of four bacterial primers for characterizing complex microbial communities in explosives contaminated and non-contaminated forest soil and by in silico evaluation against the current SILVA123 database. Primer pair 341f/785r produced the highest number of bacterial OTUs, phylogenetic richness, Shannon diversity, low non-specificity and most reproducible results, followed by 967f/1391r and 799f/1193r. Primer pair 68f/518r showed overall low coverage and a bias toward Alphaproteobacteria. In silico, primer pair 341f/785r showed the highest coverage of the domain Bacteria (96.1%) with no obvious bias toward the majority of bacterial species. This suggests the high utility of primer pair 341f/785r for soil and plant-associated bacterial microbiome studies. PMID:28400755

  10. Newly paired zebra finches have higher dopamine levels and immediate early gene Fos expression in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sunayana B; Dias, Brian G; Crews, David; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Most birds are socially monogamous, yet little is known about the neural pathways underlying avian monogamy. Recent studies have implicated dopamine as playing a role in courtship and affiliation in a socially monogamous songbird, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). In the present study, we sought to understand the specific contribution to pair formation in zebra finches of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway that projects from the midbrain ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. We observed that paired birds had higher levels of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the ventral medial striatum, where the nucleus accumbens is situated, than unpaired birds. Additionally, we found that the percentage of dopaminergic neurons expressing immediate early gene Fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was higher in the ventral tegmental area of paired birds than in that of unpaired birds. These data are consistent with a role for the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway in pair formation in zebra finches, suggesting the possibility of a conserved neural mechanism of monogamy in birds and mammals.

  11. Candidate-gene studies of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype: a sib-pair linkage analysis of DZ women twins.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, M A; Talmud, P J; Luong, L A; Haddad, L; Day, I N; Newman, B; Edwards, K L; Krauss, R M; Humphries, S E

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting the roles of small, dense LDL and plasma triglyceride (TG), both features of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype, as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Although family studies and twin studies have demonstrated genetic influences on these risk factors, the specific genes involved remain to be determined definitively. The purpose of this study was to investigate genetic linkage between LDL size, TG, and related atherogenic lipoproteins and candidate genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. The linkage analysis was based on a sample of 126 DZ women twin pairs, which avoids the potentially confounding effects of both age and gender, by use of a quantitative sib-pair linkage-analysis approach. Eight candidate genes were examined, including those for microsomal TG-transfer protein (MTP), hepatic lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, apolipoprotein (apo) B, apo CIII, apo E, insulin receptor, and LDL receptor. The analysis suggested genetic linkage between markers for the apo B gene and LDL size, plasma levels of TG, of HDL cholesterol, and of apo B, all features of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype. Furthermore, evidence for linkage was maintained when the analysis was limited to women with a major LDL-subclass diameter >255 A, indicating that the apo B gene may influence LDL heterogeneity in the intermediate-to-large size range. In addition, linkage was found between the MTP gene and TG, among all the women. These findings add to the growing evidence for genetic influences on the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype and its role in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. PMID:9463319

  12. Losses of functional opsin genes, short-wavelength cone photopigments, and color vision--a significant trend in the evolution of mammalian vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2013-03-01

    All mammalian cone photopigments are derived from the operation of representatives from two opsin gene families (SWS1 and LWS in marsupial and eutherian mammals; SWS2 and LWS in monotremes), a process that produces cone pigments with respective peak sensitivities in the short and middle-to-long wavelengths. With the exception of a number of primate taxa, the modal pattern for mammals is to have two types of cone photopigment, one drawn from each of the gene families. In recent years, it has been discovered that the SWS1 opsin genes of a widely divergent collection of eutherian mammals have accumulated mutational changes that render them nonfunctional. This alteration reduces the retinal complements of these species to a single cone type, thus rendering ordinary color vision impossible. At present, several dozen species from five mammalian orders have been identified as falling into this category, but the total number of mammalian species that have lost short-wavelength cones in this way is certain to be much larger, perhaps reaching as high as 10% of all species. A number of circumstances that might be used to explain this widespread cone loss can be identified. Among these, the single consistent fact is that the species so affected are nocturnal or, if they are not technically nocturnal, they at least feature retinal organizations that are typically associated with that lifestyle. At the same time, however, there are many nocturnal mammals that retain functional short-wavelength cones. Nocturnality thus appears to set the stage for loss of functional SWS1 opsin genes in mammals, but it cannot be the sole circumstance.

  13. Insights into the evolution of mammalian telomerase: Platypus TERT shares similarities with genes of birds and other reptiles and localizes on sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The TERT gene encodes the catalytic subunit of the telomerase complex and is responsible for maintaining telomere length. Vertebrate telomerase has been studied in eutherian mammals, fish, and the chicken, but less attention has been paid to other vertebrates. The platypus occupies an important evolutionary position, providing unique insight into the evolution of mammalian genes. We report the cloning of a platypus TERT (OanTERT) ortholog, and provide a comparison with genes of other vertebrates. Results The OanTERT encodes a protein with a high sequence similarity to marsupial TERT and avian TERT. Like the TERT of sauropsids and marsupials, as well as that of sharks and echinoderms, OanTERT contains extended variable linkers in the N-terminal region suggesting that they were present already in basal vertebrates and lost independently in ray-finned fish and eutherian mammals. Several alternatively spliced OanTERT variants structurally similar to avian TERT variants were identified. Telomerase activity is expressed in all platypus tissues like that of cold-blooded animals and murine rodents. OanTERT was localized on pseudoautosomal regions of sex chromosomes X3/Y2, expanding the homology between human chromosome 5 and platypus sex chromosomes. Synteny analysis suggests that TERT co-localized with sex-linked genes in the last common mammalian ancestor. Interestingly, female platypuses express higher levels of telomerase in heart and liver tissues than do males. Conclusions OanTERT shares many features with TERT of the reptilian outgroup, suggesting that OanTERT represents the ancestral mammalian TERT. Features specific to TERT of eutherian mammals have, therefore, evolved more recently after the divergence of monotremes. PMID:22655747

  14. A bacterial analog of the mdr gene of mammalian tumor cells is present in Streptomyces peucetius, the producer of daunorubicin and doxorubicin.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoile, P G; Hutchinson, C R

    1991-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the drrAB locus from Streptomyces peucetius (American Type Culture Collection 29050) reveals the presence of two genes, drrA and drrB, both of which are required for daunorubicin and doxorubicin (Adriamycin) resistance in the heterologous host Streptomyces lividans. The DrrA protein is similar to a large family of ATP-binding transport proteins, including the proteins encoded by the mdr genes from mammalian tumor cells, which confer resistance to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, and some other structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. The DrrB protein shows no significant similarity to other known proteins but is probably very hydrophobic, suggesting that it is located in the bacterial membrane. These two proteins may act jointly to confer daunorubicin and doxorubicin resistance by an analog of the antiport mechanism established for mammalian tumor cells that contain amplified or overexpressed mdr genes. Transcriptional analysis of the drrAB region supports the presence of one transcript containing drrA and drrB and indicates that these genes are expressed only during antibiotic production. Images PMID:1924314

