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Sample records for mammalian hemoglobins effect

  1. Structural analysis of fish versus mammalian hemoglobins: Effect of the heme pocket environment on autooxidation and hemin loss

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda IV, Roman; Cai, He; Worley, Chad E.; Levin, Elena J.; Li, Rong; Olson, John S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Richards, Mark P.

    2010-01-07

    The underlying stereochemical mechanisms for the dramatic differences in autooxidation and hemin loss rates of fish versus mammalian hemoglobins (Hb) have been examined by determining the crystal structures of perch, trout IV, and bovine Hb at high and low pH. The fish Hbs autooxidize and release hemin {approx}50- to 100-fold more rapidly than bovine Hb. Five specific amino acid replacements in the CD corner and along the E helix appear to cause the increased susceptibility of fish Hbs to oxidative degradation compared with mammalian Hbs. Ile is present at the E11 helical position in most fish Hb chains whereas a smaller Val residue is present in all mammalian {alpha} and {beta} chains. The larger IleE11 side chain sterically hinders bound O{sub 2} and facilitates dissociation of the neutral superoxide radical, enhancing autooxidation. Lys(E10) is found in most mammalian Hb and forms favorable electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions with the heme-7-propionate. In contrast, Thr(E10) is present in most fish Hbs and is too short to stabilize bound heme, and causes increased rates of hemin dissociation. Especially high rates of hemin loss in perch Hb are also due to a lack of electrostatic interaction between His(CE3) and the heme-6 propionate in {alpha} subunits whereas this interaction does occur in trout IV and bovine Hb. There is also a larger gap for solvent entry into the heme crevice near {beta} CD3 in the perch Hb ({approx}8 {angstrom}) compared with trout IV Hb ({approx}6 {angstrom}) which in turn is significantly higher than that in bovine Hb ({approx}4 {angstrom}) at low pH. The amino acids at CD4 and E14 differ between bovine and the fish Hbs and have the potential to modulate oxidative degradation by altering the orientation of the distal histidine and the stability of the E-helix. Generally rapid rates of lipid oxidation in fish muscle can be partly attributed to the fact that fish Hbs are highly susceptible to oxidative degradation.

  2. Structural analysis of fish versus mammalian hemoglobins: effect of the heme pocket environment on autooxidation and hemin loss.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Roman; Cai, He; Worley, Chad E; Levin, Elena J; Li, Rong; Olson, John S; Phillips, George N; Richards, Mark P

    2009-04-01

    The underlying stereochemical mechanisms for the dramatic differences in autooxidation and hemin loss rates of fish versus mammalian hemoglobins (Hb) have been examined by determining the crystal structures of perch, trout IV, and bovine Hb at high and low pH. The fish Hbs autooxidize and release hemin approximately 50- to 100-fold more rapidly than bovine Hb. Five specific amino acid replacements in the CD corner and along the E helix appear to cause the increased susceptibility of fish Hbs to oxidative degradation compared with mammalian Hbs. Ile is present at the E11 helical position in most fish Hb chains whereas a smaller Val residue is present in all mammalian alpha and beta chains. The larger IleE11 side chain sterically hinders bound O(2) and facilitates dissociation of the neutral superoxide radical, enhancing autooxidation. Lys(E10) is found in most mammalian Hb and forms favorable electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions with the heme-7-propionate. In contrast, Thr(E10) is present in most fish Hbs and is too short to stabilize bound heme, and causes increased rates of hemin dissociation. Especially high rates of hemin loss in perch Hb are also due to a lack of electrostatic interaction between His(CE3) and the heme-6 propionate in alpha subunits whereas this interaction does occur in trout IV and bovine Hb. There is also a larger gap for solvent entry into the heme crevice near beta CD3 in the perch Hb (approximately 8 A) compared with trout IV Hb (approximately 6 A) which in turn is significantly higher than that in bovine Hb (approximately 4 A) at low pH. The amino acids at CD4 and E14 differ between bovine and the fish Hbs and have the potential to modulate oxidative degradation by altering the orientation of the distal histidine and the stability of the E-helix. Generally rapid rates of lipid oxidation in fish muscle can be partly attributed to the fact that fish Hbs are highly susceptible to oxidative degradation.

