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Sample records for mammalian group iia

  1. Molecular determinants of bacterial sensitivity and resistance to mammalian Group IIA phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jerrold P

    2015-11-01

    Group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA(2)-IIA) of mammalian species is unique among the many structurally and functionally related mammalian sPLA(2) in their high net positive charge and potent (nM) antibacterial activity. Toward the Gram-positive bacteria tested thus far, the global cationic properties of sPLA(2)-IIA are necessary for optimal binding to intact bacteria and penetration of the multi-layered thick cell wall, but not for the degradation of membrane phospholipids that is essential for bacterial killing. Various Gram-positive bacterial species can differ as much as 1000-fold in sPLA(2)-IIA sensitivity despite similar intrinsic enzymatic activity of sPLA(2)-IIA toward the membrane phospholipids of various bacteria. d-alanylation of wall- and lipo-teichoic acids in Staphylococcus aureus and sortase function in Streptococcus pyogenes increase bacterial resistance to sPLA(2)-IIA by up to 100-fold apparently by affecting translocation of bound sPLA(2)-IIA to the cell membrane. Action of the sPLA(2)-IIA and other related sPLA(2) against Gram-negative bacteria is more dependent on cationic properties of the enzyme near the amino-terminus of the protein and collaboration with other host defense proteins that produce alterations of the unique Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane that normally represents a barrier to sPLA(2)-IIA action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides.

  2. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  3. Human group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Ueda, Keiichi; Asakura, Kenji; Hata, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takayuki; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Takasu, Nobuo; Tanaka, Kazushige; Gemba, Takefumi; Hori, Yozo

    2002-01-01

    Expression of group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) is documented in the cerebral cortex (CTX) after ischemia, suggesting that sPLA2-IIA is associated with neurodegeneration. However, how sPLA2-IIA is involved in the neurodegeneration remains obscure. To clarify the pathologic role of sPLA2-IIA, we examined its neurotoxicity in rats that had the middle cerebral artery occluded and in primary cultures of cortical neurons. After occlusion, sPLA2 activity was increased in the CTX. An sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam, significantly ameliorated not only the elevated activity of the sPLA2 but also the neurodegeneration in the CTX. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after occlusion. In primary cultures, sPLA2-IIA caused marked neuronal cell death. Morphologic and ultrastructural characteristics of neuronal cell death by sPLA2-IIA were apoptotic, as evidenced by condensed chromatin and fragmented DNA. Before apoptosis, sPLA2-IIA liberated arachidonic acid (AA) and generated prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), an AA metabolite, from neurons. Indoxam significantly suppressed not only AA release, but also PGD2 generation. Indoxam prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced neuronal cell death. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after sPLA2-IIA treatment. Furthermore, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor significantly prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced PGD2 generation and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, sPLA2-IIA induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis, which might be associated with AA metabolites, especially PGD2. Furthermore, sPLA2 contributes to neurodegeneration in the ischemic brain, highlighting the therapeutic potential of sPLA2-IIA inhibitors for stroke.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Orientin on Secretory Group IIA Phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that the expression level of secretory group IIA phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) is elevated in inflammatory diseases and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) upregulates the expression of sPLA2-IIA in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Orientin, a C-glycosyl flavonoid, is known to have anxiolytic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory activity. Here, orientin was examined for its effects on the expression and activity of sPLA2-IIA in HUVECs and mouse. Prior treatment of cells or mouse with orientin inhibited LPS-induced expression and activity of sPLA2-IIA. And orientin suppressed the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 by LPS. Therefore, these results suggest that orientin may inhibit LPS-mediated expression of sPLA2-IIA by suppression of cPLA2 and ERK 1/2.

  5. Point of care testing of phospholipase A2 group IIA for serological diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Mmesi, Jonas; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Abraham, Sonya; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-02-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care.Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08423g

  6. Interaction of low molecular weight group IIA phospholipase A2 with apoptotic human T cells: role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Bourgoin, Sylvain G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Poubelle, Patrice E; Surette, Marc E

    2003-06-01

    Human group IIA phospholipase A2 (hIIA PLA2) is a 14 kDa secreted enzyme associated with inflammatory diseases. A newly discovered property of hIIA PLA2 is the binding affinity for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) glypican-1. In this study, the binding of hIIA PLA2 to apoptotic human T cells was investigated. Little or no exogenous hIIA PLA2 bound to CD3-activated T cells but significant binding was measured on activated T cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-CD95. Binding to early apoptotic T cells was greater than to late apoptotic cells. The addition of heparin and the hydrolysis of HSPG by heparinase III only partially inhibited hIIA PLA2 binding to apoptotic cells, suggesting an interaction with both HSPG and other binding protein(s). Two low molecular weight HSPG were coimmunoprecipitated with hIIA PLA2 from apoptotic T cells, but not from living cells. Treatment of CD95-stimulated T cells with hIIA PLA2 resulted in the release of arachidonic acid but not oleic acid from cells and this release was blocked by heparin and heparinase III. Altogether, these results suggest a role for hIIA PLA2 in the release of arachidonic acid from apoptotic cells through interactions with HSPG and its potential implication in the progression of inflammatory diseases.

  7. Anti-bactericidal properties of stingray Dasyatis pastinaca groups V, IIA, and IB phospholipases A2: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Abir Ben

    2014-10-01

    Group IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (group IIA sPLA2) is known to display potent Gram-positive bactericidal activity in vitro and in vivo. We have analyzed the bactericidal activity of the full set of native stingray and dromedary groups V, IIA, and IB sPLA2s on several Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. The rank order potency among both marine and mammal sPLA2s against Gram-positive bacteria is group IIA > V > IB, whereas Gram-negative bacteria exhibited a much higher resistance. There is a synergic action of the sPLA2 with lysozyme when added to the bacteria culture prior to sPLA2.The bactericidal efficiency of groups V and IIA sPLA2s was shown to be dependent upon the presence of calcium ions and to a less extent Mg(2+) ions and then a correlation could be made to its hydrolytic activity of membrane phospholipids. Importantly, we showed that stingray and dromedary groups V, IIA, and IB sPLA2s present no cytotoxicity after their incubation with MDA-MB-231cells. stingray groups V and IIA sPLA2s, like mammal ones, may be considered as future therapeutic agents against bacterial infections.

  8. Energetics, molecular electronic structure, and spectroscopy of forming Group IIA dihalide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, T. C.; Gole, J. L.

    1999-02-01

    Multiple-collision relaxed (helium) chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescent spectroscopy have been used to demonstrate the highly efficient collisional stabilization of electronically excited Group IIA dihalide collision complexes formed in M (Ca,Sr)+X 2 (XY) (Cl 2, Br 2, ICl, IBr, I 2) reactive encounters. The first discrete emission spectra for the CaCl 2, CaBr 2, SrCl 2, SrBr 2, and SrICl dihalides are observed and evaluated; however, the low-pressure `continuous' chemiluminescent emission observed for forming barium dihalide (BaX 2) complexes is quenched under these experimental conditions. The reactions of the Group IIA metals with molecular fluorine do not readily produce the corresponding dihalide. While the lowest-lying observed dihalide visible transition is, as predicted, found to result in an extended progression in a dihalide complex bending mode (SrCl 2), the observed progression suggests the presence of a residual halogen (Cl-Cl) bond. Two higher-lying transitions are dominated by a vibrational mode structure corresponding to progressions in the symmetric stretching mode or, for nominally forbidden electronic transitions, odd quanta of the asymmetric stretching mode. Some evidence for sequence structure associated with the dihalide bending mode is also obtained. These observations are consistent with complex formation as it is coupled with a modified valence electron structure (correlation diagram) associated with the highly ionic nature of the dihalides. The bonding in the Group IIA dihalides (and their complexes), whose atomization energies are more than twice the metal monohalide bond energy, strongly influences the evaluation of energetics and the determination of monohalide bond energies from chemiluminescent processes. Discrepancies between those bond strengths determined by mass spectrometry and chemiluminescence are discussed with a focus on energy partitioning in dihalide complex formation and its influence on chemical vapor

  9. Effects of Statins and Xuezhikang on the Expression of Secretory Phospholipase A2, Group IIA in Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang; Zhang, Dan

    2017-02-07

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial vascular disease characterized by formation of inflammatory lesions. Secretory phospholipase A2, group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) is involved in this process and plays a critical role. However, the exact role of sPLA2-IIA in cardiovascular inflammation is more complicated and remains unclear. Furthermore, both statins and Xuezhikang (XZK) are widely used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease risk because of their pleiotropic effects on the cardiovascular system. However, their effects on sPLA2-IIA are still controversial. We investigated the regulation of sPLA2-IIA by rat thoracic aorta smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in culture. Cells were first incubated with IL-1β alone to induce expression of sPLA2-IIA and then treated with several concentrations of statins or XZK for different times in the absence or presence of IL-1β. We tested the expression of sPLA2-IIA, including sPLA2-IIA mRNA, protein, as well as activity. We found that statins or IL-1β increase the expression of sPLA2-IIA in VSMCs and the effect is based on a synergetic relationship between them. However, for the first time, we observed that XZK effectively reduces sPLA2-IIA expression in IL-1β-treated VSMCs. Our findings may shine a new light on the clinical use of XZK and statins in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis-related thrombosis.

  10. Effect of NGF on the subcellular localization of group IIA secretory phospholipase A(2) (GIIA) in PC12 cells: role in neuritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, M; Nardicchi, V; Mannucci, R; Arcuri, C; Nicoletti, I; Donato, R; Goracci, G

    2010-12-01

    Phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s) are involved in neuritogenesis but the identity of the isoforms(s) contributing to this process is still not defined. Several reports have focused on secretory PLA(2)s (sPLA(2)) as the administration of exogenous sPLA(2)s to PC12 neuronal cells stimulates neurite outgrowth. The present study demonstrates that the endogenous group IIA sPLA(2) (GIIA), constitutively expressed in mammalian neural cells, changes its subcellular localization when PC12 cells are induced to differentiate by NGF treatment. Indeed, confocal analysis showed a time-dependent accumulation of GIIA in growth cones and neurite tips. Under identical conditions the subcellular distribution of another isoform (GV) was unaffected by NGF. Contrary to GX, another sPLA(2) isoform expressed by PC12 cells, the contribution of GIIA to neuritogenesis does not require its release in the extracellular medium.

  11. Enzymatic properties of stingray Dasyatis pastinaca group V, IIA and IB phospholipases A(2): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Abid, Islem; Horchani, Habib; Mejdoub, Hafedh

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we have purified the group V phospholipase from the heart of cartilaginous fish stingray Dasyatis pastinaca and compared its biochemical properties with group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) and IB (sPLA2-IB) phospholipases previously purified from pancreas and intestine, respectively. Group V phospholipase (sPLA2-V) was purified to homogeneity by heat treatment, ammonium sulphate precipitation and RP-HPLC. The N-terminal sequence of the purified sPLA2-V exhibits a high degree of homology with those of mammal. The enzyme was found to be monomeric with a molecular mass estimation of 14 kDa. The specific activity of the purified enzyme, measured at pH 8 and 37 °C was 52 U/mg. Like sPLA2-IB and sPLA2-IIA, the sPLA2-V is found to be stable between pH 3 and 11 after 30 min of incubation. The purified sPLA2-V retained 65% of its activity after 10 min of incubation at 70 °C and it absolutely requires Ca(2+) for enzymatic activity. In addition it displayed high tolerance to organic solvents. Kinetic parameters Kmapp, kcat and the deduced catalytic efficiency (kcat/Kmapp) of the purified group-V, -IB and -IIA PLA2s were determined using phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylserine (PS) as substrate. The three enzymes hydrolyze the zwiterionic PE and PC substrates more efficiently than anionic PS substrate.

  12. Inhibition of Group IIA Secretory Phospholipase A2 and its Inflammatory Reactions in Mice by Ethanolic Extract of Andrographis paniculata, a Well-known Medicinal Food

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, V.; Yarla, N. S.; Zameer, F.; Nagendra Prasad, M. N.; Santosh, M. S.; More, S. S.; Rao, D. G.; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2016-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata Nees is an important medicinal plant found in the tropical regions of the world, which has been traditionally used in Indian and Chinese medicinal systems. It is also used as medicinal food. A. paniculata is found to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities; however, its inhibitory potential on inflammatory Group IIA phospholipases A2 (PLA2) and its associated inflammatory reactions are not clearly understood. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the inhibitory/neutralizing potential of ethanolic extract of A. paniculata on the isolated inflammatory PLA2 (VRV-PL-VIIIa) from Daboii rusellii pulchella (belonging to Group IIA inflammatory secretory PLA2 [sPLA2]) and its associated edema-induced activities in Swiss albino mice. A. paniculata extract dose dependently inhibited the Group IIA sPLA2 enzymatic activity with an IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.5 μg/ml. Further, the extract dose dependently inhibited the edema formation, when co-injected with enzyme indicating that a strong correlation exists between lipolytic and pro-inflammatory activities of the enzyme. In conclusion, results of this study shows that the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata effectively inhibits Group IIA sPLA2 and its associated inflammatory activities, which substantiate its anti-inflammatory properties. The results of the present study warranted further studies to develop bioactive compound (s) in ethanolic extract of A. paniculata as potent therapeutic agent (s) for inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY This study emphasis the anti-inflammatory effect of A. paniculata by inhibiting the inflammatory Group IIA sPLA2 and its associated inflammatory activities such as edema. It was found that there is a strong correlation between lipolytic activity and pro-inflammatory activity inhibition. Therefore, the study suggests that the extract processes potent anti-inflammatory agents, which could be developed as a potential therapeutic agent against inflammatory and related diseases

  13. Native defect properties and p -type doping efficiency in group-IIA doped wurtzite AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wen; Niu, Hanben

    2008-01-01

    Using the first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the native defect properties and p -type doping efficiency in AlN doped with group-IIA elements such as Be, Mg, and Ca. It is shown that nitrogen vacancies (VN) have low formation energies and introduce deep donor levels in wurtzite AlN, while in zinc blende AlN and GaN, these levels are reported to be shallow. The calculated acceptor levels γ(0/-) for substitutional Be (BeAl) , Mg (MgAl) , and Ca (CaAl) are 0.48, 0.58, and 0.95eV , respectively. In p -type AlN, Be interstitials (Bei) , which act as donors, have low formation energies, making them a likely compensating center in the case of acceptor doping. Whereas, when N-rich growth conditions are applied, Bei are energetically not favorable. It is found that p -type doping efficiency of substitutional Be, Mg, and Ca impurities in w-AlN is affected by atomic size and electronegativity of dopants. Among the three dopants, Be may be the best candidate for p -type w-AlN . N-rich growth conditions help us to increase the concentration of BeAl , MgAl , and CaAl .

  14. Identification of an autoantigen on the surface of apoptotic human T cells as a new protein interacting with inflammatory group IIA phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Bourgoin, Sylvain G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Surette, Marc E

    2003-10-15

    One of the most studied secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2), the group IIA sPLA2, is found at high levels in inflammatory fluids of patients with autoimmune diseases. A characteristic of group IIA sPLA2 is its preference for negatively charged phospholipids, which become exposed on the extracellular leaflet of apoptotic cell membranes. We recently showed that low molecular weight heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and uncharacterized detergent-insoluble binding site(s) contribute to the enhanced binding of human group IIA PLA2 (hGIIA) to apoptotic human T cells. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry we now identify vimentin as the major HSPG-independent binding protein of hGIIA on apoptotic primary T lymphocytes. Vimentin is partially exposed on the surface of apoptotic T cells and binds hGIIA via its rod domain in a calcium-independent manner. Studies with hGIIA mutants showed that specific motifs in the interfacial binding surface are involved in the interaction with vimentin. The sPLA2 inhibitor LY311727, but not heparin, inhibited this interaction. In contrast, heparin but not LY311727 abrogated the binding of hGIIA to cellular HSPGs. Importantly, vimentin does not inhibit the catalytic activity of hGIIA. Altogether, the results show that vimentin, in conjunction with HSPGs, contributes to the enhanced binding of hGIIA to apoptotic T cells.

  15. Interleukin-22-Induced Antimicrobial Phospholipase A2 Group IIA Mediates Protective Innate Immunity of Nonhematopoietic Cells against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yamato; Shiono, Takeru; Yahagi, Ayano; Hamada, Satoru; Umemura, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-07

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen which establishes intracellular parasitism in various cells, including macrophages and nonhematopoietic cells, such as hepatocytes. It has been reported that several proinflammatory cytokines have pivotal roles in innate protection against L. monocytogenes infection. We found that a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin 22 (IL-22), was expressed by CD3(+) CD4(+) T cells at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection in mice. To assess the influence of IL-22 on L. monocytogenes infection in hepatocytes, cells of a human hepatocellular carcinoma line, HepG2, were treated with IL-22 before L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. Gene expression analysis of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells identified phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2G2A) as an upregulated antimicrobial molecule. Addition of recombinant PLA2G2A to the HepG2 culture significantly suppressed L. monocytogenes infection. Culture supernatant of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells contained bactericidal activity against L. monocytogenes, and the activity was abrogated by a specific PLA2G2A inhibitor, demonstrating that HepG2 cells secreted PLA2G2A, which killed extracellular L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, colocalization of PLA2G2A and L. monocytogenes was detected in the IL-22-treated infected HepG2 cells, which suggests involvement of PLA2G2A in the mechanism of intracellular killing of L. monocytogenes by HepG2 cells. These results suggest that IL-22 induced at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection enhances innate immunity against L. monocytogenes in the liver by stimulating hepatocytes to produce an antimicrobial molecule, PLA2G2A.

  16. Expression of group IIA phospholipase A2 is an independent predictor of favorable outcome for patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Huang, Chun-Jin; Yu, Guan-Zhen; Wang, Jie-Jun; Wang, Rui; Li, Yu-Mei; Wu, Qiong

    2013-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis in human gastrointestinal cancer. One of the well-studied isoforms of PLA2, group IIA PLA2 (PLA2G2A), appears to exert its protumorigenic or antitumorigenic effects in a tissue-specific manner. The present study was designed to determine the expression profile and prognostic value of PLA2G2A in gastric cancer in a large Chinese cohort. By using real-time polymerase chain reaction, the amount of PLA2G2A messenger RNA in 60 pairs of fresh gastric tumors and adjacent noncancerous mucosa was measured. The immunostaining of PLA2G2A in 866 gastric cancers with paired noncancerous tissues was assayed. No expression of PLA2G2A was found in normal gastric mucosa, and focal expression of PLA2G2A was noticed in intestinal metaplasia, whereas significantly increased expression of PLA2G2A was observed in the cytoplasm of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the extent of PLA2G2A expression was associated with tumor size (P < .001), tumor differentiation (P = .001), T class (P < .001), N class (P < .001), and TNM stage (P < .001) of gastric cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that PLA2G2A expression was an independent predictor of survival for patients with gastric cancer (P = .024). Expression of PLA2G2A seems to be protective for patients with gastric cancer (hazard ratio, 1.423; 95% confidence interval, 1.047-1.935), and it may be a target for achieving better treatment outcomes.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption on Be, Mg, Ca and Sr doped graphenes: The role of the dopant in the IIA main group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Huijuan; Li, Hejun; Fu, Qiangang

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen (H2) adsorption on the IIA elements doped double-vacancy graphenes (BeG, MgG, CaG and SrG) was studied by using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations. Through investigation of different numbers of hydrogen dockings from two directions, it is found that 1H2/BeG, 1H2/MgG, 8H2/CaG and 8H2/SrG are the most stable adsorption configurations for Be, Mg, Ca and Sr doped graphenes, respectively. Atomic radius, electronegativity and ionization potential of the IIA dopant contribute to the dominating adsorption mechanism under specific H2 concentration. The study would facilitate exploration of high performance graphene-related supports for hydrogen storage.

  18. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Luc H; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2014-10-02

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses.

  19. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S.; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W.; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. PMID:25082876

  20. Life in groups: the roles of oxytocin in mammalian sociality.

    PubMed

    Anacker, Allison M J; Beery, Annaliese K

    2013-12-11

    In recent decades, scientific understanding of the many roles of oxytocin (OT) in social behavior has advanced tremendously. The focus of this research has been on maternal attachments and reproductive pair-bonds, and much less is known about the substrates of sociality outside of reproductive contexts. It is now apparent that OT influences many aspects of social behavior including recognition, trust, empathy, and other components of the behavioral repertoire of social species. This review provides a comparative perspective on the contributions of OT to life in mammalian social groups. We provide background on the functions of OT in maternal attachments and the early social environment, and give an overview of the role of OT circuitry in support of different mating systems. We then introduce peer relationships in group-living rodents as a means for studying the importance of OT in non-reproductive affiliative behaviors. We review species differences in oxytocin receptor (OTR) distributions in solitary and group-living species of South American tuco-tucos and in African mole-rats, as well as singing mice. We discuss variation in OTR levels with seasonal changes in social behavior in female meadow voles, and the effects of OT manipulations on peer huddling behavior. Finally, we discuss avenues of promise for future investigation, and relate current findings to research in humans and non-human primates. There is growing evidence that OT is involved in social selectivity, including increases in aggression toward social outgroups and decreased huddling with unfamiliar individuals, which may support existing social structures or relationships at the expense of others. OT's effects reach beyond maternal attachment and pair bonds to play a role in affiliative behavior underlying "friendships", organization of broad social structures, and maintenance of established social relationships with individuals or groups.

  1. Production of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors from Human Lung Macrophages Induced by Group IIA and Group X Secreted Phospholipases A2

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Francescopaolo; Frattini, Annunziata; Loffredo, Stefania; Staiano, Rosaria I.; Petraroli, Angelica; Ribatti, Domenico; Oslund, Rob; Gelb, Michael H.; Lambeau, Gerard; Marone, Gianni; Triggiani, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis mediated by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are main features of chronic inflammation and tumors. Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) are overexpressed in inflammatory lung diseases and cancer and they activate inflammatory cells by enzymatic and receptor-mediated mechanisms. We investigated the effect of sPLA2s on the production of VEGFs from human macrophages purified from the lung tissue of patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Primary macrophages express VEGF-A, VEGF-B, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D at both mRNA and protein level. Two human sPLA2s (group IIA and group X) induced the expression and release of VEGF-A and VEGF-C from macrophages. Enzymatically-inactive sPLA2s were as effective as the active enzymes in inducing VEGF production. Me-Indoxam and RO092906A, two compounds that block receptor-mediated effects of sPLA2s, inhibited group X-induced release of VEGF-A. Inhibition of the MAPK p38 by SB203580 also reduced sPLA2-induced release of VEGF-A. Supernatants of group X-activated macrophages induced an angiogenic response in chorioallantoic membranes that was inhibited by Me-Indoxam. Stimulation of macrophages with group X sPLA2 in the presence of adenosine analogs induced a synergistic increase of VEGF-A release and inhibited TNF-α production through a cooperation between A2A and A3 receptors. These results demonstrate that sPLA2s induce production of VEGF-A and VEGF-C in human macrophages by a receptor-mediated mechanism independent from sPLA2 catalytic activity. Thus, sPLA2s may play an important role in inflammatory and/or neoplastic angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:20357262

  2. Report of the NASA Mammalian Developmental Biology Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Development is considered to encompass all aspects of the mammalian life span from initial initial germ cell production through the complete life cycle to death of the organism. Thus, gamete production, fertilization, embryogenesis, implantation, fetogenesis, birth, peri- and postnatal maturation, and aging were all considered as stages of a development continuum relevant to problems of Space Biology. Deliberations thus far have been limited to stages of the development cycle from fertilization to early postnatal life. The deliberations are detailed.

  3. The Finding of a Group IIE Phospholipase A2 Gene in a Specified Segment of Protobothrops flavoviridis Genome and Its Possible Evolutionary Relationship to Group IIA Phospholipase A2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chijiwa, Takahito; Ikeda, Naoki; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Hattori, Shosaku; Ohno, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    The genes encoding group IIE phospholipase A2, abbreviated as IIE PLA2, and its 5' and 3' flanking regions of Crotalinae snakes such as Protobothrops flavoviridis, P. tokarensis, P. elegans, and Ovophis okinavensis, were found and sequenced. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns and coded for 22 or 24 amino acid residues of the signal peptides and 134 amino acid residues of the mature proteins. These IIE PLA2s show high similarity to those from mammals and Colubridae snakes. The high expression level of IIE PLA2s in Crotalinae venom glands suggests that they should work as venomous proteins. The blast analysis indicated that the gene encoding OTUD3, which is ovarian tumor domain-containing protein 3, is located in the 3' downstream of IIE PLA2 gene. Moreover, a group IIA PLA2 gene was found in the 5' upstream of IIE PLA2 gene linked to the OTUD3 gene (OTUD3) in the P. flavoviridis genome. It became evident that the specified arrangement of IIA PLA2 gene, IIE PLA2 gene, and OTUD3 in this order is common in the genomes of humans to snakes. The present finding that the genes encoding various secretory PLA2s form a cluster in the genomes of humans to birds is closely related to the previous finding that six venom PLA2 isozyme genes are densely clustered in the so-called NIS-1 fragment of the P. flavoviridis genome. It is also suggested that venom IIA PLA2 genes may be evolutionarily derived from the IIE PLA2 gene. PMID:25529307

  4. NGF induces the expression of group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 in PC12 cells: the newly synthesized enzyme is addressed to growing neurites.

    PubMed

    Nardicchi, Vincenza; Ferrini, Monica; Pilolli, Francesca; Angeli, Emanuela Biagioni; Persichetti, Emanuele; Beccari, Tommaso; Mannucci, Roberta; Arcuri, Cataldo; Donato, Rosario; Dorman, Robert V; Goracci, Gianfrancesco

    2014-08-01

    We proposed that group IIA secretory phospholipase A(2) (GIIA) participates in neuritogenesis based on our observations that the enzyme migrates to growth cones and neurite tips when PC12 cells are induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor (NGF) (Ferrini et al., Neurochem Res 35:2168-2174, 2010). The involvement of other secretory PLA(2) isoforms in neuronal development has been suggested by others but through different mechanisms. In the present study, we compared the subcellular distribution of GIIA and group X sPLA(2) (GX) after stimulation of PC12 cells with NGF. We found that GIIA, but not GX, localized at the neuritic tips after treatment with NGF, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analysis. We also found that NGF stimulated the expression and the activity of GIIA. In addition, NGF induced the expressed myc-tagged GIIA protein to migrate to neurite tips in its active form. We propose that GIIA expression, activity, and subcellular localization is regulated by NGF and that the enzyme may participate in neuritogenesis through intracellular mechanisms, most likely by facilitating the remodelling of glycerophospholipid molecular species by deacylation-reacylation reactions necessary for the incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  5. Purification and characterization of a phospholipase A2-IIA from common stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca) intestine.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Daihan, Sooad K; Moubayed, Nadine M S; Mejdoub, Hafedh

    2013-06-01

    A phospholipase A2 belonging to IIA group secretory PLA2 was isolated and purified to homogeneity from the intestine of common stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca) using acidic treatment (pH 1.5) and ammonium sulphate precipitation methods combined with single-column ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was found to be a glycosylated monomeric protein with a molecular mass of about 14 kDa. The stingray sPLA2-IIA had optimum activity at 45 degrees C, unlike known mammalian PLA2-IIAs, which show optimum activity at 37 degrees C. The purified enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 290 U/mg at optimal conditions (pH 9.5 and 45 degrees C) in the presence of 6 mM NaDC and 8 mM CaCl2 with egg yolk as substrate. The NH2-terminal sequence of the enzyme and some protein fragments obtained from its tryptic digestion were also determined. All sequences obtained were similar to those of sPLA2-IIA. The enzyme also showed good stability in the presence of organic solvents, acidic and alkaline pH media and high temperature conditions. Thus, the purified enzyme exhibited a number of unique and promising properties, making it a potential possible candidate for future applications in the treatment of phospholipid-rich industrial effluents and synthesis of useful preparations for the food production and processing industry.

  6. AMPK Signaling Involvement for the Repression of the IL-1β-Induced Group IIA Secretory Phospholipase A2 Expression in VSMCs

    PubMed Central

    El Hadri, Khadija; Denoyelle, Chantal; Ravaux, Lucas; Viollet, Benoit; Foretz, Marc; Friguet, Bertrand; Rouis, Mustapha; Raymondjean, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Secretory Phospholipase A2 of type IIA (sPLA2 IIA) plays a crucial role in the production of lipid mediators by amplifying the neointimal inflammatory context of the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), especially during atherogenesis. Phenformin, a biguanide family member, by its anti-inflammatory properties presents potential for promoting beneficial effects upon vascular cells, however its impact upon the IL-1β-induced sPLA2 gene expression has not been deeply investigated so far. The present study was designed to determine the relationship between phenformin coupling AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) function and the molecular mechanism by which the sPLA2 IIA expression was modulated in VSMCs. Here we find that 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleotide (AICAR) treatment strongly repressed IL-1β-induced sPLA2 expression at least at the transcriptional level. Our study reveals that phenformin elicited a dose-dependent inhibition of the sPLA2 IIA expression and transient overexpression experiments of constitutively active AMPK demonstrate clearly that AMPK signaling is involved in the transcriptional inhibition of sPLA2-IIA gene expression. Furthermore, although the expression of the transcriptional repressor B-cell lymphoma-6 protein (BCL-6) was markedly enhanced by phenformin and AICAR, the repression of sPLA2 gene occurs through a mechanism independent of BCL-6 DNA binding site. In addition we show that activation of AMPK limits IL-1β-induced NF-κB pathway activation. Our results indicate that BCL-6, once activated by AMPK, functions as a competitor of the IL-1β induced NF-κB transcription complex. Our findings provide insights on a new anti-inflammatory pathway linking phenformin, AMPK and molecular control of sPLA2 IIA gene expression in VSMCs. PMID:26162096

  7. Clinical value of 12 occlusal features for the prediction of disc displacement with reduction (RDC/TMD Axis I group IIa).

    PubMed

    Chiappe, G; Fantoni, F; Landi, N; Biondi, K; Bosco, M

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the clinical value of 12 occlusal variables for the prediction of disc displacement with reduction diagnosed according to research diagnostic criteria (RDC)/temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Twelve occlusal features were clinically assessed by the same three operators. The sample consisted of 165 TMD patients (65 males, 100 females; mean age: 32.55 +/-11.685 years) with only disc displacement with reduction (RDC/TMD Axis I group IIa) and a control sample of 145 healthy subjects (65 males, 80 females; mean age:31.24+/-12.436 years) diagnosed with RDC/TMD Axis I group 0. A stepwise multiple logistic regression model was used to identify the significant correlation between occlusal features and disease. The odds ratio for disc displacement was 2.84 for absence of canine guidance, 2.14 for mediotrusive interference and 1.75 for retruded contact position (RCP)/maximum intercuspation (MI) slide >or=2 mm. Other occlusal variables did not reveal to be statistically significant. The percentage of the total log likelihood for disc displacement explained by the significant occlusal factors was acceptable with a Nagelkerke's R(2) = 0.124. The final model including the significant occlusal features revealed an optimal discriminant capacity to predict patients with disc displacement with a sensitivity of 63.6% or with a specificity of 64.8% for healthy subjects and an accuracy of 64.2%. Occlusal features showed a low predictive value for detecting disc displacement. Multifactorial complex pathologies such as TMD should be investigated using a multivariate statistical analysis; moreover,the future of aetiopathogenic research in this matter requires a multifactorial approach.

  8. The Dimerization State of the Mammalian High Mobility Group Protein AT-Hook 2 (HMGA2)

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Lorraine; Baez, Maria A. M.; Harrilal, Christopher; Garabedian, Alyssa; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco; Leng, Fenfei

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian high mobility group protein AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is a chromosomal architectural transcription factor involved in cell transformation and oncogenesis. It consists of three positively charged “AT-hooks” and a negatively charged C-terminus. Sequence analyses, circular dichroism experiments, and gel-filtration studies showed that HMGA2, in the native state, does not have a defined secondary or tertiary structure. Surprisingly, using combined approaches of 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and mass spectrometry, we discovered that HMGA2 is capable of self-associating into homodimers in aqueous buffer solution. Our results showed that electrostatic interactions between the positively charged “AT-hooks” and the negatively charged C-terminus greatly contribute to the homodimer formation. PMID:26114780

  9. Group D prothrombin activators from snake venom are structural homologues of mammalian blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Veena S; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2003-01-01

    Procoagulant venoms of several Australian elapids contain proteinases that specifically activate prothrombin; among these, Group D activators are functionally similar to coagulation factor Xa (FXa). Structural information on this class of prothrombin activators will contribute significantly towards understanding the mechanism of FXa-mediated prothrombin activation. Here we present the purification of Group D prothrombin activators from three Australian snake venoms (Hoplocephalus stephensi, Notechis scutatus scutatus and Notechis ater niger) using a single-step method, and their N-terminal sequences. The N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain of hopsarin D (H. stephensi) revealed that a fully conserved Cys-7 was substituted with a Ser residue. We therefore determined the complete amino acid sequence of hopsarin D. Hopsarin D shows approximately 70% similarity with FXa and approximately 98% similarity with trocarin D, a Group D prothrombin activator from Tropidechis carinatus. It possesses the characteristic Gla domain, two epidermal growth factor-like domains and a serine proteinase domain. All residues important for catalysis are conserved, as are most regions involved in interactions with factor Va and prothrombin. However, there are some structural differences. Unlike FXa, hopsarin D is glycosylated in both its chains: in light-chain residue 52 and heavy-chain residue 45. The glycosylation on the heavy chain is a large carbohydrate moiety adjacent to the active-site pocket. Overall, hopsarin D is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian coagulation FXa. PMID:12403650

  10. Aldehyde Recognition and Discrimination by Mammalian Odorant Receptors via Functional Group-Specific Hydration Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian odorant receptors (ORs) form a chemical-detecting interface between the atmosphere and the nervous system. This large gene family is composed of hundreds of membrane proteins predicted to form as many unique small molecule binding niches within their G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) framework, but very little is known about the molecular recognition strategies they use to bind and discriminate between small molecule odorants. Using rationally designed synthetic analogs of a typical aliphatic aldehyde, we report evidence that among the ORs showing specificity for the aldehyde functional group, a significant percentage detect the aldehyde through its ability to react with water to form a 1,1-geminal (gem)-diol. Evidence is presented indicating that the rat OR-I7, an often-studied and modeled OR known to require the aldehyde function of octanal for activation, is likely one of the gem-diol activated receptors. A homology model based on an activated GPCR X-ray structure provides a structural hypothesis for activation of OR-I7 by the gem-diol of octanal. PMID:25181321

  11. Survival implications of the development of behavioural responsiveness and awareness in different groups of mammalian young.

    PubMed

    Mellor, D J; Lentle, R G

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on the development of behaviours that are critical for the survival of newborn and juvenile mammals of veterinary and wider biological interest. It provides an updated, integrated and comparative analysis of how postnatal maturation of sensory, motor and perceptual capacities support and constrain behavioural interactions between mammalian young and the mother, any littermates and the environment. Young that are neurologically exceptionally immature, moderately immature and mature at birth are compared, and include, for example, marsupial joeys, rodent pups and ruminant offspring. Mothers in these three groups exhibit distinctive patterns of birthing and postnatal care behaviours. To secure survival of the young, maternal care must compensate for behavioural inadequacies imposed by the limited sensory capacities the young possess at each stage. These sensory capacities develop in a predictable sequence in most mammals such that before birth the sequence progresses to an extent that parallels the degree of neurological maturity reached at birth. The extent of neurological maturity is likewise reflected in how long it takes after birth for the necessary brain circuit connectivity to develop sufficiently to support cortically based cognitive modulation of behaviour. This takes several months, days-to-weeks or minutes-to-hours in young that are, respectively, neurologically exceptionally immature, moderately immature, or mature at birth. Once achieved, cognitive awareness confers a high degree of behavioural flexibility that allows the young to respond more effectively to the unpredictability of their postnatal environments. It is shown that the onset of this cognitively based flexibility in the young of each group coincides with their first exposure to a variable environment that requires such behavioural flexibility.

  12. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  13. Selective Inhibition of Human Group IIA-secreted Phospholipase A2 (hGIIA) Signaling Reveals Arachidonic Acid Metabolism Is Associated with Colocalization of hGIIA to Vimentin in Rheumatoid Synoviocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Bryant, Katherine J.; Bouveret, Romaric; Lei, Pei-Wen; Duff, Anthony P.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Huang, Edwin P.; Harvey, Richard P.; Gelb, Michael H.; Gray, Peter P.; Curmi, Paul M.; Cunningham, Anne M.; Church, W. Bret; Scott, Kieran F.

    2013-01-01

    Human group IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (hGIIA) promotes tumor growth and inflammation and can act independently of its well described catalytic lipase activity via an alternative poorly understood signaling pathway. With six chemically diverse inhibitors we show that it is possible to selectively inhibit hGIIA signaling over catalysis, and x-ray crystal structures illustrate that signaling involves a pharmacologically distinct surface to the catalytic site. We demonstrate in rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes that non-catalytic signaling is associated with rapid internalization of the enzyme and colocalization with vimentin. Trafficking of exogenous hGIIA was monitored with immunofluorescence studies, which revealed that vimentin localization is disrupted by inhibitors of signaling that belong to a rare class of small molecule inhibitors that modulate protein-protein interactions. This study provides structural and pharmacological evidence for an association between vimentin, hGIIA, and arachidonic acid metabolism in synovial inflammation, avenues for selective interrogation of hGIIA signaling, and new strategies for therapeutic hGIIA inhibitor design. PMID:23482564

  14. Fc gamma receptor IIa-H131R polymorphism and malaria susceptibility in sympatric ethnic groups, Fulani and Dogon of Mali.

    PubMed

    Maiga, B; Dolo, A; Touré, O; Dara, V; Tapily, A; Campino, S; Sepulveda, N; Corran, P; Rockett, K; Clark, T G; Blomberg, M Troye; Doumbo, O K

    2014-01-01

    It has been previously shown that there are some interethnic differences in susceptibility to malaria between two sympatric ethnic groups of Mali, the Fulani and the Dogon. The lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria seen in the Fulani has not been fully explained by genetic polymorphisms previously known to be associated with malaria resistance, including haemoglobin S (HbS), haemoglobin C (HbC), alpha-thalassaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Given the observed differences in the distribution of FcγRIIa allotypes among different ethnic groups and with malaria susceptibility that have been reported, we analysed the rs1801274-R131H polymorphism in the FcγRIIa gene in a study of Dogon and Fulani in Mali (n = 939). We confirm that the Fulani have less parasite densities, less parasite prevalence, more spleen enlargement and higher levels of total IgG antibodies (anti-CSP, anti-AMA1, anti-MSP1 and anti-MSP2) and more total IgE (P < 0.05) compared with the Dogon ethnic group. Furthermore, the Fulani exhibit higher frequencies of the blood group O (56.5%) compared with the Dogon (43.5%) (P < 0.001). With regard to the FcγRIIa polymorphism and allele frequency, the Fulani group have a higher frequency of the H allele (Fulani 0.474, Dogon 0.341, P < 0.0001), which was associated with greater total IgE production (P = 0.004). Our findings show that the FcγRIIa polymorphism might have an implication in the relative protection seen in the Fulani tribe, with confirmatory studies required in other malaria endemic settings.

  15. MYBPH inhibits NM IIA assembly via direct interaction with NMHC IIA and reduces cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Yasuyuki; Usukura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits NMHC IIA assembly and cell motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH interacts to assembly-competent NM IIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA. -- Abstract: Actomyosin filament assembly is a critical step in tumor cell migration. We previously found that myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) is directly transactivated by the TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinomas and inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) of non-muscle myosin IIA (NM IIA) via direct interaction with Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1). Here, we report that MYBPH also directly interacts with an additional molecule, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC IIA), which was found to occur between MYBPH and the rod portion of NMHC IIA. MYBPH inhibited NMHC IIA assembly and reduced cell motility. Conversely, siMYBPH-induced increased motility was partially, yet significantly, suppressed by blebbistatin, a non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, while more profound effects were attained by combined treatment with siROCK1 and blebbistatin. Electron microscopy observations showed well-ordered paracrystals of NMHC IIA reflecting an assembled state, which were significantly less frequently observed in the presence of MYBPH. Furthermore, an in vitro sedimentation assay showed that a greater amount of NMHC IIA was in an unassembled state in the presence of MYBPH. Interestingly, treatment with a ROCK inhibitor that impairs transition of NM IIA from an assembly-incompetent to assembly-competent state reduced the interaction between MYBPH and NMHC IIA, suggesting that MYBPH has higher affinity to assembly-competent NM IIA. These results suggest that MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA, and negatively regulates actomyosin organization at 2 distinct steps, resulting in firm inhibition of NM IIA assembly.

  16. Differential turnover of phosphate groups on neurofilament subunits in mammalian neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nixon, R A; Lewis, S E

    1986-12-15

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of specific proteins was demonstrated directly in the intact vertebrate nervous system in vivo. By exploiting the neurons' ability to segregate a select group of cytoskeletal proteins from most other phosphorylated constituents of the cell by axoplasmic transport, we were able to examine the dynamics of phosphate turnover on neurofilament proteins in mouse retinal ganglion cell neurons simultaneously labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and [3H]proline in vivo. Three [3H]proline-labeled neurofilament protein (NFP) subunits, designated H (160-200 kDa), M (135-145 kDa), and L (68-70 kDa), entered optic axons in a mole:mole ratio similar to that of isolated axonal neurofilaments, supporting the notion that newly synthesized NFPs are transported along axons as assembled neurofilaments. NFP subunits incorporated high levels of 32P before reaching axonal sites at the level of the optic nerve. As neurofilaments were transported along axons, however, many initially incorporated [32P]phosphate groups were removed. Loss of these phosphate groups occurred to a different extent on each subunit. A minimum of 50-60 and 35-40% of the labeled phosphate groups was removed in a 5-day period from the L and M subunits, respectively. By contrast, the H subunit exhibited relatively little or no phosphate turnover during the same period. Dephosphorylation of L in axons is accompanied by a decrease in its net state of phosphorylation; changes in the phosphorylation state of H and M, however, also reflect ongoing addition of phosphates to these polypeptides during axonal transport (Nixon, R.A., Lewis, S.E., and Marotta, C.A. (1986) J. Neurosci., in press). The possibility is raised that dynamic rearrangements of phosphate topography on NFPs represent a mechanism to coordinate interactions of neurofilaments with other proteins as these elements are transported and incorporated into the stationary cytoskeleton along retinal ganglion cell axons.

  17. Exceptional generalised geometry for massive IIA and consistent reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassani, Davide; de Felice, Oscar; Petrini, Michela; Strickland-Constable, Charles; Waldram, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We develop an exceptional generalised geometry formalism for massive type IIA supergravity. In particular, we construct a deformation of the generalised Lie derivative, which generates the type IIA gauge transformations as modified by the Romans mass. We apply this new framework to consistent Kaluza-Klein reductions preserving maximal supersymmetry. We find a generalised parallelisation of the exceptional tangent bundle on S 6, and from this reproduce the consistent truncation ansatz and embedding tensor leading to dyonically gauged ISO(7) supergravity in four dimensions. We also discuss closely related hyperboloid reductions, yielding a dyonic ISO( p, 7 - p) gauging. Finally, while for vanishing Romans mass we find a generalised parallelisation on S d , d = 4 , 3 , 2, leading to a maximally supersymmetric reduction with gauge group SO( d + 1) (or larger), we provide evidence that an analogous reduction does not exist in the massive theory.

  18. [Effects of Tanshinone IIa on cytokines and platelets in immune vasculitis and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Zhou, Min; Li, Xiao-Hui; Xu, You-Hua; Liu, Hong; Yang, Mo

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Tanshinone IIa on IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha cytokines in immune vasculitis and platelets, as well as their relationship. The model of immune vasculitis of rabbits were established by intravenous injection of bovine serum albumin twice. Experiment was divided into 4 groups: control group, model group, tanshinone IIa-treated group and aspirin-treated group. The platelet count, platelet aggregation of peripheral blood were determined. The levels of serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha were detected by ELISA. The pathological changes of immune vasculitis were analyzed by hematoxylin & eosin staining, elastic fibers staining and electron microscopy. The results showed that the levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in model group were significantly higher than those in normal group (p < 0.05), while the level of IL-6 was not significantly different between various groups. The serum level of IL-1beta was correlated with platelet number, while serum levels IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were both correlated with the platelet aggregation. The treatment with tanshinone IIa could significantly decrease the serum levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and platelet number, and the efficacy of tanshinone IIa was same as aspirin. The tanshinone IIa and aspirin both could alleviate the vessels damage in patients with immune vasculitis. It is concluded that the tanshinone IIa may diminish the inflammation damage of vessels in patients with immune vasculitis through the inhibition of cytokines and platelets.

  19. Class IIa Bacteriocins: Current Knowledge and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguesmia, Yanath; Naghmouchi, Karim; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Drider, Djamel

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to produce antibacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. Bacteriocins fall structurally and chemically into three different classes, I, II, and III. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized peptides with antagonism against closely related bacteria. This late observation has evolved because bacteriocins active against Gram-negative bacteria have recently been reported. Members of class IIa bacteriocins, referred to as pediocin-like bacteriocins, are among the most studied bacteriocins. This chapter is aimed at providing an updated review on the biology of class IIa bacteriocins.

  20. Class IIa Bacteriocins: Diversity and New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanhua; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Yunfeng; Shi, John; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Qu, Xiaojun; Cui, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    Class IIa bacteriocins are heat-stable, unmodified peptides with a conserved amino acids sequence YGNGV on their N-terminal domains, and have received much attention due to their generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status, their high biological activity, and their excellent heat stability. They are promising and attractive agents that could function as biopreservatives in the food industry. This review summarizes the new developments in the area of class IIa bacteriocins and aims to provide uptodate information that can be used in designing future research. PMID:23222636

  1. Class IIa bacteriocins: diversity and new developments.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanhua; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Yunfeng; Shi, John; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Qu, Xiaojun; Cui, Hongyu

    2012-12-06

    Class IIa bacteriocins are heat-stable, unmodified peptides with a conserved amino acids sequence YGNGV on their N-terminal domains, and have received much attention due to their generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status, their high biological activity, and their excellent heat stability. They are promising and attractive agents that could function as biopreservatives in the food industry. This review summarizes the new developments in the area of class IIa bacteriocins and aims to provide uptodate information that can be used in designing future research.

  2. Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis type IIa - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Majoriê Mergen; Schmitt, Eloísa Unfer; Hagemann, Laura Netto; da Silva, Roberta Castilhos; Cattani, Cristiane Almeida Soares

    2013-01-01

    Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis is a rare syndrome characterized by capillary malformation and pigmentary nevus. A case of a 2-year-old patient is reported, who presented extensive nevus flammeus and an aberrant Mongolian spot, without systemic disease, manifestations that allow us to classify this case as type IIa Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis, according to Hasegawa's classification. PMID:24346888

  3. Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis type IIa--case report.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Majoriê Mergen; Schmitt, Eloísa Unfer; Hagemann, Laura Netto; Silva, Roberta Castilhos da; Cattani, Cristiane Almeida Soares

    2013-01-01

    Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis is a rare syndrome characterized by capillary malformation and pigmentary nevus. A case of a 2-year-old patient is reported, who presented extensive nevus flammeus and an aberrant Mongolian spot, without systemic disease, manifestations that allow us to classify this case as type IIa Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis, according to Hasegawa's classification.

  4. Script N = 2 solutions of massive type IIA and their Chern-Simons duals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrini, Michela; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    We find explicit AdS4 solutions of massive type IIA with Script N = 2 supersymmetry obtained deforming with a Roman mass the type IIA supersymmetric reduction of the M theory background AdS4 × M111. The family of solutions have SU(3) × SU(3) structure and isometry SU(3) × U(1)2. They are conjectured to be dual to three-dimensional Script N = 2 Chern-Simons theories with generic Chern-Simons couplings and gauge group ranks.

  5. Supersymmetric geometries of IIA supergravity III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Ulf; Papadopoulos, George; von Schultz, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We find that (massive) IIA backgrounds that admit a {G}_2ltimes {mathbb{R}}^8 invariant Killing spinor must exhibit a null Killing vector field which leaves the Killing spinor invariant and that the rotation of the Killing vector field satisfies a certain g2 instanton condition. This result together with those in [4] and [5] complete the classification of geometries of all (massive) IIA backgrounds that preserve one supersymmetry. We also explore the geometry of a class of backgrounds which admit a {G}_2ltimes {mathbb{R}}^8 invariant Killing spinor and where in addition an appropriate 1-form bilinear vanishes. In all cases, we express the fluxes of the theory in terms of the geometry.

  6. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with nedaplatin in patients with stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Toru; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Koizumi, Masae; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Nabeta, Motoo; Koizumi, Koji; Matsubara, Yuko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Matsubara, Keiichi; Katayama, Tomihiro; Nawa, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of nadaplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma. Patients with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma were treated with nadaplatin-based CCRT, using high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) or radiotherapy (RT) alone, in patients with FIGO stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma. CCRT with nedaplatin (80 mg/m(2)) was administered on Days 1 and 29. The records of 17 women treated either with nadaplatin-based CCRT using HSR-ICBT (n=8) or RT alone (n=9), for stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The activity and toxicity were compared in the two treatment groups. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were the main endpoints. The 5-year overall survival rates in the CCRT and RT groups were 68.6 and 77.8%, respectively. The median OS of the CCRT and RT groups was 38.5 and 27.3 months, respectively. There was no significant difference in either PFS (P=0.618) or OS (P= 0.231). The most common grade 3-4 or higher toxicities in the CCRT groups were leuko-/neutropenia (37.5%). The frequency of acute grade 3-4 toxicity was higher in the CCRT compared to the RT group. However, no statistically significant difference was observed. Nedaplatin-based CCRT was safely performed. Although the prognosis of patients with FIGO stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma was not significantly improved, fewer distant relapses were observed in this treatment. Consequently, nedaplatin-based CCRT may be considered as a potential alternative to cisplatin-based CCRT in this patient population.

  7. Inhibition of the function of class IIa HDACs by blocking their interaction with MEF2

    PubMed Central

    Jayathilaka, Nimanthi; Gaffney, Kevin J.; Dey, Raja; Jarusiewicz, Jamie A.; Noridomi, Kaori; Philips, Michael A.; Lei, Xiao; He, Ju; Ye, Jun; Gao, Tao; Petasis, Nicos A.; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes that modify the epigenetic status of cells provide attractive targets for therapy in various diseases. The therapeutic development of epigenetic modulators, however, has been largely limited to direct targeting of catalytic active site conserved across multiple members of an enzyme family, which complicates mechanistic studies and drug development. Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a group of epigenetic enzymes that depends on interaction with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 (MEF2) for their recruitment to specific genomic loci. Targeting this interaction presents an alternative approach to inhibiting this class of HDACs. We have used structural and functional approaches to identify and characterize a group of small molecules that indirectly target class IIa HDACs by blocking their interaction with MEF2 on DNA.Weused X-ray crystallography and 19F NMRto show that these compounds directly bind to MEF2. We have also shown that the small molecules blocked the recruitment of class IIa HDACs to MEF2-targeted genes to enhance the expression of those targets. These compounds can be used as tools to study MEF2 and class IIa HDACs in vivo and as leads for drug development. PMID:22396528

  8. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  9. Accelerated universes from type IIA compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blåbäck, Johan; Danielsson, Ulf; Dibitetto, Giuseppe E-mail: ulf.danielsson@physics.uu.se

    2014-03-01

    We study slow-roll accelerating cosmologies arising from geometric compactifications of type IIA string theory on T{sup 6}/(Z{sub 2}  ×  Z{sub 2}). With the aid of a genetic algorithm, we are able to find quasi-de Sitter backgrounds with both slow-roll parameters of order 0.1. Furthermore, we study their evolution by numerically solving the corresponding time-dependent equations of motion, and we show that they actually display a few e-folds of accelerated expansion. Finally, we comment on their perturbative reliability.

  10. Thermal Conductivity Of Natural Type IIa Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan; Vining, Cronin; Zoltan, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Report describes application of flash diffusivity method to measure thermal conductivity of 8.04 x 8.84 x 2.35-mm specimen of natural, white, type-IIa diamond at temperatures between 500 and 1,250 K. Provides baseline for comparison to isotopically pure (12C) diamond. Results used as reference against which diamond films produced by chemical-vapor deposition at low pressures can be compared. High thermal conductivity of diamond exploited for wide variety of applications, and present results also used to estimate heat-conduction performances of diamond films in high-temperature applications.

  11. Class IIa histone deacetylases affect neuronal remodeling and functional outcome after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Haifa; Shehadah, Amjad; Li, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Sadry, Neema; Liu, Xianshuang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that stroke induces nuclear shuttling of class IIa histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Stroke-induced nuclear shuttling of HDAC4 is positively and significantly correlated with improved indices of neuronal remodeling in the peri-infarct cortex. In this study, using a rat model for middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), we tested the effects of selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs on functional recovery and neuronal remodeling when administered 24hr after stroke. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 15-17/group) were subjected to 2 h MCAO and orally gavaged with MC1568 (a selective class IIa HDAC inhibitor), SAHA (a non-selective HDAC inhibitor), or vehicle-control for 7 days starting 24 h after MCAO. A battery of behavioral tests was performed. Lesion volume measurement and immunohistochemistry were performed 28 days after MCAO. We found that stroke increased total HDAC activity in the ipsilateral hemisphere compared to the contralateral hemisphere. Stroke-increased HDAC activity was significantly decreased by the administration of SAHA as well as by MC1568. However, SAHA significantly improved functional outcome compared to vehicle control, whereas selective class IIa inhibition with MC1568 increased mortality and lesion volume and did not improve functional outcome. In addition, MC1568 decreased microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2, dendrites), phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNFH, axons) and myelin basic protein (MBP, myelination) immunoreactivity in the peri-infarct cortex. Quantitative RT-PCR of cortical neurons isolated by laser capture microdissection revealed that MC1568, but not SAHA, downregulated CREB and c-fos expression. Additionally, MC1568 decreased the expression of phosphorylated CREB (active) in neurons. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs impairs neuronal remodeling and neurological outcome. Inactivation of CREB and c-fos by MC1568 likely contributes to

  12. MOUSE TRANSGENIC LINES THAT SELECTIVELY LABEL TYPE I, TYPE IIA AND TYPES IIX+B SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Chakkalakal, Joe V.; Kuang, Shihuan; Buffelli, Mario; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers vary in contractile and metabolic properties. Four main fiber types are present in mammalian trunk and limb muscles; they are called I, IIA, IIX and IIB, ranging from slowest- to fastest-contracting. Individual muscles contain stereotyped proportions of two or more fiber types. Fiber type is determined by a combination of nerve-dependent and –independent influences, leading to formation of “homogeneous motor units” in which all branches of a single motor neuron form synapses on fibers of a single type. Fiber type composition of muscles can be altered in adulthood by multiple factors including exercise, denervation, hormones and aging. To facilitate analysis of muscle development, plasticity and innervation, we generated transgenic mouse lines in which Type I, Type IIA, and Type IIX+B fibers can be selectively labeled with distinguishable fluorophores. We demonstrate their use for motor unit reconstruction and live imaging of nerve-dependent alterations in fiber type. PMID:21898764

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi High Mobility Group B (TcHMGB) can act as an inflammatory mediator on mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Virginia; Alonso, Victoria L.; Manarin, Romina; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Tavernelli, Luis; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2017-01-01

    Background High Mobility Group B (HMGB) proteins are nuclear architectural factors involved in chromatin remodeling and important nuclear events. HMGBs also play key roles outside the cell acting as alarmins or Damage-associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs). In response to a danger signal these proteins act as immune mediators in the extracellular milieu. Moreover, these molecules play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune and both infectious and sterile inflammatory chronic diseases. Principal findings We have previously identified a High mobility group B protein from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHMGB) and showed that it has architectural properties interacting with DNA like HMGBs from other eukaryotes. Here we show that TcHMGB can be translocated to the cytoplasm and secreted out of the parasite, a process that seems to be stimulated by acetylation. We report that recombinant TcHMGB is able to induce an inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo, evidenced by the production of Nitric Oxide and induction of inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ gene expression. Also, TGF-β and IL-10, which are not inflammatory cytokines but do play key roles in Chagas disease, were induced by rTcHMGB. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that TcHMGB can act as an exogenous immune mediator that may be important for both the control of parasite replication as the pathogenesis of Chagas disease and can be envisioned as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) partially overlapping in function with the host DAMPs. PMID:28178282

  14. Crosstalk between Beclin-1-dependent autophagy and caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by tanshinone IIA in human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Zhang, Chuan; Huang, Man-Yu; Guo, Yan-Xing; Hu, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether or not autophagy is induced by tanshinone IIA (TanIIA), and to explore the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in regards to the antitumor effects of TanIIA on MG-63 cells and the potential mechanism. MG-63 cells were cultured in vitro with various concentrations of TanIIA (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/l) for 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT assay was used to evaluate the inhibition of the proliferation of osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by TanIIA or in the presence/absence of chloroquine (CQ). Autophagic vacuoles and characteristic autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TanIIA-induced autophagy in MG-63 cells was confirmed by GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence. The expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and cleaved-PARP and autophagy-related proteins LC3II/LC3I and Beclin-1 were detected by western blotting. FITC-Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate. Fluorescence intensity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined under a fluorescence microscope using an analysis software system. Cell proliferation was obviously inhibited by TanIIA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Generation of autophagy was triggered by TanIIA (0–20 mg/l) treatment, and in a Beclin-1-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, the apoptosis ratio following treatment with 2.5 mg/l TanIIA failed to achieve statistical significance. Expression of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and cleaved-PARP in the other groups was gradually enhanced in dose-dependent manner. Our analysis also suggested that the influence of autophagy on TanIIA cytotoxicity had a phase effect; with low-dose drugs and shorter treatment periods, autophagy functioned as a damage repair mechanism. In conrast, when the cells were treated with higher doses of TanIIA

  15. [Toward exploration of morphological disparity of measurable traits of mammalian skull. 1. Interrelation between different forms of group variation].