  15. GeneOrder3.0: Software for comparing the order of genes in pairs of small bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Celamkoti, Srikanth; Kundeti, Sashidhara; Purkayastha, Anjan; Mazumder, Raja; Buck, Charles; Seto, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing number of whole viral and bacterial genomes are being sequenced and deposited in public databases. In parallel to the mounting interest in whole genomes, the number of whole genome analyses software tools is also increasing. GeneOrder was originally developed to provide an analysis of genes between two genomes, allowing visualization of gene order and synteny comparisons of any small genomes. It was originally developed for comparing virus, mitochondrion and chloroplast genomes. This is now extended to small bacterial genomes of sizes less than 2 Mb. Results GeneOrder3.0 has been developed and validated successfully on several small bacterial genomes (ca. 580 kb to 1.83 Mb) archived in the NCBI GenBank database. It is an updated web-based "on-the-fly" computational tool allowing gene order and synteny comparisons of any two small bacterial genomes. Analyses of several bacterial genomes show that a large amount of gene and genome re-arrangement occurs, as seen with earlier DNA software tools. This can be displayed at the protein level using GeneOrder3.0. Whole genome alignments of genes are presented in both a table and a dot plot. This allows the detection of evolutionary more distant relationships since protein sequences are more conserved than DNA sequences. Conclusions GeneOrder3.0 allows researchers to perform comparative analysis of gene order and synteny in genomes of sizes up to 2 Mb "on-the-fly." Availability: and . PMID:15128433

  16. c-Myc regulates the coordinated transcription of brain disease-related PDCD10-SERPINI1 bidirectional gene pair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Yen; Chang, Wun-Shaing W; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Wu, Cheng-Wen

    2009-09-01

    Two brain disease-related genes, one coding for the protease inhibitor SERPINI1 which is down-regulated in brain tumors, and the other for the PDCD10 programmed cell death gene which is often mutated in cerebral cavernous malformation, are closely adjacent in a head-to-head configuration and separated by only 851 bp on human chromosome 3q26. The 851-bp intergenic region contains a GC-rich 175-bp minimal bidirectional promoter which is essential for transcriptional activation of the two flanking genes. The oncogenic c-Myc transcription factor was identified to bind to a non-canonical E-box element (5'-CATGCG-3') of the minimal bidirectional promoter to drive both gene expressions. Methylation at the specific C nucleotide within the E-box sequence (5'-CATG(m)CG-3'), however, would severely interfere with the binding of c-Myc to the E-box. These results suggest that c-Myc plays an important role in regulating the coordinated transcription of the PDCD10-SERPINI1 bidirectional gene pair, and is possibly involved in differential expressions of these two neighboring genes in central nervous system diseases such as brain cancer.

  17. Selective regulation of gene expression by an orthogonal estrogen receptor-ligand pair created by polar-group exchange.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Koh, J T

    2001-05-01

    The nuclear and steroid hormone receptors function as ligand-dependent transcriptional regulators in eukaryotes. Hormone receptors have been engineered to selectively respond to synthetic ligands and used as remote regulators of gene expression for the study of gene function and as potential regulators of gene therapies. In this work, a new ligand-receptor engineering strategy called 'polar-group exchange' is used to create a mutant form of the estrogen receptor, ER(Glu353-->Ala), which lacks a carboxyl group critical for high-affinity binding of estradiol, but is able to transactivate in response to nanomolar concentrations of a carboxylate-functionalized estrogen analog, ES8. ES8 activates ER(Glu353-->Ala) at concentrations that do not appreciably activate the 'wild-type' receptor ER(wt). Two similar carboxylate-functionalized ligands, ES6 and ES7, do not induce transactivation function. Similar selectivities are observed in ligand-binding assays in vitro, which follow the trends predicted by molecular modeling. Polar-group exchange is an effective strategy for rationally engineering ligand-receptor pairs. The ER(E353A)/ES8 ligand-receptor pair should constitute a unique and functionally orthogonal ligand-dependent transcriptional regulator.

  18. Isoform- and Dose-sensitive Feedback Interactions between Paired Box 6 gene and δ-Catenin in Cell Differentiation and Death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Suter, David M.; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Fini, M. Elizabeth; Chen, Baoan; Lu, Qun

    2010-01-01

    Pax6, a mammalian homolog of the Drosophila paired box gene family member expressed in stem and progenitor cells, resides at the top of the genetic hierarchy in controlling cell fates and morphogenesis. While Pax6 activation can lead to mitotic arrest, premature neurogenesis, and apoptosis, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been resolved. Here we report that either Pax6(+5a) or Pax6(−5a) was sufficient to promote, whereas their knockdown reduced the expression of δ-catenin (CTNND2), a neural specific member of the armadillo/β-catenin superfamily. Pax6(+5a) elicited stronger effects on δ-catenin than Pax6(−5a). Inducible Pax6(+5a) expression demonstrated a biphasic and dose-dependent regulation of δ-catenin expression and cell fates. A moderate upregulation of Pax6(+5a) promoted δ-catenin expression and induced neurite-like cellular protrusions, but increasing expression of Pax6(+5a) reversed these processes. Furthermore, sustained high expression of Pax6(+5a) triggered apoptosis as determined by the reduction of phospho-Bad, Bcl-2, survivin and procaspases, as well as the increases in Bax and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Importantly, re-introducing δ-catenin by ectopic expression elicited a feedback suppression on Pax6(+5a) expression and reduced Pax6(+5a) induced apoptosis. Therefore, δ-catenin expression is not only controlled by Pax6, but it also provides a feedback suppression mechanism for their functional interactions with important implications in cellular morphogenesis, apoptosis, and cancer. PMID:20074565

  19. Prerequisites for the acquisition of mammalian pathogenicity by influenza A virus with a prototypic avian PB2 gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Young; An, Se-Hee; Kim, Ilhwan; Go, Du-Min; Kim, Dae-Yong; Choi, Jun-Gu; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Hyuk-Joon

    2017-08-31

    The polymerase of avian influenza A virus (AIV) is a heterotrimer composed of PB2, PB1, and PA. PB2 plays a role in overcoming the host barrier; however, the genetic prerequisites for avian PB2 to acquire mammalian pathogenic mutations have not been well elucidated. Previously, we identified a prototypic avian PB2 that conferred non-replicative and non-pathogenic traits to a PR8-derived recombinant virus when it was used to infect mice. Here, we demonstrated that key amino acid mutations (I66M, I109V, and I133V, collectively referred to as MVV) of this prototypic avian PB2 increase the replication efficiency of recombinant PR8 virus carrying the mutated PB2 in both avian and mammalian hosts. The MVV mutations caused no weight loss in mice, but they did allow replication in infected lungs, and the viruses acquired fatal mammalian pathogenic mutations such as Q591R/K, E627K, or D701N in the infected lungs. The MVV mutations are located at the interfaces of the trimer and are predicted to increase the strength of this structure. Thus, gaining MVV mutations might be the first step for AIV to acquire mammalian pathogenicity. These results provide new insights into the evolution of AIV in birds and mammals.