  3. Anion Bohr effect of human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bucci, E; Fronticelli, C

    1985-01-15

    The pH dependence of oxygen affinity of hemoglobin (Bohr effect) is due to ligand-linked pK shifts of ionizable groups. Attempt to identify these groups has produced controversial data and interpretations. In a further attempt to clarify the situation, we noticed that hemoglobin alkylated in its liganded form lost the Bohr effect while hemoglobin alkylated in its unliganded form showed the presence of a practically unmodified Bohr effect. In spite of this difference, analyses of the extent of alkylation of the two compounds failed to identify the presence of specific preferential alkylations. In particular, the alpha 1 valines and beta 146 histidines appeared to be alkylated to the same extent in the two proteins. Focusing our attention on the effect of the anions on the functional properties of hemoglobin, we measured the Bohr effect of untreated hemoglobin in buffers made with HEPES [N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid], MES [2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid], and MOPS [3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid], which being zwitterions do not need addition of chlorides or other anions for reaching the desired pH. The shape acquired by the Bohr effect curves, either as pH dependence of oxygen affinity or as pH dependence of protons exchanged with the solution, was irreconcilable with that of the Bohr effect curves in usual buffers. This indicated the relevance of solvent components in determining the functional properties of hemoglobin. A new thermodynamic model is proposed for the Bohr effect that includes the interaction of hemoglobin with solvent components. The classic proton Bohr effect is a special case of the new theory.

  4. Hemoglobin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hemoglobin Share this page: Was ...

  5. Bohr effect of hemoglobins: Accounting for differences in magnitude.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde O

    2015-09-07

    The basis of the difference in the Bohr effect of various hemoglobins has remained enigmatic for decades. Fourteen amino acid residues, identical in pairs and located at specific 'Bohr group positions' in human hemoglobin, are implicated in the Bohr effect. All 14 are present in mouse, 11 in dog, eight in pigeon and 13 in guinea pig hemoglobin. The Bohr data for human and mouse hemoglobin are identical: the 14 Bohr groups appear at identical positions in both molecules. The dog data are different from the human because three Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in dog hemoglobin; the pigeon data are vastly different from the human because six Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. The guinea pig data are quite complex. Quantitative analyses showed that only the pigeon data could be fitted with the Wyman equation for the Bohr effect. We demonstrate that, apart from guinea pig hemoglobin, the difference between the Bohr effect of each of the other hemoglobins and of pigeon hemoglobin can be accounted for quantitatively on the basis of the occupation of some of their Bohr group positions by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. We attribute the anomalous guinea pig result to a new salt-bridge formed in its R2 quaternary structure between the terminal NH3(+) group of one β-chain and the COO(-) terminal group of the partner β-chain in the same molecule. The pKas of this NH3(+) group are 6.33 in the R2 and 4.59 in the T state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rana; Thukral, Anubhav; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Roy, Ajitesh; Goswami, Soumik; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC) turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover) were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism. PMID:28217494

  7. RENAL EFFECTS OF HEMOGLOBIN INFUSIONS IN DOGS IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Hiller, Alma; Van Slyke, Donald D.

    1947-01-01

    The immediate effects of treating hemorrhagic shock in dogs by replacing lost blood with 7 per cent hemoglobin solution were favorable, both on renal function and on general condition. However, subsequent transitory depression of the urea clearance for several days, shown by some of the treated animals, but not by untreated bled controls, indicates sufficient possibility of renal damage by the hemoglobin solution to prevent its recommendation at present as a blood substitute. PMID:19871692

  8. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Knight, C.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization.The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights.Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system.We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon Inc (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells for a time period of forty eight hours exposure.Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  9. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization. The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights. Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system and nervous system. We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes and astrocyte cells to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon, Inc. (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells up to a time period of 120 hours exposure. Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  10. Role of tertiary structures on the Root effect in fish hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Luca; Merlino, Antonello; Bettati, Stefano; Verde, Cinzia; Balsamo, Anna; Mazzarella, Lelio; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Vergara, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    Many fish hemoglobins exhibit a marked dependence of oxygen affinity and cooperativity on proton concentration, called Root effect. Both tertiary and quaternary effects have been evoked to explain the allosteric regulation brought about by protons in fish hemoglobins. However, no general rules have emerged so far. We carried out a complementary crystallographic and microspectroscopic characterization of ligand binding to crystals of deoxy-hemoglobin from the Antarctic fish Trematomus bernacchii (HbTb) at pH6.2 and pH8.4. At low pH ligation has negligible structural effects, correlating with low affinity and absence of cooperativity in oxygen binding. At high pH, ligation causes significant changes at the tertiary structural level, while preserving structural markers of the T state. These changes mainly consist in a marked displacement of the position of the switch region CD corner towards an R-like position. The functional data on T-state crystals validate the relevance of the crystallographic observations, revealing that, differently from mammalian Hbs, in HbTb a significant degree of cooperativity in oxygen binding is due to tertiary conformational changes, in the absence of the T-R quaternary transition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  11. Lamprey hemoglobin. Structural basis of the bohr effect.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Maillett, D H; Knapp, J; Olson, J S; Riggs, A F