    PubMed

    Pavlinov, I Ia; Nanova, O G; Spasskaia, N N

    2008-01-01

    Interrelations between some forms of group variation (FGVs) (age, sex, geographic, inter-species, differences among breeds) of 12 to 15 measurable skull traits are studied in 6 mammal species (pine marten, polar fox, Przewalskii horse, and 3 jird species) by means of dispersion analysis (model III, MANOVA). The above FGVs are considered as factors in the MANOVA, and skull traits are considered as dependent variables. To obtaine commeasurables estimates for the FGVs, each of them is assessed numerically as a portion of its dispersion in the entire morphological disparity defined for each character (or a set of characters) by MANOVA. The data obtained indicate a wide diversity of interrelations between FGVs. It is shown that statistical analysis of significance of joint effects of FGVs does not substitute the analysis of numerical interrelations of their dispersion portions. It is concluded that it is unproductive to study such interrelations as simple "statistical regularities" like the Kluge-Kerfoot phenomenon, so the character sets are not to be considered as statistical ensembles. A kind of content-wise null-model for FGVs of measurable traits is formulated according to which there is a "background" age variation while other FGVs are its derivatives. Respectively, other factors structuring the morphological disparity under investigation being absent, a positive correlation between FGVs is to be anticipated (strong succession). With the significant deviations of the postulated correlation being observed, other factors regulating respective FGVs that cannot be reduced to the age variation are to be supposed (weak succession). Possible interpretations of interrelations between age variation and some other FGVs in carnivores are considered. Craniological variation in the Przewalskii horse is just slightly effected by maintenance conditions under its domestication, a significant influence of other factors is to be supposed. Negative correlation between geographic and

  16. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors.

  17. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Tanshinone IIA on Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Wei; Huang, Yi-Tsau

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB pathways in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is one therapeutic approach to hepatic fibrosis. Tanshinone IIA (C19H18O3, Tan IIA) is a lipophilic diterpene isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, with reported anti-inflammatory activity. We tested whether Tan IIA could inhibit HSC activation. Materials and Methods The cell line of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6) was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 ng/ml). Cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assay. HSC-T6 cells were pretreated with Tan IIA (1, 3 and 10 µM), then induced by LPS (100 ng/ml). NF-κB activity was evaluated by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Western blotting analysis was performed to measure NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38). Cell chemotaxis was assessed by both wound-healing assay and trans-well invasion assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect gene expression in HSC-T6 cells. Results All concentrations of drugs showed no cytotoxicity against HSC-T6 cells. LPS stimulated NF-κB luciferase activities, nuclear translocation of NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of ERK, JNK and p38, all of which were suppressed by Tan IIA. In addition, Tan IIA significantly inhibited LPS-induced HSCs chemotaxis, in both wound-healing and trans-well invasion assays. Moreover, Tan IIA attenuated LPS-induced mRNA expressions of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, ICAM-1, iNOS, and α-SMA in HSC-T6 cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that Tan IIA decreased LPS-induced HSC activation. PMID:25076488

  19. Mammalian homologues of the Polycomb-group gene Enhancer of zeste mediate gene silencing in Drosophila heterochromatin and at S. cerevisiae telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Laible, G; Wolf, A; Dorn, R; Reuter, G; Nislow, C; Lebersorger, A; Popkin, D; Pillus, L; Jenuwein, T

    1997-01-01

    Gene silencing is required to stably maintain distinct patterns of gene expression during eukaryotic development and has been correlated with the induction of chromatin domains that restrict gene activity. We describe the isolation of human (EZH2) and mouse (Ezh1) homologues of the Drosophila Polycomb-group (Pc-G) gene Enhancer of zeste [E(z)], a crucial regulator of homeotic gene expression implicated in the assembly of repressive protein complexes in chromatin. Mammalian homologues of E(z) are encoded by two distinct loci in mouse and man, and the two murine Ezh genes display complementary expression profiles during mouse development. The E(z) gene family reveals a striking functional conservation in mediating gene repression in eukaryotic chromatin: extra gene copies of human EZH2 or Drosophila E(z) in transgenic flies enhance position effect variegation of the heterochromatin-associated white gene, and expression of either human EZH2 or murine Ezh1 restores gene repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that are impaired in telomeric silencing. Together, these data provide a functional link between Pc-G-dependent gene repression and inactive chromatin domains, and indicate that silencing mechanism(s) may be broadly conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:9214638

  20. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of hepatitis A virus genotype IIA.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-09-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5' untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored.

  1. Regulation of amantadine hydrochloride binding with IIA subdomain of human serum albumin by fatty acid chains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Lee, Philbert; Ma, Zhiyuan; Ma, Li; Yang, Guoping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Liang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a major protein component of blood plasma that has been exploited to bind and transport a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous organic compounds. Although anionic drugs readily associate with the IIA subdomain of HSA, most cationic drugs poorly associate with HSA at this subdomain. In this study, we propose to improve the association between cationic drugs and HSA by modifying HSA with fatty acid chains. For our experiments, we tested amantadine hydrochloride, a cationic drug with antiviral and antiparkinsonian effects. Our results suggest that extensive myristoylation of HSA can help stabilize the interaction between amantadine and HSA in vitro. Our X-ray crystallography data further elucidate the structural basis of this regulation. Additionally, our crystallography data suggest that anionic drugs, with a functional carboxylate group, may enhance the association between amantadine and HSA by a mechanism similar to myristoylation. Ultimately, our results provide critical structural insight into this novel association between cationic drugs and the HSA IIA subdomain, raising the tempting possibility to fully exploit the unique binding capacity of HSA's IIA subdomain to achieve simultaneous delivery of anionic and cationic drugs.

  2. sPLA2 -IIA Overexpression in Mice Epidermis Depletes Hair Follicle Stem Cells and Induces Differentiation Mediated Through Enhanced JNK/c-Jun Activation.

    PubMed

    Sarate, Rahul M; Chovatiya, Gopal L; Ravi, Vagisha; Khade, Bharat; Gupta, Sanjay; Waghmare, Sanjeev K

    2016-09-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 Group-IIA (sPLA2 -IIA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids to yield fatty acids and lysophospholipids. sPLA2 -IIA is deregulated in various cancers; however, its role in hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) regulation is obscure. Here we report a transgenic mice overexpressing sPLA2 -IIA (K14-sPLA2 -IIA) showed depletion of HFSC pool. This was accompanied with increased differentiation, loss of ortho-parakeratotic organization and enlargement of sebaceous gland, infundibulum and junctional zone. The colony forming efficiency of keratinocytes was significantly reduced. Microarray profiling of HFSCs revealed enhanced level of epithelial mitogens and transcription factors, c-Jun and FosB that may be involved in proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, K14-sPLA2 -IIA keratinocytes showed enhanced activation of EGFR and JNK1/2 that led to c-Jun activation, which co-related with enhanced differentiation. Further, depletion of stem cells in bulge is associated with high levels of chromatin silencing mark, H3K27me3 and low levels of an activator mark, H3K9ac suggestive of alteration in gene expression contributing toward stem cells differentiation. Our results, first time uncovered that overexpression of sPLA2 -IIA lead to depletion of HFSCs and differentiation associated with altered histone modification. Thus involvement of sPLA2 -IIA in stem cells regulation and disease pathogenesis suggest its prospective clinical implications. Stem Cells 2016;34:2407-2417.

  3. Eccentric contraction-induced injury to type I, IIa, and IIa/IIx muscle fibers of elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Jun; Lim, Jae-Young; Nibaldi, Eva G; Phillips, Edward M; Frontera, Walter R; Fielding, Roger A; Widrick, Jeffrey J

    2012-02-01

    Muscles of old laboratory rodents experience exaggerated force losses after eccentric contractile activity. We extended this line of inquiry to humans and investigated the influence of fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content on the injury process. Skinned muscle fiber segments, prepared from vastus lateralis biopsies of elderly men and women (78 ± 2 years, N = 8), were subjected to a standardized eccentric contraction (strain, 0.25 fiber length; velocity, 0.50 unloaded shortening velocity). Injury was assessed by evaluating pre- and post-eccentric peak Ca(2+)-activated force per fiber cross-sectional area (F (max)). Over 90% of the variability in post-eccentric F (max) could be explained by a multiple linear regression model consisting of an MHC-independent slope, where injury was directly related to pre-eccentric F (max), and MHC-dependent y-intercepts, where the susceptibility to injury could be described as type IIa/IIx fibers > type IIa fibers > type I fibers. We previously reported that fiber type susceptibility to the same standardized eccentric protocol was type IIa/IIx > type IIa = type I for vastus lateralis fibers of 25-year-old adults (Choi and Widrick, Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 299:C1409-C1417, 2010). Modeling combined data sets revealed significant age by fiber type interactions, with post-eccentric F (max) deficits greater for type IIa and type IIa/IIx fibers from elderly vs. young subjects at constant pre-eccentric F (max). We conclude that the resistance of the myofilament lattice to mechanical strain has deteriorated for type IIa and type IIa/IIx, but not for type I, vastus lateralis fibers of elderly adults.

  4. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  5. H-IIA: Concept, missions, program status, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.

    1997-01-01

    In addition to earth orbiting satellite missions, cargo supply to the International Space Station/Japanese Experiment Module (ISS/JEM), lunar and planetary probes, technology verifications for the H-II Orbiting Plane (HOPE), and other missions are under study for early in the new century. The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) is developing the H-IIA rocket to meet these diversifying missions and to conduct them efficiently and economically. This paper presents the purposes, concept, and philosophy of system planning of the H-IIA rocket, the combinations of the H-IIA and a transfer vehicle to the ISS/JEM and an experimental winged re-entry vehicle, HOPE-X. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  7. High ω-3:ω-6 fatty acids ratio increases fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in human ectopic endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khanaki, Korosh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shabani, Mahdi; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis, a common chronic inflammatory disorder, is defined by the atypical growth of endometrium- like tissue outside of the uterus. Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and fatty acid binding protein4 (FABP4) play several important roles in the inflammatory diseases. Objective: Due to reported potential anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in cultured endometrial cells. Materials and Methods: Ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissues obtained from 15 women were snap frozen. After thawing and tissue digestion, primary mixed stromal and endometrial epithelial cell culture was performed for 8 days in culture mediums supplemented with normal and high ratios of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. sPLA2-IIa in the culture medium and FABP4 level was determined using enzyme immuno assay (EIA) technique. Results: Within ectopic endometrial cells group, the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa were remarkably increased under high ω-3 PUFA exposure compared with control condition (p=0.014 and p=0.04 respectively). Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs may increase the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa in ectopic endometrial cells, since sPLAIIa and FABP4 may affect endometriosis via several mechanisms, more relevant studies are encouraged to know the potential effect of increased cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa on endometriosis. PMID:25709631

  8. Characterization of Class IIa Bacteriocin Resistance in Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Geldart, Kathryn; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2017-04-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci, particularly resistant Enterococcus faecium, pose an escalating threat in nosocomial environments because of their innate resistance to many antibiotics, including vancomycin, a treatment of last resort. Many class IIa bacteriocins strongly target these enterococci and may offer a potential alternative for the management of this pathogen. However, E. faecium's resistance to these peptides remains relatively uncharacterized. Here, we explored the development of resistance of E. faecium to a cocktail of three class IIa bacteriocins: enterocin A, enterocin P, and hiracin JM79. We started by quantifying the frequency of resistance to these peptides in four clinical isolates of E. faecium We then investigated the levels of resistance of E. faecium 6E6 mutants as well as their fitness in different carbon sources. In order to elucidate the mechanism of resistance of E. faecium to class IIa bacteriocins, we completed whole-genome sequencing of resistant mutants and performed reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) of a suspected target mannose phosphotransferase (ManPTS). We then verified this ManPTS's role in bacteriocin susceptibility by showing that expression of the ManPTS in Lactococcus lactis results in susceptibility to the peptide cocktail. Based on the evidence found from these studies, we conclude that, in accord with other studies in E. faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes, resistance to class IIa bacteriocins in E. faecium 6E6 is likely caused by the disruption of a particular ManPTS, which we believe we have identified.

  9. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  10. Conserved DNA motifs in the type II-A CRISPR leader region

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Kesavan; Najar, Fares Z.

    2017-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems consist of RNA-protein complexes that provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific immunity against bacteriophages, plasmids, and other mobile genetic elements. Bacteria and archaea become immune to phage or plasmid infections by inserting short pieces of the intruder DNA (spacer) site-specifically into the leader-repeat junction in a process called adaptation. Previous studies have shown that parts of the leader region, especially the 3′ end of the leader, are indispensable for adaptation. However, a comprehensive analysis of leader ends remains absent. Here, we have analyzed the leader, repeat, and Cas proteins from 167 type II-A CRISPR loci. Our results indicate two distinct conserved DNA motifs at the 3′ leader end: ATTTGAG (noted previously in the CRISPR1 locus of Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710) and a newly defined CTRCGAG, associated with the CRISPR3 locus of S. thermophilus DGCC7710. A third group with a very short CG DNA conservation at the 3′ leader end is observed mostly in lactobacilli. Analysis of the repeats and Cas proteins revealed clustering of these CRISPR components that mirrors the leader motif clustering, in agreement with the coevolution of CRISPR-Cas components. Based on our analysis of the type II-A CRISPR loci, we implicate leader end sequences that could confer site-specificity for the adaptation-machinery in the different subsets of type II-A CRISPR loci. PMID:28392985

  11. IIA/IIB supergravity and ten-forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, E. A.; Hartong, J.; Howe, P. S.; Ortín, T.; Riccioni, F.

    2010-05-01

    We perform a careful investigation of which p-form fields can be introduced consistently with the supersymmetry algebra of IIA and/or IIB ten-dimensional supergravity. In particular the ten-forms, also known as “top-forms”, require a careful analysis since in this case, as we will show, closure of the supersymmetry algebra at the linear level does not imply closure at the non-linear level. Consequently, some of the (IIA and IIB) ten-form potentials introduced in earlier work of some of us are discarded. At the same time we show that new ten-form potentials, consistent with the full non-linear supersymmetry algebra can be introduced. We give a superspace explanation of our work. All of our results are precisely in line with the predictions of the E 11 algebra.

  12. Presence of Cryptosporidium scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 and IIaA13G1R1 in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    García-Presedo, Ignacio; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes; Gómez-Bautista, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio

    2013-09-23

    The aim of the present study was to identify the species of Cryptosporidium infecting Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Galicia (NW, Spain). A sampling of 209 wild boars shot in different game preserves was carried out during the hunting season in 2009-2010. All samples were examined for Cryptosporidium infection, using both immunological and molecular tools. Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples were identified using a direct immunofluorescence technique with monoclonal antibodies (DFA). The presence of Cryptosporidium DNA was determined using nested PCR involving amplification of a fragment of the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). A total of 35 (16.7%) samples tested positive with both techniques. However, sequencing was only possible in 27 samples. Cryptosporidium scrofarum, Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were identified in 19, 5 and 3 of the samples, respectively. Moreover, C. scrofarum was detected as a dominant species infecting all age groups (juveniles, sub adults and adults). Sequence analyses of the glycoprotein (GP60) gene revealed the presence of C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 in 2 juveniles and IIaA13G1R1 in 1 sub adult wild boar. These species and subtypes have previously been described in human patients, indicating that isolates from asymptomatic wild boars might have zoonotic potential. This is the first report of the presence of C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 and IIaA13G1R1 in wild boars (S. scrofa) in Spain.

  13. Effects of salvianolic acid B and tanshinone IIA on the pharmacokinetics of losartan in rats by regulating the activities and expression of CYP3A4 and CYP2C9.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Hai; Wang, Yujie; Yu, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Yongfang

    2016-03-02

    Losartan (LST) is a common chemical drug used to treat high blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke in certain people with heart disease. Danshen, prepared from the dried root and rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been widely used for prevention and treatment of various cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. There are more than 35 formulations containing Danshen indexed in the 2010 Chinese Pharmacopoeia, which are often combined with LST to treat cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in the clinic. The effects of the two major components of Danshen, salvianolic acid B (SA-B) and tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its metabolite, EXP3174, in rats were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: LST, LST+SA-B and LST+Tan IIA, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated after oral administration of LST, LST+SA-B and LST+Tan IIA. It was found that there are significant differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters among the three groups: Cmax, t1/2, AUC, AUMC in the LST+SA-B group was smaller than those in group LST, while larger in group LST+Tan IIA. Further, the effects of SA-B and Tan IIA on the metabolism of losartan was also investigated using rat liver microsomes in vitro. The results indicated that SA-B can induce the metabolism of LST, while Tan IIA can inhibit the metabolism of LST in rat liver microsomes in vitro by regulating activities of CYP450 enzymes. In addition, the effect of SA-B and Tan IIA on CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 expression was studied in Chang liver cells by western-blotting and Real-time PCR. It was concluded that the two components of Danshen, SA-B and Tan IIA have different influences on the metabolism of LST: SA-B can obviously speed up the metabolism of LST by inducing CYP3A4/CYP2C9 activities and expression, however, Tan IIA can slow down the metabolism of LST by inhibiting CYP3A4/CYP2C

  14. Tanshinone IIA improves functional recovery in spinal cord injury-induced lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-dong; Yu, Xing; Wang, Xiu-mei; Mu, Xiao-hong; He, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA, extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, exerts neuroprotective effects through its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties. This study intravenously injected tanshinone IIA 20 mg/kg into rat models of spinal cord injury for 7 consecutive days. Results showed that tanshinone IIA could reduce the inflammation, edema as well as compensatory thickening of the bladder tissue, improve urodynamic parameters, attenuate secondary injury, and promote spinal cord regeneration. The number of hypertrophic and apoptotic dorsal root ganglion (L6–S1) cells was less after treatment with tanshinone IIA. The effects of tanshinone IIA were similar to intravenous injection of 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone. These findings suggested that tanshinone IIA improved functional recovery after spinal cord injury-induced lower urinary tract dysfunction by remodeling the spinal pathway involved in lower urinary tract control.

  15. Protective effect of tanshinone IIA against cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats through inhibiting the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Chen, Hua-Wen; Pi, Li-Juan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Da-Qian

    2017-02-07

    The study aimed to investigate the protective effect of tanshinone IIA against cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) through the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway. Thirty SHRs were randomly divided into cardiac hypertrophy, low- and high-dose tanshinone IIA groups. Ten Wistar-Kyoto rats were selected as control group. The systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart weight (HW), left ventricular weight (LVW) and body weight (BW) of all rats were recorded. HE staining and qRT-PCR were applied to observe the morphology of myocardial tissue and mRNA expressions of COL1A1 and COL3A1. ELISA and Western blotting were used to measure the serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), nitric oxide (NO) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels, and the expressions of the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway-related proteins, eNOS and Nox4. Compared with the cardiac hypertrophy group, the SBP, HW/BW, LVW/BW, swelling degree of myocardial cells, COL1A1 and COL3A1 mRNA expressions, serum cTnI and ADMA levels, and the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway-related proteins and Nox4 expressions in the low- and high-dose tanshinone IIA groups were decreased, but the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (Ser1177) and NO expressions were increased. No significant difference was found between the low- and high-dose tanshinone IIA groups. Our study indicated a protective effect of tanshinone IIA against cardiac hypertrophy in SHRs through inhibiting the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway.

  16. The mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen R; de Barros, Flavia R O; Rossant, Janet; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-01-01

    The blastocyst is a mammalian invention that carries the embryo from cleavage to gastrulation. For such a simple structure, it exhibits remarkable diversity in its mode of formation, morphology, longevity, and intimacy with the uterine endometrium. This review explores this diversity in the light of the evolution of viviparity, comparing the three main groups of mammals: monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians. The principal drivers in blastocyst evolution were loss of yolk coupled with evolution of the placenta. An important outcome of blastocyst development is differentiation of two extraembryonic lineages (trophoblast and hypoblast) that contribute to the placenta. While in many species trophoblast segregation is often coupled with blastocyst formation, in marsupials and at least some Afrotherians, these events do not coincide. Thus, many questions regarding the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling these events are of great interest but currently unresolved. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  17. Therapeutic Intervention in Multiple Sclerosis with Alpha B-Crystallin: A Randomized Controlled Phase IIa Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Verbeek, Richard; Venneker, Edna H.G.

    2015-01-01

    As a molecular chaperone and activator of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated protective responses by microglia and macrophages, the small heat shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HspB5) exerts therapeutic effects in different animal models for neuroinflammation, including the model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, HspB5 can also stimulate human antigen-specific memory T cells to release IFN-γ, a cytokine with well-documented detrimental effects during MS. In this study, we explored in a Phase IIa randomized clinical trial the therapeutic application of HspB5 in relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS), using intravenous doses sufficient to support its protective effects, but too low to trigger pathogenic memory T-cell responses. These sub-immunogenic doses were selected based on in vitro analysis of the dose-response profile of human T cells and macrophages to HspB5, and on the immunological effects of HspB5 in healthy humans as established in a preparatory Phase I study. In a 48-week randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind Phase IIa trial, three bimonthly intravenous injections of 7.5, 12.5 or 17.5 mg HspB5 were found to be safe and well tolerated in RR-MS patients. While predefined clinical endpoints did not differ significantly between the relatively small groups of MS patients treated with either HspB5 or placebo, repeated administration especially of the lower doses of HspB5 led to a progressive decline in MS lesion activity as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was not seen in the placebo group. Exploratory linear regression analysis revealed this decline to be significant in the combined group receiving either of the two lower doses, and to result in a 76% reduction in both number and total volumes of active MRI lesions at 9 months into the study. These data provide the first indication for clinical benefit resulting from intervention in RR-MS with HspB5. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Phase I: NCT02442557; Phase IIa: NCT02442570 PMID

  18. Recent advances in mammalian protein production

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian protein production platforms have had a profound impact in many areas of basic and applied research, and an increasing number of blockbuster drugs are recombinant mammalian proteins. With global sales of these drugs exceeding US$120 billion per year, both industry and academic research groups continue to develop cost effective methods for producing mammalian proteins to support preclinical and clinical evaluations of potential therapeutics. While a wide range of platforms have been successfully exploited for laboratory use, the bulk of recent biologics have been produced in mammalian cell lines due to the requirement for post translational modification and the biosynthetic complexity of the target proteins. In this review we highlight the range of mammalian expression platforms available for recombinant protein production, as well as advances in technologies for the rapid and efficient selection of highly productive clones. PMID:24316512

  19. Upregulation effects of Tanshinone IIA on the expressions of NeuN, Nissl body, and IκB and downregulation effects on the expressions of GFAP and NF-κB in the brain tissues of rat models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Wen, Pu-yuan; Li, Wen-wen; Zhou, Jun

    2015-09-09

    This study aimed to observe the effects of Tanshinone IIA(Tan IIA) treatment on the expression levels of brain tissue NeuN, Nissl body, IκB, GFAP and NF-κB in Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats to explore the possible anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective mechanisms of Tan IIA. Thirty healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: Sham group, AD+vehicle control group, and AD+Tan IIA group. The models of AD were established by injecting Aβ1-42 into the hippocampus of rats. Tagged position and the expression levels of Aβ1-42 were observed by immunohistochemistry staining to prove the success of the model of AD. Brain tissues of all groups were collected after Tan IIA treatment and paraffin sections were prepared to assess pathological changes and expression levels of GFAP, IκB and NF-κB by both immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After Aβ1-42 injection, the expression levels of GFAP and NF-κB were significantly stronger in the AD+vehicle control group than those in the AD+Tan IIA group and the sham group (P<0.05), the IκB expression level and the number of neurons and Nissl bodies of AD+vehicle control group was reduced compared with the sham or the AD+Tan IIA group (P<0.05). In conclusion, Aβ induces a cerebral tissue inflammation reaction. Tan IIA treatment can suppress the proliferation of astrocytes in an AD model, lower the level of NF-κB, and increase the level of NeuN, Nissl body, IκB, thus exerting anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects.

  20. Structure of hepatitis C virus IRES subdomain IIa

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.; Han, Q.; Kissinger, C.R.; Hermann, T.; Thompson, P.A.

    2008-07-03

    The hepatitis C (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element plays a central role in cap-independent translation of the viral genomic RNA. The unique conformation of IRES domain II is critical for 80S ribosomal assembly and initiation of viral translation. Here, the crystal structure of subdomain IIa of the HCV IRES has been determined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, revealing the positions of divalent metal ions and complex inter-strand interactions that stabilize the L-shaped conformation of the RNA. The presence of divalent metal ions was necessary for crystal formation. Magnesium ions occupy specific sites that appear to be critical for the formation of the folded conformation. Subdomain IIa also was crystallized in the presence of strontium, which improved the diffraction quality of the crystals and the ability to identify interactions of the RNA with metal ions and tightly bound water molecules. The hinge region and noncanonical G-U base-pair motifs are stabilized by divalent metal ions and provide unique structural features that are potential interaction sites for small-molecule ligands. The information obtained from the crystal structure provides a basis for structure-guided design of HCV translation inhibitors targeting disruption of ribosomal assembly.

  1. Crystal structure of human secretory phospholipase A2-IIA complex with the potent indolizine inhibitor 120-1032.

    PubMed

    Kitadokoro, K; Hagishita, S; Sato, T; Ohtani, M; Miki, K

    1998-04-01

    Phospholipase A2 is a key enzyme in a number of physiologically important cellular processes including inflammation and transmembrane signaling. Human secretory phospholipase A2-IIA is present at high concentrations in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in the plasma of patients with septic shock. Inhibitors of this enzyme have been suggested to be therapeutically useful non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The crystal structure of human secretory phospholipase A2-IIA bound to a novel potent indolizine inhibitor (120-1032) has been determined. The complex crystallizes in the space group P3121, with cell dimensions of a = b = 75.8 A and c = 51.3 A. The model was refined to an R-factor of 0. 183 for the intensity data collected to a resolution of 2.2 A. It was revealed that the inhibitor is located near the active site and bound to the calcium ion. Although the binding mode of the 120-1032 inhibitor to human secretory phospholipase A2-IIA is similar to that previously determined for an indole inhibitor LY311299, the specific interactions between the enzyme and the inhibitor in the present complex include the oxycarboxylate group which was introduced in this inhibitor. The oxycarboxylate group in 120-1032 is coordinated to the calcium ion and included in the water-mediated hydrogen bonding to the catalytic Asp49. In addition, the ethyl group in 120-1032 gains hydrophobic contacts with the cavity wall of the hydrophobic channel of the enzyme.

  2. 30 CFR 57.22312 - Distribution boxes (II-A and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distribution boxes (II-A and V-A mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22312 Distribution boxes (II-A and V-A mines). Distribution boxes containing short circuit protection for trailing cables...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22307 - Methane monitors (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methane monitors (II-A mines). 57.22307 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22307 Methane monitors (II-A mines). (a) Methane monitors shall be installed on continuous mining machines, longwall mining systems, bench and...

  4. Potent, Selective, and CNS-Penetrant Tetrasubstituted Cyclopropane Class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potent and selective class IIa HDAC tetrasubstituted cyclopropane hydroxamic acid inhibitors were identified with high oral bioavailability that exhibited good brain and muscle exposure. Compound 14 displayed suitable properties for assessment of the impact of class IIa HDAC catalytic site inhibition in preclinical disease models. PMID:26819662

  5. 30 CFR 57.22311 - Electrical cables (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical cables (II-A mines). 57.22311... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22311 Electrical cables (II-A mines). Only jacketed electrical cables accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant shall be used to supply power...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22307 - Methane monitors (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane monitors (II-A mines). 57.22307 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22307 Methane monitors (II-A mines). (a) Methane monitors shall be installed on continuous mining machines, longwall mining systems, bench and...

  7. Significance of the methyl group on the oxazine ring of ofloxacin derivatives in the inhibition of bacterial and mammalian type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, K; Sato, K; Akahane, K; Yoshida, A; Hayakawa, I; Sato, M; Une, T; Osada, Y

    1991-01-01

    A study was made of the correlation between the in vitro inhibitory effects of several quinolones, including four ofloxacin derivatives, on bacterial DNA gyrase from Escherichia coli KL-16 and on topoisomerase II from fetal calf thymus. No correlation was observed between the inhibitions of DNA gyrase activity and topoisomerase II activity. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects of these quinolones against topoisomerase II were closely correlated with their inhibition of cell growth. Furthermore, among the oxazine derivatives tested, the derivative with a methyl group at position 3 in an S configuration showed the highest activity against DNA gyrase and derivatives without a methyl group on the oxazine ring were more potent against topoisomerase II than those with a methyl group. Among these derivatives, DR-3355, the S isomer of ofloxacin, showed the highest activity against DNA gyrase and low activity against topoisomerase II. These results indicate that the methyl group on the oxazine ring plays an important role in the inhibitory activities of ofloxacin derivatives for these enzymes. PMID:1850968

  8. Tanshinone IIA Protects Endothelial Cells from H2O2-Induced Injuries via PXR Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Chen, Zhiwu; Ma, Zengchun; Tan, Hongling; Xiao, Chengrong; Tang, Xianglin; Zhang, Boli; Wang, Yuguang; Gao, Yue

    2017-02-06

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is a pharmacologically active substance extracted from the rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (also known as the Chinese herb Danshen), and is widely used to treat atherosclerosis. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is a key regulator of xenobiotic and endobiotic detoxification. Tan IIA is an efficacious PXR agonist that has a potential protective effect on endothelial injuries induced by xenobiotics and endobiotics via PXR activation. Previously numerous studies have demonstrated the possible effects of Tan IIA on human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but the further mechanism for its exerts the protective effect is not well established. To study the protective effects of Tan IIA against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we pretreated cells with or without different concentrations of Tan IIA for 24 h, then exposed the cells to 400 μM H2O2 for another 3 h. Therefore, our data strongly suggests that Tan IIA may lead to increased regeneration of glutathione (GSH) from the glutathione disulfide (GSSG) produced during the GSH peroxidase-catalyzed decomposition of H2O2 in HUVECs, and the PXR plays a significant role in this process. Tan IIA may also exert protective effects against H2O2-induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway associated with the participation of PXR. Tan IIA protected HUVECs from inflammatory mediators triggered by H2O2 via PXR activation. In conclusion, Tan IIA protected HUVECs against H2O2-induced cell injury through PXR-dependent mechanisms.

  9. Tanshinone IIA ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced inflammatory bowel disease via the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianxie; Wang, Yuguang; Ma, Zengchun; Liang, Qiande; Tang, Xianglin; Hu, Donghua; Tan, Hongling; Xiao, Chengrong; Gao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) (C19H18O3) is one of the major active lipophilic components in a conventional Chinese medicine called danshen, and it has long been used in the People's Republic of China and other neighboring countries to treat patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous experiments by many teams determined which mechanism of Tan IIA is relevant to the treatment of IBD associated with inflammation and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The current study demonstrated that Tan IIA is an efficacious PXR agonist and its ability to induce CYP3A4 mRNA and protein expression was mediated by the transactivation of PXR, a known target of abrogating inflammation in IBD. Clinical symptoms in mice and histological assessment data suggested that administration of Tan IIA in mice demonstrated significant protection and showed that in DSS-induced IBD it acts in a concentration-dependent manner. PXR-silenced mice treated with Tan IIA demonstrated low protection against DSS-induced mouse IBD and exacerbated the severity of IBD compared with wild-type mice; PXR-silenced mice demonstrated the necessity for PXR in Tan IIA-mediated upregulation of xenobiotic metabolism genes. The IBD treatment effects of Tan IIA are partially due to PXR-mediated upregulation of xenobiotic metabolism and downregulation of inflammatory mediators. The novel findings reported here may contribute to the effective utilization of Tan IIA and its derivatives as a PXR ligand in the treatment of human IBD. This suggests that Tan IIA may have considerable clinical utility.

  10. Tanshinone IIA ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced inflammatory bowel disease via the pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianxie; Wang, Yuguang; Ma, Zengchun; Liang, Qiande; Tang, Xianglin; Hu, Donghua; Tan, Hongling; Xiao, Chengrong; Gao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) (C19H18O3) is one of the major active lipophilic components in a conventional Chinese medicine called danshen, and it has long been used in the People’s Republic of China and other neighboring countries to treat patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous experiments by many teams determined which mechanism of Tan IIA is relevant to the treatment of IBD associated with inflammation and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The current study demonstrated that Tan IIA is an efficacious PXR agonist and its ability to induce CYP3A4 mRNA and protein expression was mediated by the transactivation of PXR, a known target of abrogating inflammation in IBD. Clinical symptoms in mice and histological assessment data suggested that administration of Tan IIA in mice demonstrated significant protection and showed that in DSS-induced IBD it acts in a concentration-dependent manner. PXR-silenced mice treated with Tan IIA demonstrated low protection against DSS-induced mouse IBD and exacerbated the severity of IBD compared with wild-type mice; PXR-silenced mice demonstrated the necessity for PXR in Tan IIA-mediated upregulation of xenobiotic metabolism genes. The IBD treatment effects of Tan IIA are partially due to PXR-mediated upregulation of xenobiotic metabolism and downregulation of inflammatory mediators. The novel findings reported here may contribute to the effective utilization of Tan IIA and its derivatives as a PXR ligand in the treatment of human IBD. This suggests that Tan IIA may have considerable clinical utility. PMID:26674743

  11. Diamond radiation detectors I. Detector properties for IIa diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-05-16

    The detector properties and carrier dynamics of type IIa diamonds are reasonably well understood. The trends in the electron and hole mobilities have been characterized as a function of temperature, impurity content, electric field and carrier density. The carrier lifetimes are coupled through the nitrogen impurity. This leaves us with typical samples with collection distances of 20 to 50 micrometers. The detailed dynamics of the carriers can be modeled using a rate equation analysis. Much progress has been made in understanding the detector properties of diamond, but continued progress has been limited by the geologic processes used to make the material, for example sample size and no synthesis control. CVD diamond promises to eliminate these restrictions.

  12. Area and mammalian elevational diversity.

    PubMed

    McCain, Christy M

    2007-01-01

    Elevational gradients hold enormous potential for understanding general properties of biodiversity. Like latitudinal gradients, the hypotheses for diversity patterns can be grouped into historical explanations, climatic drivers, and spatial hypotheses. The spatial hypotheses include the species-area effect and spatial constraint (mid-domain effect null models). I test these two spatial hypotheses using regional diversity patterns for mammals (non-volant small mammals and bats) along 34 elevational gradients spanning 24.4 degrees S-40.4 degrees N latitude. There was high variability in the fit to the species-area hypothesis and the mid-domain effect. Both hypotheses can be eliminated as primary drivers of elevational diversity. Area and spatial constraint both represent sources of error rather than mechanisms underlying these mammalian diversity patterns. Similar results are expected for other vertebrate taxa, plants, and invertebrates since they show comparable distributions of elevational diversity patterns to mammalian patterns.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a mammalian excision repair gene that partially restores UV resistance to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arrand, J.E.; Bone, N.M.; Johnson, R.T. )

    1989-09-01

    A hamster DNA repair gene has been isolated by cosmid rescue after two rounds of transfection of an immortalized xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D cell line with neomycin-resistance gene (neo)-tagged normal hamster DNA and selection with G418 and ultraviolet irradiation. The functional length of the sequence has been defined as 11.5 kilobase pairs by measurement of the region of overlap between two hamster DNA-containing cosmids, cloned by selection for the integrated neo gene, that are able to confer an increase in resistance to ultraviolet irradiation on two XP-D cell line but not on an XP-A line. Detailed molecular characterization of the hamster repair gene has revealed no obvious similarities to two human excision repair genes (ERCC1 and ERCC2) that correct repair-defective hamster cells but have no effect on XP cells. Hybridization analyses of normal human and XP cell genomic DNAs and mRNAs, using a cosmid-clone probe from which repeated sequences have been removed, show that homologues are present and expressed in all cases.

  14. Protective effects of tanshinone IIA on endothelial progenitor cells injured by tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XING-XIANG; YANG, JIN-XIU; PAN, YAN-YUN; ZHANG, YE-FEI

    2015-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine commonly used in Asian and Western countries for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction and associated inflammatory processes have a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in certain aspects of the endothelial repair process. The present study aimed to investigate the putative protective effects of Tan IIA on EPCs injured by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The potential effects of Tan IIA on TNF-α-stimulated EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion, in vitro tube formation ability and paracrine activity were investigated in the current study. The results indicated that TNF-α impaired EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion capacity and vasculogenesis ability in vitro as well as promoted EPC secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L). However, Tan IIA was able to reverse these effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that Tan IIA may have the potential to protect EPCs against damage induced by TNF-α. Therefore, these results may provide evidence for the pharmacological basis of Tan IIA and its potential use in the prevention and treatment of early atherosclerosis associated with EPC and endothelial damage. PMID:26095681

  15. The effect of tanshinone IIA on the cardiovascular system in ovine fetus in utero.

    PubMed

    Mao, Caiping; Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Yuying; Cao, Li; Shao, Huan; Wang, Liping; Zhu, Liyan; Xu, Zhice

    2009-01-01

    This was the first study to determine the effect of tanshinone IIA (an active ingredient in herb Danshen) on fetuses in utero under unstressed condition. Tanshinone IIA or 0.9% NaCl as control was intravenously (i.v.) administrated into pregnant ewes. Both maternal and fetal blood were analyzed for PO(2), PCO(2), SO(2)%, hemoglobin, hemotecrit, glucose, lactic acid, Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) concentrations. Maternal and fetal heart functions were assessed by examining cardiac enzymes and cardiovascular responses. The results showed that tanshinone IIA did not alter the blood values in ewes and fetuses. Cardiac enzyme activities related to the heart remained unchanged. In cardiovascular experiments, no alternation in maternal blood pressure by tanshinone IIA was observed. However, fetal systolic pressure was slightly and significantly increased following i.v. tanshinone IIA into the mothers, while fetal diastolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were not changed. The results demonstrated that tanshinone IIA used during the last third of gestation did not cause the biochemical changes related to cardiac functions in both maternal and fetal sheep. Fetal oxygen metabolism remained stable in utero, providing new information for clinical use of the herb in pregnancy. That tanshinone IIA increased fetal systolic pressure may open new opportunities to study the herb in fetal medicine.

  16. Involvement of Oxidative Pathways in Cytokine-induced Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Michael D.; Sheng, Wenwen; Simonyi, Agnes; Johnson, Gary S.; Sun, Albert Y.; Sun, Grace Y.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the involvement of secretory phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA) in neuroinflammatory diseases. Although sPLA2-IIA is transcriptionally induced through the NF-κB pathway by pro-inflammatory cytokines, whether this induction pathway is affected by other intracellular signaling pathways has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated the induction of sPLA2-IIA mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes by cytokines and detected the protein in the culture medium after stimulation. We further investigated the effects of oxidative pathways and botanical antioxidants on the induction pathway and observed that IL-1β-induced sPLA2-IIA mRNA expression in astrocytes is dependent on ERK1/2 and PI-3 kinase, but not p38 MAPK. In addition to apocynin, a known NADPH oxidase inhibitor, botanical antioxidants, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate, also inhibited IL-1β-induced sPLA2-IIA mRNA expression. These compounds also suppressed IL-1β-induced ERK1/2 activation and translocation of the NADPH oxidase subunit p67 phox from cytosol to membrane fraction. Taken together, these results support the involvement of reactive oxygen species from NADPH oxidase in cytokine induction of sPLA2-IIA in astrocytes and promote the use of botanical antioxidants as protective agents for inhibition of inflammatory responses in these cells. PMID:19375465

  17. Tanshinone IIA Protects Against Folic Acid-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Shao, Qiuyuan; Yan, Xiang; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is a diterpene extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza, a popular and safe herb medicine that has been widely used in China and other Asian countries. Previous studies have demonstrated the pleiotropic effects of Tanshinone IIA on many disease treatments via its antitoxicity, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, as well as antifibrosis activities. However, its effect on acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been fully investigated. Here, we show for the first time that systemic administration of Tanshinone IIA can lead to improved kidney function in folic acid-induced kidney injury mice. In the acute phase of AKI, Tanshinone IIA attenuated renal tubular epithelial injury, as determined by histologic changes and the detection of Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the kidney and urine. Additionally, Tanshinone IIA treatment resulted in elevated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and decreased inflammatory cells infiltration as well as chemokine expression, suggesting that Tanshinone IIA promoted renal repair following AKI and inhibited local inflammatory response in the injured kidney. This led to decreased long-term fibrosis in the injured kidney, characterized by less accumulation of fibronectin and collagen I in tubulointerstitium. Taken together, these results suggest that Tanshinone IIA may represent a potential approach for AKI treatment.

  18. Mammalian-target of rapamycin inhibition with temsirolimus in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients is associated with considerable toxicity: results of the temsirolimus pilot trial by the German MDS Study Group (D-MDS).

    PubMed

    Wermke, Martin; Schuster, Claudia; Nolte, Florian; Al-Ali, Haifa-Kathrin; Kiewe, Philipp; Schönefeldt, Claudia; Jakob, Christiane; von Bonin, Malte; Hentschel, Leopold; Klut, Ina-Maria; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Baretton, Gustavo; Germing, Ulrich; Herbst, Regina; Haase, Detelef; Hofmann, Wolf K; Platzbecker, Uwe

    2016-12-01

    The mammalian-target of rapamycin (also termed mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR) pathway integrates various pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic stimuli and is involved in regulatory T-cell (TREG) development. As these processes contribute to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), we hypothesized that mTOR modulation with temsirolimus (TEM) might show activity in MDS. This prospective multicentre trial enrolled lower and higher risk MDS patients, provided that they were transfusion-dependent/neutropenic or relapsed/refractory to 5-azacitidine, respectively. All patients received TEM at a weekly dose of 25 mg. Of the 9 lower- and 11 higher-risk patients included, only 4 (20%) reached the response assessment after 4 months of treatment and showed stable disease without haematological improvement. The remaining patients discontinued TEM prematurely due to adverse events. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached in the lower-risk group and 296 days in the higher-risk group. We observed a significant decline of bone marrow (BM) vascularisation (P = 0·006) but were unable to demonstrate a significant impact of TEM on the balance between TREG and pro-inflammatory T-helper-cell subsets within the peripheral blood or BM. We conclude that mTOR-modulation with TEM at a dose of 25 mg per week is accompanied by considerable toxicity and has no beneficial effects in elderly MDS patients.

  19. Nucleotide sequence analysis and DNA hybridization studies of the ant(4')-IIa gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Munayyer, H; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The ant(4')-IIa gene was previously cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa on a 1.6-kb DNA fragment (G. A. Jacoby, M. J. Blaser, P. Santanam, H. Hächler, F. H. Kayser, R. S. Hare, and G. H. Miller, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 34:2381-2386, 1990). In the current study, the ant(4')-IIa gene was localized by gamma-delta mutagenesis. A region of approximately 600 nucleotides which contained the ant(4')-IIa gene was identified, and DNA sequence analysis revealed two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) within this region. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated expression of both ORFs in P. aeruginosa; therefore, site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify the ORF which encodes the ant(4')-IIa gene. No homology was found between ant(4')-IIa and ant(4')-Ia DNA sequences. Hybridization experiments confirmed that the ant(4')-Ia probe hybridized only to gram-positive presumptive ANT(4')-I strains and that the ant(4')-IIa probe hybridized only to gram-negative strains presumed to carry ANT(4')-II. Seven gram-negative strains which had been classified as having ANT(4')-II resistance profiles did not hybridize with probes for either ant(4')-Ia or ant(4')-IIa, suggesting that at least one additional ant(4') gene may exist. The predicted amino-terminal sequences of the ANT(4')-Ia and ANT(4')-IIa proteins showed significant sequence similarity between residues 38 and 63 of the ANT(4')-Ia protein and residues 26 and 51 of the ANT(4')-IIa protein. PMID:8494365

  20. Extracellular regulation of type IIa receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases: mechanistic insights from structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Charlotte H.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Aricescu, A. Radu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) exhibit a wide repertoire of cellular signalling functions. In particular, type IIa RPTP family members have recently been highlighted as hubs for extracellular interactions in neurons, regulating neuronal extension and guidance, as well as synaptic organisation. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress of structural biology investigations into the architecture of type IIa RPTP ectodomains and their interactions with extracellular ligands. Structural insights, in combination with biophysical and cellular studies, allow us to begin to piece together molecular mechanisms for the transduction and integration of type IIa RPTP signals and to propose hypotheses for future experimental validation. PMID:25234613

  1. Numerical solution of first order initial value problem using 4-stage sixth order Gauss-Kronrod-Radau IIA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Teh Yuan; Yaacob, Nazeeruddin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new implicit Runge-Kutta method which based on a 4-point Gauss-Kronrod-Radau II quadrature formula is developed. The resulting implicit method is a 4-stage sixth order Gauss-Kronrod-Radau IIA method, or in brief as GKRM(4,6)-IIA. GKRM(4,6)-IIA requires four function of evaluations at each integration step and it gives accuracy of order six. In addition, GKRM(4,6)-IIA has stage order four and being L-stable. Numerical experiments compare the accuracy between GKRM(4,6)-IIA and the classical 3-stage sixth order Gauss-Legendre method in solving some test problems. Numerical results reveal that GKRM(4,6)-IIA is more accurate than the 3-stage sixth order Gauss-Legendre method because GKRM(4,6)-IIA has higher stage order.

  2. Hearing loss in the RBF/DnJ mouse, a proposed animal model of Usher syndrome type IIa.

    PubMed

    Pieke-Dahl, S; Ohlemiller, K K; McGee, J; Walsh, E J; Kimberling, W J

    1997-10-01

    The Usher syndromes (US) are a group of inherited disorders that feature autosomal recessive neurosensory hearing loss or deafness with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Moderate to severe non-progressive high frequency hearing loss with RP and normal vestibular function describes Usher syndrome type IIa, which has been localized to 1q41. Severe retinal degeneration in the inbred mouse strain RBF/DnJ is caused by rd3, a recessive gene located on mouse chromosome 1 distal to akp1 in a region which is orthologous to human 1q32-q42. We evaluated rd3 as a candidate for orthology with USH2A by first reducing and refining the relatively broad region in which rd3 is thought to reside. DNA of offspring from an RBF/DnJ x MOLF/Ei backcross was genotyped with PCR markers closely flanking the predicted location of rd3. Our haplotype analysis re-positioned rd3 to a 3.6 cM region between markers D1Mit273 (cen) and D1Mit209 (tel), consistent with the expected position of an USH2A murine orthologue. Consequently, rd3 is a positional candidate for Usher type IIa. Next we assessed the rd3/rd3 audiological phenotype to see how closely it paralleled that of Usher IIa. Audiological evaluation of mice at various ages revealed evidence of high frequency progressive hearing loss, previously unreported in the RBF/DnJ strain. However, this newly discovered hearing deficit was observed to be inherited independently of rd3, establishing that a completely different gene is responsible.

  3. Regulation of myosin IIA and filamentous actin during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Stall, Richard; Ramos, Joseph; Kent Fulcher, F.; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2014-03-10

    Insulin stimulated glucose uptake requires the colocalization of myosin IIA (MyoIIA) and the insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane for proper GLUT4 fusion. MyoIIA facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) reorganization in various cell types. In adipocytes F-actin reorganization is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. What is not known is whether MyoIIA interacts with F-actin to regulate insulin-induced GLUT4 fusion at the plasma membrane. To elucidate the relationship between MyoIIA and F-actin, we examined the colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation as well as the regulation of this interaction. Our findings demonstrated that MyoIIA and F-actin colocalized at the site of GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation. Furthermore, inhibition of MyoII with blebbistatin impaired F-actin localization at the plasma membrane. Next we examined the regulatory role of calcium in MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization. Reduced calcium or calmodulin levels decreased colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane. While calcium alone can translocate MyoIIA it did not stimulate F-actin accumulation at the plasma membrane. Taken together, we established that while MyoIIA activity is required for F-actin localization at the plasma membrane, it alone is insufficient to localize F-actin to the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Insulin induces colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the cortex in adipocytes. • MyoIIA is necessary but not sufficient to localize F-actin at the cell cortex. • MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization is regulated by calcium and calmodulin.

  4. Precipitation of kidney myosin IIA and IIB by freezing.

    PubMed

    Dias, Decivaldo dos Santos; da Cruz, Grabriel Costa Nunes; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Coelho, Milton Vieira

    2011-03-01

    Actomyosin precipitation is a critical step in the purification of myosins. In this work, the objective was to precipitate rat kidney actomyosin and isolate myosin by freezing and thawing the soluble fraction. Kidney was homogenized in imidazole buffer, centrifuged at 45000 g for 30 min, and the supernatant was frozen at -20°C for 48 h. The supernatant was thawed at 4°C, centrifuged at 45000 g for 30 min and the precipitate washed twice with imidazole buffer pH 7.0 (with and without Triton X-100, respectively). The resulting precipitate presented a polypeptide profile in SDS/PAGE characteristic of actomyosin and expressed Mg- and K/EDTA-ATPase activity. The actomyosin complex was solubilized with ATP and Mg, and the main polypeptide, p200, was purified in a DEAE-Sepharose column. p200 was marked with anti-myosin II, co-sedimented with F-actin in the absence, but not in the presence, of ATP and was identified by MS/MS with a high Mascot score for myosin IIA. The analysis identified peptides exclusive of myosin IIB, but detected no peptides exclusive of myosin IIC.

  5. ALPK1 phosphorylates myosin IIA modulating TNF-α trafficking in gout flares

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Pin; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Liu, Yu-Fan; Ma, Che; Lu, Chi-Yu; Huang, Chung-Ming; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Kuo, Tzer-Min; Chen, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Gout is characterized by the monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU)-induced arthritis. Alpha kinase-1 (ALPK1) has shown to be associated with MSU-induced inflammation and gout. Here, we used bioinformatics, proteomics, cell models, and twenty in vitro human assays to clarify some of its role in the inflammatory response to MSU. We found myosin IIA to be a frequent interacting protein partner of ALPK1, binding to its N-terminal and forming a protein complex with calmodulin and F-actin, and that MSU-induced ALPK1 phosphorylated the myosin IIA. A knockdown of endogenous ALPK1 or myosin IIA significantly reduced the MSU-induced secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Furthermore, all gouty patients expressed higher basal protein levels of ALPK1, myosin IIA, and plasma TNF-α, however those medicated with colchicine has shown reduced myosin IIA and TNF-α but not ALPK1. The findings suggest ALPK1 is a kinase that participates in the regulation of Golgi-derived TNF-α trafficking through myosin IIA phosphorylation in the inflammation of gout. This novel pathway could be blocked at the level of myosin by colchicine in gout treatment. PMID:27169898

  6. ALPK1 phosphorylates myosin IIA modulating TNF-α trafficking in gout flares.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Pin; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Liu, Yu-Fan; Ma, Che; Lu, Chi-Yu; Huang, Chung-Ming; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Kuo, Tzer-Min; Chen, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-05-12

    Gout is characterized by the monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU)-induced arthritis. Alpha kinase-1 (ALPK1) has shown to be associated with MSU-induced inflammation and gout. Here, we used bioinformatics, proteomics, cell models, and twenty in vitro human assays to clarify some of its role in the inflammatory response to MSU. We found myosin IIA to be a frequent interacting protein partner of ALPK1, binding to its N-terminal and forming a protein complex with calmodulin and F-actin, and that MSU-induced ALPK1 phosphorylated the myosin IIA. A knockdown of endogenous ALPK1 or myosin IIA significantly reduced the MSU-induced secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Furthermore, all gouty patients expressed higher basal protein levels of ALPK1, myosin IIA, and plasma TNF-α, however those medicated with colchicine has shown reduced myosin IIA and TNF-α but not ALPK1. The findings suggest ALPK1 is a kinase that participates in the regulation of Golgi-derived TNF-α trafficking through myosin IIA phosphorylation in the inflammation of gout. This novel pathway could be blocked at the level of myosin by colchicine in gout treatment.

  7. Geology and mineral resources of central Antioquia Department (Zone IIA), Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Alvarez A., Jairo; Rico H., Hector

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the geology of an area of some 6000 square kilometers in the northern part of the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. The area, in north-central Department of Antioquia, was mapped between 1964 and 1968 as part of the Inventario Minero Nacional (IMN) project. Mineral resources are summarized within a larger area, designated as subzone ILK of IMN Zone If, which comprises almost 22,000 sq. kin, including the area mapped geologically by IMN and additional areas mapped by other agencies. The oldest formation is a micaceous paragneiss of early Paleozoic or possibly late Precambrian age. A thick geosynclinal sedimentary series accumulated during the Paleozoic Era and became regionally metamorphosed to greenschist (locally amphibolite) facies during the Permian or early Triassic; these schists and gneisses are designated collectively as the Valdivia Group. The Permian(?) orogenic episode included intrusion of concordant syntectonic plutons, mostly of tonalitic composition. Rocks of unequivocal Triassic or Jurassic age are not recognized. The Cretaceous is well represented by both igneous and sedimentary assemblages. Eugeosynclinal alpine ophiolites comprising submarine basalt flows and numerous intrusions of gabbro and serpentinite are prominent in the Lower Cretaceous, together with flysch composed of marine shale and lesser sandstone and conglomerate. The Upper Cretaceous is represented along the west border of the mapped area by submarine basalt flows and pyroclastic rocks, locally Interbedded with fine-grained clastic sedimentary beds, and lenses of dark laminated chert, at least part of which is radiolarian. The Late Cretaceous was marked by an orogenic event that profoundly folded and faulted all rocks and in the Central Cordillera caused low-grade metamorphism, the overprint of which is hardly observable in pre-Cretaceous rocks elsewhere. The Late Cretaceous orogeny culminated with discordant intrusion of the epizonal tonalitic

  8. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  9. Mammalian development in space.

    PubMed

    Ronca, April E

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  10. Nisin and class IIa bacteriocin resistance among Listeria and other foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Malik, Ravinder Kumar; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Tejinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singroha, Garima; Vij, Shilpa; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    Food safety has been an important issue globally due to increasing foodborne diseases and change in food habits. To inactivate foodborne pathogens, various novel technologies such as biopreservation systems have been studied. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized peptides or proteins with antimicrobial activity produced by different groups of bacteria, but the bacteriocins produced by many lactic acid bacteria offer potential applications in food preservation. The use of bacteriocins in the food industry can help reduce the addition of chemical preservatives as well as the intensity of heat treatments, resulting in foods that are more naturally preserved. However, the development of highly tolerant and/or resistant strains may decrease the efficiency of bacteriocins as biopreservatives. Several mechanisms of bacteriocin resistance development have been proposed among various foodborne pathogens. The acquiring of resistance to bacteriocins can significantly affect physiological activity profile of bacteria, alter cell-envelope lipid composition, and also modify the antibiotic susceptibility/resistance profile of bacteria. This article presents a brief review on the scientific research about the various possible mechanisms involved in the development of resistance to nisin and Class IIa bacteriocins among the foodborne pathogens.