  20. Biphasic Hoxd Gene Expression in Shark Paired Fins Reveals an Ancient Origin of the Distal Limb Domain

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata; Zhang, GuangJun; Cohn, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary transition of fins to limbs involved development of a new suite of distal skeletal structures, the digits. During tetrapod limb development, genes at the 5′ end of the HoxD cluster are expressed in two spatiotemporally distinct phases. In the first phase, Hoxd9-13 are activated sequentially and form nested domains along the anteroposterior axis of the limb. This initial phase patterns the limb from its proximal limit to the middle of the forearm. Later in development, a second wave of transcription results in 5′ HoxD gene expression along the distal end of the limb bud, which regulates formation of digits. Studies of zebrafish fins showed that the second phase of Hox expression does not occur, leading to the idea that the origin of digits was driven by addition of the distal Hox expression domain in the earliest tetrapods. Here we test this hypothesis by investigating Hoxd gene expression during paired fin development in the shark Scyliorhinus canicula, a member of the most basal lineage of jawed vertebrates. We report that at early stages, 5′Hoxd genes are expressed in anteroposteriorly nested patterns, consistent with the initial wave of Hoxd transcription in teleost and tetrapod paired appendages. Unexpectedly, a second phase of expression occurs at later stages of shark fin development, in which Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 are re-expressed along the distal margin of the fin buds. This second phase is similar to that observed in tetrapod limbs. The results indicate that a second, distal phase of Hoxd gene expression is not uniquely associated with tetrapod digit development, but is more likely a plesiomorphic condition present the common ancestor of chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. We propose that a temporal extension, rather than de novo activation, of Hoxd expression in the distal part of the fin may have led to the evolution of digits. PMID:17710153

  1. dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins and regulates expression at divergently paired genes

    PubMed Central

    Korenjak, Michael; Kwon, Eunjeong; Morris, Robert T.; Anderssen, Endre; Amzallag, Arnaud; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    dREAM complexes represent the predominant form of E2F/RBF repressor complexes in Drosophila. dREAM associates with thousands of sites in the fly genome but its mechanism of action is unknown. To understand the genomic context in which dREAM acts we examined the distribution and localization of Drosophila E2F and dREAM proteins. Here we report a striking and unexpected overlap between dE2F2/dREAM sites and binding sites for the insulator-binding proteins CP190 and Beaf-32. Genetic assays show that these components functionally co-operate and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on mutant animals demonstrate that dE2F2 is important for association of CP190 with chromatin. dE2F2/dREAM binding sites are enriched at divergently transcribed genes, and the majority of genes upregulated by dE2F2 depletion represent the repressed half of a differentially expressed, divergently transcribed pair of genes. Analysis of mutant animals confirms that dREAM and CP190 are similarly required for transcriptional integrity at these gene pairs and suggest that dREAM functions in concert with CP190 to establish boundaries between repressed/activated genes. Consistent with the idea that dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins, genomic regions bound by dREAM possess enhancer-blocking activity that depends on multiple dREAM components. These findings suggest that dREAM functions in the organization of transcriptional domains. PMID:25053843

  2. dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins and regulates expression at divergently paired genes.

    PubMed

    Korenjak, Michael; Kwon, Eunjeong; Morris, Robert T; Anderssen, Endre; Amzallag, Arnaud; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2014-08-01

    dREAM complexes represent the predominant form of E2F/RBF repressor complexes in Drosophila. dREAM associates with thousands of sites in the fly genome but its mechanism of action is unknown. To understand the genomic context in which dREAM acts we examined the distribution and localization of Drosophila E2F and dREAM proteins. Here we report a striking and unexpected overlap between dE2F2/dREAM sites and binding sites for the insulator-binding proteins CP190 and Beaf-32. Genetic assays show that these components functionally co-operate and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on mutant animals demonstrate that dE2F2 is important for association of CP190 with chromatin. dE2F2/dREAM binding sites are enriched at divergently transcribed genes, and the majority of genes upregulated by dE2F2 depletion represent the repressed half of a differentially expressed, divergently transcribed pair of genes. Analysis of mutant animals confirms that dREAM and CP190 are similarly required for transcriptional integrity at these gene pairs and suggest that dREAM functions in concert with CP190 to establish boundaries between repressed/activated genes. Consistent with the idea that dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins, genomic regions bound by dREAM possess enhancer-blocking activity that depends on multiple dREAM components. These findings suggest that dREAM functions in the organization of transcriptional domains. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Perception of the usefulness of drug/gene pairs and barriers for pharmacogenomics in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Quinones, Luis Abel; Lavanderos, Maria Alejandra; Cayun, Juan Pablo; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Agundez, Jose Augusto; Caceres, Dante Daniel; Roco, Angela Margarita; Morales, Jorge E; Herrera, Luisa; Encina, Gonzalo; Isaza, Carlos Alberto; Redal, Maria Ana; Larovere, Laura; Soria, Nestor Walter; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Castaneda-Hernandez, Gilberto; Lopez-Cortes, Andres; Magno, Luiz Alexandre; Lopez, Marisol; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Rodeiro, Idania; Castro de Guerra, Dinorah; Teran, Enrique; Estevez-Carrizo, Francisco; Lares-Assef, Ismael

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics areas are currently emerging fields focused to manage pharmacotherapy that may prevent undertreatment while avoiding associated drug toxicity in patients. Large international differences in the awareness and in the use of pharmacogenomic testing are presumed, but not well assessed to date. In the present study we review the awareness of Latin American scientific community about pharmacogenomic testing and the perceived barriers for their clinical application. In order to that, we have compiled information from 9 countries of the region using a structured survey which is compared with surveys previously performed in USA and Spain. The most relevant group of barriers was related to the need for clear guidelines for the use of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice, followed by insufficient awareness about pharmacogenomics among clinicians and the absence of regulatory institutions that facilitate the use of pharmacogenetic tests. The higher ranked pairs were TPMT/thioguanine, TPMT/azathioprine, CYP2C9/warfarin, UGT1A1/irinotecan, CYP2D6/amitriptiline, CYP2C19/citalopram and CYP2D6/clozapine. The lower ranked pairs were SLCO1B1/simvastatin, CYP2D6/metoprolol and GP6D/chloroquine. Compared with USA and Spanish surveys, 25 pairs were of lower importance for Latin American respondents. Only CYP2C19/esomeprazole, CYP2C19/omeprazole, CYP2C19/celecoxib and G6PD/dapsone were ranked higher or similarly to the USA and Spanish surveys. Integration of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice needs training of healthcare professionals and citizens, but in addition legal and regulatory guidelines and safeguards will be needed. We propose that the approach offered by pharmacogenomics should be incorporated into the decision-making plans in Latin America.

  4. The AVR2-SIX5 gene pair is required to activate I-2-mediated immunity in tomato.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lisong; Houterman, Petra M; Gawehns, Fleur; Cao, Lingxue; Sillo, Fabiano; Richter, Hanna; Clavijo-Ortiz, Myriam J; Schmidt, Sarah M; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L W

    2015-10-01

    Plant-invading microbes betray their presence to a plant by exposure of antigenic molecules such as small, secreted proteins called 'effectors'. In Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) we identified a pair of effector gene candidates, AVR2-SIX5, whose expression is controlled by a shared promoter. The pathogenicity of AVR2 and SIX5 Fol knockouts was assessed on susceptible and resistant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants carrying I-2. The I-2 NB-LRR protein confers resistance to Fol races carrying AVR2. Like Avr2, Six5 was found to be required for full virulence on susceptible plants. Unexpectedly, each knockout could breach I-2-mediated disease resistance. So whereas Avr2 is sufficient to induce I-2-mediated cell death, Avr2 and Six5 are both required for resistance. Avr2 and Six5 interact in yeast two-hybrid assays as well as in planta. Six5 and Avr2 accumulate in xylem sap of plants infected with the reciprocal knockouts, showing that lack of I-2 activation is not due to a lack of Avr2 accumulation in the SIX5 mutant. The effector repertoire of a pathogen determines its host specificity and its ability to manipulate plant immunity. Our findings challenge an oversimplified interpretation of the gene-for-gene model by showing requirement of two fungal genes for immunity conferred by one resistance gene.