    2000-05-05

    Lampreys, among the most primitive living vertebrates, have hemoglobins (Hbs) with self-association and ligand-binding properties very different from those that characterize the alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric Hbs of higher vertebrates. Monomeric, ligated lamprey Hb self-associates to dimers and tetramers upon deoxygenation. Dissociation to monomers upon oxygenation accounts for the cooperative binding of O(2) and its pH dependence. Honzatko and Hendrickson (Honzatko, R. B., and Hendrickson, W. A. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A 83, 8487-8491) proposed that the dimeric interface of the Hb resembles either the alpha(1)beta(2) interface of mammalian Hbs or the contacts in clam Hb where the E and F helices form the interface. Perutz (Perutz, M. F. (1989) Quart. Rev. Biophys. 2, 139- 236) proposed a version of the clam model in which the distal histidine swings out of the heme pocket upon deoxygenation to form a bond with a carboxyl group of a second monomer. The sedimentation behavior and oxygen equilibria of nine mutants of the major Hb component, PMII, from Petromyzon marinus have been measured to test these models. The results strongly support a critical role of the E helix and the AB corner in forming the subunit interface in the dimer and rule out the alpha(1)beta(2) model. The pH dependence of both the sedimentation equilibrium and the oxygen binding of the mutant E75Q indicate that Glu(75) is one of two groups responsible for the Bohr effect. Changing the distal histidine 73 to glutamine almost completely abolishes the self-association of the deoxy-Hb and causes a large increase in O(2) affinity. The recent x-ray crystallographic determination of the structure of deoxy lamprey Hb, reported after the completion of this work (Heaslet, H. A., and Royer, W. E. (1999) Structure 7, 517-526), shows that the dimer interface does involve the E helix and the AB corner, supporting the measurements and interpretations reported here.

  12. Effect of Some High Consumption Spices on Hemoglobin Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, G. H.; Dinani, Narges J.; Asgary, S.; Taher, M.; Nikkhoo, N.; Boshtam, M.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes. PMID:25593391

  13. Fetal hemoglobin accumulation in vitro. Effect of adherent mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Javid, J; Pettis, P K

    1983-01-01

    In clonal cultures of erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) obtained from blood, the accumulation of fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb F and Hb A) was measured by radioligand immunoassay. Inclusion of adherent mononuclear cells in the culture promoted a striking increase in the relative amount of Hb F in each of 44 experiments with 14 donors. In two-thirds of the instances, this was accounted for by a selective increase in the absolute amount of Hb F. The differential effect on Hb F and Hb A accumulation was achieved without altering the maturity of the erythroid cells, their mean hemoglobin content, or the asynchrony of the production of the two hemoglobins. Virtually all bursts produced Hb F, and the population of BFU-E as a whole, rather than a selected subset, appeared to be the target of adherent cell action. When the adherent cells were excluded from the culture input, the base-line value of Hb F was reproducible for each donor over a period of several months, and correlated with the number of in vivo circulating F cells. PMID:6189860

  14. [The effect of peroxynitrite on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen in vitro].

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of peroxynitrite on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen in vitro. It was shown that the incubation of venous blood with peroxynitrite resulted in a rise of affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. Presumably, this effect is realized through the generation of various forms of hemoglobin: heme-oxidized and modified at the amino acid residues of the protein. The dependence of the results of hemoglobin-peroxynitrite reaction on the carbon dioxide tension and the saturation of hemoglobin by oxygen is discussed.

  15. Effects of porcine hemoglobin on serum lipid content and fecal lipid excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of dietary hemoglobin on serum and liver lipid contents in rats, and the ability of hemoglobin hydrolysates to disrupt lipid absorption. After rats had been fed on casein- or porcine hemoglobin-containing diets for 4 weeks, their serum and liver lipid contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion were measured. To elucidate the mechanism of lipid absorption by dietary hemoglobin, we also examined lipase activity, micellar solubility of cholesterol, and bile acid binding activity in the presence of hemoglobin hydrolysates. Dietary hemoglobin decreased serum and liver triglyceride and cholesterol contents and increased fecal fatty acid, cholesterol, and bile acid excretion. In addition, hemoglobin hydrolysates inhibited lipase activity compared with casein hydrolysates in an in vitro study. These results suggested that the hypolipidemic effect of hemoglobin is mediated by increased fecal lipid excretion, and that decreased lipase activity by hemoglobin is at least partially responsible for this result. The observed effects were documented with an 8 g/kg hemoglobin diet, which is lower than in other studies; therefore. hemoglobin may be useful in the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.