  11. Supersymmetry of IIA warped flux AdS and flat backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2015-09-01

    We identify the fractions of supersymmetry preserved by the most general warped flux AdS and flat backgrounds in both massive and standard IIA supergravities. We find that AdS n × w M 10 - n preserve {2}^{[n/2]}k for n ≤ 4 and {2}^{[n/2]+1}k for 4 < n ≤ 7 supersymmetries, k ∈ ℕ >0. In addition we show that, for suitably restricted fields and M 10 - n , the killing spinors of AdS backgrounds are given in terms of the zero modes of Dirac like operators on M 10 - n . This generalizes the Lichnerowicz theorem for connections whose holonomy is included in a general linear group. We also adapt our results to ℝ 1, n - 1 × w M 10 - n backgrounds which underpin flux compactifications to ℝ 1, n - 1 and show that these preserve {2}^{[n/2]}k for 2

  12. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies with a common stereotypic rearrangement recognize nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA

    PubMed Central

    Catera, Rosa; Hatzi, Katerina; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Xiao Bo; Fales, Henry M.; Allen, Steven L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Rai, Kanti R.; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Leukemic B lymphocytes of a large group of unrelated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients express an unmutated heavy chain immunoglobulin variable (V) region encoded by IGHV1-69, IGHD3-16, and IGHJ3 with nearly identical heavy and light chain complementarity-determining region 3 sequences. The likelihood that these patients developed CLL clones with identical antibody V regions randomly is highly improbable and suggests selection by a common antigen. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from this stereotypic subset strongly bind cytoplasmic structures in HEp-2 cells. Therefore, HEp-2 cell extracts were immunoprecipitated with recombinant stereotypic subset-specific CLL mAbs, revealing a major protein band at approximately 225 kDa that was identified by mass spectrometry as nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MYHIIA). Reactivity of the stereotypic mAbs with MYHIIA was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence colocalization with anti-MYHIIA antibody. Treatments that alter MYHIIA amounts and cytoplasmic localization resulted in a corresponding change in binding to these mAbs. The appearance of MYHIIA on the surface of cells undergoing stress or apoptosis suggests that CLL mAb may generally bind molecules exposed as a consequence of these events. Binding of CLL mAb to MYHIIA could promote the development, survival, and expansion of these leukemic cells. PMID:18812466

  13. Cultured normal mammalian tissue and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cell aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  14. Tanshinone IIA induces intrinsic apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells both in vivo and in vitro associated with mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Teng; Huang, Chao-Chun; Huang, Wen-Liang; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liao, Pei-Lin; Wang, Pei-Wen; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2017-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), a phytochemical derived from the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. The association of its inhibitory effect on the primary malignant bone tumor, osteosarcoma, with mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative effects of Tan IIA on human osteosarcoma 143B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Administration of Tan IIA to NOD-SCID mice implanted with 143B cells led to significant inhibition of tumor development. The inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion was observed in 143B cells treated with Tan IIA. The tumor proliferation markers, Ki67 and PCNA, were suppressed and apoptosis by TUNEL assay was activated respectively. Apoptosis in the Tan IIA-treated 143B cells and xerograft mice was associated with the activation of caspase cascade via the modulation of Bcl-2 family. The CD31 was inhibited in Tan IIA-treated xenografts to indicate anti-neovasculization. Tan IIA administration resulted in a significant decrease in the mitochondrial fusion proteins, Mfn1/2 and Opa1, as well as an increase in the fission protein Drp1. We concluded that mitochondrial dysfunction associated with dynamic change was involved in apoptosis and anti-angiogenesis elicited by Tan IIA. PMID:28106052

  15. Tanshinone IIA exerts protective effects in a LCA-induced cholestatic liver model associated with participation of pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianxie; Ma, Zengchun; Liang, Qiande; Tang, Xianglin; Hu, Donghua; Liu, Canglong; Tan, Hongling; Xiao, Chengrong; Zhang, Boli; Wang, Yuguang; Gao, Yue

    2015-04-22

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is one of the main natural active ingredients purified from Salvia miltiorrhiza radix, which has long been used in clinical practice in China to treat diseases including liver fibrosis, Alzheimer׳s disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Tan IIA has hepatoprotective properties, and is an efficacious PXR agonist. Our study was designed to observe the function and mechanism of the hepatoprotective properties of Tan IIA. HepG2 cells were used to investigate the vitrol effects of Tan IIA on PXR and CYP3A4. Gut-formed LCA is hepatotoxic, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cholestatic diseases. To further investigate the hepatoprotective mechanisms of Tan IIA against LCA-induced cholestasis in vivo, we choose the normal mice and siRNA-treated mice. The in vitro study demonstrated that the effect of Tan IIA on CYP3A4 was mediated by transactivation of PXR in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The in vivo experiments using PXR siRNA revealed that Tan IIA could protect against LCA-induced hepatotoxicity and cholestasis in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were partially caused by the upregulation of PXR, as well as Cyp3a11, Cyp3a13, and Mdr1, which are the enzymes responsible for LCA metabolism. This is the first report showing that the hepatoprotective effects of Tan IIA are partly mediated by PXR.

  16. The mammalian Cretaceous cochlear revolution.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2016-12-19

    The hearing organs of amniote vertebrates show large differences in their size and structure between the species' groups. In spite of this, their performance in terms of hearing sensitivity and the frequency selectivity of auditory-nerve units shows unexpectedly small differences. The only substantial difference is that therian, defined as live-bearing, mammalian groups are able to hear ultrasonic frequencies (above 15-20 kHz), whereas in contrast monotreme (egg laying) mammals and all non-mammalian amniotes cannot. This review compares the structure and physiology of the cochleae of the main groups and asks the question as to why the many structural differences seen in therian mammals arose, yet did not result in greater differences in physiology. The likely answers to this question are found in the history of the mammals during the Cretaceous period that ended 65 million years ago. During that period, the therian cochlea lost its lagenar macula, leading to a fall in endolymph calcium levels. This likely resulted in a small revolution and an auditory crisis that was compensated for by a subsequent series of structural and physiological adaptations. The end result was a system of equivalent performance to that independently evolved in other amniotes but with the additional - and of course "unforeseen" - advantage that ultrasonic-frequency responses became an available option. That option was not always availed of, but in most groups of therian mammals it did evolve and is used for communication and orientation based on improved sound localization, with micro-bats and toothed whales relying on it for prey capture.

  17. Direct measurement of DNA bending by type IIA topoisomerases: implications for non-equilibrium topology simplification

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Ashley H.; Sarkar, Susanta K.; Seol, Yeonee; Liou, Grace F.; Osheroff, Neil; Neuman, Keir C.

    2011-01-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases modify DNA topology by passing one segment of duplex DNA (transfer or T–segment) through a transient double-strand break in a second segment of DNA (gate or G–segment) in an ATP-dependent reaction. Type IIA topoisomerases decatenate, unknot and relax supercoiled DNA to levels below equilibrium, resulting in global topology simplification. The mechanism underlying this non-equilibrium topology simplification remains speculative. The bend angle model postulates that non-equilibrium topology simplification scales with the bend angle imposed on the G–segment DNA by the binding of a type IIA topoisomerase. To test this bend angle model, we used atomic force microscopy and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to measure the extent of bending imposed on DNA by three type IIA topoisomerases that span the range of topology simplification activity. We found that Escherichia coli topoisomerase IV, yeast topoisomerase II and human topoisomerase IIα each bend DNA to a similar degree. These data suggest that DNA bending is not the sole determinant of non-equilibrium topology simplification. Rather, they suggest a fundamental and conserved role for DNA bending in the enzymatic cycle of type IIA topoisomerases. PMID:21421557

  18. Mammalian diversity: gametes, embryos and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Richard R; Eakin, Guy S; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2006-01-01

    The class Mammalia is composed of approximately 4800 extant species. These mammalian species are divided into three subclasses that include the monotremes, marsupials and eutherians. Monotremes are remarkable because these mammals are born from eggs laid outside of the mother's body. Marsupial mammals have relatively short gestation periods and give birth to highly altricial young that continue a significant amount of 'fetal' development after birth, supported by a highly sophisticated lactation. Less than 10% of mammalian species are monotremes or marsupials, so the great majority of mammals are grouped into the subclass Eutheria, including mouse and human. Mammals exhibit great variety in morphology, physiology and reproduction. In the present article, we highlight some of this remarkable diversity relative to the mouse, one of the most widely used mammalian model organisms, and human. This diversity creates challenges and opportunities for gamete and embryo collection, culture and transfer technologies.

  19. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using N-nitrosomorpholine in young adult rats: report on collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Aya; Kosaka, Mizuki; Kimura, Aoi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (LMN) assay in young adult rats as a collaborative study by the Mammalian mutagenicity study (MMS) group. All procedures were performed in accordance with the standard protocols of the MMS Group. Six-week-old male Crl:CD(SD) rats (5 animals/group) received oral doses of the hepatocarcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) at 0 (control), 5, 10, and 30mg/kg/day (10mL/kg) for 14 days. Control animals received vehicle (water). Hepatocytes were collected from the liver 24h after the last dose, and the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was determined by microscopy. The number of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the femoral bone marrow was also determined. The liver was examined using histopathologic methods after formalin fixation. The results showed statistically significant and dose-dependent increases in the number of MNHEPs in the liver at doses of 10mg/kg and greater when compared with the vehicle control. However, no significant increase was noted in the number of MNIMEs in the bone marrow at doses of up to 30mg/kg. Histopathology of the liver revealed hypertrophy and single cell necrosis of hepatocytes at doses of 5mg/kg and above. These results showed that the induction of micronuclei by NMOR was detected by the repeated-dose LMN assay, but not by the repeated-dose bone marrow micronucleus assay.

  20. Q-I/IIA-OS formula for predicting left atrial pressure in mitral stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yiğitbaşi, Ömer; Nalbantgil, İstemi; Birand, Ahmet; Terek, Ahmet

    1970-01-01

    The relation of the phonocardiographic time intervals (Q-I) and (IIA-OS) and the use of two formulas (Q-I, IIA-OS difference versus their ratio) for estimation of left atrial pressure were investigated in 70 cases of pure mitral stenosis. It was noted that, in cases with normal blood pressure and pluse rate, there was a fair correlation of the two intervals to left atrial pressure. In our studies the best correlation was obtained by using the ratio of these two intervals (Q-I)/(IIA-OS). These results indicate that it is possible to use a new formula and equation that are dependable for phonocardiographic evaluation of left atrial pressure. PMID:5433316

  1. Non-Muscle Myosin IIA Differentially Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Cell Restitution and Matrix Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Brian A.; Koch, Stefan; Bachar, Moshe; Conti, Mary-Anne; Parkos, Charles A.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Nusrat, Asma; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cell motility is critical for self-rejuvenation of normal intestinal mucosa, wound repair, and cancer metastasis. This process is regulated by the reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton, which is driven by a myosin II motor. However, the role of myosin II in regulating epithelial cell migration remains poorly understood. This study addressed the role of non-muscle myosin (NM) IIA in two different modes of epithelial cell migration: two-dimensional (2-D) migration that occurs during wound closure and three-dimensional (3-D) migration through a Matrigel matrix that occurs during cancer metastasis. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of NM IIA in SK-CO15 human colonic epithelial cells resulted in decreased 2-D migration and increased 3-D invasion. The attenuated 2-D migration was associated with increased cell adhesiveness to collagen and laminin and enhanced expression of β1-integrin and paxillin. On the 2-D surface, NM IIA-deficient SK-CO15 cells failed to assemble focal adhesions and F-actin stress fibers. In contrast, the enhanced invasion of NM IIA-depleted cells was dependent on Raf-ERK1/2 signaling pathway activation, enhanced calpain activity, and increased calpain-2 expression. Our findings suggest that NM IIA promotes 2-D epithelial cell migration but antagonizes 3-D invasion. These observations indicate multiple functions for NM IIA, which, along with the regulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, involve previously unrecognized control of intracellular signaling and protein expression. PMID:19147824

  2. Myosin IIA-related Actomyosin Contractility Mediates Oxidative Stress-induced Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Yingqiong; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Zhen; Yin, Mingzhu; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Guosheng; Yu, Boyang; Cao, Zhengyu; Kou, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis plays an important role in the progression of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. In our study, when neuronal cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an exogenous oxidant, cell apoptosis was observed with typical morphological changes including membrane blebbing, neurite retraction and cell contraction. The actomyosin system is considered to be responsible for the morphological changes, but how exactly it regulates oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis and the distinctive functions of different myosin II isoforms remain unclear. We demonstrate that myosin IIA was required for neuronal contraction, while myosin IIB was required for neuronal outgrowth in normal conditions. During H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis, myosin IIA, rather than IIB, interacted with actin filaments to generate contractile forces that lead to morphological changes. Moreover, myosin IIA knockout using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) reduced H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis and the associated morphological changes. We further demonstrate that caspase-3/Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) dependent phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) was required for the formation of the myosin IIA-actin complex. Meanwhile, either inhibition of myosin II ATPase with blebbistatin or knockdown of myosin IIA with siRNA reversely attenuated caspase-3 activation, suggesting a positive feedback loop during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Based on our observation, myosin IIA-actin complex contributes to actomyosin contractility and is associated with the positive feedback loop of caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC pathway. This study unravels the biochemical and mechanistic mechanisms during oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis and may be applicable for the development of therapies for CNS diseases. PMID:28352215

  3. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. )

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  4. Inhibition of coagulation proteases Xa and IIa decreases ischemia-reperfusion injuries in a preclinical renal transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Tillet, Solenne; Giraud, Sébastien; Kerforne, Thomas; Saint-Yves, Thibaut; Joffrion, Sandrine; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Cau, Jerôme; Mauco, Gérard; Petitou, Maurice; Hauet, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    Coagulation is an important pathway in the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injuries. In particular, deceased after circulatory death (DCD) donors undergo a no-flow period, a strong activator of coagulation. Hence, therapies influencing the coagulation cascade must be developed. We evaluated the effect of a new highly specific and effective anti-Xa/IIa molecule, with an integrated innovative antidote site (EP217609), in a porcine preclinical model mimicking injuries observed in DCD donor kidney transplantation. Kidneys were clamped for 60 minutes (warm ischemia), then flushed and preserved for 24 hours at 4°C in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution (supplemented or not). EP217609-supplemented UW solution (UW-EP), compared with unfractionated heparin-supplemented UW solution (UW-UFH) or UW alone (UW). A mechanistic investigation was conducted in vitro: addition of EP217609 to endothelial cells during hypoxia at 4°C in the UW solution inhibited thrombin generation during reoxygenation at 37°C in human plasma and reduced tumor necrosis factor alpha, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 messenger RNA cell expressions. In vivo, function recovery was markedly improved in the UW-EP group. Interestingly, levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (reflecting thrombin generation) were reduced 60 minutes after reperfusion in the UW-EP group. In addition, 3 months after transplantation, lower fibrosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, inflammation, and leukocyte infiltration were observed. Using this new dual anticoagulant, anti-Xa/IIa activity during kidney flush and preservation is protected by reducing thrombin generation at revascularization, improving early function recovery, and decreasing chronic lesions. Such an easy-to-deploy clinical strategy could improve marginal graft outcome.

  5. The miniaturised Mössbauer spectrometer MIMOS IIA: Increased sensitivity and new capability for elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumers, M.; Bernhardt, B.; Lechner, P.; Klingelhöfer, G.; d'Uston, C.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.; Eckhardt, R.; Brückner, J.; Henkel, H.; Lopez, J. G.; Maul, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Miniaturised Mössbauer Spectrometers MIMOS II on board the two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) have now been collecting valuable scientific data for more than five years. Mössbauer Spectrometers are part of two future missions: Phobos Grunt (Russian Space Agency) and a joint ESA—NASA Rover in 2018. The new advanced MIMOS IIA instrument described in this paper uses Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) allowing also X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis (XRF) simultaneously to Mössbauer acquisitions. This paper highlights the features and technological improvements of the new spectrometer MIMOS IIA.

  6. Body Size in Mammalian Paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damuth, John; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    1990-11-01

    This valuable collection of essays presents and evaluates techniques of body-mass estimation and reviews current and potential applications of body-size estimates in paleobiology. Papers discuss explicitly the errors and biases of various regression techniques and predictor variables, and the identification of functionally similar groups of species for improving the accuracy of estimates. At the same time other chapters review and discuss the physiological, ecological, and behavioral correlates of body size in extant mammals; the significance of body-mass distributions in mammalian faunas; and the ecology and evolution of body size in particular paleofaunas. Coverage is particularly detailed for carnivores, primates, and ungulates, but information is also presented on marsupials, rodents, and proboscideans.

  7. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  11. Mammalian glycosylation in immunity.

    PubMed

    Marth, Jamey D; Grewal, Prabhjit K

    2008-11-01

    Glycosylation produces a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans, which are collectively known as the glycome. Glycans are one of the four fundamental macromolecular components of all cells, and are highly regulated in the immune system. Their diversity reflects their multiple biological functions that encompass ligands for proteinaceous receptors known as lectins. Since the discovery that selectins and their glycan ligands are important for the regulation of leukocyte trafficking, it has been shown that additional features of the vertebrate immune system are also controlled by endogenous cellular glycosylation. This Review focuses on the emerging immunological roles of the mammalian glycome.

  12. Tanshinone IIA Prevents Leu27IGF-II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Mediated by Estrogen Receptor and Subsequent Akt Activation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yueh-Shan; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Pai, Pei-Ying; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chung, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; HsuanDay, Cecilia; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    IGF-IIR plays important roles as a key regulator in myocardial pathological hypertrophy and apoptosis, which subsequently lead to heart failure. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen) is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Tanshinone IIA is an active compound in Danshen and is structurally similar to 17[Formula: see text]-estradiol (E[Formula: see text]. However, whether tanshinone IIA improves cardiomyocyte survival in pathological hypertrophy through estrogen receptor (ER) regulation remains unclear. This study investigates the role of ER signaling in mediating the protective effects of tanshinone IIA on IGF-IIR-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Leu27IGF-II (IGF-II analog) was shown in this study to specifically activate IGF-IIR expression and ICI 182,780 (ICI), an ER antagonist used to investigate tanshinone IIA estrogenic activity. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly enhanced Akt phosphorylation through ER activation to inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin expression and subsequent NFATc3 nuclear translocation to suppress myocardial hypertrophy. Tanshinone IIA reduced the cell size and suppressed ANP and BNP, inhibiting antihypertrophic effects induced by Leu27IGF-II. The cardioprotective properties of tanshinone IIA that inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced cell hypertrophy and promote cell survival were reversed by ICI. Furthermore, ICI significantly reduced phospho-Akt, Ly294002 (PI3K inhibitor), and PI3K siRNA significantly reduced the tanshinone IIA-induced protective effect. The above results suggest that tanshinone IIA inhibited cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which was mediated through ER, by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibiting Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin and NFATC3. Tanshinone IIA exerted strong estrogenic activity and therefore represented a novel selective ER modulator that inhibits IGF-IIR signaling to block cardiac hypertrophy.

  13. Mammalian sperm morphometry.

    PubMed Central

    Gage, M J

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the adaptive significance of sperm form and function has been a challenge to biologists because sperm are highly specialized cells operating at a microscopic level in a complex environment. A fruitful course of investigation has been to use the comparative approach. This comparative study attempts to address some fundamental questions of the evolution of mammalian sperm morphometry. Data on sperm morphometry for 445 mammalian species were collated from published sources. I use contemporary phylogenetic analysis to control for the inherent non-independence of species and explore relationships between the morphometric dimensions of the three essential spermatozoal components: head, mid-piece and flagellum. Energy for flagellar action is metabolized by the mitochondrial-dense mid-piece and these combine to propel the sperm head, carrying the male haplotype, to the ovum. I therefore search for evolutionary associations between sperm morphometry and body mass, karyotype and the duration of oestrus. In contrast to previous findings, there is no inverse correlation between body weight and sperm length. Sperm mid-piece and flagellum lengths are positively associated with both head length and area, and the slopes of these relationships are discussed. Flagellum length is positively associated with mid-piece length but, in contrast to previous research and after phylogenetic control, I find no relationship between flagellum length and the volume of the mitochondrial sheath. Sperm head dimensions are not related to either genome mass or chromosome number, and there are no relationships between sperm morphometry and the duration of oestrus. PMID:9474794

  14. Potential energy curves and dissociation energy of group IIA diatomic fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, M. P.; Ishwar, N. B.; Jha, B. L.

    1982-04-01

    Reliable (RKRV) potential energy curves have been constructed for different experimentally observed electronic states of BeF, MgF, CaF, SrF and BaF molecules from the latest spectroscopic data using the method of Rao and Venkateswarlu. Using a three-parameters Lippincott potential function the precise values of ground state dissociation energies of these molecules have been obtained. Values so obtained are found to be in close agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunctions via Improving Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Jun; Yang, Cong; Li, Lin; Hou, Bo-Nan; Chen, Hui-Fang; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Sodium Tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) is a derivative of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA). Tan IIA has been reported to possess neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether STS possesses effect on AD remains unclear. This study aims to estimate whether STS could protect against scopolamine- (SCOP-) induced learning and memory deficit in Kunming mice. Morris water maze results showed that oral administration of STS (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) and Donepezil shortened escape latency, increased crossing times of the original position of the platform, and increased the time spent in the target quadrant. STS decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and increased the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the hippocampus and cortex of SCOP-treated mice. Oxidative stress results showed that STS increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hippocampus and cortex. In addition, western blot was carried out to detect the expression of apoptosis related proteins (Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3). STS upregulated the protein expression of Bcl-2 and downregulated the proteins expression of Bax and Caspase-3. These results indicated that STS might become a promising therapeutic candidate for attenuating AD-like pathological dysfunction. PMID:27556046

  16. Job Training Partnership Act PY '91 Title II-A Program Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sue; Riley, Dee Ann

    Management information system (MIS) data about women's participation in Missouri's job training system funded under Title II-A of the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) in program year 1992 were analyzed. Analysis of data from Missouri's 15 service delivery areas (SDAs) established the following: 75% of the state's 4,598 female JTPA participants…

  17. Bulky “Gatekeeper” Residue Changes the Cosubstrate Specificity of Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase IIa

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Toth, Marta; Smith, Clyde A.

    2013-01-01

    The aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases APH(2″)-IIa and APH(2″)-IVa can utilize ATP and GTP as cosubstrates, since both enzymes possess overlapping but discrete structural templates for ATP and GTP binding. APH(2″)-IIIa uses GTP exclusively, because its ATP-binding template is blocked by a bulky tyrosine “gatekeeper” residue. Replacement of the “gatekeeper” residues M85 and F95 in APH(2″)-IIa and APH(2″)-IVa, respectively, by tyrosine does not significantly change the antibiotic susceptibility profiles produced by the enzymes. In APH(2″)-IIa, M85Y substitution results in an ∼10-fold decrease in the Km value of GTP and an ∼320-fold increase in the Km value of ATP. In APH(2″)-IVa, F95Y substitution results in a modest decrease in the Km values of both GTP and ATP. Structural analysis indicates that in the APH(2″)-IIa M85Y mutant, tyrosine blocks access of ATP to the correct position in the binding site, while the larger nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding pocket of the APH(2″)-IVa F95Y mutant allows the tyrosine to move away, thus giving access to the ATP-binding template. PMID:23716051

  18. 30 CFR 57.22304 - Approved equipment (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 57.22304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22304 Approved equipment (II-A mines)....

  19. 30 CFR 57.22304 - Approved equipment (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 57.22304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22304 Approved equipment (II-A mines)....

  20. 30 CFR 57.22304 - Approved equipment (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 57.22304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22304 Approved equipment (II-A mines)....

  1. 30 CFR 57.22304 - Approved equipment (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 57.22304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22304 Approved equipment (II-A mines)....

  2. 30 CFR 57.22304 - Approved equipment (II-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 57.22304 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22304 Approved equipment (II-A mines)....

  3. Production and immunogenicity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIIA protein in transgenic rice callus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Tae-Geum; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2017-04-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a major etiological agent that is responsible for swine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious respiratory infection that causes severe economic losses in the swine production industry. ApxIIA is one of the virulence factors in A. pleuropneumoniae and has been considered as a candidate for developing a vaccine against the bacterial infection. A gene encoding an ApxIIA fragment (amino acids 439-801) was modified based on a plant-optimized codon and constructed into a plant expression vector under the control of a promoter and the 3' UTR of the rice amylase 3D gene. The plant expression vector was introduced into rice embryogenic callus (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) via particle bombardment-mediated transformation. The integration and transcription of the ApxIIA439-801 gene were confirmed by using genomic DNA PCR amplification and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The synthesis of ApxIIA439-801 antigen protein in transgenic rice callus was confirmed by western blot analysis. The concentration of antigen protein in lyophilized samples of transgenic rice callus was 250 μg/g. Immunizing mice with protein extracts from transgenic plants intranasally elicited secretory IgA. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a transgenic plant to elicit immune responses against A. pleuropneumoniae.

  4. Genome regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Krystosek, A; Chan, D C

    1990-05-01

    A theory is presented proposing that genetic regulation in mammalian cells is at least a two-tiered effect; that one level of regulation involves the transition between gene exposure and sequestration; that normal differentiation requires a different spectrum of genes to be exposed in each separate state of differentiation; that the fiber systems of the cell cytoskeleton and the nuclear matrix together control the degree of gene exposure; that specific phosphorylation of these elements causes them to assume a different organizational network and to impose a different pattern of sequestration and exposure on the elements of the genome; that the varied gene phosphorylation mechanisms in the cell are integrated in this function; that attachment of this network system to specific parts of the chromosomes brings about sequestration or exposure of the genes in their neighborhood in a fashion similar to that observed when microtubule elements attach through the kinetochore to the centromeric DNA; that one function of repetitive sequences is to serve as elements for the final attachment of this fibrous network to the specific chromosomal loci; and that at least an important part of the calcium manifestation as a metabolic trigger of different differentiation states involves its acting as a binding agent to centers of electronegativity, in particular proteins and especially phosphorylated groups, so as to change the conformation of the fiber network that ultimately controls gene exposure in the mammalian cell. It would appear essential to determine what abnormal gene exposures and sequestrations are characteristic of each type of cancer; which agonists, if any, will bring about reverse transformation; and whether these considerations can be used in therapy.

  5. Crossroads between Bacterial and Mammalian Glycosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Brockhausen, Inka

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial glycosyltransferases (GT) often synthesize the same glycan linkages as mammalian GT; yet, they usually have very little sequence identity. Nevertheless, enzymatic properties, folding, substrate specificities, and catalytic mechanisms of these enzyme proteins may have significant similarity. Thus, bacterial GT can be utilized for the enzymatic synthesis of both bacterial and mammalian types of complex glycan structures. A comparison is made here between mammalian and bacterial enzymes that synthesize epitopes found in mammalian glycoproteins, and those found in the O antigens of Gram-negative bacteria. These epitopes include Thomsen–Friedenreich (TF or T) antigen, blood group O, A, and B, type 1 and 2 chains, Lewis antigens, sialylated and fucosylated structures, and polysialic acids. Many different approaches can be taken to investigate the substrate binding and catalytic mechanisms of GT, including crystal structure analyses, mutations, comparison of amino acid sequences, NMR, and mass spectrometry. Knowledge of the protein structures and functions helps to design GT for specific glycan synthesis and to develop inhibitors. The goals are to develop new strategies to reduce bacterial virulence and to synthesize vaccines and other biologically active glycan structures. PMID:25368613

  6. [Liquisolid technique for enhancement of dissolution prosperities of tanshinone II(A)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-qian; Meng, Qing-ju; Xu, Xue-lin; Zhao, Jie; Yang, Hua; Yi, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The technique of liquisolid compress is a new technique developed in 1990s, which was considered to be the most promising technique to improve the dissolution of water-insoluble drugs. In this article, tanshinone II(A) and the extracts of the ester-solubility fractions were chosen as the model drugs to evaluate the effects of the liquisolid technique for enhancement of dissolution properties of tanshinone II(A). Several liquisolid tablets (LS) formulations containing different dosage of drugs and various liquid vehicle were pre-pared and for all the formulations, microcrystalline cellulose and silica were chosen as the carrier and coating materials to evaluate their flow properties, such as angle of repose, Carr's compressibility index and Hausner's ratio. The interaction between drug and excipients in prepared LS compacts were studied by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The dissolution curves of tanshinone II(A) from liquisolid compacts were investigated to determine the technique's effect in improving the dissolution of tanshinone II(A) and its impacting factors. According to the results, the dissolution increased with the rise in the dissolution of the liquid-phase solvent. The R-value and drug dosage can significantly affect the drug release, but with less impact on active fractions. This indicated that liquisolid technique is a promising alternative for improvement of dissolution property of water-soluble drugs, and can make a synergistic effect with other ester-soluble constituents and bettern improve the release of tanshinone II(A). Therefore, the technique of liquisolid compress will have a better development prospect in traditional Chinese medicines.

  7. The prevention and treatment effects of tanshinone IIA on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Du, Xiaoling; Yang, Rui; Liu, Jie; Xu, Da; Shi, Jiandang; Chen, Linfeng; Shao, Rui; Fan, Guanwei; Gao, Xiumei; Tian, Guo; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major diseases of the urinary system in elderly men. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is the active ingredient extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine Salvia, and it has effects of anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, vascular smooth muscle relaxation and tumour growth inhibition. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of Tan IIA in the prevention and treatment of BPH. In a rat model of oestradiol/testosterone-induced BPH, Tan IIA inhibited the increase in the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, suppressed the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in both prostate epithelial cells and stromal cells, downregulated the expression of androgen receptor (AR), oestrogen receptor α (ERα), cyclin B1 (CCNB1) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), and effectively prevented the development of the disorder. In vitro, Tan IIA inhibited the proliferation of human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In WPMY-1 cells, Tan IIA treatment arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase and downregulated the expression of CCNB1. However, in RWPE-1 cells, Tan IIA treatment arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and reduced the expression of CCND1. Tan IIA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results suggest that Tan IIA can inhibit the growth of prostate stromal and epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro by a mechanism that may involve arresting the cell cycle and downregulating ERα and AR expression.

  8. Structure and function in mammalian societies

    PubMed Central

    Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Traditional interpretations of the evolution of animal societies have suggested that their structure is a consequence of attempts by individuals to maximize their inclusive fitness within constraints imposed by their social and physical environments. In contrast, some recent re-interpretations have argued that many aspects of social organization should be interpreted as group-level adaptations maintained by selection operating between groups or populations. Here, I review our current understanding of the evolution of mammalian societies, focusing, in particular, on the evolution of reproductive strategies in societies where one dominant female monopolizes reproduction in each group and her offspring are reared by other group members. Recent studies of the life histories of females in these species show that dispersing females often have little chance of establishing new breeding groups and so are likely to maximize their inclusive fitness by helping related dominants to rear their offspring. As in eusocial insects, increasing group size can lead to a progressive divergence in the selection pressures operating on breeders and helpers and to increasing specialization in their behaviour and life histories. As yet, there is little need to invoke group-level adaptations in order to account for the behaviour of individuals or the structure of mammalian groups. PMID:19805430

  9. Adjuvant therapy after primary surgery for stage I-IIA carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G M

    1996-01-01

    Radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection is commonly used as a primary management option for treatment of stage IB/IIA carcinoma of the cervix. Overall cure rates approach 85%. However, a spectrum of relapse risk exists, depending on the presence or absence of primary tumor and nodal-related prognostic factors. Known factors include number and location of lymph nodes; size of primary, deep invasion in the cervix; capillary lymphatic space involvement; occult parametrial involvement; and positive or close surgical margins. Biologic determinants have yet to be identified. No systematic analysis has examined various combinations of prognostic factors to precisely define associated levels of risk and to predict the sites of relapse. Decreased local control and survival rates in some high-risk subgroups, usually those with nodal positivity, has led to the exploration of adjuvant therapies. Compiled data from retrospective series have defined the overall patterns of failure. Seventy-two percent of those relapsing have a component of pelvic failure, while 42% experience relapse in the pelvis alone. Fifty-eight percent have a component of distant failure but only 28% have distant disease alone. Adjuvant treatment options include pelvic radiotherapy, extended-field radiotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Trials of adjuvant chemotherapy are too few to evaluate the use of available agents. Pelvic radiotherapy has been shown to reduce the relapse risk when surgical margins are close or positive. It also reduces the risk of pelvic relapse and improves the relapse-free interval but has no apparent impact on overall survival in the groups that have been selected for treatment. The apparent lack of benefit may relate to the choice of patients with nodal involvement who, despite high risk of pelvic failure, most likely have a predominant pattern of distant failure. Maximization of the survival benefit of pelvic radiotherapy requires the

  10. Mammalian clock output mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; Cailotto, Cathy; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M

    2011-06-30

    In mammals many behaviours (e.g. sleep-wake, feeding) as well as physiological (e.g. body temperature, blood pressure) and endocrine (e.g. plasma corticosterone concentration) events display a 24 h rhythmicity. These 24 h rhythms are induced by a timing system that is composed of central and peripheral clocks. The highly co-ordinated output of the hypothalamic biological clock not only controls the daily rhythm in sleep-wake (or feeding-fasting) behaviour, but also exerts a direct control over many aspects of hormone release and energy metabolism. First, we present the anatomical connections used by the mammalian biological clock to enforce its endogenous rhythmicity on the rest of the body, especially the neuro-endocrine and energy homoeostatic systems. Subsequently, we review a number of physiological experiments investigating the functional significance of this neuro-anatomical substrate. Together, this overview of experimental data reveals a highly specialized organization of connections between the hypothalamic pacemaker and neuro-endocrine system as well as the pre-sympathetic and pre-parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.

  11. The Mammalian Septin Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina; Zieger, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Septins are GTP-binding and membrane-interacting proteins with a highly conserved domain structure involved in various cellular processes, including cytoskeleton organization, cytokinesis, and membrane dynamics. To date, 13 different septin genes have been identified in mammals (SEPT1 to SEPT12 and SEPT14), which can be classified into four distinct subgroups based on the sequence homology of their domain structure (SEPT2, SEPT3, SEPT6, and SEPT7 subgroup). The family members of these subgroups have a strong affinity for other septins and form apolar tri-, hexa-, or octameric complexes consisting of multiple septin polypeptides. The first characterized core complex is the hetero-trimer SEPT2-6-7. Within these complexes single septins can be exchanged in a subgroup-specific manner. Hexamers contain SEPT2 and SEPT6 subgroup members and SEPT7 in two copies each whereas the octamers additionally comprise two SEPT9 subgroup septins. The various isoforms seem to determine the function and regulation of the septin complex. Septins self-assemble into higher-order structures, including filaments and rings in orders, which are typical for different cell types. Misregulation of septins leads to human diseases such as neurodegenerative and bleeding disorders. In non-dividing cells such as neuronal tissue and platelets septins have been associated with exocytosis. However, many mechanistic details and roles attributed to septins are poorly understood. We describe here some important mammalian septin interactions with a special focus on the clinically relevant septin interactions. PMID:28224124

  12. Mutation hot spots in mammalian mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Nicolas; Enard, David; Radondy, Yoan; Bazin, Eric; Belkhir, Khalid

    2006-02-01

    Animal mitochondrial DNA is characterized by a remarkably high level of within-species homoplasy, that is, phylogenetic incongruence between sites of the molecule. Several investigators have invoked recombination to explain it, challenging the dogma of maternal, clonal mitochondrial inheritance in animals. Alternatively, a high level of homoplasy could be explained by the existence of mutation hot spots. By using an exhaustive mammalian data set, we test the hot spot hypothesis by comparing patterns of site-specific polymorphism and divergence in several groups of closely related species, including hominids. We detect significant co-occurrence of synonymous polymorphisms among closely related species in various mammalian groups, and a correlation between the site-specific levels of variability within humans (on one hand) and between Hominoidea species (on the other hand), indicating that mutation hot spots actually exist in mammalian mitochondrial coding regions. The whole data, however, cannot be explained by a simple mutation hot spots model. Rather, we show that the site-specific mutation rate quickly varies in time, so that the same sites are not hypermutable in distinct lineages. This study provides a plausible mutation model that potentially accounts for the peculiar distribution of mitochondrial sequence variation in mammals without the need for invoking recombination. It also gives hints about the proximal causes of mitochondrial site-specific hypermutability in humans.

  13. A Rosetta stone of mammalian genetics.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, J H; Grant, P L; Mankala, S; Reiner, A H; Richardson, J E; Eppig, J T

    1995-01-26

    The Mammalian Comparative Database provides genetic maps of mammalian species. Comparative maps are valuable aids for predicting linkages, developing animal models and studying genome organization and evolution.

  14. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  15. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  16. Autophagosome formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Burman, Chloe; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental intracellular trafficking pathway conserved from yeast to mammals. It is generally thought to play a pro-survival role, and it can be up regulated in response to both external and intracellular factors, including amino acid starvation, growth factor withdrawal, low cellular energy levels, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, pathogen infection, and organelle damage. During autophagy initiation a portion of the cytosol is surrounded by a flat membrane sheet known as the isolation membrane or phagophore. The isolation membrane then elongates and seals itself to form an autophagosome. The autophagosome fuses with normal endocytic traffic to mature into a late autophagosome, before fusing with lysosomes. The molecular machinery that enables formation of an autophagosome in response to the various autophagy stimuli is almost completely identified in yeast and-thanks to the observed conservation-is also being rapidly elucidated in higher eukaryotes including mammals. What are less clear and currently under intense investigation are the mechanism by which these various autophagy components co-ordinate in order to generate autophagosomes. In this review, we will discuss briefly the fundamental importance of autophagy in various pathophysiological states and we will then review in detail the various players in early autophagy. Our main thesis will be that a conserved group of heteromeric protein complexes and a relatively simple signalling lipid are responsible for the formation of autophagosomes in mammalian cells.

  17. Rational sphere valued supercocycles in M-theory and type IIA string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorenza, Domenico; Sati, Hisham; Schreiber, Urs

    2017-04-01

    We show that supercocycles on super L∞-algebras capture, at the rational level, the twisted cohomological charge structure of the fields of M-theory and of type IIA string theory. We show that rational 4-sphere-valued supercocycles for M-branes in M-theory descend to supercocycles in type IIA string theory with coefficients in the free loop space of the 4-sphere, to yield the Ramond-Ramond fields in the rational image of twisted K-theory, with the twist given by the B-field. In particular, we derive the M2/M5 ↔ F1/Dp/NS5 correspondence via dimensional reduction of sphere-valued super-L∞-cocycles.

  18. Morphology of a fossil elephant calf (Archidiskodon, Elephantidae) from the Oldowan Muhkai IIa site.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, E N; Amirkhanov, Kh A; Ozherelyev, D V

    2015-11-01

    The skull and lower jaw morphology of a calf of Archidiskodon sp. from the Oldowan (Early Paleolithic) Muhkai IIa site (Akushinskii raion, Dagestan) is described. The Muhkai IIa site is dated more than 1.5 Ma. This is the first record of the skull and lower jaw of calf of this species from the northern Caucasus. A skull fragment and lower jaw with functioning teeth of the DP2/DP3 generation are preserved. The calf is at most 8-10 months of individual age. The finely plicate enamel and formation of a complete enamel loop on DP3 are evidence that the calf belongs to Archidiskodon rather than to the European Elephas lineage.

  19. Parameters of tensile strength, elongation, and tenacity of 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Peters, Kevin A.

    The 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film was tested to determine its tensile strength, elongation, and breaking strength, using an Instron (strength and compression) 4201 Test Instrument. These data provide information leading to the upper and lower limits of the above parameters for 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film. This film will be developed by a commercial developing machine after the Ultraviolet Telescope Space Shuttle Mission returns to the Earth in the early 1990's; thus, it is necessary to understand these force parameters. Several test strips of approximately 200mm in length were used. The results indicate that when a stress load of 100 kg was applied, the film elongated approximately 1.06mm and the break strength was 19.45 kilograms.

  20. Parameters of tensile strength, elongation, and tenacity of 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Peters, Kevin A.

    1989-01-01

    The 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film was tested to determine its tensile strength, elongation, and breaking strength, using an Instron (strength and compression) 4201 Test Instrument. These data provide information leading to the upper and lower limits of the above parameters for 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film. This film will be developed by a commercial developing machine after the Ultraviolet Telescope Space Shuttle Mission returns to the Earth in the early 1990's; thus, it is necessary to understand these force parameters. Several test strips of approximately 200mm in length were used. The results indicate that when a stress load of 100 kg was applied, the film elongated approximately 1.06mm and the break strength was 19.45 kilograms.

  1. Ligand promiscuity through the eyes of the aminoglycoside N3 acetyltransferase IIa

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Adrianne L; Serpersu, Engin H

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AGMEs) are expressed in many pathogenic bacteria and cause resistance to aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics. Remarkably, the substrate promiscuity of AGMEs is quite variable. The molecular basis for such ligand promiscuity is largely unknown as there is not an obvious link between amino acid sequence or structure and the antibiotic profiles of AGMEs. To address this issue, this article presents the first kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of one of the least promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3 acetyltransferase-IIa (AAC-IIa) and its comparison to two highly promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3-acetyltransferase-IIIb (AAC-IIIb) and the AG phosphotransferase(3′)-IIIa (APH). Despite having similar antibiotic selectivities, AAC-IIIb and APH catalyze different reactions and share no homology to one another. AAC-IIa and AAC-IIIb catalyze the same reaction and are very similar in both amino acid sequence and structure. However, they demonstrate strong differences in their substrate profiles and kinetic and thermodynamic properties. AAC-IIa and APH are also polar opposites in terms of ligand promiscuity but share no sequence or apparent structural homology. However, they both are highly dynamic and may even contain disordered segments and both adopt well-defined conformations when AGs are bound. Contrary to this AAC-IIIb maintains a well-defined structure even in apo form. Data presented herein suggest that the antibiotic promiscuity of AGMEs may be determined neither by the flexibility of the protein nor the size of the active site cavity alone but strongly modulated or controlled by the effects of the cosubstrate on the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme. PMID:23640799

  2. Entropy function for 4-charge extremal black holes in type IIA superstring theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Pang Dawei

    2006-09-15

    We calculate the entropy of 4-charge extremal black holes in Type IIA supersting theory by using Sen's entropy function method. Using the low-energy effective actions in both 10D and 4D, we find precise agreements with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole. We also calculate the higher-order corrections to the entropy and find that they depend on the exact form of the higher-order corrections to the effective action.

  3. 30 CFR 57.22101 - Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22101 Section 57.22101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches,...

  4. 30 CFR 57.22101 - Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22101 Section 57.22101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches,...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22101 - Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22101 Section 57.22101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches,...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22101 - Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22101 Section 57.22101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches,...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22101 - Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22101 Section 57.22101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches,...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22103 - Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57... Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Open flames shall not be permitted underground except for... I-A mine. When using open flames in other than fresh air, or in places where methane may enter...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22103 - Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57... Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Open flames shall not be permitted underground except for... I-A mine. When using open flames in other than fresh air, or in places where methane may enter...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22103 - Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57... Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Open flames shall not be permitted underground except for... I-A mine. When using open flames in other than fresh air, or in places where methane may enter...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22103 - Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57... Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Open flames shall not be permitted underground except for... I-A mine. When using open flames in other than fresh air, or in places where methane may enter...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22103 - Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57... Open flames (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Open flames shall not be permitted underground except for... I-A mine. When using open flames in other than fresh air, or in places where methane may enter...

  13. A dangerous liaison: Leptin and sPLA2-IIA join forces to induce proliferation and migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rubén; Cordova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour, shows worse prognosis linked to diabetes or obesity persistence. These pathologies are chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by altered profiles of inflammatory mediators, including leptin and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA). Both proteins, in turn, display diverse pro-cancer properties in different cell types, including astrocytes. Herein, to understand the underlying relationship between obesity and brain tumors, we investigated the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with sPLA2-IIA on astrocytoma cell functions. sPLA2-IIA induced up-regulation of leptin receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Leptin, as well as sPLA2-IIA, increased growth and migration in these cells, through activation/phosphorylation of key proteins of survival cascades. Leptin, at concentrations with minimal or no activating effects on astrocytoma cells, enhanced growth and migration promoted by low doses of sPLA2-IIA. sPLA2-IIA alone induced a transient phosphorylation pattern in the Src/ERK/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/rS6 pathway through EGFR transactivation, and co-addition of leptin resulted in a sustained phosphorylation of these signaling regulators. Mechanistically, EGFR transactivation and tyrosine- and serine/threonine-protein phosphatases revealed a key role in this leptin-sPLA2-IIA cross-talk. This cooperative partnership between both proteins was also found in primary astrocytes. These findings thus indicate that the adipokine leptin, by increasing the susceptibility of cells to inflammatory mediators, could contribute to worsen the prognosis of tumoral and neurodegenerative processes, being a potential mediator of some obesity-related medical complications. PMID:28249041

  14. A dangerous liaison: Leptin and sPLA2-IIA join forces to induce proliferation and migration of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rubén; Cordova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour, shows worse prognosis linked to diabetes or obesity persistence. These pathologies are chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by altered profiles of inflammatory mediators, including leptin and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA). Both proteins, in turn, display diverse pro-cancer properties in different cell types, including astrocytes. Herein, to understand the underlying relationship between obesity and brain tumors, we investigated the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with sPLA2-IIA on astrocytoma cell functions. sPLA2-IIA induced up-regulation of leptin receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Leptin, as well as sPLA2-IIA, increased growth and migration in these cells, through activation/phosphorylation of key proteins of survival cascades. Leptin, at concentrations with minimal or no activating effects on astrocytoma cells, enhanced growth and migration promoted by low doses of sPLA2-IIA. sPLA2-IIA alone induced a transient phosphorylation pattern in the Src/ERK/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/rS6 pathway through EGFR transactivation, and co-addition of leptin resulted in a sustained phosphorylation of these signaling regulators. Mechanistically, EGFR transactivation and tyrosine- and serine/threonine-protein phosphatases revealed a key role in this leptin-sPLA2-IIA cross-talk. This cooperative partnership between both proteins was also found in primary astrocytes. These findings thus indicate that the adipokine leptin, by increasing the susceptibility of cells to inflammatory mediators, could contribute to worsen the prognosis of tumoral and neurodegenerative processes, being a potential mediator of some obesity-related medical complications.

  15. Maturation of the mammalian secretome

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jeremy C; Mateos, Alvaro; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    A recent use of quantitative proteomics to determine the constituents of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex is discussed in the light of other available methodologies for cataloging the proteins associated with the mammalian secretory pathway. PMID:17472737

  16. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. Myosin IIA Heavy Chain Phosphorylation Mediates Adhesion Maturation and Protrusion in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandana; Thomas, Dustin G; Beach, Jordan R; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2017-02-24

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) is a conserved force-producing cytoskeletal enzyme with important but poorly understood roles in cell migration. To investigate myosin heavy chain (MHC) phosphorylation roles in 3D migration, we expressed GFP-tagged NMIIA wild-type or mutant constructs in cells depleted of endogenous NMIIA protein. We find that individual mutation or double mutation of Ser-1916 or Ser-1943 to alanine potently blocks recruitment of GFP-NM-IIA filaments to leading edge protrusions in 2D, and this in turn blocks maturation of anterior focal adhesions. When placed in 3D collagen gels, cells expressing wild-type GFP MHC-IIA behave like parental cells, displaying robust and active formation and retraction of protrusions. However, cells depleted of NMIIA or cells expressing the mutant GFP MHC-IIA display severe defects in invasion and in stabilizing protrusions in 3D. These studies reveal an NMIIA-specific role in 3D invasion that requires competence for NMIIA phosphorylation at Ser-1916 and Ser-1943. In sum, these results demonstrate a critical and previously unrecognized role for NMIIA phosphorylation in 3D invasion.

  18. The molecular interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with insect and mammalian sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Vais, H; Williamson, M S; Devonshire, A L; Usherwood, P N

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in the cloning of alpha (para) and beta (TipE) Na channel sub-units from Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and Musca domestica (housefly) have facilitated functional expression studies of insect Na channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, assayed by voltage clamp techniques. The effects of Type I and Type III pyrethroids on the biophysical properties of these channels are critically reviewed. Pyrethroid resistance mutations (termed kdr and super-kdr) that reduce the sensitivity of the insect Na channel to pyrethroids have been identified in a range of insect species. Some of these mutations (e.g. L1014F, M918T and T929I) have been incorporated into the para Na channel of Drosophila, either individually or in combination, to investigate their effects on the sensitivity of this channel to pyrethroids. The kdr mutation (L1014F) shifts the voltage dependence of both activation and steady-state inactivation by approximately 5 mV towards more positive potentials and facilitates Na channel inactivation. Incorporation of the super-kdr mutation (M918T) into the Drosophila Na channel also increases channel inactivation and causes a > 100-fold reduction in deltamethrin sensitivity. These effects are shared by T929I, an alternative mutation that confers super-kdr-like resistance. Parallel studies have been undertaken using the rat IIA Na channel to investigate the molecular basis for the low sensitivity of mammalian brain Na channels to pyrethroids. Rat IIA channels containing the mutation L1014F exhibit a shift in their mid-point potential for Na activation, but their overall sensitivity to permethrin remains similar to that of the wild-type rat channel (i.e. both are 1000-fold less sensitive than the wild-type insect channel). Mammalian neuronal Na channels have an isoleucine rather than a methionine at the position (874) corresponding to the super-kdr (M918) residue of the insect channel. Replacement of the isoleucine of the wild-type rat IIA Na channel with a

  19. Fludarabine resistance mediated by aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa and the structurally related eukaryotic cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carrera, Dámaso; Bravo-Navas, Sara; Cabezón, Elena; Arechaga, Ignacio; Cabezas, Matilde; Yáñez, Lucrecia; Pipaón, Carlos

    2017-04-03

    While working with G418-resistant stably transfected cells, we realized the neomycin resistance gene (NeoR), which encodes the aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(3')-IIa], also confers resistance to the nucleoside analog fludarabine. Fludarabine is a cytostatic drug widely used in the treatment of hematologic and solid tumors as well as in the conditioning of patients before transplantation of hematopoietic progenitors. We present evidence that NeoR-transfected cells do not incorporate fludarabine, thus avoiding DNA damage caused by the drug, evidenced by a lack of FANCD2 monoubiquitination and impaired apoptosis. A screening of other nucleoside analogs revealed that APH(3')-IIa only protects against ATP purine analogs. Moreover, APH(3')-IIa ATPase activity is inhibited by fludarabine monophosphate, suggesting that APH(3')-IIa blocks fludarabine incorporation into DNA by dephosphorylating its active fludarabine triphosphate form. Furthermore, overexpression of the catalytic subunit of the eukaryotic kinase PKA, which is structurally related to APHs, also provides resistance to fludarabine, anticipating its putative utility as a response marker to the drug. Our results preclude the use of Neo marker plasmids in the study of purine analogs and unveils a new resistance mechanism against these chemotherapeuticals.-Sánchez-Carrera, D., Bravo-Navas, S., Cabezón, E., Arechaga, I., Cabezas, M., Yáñez, L., Pipaón, C. Fludarabine resistance mediated by aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa and the structurally related eukaryotic cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  20. Rescue therapy with Tanshinone IIA hinders transition of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease via targeting GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Xiang; Shao, Qiuyuan; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Miao; Gong, Rujun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains challenging for clinical practice and poses a risk of developing progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) with no definitive treatment available yet. Tanshinone IIA, an active ingredient of Chinese herbal Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been widely used in Asia for the remarkable organoprotective activities. Its effect on established AKI, however, remains unknown. In mice with folic acid-induced AKI, delayed treatment with Tanshinone IIA, commenced early or late after injury, diminished renal expression of kidney injury markers, reduced apoptosis and improved kidney dysfunction, concomitant with mitigated histologic signs of AKI to CKD transition, including interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, and with an ameliorated inflammatory infiltration in tubulointerstitium and a favored M2-skewed macrophage polarization. Mechanistically, Tanshinone IIA blunted glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β overactivity and hyperactivation of its downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases that are centrally implicated in renal fibrogenesis and inflammation. Inhibition of GSK3β is likely a key mechanism mediating the therapeutic activity of Tanshinone IIA, because sodium nitroprusside, a GSK3β activator, largely offset its renoprotective effect. In confirmatory studies, rescue treatment with Tanshinone IIA likewise ameliorated ischemia/reperfusion-induced kidney destruction in mice. Our data suggest that Tanshinone IIA represents a valuable treatment that improves post-AKI kidney salvage via targeting GSK3β. PMID:27857162

  1. The 763C>G Polymorphism of The Secretory PLA2IIa Gene Is Associated with Endometriosis in Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Sahmani, Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Darabi, Maryam; Dabaghi, Talaat; Alizadeh, Safar Ali; Najafipour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological disease resulting from complex interactions between genetic, hormonal, environmental and oxidative stress and intrinsic inflammatory components. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association of the 763C>G polymorphism in the secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa gene (PLA2G2A) with the risk of endometriosis in Iranian women. Materials and Methods Ninety seven patients with endometriosis along with 107 women who were negative for endometriosis after laparoscopy and laparatomy, and served as the control group, were enrolled for this cross-sectional study. Samples were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Results Multivariate analysis was used to examine the association between the risk of endometriosis and the 763C>G polymorphism of PLA2G2A. Genotype distributions of PLA2G2A were significantly different between patients and the controls (p<0.001, OR=0.22, 95% CI=0.21-0.39). Correlation analysis showed that there was a significant association between the normal homozygous genotype and susceptibility to endometriosis (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study suggests that the 763C>G polymorphism of PLA2G2A plays an important role as an independent factor in the risk of endometriosis in Iranian women. PMID:25780526

  2. Characterization of 40 full-length MHC class IIA functional alleles in miiuy croaker: Polymorphism and positive selection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Yueyan; Zhu, Zhihuang; Liu, Tianxing

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex is a highly polymorphic gene superfamily in vertebrates that plays an important role in adaptive immune response. In the present study, we identified 40 full-length miiuy croaker MHC class IIA (Mimi-DAA) functional alleles from 26 miiuy croaker individuals and found that the alleles encode 30 amino acid sequences. A high level of polymorphism in Mimi-DAA was detected in miiuy croaker. The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (d(N)) occurred at a significantly higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (d(S)) in the peptide-binding region (PBR) and non-PBR. This result suggests that balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at the Mimi-DAA locus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length sequences showed that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into three groups. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed using the exon 2 sequences indicated that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into two groups. A total of 22 positively selected sites were identified on the Mimi-DAA alleles after testing for positive selection, and five sites were predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen, suggesting that a few selected residues may play a significant role in immune function.

  3. Antinociceptive effects of systemic tanshinone IIA on visceral and somatic persistent nociception and pain hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fa-Le; Su, Xue-Jia; Wang, Yan; Xu, Min; Shan, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies showed that tanshinone IIA (TIIA), an important lipophilic component of Danshen, has been well-established to exhibit various neuroprotective actions in the nervous system. Although we previously reported that TIIA had a significant anti-nociceptive effect in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced pain, it is surprisingly noted that few pharmacological studies have been carried out to explore the possible analgesic action of TIIA in animals and the appropriate indications for treatment of clinical pain remain unclear. Therefore, in the present study, by using both somatic and visceral pain models, the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of TIIA were evaluated by intraperitoneal administration in rats. In the bee venom (BV) test, when compared with saline controls, systemic pre- and post-treatment with TIIA resulted in an apparent antinociception against persistent spontaneous nociception (PSN) and primary heat and mechanical hypersensitivity, while for the mirror-image heat hypersensitivity, only pre-treatment was effective. Moreover, in the formalin test, the antinociception of TIIA was significant for both phases 1 and 2 in the pretreatment groups, but only effective for phase 2 in the post-treatment group. In the acetic acid writhing test, the number of writhes was effectively blocked by both pre- and post-treatment of TIIA. Taken together, these results provide a new line of evidence showing that TIIA is also able to produce analgesia against various 'phenotypes' of nociception and hypersensitivity.