  5. Systems biology-guided identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs and its potential use to discover antibiotic combinations

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Lewis, Robert M.; In Loh, Suh; Mishra, Arti; Abhay Nagle, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Fong, Nicole L.; Li, Howard J.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of metabolism from bacterial systems biology have proven their utility across multiple fields, for example metabolic engineering, growth phenotype simulation, and biological discovery. The usefulness of the models stems from their ability to compute a link between genotype and phenotype, but their ability to accurately simulate gene-gene interactions has not been investigated extensively. Here we assess how accurately a metabolic model for Escherichia coli computes one particular type of gene-gene interaction, synthetic lethality, and find that the accuracy rate is between 25% and 43%. The most common failure modes were incorrect computation of single gene essentiality and biological information that was missing from the model. Moreover, we performed virtual and biological screening against several synthetic lethal pairs to explore whether two-compound formulations could be found that inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. One set of molecules was identified that, depending on the concentrations, inhibits E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in an additive or antagonistic manner. These findings pinpoint specific ways in which to improve the predictive ability of metabolic models, and highlight one potential application of systems biology to drug discovery and translational medicine. PMID:26531810

  6. Structure and function in rhodopsin: high level expression of a synthetic bovine opsin gene and its mutants in stable mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Reeves, P J; Thurmond, R L; Khorana, H G

    1996-10-15

    Stable mammalian cell lines harboring a synthetic bovine opsin gene have been derived from the suspension-adapted HEK293 cell line. The opsin gene is under the control of the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer in an expression vector that also contains a selectable marker (Neo) governed by a relatively weak promoter. The cell lines expressing the opsin gene at high levels are selected by growth in the presence of high concentrations of the antibiotic geneticin. Under the conditions used for cell growth in suspension, opsin is produced at saturated culture levels of more than 2 mg/liter. After reconstitution with 11-cis-retinal, rhodopsin is purified to homogeneity in a single step by immunoaffinity column chromatography. Rhodopsin thus prepared (> 90% recovery at concentrations of up to 15 microM) is indistinguishable from rhodopsin purified from bovine rod outer segments by the following criteria: (i) UV/Vis absorption spectra in the dark and after photobleaching and the rate of metarhodopsin II decay, (ii) initial rates of transducin activation, and (iii) the rate of phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Although mammalian cell opsin migrates slower than rod outer segment opsin on SDS/polyacrylamide gels, presumably due to a different N-glycosylation pattern, their mobilities after deglycosylation are identical. This method has enabled the preparation of several site-specific mutants of bovine opsin in comparable amounts.

  7. The mechanism of mammalian gene replacement is consistent with the formation of long regions of heteroduplex DNA associated with two crossing-over events.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Read, L R; Baker, M D

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the mechanism of mammalian gene replacement was investigated. The system is based on detecting homologous recombination between transferred vector DNA and the haploid, chromosomal immunoglobulin mu-delta region in a murine hybridoma cell line. The backbone of the gene replacement vector (pCmuCdeltapal) consists of pSV2neo sequences bounded on one side by homology to the mu gene constant (Cmu) region and on the other side by homology to the delta gene constant (Cdelta) region. The Cmu and Cdelta flanking arms of homology were marked by insertions of an identical 30-bp palindrome which frequently escapes mismatch repair when in heteroduplex DNA (hDNA). As a result, intermediates bearing unrepaired hDNA generate mixed (sectored) recombinants following DNA replication and cell division. To monitor the presence and position of sectored sites and, hence, hDNA formation during the recombination process, the palindrome contained a unique NotI site that replaced an endogenous restriction enzyme site at each marker position in the vector-borne Cmu and Cdelta regions. Gene replacement was studied under conditions which permitted the efficient recovery of the product(s) of individual recombination events. Analysis of marker segregation patterns in independent recombinants revealed that extensive hDNA was formed within the Cmu and Cdelta regions. In several recombinants, palindrome markers in the Cmu and Cdelta regions resided on opposite DNA strands (trans configuration). These results are consistent with the mammalian gene replacement reaction involving two crossing-over events in homologous flanking DNA.

  8. MicroRNA-34 directly targets pair-rule genes and cytoskeleton component in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Flávia C P; Pires, Camilla V; Claudianos, Charles; Cristino, Alexandre S; Simões, Zilá L P

    2017-01-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of developmental processes, such as cell fate determination and differentiation. Previous studies showed Dicer knockdown in honeybee embryos disrupt the processing of functional mature miRNAs and impairs embryo patterning. Here we investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in honeybee embryogenesis and the role of the highly conserved miR-34-5p in the regulation of genes involved in insect segmentation. A total of 221 miRNAs were expressed in honey bee embryogenesis among which 97 mature miRNA sequences have not been observed before. Interestingly, we observed a switch in dominance between the 5-prime and 3-prime arm of some miRNAs in different embryonic stages; however, most miRNAs present one dominant arm across all stages of embryogenesis. Our genome-wide analysis of putative miRNA-target networks and functional pathways indicates miR-34-5p is one of the most conserved and connected miRNAs associated with the regulation of genes involved in embryonic patterning and development. In addition, we experimentally validated that miR-34-5p directly interacts to regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated regions of pair-rule (even-skipped, hairy, fushi-tarazu transcription factor 1) and cytoskeleton (actin5C) genes. Our study suggests that miR-34-5p may regulate the expression of pair-rule and cytoskeleton genes during early development and control insect segmentation.

  9. MicroRNA-34 directly targets pair-rule genes and cytoskeleton component in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Flávia C. P.; Pires, Camilla V.; Claudianos, Charles; Cristino, Alexandre S.; Simões, Zilá L. P.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of developmental processes, such as cell fate determination and differentiation. Previous studies showed Dicer knockdown in honeybee embryos disrupt the processing of functional mature miRNAs and impairs embryo patterning. Here we investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in honeybee embryogenesis and the role of the highly conserved miR-34-5p in the regulation of genes involved in insect segmentation. A total of 221 miRNAs were expressed in honey bee embryogenesis among which 97 mature miRNA sequences have not been observed before. Interestingly, we observed a switch in dominance between the 5-prime and 3-prime arm of some miRNAs in different embryonic stages; however, most miRNAs present one dominant arm across all stages of embryogenesis. Our genome-wide analysis of putative miRNA-target networks and functional pathways indicates miR-34-5p is one of the most conserved and connected miRNAs associated with the regulation of genes involved in embryonic patterning and development. In addition, we experimentally validated that miR-34-5p directly interacts to regulatory elements in the 3′-untranslated regions of pair-rule (even-skipped, hairy, fushi-tarazu transcription factor 1) and cytoskeleton (actin5C) genes. Our study suggests that miR-34-5p may regulate the expression of pair-rule and cytoskeleton genes during early development and control insect segmentation. PMID:28098233

  10. Evolution of CpG island promoter function underlies changes in KChIP2 potassium channel subunit gene expression in mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinghong; Masson, Rajeev; Ren, Yi; Rosati, Barbara; McKinnon, David

    2012-01-31

    Scaling of cardiac electrophysiology with body mass requires large changes in the ventricular action potential duration and heart rate in mammals. These changes in cellular electrophysiological function are produced by systematic and coordinated changes in the expression of multiple ion channel and transporter genes. Expression of one important potassium current, the transient outward current (I(to)), changes significantly during mammalian evolution. Changes in I(to) expression are determined, in part, by variation in the expression of an obligatory auxiliary subunit encoded by the KChIP2 gene. The KChIP2 gene is expressed in both cardiac myocytes and neurons and transcription in both cell types is initiated from the same CpG island promoter. Species-dependent variation of KChIP2 expression in heart is mediated by the evolution of the cis-regulatory function of this gene. Surprisingly, the major locus of evolutionary change for KChIP2 gene expression in heart lies within the CpG island core promoter. The results demonstrate that CpG island promoters are not simply permissive for gene expression but can also contribute to tissue-selective expression and, as such, can function as an important locus for the evolution of cis-regulatory function. More generally, evolution of the cis-regulatory function of voltage-gated ion channel genes appears to be an effective and efficient way to modify channel expression levels to optimize electrophysiological function.