  16. The effect of cationic starch on hemoglobin, and the primary attempt to encapsulate hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Sha, Baoyong; Liu, Yongchun; Wu, Daocheng; Shen, Xin; Jing, Guixia

    2015-06-01

    Though starch has been a common material used for drug delivery, it has not been used as an encapsulation material for hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. In this study, cationic amylose (CA) was synthesized by an etherification reaction. The interaction behaviors between CA and hemoglobin (Hb) were measured by zeta potential, size, and UV-Vis absorption spectra at different pH values. Cationic starch encapsulated Hb by electrostatic adhesion, reverse micelles, and cross-linking, and showed a core shell structure with a size of around 100 nm, when measured immediately after dispersing in PBS solution. However, we found that it was prone to swell, aggregate, and leak Hb with a longer duration of dispersal in PBS.

  17. Mössbauer Effect in Hemoglobin and Some Iron-Containing Biological Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gonser, U.; Grant, R. W.

    1965-01-01

    The Mössbauer effect in Fe57 has been used to study the molecules, hemoglobin, O2-hemoglobin, CO2-hemoglobin, and CO-hemoglobin (within red cells) and the molecules, hemin and hematin (in the crystalline state). Quadrupole splittings and isomeric shifts observed in the Mössbauer spectra of these molecules are tabulated. The temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting and relative recoil-free fraction for hemoglobin with different ligands has been investigated. An estimate of the Debye-Waller factor in O2-hemoglobin at 5°K is 0.83. An asymmetry in the quadrupole splitting observed in hemoglobin is attributed to a directional dependence of the recoil-free fraction which establishes the sign of the electric field gradient in the molecule and indicates that the lowest lying d orbital of the Fe atoms is |xy>. This asymmetry indicates that the iron atoms in hemoglobin are vibrating farther perpendicular to the heme planes than parallel to them, and, in fact, the ratio of the mean square displacements perpendicular and parallel to the heme planes in hemoglobin is ≈5.5 at 5°K. The temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting in hemoglobin has been used to estimate a splitting between the lowest lying iron atom d orbitals of ≈420 cm-1. PMID:5884013

  18. Photodynamic effect occurance in photosensitizer mixtures with albumin or blood serum, or hemoglobin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Posypanova, Anna M.; Volkova, Anna I.

    1996-05-01

    Under laser irradiation of different photosensitizers (PS) mixtures with pure albumin or without hemolysis blood serum the photodynamic effect (PE) is scarcely to be manifested. The coupling of PS with albumins prevents the interactions of dissolved oxygen molecules with PS molecules and formation of active oxygen forms. In order to promote the PE it is necessary to add the solution of hemoglobin. The PE is readily recognized in mixtures of PS with the blood. Such mixing leads to the erythrocytes' destruction and yields uncombined hemoglobin in blood plasma. The irradiation of hemoglobin mixtures with PS leads to the destruction of hemoglobin. In this case the direct combination of oxygen molecules with hemoglobin is important for PE performance (the deoxy hemoglobin can not promote PE otherwise).

  19. Effects of rutin on the redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Ding, Yun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Pingzhang

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoids are widely used to attenuate oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the influence of rutin (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside) on hemoglobin (Hb)- dependent redox reactions, i.e. oxidative stability of Hb and its cytotoxic ferryl intermediate. It was found that rutin induced generation of H2O2, which in turn oxidized Hb rapidly. Meanwhile, rutin exhibited anti-oxidant effect by effectively reducing ferryl intermediate back to ferric Hb at physiological pH. In comparison with quercetin, rutin had stronger capability on reducing ferryl species while lesser pro-oxidant effect on H2O2 generation, thus it exhibited more protective effect on H2O2-induced Hb oxidation. Circular dichroism spectrum showed no significant change in the secondary structure of Hb after flavonoid addition, while molecular docking revealed different binding modes of quercetin and rutin with Hb. These results might provide new insights into the potential nutritional and physiological implications of rutin and quercetin with redox active heme proteins regarding their ani- and pro-oxidant effects.