  4. The impact of transposable elements on mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Widmann, Thomas J; Adams, Ian R

    2016-11-15

    Despite often being classified as selfish or junk DNA, transposable elements (TEs) are a group of abundant genetic sequences that have a significant impact on mammalian development and genome regulation. In recent years, our understanding of how pre-existing TEs affect genome architecture, gene regulatory networks and protein function during mammalian embryogenesis has dramatically expanded. In addition, the mobilization of active TEs in selected cell types has been shown to generate genetic variation during development and in fully differentiated tissues. Importantly, the ongoing domestication and evolution of TEs appears to provide a rich source of regulatory elements, functional modules and genetic variation that fuels the evolution of mammalian developmental processes. Here, we review the functional impact that TEs exert on mammalian developmental processes and discuss how the somatic activity of TEs can influence gene regulatory networks.

  5. A role for myosin II in mammalian mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Korobova, Farida; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-02-17

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, undergoing both fission and fusion regularly in interphase cells. Mitochondrial fission is thought to be part of a quality-control mechanism whereby damaged mitochondrial components are segregated from healthy components in an individual mitochondrion, followed by mitochondrial fission and degradation of the damaged daughter mitochondrion. Fission also plays a role in apoptosis. Defects in mitochondrial dynamics can lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondrial fission requires the dynamin GTPase Drp1, which assembles in a ring around the mitochondrion and appears to constrict both outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. However, mechanisms controlling Drp1 assembly on mammalian mitochondria are unclear. Recent results show that actin polymerization, driven by the endoplasmic reticulum-bound formin protein INF2, stimulates Drp1 assembly at fission sites. Here, we show that myosin II also plays a role in fission. Chemical inhibition by blebbistatin or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated suppression of myosin IIA or myosin IIB causes an increase in mitochondrial length in both control cells and cells expressing constitutively active INF2. Active myosin II accumulates in puncta on mitochondria in an actin- and INF2-dependent manner. In addition, myosin II inhibition decreases Drp1 association with mitochondria. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic model in which INF2-mediated actin polymerization leads to myosin II recruitment and constriction at the fission site, enhancing subsequent Drp1 accumulation and fission.

  6. Developing an anticancer copper(II) pro-drug based on the nature of cancer cell and human serum albumin carrier IIA subdomain: mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jinxu; Chen, Shifang; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Liang, Hong; Yang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-based drug delivery systems are promising for improving delivery efficiency, anticancer activity and selectivity of anticancer agents. To rationally guide to design HSA carrier for anticancer metal agent, we built a breast mouse model on developing anti-cancer copper (Cu) pro-drug based on the nature of IIA subdomain of HSA carrier and cancer cells. Thus, we first synthesized a new Cu(II) compound derived from tridentate (E)-N'-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide Schiff base ligand (HL) containing 2 potential leaving groups [indazole (Ind) and NO3−], namely, [Cu(L)(Ind)NO3]. Structural analysis of the HSA complex showed that Cu(L)(Ind)(NO3) could bind to the hydrophobic pocket of the HSA IIA subdomain. Lys199 and His242 coordinate with Cu2+ by replacing the indazole and NO3 ligands of [Cu(L)(Ind)NO3]. The release behavior of the Cu compound from the HSA complex is different at different pH levels. [Cu(L)(Ind)NO3] can enhance cytotoxicity by 2 times together with HSA specifically in cancer cells but has no such effect on normal cells in vitro. Importantly, our in vivo results showed that the HSA complex displayed increased selectivity and capacity to inhibit tumor growth and was less toxic than [Cu(L)(Ind)NO3] alone. PMID:27564255

  7. Aneuploidy in mammalian somatic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cimino, M C; Tice, R R; Liang, J C

    1986-01-01

    Aneuploidy is an important potential source of human disease and of reproductive failure. Nevertheless, the ability of chemical agents to induce aneuploidy has been investigated only sporadically in intact (whole-animal) mammalian systems. A search of the available literature from the EMCT Aneuploidy File (for years 1970-1983) provided 112 papers that dealt with aneuploidy in mammalian somatic cells in vivo. 59 of these papers did not meet minimal criteria for analysis and were rejected from subsequent review. Of the remaining 53 papers that dealt with aneuploidy induction by chemical agents in mammalian somatic cells in vivo, only 3 (6%) contained data that were considered to be supported conclusively by adequate study designs, execution, and reporting. These 3 papers dealt with 2 chemicals, one of which, mercury, was negative for aneuploidy induction in humans, and the other, pyrimethamine, was positive in an experimental rodent study. The majority of papers (94%) were considered inconclusive for a variety of reasons. The most common reasons for calling a study inconclusive were (a) combining data on hyperploidy with those on hypoploidy and/or polyploidy, (b) an inadequate or unspecified number of animals and/or cells per animal scored per treatment group, and (c) poor data presentation such that animal-to-animal variability could not be assessed. Suggestions for protocol development are made, and the future directions of research into aneuploidy induction are discussed.

  8. Mammalian masticatory muscles: homology, nomenclature, and diversification.

    PubMed

    Druzinsky, Robert E; Doherty, Alison H; De Vree, Frits L

    2011-08-01

    There is a deep and rich literature of comparative studies of jaw muscles in mammals but no recent analyses employ modern phylogenetic techniques to better understand evolutionary changes that have occurred in these muscles. In order to fully develop and utilize the Feeding Experiments End-user Database (FEED), we are constructing a comprehensive ontology of mammalian jaw muscles. This process has led to a careful consideration of nomenclature and homologies of the muscles and their constituent parts. Precise determinations of muscle attachments have shown that muscles with similar names are not necessarily homologous. Using new anatomical descriptions derived from the literature, we defined character states for the jaw muscles in diverse mammalian species. We then mapped those characters onto a recent phylogeny of mammals with the aid of the Mesquite software package. Our data further elucidate how muscle groups associated with the feeding apparatus differ and have become highly specialized in certain mammalian orders, such as Rodentia, while remaining conserved in other orders. We believe that careful naming of muscles and statistical analyses of their distributions among mammals, in association with the FEED database, will lead to new, significant insights into the functional, structural, and evolutionary morphology of the jaw muscles.

  9. Mammalian Evolution May not Be Strictly Bifurcating

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Björn M.; Janke, Axel

    2010-01-01

    The massive amount of genomic sequence data that is now available for analyzing evolutionary relationships among 31 placental mammals reduces the stochastic error in phylogenetic analyses to virtually zero. One would expect that this would make it possible to finally resolve controversial branches in the placental mammalian tree. We analyzed a 2,863,797 nucleotide-long alignment (3,364 genes) from 31 placental mammals for reconstructing their evolution. Most placental mammalian relationships were resolved, and a consensus of their evolution is emerging. However, certain branches remain difficult or virtually impossible to resolve. These branches are characterized by short divergence times in the order of 1–4 million years. Computer simulations based on parameters from the real data show that as little as about 12,500 amino acid sites could be sufficient to confidently resolve short branches as old as about 90 million years ago (Ma). Thus, the amount of sequence data should no longer be a limiting factor in resolving the relationships among placental mammals. The timing of the early radiation of placental mammals coincides with a period of climate warming some 100–80 Ma and with continental fragmentation. These global processes may have triggered the rapid diversification of placental mammals. However, the rapid radiations of certain mammalian groups complicate phylogenetic analyses, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting and introgression. These speciation-related processes led to a mosaic genome and conflicting phylogenetic signals. Split network methods are ideal for visualizing these problematic branches and can therefore depict data conflict and possibly the true evolutionary history better than strictly bifurcating trees. Given the timing of tectonics, of placental mammalian divergences, and the fossil record, a Laurasian rather than Gondwanan origin of placental mammals seems the most parsimonious explanation. PMID:20591845

  10. Simultaneous induction of apoptosis and necroptosis by Tanshinone IIA in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C-Y; Chang, T-W; Hsieh, W-H; Hung, M-C; Lin, I-H; Lai, S-C; Tzeng, Y-J

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), a constituent of the traditional medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, has been reported to possess anticancer activity through induction of apoptosis in many cancer cells. Surprisingly, the present study finds that Tan IIA simultaneously causes apoptosis and necroptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. We further find that apoptosis can be converted to necroptosis by pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, and the two death modes can be blocked by necroptotic inhibitor necrostatin-1. The underlying mechanisms are revealed by analysis of the signaling molecules using western blotting. In control cells, FLICE inhibitory protein in short form (FLIPS) is expressed in relatively high levels and binds to caspase 8 in ripoptosome, which supposedly sustains cell survival. However, in Tan IIA-treated cells, FLIPS is down-regulated and may thus cause homodimer formation of cleaved caspase 8, cleavage of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinases 1, 3 (RIP1, RIP3), and mixed-lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL), in turn leads to cell apoptosis. In parallel, Tan IIA causes necroptosis by forming a suggested necrosomal complex composed of RIP1/RIP3. Regarding the inhibitors, z-VAD-fmk diminishes the cleaved caspase 8, RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL induced by Tan IIA, and reconstructs the ripoptosome complex, which marks cells moving from apoptosis to necroptosis. Nec-1 recovers the Tan IIA down-regulated FLIPS, consequently causes FLIPS to form heterodimer with caspase 8 and thus block apoptosis. Meanwhile, cleaved forms of RIP1 and RIP3 were observed preventing necroptosis. Intriguingly, the cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand to HepG2 cells is enhanced by Tan IIA in a pilot study, which may be attributed to low FLIPS levels induced by Tan IIA. In short, Tan IIA simultaneously induces both Nec-1 inhibition and FLIPS regulation-mediated apoptosis/necroptosis, which has not been previously documented

  11. The effect of structural alterations of three mammalian serum albumins on their binding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, L.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.

    2013-07-01

    The binding of piroxicam (PIR) to human (HSA), bovine (BSA) and sheep (SSA) serum albumin in native and destabilized/denaturated state was studied by the fluorescence quenching technique. Quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of three analyzed serum albumins was observed due to selective exciting of tryptophanyl and tyrosil residues at 295 nm and 280 nm. Based on fluorescence emission spectra the quenching (KQ) and binding constants (Ka) were determined. The results showed that PIR is bound mainly in IIA subdomain of HSA and is additionally able to interact with tyrosil groups located in subdomains IB, IIB or IIIA. PIR interacts only with tryptophanyl residues of BSA and SSA [Trp-214, Trp-237 (IIA) and Trp-135, Trp-158 (IB)]. The presence of denaturating factors modified the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of SSA by PIR. Linear Scatchard plots suggest that HSA, BSA and SSA bind PIR in one class of binding sites.

  12. Neuroprotection of Tanshinone IIA against Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanlin; Wu, Xuemei; Yu, Shanshan; Lin, Xuemei; Wu, Jingxian; Li, Lan; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is associated with systemic inflammatory response. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been implicated in many inflammatory processes. Tanshinone IIA (TSA) is one of the active ingredients in danshen, which derived from the dried root or rhizome of Salviae miltiorrhizae Bge. Recent studies have demonstrated that TSA has protective effects against focal cerebral I/R injury. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here we put forward the hypothesis that TSA acts through inhibition of MIF expression during focal cerebral I/R injury in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 hours. This was followed by reperfusion. We measured neurological deficits, brain water content, and infarct volume, and found that neurological dysfunction, brain edema, and brain infarction were significantly attenuated by TSA 6 hours after reperfusion. We also measured myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity at 6 and 24 hours, and found that neutrophil infiltration was significantly higher in the vehicle+I/R group than in the TSA+I/R group. ELISA demonstrated that TSA could inhibit MIF expression and the release of TNF-α and IL-6 induced by I/R injury. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that MIF expression was significantly lower in the TSA+I/R group than in the vehicle+I/R group. MIF was found almost all located in neurons and hardly any located in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex. Western blot analysis and EMSA demonstrated that NF-κB expression and activity were significantly increased in the vehicle+I/R group. However, these changes were attenuated by TSA. Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that TSA helps alleviate the proinflammatory responses associated with I/R-induced injury and that this neuroprotective effect may occur through down-regulation of MIF expression in neurons. PMID:22768247

  13. The effects of Tanshinone IIA on blood-brain barrier and brain edema after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Xue, Hongli; Bai, Changlin; Fu, Rong; Wu, Anhua

    2010-12-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema formation play a key role in the development of neurological dysfunction after cerebral ischemia. In this study, the effects of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), one of the active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza root, on the BBB and brain edema after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats were examined. Our study demonstrated that Tan IIA reduced brain infarct area, water content in the ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, Tan IIA significantly decreased BBB permeability to Evans blue, suppressed the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), inhibited the degradation of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Occludin. These results demonstrated that Tan IIA was effective for attenuating the extent of brain edema formation in response to ischemia injury in rats, partly by Tan IIA's protective effect on the BBB. Our results may have implications in the treatment of brain edema in cerebral ischemia.

  14. Alanine scan of α-conotoxin RegIIA reveals a selective α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kompella, Shiva N; Hung, Andrew; Clark, Richard J; Marí, Frank; Adams, David J

    2015-01-09

    Activation of the α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of various conditions, including development and progression of lung cancer and in nicotine addiction. As selective α3β4 nAChR antagonists, α-conotoxins are valuable tools to evaluate the functional roles of this receptor subtype. We previously reported the discovery of a new α4/7-conotoxin, RegIIA. RegIIA was isolated from Conus regius and inhibits acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents mediated by α3β4, α3β2, and α7 nAChR subtypes. The current study used alanine scanning mutagenesis to understand the selectivity profile of RegIIA at the α3β4 nAChR subtype. [N11A] and [N12A] RegIIA analogs exhibited 3-fold more selectivity for the α3β4 than the α3β2 nAChR subtype. We also report synthesis of [N11A,N12A]RegIIA, a selective α3β4 nAChR antagonist (IC50 of 370 nM) that could potentially be used in the treatment of lung cancer and nicotine addiction. Molecular dynamics simulations of RegIIA and [N11A,N12A]RegIIA bound to α3β4 and α3β2 suggest that destabilization of toxin contacts with residues at the principal and complementary faces of α3β2 (α3-Tyr(92), Ser(149), Tyr(189), Cys(192), and Tyr(196); β2-Trp(57), Arg(81), and Phe(119)) may form the molecular basis for the selectivity shift.

  15. Defoliation induces fructan 1-exohydrolase II in Witloof chicory roots. Cloning and purification of two isoforms, fructan 1-exohydrolase IIa and fructan 1-exohydrolase IIb. Mass fingerprint of the fructan 1-exohydrolase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Van den Ende, W; Michiels, A; Van Wonterghem, D; Clerens, S P; De Roover, J; Van Laere, A J

    2001-07-01

    The cloning of two highly homologous chicory (Cichorium intybus var. foliosum cv Flash) fructan 1-exohydrolase cDNAs (1-FEH IIa and 1-FEH IIb) is described. Both isoenzymes could be purified from forced chicory roots as well as from the etiolated "Belgian endive" leaves where the 1-FEH IIa isoform is present in higher concentrations. Full-length cDNAs were obtained by a combination of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR and 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends using primers based on N-terminal and conserved amino acid sequences. 1-FEH IIa and 1-FEH IIb cDNA-derived amino acid sequences are most homologous to a new group of plant glycosyl hydrolases harboring cell wall-type enzymes with acid isoelectric points. Unlike the observed expression profiles of chicory 1-FEH I, northern analysis revealed that 1-FEH II is expressed when young chicory plants are defoliated, suggesting that this enzyme can be induced at any developmental stage when large energy supplies are necessary (regrowth after defoliation).

  16. An Adaptive Threshold in Mammalian Neocortical Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kalinka, Alex T.; Tomancak, Pavel; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of the neocortex is a hallmark of human evolution. However, determining which adaptive mechanisms facilitated its expansion remains an open question. Here we show, using the gyrencephaly index (GI) and other physiological and life-history data for 102 mammalian species, that gyrencephaly is an ancestral mammalian trait. We find that variation in GI does not evolve linearly across species, but that mammals constitute two principal groups above and below a GI threshold value of 1.5, approximately equal to 109 neurons, which may be characterized by distinct constellations of physiological and life-history traits. By integrating data on neurogenic period, neuroepithelial founder pool size, cell-cycle length, progenitor-type abundances, and cortical neuron number into discrete mathematical models, we identify symmetric proliferative divisions of basal progenitors in the subventricular zone of the developing neocortex as evolutionarily necessary for generating a 14-fold increase in daily prenatal neuron production, traversal of the GI threshold, and thus establishment of two principal groups. We conclude that, despite considerable neuroanatomical differences, changes in the length of the neurogenic period alone, rather than any novel neurogenic progenitor lineage, are sufficient to explain differences in neuron number and neocortical size between species within the same principal group. PMID:25405475

  17. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  18. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA.

    PubMed

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H; Naika, Gajendra S; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2015-07-07

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms.

  19. Novel hydroxyl tricyclics (e.g., GSK966587) as potent inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Miles, Timothy J; Hennessy, Alan J; Bax, Ben; Brooks, Gerald; Brown, Barry S; Brown, Pamela; Cailleau, Nathalie; Chen, Dongzhao; Dabbs, Steven; Davies, David T; Esken, Joel M; Giordano, Ilaria; Hoover, Jennifer L; Huang, Jianzhong; Jones, Graham E; Sukmar, Senthill K Kusalakumari; Spitzfaden, Claus; Markwell, Roger E; Minthorn, Elisabeth A; Rittenhouse, Steve; Gwynn, Michael N; Pearson, Neil D

    2013-10-01

    During the course of our research to find novel mode of action antibacterials, we discovered a series of hydroxyl tricyclic compounds that showed good potency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. These compounds inhibit bacterial type IIA topoisomerases. Herein we will discuss structure-activity relationships in this series and report advanced studies on compound 1 (GSK966587) which demonstrates good PK and in vivo efficacy properties. X-ray crystallographic studies were used to provide insight into the structural basis for the difference in antibacterial potency between enantiomers.

  20. New industrial heat pump applications to a synthetic rubber plant. Final report, Phase IIA

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the Phase IIA of the DOE sponsored study titled, Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Application and Evaluation. The scope of this phase of the study was to finalize the process design of the heat pump scheme, develop a process and instrumentation diagram, and a detailed cost estimate for the project. This information is essential for the site management to evaluate the economic viability and operability of the proposed heat pump design, prior to the next phase of installation and testing.

  1. Non-perturbative scalar potential inspired by type IIA strings on rigid CY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Ketov, Sergei V.; Wakimoto, Yuki

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by a class of flux compactifications of type IIA strings on rigid Calabi-Yau manifolds, preserving N = 2 local supersymmetry in four dimensions, we derive a non-perturbative potential of all scalar fields from the exact D-instanton corrected metric on the hypermultiplet moduli space. Applying this potential to moduli stabilization, we find a discrete set of exact vacua for axions. At these critical points, the stability problem is decoupled into two subspaces spanned by the axions and the other fields (dilaton and Kähler moduli), respectively. Whereas the stability of the axions is easily achieved, numerical analysis shows instabilities in the second subspace.

  2. General N=1 supersymmetric flux vacua of massive type IIA string theory.

    PubMed

    Behrndt, Klaus; Cvetic, Mirjam

    2005-07-08

    We derive conditions for the existence of four-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric flux vacua of massive type IIA string theory with general supergravity fluxes turned on. For an SU(3) singlet Killing spinor, we show that such flux vacua exist when the internal geometry is nearly Kähler. The geometry is not warped, all the allowed fluxes are proportional to the mass parameter, and the dilaton is fixed by a ratio of (quantized) fluxes. The four-dimensional cosmological constant, while negative, becomes small in the vacuum with the weak string coupling.

  3. Effect of rosuvastatin on diabetic polyneuropathy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase IIa study

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ojeda, Jaime; Román-Pintos, Luis Miguel; Rodríguez-Carrízalez, Adolfo Daniel; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto Germán; Alatorre-Carranza, María del Pilar; Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic neuropathy affects 50%–66% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress generates nerve dysfunction by causing segmental demyelinization and axonal degeneration. Antioxidants are considered to be the only etiologic management for diabetic polyneuropathy, and statins such as rosuvastatin increase nitric oxide bioavailability and reduce lipid peroxidation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant effect of rosuvastatin in diabetic polyneuropathy. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase IIa clinical trial in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) stage ≥1b. We allocated subjects to two parallel groups (1:1) that received rosuvastatin 20 mg or placebo for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes were neuropathic symptom score, disability score, and nerve conduction studies, and secondary outcomes were glycemic control, lipid and hepatic profile, lipid peroxidation, and nerve growth factor beta (NGF-β) levels. Results Both groups were of similar age and duration since diagnosis of diabetes and DPN. We observed improvement of DPN in the rosuvastatin group from stage 2a (88.2%) to stage 1b (41.2%), improvement of neuropathic symptom score from 4.5±2 to 2.4±1.8, and significant (P=0.001) reductions of peroneal nerve conduction velocity (from 40.8±2.2 to 42.1±1.6 seconds) and lipid peroxidation (from 25.4±2 to 12.2±4.0 nmol/mL), with no significant change in glycemic control or β-NGF. Conclusion The severity, symptoms, and nerve conduction parameters of DPN improved after 12 weeks of treatment with rosuvastatin. These beneficial effects appear to be attributable to reductions in lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. PMID:25214797

  4. Serum protein profiling using an aptamer array predicts clinical outcomes of stage IIA colon cancer: A leave-one-out crossvalidation

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Sung Chun; Sohn, Insuk; Jung, Sin-Ho; Kim, Hee Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we established and validated a model for predicting prognosis of stage IIA colon cancer patients based on expression profiles of aptamers in serum. Methods Bloods samples were collected from 227 consecutive patients with pathologic T3N0M0 (stage IIA) colon cancer. We incubated 1,149 serum molecule-binding aptamer pools of clinical significance with serum from patients to obtain aptamers bound to serum molecules, which were then amplified and marked. Oligonucleotide arrays were constructed with the base sequences of the 1,149 aptamers, and the marked products identified above were reacted with one another to produce profiles of the aptamers bound to serum molecules. These profiles were organized into low- and high-risk groups of colon cancer patients based on clinical information for the serum samples. Cox proportional hazards model and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) were used to evaluate predictive performance. Results During a median follow-up period of 5 years, 29 of the 227 patients (11.9%) experienced recurrence. There were 212 patients (93.4%) in the low-risk group and 15 patients (6.6%) in the high-risk group in our aptamer prognosis model. Postoperative recurrence significantly correlated with age and aptamer risk stratification (p = 0.046 and p = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, aptamer risk stratification (p < 0.001) was an independent predictor of recurrence. Disease-free survival curves calculated according to aptamer risk level predicted through a LOOCV procedure and age showed significant differences (p < 0.001 from permutations). Conclusion Aptamer risk stratification can be a valuable prognostic factor in stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:26908450

  5. The Crystal Structures of Substrate and Nucleotide Complexes of Enterococcus faecium Aminoglycoside-2′′-Phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(2′′)-IIa] Provide Insights into Substrate Selectivity in the APH(2′′) Subfamily▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Young, Paul G.; Walanj, Rupa; Lakshmi, Vendula; Byrnes, Laura J.; Metcalf, Peter; Baker, Edward N.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2009-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(2′′)-IIa] is one of a number of homologous bacterial enzymes responsible for the deactivation of the aminoglycoside family of antibiotics and is thus a major component in bacterial resistance to these compounds. APH(2′′)-IIa produces resistance to several clinically important aminoglycosides (including kanamycin and gentamicin) in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, most notably in Enterococcus species. We have determined the structures of two complexes of APH(2′′)-IIa, the binary gentamicin complex and a ternary complex containing adenosine-5′-(β,γ-methylene)triphosphate (AMPPCP) and streptomycin. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the APH(2′′) family of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. The structure of the gentamicin-APH(2′′)-IIa complex was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction methods from a single selenomethionine-substituted crystal and was refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.210 (Rfree, 0.271) at a resolution of 2.5 Å. The structure of the AMPPCP-streptomycin complex was solved by molecular replacement using the gentamicin-APH(2′′)-IIa complex as the starting model. The enzyme has a two-domain structure with the substrate binding site located in a cleft in the C-terminal domain. Gentamicin binding is facilitated by a number of conserved acidic residues lining the binding cleft, with the A and B rings of the substrate forming the majority of the interactions. The inhibitor streptomycin, although binding in the same pocket as gentamicin, is orientated such that no potential phosphorylation sites are adjacent to the catalytic aspartate residue. The binding of gentamicin and streptomycin provides structural insights into the substrate selectivity of the APH(2′′) subfamily of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, specifically, the selectivity between the 4,6-disubstituted and the 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:19429619

  6. Chronobiology in mammalian health.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Chu, Guiyan

    2013-03-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of physiology and behavior that are driven by an endogenous oscillator with a period of approximately one day. In mammals, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei are our principal circadian oscillators which influences peripheral tissue clocks via endocrine, autonomic and behavioral cues, and other brain regions and most peripheral tissues contain circadian clocks as well. The circadian molecular machinery comprises a group of circadian genes, namely Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and Cry2. These circadian genes drive endogenous oscillations which promote rhythmically expression of downstream genes and thereby physiological and behavioral processes. Disruptions in circadian homeostasis have pronounced impact on physiological functioning, overall health and disease susceptibility. This review introduces the general profile of circadian gene expression and tissue-specific circadian regulation, highlights the connection between the circadian rhythms and physiological processes, and discusses the role of circadian rhythms in human disease.

  7. The saxitoxin/tetrodotoxin binding site on cloned rat brain IIa Na channels is in the transmembrane electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Satin, J.; Limberis, J. T.; Kyle, J. W.; Rogart, R. B.; Fozzard, H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The rat brain IIa (BrIIa) Na channel alpha-subunit and the brain beta 1 subunit were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, and peak whole-oocyte Na current (INa) was measured at a test potential of -10 mV. Hyperpolarization of the holding potential resulted in an increased affinity of STX and TTX rested-state block of BrIIa Na channels. The apparent half-block concentration (ED50) for STX of BrIIa current decreased with hyperpolarizing holding potentials (Vhold). At Vhold of -100 mV, the ED50 was 2.1 +/- 0.4 nM, and the affinity increased to a ED50 of 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM with Vhold of -140 mV. In the absence of toxin, the peak current amplitude was the same for all potentials negative to -90 mV, demonstrating that all of the channels were in a closed conformation and maximally available to open in this range of holding potentials. The Woodhull model (1973) was used to describe the increase of the STX ED50 as a function of holding potential. The equivalent electrical distance of block (delta) by STX was 0.18 from the extracellular milieu when the valence of STX was fixed to +2. Analysis of the holding potential dependence of TTX block yielded a similar delta when the valence of TTX was fixed to +1. We conclude that the guanidinium toxin site is located partially within the transmembrane electric field. Previous site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that an isoform-specific phenylalanine in the BrIIa channel is critical for high affinity toxin block. Therefore, we propose that amino acids at positions corresponding to this Phe in the BrIIa channel, which lie in the outer vestibule of the channel adjacent to the pore entrance,are partially in the transmembrane potential drop. PMID:7811911

  8. The saxitoxin/tetrodotoxin binding site on cloned rat brain IIa Na channels is in the transmembrane electric field.

    PubMed

    Satin, J; Limberis, J T; Kyle, J W; Rogart, R B; Fozzard, H A

    1994-09-01

    The rat brain IIa (BrIIa) Na channel alpha-subunit and the brain beta 1 subunit were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, and peak whole-oocyte Na current (INa) was measured at a test potential of -10 mV. Hyperpolarization of the holding potential resulted in an increased affinity of STX and TTX rested-state block of BrIIa Na channels. The apparent half-block concentration (ED50) for STX of BrIIa current decreased with hyperpolarizing holding potentials (Vhold). At Vhold of -100 mV, the ED50 was 2.1 +/- 0.4 nM, and the affinity increased to a ED50 of 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM with Vhold of -140 mV. In the absence of toxin, the peak current amplitude was the same for all potentials negative to -90 mV, demonstrating that all of the channels were in a closed conformation and maximally available to open in this range of holding potentials. The Woodhull model (1973) was used to describe the increase of the STX ED50 as a function of holding potential. The equivalent electrical distance of block (delta) by STX was 0.18 from the extracellular milieu when the valence of STX was fixed to +2. Analysis of the holding potential dependence of TTX block yielded a similar delta when the valence of TTX was fixed to +1. We conclude that the guanidinium toxin site is located partially within the transmembrane electric field. Previous site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that an isoform-specific phenylalanine in the BrIIa channel is critical for high affinity toxin block. Therefore, we propose that amino acids at positions corresponding to this Phe in the BrIIa channel, which lie in the outer vestibule of the channel adjacent to the pore entrance,are partially in the transmembrane potential drop.

  9. Immunohistochemical study of collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in human cartilage repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Sandell, L J; Evans, E H; Richardson, J B

    2009-10-01

    This study has assessed the relative proportions of type I and II collagens and IIA procollagen in full depth biopsies of repair tissue in a large sample of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Sixty five full depth biopsies were obtained from knees of 58 patients 8-60 months after treatment by ACI alone (n=55) or in combination with mosaicplasty (n=10). In addition articular cartilage was examined from eight individuals (aged 10-50) as controls. Morphology and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in the repair tissue were studied. Repair cartilage thickness was 2.89+/-1.5 mm and there was good basal integration between the repair cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral bone. Sixty five percent of the biopsies were predominantly fibrocartilage (mostly type I collagen and IIA procollagen), 15% were hyaline cartilage (mostly type II collagen), 17% were of mixed morphology and 3% were fibrous tissue (mostly type I collagen). Type II collagen and IIA procollagen were usually found in the lower regions near the bone and most type II collagen was present 30-60 months after treatment. The presence of type IIA procollagen in the repair tissue supports our hypothesis that this is indicative of a developing cartilage, with the ratio of type II collagen:procollagen IIA increasing from <2% in the first two years post-treatment to 30% three to five years after treatment. This suggests that cartilage repair tissue produced following ACI treatment, is likely to take some years to mature.

  10. Myosin IIA is critical for organelle distribution and F-actin organization in megakaryocytes and platelets.

    PubMed

    Pertuy, Fabien; Eckly, Anita; Weber, Josiane; Proamer, Fabienne; Rinckel, Jean-Yves; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian; Léon, Catherine

    2014-02-20

    During proplatelet formation, a relatively homogeneous content of organelles is transported from the megakaryocyte (MK) to the nascent platelets along microtubule tracks. We found that platelets from Myh9(-/-) mice and a MYH9-RD patient were heterogeneous in their organelle content (granules and mitochondria). In addition, Myh9(-/-) MKs have an abnormal cytoplasmic clustering of organelles, suggesting that the platelet defect originates in the MKs. Myosin is not involved in the latest stage of organelle traffic along microtubular tracks in the proplatelet shafts as shown by confocal observations of proplatelet buds. By contrast, it is required for the earlier distribution of organelles within the large MK preplatelet fragments shed into the sinusoid circulation before terminal proplatelet remodeling. We show here that F-actin is abnormally clustered in the cytoplasm of Myh9(-/-) MKs and actin polymerization is impaired in platelets. Myosin IIA is required for normal granule motility and positioning within MKs, mechanisms that may be dependent on organelle traveling and tethering onto F-actin cytoskeleton tracks. Altogether, our results indicate that the distribution of organelles within platelets critically depends on a homogeneous organelle distribution within MKs and preplatelet fragments, which requires myosin IIA.

  11. Type IIA photosensitivity and formation of pores in optical fibers under intense ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Shlyagin, M. G.; Swart, P. L.; Chtcherbakov, A. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2007-09-01

    Formation of the type IIA Bragg gratings in germanosilicate optical fibers is studied. We report the observation of such a type of gratings in the standard single-mode fiber (Corning SMF-28) under different experimental conditions. A mechanism for the type IIA photosensitivity in optical fibers is proposed which is based on nucleation and evolution of pores from vacancy-type defects in fiber areas where a high level of mechanical stress is induced under intense ultraviolet (UV) light. Evolution of fiber core temperature under influence of a single 20 ns light pulse from a KrF excimer laser was measured and compared with theoretical calculations. It was shown that transient thermoinduced stress in the fiber core can achieve a level sufficient for effective nucleation of pores. A theory describing formation of pores in optical fibers has been developed and was used to estimate the pore nucleation rate, concentration, and other parameters of pore evolution for different levels of UV fluence and fiber core stress.

  12. Force Dependent Biotinylation of Myosin IIA by α-Catenin Tagged with a Promiscuous Biotin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shuji; Blee, Alexandra M.; Macway, Katherine G.; Renner, Derrick J.; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion. PMID:25806963

  13. An adhesome comprising laminin, dystroglycan and myosin IIA is required during notochord development in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Nicolas; Sirour, Cathy; Moreau, Nicole; Denker, Elsa; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Goullancourt, Aline; Darribère, Thierry; Bello, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane receptor for laminin that must be expressed at the right time and place in order to be involved in notochord morphogenesis. The function of Dg was examined in Xenopus laevis embryos by knockdown of Dg and overexpression and replacement of the endogenous Dg with a mutated form of the protein. This analysis revealed that Dg is required for correct laminin assembly, for cell polarization during mediolateral intercalation and for proper differentiation of vacuoles. Using mutations in the cytoplasmic domain, we identified two sites that are involved in cell polarization and are required for mediolateral cell intercalation, and a site that is required for vacuolation. Furthermore, using a proteomic analysis, the cytoskeletal non-muscle myosin IIA has been identified for the first time as a molecular link between the Dg-cytoplasmic domain and cortical actin. The data allowed us to identify the adhesome laminin-Dg-myosin IIA as being required to maintain the cortical actin cytoskeleton network during vacuolation, which is crucial to maintain the shape of notochordal cells.

  14. Tactile responses in the granule cell layer of cerebellar folium crus IIa of freely behaving rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.; Bower, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We recorded activity from the granule cell layer (GCL) of cerebellar folium Crus IIa as freely moving rats engaged in a variety of natural behaviors, including grooming, eating, and free tactile exploration. Multiunit responses in the 1000-4500 Hz range were found to be strongly correlated with tactile stimulation of lip and whisker (perioral) regions. These responses occurred regardless of whether the stimulus was externally or self-generated and during both active and passive touch. In contrast, perioral movements that did not tactually stimulate this region of the face (e.g., chewing) produced no detectable increases in GCL activity. In addition, GCL responses were not correlated with movement extremes. When rats used their lips actively for palpation and exploration, the tactile responses in the GCL were not detectably modulated by ongoing jaw movements. However, active palpation and exploratory behaviors did result in the largest and most continuous bursts of GCL activity: responses were on average 10% larger and 50% longer during palpation and exploration than during grooming or passive stimulation. Although activity levels differed between behaviors, the position and spatial extent of the peripheral receptive field was similar over all behaviors that resulted in tactile input. Overall, our data suggest that the 1000-4500 Hz multiunit responses in the Crus IIa GCL of awake rats are correlated with tactile input rather than with movement or any movement parameter and that these responses are likely to be of particular importance during the acquisition of sensory information by perioral structures.

  15. Monoclonal antibody typing of Chlamydia psittaci strains derived from avian and mammalian species.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushi, H; Nojiri, K; Hirai, K

    1987-01-01

    A total of 77 Chlamydia psittaci strains of avian, human, and mammalian origin were grouped into four serovars with 11 monoclonal antibodies recognizing the lipopolysaccharide and the major outer membrane protein antigens. The avian and human strains, which were closely related to each other, were distinct from the mammalian strains. Immunological typing of C. psittaci with monoclonal antibodies seems practical. PMID:3667918

  16. Prevention and Therapeutic Effects and Mechanisms of Tanshinone IIA Sodium Sulfonate on Acute Liver Injury Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lunjie; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Jingying; Che, Jun; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Yusong

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA sodium sulfonate (TSS) is a water-soluble derivative of tanshinone IIA, which is the main pharmacologically active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza. This study aimed to verify the preventive and therapeutic effects of TSS and its combined therapeutic effects with magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate (MI) in D-galactosamine- (D-Gal-) induced acute liver injury (ALI) in mice. The potential regulatory mechanisms of TSS on ALI were also examined. Our results may provide a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for ALI. PMID:27274751

  17. Phenylenevinylene conjugated oligoelectrolytes as fluorescent dyes for mammalian cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Gwozdzinska, Paulina; Pawlowska, Roza; Milczarek, Justyna; Garner, Logan E; Thomas, Alexander W; Bazan, Guillermo C; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2014-12-07

    Conjugated phenylenevinylene oligoelectrolytes, which consist of a phenylenevinylene core equipped at each end with hydrophilic pendent groups, are shown to be good candidates for mammalian cell membrane staining. When used in the micromolar concentration range, they express low to moderate cell toxicity for selected regular and cancerous cell lines as tested for adherent and suspension cells.

  18. 30 CFR 57.22204 - Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A... Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Main fans shall be— (a) Provided with a pressure-recording system; and (b) Inspected daily while operating if persons are...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22204 - Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A... Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Main fans shall be— (a) Provided with a pressure-recording system; and (b) Inspected daily while operating if persons are...

  20. Antimalarial efficacy of a quantified extract of Nauclea pobeguinii stem bark in human adult volunteers with diagnosed uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Part 1: a clinical phase IIA trial.

    PubMed

    Mesia, Kahunu; Tona, Lutete; Mampunza, Ma Miezi; Ntamabyaliro, Nsengi; Muanda, Tsobo; Muyembe, Tamfum; Cimanga, Kanyanga; Totté, Jozef; Mets, Tony; Pieters, Luc; Vlietinck, Arnold J

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this phase IIA clinical trial was to assess the efficacy of an 80 % ethanolic quantified extract (containing 5.6 % strictosamide as the putative active constituent) from Nauclea pobeguinii stem bark denoted as PR 259 CT1 in a small group of adult patients diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Results obtained from a phase I clinical trial on healthy male volunteers indicated that the oral administration during meals of two 500 mg capsules three times daily (each eight hours) during seven days was well tolerated and showed only mild and self-resolving adverse effects. This PR 259 CT1 drug regimen was obtained by mathematical conversion of animal doses obtained in several in vivo studies in mice to human equivalent doses as in falciparum malaria patients. The phase IIA study was an open cohort study in eleven appraisable adult patients suffering from proven Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The study was specifically designed to assess the efficacy of PR 259 CT1 administered with a dose regimen of two 500 mg capsules three times daily for three days, followed by outpatient treatment of one 500 mg capsule three times daily for the next four days, in order to prove that this therapeutic dose, which was calculated from animal doses, was effective to treat adult malaria patients and consequently useful for a future Phase IIB clinical trial. This study would then substitute a dose-escalating trial, which in general is used to find the appropriate dose for clinical studies. The phase IIA clinical trial was carried out according to the WHO 2003 14-day test, and the results revealed that all eleven patients were completely cleared of parasitemia and fever on days 3, 7, and 14 except for one patient, who experienced a recurrence of parasitemia at days 7 until 14. Besides this adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR), this trial also demonstrated that PR 259 CT1 was well tolerated with only mild and self-resolving adverse effects

  1. Molecular sled sequences are common in mammalian proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Kan; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work revealed a new class of molecular machines called molecular sleds, which are small basic molecules that bind and slide along DNA with the ability to carry cargo along DNA. Here, we performed biochemical and single-molecule flow stretching assays to investigate the basis of sliding activity in molecular sleds. In particular, we identified the functional core of pVIc, the first molecular sled characterized; peptide functional groups that control sliding activity; and propose a model for the sliding activity of molecular sleds. We also observed widespread DNA binding and sliding activity among basic polypeptide sequences that implicate mammalian nuclear localization sequences and many cell penetrating peptides as molecular sleds. These basic protein motifs exhibit weak but physiologically relevant sequence-nonspecific DNA affinity. Our findings indicate that many mammalian proteins contain molecular sled sequences and suggest the possibility that substantial undiscovered sliding activity exists among nuclear mammalian proteins. PMID:26857546

  2. Bioenergetics of Mammalian Sperm Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Zara, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    After ejaculation, the mammalian male gamete must undergo the capacitation process, which is a prerequisite for egg fertilization. The bioenergetics of sperm capacitation is poorly understood despite its fundamental role in sustaining the biochemical and molecular events occurring during gamete activation. Glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are the two major metabolic pathways producing ATP which is the primary source of energy for spermatozoa. Since recent data suggest that spermatozoa have the ability to use different metabolic substrates, the main aim of this work is to present a broad overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside sperm mitochondria during capacitation in different mammalian species. Metabolism of glucose and of other energetic substrates, such as pyruvate, lactate, and citrate, is critically analyzed. Such knowledge, besides its obvious importance for basic science, could eventually translate into the development of novel strategies for treatment of male infertility, artificial reproduction, and sperm selection methods. PMID:24791005

  3. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  4. Mammalian Polyamine Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play multiple essential roles in mammalian physiology. Their cellular content is highly regulated and there is convincing evidence that altered metabolism is involvement in many disease states. Drugs altering polyamine levels may therefore have a variety of important targets. This review will summarize the current state of understanding of polyamine metabolism and function, the regulation of polyamine content, and heritable pathological conditions that may be derived from altered polyamine metabolism. PMID:19603518

  5. GLUTs and mammalian sperm metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Diego; Rodriguez-Gil, Juan Enrique; Vallorani, Claudia; Spinaci, Marcella; Galeati, Giovanna; Tamanini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells use glucides as a substrate that can be catabolized through glycolitic pathways or oxidative phosphorylation, used as a source of reducing potential, or used for anabolic aims. An important role in supplying cells with energy is played by different membrane proteins that can actively (sodium-dependent glucose transporters) or passively (glucose transporters; GLUT) transport hexoses through the lipidic bilayer. In particular, GLUTs are a family of 13 proteins that facilitate the transport of sugars and have a peculiar distribution in different tissues as well as a particular affinity for substrates. These proteins are also present in mature sperm cells, which, in fact, need carriers for uptake energetic sources that are important for maintaining cell basic activity as well as specific functions, such as motility and fertilization ability. Likewise, several GLUTs have been studied in various mammalian species (man, bull, rat, mouse, boar, dog, stallion, and donkey) to point out both their actual presence or absence and their localization on plasma membrane. The aim of this work is to give an overall picture of the studies available on GLUTs in mammalian spermatozoa at this moment, pointing out the species peculiarity, the possible role of these proteins, and the potential future research on this item.

  6. Radiation therapy for stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma: peripheral dose calculations and risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theocharris; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to calculate the peripheral dose to critical structures and assess the radiation risks from modern radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB testicular seminoma. A Monte Carlo code was used for treatment simulation on a computational phantom representing an average adult. The initial treatment phase involved anteroposterior and posteroanaterior modified dog-leg fields exposing para-aortic and ipsilateral iliac lymph nodes followed by a cone-down phase for nodal mass irradiation. Peripheral doses were calculated using different modified dog-leg field dimensions and an extended conventional dog-leg portal. The risk models of the BEIR-VII report and ICRP-103 were combined with dosimetric calculations to estimate the probability of developing stochastic effects. Radiotherapy for stage IIA seminoma with a target dose of 30 Gy resulted in a range of 23.0-603.7 mGy to non-targeted peripheral tissues and organs. The corresponding range for treatment of stage IIB disease to a cumulative dose of 36 Gy was 24.2-633.9 mGy. A dose variation of less than 13% was found by altering the field dimensions. Radiotherapy with the conventional instead of the modern modified dog-leg field increased the peripheral dose up to 8.2 times. The calculated heart doses of 589.0-632.9 mGy may increase the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases whereas the testicular dose of more than 231.9 mGy may lead to a temporary infertility. The probability of birth abnormalities in the offspring of cancer survivors was below 0.13% which is much lower than the spontaneous mutation rate. Abdominoplevic irradiation may increase the lifetime intrinsic risk for the induction of secondary malignancies by 0.6-3.9% depending upon the site of interest, patient’s age and tumor dose. Radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB seminoma with restricted fields and low doses is associated with an increased morbidity. These data may allow the definition of a risk-adapted follow-up scheme for long

  7. Effects of escins Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb from horse chestnuts on gastrointestinal transit and ileus in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Li, Y; Yoshikawa, M

    1999-08-01

    The effects of saponin fraction and its principal constituents escins Ia (1), Ib (2), IIa (3), and IIb (4) from horse chestnuts on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) and ileus were investigated in mice. Ileus was induced by acetic acid peritoneal irritation or by laparotomy with manipulation. One hour after the oral administration, the saponin fraction (12.5-100 mg/kg) and 14 (12.5-50 mg/ kg, except for 3 at 12.5 mg/kg) dose-dependently accelerated GIT. The optimal effects of the saponin fraction (25 mg/kg) occurred 5-240 min (applied intervals between the fraction and the charcoal meal) after the oral administration. The fraction (12.5-100 mg/ kg) and 1-4 (12.5-50 mg/kg, except for 1 and 2 at 12.5 mg/kg) dose-dependently prevented the inhibition of GIT induced by the acetic acid peritoneal irritation. They (12.5-100mg/kg) also dose-dependently prevented the inhibition of GIT induced by the laparotomy with manipulation. Desacylescins I (5) and II (6) (50 mg/kg) showed no such effects. These results demonstrated that the saponin fraction and 1-4 accelerated GIT and prevented the experimental ileus, and indicate that the 21, 22-acyl groups are essential for the accelerative effects of 1-4. The accelerations of GIT by 1-4 were completely abolished by the pretreatment with streptozotocin (100 mg/kg, iv), but not by the pretreatment with capsaicin (75 mg/kg in total, sc) or atropine (10 mg/kg, sc). These results imply that the sympathetic nervous system may be, but neither capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves nor the cholinergic mechanism, involved in the accelerations of GIT by escins 1-4.

  8. Conditional deletion of nonmuscle myosin II-A in mouse tongue epithelium results in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Conti, Mary Anne; Saleh, Anthony D; Brinster, Lauren R; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Zhong; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Liu, Chengyu; Ma, Xuefei; Van Waes, Carter; Adelstein, Robert S

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the contribution of nonmuscle myosin II-A (NM II-A) to early cardiac development we crossed Myh9 floxed mice and Nkx2.5 cre-recombinase mice. Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early heart (E7.5) and later in the tongue epithelium. Mice homozygous for deletion of NM II-A (A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) are born at the expected ratio with normal hearts, but consistently develop an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (32/32 A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) as early as E17.5. To assess reproducibility a second, independent line of Myh9 floxed mice derived from a different embryonic stem cell clone was tested. This second line also develops SCC indistinguishable from the first (15/15). In A(Nkx)/A(Nkx) mouse tongue epithelium, genetic deletion of NM II-A does not affect stabilization of TP53, unlike a previous report for SCC. We attribute the consistent, early formation of SCC with high penetrance to the role of NM II in maintaining mitotic stability during karyokinesis.

  9. Investigation of the effect of tanshinone IIA on nitric oxide production in human vascular endothelial cells by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Wang, Hong; Xie, Wan-Zhen; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2007-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proved to be a potent vasodilator that played an important role in regulating vascular tones. Tanshinone, one of the active components of Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, was used widely in clinics in China for treating cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to sensitively and specifically investigate the effects of tanshinone IIA, one important pharmacological constituent of tanshinone, on the release of NO from human vascular endothelial cells (HVECs) by fluorescence imaging with an excellent fluorescent probe 1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-2,6-dicarbethoxy-8-(3',4'-diaminophenyl)-difluoroboradiaza- s-indacence (TMDCDABODIPY). After cells were incubated with tanshinone IIA, TMDCDABODIPY was employed to label NO. Following the tagging, real-time imaging of NO release from the cells was performed with inverted fluorescence microscope. The results of the experiments showed that tanshinone IIA could induce NO production significantly enhanced in HVECs. The activation of NO by tanshinone IIA may be employed therapeutically in modulating NO production in HVECs.

  10. 30 CFR 57.22206 - Main ventilation failure (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22206..., tests for methane shall be conducted in affected active workings until normal air flow has resumed. (b... less than 1.0 percent methane. Persons other than examiners shall not reenter a Subcategory II-A...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22212 - Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22212 Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines). Air flow across each working face shall be sufficient to carry away any accumulation of methane,...

  12. Statewide Analysis of the Ohio Thirteen-Week Follow-up Survey of Title IIA JTP Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotchkiss, Lawrence; Smythe, John

    Data from a sample of adult participants in JTP Ohio under Title IIA of the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) were analyzed. Respondents were surveyed after completion of 13 weeks of JTP training. Five outcome variables were studied: weeks worked, employment status during week 13, earnings in week 13, welfare status during week 13, and school…

  13. On WZ and RR couplings of BPS branes and their all order α‧ corrections in IIB, IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    We compute all three and four point couplings of BPS Dp-branes for all different nonzero p-values on the entire world volume and transverse directions. We start finding out all four point function supersymmetric Wess-Zumino (WZ) actions of one closed string Ramond-Ramond (RR) field with two fermions, either with the same (IIB) or different chirality (IIA) as well as their all order α‧ corrections. The closed form of S-matrices of two closed string RR in both IIB, IIA, including their all order α‧ corrections have also been addressed. Our results confirm that, not only the structures of α‧ corrections but also their coefficients of IIB are quite different from their IIA ones. The S-matrix of an RR and two gauge (scalar) fields and their all order corrections in antisymmetric picture of RR have been carried out as well. Various remarks on the restricted Bianchi identities as well as all order α‧ corrections to all different supersymmetric WZ couplings in both type IIA and IIB superstring theory are also released. Lastly, different singularity structures as well as all order contact terms for all non-vanishing traces in type II have also been constructed.

  14. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  15. 30 CFR 57.22206 - Main ventilation failure (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22206..., tests for methane shall be conducted in affected active workings until normal air flow has resumed. (b... less than 1.0 percent methane. Persons other than examiners shall not reenter a Subcategory II-A...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22212 - Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22212 Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines). Air flow across each working face shall be sufficient to carry away any accumulation of methane,...

  17. Experimental infection with Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA21G1R1 subtype in immunosuppressed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIaA21G1R1 oocysts were used to infect dexamethasone immunosuppressed N: NIH Swiss mice. Histology showed developmental stages in the duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon, with the small intestine remaining infected until day 35 post infection....

  18. UNITED PRESBYTERIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION SURVEY, AN INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROJECT. VOLUMES IIA AND IIB, COMMUNICATIONS VARIABLES IN THE CHURCH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITMAN, LAURIS B.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEPARTMENT OF RESEARCH OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES CONDUCTED A SURVEY FOR THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF ITS MEMBERSHIP AND RELIGIOUS BELIEFS. THE AIM WAS TO COMPARE VARIOUS POPULATIONS (CLERGY, COMMUNICANTS, CHURCH SCHOOL TEACHERS, AND YOUTH), CONCERNING THE EXTENT OF THEIR ORTHODOXY. VOLUMES IIA AND IIB OF THE REPORT RELATE TO THE…

  19. Remarks on non-BPS string amplitudes and their all order α' contact interactions in IIB, IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    We explore the entire form of S-Matrix elements of a potential C n-1 Ramond-Ramond (RR) form field, a tachyon and two transverse scalar fields on both world volume and transverse directions of type IIB and IIA superstring theories. Apart from < {V}_{C^{-2}}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{T^0}\\rangle the other scattering amplitude, namely < {V}_{C^{-1}}{V}_{φ^{-1}}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{T^0}\\rangle is also revealed. We then start to compare all singularity structures of symmetric and asymmetric analysis, generating all infinite singularity structures as well as all order α' contact interactions on the whole directions. This leads to deriving various new contact terms and several new restricted Bianchi identities in both type IIB and IIA. It is also shown that just some of the new couplings of type IIB (IIA) string theory can be re-verified in an Effective Field Theory (EFT) by pull-back of branes. To construct the rest of S-matrix elements one needs to first derive restricted world volume (or bulk) Bianchi identities and then discover new EFT couplings in both type IIB and IIA. Finally the presence of commutator of scalar fields inside the exponential of Wess-Zumino action for non-BPS branes has been confirmed as well.

  20. Implementation of Title I and Title II-A Program Initiatives: Results from 2013-14. NCEE 2017-4014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troppe, Patricia; Milanowski, Anthony T.; Heid, Camilla; Gill, Brian; Ross, Christine

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the implementation of policies and initiatives supported by Title I and Title II-A of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) during the 2013-14 school year. Title I is one of the U.S. Department of Education's largest programs, accounting for $15 billion in the 2016 federal budget. Historically, Title I has…

  1. Supersymmetric Intersecting Branes on the Type IIA T6/Bbb Z4 Orientifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Görlich, Lars; Ott, Tassilo

    2003-01-01

    We study supersymmetric intersecting D6-branes wrapping 3-cycles in the Type IIA T6/Z4 orientifold background. As a new feature, the 3-cycles in this orbifold space arise both from the untwisted and the Z2 twisted sectors. We present an integral basis for the homology lattice, H3(M,Z), in terms of fractional 3-cycles, for which the intersection form involves the Cartan matrix of E8. We show that these fractional D6-branes can be used to construct supersymmetric brane configurations realizing a three generation Pati-Salam model. Via brane recombination processes preserving supersymmetry, this GUT model can be broken down to a standard-like model.

  2. Effects of homoeologous wheat starch synthase IIa genes on starch properties.

    PubMed

    Shimbata, Tomoya; Ai, Yongfeng; Fujita, Masaya; Inokuma, Takayuki; Vrinten, Patricia; Sunohara, Ai; Saito, Mika; Takiya, Toshiyuki; Jane, Jay-lin; Nakamura, Toshiki

    2012-12-05

    Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the eight haplotypes of starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) were used to analyze the effects of SSIIa gene dosage on branch chain length, gelatinization, pasting, retrogradation, and enzymatic hydrolysis of starches. Compared to wild-type, the amylopectin of lines missing one or more active SSIIa enzymes had increases in the proportion of short branch chains (DP6-10) and decreases in midlength chains (DP11-24), and the size of these differences depended on the dosage of active SSIIa enzymes. Of the three loci, SSIIa-A1 had the smallest contribution to amylopectin structure and SSIIa-B1 the largest. The different effects of the three SSIIa enzymes on starch properties were also seen in gelatinization, retrogradation, pasting, and enzymatic hydrolysis properties. Such differences in starch properties might be useful in influencing the texture and shelf life of food products.

  3. Mutant APH(2″)-IIa Enzymes with Increased Activity against Amikacin and Isepamicin▿

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Chow, Joseph W.; Smith, Clyde; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2010-01-01

    Directed evolution by random PCR mutagenesis of the gene for the aminoglycoside 2″-IIa phosphotransferase generated R92H/D268N and N196D/D268N mutant enzymes, resulting in elevated levels of resistance to amikacin and isepamicin but not to other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Increases in the activities of the mutant phosphotransferases for isepamicin are the result of decreases in Km values, while improved catalytic efficiency for amikacin is the result of both a decrease in Km values and an increase in turnover of the antibiotic. Enzymes with R92H, D268N, and D268N single amino acid substitutions did not result in elevated MICs for aminoglycosides. PMID:20145089

  4. The crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa, an enzyme responsible for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Nurizzo, Didier; Shewry, Steven C; Perlin, Michael H; Brown, Scott A; Dholakia, Jaydev N; Fuchs, Roy L; Deva, Taru; Baker, Edward N; Smith, Clyde A

    2003-03-21

    A major factor in the emergence of antibiotic resistance is the existence of enzymes that chemically modify common antibiotics. The genes for these enzymes are commonly carried on mobile genetic elements, facilitating their spread. One such class of enzymes is the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (APH) family, which uses ATP-mediated phosphate transfer to chemically modify and inactivate aminoglycoside antibiotics such as streptomycin and kanamycin. As part of a program to define the molecular basis for aminoglycoside recognition and inactivation by such enzymes, we have determined the high resolution (2.1A) crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa (APH(3')-IIa) in complex with kanamycin. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using multiple models derived from the related aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-III enzyme (APH(3')-III), and refined to an R factor of 0.206 (R(free) 0.238). The bound kanamycin molecule is very well defined and occupies a highly negatively charged cleft formed by the C-terminal domain of the enzyme. Adjacent to this is the binding site for ATP, which can be modeled on the basis of nucleotide complexes of APH(3')-III; only one change is apparent with a loop, residues 28-34, in a position where it could fold over an incoming nucleotide. The three rings of the kanamycin occupy distinct sub-pockets in which a highly acidic loop, residues 151-166, and the C-terminal residues 260-264 play important parts in recognition. The A ring, the site of phosphoryl transfer, is adjacent to the catalytic base Asp190. These results give new information on the basis of aminoglycoside recognition, and on the relationship between this phosphotransferase family and the protein kinases.