  11. Most Lung and Colon Cancer Susceptibility Genes Are Pair-Wise Linked in Mice, Humans and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Lei; Stassen, Alphons P. M.; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A. L.; van Wezel, Tom; Fijneman, Remond J. A.; Hutson, Alan; Kakarlapudi, Neelima; Hart, Augustinus A. M.; Demant, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Genetic predisposition controlled by susceptibility quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributes to a large proportion of common cancers. Studies of genetics of cancer susceptibility, however, did not address systematically the relationship between susceptibility to cancers in different organs. We present five sets of data on genetic architecture of colon and lung cancer susceptibility in mice, humans and rats. They collectively show that the majority of genes for colon and lung cancer susceptibility are linked pair-wise and are likely identical or related. Four CcS/Dem recombinant congenic strains, each differing from strain BALB/cHeA by a different small random subset of ±12.5% of genes received from strain STS/A, suggestively show either extreme susceptibility or extreme resistance for both colon and lung tumors, which is unlikely if the two tumors were controlled by independent susceptibility genes. Indeed, susceptibility to lung cancer (Sluc) loci underlying the extreme susceptibility or resistance of such CcS/Dem strains, mapped in 226 (CcS-10×CcS-19)F2 mice, co-localize with susceptibility to colon cancer (Scc) loci. Analysis of additional Sluc loci that were mapped in OcB/Dem strains and Scc loci in CcS/Dem strains, respectively, shows their widespread pair-wise co-localization (P = 0.0036). Finally, the majority of published human and rat colon cancer susceptibility genes map to chromosomal regions homologous to mouse Sluc loci. 12/12 mouse Scc loci, 9/11 human and 5/7 rat colon cancer susceptibility loci are close to a Sluc locus or its homologous site, forming 21 clusters of lung and colon cancer susceptibility genes from one, two or three species. Our data shows that cancer susceptibility QTLs can have much broader biological effects than presently appreciated. It also demonstrates the power of mouse genetics to predict human susceptibility genes. Comparison of molecular mechanisms of susceptibility genes that are organ-specific and those with trans

  12. Cognitive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pairs with ADHD: Familial Clustering and Dopamine Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Rich, Erika Carpenter; Ishii, Janeen; McGough, James; McCracken, James; Nelson, Stanley; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper examines familiality and candidate gene associations of cognitive measures as potential endophenotypes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The sample consists of 540 participants, aged 6 to 18, who were diagnosed with ADHD from 251 families recruited for a larger genetic study of ADHD. All members of…

  13. Cognitive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pairs with ADHD: Familial Clustering and Dopamine Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Rich, Erika Carpenter; Ishii, Janeen; McGough, James; McCracken, James; Nelson, Stanley; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper examines familiality and candidate gene associations of cognitive measures as potential endophenotypes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The sample consists of 540 participants, aged 6 to 18, who were diagnosed with ADHD from 251 families recruited for a larger genetic study of ADHD. All members of…

  14. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors.

  15. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  16. Two Distinct Mechanisms Govern RpoS-Mediated Repression of Tick-Phase Genes during Mammalian Host Adaptation by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Arianna P.; Liveris, Dionysios; Iyer, Radha; Petzke, Mary; Rudman, Joseph; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alternative sigma factor RpoS plays a key role modulating gene expression in Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, by transcribing mammalian host-phase genes and repressing σ70-dependent genes required within the arthropod vector. To identify cis regulatory elements involved in RpoS-dependent repression, we analyzed green fluorescent protein (GFP) transcriptional reporters containing portions of the upstream regions of the prototypical tick-phase genes ospAB, the glp operon, and bba74. As RpoS-mediated repression occurs only following mammalian host adaptation, strains containing the reporters were grown in dialysis membrane chambers (DMCs) implanted into the peritoneal cavities of rats. Wild-type spirochetes harboring ospAB- and glp-gfp constructs containing only the minimal (−35/−10) σ70 promoter elements had significantly lower expression in DMCs relative to growth in vitro at 37°C; no reduction in expression occurred in a DMC-cultivated RpoS mutant harboring these constructs. In contrast, RpoS-mediated repression of bba74 required a stretch of DNA located between −165 and −82 relative to its transcriptional start site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays employing extracts of DMC-cultivated B. burgdorferi produced a gel shift, whereas extracts from RpoS mutant spirochetes did not. Collectively, these data demonstrate that RpoS-mediated repression of tick-phase borrelial genes occurs by at least two distinct mechanisms. One (e.g., ospAB and the glp operon) involves primarily sequence elements near the core promoter, while the other (e.g., bba74) involves an RpoS-induced transacting repressor. Our results provide a genetic framework for further dissection of the essential “gatekeeper” role of RpoS throughout the B. burgdorferi enzootic cycle. PMID:28830947

  17. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin A.; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  18. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  19. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Complete genome and gene expression analyses of Asaia bogorensis reveal unique responses to culture with mammalian cells as a potential opportunistic human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Higashiura, Norie; Hayasaki, Kimie; Okamoto, Naruhei; Takami, Akiko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Azuma, Yoshinao

    2015-10-01

    Asaia bogorensis, a member of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), is an aerobic bacterium isolated from flowers and fruits, as well as an opportunistic pathogen that causes human peritonitis and bacteraemia. Here, we determined the complete genomic sequence of the As. bogorensis type strain NBRC 16594, and conducted comparative analyses of gene expression under different conditions of co-culture with mammalian cells and standard AAB culture. The genome of As. bogorensis contained 2,758 protein-coding genes within a circular chromosome of 3,198,265 bp. There were two complete operons encoding cytochrome bo3-type ubiquinol terminal oxidases: cyoABCD-1 and cyoABCD-2. The cyoABCD-1 operon was phylogenetically common to AAB genomes, whereas the cyoABCD-2 operon belonged to a lineage distinctive from the cyoABCD-1 operon. Interestingly, cyoABCD-1 was less expressed under co-culture conditions than under the AAB culture conditions, whereas the converse was true for cyoABCD-2. Asaia bogorensis shared pathogenesis-related genes with another pathogenic AAB, Granulibacter bethesdensis, including a gene coding pathogen-specific large bacterial adhesin and additional genes for the inhibition of oxidation and antibiotic resistance. Expression alteration of the respiratory chain and unique hypothetical genes may be key traits that enable the bacterium to survive under the co-culture conditions.

  1. Inverse correlation between expression of the Wolfs Hirschhorn candidate gene Letm1 and mitochondrial volume in C. elegans and in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ayako; van der Bliek, Alexander M

    2007-09-01

    Deletion of the Letm1 gene correlates with the occurrence of epilepsy in patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. The Letm1 gene encodes a mitochondrial protein that is homologous to yeast Mdm38. Yeast Mdm38 is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane where it was proposed to act as a K+/H+ antiporter or alternatively as a chaperone for selected mitochondrial inner membrane proteins. Here, we present cellular and biochemical analysis of Letm1 in mammalian cells and an analysis of a C. elegans mutant that could serve as a model for Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. We localized the Letm1 protein to the mitochondrial inner membrane of mammalian cells, where it exists in a 550-kDa complex. We show that Letm1 can bind to itself in vitro, raising the possibility that it can form higher order multimers in vivo. Reduced levels of Letm1 in human cells and in C. elegans lead to swellings along the lengths of mitochondria, consistent with the phenotype observed in yeast. Electron micrographs show mitochondria with swollen matrices that are less electron-dense than matrices in normal mitochondria. The opposite effect is achieved by overexpression of Letm1. Overexpression increases the electron density of the mitochondrial matrix and swelling of cristae. Our results are therefore consistent with a protein that regulates the volume of the mitochondrial matrix.