  20. Allosteric water and phosphate effects in Hoplosternum littorale hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Peres, Patricia; de Azevedo Júnior, Walter F; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports the results obtained using the osmotic stress method applied to the purified cathodic and anodic hemoglobins (Hbs) from the catfish Hoplosternum littorale, a species that displays facultative accessorial air oxygenation. We demonstrate that water potential affects the oxygen affinity of H. littorale Hbs in the presence of an inert solute (sucrose). Oxygen affinity increases when water activity increases, indicating that water molecules stabilize the high-affinity state of the Hb. This effect is the same as that observed in tetrameric vertebrate Hbs. We show that both anodic and cathodic Hbs show conformational substrates similar to other vertebrate Hbs. For both Hbs, addition of anionic effectors, especially chloride, strongly increases the number of water molecules bound, although anodic Hb did not exhibit sensitivity to saturating levels of ATP. Accordingly, for both Hbs, we propose that the deoxy conformations coexist in at least two anion-dependent allosteric states, T(o) and T(x), as occurs for human Hb. We found a single phosphate binding site for the cathodic Hb.

  1. O-Raffinose Crosslinking Substantially Ameliorates the Vasoconstrictive and Nitric-Oxide-Inactivating Effects of Unmodified Human Hemoglobin in the Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-11

    human hemoglobin Ao. We compared the effects of unmodified hemoglobin with o-raffinose crosslinked oligomers of hemoglobin ( modified hemoglobin). The...by -20%) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) only modestly increased (by -13%). In contrast, the modified hemoglobin solution caused less increase in...molecules can be chemically modified to prevent the excretion of hemoglobin in the urine. Native hemoglobin (~64,500kD), when released from red cells

  2. Effects of Hemoglobin Variants on Hemoglobin A1c Values Measured Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Iglesia, Silvia; Ropero, Paloma; Nogueira-Salgueiro, Patricia; Santana-Benitez, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is routinely used to monitor long-term glycemic control and for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. However, hemoglobin (Hb) gene variants/modifications can affect the accuracy of some methods. The potential effect of Hb variants on HbA1c measurements was investigated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method compared with an immunoturbimetric assay. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in 42 371 blood samples. Samples producing abnormal chromatograms were further analyzed to characterize any Hb variants. Fructosamine levels were determined in place of HbA1c levels when unstable Hb variants were identified. Abnormal HPLC chromatograms were obtained for 160 of 42 371 samples. In 26 samples HbS was identified and HbA1c results correlated with FPG. In the remaining 134 samples HbD, Hb Louisville, Hb Las Palmas, Hb N-Baltimore, or Hb Porto Alegre were identified and HbA1c did not correlate with FPG. These samples were retested using an immunoturbidimetric assay and the majority of results were accurate; only 3 (with the unstable Hb Louisville trait) gave aberrant HbA1c results. Hb variants can affect determination of HbA1c levels with some methods. Laboratories should be aware of Hb variants occurring locally and choose an appropriate HbA1c testing method. PMID:25355712

  3. Hemoglobin derivatives

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003371.htm Hemoglobin derivatives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemoglobin derivatives are altered forms of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is ...

  4. Hemoglobin Solution Effects on the Heart: Review of 19 Research Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    York: Alan R Liss, Inc.] 213-222. niEor 6. Biro GP, Heresford-Kroeger D. 1180. The effect of hemodilut ion with st roma-free hemoglobin and dextran on...1980. The effect of hemodilution with stroma-free hemoglobin and dextran on collateral perfusion of ischemic myocardium in the dog. Am Heart J 99:64-75...Nine dogs received stroma-free hemoglobin solution (Group 1), 9 dogs received their shed blood (Group 2) and 6 dogs received a 6% solution of Dextran -70

  5. Anti- and pro-oxidant effects of (+)-catechin on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Puqing; Yang, Qin; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme proteins as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Flavonoids have been widely used to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and in vitro, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action was usually dependent on their anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of (+)-catechin, a polyphenol identified in tea, cocoa, and red wine, on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage. It was found that (+)-catechin had the capacities to act as a free radical scavenger and reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl hemoglobin, demonstrating apparent anti-oxidant activities. However, the presence of (+)-catechin surprisingly promoted hemoglobin-induced protein oxidation, which was probably due to the ability of this anti-oxidant to rapidly trigger the oxidative degradation of normal hemoglobin. In addition, hemoglobin-H2O2-induced protein carbonyl formation was significantly enhanced by (+)-catechin at lower concentrations, while it was efficiently inhibited when higher concentrations were used. These novel results showed that the dietary intake and therapeutic use of catechins might possess pro-oxidant activity through aggravating hemoglobin-related oxidative damage. The dual effects on hemoglobin redox reactions may provide new insights into the physiological implications of tea extract and wine (catechins) with cellular heme proteins.