  5. Hyperactivity in 103P/Hartley 2: Chunks from the sub-surface in Type IIa jet regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2017-03-01

    comet 103P/Hartley 2 is the result of super-volatiles that "… drag out chunks of nearly pure water ice that then sublime to provide a large fraction of the total H2O gaseous output of the comet (A'Hearn et al., 2011. Science 332, 1396-1400). We find that the largest chunks (effective radius ∼4 m) are probably dislodged at an average rate less than 1 chunk/filament/1-3 rotation periods near perihelion and we estimate that the filamentary source regions, if 50-100 m in diameter, could be excavated to a depth of 44-171 m in a single perihelion passage. We note similarities with groups of active pits discovered on 67P (Vincent et al., 2015. Nature 523, 63-66) and suggest that these features may have, in the past, supported Type IIa super-volatile jet outflows that are now essentially exhausted.

  6. Cenozoic climate change influences mammalian evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M.; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; De Renzi, Miquel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change is having profound impacts on the natural world. However, climate influence on faunal dynamics at macroevolutionary scales remains poorly understood. In this paper we investigate the influence of climate over deep time on the diversity patterns of Cenozoic North American mammals. We use factor analysis to identify temporally correlated assemblages of taxa, or major evolutionary faunas that we can then study in relation to climatic change over the past 65 million years. These taxa can be grouped into six consecutive faunal associations that show some correspondence with the qualitative mammalian chronofaunas of previous workers. We also show that the diversity pattern of most of these chronofaunas can be correlated with the stacked deep-sea benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ18O) curve, which strongly suggests climatic forcing of faunal dynamics over a large macroevolutionary timescale. This study demonstrates the profound influence of climate on the diversity patterns of North American terrestrial mammals over the Cenozoic. PMID:22203974

  7. Cenozoic climate change influences mammalian evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M; Pérez-Claros, Juan A; De Renzi, Miquel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2012-01-17

    Global climate change is having profound impacts on the natural world. However, climate influence on faunal dynamics at macroevolutionary scales remains poorly understood. In this paper we investigate the influence of climate over deep time on the diversity patterns of Cenozoic North American mammals. We use factor analysis to identify temporally correlated assemblages of taxa, or major evolutionary faunas that we can then study in relation to climatic change over the past 65 million years. These taxa can be grouped into six consecutive faunal associations that show some correspondence with the qualitative mammalian chronofaunas of previous workers. We also show that the diversity pattern of most of these chronofaunas can be correlated with the stacked deep-sea benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) curve, which strongly suggests climatic forcing of faunal dynamics over a large macroevolutionary timescale. This study demonstrates the profound influence of climate on the diversity patterns of North American terrestrial mammals over the Cenozoic.

  8. Ginsenoside Rg1 Protects against Oxidative Stress-induced Neuronal Apoptosis through Myosin IIA-actin Related Cytoskeletal Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Qian; Xu, Yingqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Yanni; Tan, Yisha; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Guosheng; Ma, Xiaonan; Wang, Jingrong; Cao, Zhengyu; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cytoskeletal dysfunction of neurons has been implicated as a crucial cause of cell apoptosis or death in the central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. The application of neuroprotectants rescuing the neurons from cytoskeletal damage and apoptosis can be a potential treatment for these CNS diseases. Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), one of the major active components of ginseng, has been reported possessing notable neuroprotective activities. However, there is rare report about its effect on cytoskeleton and its undergoing mechanism. The current study is to reveal the regulatory effects of Rg1 on cytoskeletal and morphological lesion in oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. The results demonstrated that pre-treatment with Rg1 (0.1-10 μM) attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress through reducing the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level. The Rg1 treatment also abolished H2O2-induced morphological changes, including cell rounding, membrane blebbing, neurite retraction and nuclei condensation, which were generated by myosin IIA-actin interaction. These effects were mediated via the down-regulation of caspase-3, ROCK1 (Rho-associated kinase1) activation and myosin light chain (MLC, Ser-19) phosphorylation. Furthermore, inhibiting myosin II activity with blebbistatin partly blocked the neuroprotective effects of Rg1. The computer-aided homology modelling revealed that Rg1 preferentially positioned in the actin binding cleft of myosin IIA and might block the binding of myosin IIA to actin filaments. Accordingly, the neuroprotective mechanism of Rg1 is related to the activity that inhibits myosin IIA-actin interaction and the caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC signaling pathway. These findings put some insights into the unique neuroprotective properties of Rg1 associated with the regulation of myosin IIA

  9. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA

    PubMed Central

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H.; Naika, Gajendra S.; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E.; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J.; Poubelle, Patrice E.; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H.; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms. PMID:26106157

  10. Functional characterization of mammalian Wntless homolog in mammalian system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ting; Wang, Shih-Jong; Hsu, Shih-Hsien

    2012-07-01

    Wntless (GPR177) protein is a newly identified regulator of Wnt signals in Drosophila, but its cellular function in mammals is still unclear. In this study, we explored the expression pattern and potential cellular function of Wntless in mammalian cells. Wntless mRNA was expressed in many mouse tissues, including the spleen, lung, kidney, thymus, and stomach, and lower levels of expression were detected in the mouse brain and testis. Expression of Wntless protein analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining was only detected in the submucosa, muscle, ganglia, and nerve cells of murine large intestines. Both immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fraction extraction analysis revealed that endogenous Wntless protein was expressed predominantly in the cytoplasmic organelles with a morphologically dot-shaped distribution. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless could be corrected by and may activate the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in cancer (HeLa) cells. These results suggest that Wntless plays a role in signaling regulation during the formation of cancer in addition to its role as a retromer protein in mammalian systems.

  11. Evolutionary paths to mammalian cochleae.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Evolution of the cochlea and high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz; ultrasonic to humans) in mammals has been a subject of research for many years. Recent advances in paleontological techniques, especially the use of micro-CT scans, now provide important new insights that are here reviewed. True mammals arose more than 200 million years (Ma) ago. Of these, three lineages survived into recent geological times. These animals uniquely developed three middle ear ossicles, but these ossicles were not initially freely suspended as in modern mammals. The earliest mammalian cochleae were only about 2 mm long and contained a lagena macula. In the multituberculate and monotreme mammalian lineages, the cochlea remained relatively short and did not coil, even in modern representatives. In the lineage leading to modern therians (placental and marsupial mammals), cochlear coiling did develop, but only after a period of at least 60 Ma. Even Late Jurassic mammals show only a 270 ° cochlear coil and a cochlear canal length of merely 3 mm. Comparisons of modern organisms, mammalian ancestors, and the state of the middle ear strongly suggest that high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz) was not realized until the early Cretaceous (~125 Ma). At that time, therian mammals arose and possessed a fully coiled cochlea. The evolution of modern features of the middle ear and cochlea in the many later lineages of therians was, however, a mosaic and different features arose at different times. In parallel with cochlear structural evolution, prestins in therian mammals evolved into effective components of a new motor system. Ultrasonic hearing developed quite late-the earliest bat cochleae (~60 Ma) did not show features characteristic of those of modern bats that are sensitive to high ultrasonic frequencies.

  12. Genetic variants of human T-lymphotrophic virus type II in American Indian groups.

    PubMed

    Biggar, R J; Taylor, M E; Neel, J V; Hjelle, B; Levine, P H; Black, F L; Shaw, G M; Sharp, P M; Hahn, B H

    1996-02-01

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) is found in many New World Indian groups in North and South America and may have entered the New World from Asia with the earliest migration of ancestral Amerindians over 15,000 years ago. To characterize the phylogenetic relationships of HTLV-II strains infecting geographically diverse Indian populations, we used polymerase chain reaction to amplify HTLV-II sequences from lymphocytes of seropositive Amerindians from Brazil (Kraho, Kayapo, and Kaxuyana), Panama (Guaymi), and the United States (the Navajo and Pueblo tribes of the southwestern states and the Seminoles of Florida). Sequence analysis of a 780-base pair fragment (located between the env gene and the second exons of tax/rex) revealed that Amerindian viruses clustered in the same two genetic subtypes (IIa and IIb) previously identified for viruses from intravenous drug users. Most infected North and Central American Indians had subtype IIb, while HTLV-II infected members of three remote Amazonian tribes clustered as a distinct group within subtype IIa. These findings suggest that the ancestral Amerindians migrating to the New World brought at least two genetic subtypes, IIa and IIb. Because HTLV-II strains from Amazonian Indians form a distinct group within subtype HTLV-IIa, these Brazilian tribes are unlikely to be the source of IIa viruses in North American drug users. Finally, the near identity of viral sequences from geographically diverse populations indicate that HTLV-II is a very ancient virus of man.

  13. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianyong; Zhang, Guangxian; Qiu, Pengxiang; Liu, Xijuan; Wu, Yingya; Du, Biaoyan; Li, Jiefen; Zhou, Jing; Li, Jingjing; Tan, Yuhui

    2013-01-01

    The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV). This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  14. Tanshinone IIA Modulates Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake via Down-Regulation of PCSK9 Gene Expression in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Chen; Chen, Pei-Yi; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA, one of the most pharmacologically bioactive phytochemicals isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, possesses several biological activities such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, neuroprotection and hypolipidemic activities. In this study, we aim to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effect of tanshinone IIA in hepatic cells. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly increased the amount of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and LDL uptake activity in HepG2 cells at the post-transcriptional regulation. We further demonstrated that tanshinone IIA inhibited the expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) mRNA and mature protein, which may lead to an increase the cell-surface LDLR in hepatic cells. We further identified a regulatory DNA element involved in the tanshinone IIA-mediated PCSK9 down-regulation, which is located between the -411 and -336 positions of the PCSK9 promoter. Moreover, we found that tanshinone IIA markedly increased the nuclear forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) level, enhanced FoxO3a/PCSK9 promoter complexes formation and decreased the PCSK9 promoter binding capacity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF-1α), resulting in suppression of PCSK9 gene expression. Finally, we found that the statin-induced PCSK9 overexpression was attenuated and the LDLR activity was elevated in a synergic manner by combination of tanshinone IIA treatment in HepG2 cells. Overall, our results reveal that the tanshinone IIA modulates LDLR level and activity via down-regulation of PCSK9 expression in hepatic cells. Our current findings provide a molecular basis of tanshinone IIA to develop PCSK9 inhibitors for cholesterol management.

  15. Tanshinone IIA Modulates Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake via Down-Regulation of PCSK9 Gene Expression in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA, one of the most pharmacologically bioactive phytochemicals isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, possesses several biological activities such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, neuroprotection and hypolipidemic activities. In this study, we aim to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effect of tanshinone IIA in hepatic cells. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly increased the amount of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and LDL uptake activity in HepG2 cells at the post-transcriptional regulation. We further demonstrated that tanshinone IIA inhibited the expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) mRNA and mature protein, which may lead to an increase the cell-surface LDLR in hepatic cells. We further identified a regulatory DNA element involved in the tanshinone IIA-mediated PCSK9 down-regulation, which is located between the -411 and -336 positions of the PCSK9 promoter. Moreover, we found that tanshinone IIA markedly increased the nuclear forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) level, enhanced FoxO3a/PCSK9 promoter complexes formation and decreased the PCSK9 promoter binding capacity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF-1α), resulting in suppression of PCSK9 gene expression. Finally, we found that the statin-induced PCSK9 overexpression was attenuated and the LDLR activity was elevated in a synergic manner by combination of tanshinone IIA treatment in HepG2 cells. Overall, our results reveal that the tanshinone IIA modulates LDLR level and activity via down-regulation of PCSK9 expression in hepatic cells. Our current findings provide a molecular basis of tanshinone IIA to develop PCSK9 inhibitors for cholesterol management. PMID:27617748

  16. Direct vasorelaxation by a novel phytoestrogen tanshinone IIA is mediated by nongenomic action of estrogen receptor through endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and calcium mobilization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan; Guo, Hao; Wang, Xiaoying; Wang, Hong; Gao, Xiumei

    2011-03-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen) has been widely used in China and other Asian countries for treating various cardiovascular diseases resulting from its ability to improve coronary microcirculation and increase coronary blood flow. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), the major active lipophilic ingredient responsible for the beneficial actions of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to induce vasodilation in coronary arteries. Because our recent study identified Tan IIA as a new member of the phytoestrogens, we hypothesized that its action might be mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) in vascular endothelial cells. The aim of the present study was to assess whether cardiovascular protection exerted by Tan IIA is mediated by the ER signal pathway and whether the genomic or nongenomic action of ER is involved within arteries and vascular endothelial cells. The effect of Tan IIA on blood vessels was investigated by vascular ring assay using endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded rat aortas. Similar to estrogen, Tan IIA caused an nitric oxide- and endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was blocked by ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells were used as a model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Tan IIA-induced vasorelaxation. We demonstrate that Tan IIA is capable of activating the estrogen receptor signal pathway, leading to increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression, nitric oxide production, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and Ca mobilization. Collectively, these effects contribute to Tan IIA's vasodilative activity effects of y ER antagonist Cnt of cardiovascular diseases. Our findings support a continued effort in discovering and developing novel phytoestrogens as an alternative hormone replacement therapy for safer and more effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Ceramide signaling in mammalian epidermis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    Ceramide, the backbone structure of all sphingolipids, as well as a minor component of cellular membranes, has a unique role in the skin, by forming the epidermal permeability barrier at the extracellular domains of the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, which is required for terrestrial mammalian survival. In contrast to the role of ceramide in forming the permeability barrier, the signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites have not yet been recognized. Ceramide and/or its metabolites regulate proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in epidermal keratinocytes. Recent studies have further demonstrated that a ceramide metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate, modulates innate immune function. Ceramide has already been applied to therapeutic approaches for treatment of eczema associated with attenuated epidermal permeability barrier function. Pharmacological modulation of ceramide and its metabolites' signaling can also be applied to cutaneous disease prevention and therapy. The author here describes the signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites in mammalian cells and tissues, including the epidermis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  18. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  19. Scaling of the mammalian middle ear.

    PubMed

    Nummela, S

    1995-05-01

    This study considers the general question how animal size limits the size and information receiving capacity of sense organs. To clarify this in the case of the mammalian middle ear, I studied 63 mammalian species, ranging from a small bat to the Indian elephant. I determined the skull mass and the masses of the ossicles malleus, incus and stapes (M, I and S), and measured the tympanic membrane area, A1. The ossicular mass (in mg) is generally negatively allometric to skull mass (in g), the regression equation for the whole material (excluding true seals) being y = 1.373 x(0.513). However, for very small mammals the allometry approaches isometry. Within a group of large mammals no distinct allometry can be discerned. The true seals (Phocidae) are exceptional by having massive ossicles. The size relations within the middle ear are generally rather constant. However, the I/M relation is slightly positively allometric, y = 0.554 x(1.162). Two particularly isometric relations were found; the S/(M + I) relation for the ossicles characterized by the regression equation y = 0.054 x(0.993), and the relation between a two-dimensional measure of the ossicles and the tympanic membrane ares, (M + I)2/3 /A1. As in isometric ears the sound energy collected by the tympanic membrane is linearly related to its area, the latter isometry suggests that, regardless of animal size, a given ossicular cross-sectional area is exposed to a similar sound-induced stress. Possible morphological middle ear adaptations to particular acoustic environments are discussed.

  20. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies.

  1. Lung development of monotremes: evidence for the mammalian morphotype.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Kirsten; Zeller, Ulrich; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-01

    The reproductive strategies and the extent of development of neonates differ markedly between the three extant mammalian groups: the Monotremata, Marsupialia, and Eutheria. Monotremes and marsupials produce highly altricial offspring whereas the neonates of eutherian mammals range from altricial to precocial. The ability of the newborn mammal to leave the environment in which it developed depends highly on the degree of maturation of the cardio-respiratory system at the time of birth. The lung structure is thus a reflection of the metabolic capacity of neonates. The lung development in monotremes (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Tachyglossus aculeatus), in one marsupial (Monodelphis domestica), and one altricial eutherian (Suncus murinus) species was examined. The results and additional data from the literature were integrated into a morphotype reconstruction of the lung structure of the mammalian neonate. The lung parenchyma of monotremes and marsupials was at the early terminal air sac stage at birth, with large terminal air sacs. The lung developed slowly. In contrast, altricial eutherian neonates had more advanced lungs at the late terminal air sac stage and postnatally, lung maturation proceeded rapidly. The mammalian lung is highly conserved in many respects between monotreme, marsupial, and eutherian species and the structural differences in the neonatal lungs can be explained mainly by different developmental rates. The lung structure of newborn marsupials and monotremes thus resembles the ancestral condition of the mammalian lung at birth, whereas the eutherian newborns have a more mature lung structure.

  2. Analysis of Mammalian rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, are widely used for eukaryote phylogenetic studies from the ordinal level to the species level, and there is even a database for ITS2 sequences. However, ITS regions have been ignored in mammalian phylogenetic studies, and only a few rodent and ape sequences are represented in GenBank. The reasons for this dearth, and the remedies, are described here. We have recovered these sequences, mostly >1 kb in length, for 36 mammalian species. Sequence alignment and transcript folding comparisons reveal the rRNA transcript secondary structure. Mammalian ITS regions, though quite long, still fold into the recognizable secondary structure of other eukaryotes. The ITS2 in particular bears the four standard helix loops, and loops II and III have the hallmark characters universal to eukaryotes. Both sequence and insertions/deletions of transcript secondary structure helices observed here support the four superorder taxonomy of Placentalia. On the family level, major unique indels, neatly excising entire helices, will be useful when additional species are represented, resulting in significant further understanding of the details of mammalian evolutionary history. Furthermore, the identification of a highly conserved element of ITS1 common to warm-blooded vertebrates may aid in deciphering the complex mechanism of RNA transcript processing. This is the last major group of terrestrial vertebrates for which rRNA ITS secondary structure has been resolved. PMID:24260162

  3. Leadership in Mammalian Societies: Emergence, Distribution, Power, and Payoff.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer E; Gavrilets, Sergey; Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Hooper, Paul L; El Mouden, Claire; Nettle, Daniel; Hauert, Christoph; Hill, Kim; Perry, Susan; Pusey, Anne E; van Vugt, Mark; Smith, Eric Alden

    2016-01-01

    Leadership is an active area of research in both the biological and social sciences. This review provides a transdisciplinary synthesis of biological and social-science views of leadership from an evolutionary perspective, and examines patterns of leadership in a set of small-scale human and non-human mammalian societies. We review empirical and theoretical work on leadership in four domains: movement, food acquisition, within-group conflict mediation, and between-group interactions. We categorize patterns of variation in leadership in five dimensions: distribution (across individuals), emergence (achieved versus inherited), power, relative payoff to leadership, and generality (across domains). We find that human leadership exhibits commonalities with and differences from the broader mammalian pattern, raising interesting theoretical and empirical issues.

  4. Matched-Case Comparisons in a Single Institution to Determine Critical Points for Inexperienced Surgeons’ Successful Performances of Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy versus Abdominal Radical Hysterectomy in Stage IA2-IIA Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hye-Yon; Kim, Kidong; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective study which aims to identify major determinants of successful laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) versus abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH) performed by inexperienced surgeons for stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer. A total of 161 consecutive patients with stage IA2–IIA cervical cancer who underwent RH were grouped into 2 groups according to the surgeons’ experience with LRH: experienced surgeon versus inexperienced surgeon. After matching for age and risk factors, surgical and survival outcomes were compared. Experienced surgeon selected patients with earlier-stage and fewer risk factors for LRH than ARH, but inexperience surgeons did not. After matching, the vaginal tumor-free margin of LRH was shorter than that of ARH in experienced surgeon group (1.3 versus 1.7 cm, p=0.007); however, the vaginal tumor-free margin was longer than that of ARH in the inexperienced surgeon group (1.8 versus 1.3 cm, p=0.035). The postoperative hospital stay of LRH was shorter than that of ARH in experienced surgeon group (5.5 versus 7.7 days, p<0.001), but not different from that of ARH in the inexperienced surgeon group. Vaginal tumor-free margin >1.8 cm (OR 7.33, 95% CI 1.22–40.42), stage >IB1 (OR 8.83, 95% CI 1.51–51.73), and estimated blood loss >575 mL (OR 33.95, 95% CI 4.87–236.79) were independent risk factors for longer postoperative hospital stay in the inexperienced surgeon group. There was no difference of 5-year-profression-free survival of LRH patients between experienced surgeon and inexperienced surgeon groups after matching (55.1 versus 33.3%, p=0.391). Selection of earlier-stage disease and moderate vaginal tumor-free margin might be important for an inexperienced surgeon to successfully perform LRH with minimal complications in stage IA2–IIA cervical cancer. PMID:26110866

  5. Hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass: the effect on anti-Xa and anti-IIa heparin activity.

    PubMed

    Despotis, G J; Levine, V; Filos, K S; Joiner-Maier, D; Joist, J H

    1997-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that heparin concentrations during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may vary considerably, which may be related to variability in redistribution, cellular and plasma protein binding, and clearance of heparin. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hemofiltration removes lower molecular weight fractions of heparin from plasma and thus contributes to variability of blood levels of heparin. Twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB were enrolled in this study after informed consent was obtained. The study was subdivided into two phases. The first 10 patients were enrolled in Phase I, which was designed to determine whether hemofiltration removes lower molecular weight fractions of heparin from blood. Blood specimens obtained from the inflow line and outflow lines of the hemofiltration unit were used to measure complete blood counts (CBC) and plasma heparin activity by anti-Xa and anti-IIa assays. Phase II was designed to evaluate the effect of hemofiltration on circulating plasma heparin activity. In Phase II, blood specimens were obtained from 10 patients via the arterial cannula of the extracorporeal circuit prior to and after hemofiltration for measurements of CBCs, anti-Xa plasma heparin, as well as whole blood heparin concentration using an automated protamine titration assay (Hepcon instrument, Medtronic Inc., Parker, CO). Ultrafiltrate and reservoir volumes were measured in both phases of the study. Hemofiltration did not remove lower (anti-Xa measurable) molecular weight heparin, but it resulted in a considerable increase in heparin activity in the outflow line, as measured by both anti-Xa and anti-IIa assays. The plasma anti-Xa heparin activity obtained after hemofiltration (5 +/- 1.8 U/mL) was substantially (P = 0.003) greater than heparin activity obtained prior to hemofiltration (3.9 +/- 1.7 U/mL). The increase in heparin activity with hemofiltration was directly related to ultrafiltrate volume (r = 0

  6. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  7. Mammalian skin evolution: a reevaluation.

    PubMed

    Maderson, P F A

    2003-06-01

    A 1972 model for the evolutionary origin of hair suggested a primary mechanoreceptor role improving behavioral thermoregulation contributed to the success of late Paleozoic mammal-like reptiles. An insulatory role appeared secondarily subsequent to protohair multiplication. That model is updated in light of new data on (a) palaeoecology of mammalian ancestors; (b) involvement of HRPs in keratinization; (c) lipogenic lamellar bodies that form the barrier to cutaneous water loss; and (d) growth factors involved in hair follicle embryogenesis and turnover. It is now proposed that multiplication of sensory protohairs caused by mutations in patterning genes initially protected the delicate barrier tissues and eventually produced the minimal morphology necessary for an insulatory pelage. The latter permitted Mesozoic mammals to occupy the nocturnal niche 'in the shadow of dinosaurs'. When the giant reptiles became extinct, mammals underwent rapid radiation and reemerged as the dominant terrestrial vertebrates.

  8. Mammalian glutaminase isozymes in brain.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Cardona, Carolina; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Tosina, Marta; Matés, José M; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes

    2013-06-01

    Glutamine/glutamate homeostasis must be exquisitely regulated in mammalian brain and glutaminase (GA, E.C. 3.5.1.2) is one of the main enzymes involved. The products of GA reaction, glutamate and ammonia, are essential metabolites for energy and biosynthetic purposes but they are also hazardous compounds at concentrations beyond their normal physiological thresholds. The classical pattern of GA expression in mammals has been recently challenged by the discovery of novel transcript variants and protein isoforms. Furthermore, the interactome of brain GA is also starting to be uncovered adding a new level of regulatory complexity. GA may traffic in brain and unexpected locations, like cytosol and nucleus, have been found for GA isoforms. Finally, the expression of GA in glial cells has been reported and its potential implications in ammonia homeostasis are discussed.

  9. Pharmacology of mammalian olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard S; Peterlin, Zita; Araneda, Ricardo C

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian species have evolved a large and diverse number of odorant receptors (ORs). These proteins comprise the largest family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known, amounting to ~1,000-different receptors in the rodent. From the perspective of olfactory coding, the availability of such a vast number of chemosensory receptors poses several fascinating questions; in addition, such a large repertoire provides an attractive biological model to study ligand-receptor interactions. The limited functional expression of these receptors in heterologous systems, however, has greatly hampered attempts to deorphanize them. We have employed a successful approach that combines electrophysiological and imaging techniques to analyze the response profiles of single sensory neurons. Our approach has enabled us to characterize the "odor space" of a population of native aldehyde receptors and the molecular range of a genetically engineered receptor, OR-I7.

  10. Interaction theory of mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Nakada, K; Inoue, K; Hayashi, J

    2001-11-09

    We generated mice with deletion mutant mtDNA by its introduction from somatic cells into mouse zygotes. Expressions of disease phenotypes are limited to tissues expressing mitochondrial dysfunction. Considering that all these mice share the same nuclear background, these observations suggest that accumulation of the mutant mtDNA and resultant expressions of mitochondrial dysfunction are responsible for expression of disease phenotypes. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction and expression of clinical abnormalities were not observed until the mutant mtDNA accumulated predominantly. This protection is due to the presence of extensive and continuous interaction between exogenous mitochondria from cybrids and recipient mitochondria from embryos. Thus, we would like to propose a new hypothesis on mitochondrial biogenesis, interaction theory of mitochondria: mammalian mitochondria exchange genetic contents, and thus lost the individuality and function as a single dynamic cellular unit.

  11. Determinants of Mammalian Nucleolar Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Katherine I.; Surovtseva, Yulia; Merkel, Janie; Baserga, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is responsible for the production of ribosomes, essential machines which synthesize all proteins needed by the cell. The structure of human nucleoli is highly dynamic and is directly related to its functions in ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of this organelle, the intricate relationship between nucleolar structure and function remains largely unexplored. How do cells control nucleolar formation and function? What are the minimal requirements for making a functional nucleolus? Here we review what is currently known regarding mammalian nucleolar formation at nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), which can be studied by observing the dissolution and reformation of the nucleolus during each cell division. Additionally, the nucleolus can be examined by analyzing how alterations in nucleolar function manifest in differences in nucleolar architecture. Furthermore, changes in nucleolar structure and function are correlated with cancer, highlighting the importance of studying the determinants of nucleolar formation. PMID:25670395

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals tanshinone IIA enhances apoptosis of advanced cervix carcinoma CaSki cells through mitochondria intrinsic and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tai-Long; Wang, Pei-Wen; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Huang, Chun-Hsun; Rau, Kun-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Cervix cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, whereas paclitaxel, the first line chemotherapeutic drug used to treat cervical cancer, shows low chemosensitivity on the advanced cervical cancer cell line. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) exhibited strong growth inhibitory effect on CaSki cells (IC50 = 5.51 μM) through promoting caspase cascades with concomitant upregulating the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK signaling. Comprehensive proteomics revealed the global protein changes and the network analysis implied that Tan IIA treatment would activate ER stress pathways that finally lead to apoptotic cell death. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor could alleviate Tan IIA caused cell growth inhibition and ameliorate C/EBP-homologous protein as well as apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediated cell death. The therapeutic interventions targeting the mitochondrial-related apoptosis and ER stress responses might be promising strategies to conquer paclitaxel resistance.

  13. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGES

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R. C.; ...

    2016-05-03

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3 and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local and semi-local Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local and semi-local DFT approximations themore » deviation is 3.06 and 0.94 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviation in DMC, local and semi-local DFT approximations, are 0.017(1), 0.07 and 0.05 , respectively. In conclusion, DMC is highly accurate method, outperforming the local and semi-local DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides.« less

  14. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-05-03

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3 and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local and semi-local Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local and semi-local DFT approximations the deviation is 3.06 and 0.94 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviation in DMC, local and semi-local DFT approximations, are 0.017(1), 0.07 and 0.05 , respectively. In conclusion, DMC is highly accurate method, outperforming the local and semi-local DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides.

  15. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-05-01

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3, and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local, semi-local, and hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations, the deviation is 3.06, 0.94, and 1.23 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviations in DMC, local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations are 0.017(1), 0.07, 0.05, and 0.04 Å, respectively. DMC is a highly accurate method, outperforming the DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides.

  16. Molecular properties and fibril ultrastructure of types II and XI collagens in cartilage of mice expressing exclusively the α1(IIA) collagen isoform.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, Audrey; Traeger, Geoffrey; Hansen, Uwe; Weis, Mary Ann; Ravindran, Soumya; Wirthlin, Louisa; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2014-02-01

    Until now, no biological tools have been available to determine if a cross-linked collagen fibrillar network derived entirely from type IIA procollagen isoforms, can form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage. Recently, homozygous knock-in transgenic mice (Col2a1(+ex2), ki/ki) were generated that exclusively express the IIA procollagen isoform during post-natal development while type IIB procollagen, normally present in the ECM of wild type mice, is absent. The difference between these Col2a1 isoforms is the inclusion (IIA) or exclusion (IIB) of exon 2 that is alternatively spliced in a developmentally regulated manner. Specifically, chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA mRNA isoforms while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB mRNA isoforms. Recent characterization of the Col2a1(+ex2) mice has surprisingly shown that disruption of alternative splicing does not affect overt cartilage formation. In the present study, biochemical analyses showed that type IIA collagen extracted from ki/ki mouse rib cartilage can form homopolymers that are stabilized predominantly by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) cross-links at levels that differed from wild type rib cartilage. The findings indicate that mature type II collagen derived exclusively from type IIA procollagen molecules can form hetero-fibrils with type XI collagen and contribute to cartilage structure and function. Heteropolymers with type XI collagen also formed. Electron microscopy revealed mainly thin type IIA collagen fibrils in ki/ki mouse rib cartilage. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry of purified type XI collagen revealed a heterotrimeric molecular composition of α1(XI)α2(XI)α1(IIA) chains where the α1(IIA) chain is the IIA form of the α3(XI) chain. Since the N-propeptide of type XI collagen regulates type II collagen fibril diameter in cartilage, the retention of the exon 2-encoded IIA globular domain would structurally alter the N-propeptide of type XI collagen

  17. Tritherapy (Spinalon)-Elicited Spinal Locomotor Network Activation: Phase I-IIa Clinical Trial in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    PROTOCOL SPIN-01 Tri- therapy (SPINALON)-elicited spinal locomotor network activation: Phase I-Ila clinicaltrials in spinalcord-injured patients Clinical...STUDY) described in the Protocol SPIN-01 (PROTOCOL) being entitled: "Tri- therapy (SPINALON)-elicited spinal locomotor network activation: Phase I...Report SC100155 SPIN-01 Tri- therapy (SPINALON)-elicited spinal locomotor network activation: Phase I-IIa clinical trials in spinal cord-injured

  18. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA is a critical factor contributing to the efficiency of early infection of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinyan; Qi, Yonghe; Liu, Chenxuan; Gao, Wenqing; Chen, Pan; Fu, Liran; Peng, Bo; Wang, Haimin; Jing, Zhiyi; Zhong, Guocai; Li, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a novel phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae family. Most patients infected by SFTSV present with fever and thrombocytopenia, and up to 30% die due to multiple-organ dysfunction. The mechanisms by which SFTSV enters multiple cell types are unknown. SFTSV contains two species of envelope glycoproteins, Gn (44.2 kDa) and Gc (56 kDa), both of which are encoded by the M segment and are cleaved from a precursor polypeptide (about 116 kDa) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Gn fused with an immunoglobulin Fc tag at its C terminus (Gn-Fc) bound to multiple cells susceptible to the infection of SFTSV and blocked viral infection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Immunoprecipitation assays following mass spectrometry analysis showed that Gn binds to nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA), a cellular protein with surface expression in multiple cell types. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of NMMHC-IIA, but not the closely related NMMHC-IIB or NMMHC-IIC, reduced SFTSV infection, and NMMHC-IIA specific antibody blocked infection by SFTSV but not other control viruses. Overexpression of NMMHC-IIA in HeLa cells, which show limited susceptivity to SFTSV, markedly enhanced SFTSV infection of the cells. These results show that NMMHC-IIA is critical for the cellular entry of SFTSV. As NMMHC-IIA is essential for the normal functions of platelets and human vascular endothelial cells, it is conceivable that NMMHC-IIA directly contributes to the pathogenesis of SFTSV and may be a useful target for antiviral interventions against the viral infection.

  19. 30 CFR 57.22222 - Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22222 Section 57.22222 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22222 Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). Brattice cloth...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22222 - Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22222 Section 57.22222 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22222 Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). Brattice cloth...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22228 - Preshift examination (I-A, I-C, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preshift examination (I-A, I-C, II-A, III, and... Preshift examination (I-A, I-C, II-A, III, and V-A mines). (a) Preshift examinations shall be conducted... each face blasted before work is started. (e) Except in Subcategory I-C or Category III......

  2. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22232 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22232 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches...

  4. 30 CFR 57.22220 - Air passing unsealed areas (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air passing unsealed areas (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22220 Section 57.22220 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... passing unsealed areas (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Air that has passed by or through...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22232 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22232 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches...

  7. Tanshinone IIA inhibits breast cancer stem cells growth in vitro and in vivo through attenuation of IL-6/STAT3/NF-kB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Caiyu; Wang, Li; Wang, Hong; Yang, Liuqi; Guo, Huijie; Wang, Xiujie

    2013-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by inflammatory cytokines and signaling pathways. Tanshinone IIA (Tan-IIA) possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. The purpose of this study is to confirm the growth inhibition effect of Tan-IIA on human breast CSCs growth in vitro and in vivo and to explore the possible mechanism of its activity. Human breast CSCs were enriched and expanded under serum-free mammosphere culture condition, and identified through mammosphere formation, toluidine blue staining, immunofluorescence staining, and flow cytometry analysis of stemness markers of CD44/CD24 and ALDH, and tumorigenecity in vivo; the growth inhibition effect of Tan-IIA on human breast CSCs in vitro were tested by cell proliferation and mammosphere formation assays; inflammatory signaling pathway related protein expression in response to Tan-IIA, IL-6, STAT3, phospho-STAT3 (Tyr705), NF-κBp65 in cytoplasm and nucleus and cyclin D1 were evaluated with Western blotting; the growth inhibition effect of Tan-IIA on human breast CSCs growth were tested in vivo. A useful model of human breast CSCs for researching and developing the agents targeting CSCs was established. After Tan-IIA treatment, cell proliferation and mammosphere formation of CSCs were decreased significantly; the expression levels of IL-6, STAT3, phospho-STAT3 (Tyr705), NF-κBp65 in nucleus and cyclin D1 proteins were decreased significantly; the tumor growth and mean tumor weight were reduced significantly. Tan-IIA has the potential to target and kill CSCs, and can inhibit human breast CSCs growth both in vitro and in vivo through attenuation of IL-6/STAT3/NF-kB signaling pathways.

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  9. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  10. Expression of abnormal von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells from a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, R B; Booyse, F M; Chediak, J; Zimmerman, T S; Livingston, D M; Lynch, D C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the biosynthesis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) by cultured endothelial cells (EC) derived from the umbilical vein of a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The patient's EC, compared with those from normal individuals, produced vWf that had decreased amounts of large multimers and an increase in rapidly migrating satellite species, features characteristic of plasma vWf from patients with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The type IIA EC did produce a full spectrum of vWf multimers in both cell lysates and postculture medium, although the relative amounts of the largest species were decreased. The large multimers were degraded in conjunction with the appearance of rapidly migrating satellites that contained approximately equal to 170-kDa proteolytic fragments, suggesting that this patient's functional defect is due to abnormal proteolysis and not to a primary failure of vWf subunit oligomerization. Moreover, the observed degradation appears to result from an abnormal vWf molecule and not elevated protease levels. These results suggest that this patient's von Willebrand disease phenotype is caused by increased proteolytic sensitivity of his vWf protein. Images PMID:3306682

  11. Tanshinone IIA enhances bystander cell killing of cancer cells expressing Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase in nuclei and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyang; Zhao, Lei; Dong, Xiaoshen; He, Anning; Zheng, Caiwei; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna; Zheng, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Heterologous expression of the Drosophila melanogaster multi-substrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to several cytotoxic nucleoside analogs. Thus, it may be used as a suicide gene in combined gene/chemotherapy treatment of cancer. To further characterize this potential suicide gene, we constructed two retroviral vectors that enabled the expression of Dm-dNK in cancer cells. One vector harbored the wild‑type enzyme that localized to the nucleus. The other vector harbored a mitochondrial localized mutant enzyme that was constructed by deleting the nuclear localization signal and fusing it to a mitochondrial import signal of cytochrome c oxidase. A thymidine kinase-deficient osteosarcoma cell line was transduced with the recombinant viruses. The sensitivity and bystander cell killing in the presence of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)‑2'‑deoxyuridine and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylthymine were investigated. Tanshinone IIA is a constituent of Danshen; a traditional Chinese medicine used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This study also looked at the influence of Tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect and the underlying mechanisms. We showed that sensitivity of the osteosarcoma cell line to the nucleoside analogs and the efficiency of bystander cell killing were independent of the subcellular localization of Dm-dNK. The enhanced effect of tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect was related to the increased expression of Cx43 and Cx26.

  12. Ubiquitin Ligase, MuRF-1 regulates myosin heavy chain type IIa transcripts during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Sachiko

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity conditions. We previously reported that gastrocnemius muscle atrophy by spaceflight was specifically sensitive to the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. We also screened more over 26,000 skeletal muscle genes in rats exposed to real weightlessness and found that the expression of Ubiquitin Ligase, Muscle specific Ring Finger-1 (MuRF-1) upregulated under microgravity. In the present study, we examined the role of MuRF-1 in microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. The amounts of MuRF-1 transcripts significantly increased in skeletal muscle after denervation, an in vivo model of microgravity-induced unloading. MuRF-1 deficient (MuRF-1-/-) mice significantly inhibited reduction of muscle weight for muscle atrophy, compared with wild type mice. Interestingly, MuRF-1-/- mice significantly inhibited upregulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIa transcrips, while wild type mice significantly increased expression of MyHC type IIa transcripts in denervated skeletal muscle. Our present results suggest that MuRF-1 may play an important role in regulation of MyHC type IIa during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions.

  13. Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa and Giardia duodenalis assemblage A in Mytilus galloprovincialis on sale at local food markets.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Annunziata; Papini, Roberto; Marangi, Marianna; Koehler, Anson V; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-02-03

    To date, there has been no study to establish the genotypic or subgenotypic identities of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in edible shellfish. Here, we explored the genetic composition of these protists in Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean mussel) purchased from three markets in the city of Foggia, Italy, from May to December 2012. Samples from the digestive glands, gills and haemolymph were tested by nested PCR, targeting DNA regions within the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene of Cryptosporidium, and the triose-phosphate isomerase (tpi) and β-giardin genes of Giardia. In total, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in 66.7% of mussels (M. galloprovincialis) tested. Cryptosporidium was detected mostly between May and September 2012. Sequencing of amplicons showed that 60% of mussels contained Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa (including subgenotypes A15G2R1, IIaA15G2 and IIaA14G3R1), 23.3% Giardia duodenalis assemblage A, and 6.6% had both genetic types. This is the first report of these types in fresh, edible shellfish, particularly the very commonly consumed M. galloprovincialis from highly frequented fish markets. These genetic types of Cryptosporidium and Giardia are known to infect humans and thus likely to represent a significant public health risk. The poor observance of hygiene rules by vendors, coupled to the large numbers of M. galloprovincialis sold and the eating habits of consumers in Italy, call for more effective sanitary measures pertaining to the selling of fresh shellfish in street markets.

  14. The role of metallothionein IIa in defending lens epithelial cells against cadmium and TBHP induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Hawse, John R.; Padgaonkar, Vanita A.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Pelliccia, Sara E.; Kantorow, Marc; Giblin, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Heavy metals and other forms of oxidative stress have been implicated as key factors in the formation of age-related cataract in humans. Metallothioneins are a group of proteins known to play important roles in defending cells against the cytotoxic effects of heavy metals. However, little is known about their involvement in defending against other forms of oxidative stress. Here, we examined the ability of metallothionein IIa (MTIIa) to protect human lens epithelial cells against cadmium and tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP)-induced oxidative stress. Methods MTIIa over-expressing human lens epithelial cells (SRA01/04) were created by retroviral mediated gene transfer. Normal and MTIIa over-expressing cells were exposed to various concentrations of cadmium and TBHP and subsequently monitored for cell death, changes in cell phenotype and differences in growth rate. In addition, expression levels of three other important antioxidant genes, heme oxygenase-1, thioredoxin reductase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase were monitored by real-time RT-PCR following exposure to TBHP. Results Analysis of the over expressing cell lines revealed an approximate 3–4 fold increase in MTIIa expression relative to control cells, resulting in as much as 20% protection against cadmium-induced oxidative stress (p<0.001). The MTIIa over expressing cells were also significantly more resistant to TBHP treatment while control cells exhibited significant shrinking and rounding-up following 3–6 h TBHP treatment, no changes were observed in TBHP-treated over expressing cells. When control cells were treated for 3 h or overnight with TBHP, 40–45% cell death occurred by day three. However, no cell death was observed at this time for the treated MTIIa over-expressing cell line. In addition, TBHP induced the expression of MTIIa, heme oxygenase-1, thioredoxin reductase-1, and MnSOD in both normal and MTIIa over-expressed cell lines. Interestingly the latter three genes were

  15. Type IIA topoisomerase inhibition by a new class of antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Bax, Benjamin D; Chan, Pan F; Eggleston, Drake S; Fosberry, Andrew; Gentry, Daniel R; Gorrec, Fabrice; Giordano, Ilaria; Hann, Michael M; Hennessy, Alan; Hibbs, Martin; Huang, Jianzhong; Jones, Emma; Jones, Jo; Brown, Kristin Koretke; Lewis, Ceri J; May, Earl W; Saunders, Martin R; Singh, Onkar; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony; Theobald, Andrew J; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Pearson, Neil D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2010-08-19

    Despite the success of genomics in identifying new essential bacterial genes, there is a lack of sustainable leads in antibacterial drug discovery to address increasing multidrug resistance. Type IIA topoisomerases cleave and religate DNA to regulate DNA topology and are a major class of antibacterial and anticancer drug targets, yet there is no well developed structural basis for understanding drug action. Here we report the 2.1 A crystal structure of a potent, new class, broad-spectrum antibacterial agent in complex with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase and DNA, showing a new mode of inhibition that circumvents fluoroquinolone resistance in this clinically important drug target. The inhibitor 'bridges' the DNA and a transient non-catalytic pocket on the two-fold axis at the GyrA dimer interface, and is close to the active sites and fluoroquinolone binding sites. In the inhibitor complex the active site seems poised to cleave the DNA, with a single metal ion observed between the TOPRIM (topoisomerase/primase) domain and the scissile phosphate. This work provides new insights into the mechanism of topoisomerase action and a platform for structure-based drug design of a new class of antibacterial agents against a clinically proven, but conformationally flexible, enzyme class.

  16. Parenteral administration of factor Xa/IIa inhibitors limits experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Corey S.; Seto, Sai-Wang; Krishna, Smriti M.; Sharma, Surabhi; Jose, Roby J.; Biros, Erik; Wang, Yutang; Morton, Susan K.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Intraluminal thrombus is a consistent feature of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Coagulation factor Xa (FXa) catalyses FII to thrombin (FIIa). We examined the effect of FXa/FIIa inhibition on experimental aortic aneurysm in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice infused with angiotensin II (AngII). The concentration of FXa within the supra-renal aorta (SRA) correlated positively with SRA diameter. Parenteral administration of enoxaparin (FXa/IIa inhibitor) and fondaparinux (FXa inhibitor) over 14 days reduced to severity of aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in AngII-infused ApoE−/− mice. Enteral administration of the FIIa inhibitor dabigatran had no significant effect. Aortic protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 expression increased in response to AngII infusion. Fondaparinux reduced SRA levels of FXa, FIIa, PAR-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2, Smad2/3 phosphorylation, and MOMA-2 positive cells in the mouse model. FXa stimulated Smad2/3 phosphorylation and MMP2 expression in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. Expression of MMP2 in FXa-stimulated VSMC was downregulated in the presence of a PAR-2 but not a PAR-1 inhibitor. These findings suggest that FXa/FIIa inhibition limits aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis severity due to down-regulation of vascular PAR-2-mediated Smad2/3 signalling and MMP2 expression. Inhibition of FXa/FIIa may be a potential therapy for limiting aortic aneurysm. PMID:28220880

  17. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  18. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  19. Reduction of atrial fibrillation by Tanshinone IIA in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    He, Zhifeng; Sun, Changzheng; Xu, Yi; Cheng, Dezhi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to confirm the effect of Tanshinone IIA (TAN) on the prevention of AF in chronic heart failure (CHF), and to elucidate the underlying electrophysiological mechanisms for the antiarrhythmic effects of TAN at the level of the atrium in an experimental model of CHF. In 10 female rabbits, CHF was induced by rapid ventricular pacing, leading to a significant decrease in ejection fraction in the presence of a dilated left ventricle and atrial enlargement. Twelve rabbits were sham-operated and served as controls. Isolated hearts were perfused using the Langendorff method. Burst pacing was used to induce AF. Monophasic action potential recordings showed an increase of atrial action potential duration (aAPD) and effective refractory period (aERP) in CHF hearts compared with sham hearts. Infusion of acetylcholine (1μm) and isoproterenol (1μm) led to AF in all failing hearts and in 11 sham hearts. Simultaneous infusion of TAN (10μm) remarkably reduced inducibility of AF in 50% of sham and 50% of failing hearts. TAN had no effect on aAPD but significantly increased aERP, leading to a marked increase in atrial post-repolarization refractoriness. Moreover, TAN application moderately increased interatrial conduction time. TAN has been shown to be effective in reducing the inducibility of AF in an experimental model of AF. The antiarrhythmic effect is mainly due to prolongations of atrial post-repolarization refractoriness and a moderate increase in interatrial conduction time.

  20. SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling pathway inhibits nonmuscle myosin IIA activity and destabilizes kidney podocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xueping; Yang, Hongying; Kumar, Sudhir; Tumelty, Kathleen E.; Pisarek-Horowitz, Anna; Sharma, Richa; Chan, Stefanie; Tyminski, Edyta; Shamashkin, Michael; Belghasem, Mostafa; Henderson, Joel M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Berasi, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The repulsive guidance cue SLIT2 and its receptor ROBO2 are required for kidney development and podocyte foot process structure, but the SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling mechanism regulating podocyte function is not known. Here we report that a potentially novel signaling pathway consisting of SLIT/ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 1 (SRGAP1) and nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) regulates podocyte adhesion downstream of ROBO2. We found that the myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC), a subunit of NMIIA, interacts directly with SRGAP1 and forms a complex with ROBO2/SRGAP1/NMIIA in the presence of SLIT2. Immunostaining demonstrated that SRGAP1 is a podocyte protein and is colocalized with ROBO2 on the basal surface of podocytes. In addition, SLIT2 stimulation inhibits NMIIA activity, decreases focal adhesion formation, and reduces podocyte attachment to collagen. In vivo studies further showed that podocyte-specific knockout of Robo2 protects mice from hypertension-induced podocyte detachment and albuminuria and also partially rescues the podocyte-loss phenotype in Myh9 knockout mice. Thus, we have identified SLIT2/ROBO2/SRGAP1/NMIIA as a potentially novel signaling pathway in kidney podocytes, which may play a role in regulating podocyte adhesion and attachment. Our findings also suggest that SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling might be a therapeutic target for kidney diseases associated with podocyte detachment and loss. PMID:27882344

  1. Parenteral administration of factor Xa/IIa inhibitors limits experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Corey S; Seto, Sai-Wang; Krishna, Smriti M; Sharma, Surabhi; Jose, Roby J; Biros, Erik; Wang, Yutang; Morton, Susan K; Golledge, Jonathan

    2017-02-21

    Intraluminal thrombus is a consistent feature of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Coagulation factor Xa (FXa) catalyses FII to thrombin (FIIa). We examined the effect of FXa/FIIa inhibition on experimental aortic aneurysm in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice infused with angiotensin II (AngII). The concentration of FXa within the supra-renal aorta (SRA) correlated positively with SRA diameter. Parenteral administration of enoxaparin (FXa/IIa inhibitor) and fondaparinux (FXa inhibitor) over 14 days reduced to severity of aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in AngII-infused ApoE(-/-) mice. Enteral administration of the FIIa inhibitor dabigatran had no significant effect. Aortic protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 expression increased in response to AngII infusion. Fondaparinux reduced SRA levels of FXa, FIIa, PAR-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2, Smad2/3 phosphorylation, and MOMA-2 positive cells in the mouse model. FXa stimulated Smad2/3 phosphorylation and MMP2 expression in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. Expression of MMP2 in FXa-stimulated VSMC was downregulated in the presence of a PAR-2 but not a PAR-1 inhibitor. These findings suggest that FXa/FIIa inhibition limits aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis severity due to down-regulation of vascular PAR-2-mediated Smad2/3 signalling and MMP2 expression. Inhibition of FXa/FIIa may be a potential therapy for limiting aortic aneurysm.

  2. Type IIA Monteggia Fracture Dislocation with Ipsilateral Distal Radius Fracture in Adult – A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    James, Boblee

    2016-01-01

    Monteggia fracture constitutes about 5-10% of the forearm fractures. Monteggia fracture by definition is proximal ulnar fracture with disruption of proximal radioulnar joint. Bado classified Monteggia fracture dislocation into four types and Jupiter subclassified type II Bado’s fractures into four types. The associated injury in the form of distal radial fractures and distal humerus fractures are rare though many cases of distal radial physeal injuries have been reported in paediatric population. Hereby we report a rare association of type IIA Monteggia fracture dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture in an adult patient. This case report also highlights on proper examination and full length radiographs of forearm to avoid missing injury at wrist in cases of elbow injuries. Management of such complex injuries included open reduction and internal fixation of olecronon fracture, distal radius fracture and radial head resection. Functional outcome at six months was good at wrist whereas at elbow, stiffness was a major concern with elbow range of movement from 40°-110°. PMID:27656518

  3. Six-Dimensional Superconformal Theories and their Compactifications from Type IIA Supergravity.

    PubMed

    Apruzzi, Fabio; Fazzi, Marco; Passias, Achilleas; Rota, Andrea; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2015-08-07

    We describe three analytic classes of infinitely many AdS(d) supersymmetric solutions of massive IIA supergravity, for d=7,5,4. The three classes are related by simple universal maps. For example, the AdS(7)×M(3) solutions (where M(3) is topologically S(3)) are mapped to AdS(5)×Σ(2)×M(3)', where Σ(2) is a Riemann surface of genus g≥2 and the metric on M(3)' is obtained by distorting M(3) in a certain way. The solutions can have localized D6 or O6 sources, as well as an arbitrary number of D8-branes. The AdS(7) case (previously known only numerically) is conjecturally dual to an NS5-D6-D8 system. The field theories in three and four dimensions are not known, but their number of degrees of freedom can be computed in the supergravity approximation. The AdS(4) solutions have numerical "attractor" generalizations that might be useful for flux compactification purposes.

  4. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with short peptide fragments from class IIa bacteriocins as recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Sarfuddin; Jiang, Keren; Stiles, Michael; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-03-09

    We employed a direct peptide-bacteria binding assay to screen peptide fragments for high and specific binding to Listeria monocytogenes. Peptides were screened from a peptide array library synthesized on cellulose membrane. Twenty four peptide fragments (each a 14-mer) were derived from three potent anti-listerial peptides, Leucocin A, Pediocin PA1, and Curvacin A, that belong to class IIa bacteriocins. Fragment Leu10 (GEAFSAGVHRLANG), derived from the C-terminal region of Leucocin A, displayed the highest binding among all of the library fragments toward several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including L. monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The specific binding of Leu10 to L. monocytogenes was further validated using microcantilever (MCL) experiments. Microcantilevers coated with gold were functionalized with peptides by chemical conjugation using a cysteamine linker to yield a peptide density of ∼4.8×10(-3) μmol/cm2 for different peptide fragments. Leu10 (14-mer) functionalized MCL was able to detect Listeria with same sensitivity as that of Leucocin A (37-mer) functionalized MCL, validating the use of short peptide fragments in bacterial detection platforms. Fragment Leu10 folded into a helical conformation in solution, like that of native Leucocin A, suggesting that both Leu10 and Leucocin A may employ a similar mechanism for binding target bacteria. The results show that peptide-conjugated microcantilevers can function as highly sensitive platforms for Listeria detection and hold potential to be developed as biosensors for pathogenic bacteria.

  5. Tanshinone IIA suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration by downregulation of FOXM1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Yuhua; Tang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (TSN) exhibits a variety of anticancer effects. However, whether it inhibits gastric cancer (GC) cell proliferation and migration and the mechanism remain unclear. In the present study, different concentrations of TSN were co-incubated with SGC-7901 cells. The pcDNA-FOXM1 or FOXM1-siRNA plasmid was transfected into cells before treatment with 5 µg/l TSN. The proliferation and migration abilities of the SGC-7901 cells were tested by MTT and wound healing assays. Western blotting was used to investigate the expression levels of P21, Ki-67, PCNA, MMP-2, MMP-9 and FOXM1. We found that compared with the control, the proliferation and migration abilities of the SGC-7901 cells were decreased after incubation with different concentrations of TSN in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01). Moreover, the expression levels of Ki-67, PCAN, MMP-2, MMP-9 and FOXM1 were decreased, and P21 was increased in the TSN-treated SGC-7901 cells (p<0.01). In addition, downregulation of FOXM1 by FOXM1-siRNA had the same effect as TSN on SGC-7901 cells, and overexpression of FOXM1 partly abrogated TSN-mediated inhibition of SGC-7901 cell proliferation and migration. These results suggested that TSN inhibits SGC-7901 cell proliferation and migration by downregulation of FOXM1. PMID:28184921

  6. Autologous myoblast transplantation for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a phase I/IIa clinical study.

    PubMed

    Périé, Sophie; Trollet, Capucine; Mouly, Vincent; Vanneaux, Valérie; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Bouazza, Belaïd; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Chapon, Françoise; Eymard, Bruno; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Larghero, Jérome; St Guily, Jean Lacau

    2014-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant genetic disease mainly characterized by ptosis and dysphagia. We conducted a phase I/IIa clinical study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00773227) using autologous myoblast transplantation following myotomy in adult OPMD patients. This study included 12 patients with clinical diagnosis of OPMD, indication for cricopharyngeal myotomy, and confirmed genetic diagnosis. The feasibility and safety end points of both autologous myoblast transplantation and the surgical procedure were assessed by videoendoscopy in addition to physical examinations. Potential therapeutic benefit was also assessed through videoendoscopy and videofluoroscopy of swallowing, quality of life score, dysphagia grade, and a drink test. Patients were injected with a median of 178 million myoblasts following myotomy. Short and long-term (2 years) safety and tolerability were observed in all the patients, with no adverse effects. There was an improvement in the quality of life score for all 12 patients, and no functional degradation in swallowing was observed for 10 patients. A cell dose-dependant improvement in swallowing was even observed in this study. This trial supports the hypothesis that a local injection of autologous myoblasts in the pharyngeal muscles is a safe and efficient procedure for OPMD patients.

  7. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling evidence of clozapine binding to human serum albumin at subdomain IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinhu; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Qiang; Xue, Weiwei; Yao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Jing

    2011-09-01

    Various spectroscopy and molecular docking methods were used to examine the binding of Clozapine (CLZ) to human serum albumin (HSA) in this paper. By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of single Trp214 residue and performing Dansylamide (DNSA) displacement measurement, the specific binding of CLZ in the vicinity of Sudlow's Site I of HSA has been clarified. An apparent distance of 27.3 Å between the Trp214 and CLZ was obtained via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method. In addition, the changes in the secondary structure of HSA after its complexation with CLZ ligand were studied with CD spectroscopy, which indicate that CLZ does not has remarkable effect on the structure of the protein. Moreover, thermal denaturation experiment shows that the HSA-CLZ complexes are conformationally more stable. Finally, the binding details between CLZ and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking studies, which revealed that CLZ was bound at subdomain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding.