  2. Amino Acid Substitutions in Polymerase Basic Protein 2 Gene Contribute to the Pathogenicity of the Novel A/H7N9 Influenza Virus in Mammalian Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Chris Ka Pun; Lee, Horace Hok Yeung; Lestra, Maxime; Nicholls, John Malcolm; Chan, Michael Chi Wai; Sia, Sin Fun; Zhu, Huachen; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Guan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel avian-origin influenza A/H7N9 virus emerged in 2013 to cause more than 130 cases of zoonotic human disease, with an overall case fatality rate of around 30% in cases detected. It has been shown that an E-to-K amino acid change at residue 627 of polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) occurred frequently in the H7N9 isolates obtained from humans but not in viruses isolated from poultry. Although this mutation has been reported to confer increased mammalian pathogenicity in other avian influenza subtypes, it has not been experimentally investigated in the H7N9 virus. In this study, we determined the contribution of PB2-E627K in H7N9 virus to its pathogenicity in mammalian hosts. In addition, the compensatory role of the PB2 mutations T271A, Q591K, and D701N in H7N9 virus was investigated. We characterized the activity of polymerase complexes with these PB2 mutations and found that they enhance the polymerase activity in human 293T cells. The rescued mutants enhanced growth in mammalian cells in vitro. Mice infected with the H7N9 mutant containing the avian signature protein PB2-627E showed a marked decrease in disease severity (weight loss) and pathology compared to mice infected with the wild-type strain (PB2-627K) or other PB2 mutants. Also, mutants with PB2-627E showed lower virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine responses in the lungs of the virus-infected mice, which may contribute to pathogenicity. Our results suggest that these amino acid substitutions contribute to mouse pathogenicity and mammalian adaptation. IMPORTANCE A novel avian H7N9 influenza A virus emerged in east China in 2013 to cause zoonotic human disease associated with significant mortality. It is important to understand the viral genetic markers of mammalian adaptation and disease severity in this H7N9 virus. Since many human (but not avian) H7N9 virus isolates have an amino acid substitution at position E627K in the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) gene, we investigated the

  3. Correlation of Global and Gene-Specific DNA Methylation in Maternal-Infant Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Molly L.; Baccarelli, Andrea; Tarantini, Letizia; Hoffman, Elaine; Wright, Robert O.; Christiani, David C.

    2010-01-01

    The inheritance of DNA methylation patterns is a popular theory to explain the influence of parental genetic and environmental factors on the phenotype of their offspring but few studies have examined this relationship in humans. Using 120 paired maternal-umbilical cord blood samples randomly selected from a prospective birth cohort in Bangladesh, we quantified DNA methylation by pyrosequencing seven CpG positions in the promoter region of p16, four CpG positions in the promoter region of p53, LINE-1 and Alu. Positive correlations were observed between maternal and umbilical cord blood at p16, LINE-1, and Alu but not p53. Multiple linear regression models observed a significant association between maternal and umbilical cord blood at LINE-1 and Alu (LINE-1: β = 0.63, p<0.0001; Alu: β = 0.28, p = 0.009). After adjusting for multiple comparisons, maternal methylation of p16 at position 4 significantly predicted methylation at the same position in umbilical cord blood (β = 0.43, p = <0.0001). These models explained 48%, 5% and 16% of the observed variability in umbilical cord %5mC for LINE-1, Alu and p16 at position 4, respectively. These results suggest that DNA methylation in maternal blood was correlated with her offspring at LINE-1, Alu, and p16 but not p53. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether these observed associations were due to the inheritance of epigenetic events or the shared environment between mother and fetus. Future studies should also use a multi-generational family-based design that would quantify both maternal and paternal contributions to DNA methylation in offspring across more than one generation. PMID:21060777

  4. Macrolide- and tetracycline-adjustable siRNA-mediated gene silencing in mammalian cells using polymerase II-dependent promoter derivatives.

    PubMed

    Malphettes, Laetitia; Fussenegger, Martin

    2004-11-20

    RNA interference has emerged as a powerful technology for downregulation of specific genes in cells and animals. We have pioneered macrolide- and tetracycline-adjustable short interfering RNA (siRNA) expression for conditional target gene translation fine-tuning in mammalian/human cell lines based on modified RNA polymerase II promoters. Established macrolide- and tetracycline-dependent transactivators/trans-silencers bound and activated modified target promoters tailored for optimal siRNA expression in response to clinical antibiotics' dosing regimes and modulated desired target genes in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells with high precision. Further optimization of adjustable RNA polymerase II-based siRNA-specific promoters as well as their combination with various transmodulators enabled near-perfect regulation configurations in specific cell types. Devoid of major genetic constraints compared to basic RNA polymerase III-based siRNA-specific promoters, we expect RNA polymerase II counterparts to significantly advance siRNA-based molecular interventions in biopharmaceutical manufacturing and gene-function analysis as well as gene therapy and tissue engineering.

  5. Escherichia coli brain abscess in a twin pair associated with TLR4 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Aydin; Kahramaner, Zelal; Cosar, Hese; Turkoglu, Ebru; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Uygun, Dilara Kocacik; Yegin, Olcay; Berdeli, Afig; Ozer, Esra Arun

    2013-08-01

    Brain abscesses are uncommon complications of bacterial meningitis or sepsis in neonates and infants. The causative pathogens of brain abscess in newborns are various. Of those, Escherichia coli is rarely seen as a pathogen in brain abscess at this age. Herein we reported brain abscesses in twin infants caused by E. coli sepsis. Interestingly, genetic analysis identified heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene mutation in the twins. Because TLR plays an important role in the natural response to bacterial products and initiates specific immune response against these pathogens, this may explain the development of brain abscess in the present case. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Defining and mapping mammalian coat pattern genes: multiple genomic regions implicated in domestic cat stripes and spots.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, Eduardo; David, Victor A; Buckley-Beason, Valerie; Roelke, Melody E; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Hannah, Steven S; Narfström, Kristina; O'Brien, Stephen J; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian coat patterns (e.g., spots, stripes) are hypothesized to play important roles in camouflage and other relevant processes, yet the genetic and developmental bases for these phenotypes are completely unknown. The domestic cat, with its diversity of coat patterns, is an excellent model organism to investigate these phenomena. We have established three independent pedigrees to map the four recognized pattern variants classically considered to be specified by a single locus, Tabby; in order of dominance, these are the unpatterned agouti form called "Abyssinian" or "ticked" (T(a)), followed by Spotted (T(s)), Mackerel (T(M)), and Blotched (t(b)). We demonstrate that at least three different loci control the coat markings of the domestic cat. One locus, responsible for the Abyssinian form (herein termed the Ticked locus), maps to an approximately 3.8-Mb region on cat chromosome B1. A second locus controls the Tabby alleles T(M) and t(b), and maps to an approximately 5-Mb genomic region on cat chromosome A1. One or more additional loci act as modifiers and create a spotted coat by altering mackerel stripes. On the basis of our results and associated observations, we hypothesize that mammalian patterned coats are formed by two distinct processes: a spatially oriented developmental mechanism that lays down a species-specific pattern of skin cell differentiation and a pigmentation-oriented mechanism that uses information from the preestablished pattern to regulate the synthesis of melanin profiles.

  7. Tobacco chloroplast tRNA(UUU) gene contains a 2.5-kilobase-pair intron: An open reading frame and a conserved boundary sequence in the intron.