  6. Bohr effect of human hemoglobin: Separation of tertiary and quaternary contributions based on the Wyman equation.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde Onwochei

    2017-09-01

    As a prelude to separating tertiary from quaternary structure contributions to the Bohr effect, we employed the Wyman equation to analyze Bohr data for human hemoglobin to which 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, 2,3-BPG, is bound. Changes in the pKas of the histidine Bohr groups result in a net reduction of their contributions to the Bohr effect at pH 7.4 compared to their contributions in stripped hemoglobin. The non-histidine 2,3-BPG binding groups - the β-chain terminal amino group and Lys82β - make negative and positive contributions, respectively, to the Bohr effect. The final result is that the Bohr effect at physiological pH is higher for 2,3-BPG bound compared to stripped hemoglobin. Contributions linked to His2β, His77β and His143β enable us to separate tertiary from quaternary Bohr contributions in stripped and in 2,3-BPG bound hemoglobin. Both contributions serve to make the Bohr effect for 2,3-BPG bound hemoglobin higher than for stripped hemoglobin at physiological pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of the adjuvant effect of hemoglobin in experimental peritonitis. VII. Hemoglobin does not inhibit clearance of Escherichia coli from the peritoneal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, D.L.; Barke, R.A.; Lee, J.T. Jr.; Condie, R.M.; Humphrey, E.W.; Simmons, R.L.

    1983-09-01

    Hemoglobin has been shown to be a potent adjuvant in experimental Escherichia coli peritonitis, although a satisfactory mechanistic rationale is still obscure. Hemoglobin has been thought to impair intraperitoneal neutrophil function, delay clearance of bacteria from the peritoneal cavity by the normal absorptive mechanisms, or directly enhance bacterial growth. Using highly purified stroma-free hemoglobin (SFHgb), we have largely discounted any direct effect of hemoglobin on peritoneal white blood cell function. In the present study, we confirmed that uncontrolled proliferation of bacteria takes place in the presence of hemoglobin in the peritoneal cavity. Nonviable 5-iododeoxyuridine /sup 125/I-labelled bacteria were then used to directly study peritoneal clearance kinetics, eliminating the problem of bacterial growth. SFHgb had no influence on the removal of intraperitoneal bacteria. The rate of bloodstream appearance of radiolabel was similar with or without intraperitoneal SFHgb. Thus, SFHgb does not prevent clearance of bacteria from the peritoneal cavity by interfering with normal host clearance mechanisms. SFHgb may act as a bacterial growth adjuvant, either by serving as a bacterial nutrient or by suitably modifying the environment so that extensive bacterial proliferation can occur. The latter hypothesis appears to be an area in which investigation concerning the adjuvant effect of hemoglobin may prove most fruitful.

  8. Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers on Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Roghani, Kimia; Holtby, Randall J.; Jahr, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been central in the development of resuscitation agents that might provide oxygen delivery in addition to simple volume expansion. Since 80% of the world population lives in areas where fresh blood products are not available, the application of these new solutions may prove to be highly beneficial (Kim and Greenburg 2006). Many improvements have been made to earlier generation HBOCs, but various concerns still remain, including coagulopathy, nitric oxide scavenging, platelet interference and decreased calcium concentration secondary to volume expansion (Jahr et al. 2013). This review will summarize the current challenges faced in developing HBOCs that may be used clinically, in order to guide future research efforts in the field. PMID:25514567

  9. Effect modification by Transferrin C2 polymorphism on lead exposure, hemoglobin levels, and IQ

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ananya; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Hu, Howard; Bellinger, David; Schwartz, Joel; Modali, Rama; Wright, Robert O.; Palaniappan, Kavitha; Balakrishnan, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency and lead exposure remain significant public health issues in many parts of the world and are both independently associated with neurocognitive deficits. Polymorphisms in iron transport pathways have been shown to modify the absorption and toxicity of lead. Objective We hypothesized that the transferrin (TF) C2 polymorphism modifies the effects of lead and hemoglobin on intelligence. Methods Children aged 3–7 years (N=708) were enrolled from 12 primary schools in Chennai, India. The Binet-Kamat Scale of Intelligence were administered to ascertain intelligence quotient (IQ). Venous blood was analyzed for lead and hemoglobin levels. Genotyping for the TF C2 polymorphism (rs1049296) was carried out using a MassARRAY iPLEXTM platform. Stratified analyses and interaction models, using generalized estimating equations, were examined to explore interactions between lead, hemoglobin, and TF C2 categories. Results A one-unit increase in log blood lead and 1 g/dl higher hemoglobin was associated with −7.7 (95% CI: −13.6, −1.8) and 1.7 (95% CI 1.4, 2.1) IQ points, respectively, among children carrying the C2 variant. In comparison, among children who had the homozygous wildtype allele, the same increment of lead and hemoglobin were associated with -−2.1(95% CI: −6.5, 2.4) and 2.8(95% CI:1.5, 4.0) IQ points, respectively. There was a significant interaction between lead (p=0.04) and hemoglobin (p=0.07) with the C2 variant. Conclusion Children who carry the TF C2 variant may be more susceptible to the neurotoxic effects of lead exposure and less protected by higher levels of hemoglobin. PMID:23732512