  8. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling evidence of clozapine binding to human serum albumin at subdomain IIA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinhu; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Qiang; Xue, Weiwei; Yao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Jing

    2011-09-01

    Various spectroscopy and molecular docking methods were used to examine the binding of Clozapine (CLZ) to human serum albumin (HSA) in this paper. By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of single Trp214 residue and performing Dansylamide (DNSA) displacement measurement, the specific binding of CLZ in the vicinity of Sudlow's Site I of HSA has been clarified. An apparent distance of 27.3 Å between the Trp214 and CLZ was obtained via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method. In addition, the changes in the secondary structure of HSA after its complexation with CLZ ligand were studied with CD spectroscopy, which indicate that CLZ does not has remarkable effect on the structure of the protein. Moreover, thermal denaturation experiment shows that the HSA-CLZ complexes are conformationally more stable. Finally, the binding details between CLZ and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking studies, which revealed that CLZ was bound at subdomain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding.

  9. Heat-Labile Enterotoxin IIa, a Platform To Deliver Heterologous Proteins into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Przedpelski, Amanda; Tepp, William H.; Pellett, Sabine; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cholera toxin (CT) and the related heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of Escherichia coli have been implicated as adjuvants in human therapies, but reactivity upon intranasal delivery dampened efforts to develop other clinical applications. However, each CT family member variant has unique biological properties that may warrant development as therapeutic platforms. In the current study, a nontoxic variant of the heat-labile enterotoxin IIa (LTIIa) was engineered to deliver heterologous, functional proteins into the cytosol of neurons. As proof of principle, the LTIIa variant delivered two cargos into neurons. LTIIa delivered β-lactamase efficiently into cells containing complex gangliosides, such as GD1b, as host receptors. LTIIa delivery of β-lactamase was sensitive to brefeldin A, an inhibitor that collapses the Golgi compartment into the endoplasmic reticulum, but not sensitive to treatment with botulinum neurotoxin D (BoNT/D), an inhibitor of synaptic vesicle cycling. LTIIa delivered a single-chain, anti-BoNT/A camelid antibody that inhibited SNAP25 cleavage during post-BoNT/A exposure of neurons. Delivery of functional, heterologous protein cargos into neurons demonstrates the potential of LTII variants as platforms to deliver therapies to inactivate toxins and microbial infections and to reverse the pathology of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26265718

  10. Myosin IIA participates in docking of Glut4 storage vesicles with the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Le Thi Kim; Hosaka, Toshio; Harada, Nagakatsu; Jambaldorj, Bayasgalan; Fukunaga, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuka; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Tohru; Nakaya, Yutaka; Funaki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    In adipocytes and myocytes, insulin stimulation translocates glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) storage vesicles (GSVs) from their intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane (PM) where they dock with the PM. Then, Glut4 is inserted into the PM and initiates glucose uptake into these cells. Previous studies using chemical inhibitors demonstrated that myosin II participates in fusion of GSVs and the PM and increase in the intrinsic activity of Glut4. In this study, the effect of myosin IIA on GSV trafficking was examined by knocking down myosin IIA expression. Myosin IIA knockdown decreased both glucose uptake and exposures of myc-tagged Glut4 to the cell surface in insulin-stimulated cells, but did not affect insulin signal transduction. Interestingly, myosin IIA knockdown failed to decrease insulin-dependent trafficking of Glut4 to the PM. Moreover, in myosin IIA knockdown cells, insulin-stimulated binding of GSV SNARE protein, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) to PM SNARE protein, syntaxin 4 was inhibited. These data suggest that myosin IIA plays a role in insulin-stimulated docking of GSVs to the PM in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through SNARE complex formation.

  11. Technology of mammalian cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Uludag, H; De Vos, P; Tresco, P A

    2000-08-20

    Entrapment of mammalian cells in physical membranes has been practiced since the early 1950s when it was originally introduced as a basic research tool. The method has since been developed based on the promise of its therapeutic usefulness in tissue transplantation. Encapsulation physically isolates a cell mass from an outside environment and aims to maintain normal cellular physiology within a desired permeability barrier. Numerous encapsulation techniques have been developed over the years. These techniques are generally classified as microencapsulation (involving small spherical vehicles and conformally coated tissues) and macroencapsulation (involving larger flat-sheet and hollow-fiber membranes). This review is intended to summarize techniques of cell encapsulation as well as methods for evaluating the performance of encapsulated cells. The techniques reviewed include microencapsulation with polyelectrolyte complexation emphasizing alginate-polylysine capsules, thermoreversible gelation with agarose as a prototype system, interfacial precipitation and interfacial polymerization, as well as the technology of flat sheet and hollow fiber-based macroencapsulation. Four aspects of encapsulated cells that are critical for the success of the technology, namely the capsule permeability, mechanical properties, immune protection and biocompatibility, have been singled out and methods to evaluate these properties were summarized. Finally, speculations regarding future directions of cell encapsulation research and device development are included from the authors' perspective.

  12. Chemosignals, hormones and mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Petrulis, Aras

    2013-05-01

    Many mammalian species use chemosignals to coordinate reproduction by altering the physiology and behavior of both sexes. Chemosignals prime reproductive physiology so that individuals become sexually mature and active at times when mating is most probable and suppress it when it is not. Once in reproductive condition, odors produced and deposited by both males and females are used to find and select individuals for mating. The production, dissemination and appropriate responses to these cues are modulated heavily by organizational and activational effects of gonadal sex steroids and thereby intrinsically link chemical communication to the broader reproductive context. Many compounds have been identified as "pheromones" but very few have met the expectations of that term: a unitary, species-typical substance that is both necessary and sufficient for an experience-independent behavioral or physiological response. In contrast, most responses to chemosignals are dependent or heavily modulated by experience, either in adulthood or during development. Mechanistically, chemosignals are perceived by both main and accessory (vomeronasal) olfactory systems with the importance of each system tied strongly to the nature of the stimulus rather than to the response. In the central nervous system, the vast majority of responses to chemosignals are mediated by cortical and medial amygdala connections with hypothalamic and other forebrain structures. Despite the importance of chemosignals in mammals, many details of chemical communication differ even among closely related species and defy clear categorization. Although generating much research and public interest, strong evidence for the existence of a robust chemical communication among humans is lacking.

  13. Structure of the mammalian kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Ris, H; Witt, P L

    1981-01-01

    The structure of the mammalian trilaminar kinetochore was investigated using stereo electron microscopy of chromosomes in hypotonic solutions which unraveled the chromosome but maintained microtubules. Mouse and Chinese hamster ovary cells were arrested in Colcemid and allowed to reform microtubules after Colcemid was removed. Recovered cells were then swelled, lysed or spread in hypotonic solutions which contained D2O to preserve microtubules. The chromosomes were observed in thin and thick sections and as whole mounts using high voltage electron microscopy. Bundles of microtubules were seen directly attached to chromatin, indicating that the kinetochore outer layer represents a differential arrangement of chromatin, continuous with the body of the chromosome. In cells fixed wihout pretreatment, the outer layer could be seen to be composed of hairpin loops of chromatin stacked together to form a solid layer. The hypotonically-induced unraveling of the outer layer was found to be reversible, and the typical 300 nm thick disk reformed when cells were returned to isotonic solutions. Short microtubules, newly nucleated after Colcemid removal, were found not to be attached to the kinetochore out layer, but were situated in the fibrous corona on the external surface of the outer layer. This was verified by observation of thick sections in stereo which made it possible to identify microtubules ends within the section. Thus, kinetochore microtubules are nucleated within the fibrous corona, and subsequently become attached to the outer layer.

  14. Mammalian cell cultivation in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmünder, Felix K.; Suter, Robert N.; Kiess, M.; Urfer, R.; Nordau, C.-G.; Cogoli, A.

    Equipment used in space for the cultivation of mammalian cells does not meet the usual standard of earth bound bioreactors. Thus, the development of a space worthy bioreactor is mandatory for two reasons: First, to investigate the effect on single cells of the space environment in general and microgravity conditions in particular, and second, to provide researchers on long term missions and the Space Station with cell material. However, expertise for this venture is not at hand. A small and simple device for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab (Dynamic Cell Culture System; DCCS) was developed. It provides 2 cell culture chambers, one is operated as a batch system, the other one as a perfusion system. The cell chambers have a volume of 200 μl. Medium exchange is achieved with an automatic osmotic pump. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Oxygen for cell growth is provided by a gas chamber that is adjacent to the cell chambers. The oxygen gradient produced by the growing cells serves to maintain the oxygen influx by diffusion. Hamster kidney cells growing on microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. On ground tests suggest that this system is feasible.

  15. Tanshinone IIA Inhibits HIF-1α and VEGF Expression in Breast Cancer Cells via mTOR/p70S6K/RPS6/4E-BP1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guobing; Shan, Changyu; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Ting; Zhou, Jing; Hu, Xiaoye; Chen, Yibiao; Cui, Hongjuan; Gao, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play important roles in angiogenesis and tumor growth. Tanshinone IIA (T2A) is a novel antiangiogenic agent with promising antitumor effects; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic effects of T2A remains unclear. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that T2A inhibited angiogenesis and breast cancer growth by down-regulating VEGF expression. Specifically, T2A repressed HIF-1α expression at the translational level and inhibited the transcriptional activity of HIF-1α, which led to the down-regulation of VEGF expression. Suppression of HIF-1α synthesis by T2A correlated with strong dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its effectors ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1), a pathway regulating HIF-1α expression at the translational level. In addition, we also found that T2A inhibited the angiogenesis and growth of human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice through suppression of HIF-1α and VEGF. Our study provides novel perspectives and potential targets for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:25659153

  16. High resolution thermal denaturation of mammalian DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Guttmann, T; Vítek, A; Pivec, L

    1977-01-01

    High resolution melting profiles of different mammalian DNAs are presented. Melting curves of various mammalian DNAs were compared with respect to the degree of asymmetry, first moment, transition breath and Tmi of individual subtransitions. Quantitative comparison of the shape of all melting curves was made. Correlation between phylogenetical relations among mammals and shape of the melting profiles of their DNAs was demonstrated. The difference between multi-component heterogeneity of mammalian DNAs found by optical melting analysis and sedimentation in CsCl-netropsin density gradient is also discussed. PMID:840642

  17. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259

  18. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation.

  19. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  20. Binding of methacycline to human serum albumin at subdomain IIA using multispectroscopic and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chengyu; Lu, Ningning; Liu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of methacyline (METC) with human serum albumin (HSA) by multispectroscopy and a molecular modeling method under simulative physiological conditions. The quenching mechanism was suggested to be static quenching based on fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. According to the Vant' Hoff equation, the values of enthalpy (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) were calculated to be -95.29 kJ/mol and -218.13 J/mol/K, indicating that the main driving force of the interaction between HSA and METC were hydrogen bonds and van der Waals's forces. By performing displacement measurements, the specific binding of METC in the vicinity of Sudlow's site I of HSA was clarified. An apparent distance of 3.05 nm between Trp214 and METC was obtained via the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method. Furthermore, the binding details between METC and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking studies, which revealed that METC was bound at subdomain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, polar forces, hydrogen bonding, etc. The results of three-dimensional fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that METC caused conformational and some microenvironmental changes in HSA and reduced the α-helix significantly in the range of 52.3-40.4% in HSA secondary structure. Moreover, the coexistence of metal ions such as Ca(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+) and Cd(2+) can decrease the binding constants of METC-HSA.

  1. Enhanced dissolution and stability of Tanshinone IIA base by solid dispersion system with nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan-rong; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Huang, Sai-yan; Lu, Yan; Ma, Tian-tian; Jia, Xiao-bin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tanshinone IIA (TSIIA) exhibits a variety of cardiovascular effects; however, it has low solubility in water. The preparation of poorly soluble drugs for oral delivery is one of the greatest challenges in the field of formulation research. Among the approaches available, solid dispersion (SD) technique has proven to be one of the most commonly used these methods for improving dissolution and bioavailability of drugs, because of its relative simplicity and economy in terms of both preparation and evaluation. Objective: This study was aimed at investigating the dissolution behavior and physical stability of SDs of TSIIA by employing nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAp). Materials and Methods: The TSIIA SDs was prepared to use a spray-drying method. First, an in vitro dissolution test was performed to assess dissolution characteristics. Next, a set of complementary techniques (differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) was used to monitor the physicochemical properties of the SDs. The SDs was stored at 40°C/75% relative humidity for 6 months, after which their stability was assessed. Results: TSIIA dissolution remarkably improved because of the formulation of the SDs with n-HAp particles. Comparisons with the corresponding physical mixtures revealed changes in the SDs and explained the formation of the amorphous phase. In the stability test, virtually no time-dependent decrease was observed in either in vitro drug dissolution or drug content. Conclusion: SD formulation with n-HAp may be a promising approach for enhancing the dissolution and stability of TSIIA. PMID:25210322

  2. Effects of escins Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb from horse chestnuts on gastric emptying in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Li, Y; Murakami, T; Yamahara, J; Yoshikawa, M

    1999-03-05

    Inhibitory effects of the saponin fraction and its principal constituents, escins Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb, from horse chestnuts on gastric emptying were investigated in mice loaded with a non-nutrient or nutrient meal. The saponin fraction and escins Ia-IIb inhibited gastric emptying of a 1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC-Na) meal by 11.1-54.2% (12.5-200 mg/kg). Escins Ia-IIb (50 mg/kg) also inhibited gastric emptying of a 40% glucose meal by 21.1-23.5% except for escin Ia, a milk meal by 18.4-33.1%, and a 30% ethanol meal by 13.5-15.9%. The effects of escins Ia-IIb on gastric emptying of the CMC-Na meal were attenuated by pretreatment with streptozotocin (100 mg/kg, i.v.), capsaicin (75 mg/kg in total, s.c.), or insulin (1 U/kg, s.c.). The effect of insulin was reduced by glucose (2 g/kg, i.v.) which can directly nourish the brain, but not by fructose (2 g/kg, i.v.) which cannot be utilized by the brain. The effects of escins Ia-IIb (50 mg/kg) were overridden in 60% ethanol-loaded mice, in which the central nervous system was suppressed by ethanol. These results suggest that capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves and central nervous system partly participate in the effects of escins Ia-IIb.

  3. Tanshinone IIA inhibits TNF-α-mediated induction of VCAM-1 but not ICAM-1 through the regulation of GATA-6 and IRF-1.

    PubMed

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Kim, Young Min; Jin, Hana; Son, Kun Ho; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hye Jung

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the differential effect of tanshinone IIA on the induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by TNF-α and the possible molecular mechanisms by which it regulates ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression differentially. Stimulation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with TNF-α increased ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and the pretreatment with tanshinone IIA concentration dependently inhibited VCAM-1 expression but not ICAM-1 expression. In previous study, PI3K/Akt, PKC and Jak/STAT-3 pathways were involved in the TNF-α-mediated induction of VCAM-1 but not ICAM-1. Thus, we examined the effect of tanshinone IIA on TNF-α-mediated activations of PI3K/Akt, PKC and Jak/STAT-3 pathways. Tanshinone IIA efficiently inhibited the phosphorylations of Akt, PKC and STAT-3 by TNF-α. Moreover, we determined the effect of tanshinone IIA on IRF-1 or GATAs induction and binding activity to VCAM-1 promoter since the upstream promoter region of VCAM-1 but not ICAM-1 contains IRF-1 and GATA binding motifs. Western blot analysis and ChIP assay showed that tanshinone IIA efficiently inhibited TNF-α-increased nuclear level of IRF-1 and GATA-6 and their binding affinity to VCAM-1 promoter region. Taken together, tanshinone IIA selectively inhibits TNF-α-mediated expression of VCAM-1 but not ICAM-1 through modulation of PI3/Akt, PKC and Jak/STAT-3 pathway as well as IRF-1 and GATA-6 binding activity.

  4. Enzymology of Mammalian DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jurkowska, Renata Z; Jeltsch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is currently one of the hottest topics in basic and biomedical research. Despite tremendous progress in understanding the structures and biochemical properties of the mammalian DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMTs), principles of their regulation in cells have only begun to be uncovered. In mammals, DNA methylation is introduced by the DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B enzymes, which are all large multi-domain proteins. These enzymes contain a catalytic C-terminal domain with a characteristic cytosine-C5 methyltransferase fold and an N-terminal part with different domains that interacts with other proteins and chromatin and is involved in targeting and regulation of the DNMTs. The subnuclear localization of the DNMT enzymes plays an important role in their biological function: DNMT1 is localized to replicating DNA via interaction with PCNA and UHRF1. DNMT3 enzymes bind to heterochromatin via protein multimerization and are targeted to chromatin by their ADD and PWWP domains. Recently, a novel regulatory mechanism has been discovered in DNMTs, as latest structural and functional data demonstrated that the catalytic activities of all three enzymes are under tight allosteric control of their N-terminal domains having autoinhibitory functions. This mechanism provides numerous possibilities for the precise regulation of the methyltransferases via controlling the binding and release of autoinhibitory domains by protein factors, noncoding RNAs, or by posttranslational modifications of the DNMTs. In this chapter, we summarize key enzymatic properties of DNMTs, including their specificity and processivity, and afterward we focus on the regulation of their activity and targeting via allosteric processes, protein interactors, and posttranslational modifications.

  5. Chemosignals, Hormones and Mammalian Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Petrulis, Aras

    2013-01-01

    Many mammalian species use chemosignals to coordinate reproduction by altering the physiology and behavior of both sexes. Chemosignals prime reproductive physiology so that individuals become sexually mature and active at times when mating is most probable and suppress it when it is not. Once in reproductive condition, odors produced and deposited by both males and females are used to find and select individuals for mating. The production, dissemination and appropriate responses to these cues are modulated heavily by organizational and activational effects of gonadal sex steroids and thereby intrinsically link chemical communication to the broader reproductive context. Many compounds have been identified as “pheromones” but very few have met the expectations of that term: a unitary, species-typical substance that is both necessary and sufficient for an experience-independent behavioral or physiological response. In contrast, most responses to chemosignals are dependent or heavily modulated by experience, either in adulthood or during development. Mechanistically, chemosignals are perceived by both main and accessory (vomeronasal) olfactory systems with the importance of each system tied strongly to the nature of the stimulus rather than to the response. In the central nervous system, the vast majority of responses to chemosignals are mediated by cortical and medial amygdala connections with hypothalamic and other forebrain structures. Despite the importance of chemosignals in mammals, many details of chemical communication differ even among closely related species and defy clear categorization. Although generating much research and public interest, strong evidence for the existence of a robust chemical communication among humans is lacking. PMID:23545474

  6. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications.

    PubMed

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Krams, Rob

    2015-05-06

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON-OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes.

  7. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  8. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Krams, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON–OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. PMID:25808341

  9. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  10. Pathways of mammalian replication fork restart.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Single-molecule analyses of DNA replication have greatly advanced our understanding of mammalian replication restart. Several proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery promote the efficient restart of replication forks that have been stalled by replication inhibitors, suggesting that bona fide fork restart pathways exist in mammalian cells. Different models of replication fork restart can be envisaged, based on the involvement of DNA helicases, nucleases, homologous recombination factors and the importance of DNA double-strand break formation.

  11. Circadian Plasticity of Mammalian Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons participate in all neuronal circuits in the mammalian brain, including the circadian clock system, and are indispensable for their effective function. Although the clock neurons have different molecular and electrical properties, their main function is the generation of circadian oscillations. Here we review the circadian plasticity of GABAergic interneurons in several areas of the mammalian brain, suprachiasmatic nucleus, neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, striatum, and in the retina. PMID:28367335

  12. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-06

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line.

  13. Repair of furocoumarin adducts in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zolan, M.E.; Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-12-01

    DNA repair was studied in cultured mammalian cells treated with the furocoumarins 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), aminomethyl trioxsalen, or angelicin and irradiated with near UV light. The amount of DNA cross-linked by 8-MOP in normal human cells decreased by about one-half in 24 hours after treatment; no decrease was observed in xeroderma pigmentosum cells, group A. At present, it is not known to what extent this decrease represents complete repair events at the sites of cross-links. Furocoumarin adducts elicited excision repair in normal human and monkey cells but not in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. This excision repair resembled in several aspects that elicited by pyrimidine dimers, formed in DNA by irradiation with 254-nm UV light; however, it appeared that for at least 8-MOP and aminomethyl trioxsalen, removal of adducts was not as efficient as was the removal of pyrimidine dimers. A comparison was also made of repair in the 172-base-pair repetitive alpha-DNA component of monkey cells to repair in the bulk of the genome. Although repair elicited by pyrimidine dimers in alpha-DNA was the same as in the bulk DNA, that following treatment of cells with either aminomethyl trioxsalen or angelicin and near UV was markedly deficient in alpha-DNA. This deficiency reflected the removal of fewer adducts from alpha-DNA after the same initial adduct frequencies. These results could mean that each furocoumarin may produce several structurally distinct adducts to DNA in cells and that the capacity of cellular repair systems to remove these various adducts may vary greatly.

  14. Implications of recent geological investigations of the Mozambique Channel for the mammalian colonization of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    McCall, R A

    1997-05-22

    Madagascar separated from continental Africa during the break-up of Gondwanaland early in the Cretaceous. The presence of several terrestrial mammalian groups on Madagascar is paradoxical as (i) these groups postdate the departure of Madagascar from Africa: and ii) terrestrial mammals are poor dispersers across wide water barriers. Recent geological studies focusing on the Davie Fracture Zone of the Mozambique Channel offer a resolution to this situation, by suggesting the presence of a land-bridge from the mid-Eocene to the early Miocene, an interval that matches the ages of Madagascar's mammalian groups.

  15. Micro-optical coherence tomography of the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani S.; Batts, Shelley A.; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Sahin, Mehmet I.; Leung, Hui Min; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cochlea has historically resisted attempts at high-resolution, non-invasive imaging due to its small size, complex three-dimensional structure, and embedded location within the temporal bone. As a result, little is known about the relationship between an individual’s cochlear pathology and hearing function, and otologists must rely on physiological testing and imaging methods that offer limited resolution to obtain information about the inner ear prior to performing surgery. Micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) is a non-invasive, low-coherence interferometric imaging technique capable of resolving cellular-level anatomic structures. To determine whether μOCT is capable of resolving mammalian intracochlear anatomy, fixed guinea pig inner ears were imaged as whole temporal bones with cochlea in situ. Anatomical structures such as the tunnel of Corti, space of Nuel, modiolus, scalae, and cell groupings were visualized, in addition to individual cell types such as neuronal fibers, hair cells, and supporting cells. Visualization of these structures, via volumetrically-reconstructed image stacks and endoscopic perspective videos, represents an improvement over previous efforts using conventional OCT. These are the first μOCT images of mammalian cochlear anatomy, and they demonstrate μOCT’s potential utility as an imaging tool in otology research. PMID:27633610

  16. Vertebrate brains and evolutionary connectomics: on the origins of the mammalian ‘neocortex’

    PubMed Central

    Karten, Harvey J.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of the non-mammalian forebrain had long puzzled neurobiologists. Unlike typical mammalian brains, the telencephalon is not organized in a laminated ‘cortical’ manner, with distinct cortical areas dedicated to individual sensory modalities or motor functions. The two major regions of the telencephalon, the basal ventricular ridge (BVR) and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), were loosely referred to as being akin to the mammalian basal ganglia. The telencephalon of non-mammalian vertebrates appears to consist of multiple ‘subcortical’ groups of cells. Analysis of the nuclear organization of the avian brain, its connections, molecular properties and physiology, and organization of its pattern of circuitry and function relative to that of mammals, collectively referred to as ‘evolutionary connectomics’, revealed that only a restricted portion of the BVR is homologous to the basal ganglia of mammals. The remaining dorsal regions of the DVR, wulst and arcopallium of the avian brain contain telencephalic inputs and outputs remarkably similar to those of the individual layers of the mammalian ‘neocortex’, hippocampus and amygdala, with instances of internuclear connections strikingly similar to those found between cortical layers and within radial ‘columns’ in the mammalian sensory and motor cortices. The molecular properties of these ‘nuclei’ in birds and reptiles are similar to those of the corresponding layers of the mammalian neocortex. The fundamental pathways and cell groups of the auditory, visual and somatosensory systems of the thalamus and telencephalon are homologous at the cellular, circuit, network and gene levels, and are of great antiquity. A proposed altered migration of these homologous neurons and circuits during development is offered as a mechanism that may account for the altered configuration of mammalian telencephalae. PMID:26554047

  17. Vertebrate brains and evolutionary connectomics: on the origins of the mammalian 'neocortex'.

    PubMed

    Karten, Harvey J

    2015-12-19

    The organization of the non-mammalian forebrain had long puzzled neurobiologists. Unlike typical mammalian brains, the telencephalon is not organized in a laminated 'cortical' manner, with distinct cortical areas dedicated to individual sensory modalities or motor functions. The two major regions of the telencephalon, the basal ventricular ridge (BVR) and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), were loosely referred to as being akin to the mammalian basal ganglia. The telencephalon of non-mammalian vertebrates appears to consist of multiple 'subcortical' groups of cells. Analysis of the nuclear organization of the avian brain, its connections, molecular properties and physiology, and organization of its pattern of circuitry and function relative to that of mammals, collectively referred to as 'evolutionary connectomics', revealed that only a restricted portion of the BVR is homologous to the basal ganglia of mammals. The remaining dorsal regions of the DVR, wulst and arcopallium of the avian brain contain telencephalic inputs and outputs remarkably similar to those of the individual layers of the mammalian 'neocortex', hippocampus and amygdala, with instances of internuclear connections strikingly similar to those found between cortical layers and within radial 'columns' in the mammalian sensory and motor cortices. The molecular properties of these 'nuclei' in birds and reptiles are similar to those of the corresponding layers of the mammalian neocortex. The fundamental pathways and cell groups of the auditory, visual and somatosensory systems of the thalamus and telencephalon are homologous at the cellular, circuit, network and gene levels, and are of great antiquity. A proposed altered migration of these homologous neurons and circuits during development is offered as a mechanism that may account for the altered configuration of mammalian telencephalae.

  18. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    PubMed

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  19. A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the space shuttle transportation system STS #3, 7, and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Since the United States of America is moving into an age of reusable space vehicles, both electronic and photographic materials will continue to be an integral part of the recording techniques available. Film as a scientifically viable recording technique in astronomy is well documented. There is a real need to expose various types of films to the Shuttle environment. Thus, the main objective was to look at the subtle densitometric changes of canisters of IIaO film that was placed aboard the Space Shuttle 3 (STS-3).

  20. A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data

    SciTech Connect

    Osta, Jyotsna

    2009-12-01

    This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W → ev decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1. With a sample of 499,830 W → ev candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of MW = 80.401 ± 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Mammalian Endogenous Parvoviruses▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2010-01-01

    Public databases of nucleotide sequences contain exponentially increasing amounts of sequence data from mammalian genomes. Through the use of large-scale bioinformatic screening for sequences homologous to exogenous mammalian viruses, we found several sequences related to human and animal parvoviruses (PVs) in the Parvovirus and Dependovirus genera within genomes of several mammals, including rats, wallabies, opossums, guinea pigs, hedgehogs, African elephants, and European rabbits. However, phylogenetic analysis of these endogenous parvovirus (EnPV) sequences demonstrated substantial genetic divergence from exogenous mammalian PVs characterized to date. Entire nonstructural and capsid gene sequences of a novel EnPV were amplified and genetically characterized from rat (Rattus norvegicus) genomic DNA. Rat EnPV sequences were most closely related to members of the genus Parvovirus, with >70% and 65% amino acid identities to nonstructural and capsid proteins of canine parvovirus, respectively. Integration of EnPV into chromosome 5 of rats was confirmed by PCR cloning and sequence analysis of the viral and chromosomal junctions. Using inverse PCR, we determined that the rat genome contains a single copy of rat EnPV. Considering mammalian phylogeny, we estimate that EnPV integrated into the rat genome less than 30 million years ago. Comparative phylogenetic analysis done using all known representative exogenous parvovirus (ExPV) and EnPV sequences showed two major genetic groups of EnPVs, one genetically more similar to genus Parvovirus and the other genetically more similar to the genus Dependovirus. The full extent of the genetic diversity of parvoviruses that have undergone endogenization during evolution of mammals and other vertebrates will be recognized only once complete genomic sequences from a wider range of classes, orders, and species of animals become available. PMID:20943964

  2. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C. W.; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration. PMID:28138518

  3. Efficacy of mirtazapine for the treatment of fibromyalgia without concomitant depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIa study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kenji; Murakami, Masato; Oka, Hiroshi; Onozawa, Kaname; Yoshida, Sadahiro; Osada, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the efficacy and safety of mirtazapine in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia (FM), a parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIa study was conducted at 57 sites between November 2012 and February 2014. Patients aged 20 to 64 years who met the American College of Rheumatology 1990 diagnostic FM criteria and had stably high pain scores during a placebo run-in period were randomly assigned (1:1) by a computer-generated allocation sequence (block size 4) to receive mirtazapine orally (15 mg/d for 1 week and then 30 mg/d) or matching placebo for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean numerical rating scale (NRS) pain score from baseline to endpoint (week 12 or early discontinuation). Of the 430 patients randomized (n = 215 each group), 422 (n = 211 each group) were analyzed for the primary endpoint. At the study endpoint, mirtazapine caused a significantly greater reduction in the mean NRS pain score compared with placebo (difference, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, −0.72 to −0.17; P = 0.0018). The reduction by mirtazapine remained significantly greater compared with placebo from week 6 onward. More patients treated with mirtazapine had their NRS pain score reduced by ≥30% from baseline (45.5% vs 30.8%). Mirtazapine also improved pain-related quality of life assessed by the Japanese version of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Short-Form 36 Questionnaire. Adverse events were more common with mirtazapine than placebo (68.8% vs 56.7%), including somnolence (32.1% vs 7.4%), weight gain (17.7% vs 0.9%), and increased appetite (11.6% vs 3.3%). In conclusion, mirtazapine was an effective and safe treatment for Japanese patients with FM. PMID:27218868

  4. Efficacy of mirtazapine for the treatment of fibromyalgia without concomitant depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIa study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miki, Kenji; Murakami, Masato; Oka, Hiroshi; Onozawa, Kaname; Yoshida, Sadahiro; Osada, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of mirtazapine in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia (FM), a parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIa study was conducted at 57 sites between November 2012 and February 2014. Patients aged 20 to 64 years who met the American College of Rheumatology 1990 diagnostic FM criteria and had stably high pain scores during a placebo run-in period were randomly assigned (1:1) by a computer-generated allocation sequence (block size 4) to receive mirtazapine orally (15 mg/d for 1 week and then 30 mg/d) or matching placebo for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean numerical rating scale (NRS) pain score from baseline to endpoint (week 12 or early discontinuation). Of the 430 patients randomized (n = 215 each group), 422 (n = 211 each group) were analyzed for the primary endpoint. At the study endpoint, mirtazapine caused a significantly greater reduction in the mean NRS pain score compared with placebo (difference, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, -0.72 to -0.17; P = 0.0018). The reduction by mirtazapine remained significantly greater compared with placebo from week 6 onward. More patients treated with mirtazapine had their NRS pain score reduced by ≥30% from baseline (45.5% vs 30.8%). Mirtazapine also improved pain-related quality of life assessed by the Japanese version of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Short-Form 36 Questionnaire. Adverse events were more common with mirtazapine than placebo (68.8% vs 56.7%), including somnolence (32.1% vs 7.4%), weight gain (17.7% vs 0.9%), and increased appetite (11.6% vs 3.3%). In conclusion, mirtazapine was an effective and safe treatment for Japanese patients with FM.

  5. Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Smutzer

    2010-01-31

    Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order to reach a

  6. Archetype, adaptation and the mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Meijler, F L; Meijler, T D

    2011-03-01

    Forty years ago, we started our quest for 'The Holy Grail' of understanding ventricular rate control and rhythm in atrial fibrillation (AF). We therefore studied the morphology and function of a wide range of mammalian hearts. From mouse to whale, we found that all hearts show similar structural and functional characteristics. This suggests that the mammalian heart remained well conserved during evolution and in this aspect it differs from other organs and parts of the mammalian body. The archetype of the mammalian heart was apparently so successful that adaptation by natural selection (evolution) caused by varying habitat demands, as occurred in other organs and many other aspects of mammalian anatomy, bypassed the heart. The structure and function of the heart of placental mammals have thus been strikingly conserved throughout evolution. The changes in the mammalian heart that did take place were mostly adjustments (scaling), to compensate for variations in body size and shape. A remarkable scaling effect is, for instance, the difference in atrioventricular (AV) conduction time, which is vital for optimal cardiac function in all mammals, small and large. Scaling of AV conduction takes place in the AV node (AVN), but its substrate is unknown. This sheds new light on the vital role of the AVN in health and disease. The AVN is master and servant of the heart at the same time and is of salient importance for our understanding of supraventricular arrhythmias in humans, especially AF. In Information Technology a software infra-structure called 'enterprise service bus' (ESB) may provide understanding of the mammalian heart's conservation during evolution. The ESB is quite unspecific (and thus general) when compared with the specialised components it has to support. For instance, one of the functions of an ESB is the routing of messages between system nodes. This routing is independent and unaware of the content of the messages. The function of the heart is likewise

  7. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases and Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 Proteins Regulate the Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition of Somatic Cell Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Qiang; Qing, Xiaobing; Ying, Yue; Wu, Haitao; Benda, Christina; Lin, Jiao; Huang, Zhijian; Liu, Longqi; Xu, Yan; Bao, Xichen; Qin, Baoming; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) and myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins compose a signaling module that orchestrates lineage specification during embryogenesis. We show here that this module also regulates the generation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells by defined transcription factors. Class IIa HDACs and MEF2 proteins rise steadily during fibroblast reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells. MEF2 proteins tend to block the process by inducing the expression of Tgfβ cytokines, which impairs the necessary phase of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Conversely, class IIa HDACs endeavor to suppress the activity of MEF2 proteins, thus enhancing the MET and colony formation efficiency. Our work highlights an unexpected role for a developmental axis in somatic cell reprogramming and provides new insight into how the MET is regulated in this context. PMID:23467414

  8. Mammalian Cell-Based Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Franz, Briana; Bhunia, Arun K.

    Use of living cells or cellular components in biosensors is receiving increased attention and opens a whole new area of functional diagnostics. The term "mammalian cell-based biosensor" is designated to biosensors utilizing mammalian cells as the biorecognition element. Cell-based assays, such as high-throughput screening (HTS) or cytotoxicity testing, have already emerged as dependable and promising approaches to measure the functionality or toxicity of a compound (in case of HTS); or to probe the presence of pathogenic or toxigenic entities in clinical, environmental, or food samples. External stimuli or changes in cellular microenvironment sometimes perturb the "normal" physiological activities of mammalian cells, thus allowing CBBs to screen, monitor, and measure the analyte-induced changes. The advantage of CBBs is that they can report the presence or absence of active components, such as live pathogens or active toxins. In some cases, mammalian cells or plasma membranes are used as electrical capacitors and cell-cell and cell-substrate contact is measured via conductivity or electrical impedance. In addition, cytopathogenicity or cytotoxicity induced by pathogens or toxins resulting in apoptosis or necrosis could be measured via optical devices using fluorescence or luminescence. This chapter focuses mainly on the type and applications of different mammalian cell-based sensor systems.

  9. Effects of Tanshinone IIA on the modulation of miR-33a and the SREBP-2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway in hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    JIA, LIANQUN; SONG, NAN; YANG, GUANLIN; MA, YIXIN; LI, XUETAO; LU, REN; CAO, HUIMIN; ZHANG, NI; ZHU, MEILIN; WANG, JUNYAN; LENG, XUE; CAO, YUAN; DU, YING; XU, YUE

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the active compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine known as Danshen. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of Tanshinone IIA on the regulation of lipid metabolism in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and the underlying molecular events. An in vivo model of hyperlipidemia was established in rats, with the animals receiving a daily dose of Tanshinone IIA. The serum lipid profiles were analyzed using an automatic biochemical analyzer, and the histopathological alterations and lipid deposition in liver tissue were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and oil red O staining, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of microRNA (miR)-33a, ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC)A1, ABCG1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) in liver tissues were measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SREBP-2, Pcsk9, and LDL-R were analyzed using western blotting. Tanshinone IIA reduced lipid deposition and improved histopathology in the rat liver tissue, however, did not alter the lipid profile in rat serum. In addition, Tanshinone IIA treatment suppressed the expression of miR-33a, whereas the protein expression levels of ABCA1, SREBP-2, Pcsk9 in addition to LDL-R mRNA and protein were upregulated. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Tanshinone IIA attenuated lipid deposition in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and modulated the expression of miR-33a and SREBP-2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway proteins. PMID:27082100

  10. Tanshinone IIA and Baicalin inhibiting the formation of benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene induced cytotoxicity: correlation with scavenging free radical.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixiang; Zang, Weijin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Ming; Gao, Zhijuan; Li, Gangcheng; Meng, Qingnai; Liu, Qinshe; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2013-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, is formed by incomplete combustion of organic materials, and causes oxidative damage to cells and tissues due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibition of Tanshinone IIA and Baicalin on the formation of BaP as well as the cytotoxicity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by BaP. The results showed that BaP formations in mainstream smoke were inhibited by 21μg/cigarette of Tanshinone IIA with a 12.8% decrease, and by 60μg/cigarette of Baicalin with an 11.1% decrease, respectively. Tanshinone IIA could protect HUVECs from the damage caused by BaP in a dose-dependent manner from 7.5 to 30μg/ml. 6μg/ml Baicalin significantly increased the cell survival rate from 47.37% to 84.21% compared with BaP-treated cells. Both Tanshinone IIA and Baicalin markedly attenuated the increase of LDH release, enhanced the activity of SOD and GPx and inhibited the generation of MDA in BaP-damaged HUVECs in vitro. In vivo exploration showed that the two compounds were capable of enhancing the activity of SOD and inhibiting generation of MDA in mainstream smoke-damaged in mice. Superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical were obviously inhibited by Tanshinone IIA and Baicalin. These data demonstrate an inhibition of Tanshinone IIA and Baicalin on the formation of BaP and the cytotoxicity on HUVECs related to free Radical induced by BaP.

  11. Behavior of crystal defects in synthetic type-IIa single-crystalline diamond at high temperatures under normal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Natsuo; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ito, Toshimichi; Sumiya, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    The behavior of dislocation lines (DLs) and stacking faults (SFs) in synthetic type-IIa single-crystalline diamond at high temperatures under normal pressure has been investigated. After annealing the diamond at 1500 °C for 60 min in pure N2 atmosphere, straight DLs were bent to converge to fewer curved dislocation bundles, so that some of the stacking faults were extinct while new DLs appeared at the edges of the removed SFs. These results indicate that SFs in the diamond examined belong to the Shockley type, and that the Shockley partials changed to a perfect dislocation. From this result, the following generation mechanism has been proposed for SFs in diamond. On one hand, because [112] dislocations in the (111) growth sector are contained in the slip plane labelled as (1 ̅ 1 ̅ 1), one perfect dislocation tends to be split into two Shockley partials and a SF when an appropriate stress is applied. On the other hand, the angle between the {111} slip plane and the direction of bundled dislocations in the (001) growth sector is as high as 54.7°, so that a perfect dislocation can hardly slip into partial dislocations. Thus, SFs exist only in the (111) growth sector of type IIa diamond.

  12. Determination of sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate in plasma by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Cui, Nan; Li, Jing; Ding, Zuoqi

    2007-11-01

    Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) is a water-soluble derivative of tanshinone IIa, an important lipophilic component contained in Salvia miltiorrhizae. A simple, sensitive and robust quantification method for STS based on LC-ESI-MS/MS was developed and validated, and has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study. Liquid-liquid extraction was used for extracting STS from biological samples, with a satisfactory recovery exceeding 75% at all test concentrations. Isocratic mobile phase consisted of 75% acetonitrile and 25% water containing 0.005% ammonia acetate (pH 3). Good retention and baseline separation for STS and the selected internal standard, diclofenac sodium, were obtained on a Shim-pack VP-ODS analytical column under this condition. The method was linear in the concentration range of 1-500 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions (RSD%) were within 9.0%. The deviation of the assay accuracies was within +/-10.0%. STS was proved to be stable during all sample storing, preparation and analytic procedures. With a lower limit of quantitation at 1 ng/mL, this method has been proved to be sensitive enough for the pharmacokinetic study of STS. The plasma profile of STS followed a single intravenous dosing was well fitted to a three compartmental model.

  13. TCR-driven transendothelial migration of human effector memory CD4 T cells involves Vav, Rac, and myosin IIA.

    PubMed

    Manes, Thomas D; Pober, Jordan S

    2013-04-01

    Human effector memory (EM) CD4 T cells may be recruited from the blood into a site of inflammation in response either to inflammatory chemokines displayed on or specific Ag presented by venular endothelial cells (ECs), designated as chemokine-driven or TCR-driven transendothelial migration (TEM), respectively. We have previously described differences in the morphological appearance of transmigrating T cells as well as in the molecules that mediate T cell-EC interactions distinguishing these two pathways. In this study, we report that TCR-driven TEM requires ZAP-70-dependent activation of a pathway involving Vav, Rac, and myosin IIA. Chemokine-driven TEM also uses ZAP-70, albeit in a quantitatively and spatially different manner of activation, and is independent of Vav, Rac, and mysosin IIA, depending instead on an as-yet unidentified GTP exchange factor that activates Cdc42. The differential use of small Rho family GTPases to activate the cytoskeleton is consistent with the morphological differences observed in T cells that undergo TEM in response to these distinct recruitment signals.

  14. Antigenic polymorphism of human very late activation protein-2 (platelet glycoprotein Ia-IIa). Platelet alloantigen Hca.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, V L; Pischel, K D; Avery, E D; Bluestein, H G

    1989-01-01

    We have found evidence for a human alloantigenic system on the very late activation protein -2 (VLA-2) heterodimer (platelet GPIa/IIa). Sera from two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contained antibodies that immunoprecipitated surface molecules from platelets and fibroblasts that comigrated on SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional O'Farrell gels with platelet GPIa (VLA-alpha2 chain) and platelet GPIIa (VLA-beta chain). These SLE antibodies were alloreactive as they precipitated VLA molecules from only 5 of 22 normal donors' platelets and did not react with the lupus patients' own platelets, despite the expression of apparently normal amounts of VLA on the donors' cells. Two-dimensional O'Farrell analysis demonstrated no differences in the molecular weight or isoelectric point of GPIa and GPIIa obtained from platelets of alloantibody reactive or unreactive donors. Sequential immunoprecipitation experiments with VLA chain-specific monoclonal antibodies, and the pattern of immunoprecipitation of several different VLA heterodimers demonstrated that the alloantibody-reactive determinant was present on the VLA-2 heterodimer, and not other VLA molecules. Thus, these SLE sera demonstrate a previously unrecognized antigenic polymorphism of the VLA-2 (platelet GPIa/IIa) heterodimer, platelet alloantigen Hca. Images PMID:2646323

  15. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  16. Involvement of opsins in mammalian sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Afanzar, Oshri; Brandis, Alexander; Nevo, Reinat; Kiss, Vladimir; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian sperm thermotaxis is extreme temperature sensitivity, manifested by the capacity of spermatozoa to respond to temperature changes of <0.0006 °C as they swim their body-length distance. The identity of the sensing system that confers this exceptional sensitivity on spermatozoa is not known. Here we show that the temperature-sensing system of mammalian spermatozoa involves opsins, known to be G-protein-coupled receptors that act as photosensors in vision. We demonstrate by molecular, immunological, and functional approaches that opsins are present in human and mouse spermatozoa at specific sites, which depend on the species and the opsin type, and that they are involved in sperm thermotaxis via two signalling pathways—the phospholipase C and the cyclic-nucleotide pathways. Our results suggest that, depending on the context and the tissue, mammalian opsins act not only as photosensors but also as thermosensors. PMID:26537127

  17. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization. The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights. Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system and nervous system. We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes and astrocyte cells to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon, Inc. (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells up to a time period of 120 hours exposure. Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  18. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Knight, C.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization.The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights.Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system.We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon Inc (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells for a time period of forty eight hours exposure.Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  19. High expression of TGF-β1 in the vaginal incisional margin predicts poor prognosis in patients with stage Ib-IIa cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dong-Mei; Wang, Xin-Jun; He, Tao; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Dan; Kong, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Mei-Mei

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between altered cytoplasmic expression of TGF-β1 in tissues of the vaginal incisional margin and vaginal cancer recurrence in patients with stage Ib-IIa cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). This paper also discusses the prognostic value of TGF-β1 expression at these locations. We found that TGF-β1 expression in the vaginal margin had a close association with vaginal recurrence of stage Ib-IIa CSCC and was an independent prognostic marker of this disease.

  20. The mammalian blastema: regeneration at our fingertips

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Schanes, Paula P.; Yu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the mouse, digit tip regeneration progresses through a series of discrete stages that include inflammation, histolysis, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. Recent studies reveal how each regenerative stage influences subsequent stages to establish a blastema that directs the successful regeneration of a complex mammalian structure. The focus of this review is on early events of healing and how an amputation wound transitions into a functional blastema. The stepwise formation of a mammalian blastema is proposed to provide a model for how specific targeted treatments can enhance regenerative performance in humans. PMID:27499871

  1. Mammalian mitogenomic relationships and the root of the eutherian tree

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Ulfur; Adegoke, Joseph A.; Bodin, Kristina; Born, Erik W.; Esa, Yuzine B.; Gullberg, Anette; Nilsson, Maria; Short, Roger V.; Xu, Xiufeng; Janke, Axel

    2002-01-01

    The strict orthology of mitochondrial (mt) coding sequences has promoted their use in phylogenetic analyses at different levels. Here we present the results of a mitogenomic study (i.e., analysis based on the set of protein-coding genes from complete mt genomes) of 60 mammalian species. This number includes 11 new mt genomes. The sampling comprises all but one of the traditional eutherian orders. The previously unrepresented order Dermoptera (flying lemurs) fell within Primates as the sister group of Anthropoidea, making Primates paraphyletic. This relationship was strongly supported. Lipotyphla (“insectivores”) split into three distinct lineages: Erinaceomorpha, Tenrecomorpha, and Soricomorpha. Erinaceomorpha was the basal eutherian lineage. Sirenia (dugong) and Macroscelidea (elephant shrew) fell within the African clade. Pholidota (pangolin) joined the Cetferungulata as the sister group of Carnivora. The analyses identified monophyletic Pinnipedia with Otariidae (sea lions, fur seals) and Odobenidae (walruses) as sister groups to the exclusion of Phocidae (true seals). PMID:12034869

  2. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate protects rat myocardium against ischemia-reperfusion injury via activation of PI3K/Akt/FOXO3A/Bim pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-qi; Zheng, Yue-liang; Chen, Huan; Tu, Jian-feng; Shen, Ye; Guo, Jun-ping; Yang, Xiang-hong; Yuan, Shu-ren; Chen, Liang-zhong; Chai, Jing-jie; Lu, Jian-hong; Zhai, Chang-lin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) in an ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced rat myocardial injury model. Methods: Male SD rats were iv injected with STS, STS+LY294002 or saline (NS) for 15 d. Then the hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Cardiac function, infarction size and area at risk were assessed. Cell apoptosis was evaluated with TUNEL staining, DNA laddering and measuring caspase-3 activity. In addition, isolated cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats were pretreated with the above drugs, then exposed to H2O2 (200 mol/L) for 1 h. Cell apoptosis was detected using flow cytometric assay. The levels of p-Akt, p-FOXO3A and Bim were examined with immunoblotting. Results: Compared to NS group, administration of STS (20 mg/kg) significantly reduced myocardial infarct size (40.28%±5.36% in STS group vs 59.52%±7.28% in NS group), and improved the myocardial function as demonstrated by the increased values of dp/dtmax, LVDP and coronary flow at different reperfusion time stages. Furthermore, STS significantly decreased the rate of apoptotic cells (15.11%±3.71% in STS group vs 38.21%±7.83% in NS group), and reduced caspase-3 activity to nearly a quarter of that in NS group. Moreover, STS significantly increased the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream target FOXO3A, and decreased the expression of pro-apoptotic gene Bim. Co-treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (40 mg/kg) partially countered the protective effects induced by STS treatment. In isolated cardiomyocytes, STS exerted similar protective effects as shown in the ex vivo I/R model. Conclusion: STS pretreatment reduces infarct size and improves cardiac function in an I/R-induced rat myocardial injury model via activation of Akt/FOXO3A/Bim-mediated signal pathway. PMID:24077633

  3. Rapid Healing of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by High-Frequency Electrocauterization and Hydrogel Wound Care with or without DAC N-055: A Randomized Controlled Phase IIa Trial in Kabul

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Reto; Wentker, Pia; Mahfuz, Farouq; Stahl, Hans-Christian; Amin, Faquir Mohammad; Bogdan, Christian; Stahl, Kurt-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) due to Leishmania (L.) tropica infection is a chronic, frequently disfiguring skin disease with limited therapeutic options. In endemic countries healing of ulcerative lesions is often delayed by bacterial and/or fungal infections. Here, we studied a novel therapeutic concept to prevent superinfections, accelerate wound closure, and improve the cosmetic outcome of ACL. Methodology/Principal Findings From 2004 to 2008 we performed a two-armed, randomized, double-blinded, phase IIa trial in Kabul, Afghanistan, with patients suffering from L. tropica CL. The skin lesions were treated with bipolar high-frequency electrocauterization (EC) followed by daily moist-wound-treatment (MWT) with polyacrylate hydrogel with (group I) or without (group II) pharmaceutical sodium chlorite (DAC N-055). Patients below age 5, with facial lesions, pregnancy, or serious comorbidities were excluded. The primary, photodocumented outcome was the time needed for complete lesion epithelialization. Biopsies for parasitological and (immuno)histopathological analyses were taken prior to EC (1st), after wound closure (2nd) and after 6 months (3rd). The mean duration for complete wound closure was short and indifferent in group I (59 patients, 43.1 d) and II (54 patients, 42 d; p = 0.83). In patients with Leishmania-positive 2nd biopsies DAC N-055 caused a more rapid wound epithelialization (37.2 d vs. 58.3 d; p = 0.08). Superinfections occurred in both groups at the same rate (8.8%). Except for one patient, reulcerations (10.2% in group I, 18.5% in group II; p = 0.158) were confined to cases with persistent high parasite loads after healing. In vitro, DAC N-055 showed a leishmanicidal effect on pro- and amastigotes. Conclusions/Significance Compared to previous results with intralesional antimony injections, the EC plus MWT protocol led to more rapid wound closure. The tentatively lower rate of relapses and the acceleration of

  4. Medical and experimental mammalian genetics: A perspective

    SciTech Connect

    McKusick, V.A.; Roderick, T.H.; Mori, J.; Paul, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Organization of Mammalian Chromosomes: Normal and Abnormal; Globin Gene Structure and the Nature of Mutation; Retroviral DNA Content of the Mouse Genome; Maternal Genes: Mitochondrial Diseases; Human Evolution; and Prospects for Gene Replacement Therapy.

  5. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research. PMID:24670764

  6. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Zhu, Jiapeng; Hirst, Judy

    2014-11-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The 14 conserved 'core' subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 'supernumerary' subunits are unknown. Here we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we considerably advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases.

  7. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The fourteen conserved ‘core’ subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 ‘supernumerary’ subunits are unknown. Here, we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we significantly advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases. PMID:25209663

  8. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  9. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  10. Structure of mammalian respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), one of the largest membrane-bound enzymes in the cell, powers ATP synthesis in mammalian mitochondria by using the reducing potential of NADH to drive protons across the inner membrane. Mammalian complex I1 contains 45 subunits, comprising 14 core subunits that house the catalytic machinery and are conserved from bacteria to humans, and a mammalian-specific cohort of 31 supernumerary subunits1,2. Knowledge about the structures and functions of the supernumerary subunits is fragmentary. Here, we describe a 4.2 Å resolution single-particle cryoEM structure of complex I from Bos taurus. We locate and model all 45 subunits to provide the entire structure of the mammalian complex. Furthermore, computational sorting of the particles identified different structural classes, related by subtle domain movements, which reveal conformationally-dynamic regions and match biochemical descriptions of the ‘active-to-deactive’ enzyme transition that occurs during hypoxia3,4. Thus, our structures provide a foundation for understanding complex I assembly5 and the effects of mutations that cause clinically-relevant complex I dysfunctions6, insights into the structural and functional roles of the supernumerary subunits, and new information on the mechanism and regulation of catalysis. PMID:27509854

  11. Ticks Take Cues from Mammalian Interferon.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Aravinda M

    2016-07-13

    Interferons are considered a first line of immune defense restricted to vertebrates. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Smith et al. (2016) demonstrate that mammalian interferon γ activates an antimicrobial response within ticks feeding on blood. The study suggests that arthropods have a parallel interferon-like defense system.

  12. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J; Meehan, Terrence F; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A; Ishizu, Yuri; Young, Robert S; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M; Arakawa, Takahiro; Archer, John A C; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Rennie, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S B; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Favorov, Alexander V; Fisher, Malcolm E; Frith, Martin C; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furino, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Gibson, Andrew P; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Hofmann, Oliver M; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Furni; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S; Kenna, Tony J; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S Peter; Knox, Alan J; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; de Lima Morais, David A; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Noma, Shohei; Noazaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohimiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G D; Rackham, Owen J L; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaai; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoko; Swoboda, Rolf K; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyodo, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Elvind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M; Verado, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A; Winteringham, Louise N; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Susan E; Zhang, Peter G; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B; Taylor, Martin S; Makeev, Vsevolod J; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-03-27

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly 'housekeeping', whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research.

  13. CORUM: the comprehensive resource of mammalian protein complexes—2009

    PubMed Central

    Ruepp, Andreas; Waegele, Brigitte; Lechner, Martin; Brauner, Barbara; Dunger-Kaltenbach, Irmtraud; Fobo, Gisela; Frishman, Goar; Montrone, Corinna; Mewes, H.-Werner

    2010-01-01

    CORUM is a database that provides a manually curated repository of experimentally characterized protein complexes from mammalian organisms, mainly human (64%), mouse (16%) and rat (12%). Protein complexes are key molecular entities that integrate multiple gene products to perform cellular functions. The new CORUM 2.0 release encompasses 2837 protein complexes offering the largest and most comprehensive publicly available dataset of mammalian protein complexes. The CORUM dataset is built from 3198 different genes, representing ∼16% of the protein coding genes in humans. Each protein complex is described by a protein complex name, subunit composition, function as well as the literature reference that characterizes the respective protein complex. Recent developments include mapping of functional annotation to Gene Ontology terms as well as cross-references to Entrez Gene identifiers. In addition, a ‘Phylogenetic Conservation’ analysis tool was implemented that analyses the potential occurrence of orthologous protein complex subunits in mammals and other selected groups of organisms. This allows one to predict the occurrence of protein complexes in different phylogenetic groups. CORUM is freely accessible at (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/genre/proj/corum/index.html). PMID:19884131

  14. Masculinization of the Mammalian Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) differ between the sexes in humans, rhesus and marmoset monkeys, and sheep. OAEs also are different in a number of special populations of humans. Those basic findings are reviewed and discussed in the context of possible prenatal androgen effects on the auditory system. A parsimonious explanation for several outcomes is that prenatal exposure to high levels of androgens can weaken the cochlear amplifiers and thereby weaken otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Prenatal androgen exposure apparently also can alter auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). Some non-hormonal factors possibly capable of producing sex and group differences are discussed, and some speculations are offered about specific cochlear structures that might differ between the two sexes. PMID:19272340

  15. IIaO ultraviolet and nuclear emulsion films responses to orbital flights on STS-3, STS-7, STS-8, and STS-40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, K. A.; Blake, S. M.; Bailey, Y.; Johnson, D.; Robancho, S.; Stober, A.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of film were flown on STS-40 space shuttle mission in June 1991. The IIaO special purpose ultraviolet film showed continued desensitization because of various thermal and cosmic ray interactions. The films were exposed to the space orbital environment for 9 days. There were several built-in launch pad delays of the shuttle mission. However, there was adequate monitoring of the temperature variations on board the shuttle that allowed for adequate knowledge of the thermal film history. This IIaO film was flown on the ASTRO I mission and is currently slated for use with the ASTRO II mission. A 50 micron thick IIIford Nuclear emulsion film was also placed on a 175 micron polyester base. The exposure to space produced several cosmic ray interactions that were analyzed and measured using Digital Image Processing techniques. This same nuclear emulsion film was flown on STS-8 and produced a similar number of cosmic ray and thermal interactions. From previous experiments of film using various laboratory electromagnetic radiation sources (e.g., alpha, beta, and neutron particles), we have been able to infer the possible oribtal interactions of both IIaO and nuclear emulsion films. The characteristic responses of IIaO on STS-40 compared favorably to the results obtained from previous STS-7 and STS-8 gas can experiments. The results indicate sufficient evidence correlating increased density on the film with possible cosmic ray, thermal and shuttle out gassing interactions.