    PubMed

    Sugita, M; Shinozaki, K; Sugiura, M

    1985-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a tRNA(Lys)(UUU) gene on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) chloroplast DNA has been determined. This gene is located 215 base pairs upstream from the gene for the 32,000-dalton thylakoid membrane protein on the same DNA strand and has a 2526-base-pair intron in the anticodon loop. The intron boundary sequence does not follow the G-U/A-G rule but is similar to those of tobacco chloroplast split genes for tRNA(Gly)(UCC) and ribosomal proteins L2 and S12. The intron contains one major open reading frame of 509 codons. The codon usage in the open reading frame resembles those observed in the genes for tobacco chloroplast proteins so far analyzed. The primary transcript of this tRNA gene is 2.7 kilobases long.

  8. Tobacco chloroplast tRNALys(UUU) gene contains a 2.5-kilobase-pair intron: An open reading frame and a conserved boundary sequence in the intron

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Mamoru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Masahiro

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a tRNALys(UUU) gene on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) chloroplast DNA has been determined. This gene is located 215 base pairs upstream from the gene for the 32,000-dalton thylakoid membrane protein on the same DNA strand and has a 2526-base-pair intron in the anticodon loop. The intron boundary sequence does not follow the G-U/A-G rule but is similar to those of tobacco chloroplast split genes for tRNAGly(UCC) and ribosomal proteins L2 and S12. The intron contains one major open reading frame of 509 codons. The codon usage in the open reading frame resembles those observed in the genes for tobacco chloroplast proteins so far analyzed. The primary transcript of this tRNA gene is 2.7 kilobases long. Images PMID:16593561

  9. Genomic structure of PIR-B, the inhibitory member of the paired immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Alley, T L; Cooper, M D; Chen, M; Kubagawa, H

    1998-03-01

    The genes encoding the murine paired immunoglobulin-like receptors PIR-A and PIR-B are members of a novel gene family which encode cell-surface receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) and their non-inhibitory/activatory counterparts. PIR-A and PIR-B have highly homologous extracellular domains but distinct transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. A charged arginine in the transmembrane region of PIR-A suggests its potential association with other transmembrane proteins to form a signal transducing unit. PIR-B, in contrast, has an uncharged transmembrane region and several ITIMs in its cytoplasmic tail. These characteristics suggest that PIR-A and PIR-B which are coordinately expressed by B cells and myeloid cells, serve counter-regulatory roles in humoral and inflammatory responses. In the present study we have determined the genomic structure of the single copy PIR-B gene. The gene consists of 15 exons and spans approximately 8 kilobases. The first exon contains the 5' untranslated region, the ATG translation start site, and approximately half of the leader peptide sequence. The remainder of the leader peptide sequence is encoded by exon 2. Exons 3-8 encode the six extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains and exons 9 and 10 code for the extracellular membrane proximal and transmembrane regions. The final five exons (exons 11-15) encode for the ITIM-bearing cytoplasmic tail and the 3' untranslated region. The intron/exon boundaries of PIR-B obey the GT-AG rule and are in phase I, with the notable exception of the three boundaries determined for ITIM-containing exons. A microsatellite composed of the trinucleotide repeat AAG in the intron between exons 9 and 10 provides a useful marker for studying population genetics.

  10. Transient Gene Expression in Serum-Free Suspension-Growing Mammalian Cells for the Production of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Empty Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Mignaqui, Ana Clara; Ruiz, Vanesa; Perret, Sylvie; St-Laurent, Gilles; Singh Chahal, Parminder; Transfiguracion, Julia; Sammarruco, Ayelén; Gnazzo, Victoria; Durocher, Yves; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. It produces severe economic losses in the livestock industry. Currently available vaccines are based on inactivated FMD virus (FMDV). The use of empty capsids as a subunit vaccine has been reported to be a promising candidate because it avoids the use of virus in the vaccine production and conserves the conformational epitopes of the virus. In this report, we explored transient gene expression (TGE) in serum-free suspension-growing mammalian cells for the production of FMDV recombinant empty capsids as a subunit vaccine. The recombinant proteins produced, assembled into empty capsids and induced protective immune response against viral challenge in mice. Furthermore, they were recognized by anti-FMDV bovine sera. By using this technology, we were able to achieve expression levels that are compatible with the development of a vaccine. Thus, TGE of mammalian cells is an easy to perform, scalable and cost-effective technology for the production of a recombinant subunit vaccine against FMDV. PMID:23977353

  11. Construction of simple and efficient siRNA validation systems for screening and identification of effective RNAi-targeted sequences from mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hui; Chang, Wen-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene silencing induced by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). Among the widely used dsRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs have evolved as extremely powerful and the most popular gene silencing reagents. The key challenge to achieving efficient gene silencing especially for the purpose of therapeutics is mainly dependent on the effectiveness and specificity of the selected RNAi-targeted sequences. Practically, only a small number of dsRNAs are capable of inducing highly effective and sequence-specific gene silencing via RNAi mechanism. In addition, the efficiency of gene silencing induced by dsRNAs can only be experimentally examined based on inhibition of the target gene expression. Therefore, it is essential to develop a fully robust and comparative validation system for measuring the efficacy of designed dsRNAs. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on a reliable and quantitative reporter-based siRNA validation system that has been previously established in our laboratory. The system consists of a short synthetic DNA fragment containing an RNAi-targeted sequence of interest and two expression vectors for targeting reporter and triggering siRNA expressions. The efficiency of siRNAs is determined by their abilities to inhibit expression of the targeting reporters with easily quantified readouts including enhanced green fluorescence protein and firefly luciferase. Since only a readily available short synthetic DNA fragment is needed for constructing this reliable and efficient reporter-based siRNA validation system, this system not only provides a powerful strategy for screening highly effective RNAi-targeted sequences from mammalian genes but also implicates the use of RNAi-based dsRNA reagents for reverse functional genomics and molecular therapeutics.

  12. Mammalian X chromosome inactivation evolved as a dosage-compensation mechanism for dosage-sensitive genes on the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Pessia, Eugénie; Makino, Takashi; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; McLysaght, Aoife; Marais, Gabriel A B

    2012-04-03

    How and why female somatic X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) evolved in mammals remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that XCI is a dosage-compensation mechanism that evolved to equalize expression levels of X-linked genes in females (2X) and males (1X), with a prior twofold increase in expression of X-linked genes in both sexes ("Ohno's hypothesis"). Whereas the parity of X chromosome expression between the sexes has been clearly demonstrated, tests for the doubling of expression levels globally along the X chromosome have returned contradictory results. However, changes in gene dosage during sex-chromosome evolution are not expected to impact on all genes equally, and should have greater consequences for dosage-sensitive genes. We show that, for genes encoding components of large protein complexes (≥ 7 members)--a class of genes that is expected to be dosage-sensitive--expression of X-linked genes is similar to that of autosomal genes within the complex. These data support Ohno's hypothesis that XCI acts as a dosage-compensation mechanism, and allow us to refine Ohno's model of XCI evolution. We also explore the contribution of dosage-sensitive genes to X aneuploidy phenotypes in humans, such as Turner (X0) and Klinefelter (XXY) syndromes. X aneuploidy in humans is common and is known to have mild effects because most of the supernumerary X genes are inactivated and not affected by aneuploidy. Only genes escaping XCI experience dosage changes in X-aneuploidy patients. We combined data on dosage sensitivity and XCI to compute a list of candidate genes for X-aneuploidy syndromes.