  10. Effect of Hemoglobin Target on Progression of Kidney Disease: A Secondary Analysis of the CHOIR (Correction of Hemoglobin and Outcomes in Renal Insufficiency) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Inrig, Jula. K.; Barnhart, Huiman X.; Reddan, Donal; Patel, Uptal D.; Sapp, Shelly; Califf, Robert M.; Singh, Ajay K.; Szczech, Lynda A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting relationships have been described between anemia correction using erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study was undertaken to examine the impact of target hemoglobin on progression of kidney disease in the CHOIR (Correction of Hemoglobin and Outcomes in Renal Insufficiency) trial. Study design Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial Setting and participants 1432 participants with CKD and anemia Intervention Participants were randomized to target hemoglobin of 13.5 vs 11.3 gm/dL with the use of epoetin-alfa. Outcomes and measurements Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for progression of CKD (a composite of doubling of creatinine, initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT), or death). Interactions between hemoglobin target and select baseline variables (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), proteinuria, diabetes, heart failure, and smoking history) were also examined. Results Participants randomized to higher hemoglobin targets experienced a shorter time to progression of kidney disease in both univariate (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03–1.52; p=0.02) and multivariable models (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00–1.48; p=0.05). These differences were attributable to higher rates of RRT and death among participants in the high hemoglobin arm. Hemoglobin target did not interact with eGFR, proteinuria, diabetes, or heart failure (p>0.05 for all). In the multivariable model, hemoglobin target interacted with tobacco use (p=0.04) such that the higher target had a greater risk of CKD progression among participants that currently smoked (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.23–5.09; p=0.01) which was not present among those who did not currently smoke (HR, 1.15; 95% CI 0.93–1.41; p=0.2). Limitations A post-hoc analysis and thus cause- effect cannot be determined. Conclusions These results suggest that high hemoglobin target is associated with a greater risk of progression of CKD. This

  11. Effect of methylprednisolone on mammalian neuronal networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Matthias; Rommer, Paulus S; Schiffmann, Florian; Jügelt, Konstantin; Stüwe, Simone; Benecke, Reiner; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Zettl, Uwe K

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GCS) are widely used for the treatment of neurological diseases, e.g. multiple sclerosis. High levels of GCS are toxic to the central nervous system and can produce adverse effects. The effect of methylprednisolone (MP) on mammalian neuronal networks was studied in vitro. We demonstrate a dose-dependent excitatory effect of MP on cultured neuronal networks, followed by a shut-down of electrical activity using the microelectrode array technique.

  12. Effects of habitat light intensity on mammalian eye shape.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Lewis, Rebecca J

    2011-05-01

    Many aspects of mammalian visual anatomy vary with activity pattern, reflecting the divergent selective pressures imposed by low light and high light visual environments. However, ambient light intensity can also differ substantially between and within habitats due to differences in foliage density. We explored the effects of interhabitat and intrahabitat variation in light intensity on mammalian visual anatomy. Data on relative cornea size, activity pattern, and habitat type were collected from the literature for 209 terrestrial mammal species. In general, mammalian relative cornea size significantly varied by habitat type. In within-order and across-mammal analyses, diurnal and cathemeral mammals from forested habitats exhibited relatively larger corneas than species from more open habitats, reflecting an adaptation to increase visual sensitivity in forest species. However, in all analyses, we found no habitat-type effect in nocturnal species, suggesting that nocturnal mammals may experience selection to maximize visual sensitivity across all habitats. We also examined whether vertical strata usage affected relative cornea size in anthropoid primates. In most analyses, species occupying lower levels of forests and woodlands did not exhibit relatively larger corneas than species utilizing higher levels. Thus, unlike differences in intensity between habitat types, differences in light intensity between vertical forest strata do not appear to exert a strong selective pressure on visual morphology. These results suggest that terrestrial mammal visual systems reflect specializations for habitat variation in light intensity, and that habitat type as well as activity pattern have influenced mammalian visual evolution.