  16. Nitric oxide determines mesodermic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by activating class IIa histone deacetylases: potential therapeutic implications in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Spallotta, Francesco; Rosati, Jessica; Straino, Stefania; Nanni, Simona; Grasselli, Annalisa; Ambrosino, Valeria; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Farsetti, Antonella; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo; Illi, Barbara

    2010-03-31

    In human endothelial cells, nitric oxide (NO) results in class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) activation and marked histone deacetylation. It is unknown whether similar epigenetic events occur in embryonic stem cells (ESC) exposed to NO and how this treatment could influence ESC therapeutic potential during tissue regeneration.This study reports that the NO-dependent class IIa HDACs subcellular localization and activity decreases the global acetylation level of H3 histones in ESC and that this phenomenon is associated with the inhibition of Oct4, Nanog, and KLF4 expression. Further, a NO-induced formation of macromolecular complexes including HDAC3, 4, 7, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) have been detected. These processes correlated with the expression of the mesodermal-specific protein brachyury (Bry) and the appearance of several vascular and skeletal muscle differentiation markers. These events were abolished by the class IIa-specific inhibitor MC1568 and by HDAC4 or HDAC7 short interfering RNA (siRNA). The ability of NO to induce mesodermic/cardiovascular gene expression prompted us to evaluate the regenerative potential of these cells in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We found that NO-treated ESCs injected into the cardiac left ventricle selectively localized in the ischemic hindlimb and contributed to the regeneration of muscular and vascular structures. These findings establish a key role for NO and class IIa HDACs modulation in ESC mesodermal commitment and enhanced regenerative potential in vivo.

  17. 30 CFR 57.22205 - Doors on main fans (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Doors on main fans (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22205 Doors on... installation shall be equipped with noncombustible doors. Such doors shall automatically close to prevent...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22205 - Doors on main fans (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Doors on main fans (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22205 Doors on... installation shall be equipped with noncombustible doors. Such doors shall automatically close to prevent...

  19. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America. Part IIa: The Northern Plains. Occasional Publications in Anthropology, Ethnology Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    Part IIa of a series of publications consisting of American Indian tribal governmental documents, this volume contains charters, constitutions, and by-laws of Indian tribes in the Northern Plains (Montana and North Dakota). Documents are presented relative to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation, the Blackfeet Tribe of the…

  20. Activated T cell trans-endothelial migration relies on myosin-IIA contractility for squeezing the cell nucleus through endothelial cell barriers.

    PubMed

    Jacobelli, Jordan; Estin Matthews, Miriam; Chen, Stephanie; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Following activation, T cells are released from lymph nodes to traffic via the blood to effector sites. The re-entry of these activated T cells into tissues represents a critical step for them to carry out local effector functions. Here we have assessed defects in effector T cells that are acutely depleted in Myosin-IIA (MyoIIA) and show a T cell intrinsic requirement for this motor to facilitate the diapedesis step of extravasation. We show that MyoIIA accumulates at the rear of T cells undergoing trans-endothelial migration. T cells can extend protrusions and project a substantial portion of their cytoplasm through the endothelial wall in the absence of MyoIIA. However, this motor protein plays a crucial role in allowing T cells to complete the movement of their relatively rigid nucleus through the endothelial junctions. In vivo, this defect manifests as poor entry into lymph nodes, tumors and into the spinal cord, during tissue-specific autoimmunity, but not the spleen. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of this molecule may allow for differential attenuation of tissue-specific inflammatory responses.

  1. Evaluation of heat-labile enterotoxins type IIa and type IIb in the pathogenicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli for neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (LT-II) have been reported in Escherichia coli isolates from humans, animals, food and water samples. The roles of the antigenically distinguishable LT-IIa and LT-IIb subtypes in pathogenesis and virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) have not been previously re...

  2. Implementation of Title I and Title II-A Program Initiatives: Results from 2013-14. Executive Summary. NCEE 2017-4015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troppe, Patricia; Milanowski, Anthony T.; Heid, Camilla; Gill, Brian; Ross, Christine

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the implementation of policies and initiatives supported by Title I and Title II-A of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) during the 2013-14 school year. Title I is one of the U.S. Department of Education's largest programs, accounting for $15 billion in the 2016 federal budget. Historically, Title I has…

  3. A phylogenetic foundation for comparative mammalian genomics.

    PubMed

    Waddell, P J; Kishino, H; Ota, R

    2001-01-01

    A major effort is being undertaken to sequence an array of mammalian genomes. Coincidentally, the evolutionary relationships of the 18 presently recognized orders of placental mammals are only just being resolved. In this work we construct and analyse the largest alignments of amino acid sequence data to date. Our findings allow us to set up a series of superordinal groups (clades) to act as prior hypotheses for further testing. Important findings include strong evidence for a clade of Euarchonta+Glires (=Supraprimates) comprised of primates, flying lemurs, tree shrews, lagomorphs and rodents. In addition, there is good evidence for a clade of all placental mammals except Xenarthra and Afrotheria (=Boreotheria) and for the previously recognised clades Laurasiatheria, Scrotifera, Fereuungulata, Ferae, Afrotheria, Euarchonta, Glires, and Eulipotyphla. Accordingly, a revised classification of the placental mammals is put forward. Using this and molecular divergence-time methods, the ages of the superordinal splits are estimated. While results are strongly consistent with the earliest superordinal divergences all being >65 mybp (Cretaceous period), they suffer from greater uncertainty than presently appreciated. The early primate split of tarsiers from the anthropoid lineage at ~55 mybp is seen to be an especially informative fossil calibration point. A statistical framework for testing clades using SINE data is presented and reveals significant support for the tarsier/anthropoid clade, as well as the clades Cetruminantia and Whippomorpha. Results also underline our thesis that while sequence analysis can help set up hypothesised clades, SINEs obtainable from sequencing 1-2 MB regions of placental genomes are essential to testing them. In contrast, derivations suggest that empirical Bayesian methods for sequence data may not be robust estimators of clades. Our findings, including the study of genes such as TP53, make a good case for the tree shrew as a closer relative

  4. Soft x-ray measurements using photoconductive type-IIa and single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond detectors.

    PubMed

    Moore, A S; Bentley, C D; Foster, J M; Goedhart, G; Graham, P; Taylor, M J; Hellewell, E

    2008-10-01

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) are routinely used alongside vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs) to provide an alternative x-ray flux measurement at laser facilities such as HELEN at AWE Aldermaston, UK, and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To evaluate diamond PCDs as an alternative to XRD arrays, calibration measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory are used to accurately calculate the x-ray flux from a laser-heated target. This is compared to a flux measurement using the Dante XRD diagnostic. Estimates indicate that the photoinduced conductivity from measurements made at Omega are too large, and calculations using the radiometric calibrations made at the NSLS agree with this hypothesis. High-purity, single-crystal, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond samples are compared to natural type-IIa PCDs and show promising high resistivity effects, the corollary of which preliminary results show is a slower response time.

  5. Labeling proteins on live mammalian cells using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nikić, Ivana; Kang, Jun Hee; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-05-01

    We describe a protocol for the rapid labeling of cell-surface proteins in living mammalian cells using click chemistry. The labeling method is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and strain-promoted inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC) reactions, in which noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) bearing ring-strained alkynes or alkenes react, respectively, with dyes containing azide or tetrazine groups. To introduce ncAAs site specifically into a protein of interest (POI), we use genetic code expansion technology. The protocol can be described as comprising two steps. In the first step, an Amber stop codon is introduced--by site-directed mutagenesis--at the desired site on the gene encoding the POI. This plasmid is then transfected into mammalian cells, along with another plasmid that encodes an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA (RS/tRNA) pair that is orthogonal to the host's translational machinery. In the presence of the ncAA, the orthogonal RS/tRNA pair specifically suppresses the Amber codon by incorporating the ncAA into the polypeptide chain of the POI. In the second step, the expressed POI is labeled with a suitably reactive dye derivative that is directly supplied to the growth medium. We provide a detailed protocol for using commercially available ncAAs and dyes for labeling the insulin receptor, and we discuss the optimal surface-labeling conditions and the limitations of labeling living mammalian cells. The protocol involves an initial cloning step that can take 4-7 d, followed by the described transfections and labeling reaction steps, which can take 3-4 d.

  6. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Daito, Takuji; Oshida, Tatsuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Jern, Patric; Gojobori, Takashi; Coffin, John M; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2010-01-07

    Retroviruses are the only group of viruses known to have left a fossil record, in the form of endogenous proviruses, and approximately 8% of the human genome is made up of these elements. Although many other viruses, including non-retroviral RNA viruses, are known to generate DNA forms of their own genomes during replication, none has been found as DNA in the germline of animals. Bornaviruses, a genus of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA virus, are unique among RNA viruses in that they establish persistent infection in the cell nucleus. Here we show that elements homologous to the nucleoprotein (N) gene of bornavirus exist in the genomes of several mammalian species, including humans, non-human primates, rodents and elephants. These sequences have been designated endogenous Borna-like N (EBLN) elements. Some of the primate EBLNs contain an intact open reading frame (ORF) and are expressed as mRNA. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EBLNs seem to have been generated by different insertional events in each specific animal family. Furthermore, the EBLN of a ground squirrel was formed by a recent integration event, whereas those in primates must have been formed more than 40 million years ago. We also show that the N mRNA of a current mammalian bornavirus, Borna disease virus (BDV), can form EBLN-like elements in the genomes of persistently infected cultured cells. Our results provide the first evidence for endogenization of non-retroviral virus-derived elements in mammalian genomes and give novel insights not only into generation of endogenous elements, but also into a role of bornavirus as a source of genetic novelty in its host.

  7. Structural Basis for Catalysis of a Tetrameric Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Ruskseree, Kamolchanok; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D. ); )

    2009-03-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), currently infects one-third of the world's population in its latent form. The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant strains has highlighted the need for new pharmacological targets within M. tuberculosis. The class IIa fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) enzyme from M. tuberculosis (MtFBA) has been proposed as one such target since it is upregulated in latent TB. Since the structure of MtFBA has not been determined and there is little information available on its reaction mechanism, we sought to determine the X-ray structure of MtFBA in complex with its substrates. By lowering the pH of the enzyme in the crystalline state, we were able to determine a series of high-resolution X-ray structures of MtFBA bound to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate at 1.5, 2.1, and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Through these structures, it was discovered that MtFBA belongs to a novel tetrameric class of type IIa FBAs. The molecular details at the interface of the tetramer revealed important information for better predictability of the quaternary structures among the FBAs based on their primary sequences. These X-ray structures also provide interesting and new details on the reaction mechanism of class II FBAs. Substrates and products were observed in geometries poised for catalysis; in addition, unexpectedly, the hydroxyl-enolate intermediate of dihydroxyacetone phosphate was also captured and resolved structurally. These concise new details offer a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms for FBAs in general and provide a structural basis for inhibitor design efforts aimed at this class of enzymes.

  8. Application of phenol red as a marker ligand for bilirubin binding site at subdomain IIA on human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sochacka, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The drug-bilirubin interaction for all drugs administered especially to infants with hyperbilirubinemia should be evaluated for their ability to displace bilirubin and vice versa. In order to examine whether phenol red (PhRed) can be used as a marker for bilirubin binding site located in subdomain IIA the interaction between PhRed and human serum albumin (HSA) in buffer solution or in normal and pathological sera solutions with different HSA:bilirubin molar ratio was investigated using absorption/absorption difference spectroscopy and molecular docking method. Six sulfonamides representing the binding site in the subdomain IIA and known to influence the binding of bilirubin were used for the PhRed displacement studies. The absorption spectra for PhRed completely bound to HSA showed significant differences in the spectral characteristic relative to the spectral profile of free PhRed. The intensity of the peak originating from the bivalent anionic form of dye was strongly reduced and the maximum peak position was red-shifted by 12 nm. The binding constant (K) of the bivalent anionic form of PhRed, calculated from absorbance data, was 1.61 · 10(4) L mol(-1). The variations of the absorption and absorption difference spectra of PhRed in the presence of HSA-bilirubin complex were indicative of the inhibition of PhRed binding process by bilirubin. Binding of PhRed carried out in the presence of sulfonamides showed that drugs and PhRed have a common site which also involves bilirubin. In agreement with the results of the spectroscopic analysis and molecular docking it was concluded that PhRed may be applied as a marker in the study of the binding of drugs to high-affinity bilirubin binding site.

  9. Nuclear Proteins Hijacked by Mammalian Cytoplasmic Plus Strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  10. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Richard E

    2015-05-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups.

  11. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  12. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  13. The correlation of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract-induced regulation of osteoclastogenesis with the amount of components tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, cryptotanshinone, and dihydrotanshinone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Kyung; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Hae-Won; Park, Hyung-Rae; Kim, Hyun-Nam; Jung, Yeon-Kwan; Choi, Je-Yong; Chae, Soo-Wan; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2008-01-01

    Tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, cryptotanshinone, and dihydrotanshinone are compounds that have been isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM), which is also known as "Danshen." The SM extract has been used successfully in China for treating postmenopausal syndrome. Furthermore, it was previously reported that SM had inhibitory effect on osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats. Another study reported that the four components, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, cryptotanshinone, and dihydrotanshinone, prevented osteoclast function in an in vitro system. However, there are no reports of a correlation between SM and its components on osteoporosis and osteoclast function. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of SM on osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast differentiation, which are two important markers of the bone physiology. Through a rapid, sensitive and specific isocratic liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of four diterpenoids, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, cryptotanshinone, and dihydrotanshinone in SM, the authors tried to correlate the amount of tanshinone compounds in SM into the antiosteoclast activity. The SM fraction (methanol and ethanol isolated) with a low concentration of tanshinone IIA (1 mug/mL) had no effect on the alkaline phosphotase activity (osteoblast differentiation), but completely inhibited osteoclastogenesis. Although the tanshinone compound itself showed similar effects, the concentrations of commercially available tanshinone (diterpenoids, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, cryptotanshinone, and dihydrotanshinone) needed for antiosteoclast activity was almost 1000 times more than that of tanshinone in SM fraction. This suggests that there are other unknown compounds in the SM extract that have a synergistic effect with tanshinone. These results also suggest that tanshinone can be a good marker compound to explain the antiosteoporotic function of SM.

  14. Qualitative detection of class IIa bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria from traditional Chinese fermented food using a YGNGV-motif-based assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenli; Zhang, Lanwei; Yi, Huaxi; Shi, John; Xue, Chaohui; Li, Hongbo; Jiao, Yuehua; Shigwedha, Nditange; Du, Ming; Han, Xue

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, a YGNGV-motif-based assay was developed and applied. Given that there is an increasing demand for natural preservatives, we set out to obtain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that produce bacteriocins against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We here isolated 123 LAB strains from 5 types of traditional Chinese fermented food and screened them for the production of bacteriocins using the agar well diffusion assay (AWDA). Then, to acquire LAB producing class IIa bacteriocins, we used a YGNGV-motif-based assay that was based on 14 degenerate primers matching all class IIa bacteriocin-encoding genes currently deposited in NCBI. Eight of the LAB strains identified by AWDA could inhibit Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; 5 of these were YGNGV-amplicon positive. Among these 5 isolates, amplicons from 2 strains (Y31 and Y33) matched class IIa bacteriocin genes. Strain Y31 demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity and the best match to a class IIa bacteriocin gene in NCBI, and was identified as Enterococcus faecium. The bacteriocin from Enterococcus avium Y33 was 100% identical to enterocin P. Both of these strains produced bacteriocins with strong antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis, hence these bacteriocins hold promise as potential bio-preservatives in the food industry. These findings also indicated that the YGNGV-motif-based assay used in this study could identify novel class IIa bacteriocinogenic LAB, rapidly and specifically, saving time and labour by by-passing multiple separation and purification steps.

  15. Inhibition of Tanshinone IIA, salvianolic acid A and salvianolic acid B on Areca nut extract-induced oral submucous fibrosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Dan-Xia; Sheng, Jiang-Tao; Chen, Xiao-Xuan; Li, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Ge-Fei; Li, Kang-Sheng; Su, Yun

    2015-04-15

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge has been reported to possess excellent antifibrotic activity. In this study, we have investigated the effect and mechanism of tanshinone IIA (Tan-IIA), salvianolic acid A (Sal-A) and salvianolic acid B (Sal-B), the important active compounds of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, on areca nut extract (ANE)-induced oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) in vitro. Through human procollagen gene promoter luciferase reporter plasmid assay, hydroxyproline assay, gelatin zymography assay, qRT-PCR, ELISA and Western blot assay, the influence of these three compounds on ANE-stimulated cell viability, collagen accumulation, procollagen gene transcription, MMP-2/-9 activity, MMP-1/-13 and TIMP-1/-2 expression, cytokine secretion and the activation of PI3K/AKT, ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK and TGF-β/Smads pathways were detected. The results showed that Tan-IIA, Sal-A and Sal-B could significantly inhibit the ANE-stimulated abnormal viability and collagen accumulation of mice oral mucosal fibroblasts (MOMFs), inhibit the transcription of procollagen gene COL1A1 and COL3A1, increase MMP-2/-9 activity, decrease TIMP-1/-2 expression and inhibit the transcription and release of CTGF, TGF-β1, IL-6 and TNF-α; Tan-IIA, Sal-A and Sal-B also inhibited the ANE-induced activation of AKT and ERK MAPK pathways in MOMFs and the activation of TGF-β/Smads pathway in HaCaT cells. In conclusion, Tan-IIA, Sal-A and Sal-B possess excellent antifibrotic activity in vitro and can possibly be used to promote the rehabilitation of OSF patients.

  16. High-throughput cell-based compound screen identifies pinosylvin methyl ether and tanshinone IIA as inhibitors of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ketola, Kirsi; Viitala, Miro; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Culig, Zoran; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are limited. In this study, a high-throughput screen of 4910 drugs and drug-like molecules was performed to identify antiproliferative compounds in androgen ablated prostate cancer cells. The effect of compounds on cell viability was compared in androgen ablated LNCaP prostate cancer cells and in LNCaP cells grown in presence of androgens as well as in two non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1 and EP156T). Validation experiments of cancer specific anti-proliferative compounds indicated pinosylvin methyl ether (PSME) and tanshinone IIA as potent inhibitors of androgen ablated LNCaP cell proliferation. PSME is a stilbene compound with no previously described anti-neoplastic activity whereas tanshinone IIA is currently used in cardiovascular disorders and proposed as a cancer drug. To gain insights into growth inhibitory mechanisms in CRPC, genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed in PSME- and tanshinone IIA-exposed cells. Both compounds altered the expression of genes involved in cell cycle and steroid and cholesterol biosynthesis in androgen ablated LNCaP cells. Decrease in androgen signalling was confirmed by reduced expression of androgen receptor and prostate specific antigen in PSME- or tanshinone IIA-exposed cells. Taken together, this systematic screen identified a novel anti-proliferative agent, PSME, for CRPC. Moreover, our screen confirmed tanshinone IIA as well as several other compounds as potential prostate cancer growth inhibitors also in androgen ablated prostate cancer cells. These results provide valuable starting points for preclinical and clinical studies for CRPC treatment. PMID:27891324

  17. The effect of ubiquinone and combined antioxidant therapy on oxidative stress markers in non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy: A phase IIa, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carrizalez, Adolfo Daniel; Castellanos-González, José Alberto; Martínez-Romero, Esaú César; Miller-Arrevillaga, Guillermo; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín Paul; Román-Pintos, Luis Miguel; Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) and combined antioxidant therapy (CAT) on oxidative stress markers in non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) under clinical management. Study design In a randomized, double-blind, phase IIa, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, three study groups were formed and administered medications as follows: Group 1, Coenzyme Q10; Group 2, CAT; and Group 3, placebo. Methods Serum levels of the products of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitrites/nitrates, as markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress, were measured. As antioxidants, the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), catalase activity, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were measured. Results Baseline serum levels of LPO and nitrites/nitrates were significantly elevated in the three groups vs. healthy group (P < 0.0001), while final levels in the Coenzyme Q10 and CAT groups were decreased vs. normal levels (P < 0.0001). The baseline TAC was consumed in the three groups (P < 0.0001), while final results in the Coenzyme Q10 and CAT groups improved (P < 0.0001). Baseline catalase activity was increased in all groups vs. normal values (P < 0.001), while final levels in the Coenzyme Q10 (P < 0.001) and CAT groups (P < 0.0001) were decreased. GPx behaved similarly to catalase and improved in the final results (P < 0.0001). Discussion Adjunctive antioxidant treatment for 6 months was effective and safe for improving the oxidative stress in NPDR.

  18. Genetic identification of mammalian meal source in dung beetle gut contents.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Andrés; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis

    2016-03-12

    Coprophagous dung beetles are a numerically and functionally important group. Their obligatory use of mammalian dung has broad ecological implications, including providing economically and epidemiologically relevant ecosystem services. Beetle-mammal ecological networks are critically important in determining the resilience of dung beetle communities and the supply of beetle-mediated ecosystem functions. However, our understanding of dung beetle trophic networks remains incomplete. Here we report on a pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of DNA-based analyses in identifying the source of dung beetle meals. Using beetles collected from dung piles of known provenance, we hypothesized that molecular analysis of gut content would correctly identify the mammal host, and that beetle body size would increase the odds of successful detection of mammalian DNA. We analyzed 90 specimens belonging to six beetle species. Most samples yielded mtDNA sequences from the expected mammalian species, suggesting that these methods can be an efficient tool for the investigation of dung beetle diet.

  19. A new developmental mechanism for the separation of the mammalian middle ear ossicles from the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Daniel J.; Anthwal, Neal; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Maier, Jennifer A.; Sadier, Alexa

    2017-01-01

    Multiple mammalian lineages independently evolved a definitive mammalian middle ear (DMME) through breakdown of Meckel's cartilage (MC). However, the cellular and molecular drivers of this evolutionary transition remain unknown for most mammal groups. Here, we identify such drivers in the living marsupial opossum Monodelphis domestica, whose MC transformation during development anatomically mirrors the evolutionary transformation observed in fossils. Specifically, we link increases in cellular apoptosis and TGF-BR2 signalling to MC breakdown in opossums. We demonstrate that a simple change in TGF-β signalling is sufficient to inhibit MC breakdown during opossum development, indicating that changes in TGF-β signalling might be key during mammalian evolution. Furthermore, the apoptosis that we observe during opossum MC breakdown does not seemingly occur in mouse, consistent with homoplastic DMME evolution in the marsupial and placental lineages. PMID:28179517

  20. Potassium transport in the mammalian collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Muto, S

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian collecting duct plays a dominant role in regulating K(+) excretion by the nephron. The collecting duct exhibits axial and intrasegmental cell heterogeneity and is composed of at least two cell types: collecting duct cells (principal cells) and intercalated cells. Under normal circumstances, the collecting duct cell in the cortical collecting duct secretes K(+), whereas under K(+) depletion, the intercalated cell reabsorbs K(+). Assessment of the electrochemical driving forces and of membrane conductances for transcellular and paracellular electrolyte movement, the characterization of several ATPases, patch-clamp investigation, and cloning of the K(+) channel have provided important insights into the role of pumps and channels in those tubule cells that regulate K(+) secretion and reabsorption. This review summarizes K(+) transport properties in the mammalian collecting duct. Special emphasis is given to the mechanisms of how K(+) transport is regulated in the collecting duct.

  1. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  2. Synaptic Release at Mammalian Bipolar Cell Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qun-Fang; Heidelberger, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar cells play a vital role in the transfer of visual information across the vertebrate retina. The synaptic output of these neurons is regulated by factors that are extrinsic and intrinsic. Relatively little is known about the intrinsic factors that regulate neurotransmitter exocytosis. Much of what we know about intrinsic presynaptic mechanisms that regulate glutamate release has come from the study of the unusually large and accessible synaptic terminal of the goldfish rod-dominant bipolar cell, the Mb1 bipolar cell. However, over the past several years, examination of presynaptic mechanisms governing neurotransmitter release has been extended to the mammalian rod bipolar cell. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of synaptic vesicle dynamics and neurotransmitter release in rodent rod bipolar cells and consider how these properties help shape the synaptic output of the mammalian retina. PMID:21272392

  3. Mammalian lipoxygenases and their biological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Hartmut; Banthiya, Swathi; van Leyen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) form a heterogeneous class of lipid peroxidizing enzymes, which have been implicated in cell proliferation and differentiation but also in the pathogenesis of various diseases with major public health relevance. As other fatty acid dioxygenases LOX oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids to their corresponding hydroperoxy derivatives, which are further transformed to bioactive lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related substances). On the other hand, lipoxygenases are key players in regulation of the cellular redox homeostasis, which is an important element in gene expression regulation. Although the first mammalian lipoxygenases were discovered 40 years ago and although the enzymes have been well characterized with respect to their structural and functional properties the biological roles of the different lipoxygenase isoforms are not completely understood. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on the physiological roles of different mammalian LOX-isoforms and their patho-physiological function in inflammatory, metabolic, hyperproliferative, neurodegenerative and infectious disorders. PMID:25316652

  4. Lactate Metabolism is Associated with Mammalian Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Jr; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Huang, Xiaojing; Singh, Manmilan; Crawford, Peter A; Johnson, Stephen L.; Gross, Richard W.; Schaefer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that lactate secreted by fermenting cells can be oxidized or used as a gluconeogenic substrate by other cells and tissues. Within the fermenting cell itself, however, it is generally assumed that lactate is produced to replenish NAD+ and then is secreted. Here we explored the possibility that cytosolic lactate is metabolized by the mitochondria of fermenting mammalian cells. We found that fermenting HeLa and H460 cells utilize exogenous lactate carbon to synthesize a large percentage of their lipids. With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that both 13C and 2-2H labels from enriched lactate enter the mitochondria. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inhibitor oxamate decreased respiration of isolated mitochondria incubated in lactate, but not isolated mitochondria incubated in pyruvate. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that LDHB localizes to the mitochondria. Taken together, our results demonstrate a link between lactate metabolism and the mitochondria of fermenting mammalian cells. PMID:27618187

  5. Circadian aspects of mammalian parturition: a review.

    PubMed

    Olcese, James

    2012-02-05

    The identification of circadian clocks in endocrine tissues has added considerable depth and complexity to our understanding of their physiology. A growing body of research reveals circadian clock gene expression in the uterus of non-pregnant and pregnant rodents. This review will focus on the mammalian uterus and its rhythmicity, particularly as it pertains to the circadian timing of parturition. This key event in the reproductive axis shows dramatic species-specific differences in its circadian phase. It is proposed here that these differences in the phasing of mammalian parturition are likely a function of opposite uterine cell responses to humoral cues. The argument will be made that melatonin fulfills many of the criteria to serve as a circadian signal in the initiation of human parturition, including specific actions on uterine smooth muscle cells that are consistent with a role for this hormone in the circadian timing of parturition.

  6. Ricin trafficking in plant and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lord, J Michael; Spooner, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    Ricin is a heterodimeric plant protein that is potently toxic to mammalian and many other eukaryotic cells. It is synthesized and stored in the endosperm cells of maturing Ricinus communis seeds (castor beans). The ricin family has two major members, both, lectins, collectively known as Ricinus communis agglutinin ll (ricin) and Ricinus communis agglutinin l (RCA). These proteins are stored in vacuoles within the endosperm cells of mature Ricinus seeds and they are rapidly broken down by hydrolysis during the early stages of post-germinative growth. Both ricin and RCA traffic within the plant cell from their site of synthesis to the storage vacuoles, and when they intoxicate mammalian cells they traffic from outside the cell to their site of action. In this review we will consider both of these trafficking routes.

  7. Adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus: Why the dentate gyrus?

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity after the perinatal period suggests that unique aspects of the structure and function of DG and olfactory bulb circuits allow them to benefit from the adult generation of neurons. In this review, we consider the distinctive features of the DG that may account for it being able to profit from this singular form of neural plasticity. Approaches to the problem of neurogenesis are grouped as “bottom-up,” where the phenotype of adult-born granule cells is contrasted to that of mature developmentally born granule cells, and “top-down,” where the impact of altering the amount of neurogenesis on behavior is examined. We end by considering the primary implications of these two approaches and future directions. PMID:24255101

  8. The mammalian molybdenum enzymes of mARC.

    PubMed

    Ott, Gudrun; Havemeyer, Antje; Clement, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The "mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component" (mARC) is the most recently discovered molybdenum-containing enzyme in mammals. All mammalian genomes studied to date contain two mARC genes: MARC1 and MARC2. The proteins encoded by these genes are mARC-1 and mARC-2 and represent the simplest form of eukaryotic molybdenum enzymes, only binding the molybdenum cofactor. In the presence of NADH, mARC proteins exert N-reductive activity together with the two electron transport proteins cytochrome b5 type B and NADH cytochrome b5 reductase. This enzyme system is capable of reducing a great variety of N-hydroxylated substrates. It plays a decisive role in the activation of prodrugs containing an amidoxime structure, and in detoxification pathways, e.g., of N-hydroxylated purine and pyrimidine bases. It belongs to a group of drug metabolism enzymes, in particular as a counterpart of P450 formed N-oxygenated metabolites. Its physiological relevance, on the other hand, is largely unknown. The aim of this article is to summarize our current knowledge of these proteins with a special focus on the mammalian enzymes and their N-reductive activity.

  9. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  10. Evolutionary aspects of reptilian and mammalian enamel structure.

    PubMed

    Sahni, A

    1987-12-01

    The evolution of enamel structure is dealt with here on the basis of fossil reptiles and mammals ranging from the Triassic to the present. The evidence suggests that prismatic enamel had developed in some therapsid reptiles and the mammal, Eozostrodon about 180 million years ago. For the next 100 million years, mammalian evolutionary history is sparingly documented and this is reflected in the poor record of enamel evolution during this period. The few Jurassic reptiles and mammals studied suggest a preprismatic structure. In the Late Cretaceous (80 to 65 million years ago) when the fossil record improves, mammalian enamel investigated from North American localities, are found to be prismatic; allotherian (multituberculate) and metatherian (marsupial) enamels are usually tubular, while eutherian (placental) ones are not. Prism structure in Tertiary mammals in general, conforms to that of their present day descendants, but there are discernible exceptions. The record of evolutionary change in Tertiary mammals is obscured by functional modifications related to biomechanical stresses. Enamel structure may be secondarily modified; similar in phylogenetically unrelated groups (eg., pauciserial enamel of early rodents) or dissimilar at the intra-familial level (eg., rodent families Ctenodactylidae and Ischryomyicae). Prismatic enamel is recorded from the tooth of a hatchling of the gavial, Gavialis gangeticus.

  11. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  12. Structure and function of mammalian cilia.

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren T

    2008-06-01

    In the past half century, beginning with electron microscopic studies of 9 + 2 motile and 9 + 0 primary cilia, novel insights have been obtained regarding the structure and function of mammalian cilia. All cilia can now be viewed as sensory cellular antennae that coordinate a large number of cellular signaling pathways, sometimes coupling the signaling to ciliary motility or alternatively to cell division and differentiation. This view has had unanticipated consequences for our understanding of developmental processes and human disease.

  13. Basic techniques in mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2015-03-02

    Cultured mammalian cells are used extensively in cell biology studies. It requires a number of special skills in order to be able to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of the cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of the Mammalian Cell

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Keith; Rönkkö, Mauno

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding how mammalian cells are regulated epigenetically to express phenotype is a priority. The cellular phenotypic transition, induced by ionising radiation, from a normal cell to the genomic instability phenotype, where the ability to replicate the genotype accurately is compromised, illustrates important features of epigenetic regulation. Based on this phenomenon and earlier work we propose a model to describe the mammalian cell as a self assembled open system operating in an environment that includes its genotype, neighbouring cells and beyond. Phenotype is represented by high dimensional attractors, evolutionarily conditioned for stability and robustness and contingent on rules of engagement between gene products encoded in the genetic network. Methodology/Findings We describe how this system functions and note the indeterminacy and fluidity of its internal workings which place it in the logical reasoning framework of predicative logic. We find that the hypothesis is supported by evidence from cell and molecular biology. Conclusions Epigenetic regulation and memory are fundamentally physical, as opposed to chemical, processes and the transition to genomic instability is an important feature of mammalian cells with probable fundamental relevance to speciation and carcinogenesis. A source of evolutionarily selectable variation, in terms of the rules of engagement between gene products, is seen as more likely to have greater prominence than genetic variation in an evolutionary context. As this epigenetic variation is based on attractor states phenotypic changes are not gradual; a phenotypic transition can involve the changed contribution of several gene products in a single step. PMID:18523589

  15. Some principles of regeneration in mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bruce M

    2005-11-01

    This article presents some general principles underlying regenerative phenomena in vertebrates, starting with the epimorphic regeneration of the amphibian limb and continuing with tissue and organ regeneration in mammals. Epimorphic regeneration following limb amputation involves wound healing, followed shortly by a phase of dedifferentiation that leads to the formation of a regeneration blastema. Up to the point of blastema formation, dedifferentiation is guided by unique regenerative pathways, but the overall developmental controls underlying limb formation from the blastema generally recapitulate those of embryonic limb development. Damaged mammalian tissues do not form a blastema. At the cellular level, differentiation follows a pattern close to that seen in the embryo, but at the level of the tissue and organ, regeneration is strongly influenced by conditions inherent in the local environment. In some mammalian systems, such as the liver, parenchymal cells contribute progeny to the regenerate. In others, e.g., skeletal muscle and bone, tissue-specific progenitor cells constitute the main source of regenerating cells. The substrate on which regeneration occurs plays a very important role in determining the course of regeneration. Epimorphic regeneration usually produces an exact replica of the structure that was lost, but in mammalian tissue regeneration the form of the regenerate is largely determined by the mechanical environment acting on the regenerating tissue, and it is normally an imperfect replica of the original. In organ hypertophy, such as that occurring after hepatic resection, the remaining liver mass enlarges, but there is no attempt to restore the original form.

  16. Comparison of amphibian and mammalian thyroperoxidase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) catalyzes the production of thyroid hormones in the vertebrate thyroid gland by oxidizing iodide (I- ) to produce iodinated tyrosines on thyroglobulin, and further coupling of specific mono- or di-iodinated tyrosines to generate the triiodo- and tetra-iodothyronine, precursors to thyroid hormone. This enzyme is a target for thyroid disrupting chemicals. TPO-inhibition by xenobiotics is a molecular initiating event that is known to perturb the thyroid axis by preventing synthesis of thyroid hormone. Previous work on TPO-inhibition has been focused on mammalian TPO; specifically, the rat and pig. A primary objective of this experiment was to directly measure TPO activity in a non-mammalian system, in this case a thyroid gland homogenate from Xenopus laevis; as well as compare chemical inhibition from past mammalian studies to the amphibian data generated. Thyroid glands obtained from X. laevis tadpoles at NF stages 58-60, were pooled and homogenized by sonication in phosphate buffer. This homogenate was then used to test 24 chemicals for inhibition of TPO as measured by conversion of Amplex UltraRed (AUR) substrate to its fluorescent product. The test chemicals were selected based upon previous results from rat in vitro TPO assays, and X. laevis in vitro and in vivo studies for thyroid disrupting endpoints, and included both positive and negative chemicals in these assays. An initial screening of the chemicals was done at a single high con

  17. MAMMALIAN CELLS CONTAIN A SECOND NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC HEXOSAMINIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Gutternigg, Martin; Rendić, Dubravko; Voglauer, Regina; Iskratsch, Thomas; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2010-01-01

    Some thirty years ago, work on mammalian tissues suggested the presence of two cytosolic hexosaminidases in mammalian cells; one of these has been more recently characterised in recombinant form and has an important role in cellular function due to its ability to cleave β-N-acetylglucosamine residues from a variety of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. However, the molecular nature of the second cytosolic hexosaminidase, named hexosaminidase D, has remained obscure. In the present study, we molecularly characterise for the first time the human and murine recombinant forms of enzymes, encoded by HEXDC genes, which appear to correspond to hexosaminidase D in terms of substrate specificity, pH dependency and temperature stability; furthermore, a myc-tagged form of this novel hexosaminidase displays a nucleocytoplasmic localisation. Transcripts of the corresponding gene are expressed in a number of murine tissues. Based on its sequence, this enzyme represents, along with the lysosomal hexosaminidase subunits encoded by the HEXA and HEXB genes, the third class 20 glycosidase to be found from mammalian sources. PMID:19040401

  18. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Coronaviruses Acts as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Wang, Haiying; Ji, Yanxi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Shan; Huang, Xingyu; Wang, Zidao; Qin, Lei; Tien, Po; Zhou, Xi; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of eukaryotic posttranscriptional gene silencing that functions in antiviral immunity in plants, nematodes, and insects. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi also plays a role in antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells. To combat RNAi-mediated antiviral responses, many viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR) to facilitate their replication. VSRs have been widely studied for plant and insect viruses, but only a few have been defined for mammalian viruses currently. We identified a novel VSR from coronaviruses, a group of medically important mammalian viruses including Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and showed that the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of coronaviruses suppresses RNAi triggered by either short hairpin RNAs or small interfering RNAs in mammalian cells. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is closely related to SARS-CoV in the family Coronaviridae and was used as a coronavirus replication model. The replication of MHV increased when the N proteins were expressed in trans, while knockdown of Dicer1 or Ago2 transcripts facilitated the MHV replication in mammalian cells. These results support the hypothesis that RNAi is a part of the antiviral immunity responses in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE RNAi has been well known to play important antiviral roles from plants to invertebrates. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi is also involved in antiviral response in mammalian cells. An important indication for RNAi-mediated antiviral activity in mammals is the fact that a number of mammalian viruses encode potent suppressors of RNA silencing. Our results demonstrate that coronavirus N protein could function as a VSR through its double-stranded RNA binding activity. Mutational analysis of N protein allowed us to find out the critical residues for the VSR activity. Using the MHV-A59 as the coronavirus replication model, we showed that ectopic expression

  19. Generating mammalian sirtuin tools for protein-interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Kathleen A; Motley, Jonathan; Hirschey, Matthew D; Anderson, Kristin A

    2013-01-01

    The sirtuins are a family of NAD(+)-dependent deacylases with important effects on aging, cancer, and metabolism. Sirtuins exert their biological effects by catalyzing deacetylation and/or deacylation reactions in which Acyl groups are removed from lysine residues of specific proteins. A current challenge is to identify specific sirtuin target proteins against the high background of acetylated proteins recently identified by proteomic surveys. New evidence indicates that bona fide sirtuin substrate proteins form stable physical associations with their sirtuin regulator. Therefore, identification of sirtuin interacting proteins could be a useful aid in focusing the search for substrates. Described here is a method for identifying sirtuin protein interactors. Employing basic techniques of molecular cloning and immunochemistry, the method describes the generation of mammalian sirtuin protein expression plasmids and their use to overexpress and immunoprecipitate sirtuins with their interacting partners. Also described is the use of the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery for interpreting the sirtuin protein-interaction data obtained.

  20. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+) and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin) and storage (myoglobin) and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes) in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis. PMID:26557657

  1. Mammalian Odor Information Recognition by Implanted Microsensor Array in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Dong, Qi; Zhuang, Liujing; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    The mammalian olfactory system has an exquisite capacity to rapidly recognize and discriminate thousands of distinct odors in our environment. Our research group focus on reading information from olfactory bulb circuit of anethetized Sprague-Dawley rat and utilize artificial recognition system for odor discrimination. After being stimulated by three odors with concentration of 10 μM to rat nose, the response of mitral cells in olfactory bulb is recorded by eight channel microwire sensor array. In 20 sessions with 3 animals, we obtained 30 discriminated individual cells recordings. The average firing rates of the cells are Isoamyl acetate 26 Hz, Methoxybenzene 16 Hz, and Rose essential oil 11 Hz. By spike sorting, we detect peaks and analyze the interspike interval distribution. Further more, principal component analysis is applied to reduce the dimensionality of the data sets and classify the response.

  2. The hypocone as a key innovation in mammalian evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J P; Jernvall, J

    1995-01-01

    The hypocone, a cusp added to the primitively triangular upper molar teeth of therian mammals, has evolved convergently > 20 times among mammals during the Cenozoic. Acquisition of the hypocone itself involves little phenotypic change, but subsequent diversification of groups possessing the hypocone may be greatly enhanced. Our analysis of the Cenozoic mammalian radiations, including the Recent fauna, shows that high species diversity of mammals with hypocones and association of the hypocone with herbivory strongly support recognition of the hypocone as a key innovation that has allowed invasion of, and diversification within, herbivorous adaptive zones. In contrast, mammals lacking hypocones show no marked increase in species diversity during the Cenozoic. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479871

  3. Common circuit design in fly and mammalian motion vision.

    PubMed

    Borst, Alexander; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Motion-sensitive neurons have long been studied in both the mammalian retina and the insect optic lobe, yet striking similarities have become obvious only recently. Detailed studies at the circuit level revealed that, in both systems, (i) motion information is extracted from primary visual information in parallel ON and OFF pathways; (ii) in each pathway, the process of elementary motion detection involves the correlation of signals with different temporal dynamics; and (iii) primary motion information from both pathways converges at the next synapse, resulting in four groups of ON-OFF neurons, selective for the four cardinal directions. Given that the last common ancestor of insects and mammals lived about 550 million years ago, this general strategy seems to be a robust solution for how to compute the direction of visual motion with neural hardware.

  4. Insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior of tanshinone IIA in the treatment of Crohn's disease: comparative data for tanshinone IIA and its two glucuronidated metabolites in normal and recurrent colitis models after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Jiang, Chao; Zheng, Xiao; Zhu, Xuanxuan; Yan, Shihai; Wang, Haidan; Fu, Rui; Fan, Hongwei; Chen, Yugen

    2017-01-01

    1. Previous reports implied that tanshinone IIA (TSA) may offer potential benefits for Crohn's disease (CD). However, the detailed pharmacokinetic behavior of TSA in the treatment of colitis remain unclear. Herein, a recurrent trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-colitis mouse model was used to investigate whether TSA possesses favorable pharmacokinetic and colonic distribution profiles to serve as a candidate drug. 2. Although the systemic TSA exposures were low (AUC0-t approximately 330 ng*h/ml) in both the normal and colitis models after oral administration TSA 20 mg/kg, high levels of TSA were found in the gastrointestinal tract (GI). Such a GI exposure of TSA in colitis mice is adequate to exert anti-inflammatory effects as observed in various in vitro studies. 3. Interestingly, colonic TSA exposure in the colitis mouse model was much lower than that in the normal mice, which may be explained by a significant upregulation of colonic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugt)1a9 expression and a higher plasma concentration of TSA glucuronides in the model mice at 0.5, 1 and 2 h after TSA administration. 4. Together, these results reveal high accumulation at the site of inflammation and minimal systemic concentration of TSA, which are favorable pharmacokinetic behaviors to meet the requirements for CD treatment.

  5. Protein and genome evolution in Mammalian cells for biotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Majors, Brian S; Chiang, Gisela G; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    Mutation and selection are the essential steps of evolution. Researchers have long used in vitro mutagenesis, expression, and selection techniques in laboratory bacteria and yeast cultures to evolve proteins with new properties, termed directed evolution. Unfortunately, the nature of mammalian cells makes applying these mutagenesis and whole-organism evolution techniques to mammalian protein expression systems laborious and time consuming. Mammalian evolution systems would be useful to test unique mammalian cell proteins and protein characteristics, such as complex glycosylation. Protein evolution in mammalian cells would allow for generation of novel diagnostic tools and designer polypeptides that can only be tested in a mammalian expression system. Recent advances have shown that mammalian cells of the immune system can be utilized to evolve transgenes during their natural mutagenesis processes, thus creating proteins with unique properties, such as fluorescence. On a more global level, researchers have shown that mutation systems that affect the entire genome of a mammalian cell can give rise to cells with unique phenotypes suitable for commercial processes. This review examines the advances in mammalian cell and protein evolution and the application of this work toward advances in commercial mammalian cell biotechnology.

  6. Mammalian niche conservation through deep time.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Larisa R G; Beavins Tracy, Rachel A; Koontz, Cassandra S; Roseberry, John C; Velasco, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    Climate change alters species distributions, causing plants and animals to move north or to higher elevations with current warming. Bioclimatic models predict species distributions based on extant realized niches and assume niche conservation. Here, we evaluate if proxies for niches (i.e., range areas) are conserved at the family level through deep time, from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. We analyze the occurrence of all mammalian families in the continental USA, calculating range area, percent range area occupied, range area rank, and range polygon centroids during each epoch. Percent range area occupied significantly increases from the Oligocene to the Miocene and again from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene; however, mammalian families maintain statistical concordance between rank orders across time. Families with greater taxonomic diversity occupy a greater percent of available range area during each epoch and net changes in taxonomic diversity are significantly positively related to changes in percent range area occupied from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Furthermore, gains and losses in generic and species diversity are remarkably consistent with ~2.3 species gained per generic increase. Centroids demonstrate southeastern shifts from the Eocene through the Pleistocene that may correspond to major environmental events and/or climate changes during the Cenozoic. These results demonstrate range conservation at the family level and support the idea that niche conservation at higher taxonomic levels operates over deep time and may be controlled by life history traits. Furthermore, families containing megafauna and/or terminal Pleistocene extinction victims do not incur significantly greater declines in range area rank than families containing only smaller taxa and/or only survivors, from the Pliocene to Pleistocene. Collectively, these data evince the resilience of families to climate and/or environmental change in deep time, the absence of terminal Pleistocene

  7. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films: Reciprocity failure and thermal responses of IIaO film at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, K. A.; Gunther, S. O.; Cunningham, L. M.; Wright, D. D.

    1985-04-01

    Reciprocity failure was examined for IIaO spectroscopic film. The results indicate reciprocity failure occurs at three distinct minimum points in time; 15 min, 30 min and 90 min. The results are unique because theory suggests only one minimum reciprocity failure point should occur. When incubating 70mm IIaO film for 15 and 30 min at temperatures of 30, 40, 50, and 60 C and then placing in a liquid nitrogen bath at a temperature of -190 C the film demonstrated an increase of the optical density when developed at a warm-up time of 30 min. Longer warm-up periods of 1, 2 and 3 hrs yield a decrease in optical density of the darker wedge patterns; whereas, shorter warm-up times yield an overall increase in the optical densities.

  8. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films: Reciprocity failure and thermal responses of IIaO film at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, K. A.; Gunther, S. O.; Cunningham, L. M.; Wright, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Reciprocity failure was examined for IIaO spectroscopic film. The results indicate reciprocity failure occurs at three distinct minimum points in time; 15 min, 30 min and 90 min. The results are unique because theory suggests only one minimum reciprocity failure point should occur. When incubating 70mm IIaO film for 15 and 30 min at temperatures of 30, 40, 50, and 60 C and then placing in a liquid nitrogen bath at a temperature of -190 C the film demonstrated an increase of the optical density when developed at a warm-up time of 30 min. Longer warm-up periods of 1, 2 and 3 hrs yield a decrease in optical density of the darker wedge patterns; whereas, shorter warm-up times yield an overall increase in the optical densities.

  9. Genome Editing Using Mammalian Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Takuro; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-01-01

    Haploid cells are useful for studying gene functions because disruption of a single allele can cause loss-of-function phenotypes. Recent success in generating haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in mice, rats, and monkeys provides a new platform for simple genetic manipulation of the mammalian genome. Use of haploid ESCs enhances the genome-editing potential of the CRISPR/Cas system. For example, CRISPR/Cas was used in haploid ESCs to generate multiple knockouts and large deletions at high efficiency. In addition, genome-wide screening is facilitated by haploid cell lines containing gene knockout libraries. PMID:26437403

  10. AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-10

    dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 50 and 100 f.J.g/rnl was used as a 3 TLS Project Nn. A0ŗ-003: AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay promutagen that requires metabolic...Chemical Source Lot No. air Air Products N/A calcium chloride Sigma 84F-0723 d imeth y !sulfoxide Fisher 933274 dimethylnitrosamine Sigma 82B0365...methanesulfonate (EMS) at 150 and 300 J.i-g/ml is used as a direct-acting mutagen for the nonactivated portion, and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 150 and 300

  11. The transcriptional landscape of the mammalian genome.

    PubMed

    Carninci, P; Kasukawa, T; Katayama, S; Gough, J; Frith, M C; Maeda, N; Oyama, R; Ravasi, T; Lenhard, B; Wells, C; Kodzius, R; Shimokawa, K; Bajic, V B; Brenner, S E; Batalov, S; Forrest, A R R; Zavolan, M; Davis, M J; Wilming, L G; Aidinis, V; Allen, J E; Ambesi-Impiombato, A; Apweiler, R; Aturaliya, R N; Bailey, T L; Bansal, M; Baxter, L; Beisel, K W; Bersano, T; Bono, H; Chalk, A M; Chiu, K P; Choudhary, V; Christoffels, A; Clutterbuck, D R; Crowe, M L; Dalla, E; Dalrymple, B P; de Bono, B; Della Gatta, G; di Bernardo, D; Down, T; Engstrom, P; Fagiolini, M; Faulkner, G; Fletcher, C F; Fukushima, T; Furuno, M; Futaki, S; Gariboldi, M; Georgii-Hemming, P; Gingeras, T R; Gojobori, T; Green, R E; Gustincich, S; Harbers, M; Hayashi, Y; Hensch, T K; Hirokawa, N; Hill, D; Huminiecki, L; Iacono, M; Ikeo, K; Iwama, A; Ishikawa, T; Jakt, M; Kanapin, A; Katoh, M; Kawasawa, Y; Kelso, J; Kitamura, H; Kitano, H; Kollias, G; Krishnan, S P T; Kruger, A; Kummerfeld, S K; Kurochkin, I V; Lareau, L F; Lazarevic, D; Lipovich, L; Liu, J; Liuni, S; McWilliam, S; Madan Babu, M; Madera, M; Marchionni, L; Matsuda, H; Matsuzawa, S; Miki, H; Mignone, F; Miyake, S; Morris, K; Mottagui-Tabar, S; Mulder, N; Nakano, N; Nakauchi, H; Ng, P; Nilsson, R; Nishiguchi, S; Nishikawa, S; Nori, F; Ohara, O; Okazaki, Y; Orlando, V; Pang, K C; Pavan, W J; Pavesi, G; Pesole, G; Petrovsky, N; Piazza, S; Reed, J; Reid, J F; Ring, B Z; Ringwald, M; Rost, B; Ruan, Y; Salzberg, S L; Sandelin, A; Schneider, C; Schönbach, C; Sekiguchi, K; Semple, C A M; Seno, S; Sessa, L; Sheng, Y; Shibata, Y; Shimada, H; Shimada, K; Silva, D; Sinclair, B; Sperling, S; Stupka, E; Sugiura, K; Sultana, R; Takenaka, Y; Taki, K; Tammoja, K; Tan, S L; Tang, S; Taylor, M S; Tegner, J; Teichmann, S A; Ueda, H R; van Nimwegen, E; Verardo, R; Wei, C L; Yagi, K; Yamanishi, H; Zabarovsky, E; Zhu, S; Zimmer, A; Hide, W; Bult, C; Grimmond, S M; Teasdale, R D; Liu, E T; Brusic, V; Quackenbush, J; Wahlestedt, C; Mattick, J S; Hume, D A; Kai, C; Sasaki, D; Tomaru, Y; Fukuda, S; Kanamori-Katayama, M; Suzuki, M; Aoki, J; Arakawa, T; Iida, J; Imamura, K; Itoh, M; Kato, T; Kawaji, H; Kawagashira, N; Kawashima, T; Kojima, M; Kondo, S; Konno, H; Nakano, K; Ninomiya, N; Nishio, T; Okada, M; Plessy, C; Shibata, K; Shiraki, T; Suzuki, S; Tagami, M; Waki, K; Watahiki, A; Okamura-Oho, Y; Suzuki, H; Kawai, J; Hayashizaki, Y

    2005-09-02

    This study describes comprehensive polling of transcription start and termination sites and analysis of previously unidentified full-length complementary DNAs derived from the mouse genome. We identify the 5' and 3' boundaries of 181,047 transcripts with extensive variation in transcripts arising from alternative promoter usage, splicing, and polyadenylation. There are 16,247 new mouse protein-coding transcripts, including 5154 encoding previously unidentified proteins. Genomic mapping of the transcriptome reveals transcriptional forests, with overlapping transcription on both strands, separated by deserts in which few transcripts are observed. The data provide a comprehensive platform for the comparative analysis of mammalian transcriptional regulation in differentiation and development.

  12. The virome in mammalian physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, Herbert W.

    2014-01-01

    The virome contains the most abundant and fastest-mutating genetic elements on Earth. The mammalian virome is constituted of viruses that infect host cells, virus-derived elements in our chromosomes, and viruses that infect the broad array of other types of organisms that inhabit us. Virome interactions with the host cannot be encompassed by a monotheistic view of viruses as pathogens. Instead, the genetic and transcriptional identity of mammals is defined in part by our co-evolved virome, a concept with profound implications for understanding health and disease. PMID:24679532

  13. Mammalian odorant receptors: functional evolution and variation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the perception of smell starts with the activation of odorant receptors (ORs) by volatile molecules in the environment. The mammalian OR repertoire has been subject to rapid evolution, and is highly diverse within the human population. Recent advances in the functional expression and ligand identification of ORs allow for functional analysis of OR evolution, and reveal that changes in OR protein sequences translate into high degrees of functional variations. Moreover, in several cases the functional variation of a single OR affects the perception of its cognate odor ligand, providing clues as to how an odor is coded at the receptor level. PMID:25660959

  14. Derivation of the mammalian skull vault

    PubMed Central

    MORRISS-KAY, GILLIAN M.

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the evolutionary history of the mammalian skull vault as a basis for understanding its complex structure. Current information on the developmental tissue origins of the skull vault bones (mesoderm and neural crest) is assessed for mammals and other tetrapods. This information is discussed in the context of evolutionary changes in the proportions of the skull vault bones at the sarcopterygian-tetrapod transition. The dual tissue origin of the skull vault is considered in relation to the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenic cell proliferation and differentiation in the sutural growth centres and in the proportionate contributions of different sutures to skull growth. PMID:11523816

  15. Mammalian Gravity Receptors: Structure and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium metabolism in mammalian gravity receptors is examined. To accomplish this objective it is necessary to study both the mineral deposits of the receptors, the otoconia, and the sensory areas themselves, the saccular and utricular maculas. The main focus was to elucidate the natures of the organic and inorganic phases of the crystalline masses, first in rat otoconia but more recently in otoliths and otoconia of a comparative series of vertebrates. Some of the ultrastructural findings in rat maculas, however, have prompted a more thorough study of the organization of the hair cells and innervation patterns in graviceptors.

  16. Mammalian developmental genetics in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Artzt, Karen

    2012-12-01

    This Perspectives is a review of the breathtaking history of mammalian genetics in the past century and, in particular, of the ways in which genetic thinking has illuminated aspects of mouse development. To illustrate the power of that thinking, selected hypothesis-driven experiments and technical advances are discussed. Also included in this account are the beginnings of mouse genetics at the Bussey Institute, Columbia University, and The Jackson Laboratory and a retrospective discussion of one of the classic problems in developmental genetics, the T/t complex and its genetic enigmas.

  17. Mammalian cell culture capacity for biopharmaceutical manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Ransohoff, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    : With worldwide sales of biopharmaceuticals increasing each year and continuing growth on the horizon, the manufacture of mammalian biopharmaceuticals has become a major global enterprise. We describe the current and future industry wide supply of manufacturing capacity with regard to capacity type, distribution, and geographic location. Bioreactor capacity and the use of single-use products for biomanufacturing are also profiled. An analysis of the use of this capacity is performed, including a discussion of current trends that will influence capacity growth, availability, and utilization in the coming years.