  13. Progesterone regulation of the mammalian ortholog of methylcitrate dehydratase (immune response gene 1) in the uterine epithelium during implantation through the protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhang, Damin; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2003-11-01

    Implantation requires coordination between development of the blastocyst and the sex steroid hormone-regulated differentiation of the uterus. Under the influence of these hormones, the uterine luminal epithelium becomes receptive to attachment of the hatched blastocyst. In this study we sought to identify genes regulated by progesterone (P4) in the uterine epithelium. This resulted in the identification of one novel P4-regulated gene that had been previously found in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages and called immune response gene-1 (Irg1) and which is the mammalian ortholog of the bacterial gene encoding methylcitrate dehydratase. In adult mice Irg1 expression was limited to the uterine luminal epithelium where it is expressed only during pregnancy with a peak coinciding with implantation. Irg1 mRNA expression is regulated synergistically by P4 and estradiol (E2) but not by E2 alone. In macrophages Irg1 is induced by lipopolysaccharide through a protein kinase C (PKC)-regulated pathway. Now we demonstrate that the PKC pathway is induced in the uterine epithelium at implantation by the synergistic action of P4 and E2 and is responsible for the hormone induction of Irg1. These results suggest that the PKC pathway plays an important role in modulating steroid hormone responsiveness in the uterine luminal epithelium during the implantation window and that Irg1 will be an important marker of this window and may play an important role in implantation.

  14. Insight into the mechanism of the peptide-based gene delivery system MPG: implications for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Simeoni, Federica; Morris, May C.; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    The improvement of non-viral-based gene delivery systems is of prime importance for the future of gene and antisense therapies. We have previously described a peptide-based gene delivery system, MPG, derived from the fusion peptide domain of HIV-1 gp41 protein and the nuclear localisation sequence (NLS) of SV40 large T antigen. MPG forms stable non-covalent complexes with nucleic acids and improves their delivery. In the present work, we have investigated the mechanism through which MPG promotes gene delivery. We demonstrate that cell entry is independent of the endosomal pathway and that the NLS of MPG is involved in both electrostatic interactions with DNA and nuclear targeting. MPG/DNA particles interact with the nuclear import machinery, however, a mutation which affects the NLS of MPG disrupts these interactions and prevents nuclear delivery of DNA. Nevertheless, we show that this mutation yields a variant of MPG which is a powerful tool for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells, enabling rapid release of the siRNA into the cytoplasm and promoting robust down-regulation of target mRNA. Taken together, these results support the potential of MPG-like peptides for therapeutic applications and suggest that specific variations in the sequence may yield carriers with distinct targeting features. PMID:12771197

  15. Insight into the mechanism of the peptide-based gene delivery system MPG: implications for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Federica; Morris, May C; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2003-06-01

    The improvement of non-viral-based gene delivery systems is of prime importance for the future of gene and antisense therapies. We have previously described a peptide-based gene delivery system, MPG, derived from the fusion peptide domain of HIV-1 gp41 protein and the nuclear localisation sequence (NLS) of SV40 large T antigen. MPG forms stable non-covalent complexes with nucleic acids and improves their delivery. In the present work, we have investigated the mechanism through which MPG promotes gene delivery. We demonstrate that cell entry is independent of the endosomal pathway and that the NLS of MPG is involved in both electrostatic interactions with DNA and nuclear targeting. MPG/DNA particles interact with the nuclear import machinery, however, a mutation which affects the NLS of MPG disrupts these interactions and prevents nuclear delivery of DNA. Nevertheless, we show that this mutation yields a variant of MPG which is a powerful tool for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells, enabling rapid release of the siRNA into the cytoplasm and promoting robust down-regulation of target mRNA. Taken together, these results support the potential of MPG-like peptides for therapeutic applications and suggest that specific variations in the sequence may yield carriers with distinct targeting features.

  16. Mammalian touch catches up

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Carolyn M.; Bautista, Diana M.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    An assortment of touch receptors innervate the skin and encode different tactile features of the environment. Compared with invertebrate touch and other sensory systems, our understanding of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of mammalian touch lags behind. Two recent breakthroughs have accelerated progress. First, an arsenal of cell-type-specific molecular markers allowed the functional and anatomical properties of sensory neurons to be matched, thereby unraveling a cellular code for touch. Such markers have also revealed key roles of non-neuronal cell types, such as Merkel cells and keratinocytes, in touch reception. Second, the discovery of Piezo genes as a new family of mechanically activated channels has fueled the discovery of molecular mechanisms that mediate and mechanotransduction in mammalian touch receptors. PMID:26100741

  17. Formation of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN)-gene vector complexes for transfection of mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Carsten; Rosenecker, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) offer several technological advantages over standard DNA carriers such as cationic lipids or cationic polymers. However, in the absence of endosomolytic agents such as chloroquine, gene-transfer efficiency mediated by SLN-derived gene vectors consisting of optimized lipid composition remains lower compared to those achieved with standard transfection agents. This protocol describes the incorporation of a dimeric human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) TAT peptide into SLN gene vectors to increase gene-transfer efficiency. This results in higher transfection rates than for standard transfection agents in vitro; the ternary SLN-gene vector complexes usually result in transfection levels equal to or higher than those observed with gene vector complexes formulated with branched polyethylenimine (PEI) 25 kDa. One significant advantage of using this method is the low cytotoxicity of the SLN gene vectors. The application of the gene-transfer technique is limited to relatively low plasmid DNA (pDNA) concentrations of the resulting complexes (10 µg/mL). At higher concentrations, the particles tend to aggregate and precipitate. Therefore, their use for in vivo application, which generally requires high pDNA concentrations, is limited.

  18. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  19. Cytotoxicity and expression of genes involved in the cellular stress response and apoptosis in mammalian fibroblast exposed to cotton cellulose nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. M.; Raposo, N. R. B.; Brayner, R.; Teixeira, E. M.; Oliveira, V.; Quintão, C. C. R.; Camargo, L. S. A.; Mattoso, L. H. C.; Brandão, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) have mechanical properties that make them very attractive for applications in the construction of polymeric matrices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. However, little is known about their impact on mammalian cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of CNF and their effect on gene expression of fibroblasts cultured in vitro. The morphology of CNF was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and the surface charge by Zeta potential. Cell viability was analyzed by flow cytometry assay and gene expression of biomarkers focused on cell stress response such as Heat shock protein 70.1 (HSP70.1) and Peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1) and apoptosis as B-cell leukemia (BCL-2) and BCL-2 associated X protein (BAX) by RT-PCR assay. Low concentrations of CNF (0.02-100 μg ml-1) did not cause cell death; however, at concentrations above 200 μg ml-1, the nanofibers significantly decreased cell viability (86.41 ± 5.37%). The exposure to high concentrations of CNF (2000 and 5000 μg ml-1) resulted in increased HSP70.1, PRDX1 and BAX gene expression. The current study concludes that, under the conditions tested, high concentrations (2000 and 5000 μg ml-1) of CNF cause decreased cell viability and affect the expression of stress- and apoptosis-associated molecular markers.

  20. Ankrd6 is a mammalian functional homolog of Drosophila planar cell polarity gene diego and regulates coordinated cellular orientation in the mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Chonnettia; Qian, Dong; Kim, Sun Myoung; Li, Shuangding; Ren, Dongdong; Knapp, Lindsey; Sprinzak, David; Avraham, Karen B.; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Chi, Fanglu; Chen, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The coordinated polarization of neighboring cells within the plane of the tissue, known as planar cell polarity (PCP), is a recurring theme in biology. It is required for numerous developmental processes for the form and function of many tissues and organs across species. The genetic pathway regulating PCP was first discovered in Drosophila, and an analogous but distinct pathway is em