  18. Mammalian Developmental Genetics in the Twentieth Century

    PubMed Central

    Artzt, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This Perspectives is a review of the breathtaking history of mammalian genetics in the past century and, in particular, of the ways in which genetic thinking has illuminated aspects of mouse development. To illustrate the power of that thinking, selected hypothesis-driven experiments and technical advances are discussed. Also included in this account are the beginnings of mouse genetics at the Bussey Institute, Columbia University, and The Jackson Laboratory and a retrospective discussion of one of the classic problems in developmental genetics, the T/t complex and its genetic enigmas. PMID:23212897

  19. Molecular architecture of the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Partch, Carrie L; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-02-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate physiology and behavior with the 24h solar day to provide temporal homeostasis with the external environment. The molecular clocks that drive these intrinsic rhythmic changes are based on interlocked transcription/translation feedback loops that integrate with diverse environmental and metabolic stimuli to generate internal 24h timing. In this review we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the core molecular clock and how it utilizes diverse transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to impart temporal control onto mammalian physiology. Understanding the way in which biological rhythms are generated throughout the body may provide avenues for temporally directed therapeutics to improve health and prevent disease.

  20. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a... be used in Subcategory I-C mines. (c)(1) If electrically......

  2. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All......

  3. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a... be used in Subcategory I-C mines. (c)(1) If electrically......

  4. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  7. A phase IIa study of rhLTα-Da in combination with cisplatin and fluorouracil for patients with metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma or gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Yun; Chen, Zhen-Dong; Chen, Jian-Hua; Qin, Feng-Zhan; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Li, Yu-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant human lymphotoxin-α derivative (rhLTα-Da) is a lymphotoxin-α derivative missing 27 N-terminal amino acid residues. This multicenter phase IIa trial was conducted to evaluate the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of rhLTα-Da with cisplatin (DDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) for metastatic esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) and gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Two different rhLTα-Da doses (10 µg/m(2)/d and 20 µg/m(2)/d) in combination with DDP and 5-Fu were evaluated in this study. The first 6 ESCC and 6 GC patients were given 10 µg/m(2)/d rhLTα-Da followed by DDP (15 mg/m(2)/d) and 5-Fu (750 mg/m(2)/d) on days 1-5. The next 6 ESCC and 6 GC patients were given 20 µg/m(2)/d rhLTα-Da after fewer than 2 of the 6 patients who received the 10 µg/m(2)/d dose exhibited dose-limiting rhLTα-Da-related toxicities. The treatment was 21 days a cycle until a maximum of 6. The rhLTα-Da pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Twelve ESCC and 12 GC patients were enrolled. The toxicities were controllable and reversible. The most common adverse events related to rhLTα-Da were chills (37.5 %, 9/24) and fever (16.7 %, 4/24) (all grades 1-2). The overall response rates in the 10- and 20-µg/m(2)/d groups were 50 % (6/12) and 33.3 % (4/12), respectively, and the overall response rates of the ESCC and GC patients were 66.7 % (8/12) and 16.7 % (2/12), respectively. rhLTα-Da in combination with DDP and 5-Fu exhibited a tolerable toxicity profile. The addition of rhLTα-Da may enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in metastatic ESCC.

  8. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9) and Rac1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbir, Mohammad G.; Dillon, Rachelle; Mowat, Michael R. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1) gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9), plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype. PMID:26977077

  9. On Simon's two-stage design for single-arm phase IIA cancer clinical trials under beta-binomial distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junfeng; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe

    2010-05-10

    Simon (Control. Clin. Trials 1989; 10:1-10)'s two-stage design has been broadly applied to single-arm phase IIA cancer clinical trials in order to minimize either the expected or the maximum sample size under the null hypothesis of drug inefficacy, i.e. when the pre-specified amount of improvement in response rate (RR) is not expected to be observed. This paper studies a realistic scenario where the standard and experimental treatment RRs follow two continuous distributions (e.g. beta distribution) rather than two single values. The binomial probabilities in Simon's (Control. Clin. Trials 1989; 10:1-10) design are replaced by prior predictive Beta-binomial probabilities that are the ratios of two beta functions and domain-restricted RRs involve incomplete beta functions to induce the null hypothesis acceptance probability. We illustrate that Beta-binomial mixture model based two-stage design retains certain desirable properties for hypothesis testing purpose. However, numerical results show that such designs may not exist under certain hypothesis and error rate (type I and II) setups within maximal sample size approximately 130. Furthermore, we give theoretical conditions for asymptotic two-stage design non-existence (sample size goes to infinity) in order to improve the efficiency of design search and to avoid needless searching.

  10. An activin receptor IIA ligand trap promotes erythropoiesis resulting in a rapid induction of red blood cells and haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Carrancio, Soraya; Markovics, Jennifer; Wong, Piu; Leisten, Jim; Castiglioni, Paola; Groza, Matthew C; Raymon, Heather K; Heise, Carla; Daniel, Tom; Chopra, Rajesh; Sung, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Sotatercept (ACE-011), a recombinant human fusion protein containing the extracellular domain of the human Activin receptor IIA, binds to and inhibits activin and other members of the transforming growth factor -β (TGF-β) superfamily. Administration of sotatercept led to a rapid and sustained increase in red blood cell (RBC) count and haemoglobin (Hb) in healthy volunteers (phase I clinical trials), but the mechanism is not fully understood. Mice treated with RAP-011 (murine ortholog of ACE-011) respond with a rapid (within 24 h) increase in haematocrit, Hb, and RBC count. These effects are accompanied by an equally rapid stimulation of late-stage erythroid precursors in the bone marrow (BM). RAP-011 also induces a significant increase in erythroid burst-forming units and erythropoietin, which could contribute to additional, sustained effects on RBC production. Further in vitro co-culture studies demonstrate that BM accessory cells are required for RAP-011 effects. To better understand which TGF-β family ligand(s) mediate RAP-011 effects, we evaluated the impact of several of these ligands on erythroid differentiation. Our data suggest that RAP-011 may act to rescue growth differentiation factor 11/Activin A-induced inhibition of late-stage erythropoiesis. These data define the mechanism of action of a novel agent that regulates RBC differentiation and provide the rationale to develop sotatercept for the treatment of anaemia and ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:24635723

  11. Effect of natural antioxidant tanshinone II-A on DNA damage by lipid peroxidation in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, E H; Liu, X Q; Wang, J J; Xu, N F

    1996-01-01

    Tanshinone II-A (TSII-A) isolated from the root of Salvia miltorrhiza Bunge, a traditional medicine in China, is a derivative of phenanthrenequinone, which is known to have antioxidant properties. In the present study, effects of TSII-A on DNA damage by lipid peroxidation were investigated using liver cells, labeled with [3H] arachidonic acid, in the presence of FeCl2-DTPA. The results show that the nuclear DNA isolated from treated cells had higher radioactivity compared to controls and the radioactivity increased with longer incubation times. Purified lipid-DNA adducts had a characteristic fluorescent spectra and showed a decrease of hyperchromicity and melting point. TSII-A could inhibit the association of peroxidation products with DNA in liver cells and prevent a decrease in cell viability and in the the activity of O6-methylguanine acceptor protein with increasing incubation time. Compared with other antioxidants, TSII-A had a higher inhibitory ratio, which was similar to vitamin E and butylated hydroxy-toluene (BHT), but markedly stronger than NaN3, mannatol, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). These data suggest that TSII-A represents a new and effective antioxidant that inhibits the association of lipid peroxidation products with DNA. Its protective effect may be through breaking the chain reactions of peroxidation by scavenging lipid free radicals, thereby decreasing their cytotoxicity.

  12. Molecular characterization of Activin Receptor Type IIA and its expression during gonadal maturation and growth stages in rohu carp.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Siddhi; Mohanty, Mausumee; Bit, Amrita; Sahoo, Lakshman; Das, Sachidananda; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Paramananda

    2017-01-01

    Activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA), a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptor is an important regulator of physiological traits, viz., reproduction and body growth in vertebrates including teleosts. However, existing knowledge of its role in regulating fish physiology is limited. To address this, we have cloned and characterized the ActRIIA cDNA of Labeo rohita (rohu), an economically important fish species of the Indian subcontinent. Comparative expression profiling of the receptor gene at various reproductive and growth stages supports to its role in promoting oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis and skeletal muscle development via interaction with multiple ligands of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family. The full-length cDNA of rohu ActRIIA was found to be of 1587bp length encoding 528 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of the intracellular kinase domain of rohu ActRIIA has also been predicted. Phylogenetic relationship studies showed that the gene is evolutionarily conserved across the vertebrate lineage implicating that the functioning of the receptor is more or less similar in vertebrates. Taken together, these findings could be an initial step towards the use of ActRIIA as a potential candidate gene marker for understanding the complex regulatory mechanism of fish reproduction and growth.

  13. Discriminative Features in Three Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa Syndromes: Cutis Laxa IIA, Cutis Laxa IIB, and Geroderma Osteoplastica

    PubMed Central

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Afroozan, Fariba; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Ghanadan, Alireza; Akbaroghli, Susan; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Setoodeh, Aria; Loh, Abigail; Tan, Yu Xuan; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Malfait, Fransiska; Reversade, Bruno; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Morava, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous condition characterized by redundant, sagging, inelastic, and wrinkled skin. The inherited forms of this disease are rare and can have autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked inheritance. Three of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes, namely cutis laxa IIA (ARCL2A), cutis laxa IIB (ARCL2B), and geroderma osteodysplastica (GO), have very similar clinical features, complicating accurate diagnosis. Individuals with these conditions often present with cutis laxa, progeroid features, and hyperextensible joints. These conditions also share additional features, such as short stature, hypotonia, and congenital hip dislocation, but the severity and frequency of these findings are variable in each of these cutis laxa syndromes. The characteristic features for ARCL2A are abnormal isoelectric focusing and facial features, including downslanting palpebral fissures and a long philtrum. Rather, the clinical phenotype of ARCL2B includes severe wrinkling of the dorsum of the hands and feet, wormian bones, athetoid movements, lipodystrophy, cataract and corneal clouding, a thin triangular face, and a pinched nose. Normal cognition and osteopenia leading to pathological fractures, maxillary hypoplasia, and oblique furrowing from the outer canthus to the lateral border of the supraorbital ridge are discriminative features for GO. Here we present 10 Iranian patients who were initially diagnosed clinically using the respective features of each cutis laxa syndrome. Each patient’s clinical diagnosis was then confirmed with molecular investigation of the responsible gene. Review of the clinical features from the cases reported from the literature also supports our conclusions. PMID:28294978

  14. Ecology and evolution of mammalian biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kate E.; Safi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Mammals have incredible biological diversity, showing extreme flexibility in eco-morphology, physiology, life history and behaviour across their evolutionary history. Undoubtedly, mammals play an important role in ecosystems by providing essential services such as regulating insect populations, seed dispersal and pollination and act as indicators of general ecosystem health. However, the macroecological and macroevolutionary processes underpinning past and present biodiversity patterns are only beginning to be explored on a global scale. It is also particularly important, in the face of the global extinction crisis, to understand these processes in order to be able to use this knowledge to prevent future biodiversity loss and loss of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, efforts to understand mammalian biodiversity have been hampered by a lack of data. New data compilations on current species' distributions, ecologies and evolutionary histories now allow an integrated approach to understand this biodiversity. We review and synthesize these new studies, exploring the past and present ecology and evolution of mammalian biodiversity, and use these findings to speculate about the mammals of our future. PMID:21807728

  15. Genomic imprinting: a mammalian epigenetic discovery model.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Denise P

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic process leading to parental-specific expression of one to two percent of mammalian genes that offers one of the best model systems for a molecular analysis of epigenetic regulation in development and disease. In the twenty years since the first imprinted gene was identified, this model has had a significant impact on decoding epigenetic information in mammals. So far it has led to the discovery of long-range cis-acting control elements whose epigenetic state regulates small clusters of genes and of unusual macro noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that directly repress genes in cis, and critically, it has demonstrated that one biological role of DNA methylation is to allow expression of genes normally repressed by default. This review describes the progress in understanding how imprinted protein-coding genes are silenced; in particular, it focuses on the role of macro ncRNAs that have broad relevance as a potential new layer of regulatory information in the mammalian genome.

  16. The terminal DNA structure of mammalian chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    McElligott, R; Wellinger, R J

    1997-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic organisms, telomeric DNA is composed of a variable number of short direct repeats. While the primary sequence of telomeric repeats has been determined for a great variety of species, the actual physical DNA structure at the ends of a bona fide metazoan chromosome with a centromere is unknown. It is shown here that an overhang of the strand forming the 3' ends of the chromosomes, the G-rich strand, is found at mammalian chromosome ends. Moreover, on at least some telomeres, the overhangs are > or = 45 bases long. Such surprisingly long overhangs were present on chromosomes derived from fully transformed tissue culture cells and normal G0-arrested peripheral leukocytes. Thus, irrespective of whether the cells were actively dividing or arrested, a very similar terminal DNA arrangement was found. These data suggest that the ends of mammalian and possibly all vertebrate chromosomes consist of an overhang of the G-rich strand and that these overhangs may be considerably larger than previously anticipated. PMID:9218811

  17. The Mammalian Ovary from Genesis to Revelation

    PubMed Central

    Edson, Mark A.; Nagaraja, Ankur K.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Two major functions of the mammalian ovary are the production of germ cells (oocytes), which allow continuation of the species, and the generation of bioactive molecules, primarily steroids (mainly estrogens and progestins) and peptide growth factors, which are critical for ovarian function, regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and development of secondary sex characteristics. The female germline is created during embryogenesis when the precursors of primordial germ cells differentiate from somatic lineages of the embryo and take a unique route to reach the urogenital ridge. This undifferentiated gonad will differentiate along a female pathway, and the newly formed oocytes will proliferate and subsequently enter meiosis. At this point, the oocyte has two alternative fates: die, a common destiny of millions of oocytes, or be fertilized, a fate of at most approximately 100 oocytes, depending on the species. At every step from germline development and ovary formation to oogenesis and ovarian development and differentiation, there are coordinated interactions of hundreds of proteins and small RNAs. These studies have helped reproductive biologists to understand not only the normal functioning of the ovary but also the pathophysiology and genetics of diseases such as infertility and ovarian cancer. Over the last two decades, parallel progress has been made in the assisted reproductive technology clinic including better hormonal preparations, prenatal genetic testing, and optimal oocyte and embryo analysis and cryopreservation. Clearly, we have learned much about the mammalian ovary and manipulating its most important cargo, the oocyte, since the birth of Louise Brown over 30 yr ago. PMID:19776209

  18. Kinetic Analysis of a Mammalian Phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Henage, Lee G.; Exton, John H.; Brown, H. Alex

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian cells, phospholipase D activity is tightly regulated by diverse cellular signals, including hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Multiple signaling pathways converge upon phospholipase D to modulate cellular actions, such as cell growth, shape, and secretion. We examined the kinetics of protein kinase C and G-protein regulation of mammalian phospholipase D1 (PLD1) in order to better understand interactions between PLD1 and its regulators. Activation by Arf-1, RhoA, Rac1, Cdc42, protein kinase Cα, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate displayed surface dilution kinetics, but these effectors modulated different kinetic parameters. PKCα activation of PLD1 involves N- and C-terminal PLD domains. Rho GTPases were binding activators, enhancing the catalytic efficiency of a purified PLD1 catalytic domain via effects on Km. Arf-1, a catalytic activator, stimulated PLD1 by enhancing the catalytic constant, kcat. A kinetic description of PLD1 activation by multiple modulators reveals a mechanism for apparent synergy between activators. Synergy was observed only when PLD1 was simultaneously stimulated by a binding activator and a catalytic activator. Surprisingly, synergistic activation was steeply dependent on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylcholine. Together, these findings suggest a role for PLD1 as a signaling node, in which integration of convergent signals occurs within discrete locales of the cellular membrane. PMID:16339153

  19. Ecological adaptation determines functional mammalian olfactory subgenomes

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Sara; Bekaert, Michaël; Crider, Tess A.; Mariani, Stefano; Murphy, William J.; Teeling, Emma C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to smell is governed by the largest gene family in mammalian genomes, the olfactory receptor (OR) genes. Although these genes are well annotated in the finished human and mouse genomes, we still do not understand which receptors bind specific odorants or how they fully function. Previous comparative studies have been taxonomically limited and mostly focused on the percentage of OR pseudogenes within species. No study has investigated the adaptive changes of functional OR gene families across phylogenetically and ecologically diverse mammals. To determine the extent to which OR gene repertoires have been influenced by habitat, sensory specialization, and other ecological traits, to better understand the functional importance of specific OR gene families and thus the odorants they bind, we compared the functional OR gene repertoires from 50 mammalian genomes. We amplified more than 2000 OR genes in aquatic, semi-aquatic, and flying mammals and coupled these data with 48,000 OR genes from mostly terrestrial mammals, extracted from genomic projects. Phylogenomic, Bayesian assignment, and principle component analyses partitioned species by ecotype (aquatic, semi-aquatic, terrestrial, flying) rather than phylogenetic relatedness, and identified OR families important for each habitat. Functional OR gene repertoires were reduced independently in the multiple origins of aquatic mammals and were significantly divergent in bats. We reject recent neutralist views of olfactory subgenome evolution and correlate specific OR gene families with physiological requirements, a preliminary step toward unraveling the relationship between specific odors and respective OR gene families. PMID:19952139

  20. Ballistic transfection of mammalian cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, V.A.; Zelenin, A.V.; Zelenina, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    The method of ballistic transfection initially proposed for genetic transformation of plants was used for animal cells in vitro and in situ. The method consists in bombarding the transfected cells with microparticles of heavy metals carrying foreign DNA. Penetrating the cell nucleus, the microparticles transport the introduced gene. Successful genetic transformation of the cultured mouse cells and fish embryos was realized, and this allowed the study of mammalian cells in situ. The performed studies allowed us to demonstrate expression of the reporter genes of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, galactosidase, and neomycin phosphotransferase in the mouse liver, mammary gland and kidney explants, in the liver and cross-striated muscle of mouse and rat in situ, and in developing mouse embryos at the stages of two-cell embryo, morula, and blastocyst. All these genes were introduced by ballistic transfection. In the liver and cross-striated muscle the transgene activity was detected within two to three months after transfection. Thus, the ballistic introduction of the foreign genes in the cells in situ was demonstrated, and this opens possibilities for the use of this method in gene therapy. Methodical aspects of the bombarding and transfection are considered in detail, and the published data on transfection and genetic transformation of mammalian cells are discussed. 41 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility may be generally defined as “the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability”. The metabolic diversification strategies used by individual bacteria vary greatly from the use of novel or acquired enzymes to the use of plasmid-localised genes and transporters. In this review, we describe the ability of lactobacilli to utilise a variety of carbon sources from their current or new environments in order to grow and survive. The genus Lactobacillus now includes more than 150 species, many with adaptive capabilities, broad metabolic capacity and species/strain variance. They are therefore, an informative example of a cell factory capable of adapting to new niches with differing nutritional landscapes. Indeed, lactobacilli naturally colonise and grow in a wide variety of environmental niches which include the roots and foliage of plants, silage, various fermented foods and beverages, the human vagina and the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT; including the mouth, stomach, small intestine and large intestine). Here we primarily describe the metabolic flexibility of some lactobacilli isolated from the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and we also describe some of the food-associated species with a proven ability to adapt to the GIT. As examples this review concentrates on the following species - Lb. plantarum, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. ruminis, Lb. salivarius, Lb. reuteri and Lb. sakei, to highlight the diversity and inter-relationships between the catabolic nature of species within the genus. PMID:23680304

  2. Focusing on RISC assembly in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Junmei; Wei Na; Chalk, Alistair; Wang Jue; Song, Yutong; Yi Fan; Qiao Renping; Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; Wahlestedt, Claes; Liang Zicai Du, Quan

    2008-04-11

    RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) is a central protein complex in RNAi, into which a siRNA strand is assembled to become effective in gene silencing. By using an in vitro RNAi reaction based on Drosophila embryo extract, an asymmetric model was recently proposed for RISC assembly of siRNA strands, suggesting that the strand that is more loosely paired at its 5' end is selectively assembled into RISC and results in target gene silencing. However, in the present study, we were unable to establish such a correlation in cell-based RNAi assays, as well as in large-scale RNAi data analyses. This suggests that the thermodynamic stability of siRNA is not a major determinant of gene silencing in mammalian cells. Further studies on fork siRNAs showed that mismatch at the 5' end of the siRNA sense strand decreased RISC assembly of the antisense strand, but surprisingly did not increase RISC assembly of the sense strand. More interestingly, measurements of melting temperature showed that the terminal stability of fork siRNAs correlated with the positions of the mismatches, but not gene silencing efficacy. In summary, our data demonstrate that there is no definite correlation between siRNA stability and gene silencing in mammalian cells, which suggests that instead of thermodynamic stability, other features of the siRNA duplex contribute to RISC assembly in RNAi.

  3. Expression of mammalian membrane proteins in mammalian cells using Semliki Forest virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    One of the major bottlenecks in drug screening and structural biology on membrane proteins has for a long time been the expression of recombinant protein in sufficient quality and quantity. The expression has been evaluated in all existing expression systems, from cell-free translation and bacterial systems to expression in animal cells. In contrast to soluble proteins, the expression levels have been relatively low due to the following reasons: The topology of membrane proteins requires special, posttranslational processing, folding, and insertion into membranes, which often are mammalian cell specific. Despite these strict demands, functional membrane proteins (G protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, and transporters) have been successfully expressed in bacterial, yeast, and insect cells. A general drawback observed in prokaryotic cells is that accumulation of foreign protein in membranes is toxic and results in growth arrest and therefore low yields of recombinant protein.In this chapter, the focus is on expression of recombinant mammalian membrane proteins in mammalian host cells, particularly applying Semliki Forest virus (SFV) vectors. Replication-deficient SFV vectors are rapidly generated at high titers in BHK-21 (Baby Hamster Kidney) cells, which then are applied for a broad range of mammalian and nonmammalian cells. The SFV system has provided high expression levels of topologically different proteins, especially for membrane proteins. Robust ligand-binding assays and functional coupling to G proteins and electrophysiological recordings have made the SFV system an attractive tool in drug discovery. Furthermore, the high susceptibility of SFV vectors to primary neurons has allowed various applications in neuroscience. Establishment of large-scale production in mammalian adherent and suspension cultures has allowed production of hundreds of milligrams of membrane proteins that has allowed their submission to serious structural biology approaches. In this

  4. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  5. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  6. Marsupials and Eutherians reunited: genetic evidence for the Theria hypothesis of mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Killian, J K; Buckley, T R; Stewart, N; Munday, B L; Jirtle, R L

    2001-07-01

    The three living monophyletic divisions of Class Mammalia are the Prototheria (monotremes), Metatheria (marsupials), and Eutheria ('placental' mammals). Determining the sister relationships among these three groups is the most fundamental question in mammalian evolution. Phylogenetic comparison of these mammals by either anatomy or mitochondrial DNA has resulted in two conflicting hypotheses, Theria and Marsupionta, and has fueled a "genes versus morphology" controversy. We have cloned and analyzed a large nuclear gene, the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R), from representatives of all three mammalian groups, including platypus, echidna, opossum, wallaby, hedgehog, mouse, rat, rabbit, cow, pig, bat, tree shrew, colugo, ringtail lemur, and human. Statistical analysis of this nuclear gene unambiguously supports the morphology-based Theria hypothesis that excludes monotremes from a clade of marsupials and eutherians. The M6P/IGF2R was also able to resolve the finer structure of the eutherian mammalian family tree. In particular, our analyses support sister group relationships between lagomorphs and rodents, and between the primates and Dermoptera. Statistical support for the grouping of the hedgehog with Feruungulata and Chiroptera was also strong.

  7. Mammalian social odours: attraction and individual recognition

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Peter A; Kendrick, Keith M

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian social systems rely on signals passed between individuals conveying information including sex, reproductive status, individual identity, ownership, competitive ability and health status. Many of these signals take the form of complex mixtures of molecules sensed by chemosensory systems and have important influences on a variety of behaviours that are vital for reproductive success, such as parent–offspring attachment, mate choice and territorial marking. This article aims to review the nature of these chemosensory cues and the neural pathways mediating their physiological and behavioural effects. Despite the complexities of mammalian societies, there are instances where single molecules can act as classical pheromones attracting interest and approach behaviour. Chemosignals with relatively high volatility can be used to signal at a distance and are sensed by the main olfactory system. Most mammals also possess a vomeronasal system, which is specialized to detect relatively non-volatile chemosensory cues following direct contact. Single attractant molecules are sensed by highly specific receptors using a labelled line pathway. These act alongside more complex mixtures of signals that are required to signal individual identity. There are multiple sources of such individuality chemosignals, based on the highly polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or lipocalins such as the mouse major urinary proteins. The individual profile of volatile components that make up an individual odour signature can be sensed by the main olfactory system, as the pattern of activity across an array of broadly tuned receptor types. In addition, the vomeronasal system can respond highly selectively to non-volatile peptide ligands associated with the MHC, acting at the V2r class of vomeronasal receptor. The ability to recognize individuals or their genetic relatedness plays an important role in mammalian social behaviour. Thus robust systems for olfactory

  8. The Metabolic and Ecological Interactions of Oxalate-Degrading Bacteria in the Mammalian Gut

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron W.; Dearing, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate-degrading bacteria comprise a functional group of microorganisms, commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Oxalate is a plant secondary compound (PSC) widely produced by all major taxa of plants and as a terminal metabolite by the mammalian liver. As a toxin, oxalate can have a significant impact on the health of mammals, including humans. Mammals do not have the enzymes required to metabolize oxalate and rely on their gut microbiota for this function. Thus, significant metabolic interactions between the mammalian host and a complex gut microbiota maintain the balance of oxalate in the body. Over a dozen species of gut bacteria are now known to degrade oxalate. This review focuses on the host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that regulate the degradation of oxalate by the gut microbiota. We discuss the pathways of oxalate throughout the body and the mammalian gut as a series of differentiated ecosystems that facilitate oxalate degradation. We also explore the mechanisms and functions of microbial oxalate degradation along with the implications for the ecological and evolutionary interactions within the microbiota and for mammalian hosts. Throughout, we consider questions that remain, as well as recent technological advances that can be employed to answer them. PMID:25437337

  9. Structural, bonding, and electronic properties of IIA-IV antifluorite compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkill, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    1993-12-01

    We have studied the electronic and structural properties of the antifluorite compounds Mg2X (X=Si, Ge, Sn), Be2C, and hypothetical compounds Mg2C and Be2Si using the first-principles pseudopotential total energy method. Five of the compounds are small-gap semiconductors, while Be2Si is a metal. Calculated lattice constants agree well with experiment for the four known compounds, but are consistently a few percent smaller than the reported values. The bulk moduli of this group of materials follow a semiempirical formula for B0 to within ~5%. Bulk moduli calculated from first principles, corrected for the underestimation of the lattice constant, agree well with the available experimental values.

  10. Tanshinone IIA increases protein expression levels of PERK, ATF6, IRE1α, CHOP, caspase‑3 and caspase‑12 in pancreatic cancer BxPC‑3 cell‑derived xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsung-Lang; Su, Chin Cheng

    2017-03-22

    Tanshinone (Tan)-IIA is a derivative of phenanthrenequinone and the main active ingredient isolated from Salviae miltiorrhizae radix (Danshen). Previous studies have demonstrated that Tan‑IIA increased the protein expressions levels of protein kinase RNA‑like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor (ATF) 6, caspase‑12 and CCAAT‑enhancer‑binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer BxPC‑3 cells. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effects of Tan‑IIA on pancreatic cancer cells have not been investigated in vivo. Further studies are required to elucidate the therapeutic potential of Tan‑IIA in inducing ER stress in cancer cells in vivo. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Tan‑IIA on the expression of ER stress‑related proteins in BxPC‑3‑derived xenograft tumors. A total of 30 male severe combined immunodeficiency mice (age, 4 weeks) were implanted with BxPC‑3 cells (2x106/0.2 ml) and subsequently treated with various doses of Tan‑IIA (0, 30 and 90 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. After mice were sacrificed on day 33, the xenograft tumors were dissected and total protein was extracted for western blot analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that Tan‑IIA inhibited the growth of BxPC‑3‑derived xenograft tumors. In addition, Tan‑IIA increased the protein expression levels of PERK, ATF6, caspase‑12, inositol‑requiring enzyme (IRE) 1α, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α, phosphorylated (p)‑c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK), CHOP and caspase‑3 in a dose‑dependent manner. These results indicated that Tan‑IIA induced ER stress via increasing the protein expression levels of PERK, ATF6, caspase‑12, IRE1α, eIF2α, p‑JNK, CHOP and caspase‑3 in BxPC‑3 cells in vivo. Therefore, it may be hypothesized that Tan‑IIA has potential for the development of novel therapeutic

  11. Isolation and characterization of rotavirus from feral pigeon in mammalian cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Minamoto, N.; Oki, K.; Tomita, M.; Kinjo, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Avian rotaviruses were isolated from feral pigeon faeces treated with trypsin using roller tube cultures of mammalian cells. Two pigeon strains, designated as strains PO-8 and PO-13, produced a marked cytopathic effect (CPE), small intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and high titres of infectious particles in infected MA-104 and MDBK cell lines without cell adaptation and roller drum apparatus. The pigeon rotaviruses shared a common group specific antigen with the Lincoln strain of bovine rotavirus by indirect immunofluorescence, but differed from both the Lincoln strain and the Wa strain of human rotavirus in neutralization tests. The RNA segment profile of this virus on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis differed from that of group A mammalian rotaviruses. The results of a serological survey suggested that antibody to pigeon rotaviruses was widespread in avian species in Japan. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:2837407

  12. Predictive chromatin signatures in the mammalian genome

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Gary C.; Hawkins, R. David; Ren, Bing

    2009-01-01

    The DNA sequence of an organism is a blueprint of life: it harbors not only the information about proteins and other molecules produced in each cell, but also instructions on when and where such molecules are made. Chromatin, the structure of histone and DNA that has co-evolved with eukaryotic genome, also contains information that indicates the function and activity of the underlying DNA sequences. Such information exists in the form of covalent modifications to the histone proteins that comprise the nucleosome. Thanks to the development of high throughput technologies such as DNA microarrays and next generation DNA sequencing, we have begun to associate the various combinations of chromatin modification patterns with functional sequences in the human genome. Here, we review the rapid progress from descriptive observations of histone modification profiles to highly predictive models enabling use of chromatin signatures to enumerate novel functional sequences in mammalian genomes that have escaped previous detection. PMID:19808796

  13. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-10-01

    Small GTPases are central regulators of many cellular processes. The highly conserved Rap GTPases perform essential functions in the mammalian nervous system during development and in mature neurons. During neocortical development, Rap1 is required to regulate cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesion. In the adult nervous system Rap1 and Rap2 regulate the maturation and plasticity of dendritic spine and synapses. Although genetic studies have revealed important roles of Rap GTPases in neurons, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate them and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that inactivate them by stimulating their intrinsic GTPase activity is just beginning to be explored in vivo. Here we review how GEFs and GAPs regulate Rap GTPases in the nervous system with a focus on their in vivo function.

  14. Chemical analysis of individual mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.; Yeung, E.S.

    1994-12-31

    The extremely small size of mammalian cells creates an unusual challenge for the analytical chemist, both in terms of separation and detection. Under a microscope, it is possible to confirm the injection of individual cells such as erythrocyte into capillaries with 10-{mu}m i.d. by hydrostatic pressure. The ionic contents can then be separated by capillary electrophoresis after the cell lyses. Enzymes at the zeptomole level can be monitored by on-column fluorescence enzyme assay. On-column particle-counting immunoassay can be applied to a broad range of analytes (antigens), also at the zeptomole level. The authors report here the simultaneous determination of the amounts of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and their activities in individual erythrocytes by using a combination of the two detection schemes. Insights into the degradation of proteins as a function of cell age can be derived.

  15. Global Epigenomic Reconfiguration During Mammalian Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Joseph R.; Urich, Mark; Puddifoot, Clare A.; Johnson, Nicholas D.; Lucero, Jacinta; Huang, Yun; Dwork, Andrew J.; Schultz, Matthew D.; Yu, Miao; Tonti-Filippini, Julian; Heyn, Holger; Hu, Shijun; Wu, Joseph C.; Rao, Anjana; Esteller, Manel; He, Chuan; Haghighi, Fatemeh G.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is implicated in mammalian brain development and plasticity underlying learning and memory. We report the genome-wide composition, patterning, cell specificity, and dynamics of DNA methylation at single-base resolution in human and mouse frontal cortex throughout their lifespan. Widespread methylome reconfiguration occurs during fetal to young adult development, coincident with synaptogenesis. During this period, highly conserved non-CG methylation (mCH) accumulates in neurons, but not glia, to become the dominant form of methylation in the human neuronal genome. Moreover, we found an mCH signature that identifies genes escaping X-chromosome inactivation. Last, whole-genome single-base resolution 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) maps revealed that hmC marks fetal brain cell genomes at putative regulatory regions that are CG-demethylated and activated in the adult brain and that CG demethylation at these hmC-poised loci depends on Tet2 activity. PMID:23828890

  16. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  17. Genetic reassortment of mammalian reoviruses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wenske, E A; Chanock, S J; Krata, L; Fields, B N

    1985-01-01

    Reassortments between type 1 (Lang) and type 3 (Dearing) reoviruses were isolated from suckling mice infected perorally with an inoculum containing both type 1 and type 3 viruses. A total of five distinct reassortants (designated as E1 through E5) were isolated from animals during the course of the experiment. Two reassortants (E1 and E2) represented the majority of the reassortants isolated. The majority of genes of types E1 and E2 were derived from type 1 (Lang). However, E1 had an M2 gene and an S1 gene derived from type 3 (Dearing), while E2 had M2 and S2 genes derived from type 3 (Dearing). Thus, nonrandom reassortment between mammalian reoviruses can be demonstrated in vivo. PMID:4057359

  18. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions.

  19. Mammalian protein glycosylation--structure versus function.

    PubMed

    Defaus, S; Gupta, P; Andreu, D; Gutiérrez-Gallego, R

    2014-06-21

    Carbohydrates fulfil many common as well as extremely important functions in nature. They show a variety of molecular displays--e.g., free mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides, glycolipids, proteoglycans, glycoproteins, etc.--with particular roles and localizations in living organisms. Structure-specific peculiarities are so many and diverse that it becomes virtually impossible to cover them all from an analytical perspective. Hence this manuscript, focused on mammalian glycosylation, rather than a complete list of analytical descriptors or recognized functions for carbohydrate structures, comprehensively reviews three central issues in current glycoscience, namely (i) structural analysis of glycoprotein glycans, covering both classical and novel approaches for teasing out the structural puzzle as well as potential pitfalls of these processes; (ii) an overview of functions attributed to carbohydrates, covering from monosaccharide to complex, well-defined epitopes and full glycans, including post-glycosylational modifications, and (iii) recent technical advances allowing structural identification of glycoprotein glycans with simultaneous assignation of biological functions.

  20. [Thiamine triphosphatase activity in mammalian mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Rusina, I M; Makarchikov, A F

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial preparations isolated from bovine kidney and brain as well as the liver and the brain of rat show thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase) activity. The activity was determined from the particles by freezing-thawing suggesting that a soluble enzyme is involved. The liberation patterns of ThTPase and marker enzyme activities from mitochondria under osmotic shock or treatment with increasing Triton X-100 concentrations indicate the presence of ThTPase both in the matrix and intermembrane space. It was found, basing on gel filtration behavior, that the mitochondrial ThTPase has the same molecular mass as specific cytosolic ThTPase (EC 3.6.1.28). The enzymes, however, were clearly distinguishable in Km values, the mitochondrial one showing a higher apparent affinity for substrate. These results imply the existence of ThTPase multiple forms in mammalian cells.

  1. Mammalian telomeres and their partnership with lamins

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; La Torre, Mattia; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromosome ends are complex structures, which require a panel of factors for their elongation, replication, and protection. We describe here the mechanics of mammalian telomeres, dynamics and maintainance in relation to lamins. Multiple biochemical connections, including association of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and matrix, of telomeric proteins to lamins, and of lamin-associated proteins to chromosome ends, underline the interplay between lamins and telomeres. Paths toward senescence, such as defective telomere replication, altered heterochromatin organization, and impaired DNA repair, are common to lamins' and telomeres' dysfunction. The convergence of phenotypes can be interpreted through a model of dynamic, lamin-controlled functional platforms dedicated to the function of telomeres as fragile sites. The features of telomeropathies and laminopathies, and of animal models underline further overlapping aspects, including the alteration of stem cell compartments. We expect that future studies of basic biology and on aging will benefit from the analysis of this telomere-lamina interplay. PMID:27116558

  2. Differential Light Scattering from Spherical Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunsting, Albert; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    The differential scattered light intensity patterns of spherical mammalian cells were measured with a new photometer which uses high-speed film as the light detector. The scattering objects, interphase and mitotic Chinese hamster ovary cells and HeLa cells, were modeled as (a) a coated sphere, accounting for nucleus and cytoplasm, and (b) a homogeneous sphere when no cellular nucleus was present. The refractive indices and size distribution of the cells were measured for an accurate comparison of the theoretical model with the light-scattering measurements. The light scattered beyond the forward direction is found to contain information about internal cellular morphology, provided the size distribution of the cells is not too broad. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:4134589

  3. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  4. The Evolution of Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Issel-Tarver, L.; Rine, J.

    1997-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of four subfamilies of olfactory receptor genes first identified in the dog to assess changes in the gene family during mammalian evolution, and to begin linking the dog genetic map to that of humans. The human subfamilies were localized to chromosomes 7, 11, and 19. The two subfamilies that were tightly linked in the dog genome were also tightly linked in the human genome. The four subfamilies were compared in human (primate), horse (perissodactyl), and a variety of artiodactyls and carnivores. Some changes in gene number were detected, but overall subfamily size appeared to have been established before the divergence of these mammals 60-100 million years ago. PMID:9017400

  5. Mammalian Autophagy: How Does It Work?

    PubMed

    Bento, Carla F; Renna, Maurizio; Ghislat, Ghita; Puri, Claudia; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Vicinanza, Mariella; Menzies, Fiona M; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-06-02

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular pathway that delivers cytoplasmic contents to lysosomes for degradation via double-membrane autophagosomes. Autophagy substrates include organelles such as mitochondria, aggregate-prone proteins that cause neurodegeneration and various pathogens. Thus, this pathway appears to be relevant to the pathogenesis of diverse diseases, and its modulation may have therapeutic value. Here, we focus on the cell and molecular biology of mammalian autophagy and review the key proteins that regulate the process by discussing their roles and how these may be modulated by posttranslational modifications. We consider the membrane-trafficking events that impact autophagy and the questions relating to the sources of autophagosome membrane(s). Finally, we discuss data from structural studies and some of the insights these have provided.

  6. Signaling mechanisms in mammalian myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-04-23

    Myoblast fusion is a critical process that contributes to the growth of muscle during development and to the regeneration of myofibers upon injury. Myoblasts fuse with each other as well as with multinucleated myotubes to enlarge the myofiber. Initial studies demonstrated that myoblast fusion requires extracellular calcium and changes in cell membrane topography and cytoskeletal organization. More recent studies have identified several cell-surface and intracellular proteins that mediate myoblast fusion. Furthermore, emerging evidence suggests that myoblast fusion is also regulated by the activation of specific cell-signaling pathways that lead to the expression of genes whose products are essential for the fusion process and for modulating the activity of molecules that are involved in cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here, we review the roles of the major signaling pathways in mammalian myoblast fusion.

  7. Mechanism of protein biosynthesis in mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Christian, Brooke E; Spremulli, Linda L

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis in mammalian mitochondria produces 13 proteins that are essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. This review provides a detailed outline of each phase of mitochondrial translation including initiation, elongation, termination, and ribosome recycling. The roles of essential proteins involved in each phase are described. All of the products of mitochondrial protein synthesis in mammals are inserted into the inner membrane. Several proteins that may help bind ribosomes to the membrane during translation are described, although much remains to be learned about this process. Mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes encoding components of the translation system often lead to severe deficiencies in oxidative phosphorylation, and a summary of these mutations is provided. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression.

  8. Studies on the mammalian toxicity of fenthion*

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jean I.; Barnes, J. M.

    1963-01-01

    This paper constitutes a report on mammalian toxicological investigations of fen hion, carried out as part of the WHO malaria eradication programme, and on the conclusions drawn from them. Fenthion is found to be of intermediate toxicity to the four rodent species studied. In rats the signs of poisoning develop rather slowly but persist for several days, male rats being more susceptible than females, whereas for most phosphorothionates the converse is true. The results suggest that fenthion is not simply oxidized from the P=S compound to the P=O. It has been stated that the sulfoxide and sulfone are produced before the P=S→P=O oxidation takes place, but experiments suggest that further changes are involved. The findings are discussed in relation to the possible health hazard that might be encountered by those who have to apply fenthion as a residual spray. PMID:14056272

  9. KN-93 inhibits IKr in mammalian cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Bence; Chen-Izu, Ye; Jian, Zhong; Shimkunas, Rafael; Izu, Leighton T.; Banyasz, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 is widely used in multiple fields of cardiac research especially for studying the mechanisms of cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. Whereas KN-93 is a potent inhibitor of CaMKII, several off-target effects have also been found in expression cell systems and smooth muscle cells, but there is no information on the KN93 side effects in mammalian ventricular myocytes. In this study we explore the effect of KN-93 on the rapid component of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) in the ventricular myocytes from rabbit and guinea pig hearts. Our data indicate that KN-93 exerts direct inhibitory effect on IKr that is not mediated via CaMKII. This off-target effect of KN93 should be taken into account when interpreting the data from using KN93 to investigate the role of CaMKII in cardiac function. PMID:26463508

  10. KN-93 inhibits IKr in mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Bence; Chen-Izu, Ye; Jian, Zhong; Shimkunas, Rafael; Izu, Leighton T; Banyasz, Tamas

    2015-12-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 is widely used in multiple fields of cardiac research especially for studying the mechanisms of cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. Whereas KN-93 is a potent inhibitor of CaMKII, several off-target effects have also been found in expression cell systems and smooth muscle cells, but there is no information on the KN93 side effects in mammalian ventricular myocytes. In this study we explore the effect of KN-93 on the rapid component of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) in the ventricular myocytes from rabbit and guinea pig hearts. Our data indicate that KN-93 exerts direct inhibitory effect on IKr that is not mediated via CaMKII. This off-target effect of KN93 should be taken into account when interpreting the data from using KN93 to investigate the role of CaMKII in cardiac function.

  11. Cellular and chemical neuroscience of mammalian sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subimal

    2010-05-01

    Extraordinary strides have been made toward understanding the complexities and regulatory mechanisms of sleep over the past two decades thanks to the help of rapidly evolving technologies. At its most basic level, mammalian sleep is a restorative process of the brain and body. Beyond its primary restorative purpose, sleep is essential for a number of vital functions. Our primary research interest is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep and its cognitive functions. Here I will reflect on our own research contributions to 50 years of extraordinary advances in the neurobiology of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. I conclude this review by suggesting some potential future directions to further our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep.

  12. Mammalian Metallothionein-2A and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xue-Bin; Wei, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jun; Kong, Yue-Qiong; Wu, Yu-You; Guo, Jun-Li; Li, Tian-Fa; Li, Ji-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian metallothionein-2A (MT2A) has received considerable attention in recent years due to its crucial pathophysiological role in anti-oxidant, anti-apoptosis, detoxification and anti-inflammation. For many years, most studies evaluating the effects of MT2A have focused on reactive oxygen species (ROS), as second messengers that lead to oxidative stress injury of cells and tissues. Recent studies have highlighted that oxidative stress could activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and MT2A, as a mediator of MAPKs, to regulate the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, the molecule mechanism of MT2A remains elusive. A deeper understanding of the functional, biochemical and molecular characteristics of MT2A would be identified, in order to bring new opportunities for oxidative stress therapy. PMID:27608012

  13. Mammalian sperm nuclear organization: resiliencies and vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Champroux, A; Torres-Carreira, J; Gharagozloo, P; Drevet, J R; Kocer, A

    2016-01-01

    Sperm cells are remarkably complex and highly specialized compared to somatic cells. Their function is to deliver to the oocyte the paternal genomic blueprint along with a pool of proteins and RNAs so a new generation can begin. Reproductive success, including optimal embryonic development and healthy offspring, greatly depends on the integrity of the sperm chromatin structure. It is now well documented that DNA damage in sperm is linked to reproductive failures both in natural and assisted conception (Assisted Reproductive Technologies [ART]). This manuscript reviews recent important findings concerning - the unusual organization of mammalian sperm chromatin and its impact on reproductive success when modified. This review is focused on sperm chromatin damage and their impact on embryonic development and transgenerational inheritance.

  14. Defining the mammalian CArGome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Chen, Guang; Streb, Jeffrey W.; Long, Xiaochun; Yang, Yumei; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) binds a 1216-fold degenerate cis element known as the CArG box. CArG boxes are found primarily in muscle- and growth-factor-associated genes although the full spectrum of functional CArG elements in the genome (the CArGome) has yet to be defined. Here we describe a genome-wide screen to further define the functional mammalian CArGome. A computational approach involving comparative genomic analyses of human and mouse orthologous genes uncovered >100 hypothetical SRF-dependent genes, including 10 previously identified SRF targets, harboring a conserved CArG element within 4000 bp of the annotated transcription start site (TSS). We PCR-cloned 89 hypothetical SRF targets and subjected each of them to at least two of several validations including luciferase reporter, gel shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and mRNA expression following RNAi knockdown of SRF; 60/89 (67%) of the targets were validated. Interestingly, 26 of the validated SRF target genes encode for cytoskeletal/contractile or adhesion proteins. RNAi knockdown of SRF diminishes expression of several SRF-dependent cytoskeletal genes and elicits an attending perturbation in the cytoarchitecture of both human and rodent cells. These data illustrate the power of integrating existing algorithms to interrogate the genome in a relatively unbiased fashion for cis-regulatory element discovery. In this manner, we have further expanded the mammalian CArGome with the discovery of an array of cyto-contractile genes that coordinate normal cytoskeletal homeostasis. We suggest one function of SRF is that of an ancient master regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:16365378

  15. Cortical pathways to the mammalian amygdala.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A J

    1998-06-01

    The amygdaloid nuclear complex is critical for producing appropriate emotional and behavioral responses to biologically relevant sensory stimuli. It constitutes an essential link between sensory and limbic areas of the cerebral cortex and subcortical brain regions, such as the hypothalamus, brainstem, and striatum, that are responsible for eliciting emotional and motivational responses. This review summarizes the anatomy and physiology of the cortical pathways to the amygdala in the rat, cat and monkey. Although the basic anatomy of these systems in the cat and monkey was largely delineated in studies conducted during the 1970s and 1980s, detailed information regarding the cortico-amygdalar pathways in the rat was only obtained in the past several years. The purpose of this review is to describe the results of recent studies in the rat and to compare the organization of cortico-amygdalar projections in this species with that seen in the cat and monkey. In all three species visual, auditory, and somatosensory information is transmitted to the amygdala by a series of modality-specific cortico-cortical pathways ("cascades") that originate in the primary sensory cortices and flow toward higher order association areas. The cortical areas in the more distal portions of these cascades have stronger and more extensive projections to the amygdala than the more proximal areas. In all three species olfactory and gustatory/visceral information has access to the amygdala at an earlier stage of cortical processing than visual, auditory and somatosensory information. There are also important polysensory cortical inputs to the mammalian amygdala from the prefrontal and hippocampal regions. Whereas the overall organization of cortical pathways is basically similar in all mammalian species, there is anatomical evidence which suggests that there are important differences in the extent of convergence of cortical projections in the primate versus the nonprimate amygdala.

  16. Identification of mammalian orthologs using local synteny

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate determination of orthology is central to comparative genomics. For vertebrates in particular, very large gene families, high rates of gene duplication and loss, multiple mechanisms of gene duplication, and high rates of retrotransposition all combine to make inference of orthology between genes difficult. Many methods have been developed to identify orthologous genes, mostly based upon analysis of the inferred protein sequence of the genes. More recently, methods have been proposed that use genomic context in addition to protein sequence to improve orthology assignment in vertebrates. Such methods have been most successfully implemented in fungal genomes and have long been used in prokaryotic genomes, where gene order is far less variable than in vertebrates. However, to our knowledge, no explicit comparison of synteny and sequence based definitions of orthology has been reported in vertebrates, or, more specifically, in mammals. Results We test a simple method for the measurement and utilization of gene order (local synteny) in the identification of mammalian orthologs by investigating the agreement between coding sequence based orthology (Inparanoid) and local synteny based orthology. In the 5 mammalian genomes studied, 93% of the sampled inter-species pairs were found to be concordant between the two orthology methods, illustrating that local synteny is a robust substitute to coding sequence for identifying orthologs. However, 7% of pairs were found to be discordant between local synteny and Inparanoid. These cases of discordance result from evolutionary events including retrotransposition and genome rearrangements. Conclusions By analyzing cases of discordance between local synteny and Inparanoid we show that local synteny can distinguish between true orthologs and recent retrogenes, can resolve ambiguous many-to-many orthology relationships into one-to-one ortholog pairs, and might be used to identify cases of non-orthologous gene

  17. Thresholds for the electrocardiographic change range of biochemical markers of acute myocardial infarction (GUSTO-IIa data).

    PubMed

    Bahit, Maria Cecilia; Criger, Douglas A; Ohman, E Magnus; Granger, Christopher B; Wagner, Galen S

    2002-08-01

    The definition of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is increasingly dependent on levels of biochemical markers, including troponin. We aimed to determine the levels of biochemical markers associated with definite evolutionary electrocardiographic (ECG) changes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. By examining the database of 855 patients from the troponin substudy of GUSTO-IIa, we selected patients with ST-segment elevation at baseline, evidence of evolution of the QRS, T, and ST-segment waveforms on the predischarge electrocardiogram, and 3 measurements of > or =1 of the following: creatine kinase (CK)-MB, troponin T, or troponin I. We identified 222 patients with evolutionary ECG changes. The median QRS score for this population was 5 points; the fifth percentile was 1. For patients with 3 CK-MB measurements, the fifth percentile as a multiple of the upper limit of normal was 2.1 (upper limit of normal 7.0 ng/ml). For patients with troponin T measurements, the fifth percentile as a multiple of the upper limit of normal was 11.0 (upper limit of normal 0.1 ng/ml). For patients with troponin I measurements, the fifth percentile as a multiple of the upper limit of normal was 3.8 (upper limit of normal 1.5 ng/ml). This study revealed that 95% of the patients with definite ECG evidence of AMI had a more than twofold increase in CK-MB and more than a 3- to 11-fold increase in troponin.

  18. A phase IIa, nonrandomized study of radium-223 dichloride in advanced breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Naume, Bjørn; Garcia, Camilo; Jerusalem, Guy; Piccart, Martine; Vobecky, Nancy; Thuresson, Marcus; Flamen, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223) mimics calcium and emits high-energy, short-range alpha-particles resulting in an antitumor effect on bone metastases. This open-label, phase IIa nonrandomized study investigated safety and short-term efficacy of radium-223 in breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease. Twenty-three advanced breast cancer patients with progressive bone-dominant disease, and no longer candidates for further endocrine therapy, were to receive radium-223 (50 kBq/kg IV) every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. The coprimary end points were change in urinary N-telopeptide of type 1 (uNTX-1) and serum bone alkaline phosphatase (bALP) after 16 weeks of treatment. Exploratory end points included sequential (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) to assess metabolic changes in osteoblastic bone metastases. Safety data were collected for all patients. Radium-223 significantly reduced uNTX-1 and bALP from baseline to end of treatment. Median uNTX-1 change was -10.1 nmol bone collagen equivalents/mmol creatinine (-32.8 %; P = 0.0124); median bALP change was -16.7 ng/mL (-42.0 %; P = 0.0045). Twenty of twenty-three patients had FDG PET/CT identifying 155 hypermetabolic osteoblastic bone lesions at baseline: 50 lesions showed metabolic decrease (≥25 % reduction of maximum standardized uptake value from baseline) after 2 radium-223 injections [32.3 % metabolic response rate (mRR) at week 9], persisting after the treatment period (41.5 % mRR at week 17). Radium-223 was safe and well tolerated. Radium-223 targets areas of increased bone metabolism and shows biological activity in advanced breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease.

  19. Genomic Structure and Identification of Novel Mutations in Usherin, the Gene Responsible for Usher Syndrome Type IIa

    PubMed Central

    Weston, M. D.; Eudy, J. D.; Fujita, S.; Yao, S.-F.; Usami, S.; Cremers, C.; Greenburg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Martini, A.; Moller, C.; Smith, R. J.; Sumegi, J.; Kimberling, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Usher syndrome type IIa (USHIIa) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. This disorder maps to human chromosome 1q41. Recently, mutations in USHIIa patients were identified in a novel gene isolated from this chromosomal region. The USH2A gene encodes a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 171.5 kD and possesses laminin epidermal growth factor as well as fibronectin type III domains. These domains are observed in other protein components of the basal lamina and extracellular matrixes; they may also be observed in cell-adhesion molecules. The intron/exon organization of the gene whose protein we name “Usherin” was determined by direct sequencing of PCR products and cloned genomic DNA with cDNA-specific primers. The gene is encoded by 21 exons and spans a minimum of 105 kb. A mutation search of 57 independent USHIIa probands was performed with a combination of direct sequencing and heteroduplex analysis of PCR-amplified exons. Fifteen new mutations were found. Of 114 independent USH2A alleles, 58 harbored probable pathologic mutations. Ten cases of USHIIa were true homozygotes and 10 were compound heterozygotes; 18 heterozygotes with only one identifiable mutation were observed. Sixty-five percent (38/58) of cases had at least one mutation, and 51% (58/114) of the total number of possible mutations were identified. The allele 2299delG (previously reported as 2314delG) was the most frequent mutant allele observed (16%; 31/192). Three new missense mutations (C319Y, N346H, and C419F) were discovered; all were restricted to the previously unreported laminin domain VI region of Usherin. The possible significance of this domain, known to be necessary for laminin network assembly, is discussed in the context of domain VI mutations from other proteins. PMID:10729113

  20. Essential amino acids of starch synthase IIa differentiate amylopectin structure and starch quality between japonica and indica rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasunori; Francisco, Perigio B; Hosaka, Yuko; Sato, Aya; Sawada, Takayuki; Kubo, Akiko; Fujita, Naoko

    2005-05-01

    Four amino acids were variable between the 'active' indica-type and 'inactive' japonica-type soluble starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) of rice plants; Glu-88 and Gly-604 in SSIIa of indica-cultivars IR36 and Kasalath were replaced by Asp-88 and Ser-604, respectively, in both japonica cultivars Nipponbare and Kinmaze SSIIa, whereas Val-737 and Leu-781 in indica SSIIa were replaced by Met-737 in cv. Nipponbare and Phe-781 in cv. Kinmaze SSIIa, respectively. The SSIIa gene fragments shuffling experiments revealed that Val-737 and Leu-781 are essential not only for the optimal SSIIa activity, but also for the capacity to synthesize indica-type amylopectin. Surprisingly, however, a combination of Phe-781 and Gly-604 could restore about 44% of the SSIIa activity provided that Val-737 was conserved. The introduction of the 'active' indica-type SSIIa gene enabled the japonica-type cv. Kinmaze to synthesize indica-type amylopectin. The starch in the transformed japonica rice plants exhibited gelatinization-resistant properties that are characteristic of indica-rice starch. Transformed lines expressing different levels of the IR36 SSIIa protein produced a variety of starches with amylopectin chain-length distribution patterns that correlated well with their onset temperatures of gelatinization. The present study confirmed that the SSIIa activity determines the type of amylopectin structure of rice starch to be either the typical indica-type or japonica-type, by playing a specific role in the synthesis of the long B(1) chains by elongating short A and B(1) chains, notwithstanding the presence of functional two additional SSII genes, a single SSI gene, two SSIII genes, and two SSIV genes in rice plants.