  13. Effects of heat stress on mammalian reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Heat stress can have large effects on most aspects of reproductive function in mammals. These include disruptions in spermatogenesis and oocyte development, oocyte maturation, early embryonic development, foetal and placental growth and lactation. These deleterious effects of heat stress are the result of either the hyperthermia associated with heat stress or the physiological adjustments made by the heat-stressed animal to regulate body temperature. Many effects of elevated temperature on gametes and the early embryo involve increased production of reactive oxygen species. Genetic adaptation to heat stress is possible both with respect to regulation of body temperature and cellular resistance to elevated temperature. PMID:19833646

  14. Role of β/δ101Gln in regulating the effect of temperature and allosteric effectors on oxygen affinity in woolly mammoth hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Byrd, Catherine; Shen, Tong-Jian; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Tam, Tsuey Chyi S; Ho, Chien

    2013-12-10

    The oxygen affinity of woolly mammoth hemoglobin (rHb WM) is less affected by temperature change than that of Asian elephant hemoglobin (rHb AE) or human normal adult hemoglobin (Hb A). We report here a biochemical-biophysical study of Hb A, rHb AE, rHb WM, and three rHb WM mutants with amino acid substitutions at β/δ101 (β/δ101Gln→Glu, Lys, or Asp) plus a double and a triple mutant, designed to clarify the role of the β/δ101 residue. The β/δ101Gln residue is important for responding to allosteric effectors, such as phosphate, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), and chloride. The rHb WM mutants studied generally have higher affinity for oxygen under various conditions of pH, temperature, and salt concentration, and in the presence or absence of organic phosphate, than do rHb WM, rHb AE, and Hb A. Titrations for the O2 affinity of these mutant rHbs as a function of chloride concentration indicate a lower heterotopic effect of this anion due to the replacement of β/δ101Gln in rHb WM. The alkaline Bohr effect of rHb WM and its mutants is reduced by 20-50% compared to that of Hb A and is independent of changes in temperature, in contrast to what has been observed in the hemoglobins of most mammalian species, including human. The results of our study on the temperature dependence of the O2 affinity of rHb WM and its mutant rHbs illustrate the important role of β/δ101Gln in regulating the functional properties of these hemoglobins.

  15. Nonantibiotic Effects of Fluoroquinolones in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Badal, Sujan; Her, Yeng F; Maher, L James

    2015-09-04

    Fluoroquinolones (FQ) are powerful broad-spectrum antibiotics whose side effects include renal damage and, strangely, tendinopathies. The pathological mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Here, we show that the FQ drugs norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin are powerful iron chelators comparable with deferoxamine, a clinically useful iron-chelating agent. We show that iron chelation by FQ leads to epigenetic effects through inhibition of α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that require iron as a co-factor. Three dioxygenases were examined in HEK293 cells treated with FQ. At sub-millimolar concentrations, these antibiotics inhibited jumonji domain histone demethylases, TET DNA demethylases, and collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases, leading to accumulation of methylated histones and DNA and inhibition of proline hydroxylation in collagen, respectively. These effects may explain FQ-induced nephrotoxicity and tendinopathy. By the same reasoning, dioxygenase inhibition by FQ was predicted to stabilize transcription factor HIF-1α by inhibition of the oxygen-dependent hypoxia-inducible transcription factor prolyl hydroxylation. In dramatic contrast to this prediction, HIF-1α protein was eliminated by FQ treatment. We explored possible mechanisms for this unexpected effect and show that FQ inhibit HIF-1α mRNA translation. Thus, FQ antibiotics induce global epigenetic changes, inhibit collagen maturation, and block HIF-1α accumulation. We suggest that these mechanisms explain the classic renal toxicities and peculiar tendinopathies associated with FQ antibiotics. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Nonantibiotic Effects of Fluoroquinolones in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Sujan; Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQ) are powerful broad-spectrum antibiotics whose side effects include renal damage and, strangely, tendinopathies. The pathological mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Here, we show that the FQ drugs norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin are powerful iron chelators comparable with deferoxamine, a clinically useful iron-chelating agent. We show that iron chelation by FQ leads to epigenetic effects through inhibition of α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that require iron as a co-factor. Three dioxygenases were examined in HEK293 cells treated with FQ. At sub-millimolar concentrations, these antibiotics inhibited jumonji domain histone demethylases, TET DNA demethylases, and collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases, leading to accumulation of methylated histones and DNA and inhibition of proline hydroxylation in collagen, respectively. These effects may explain FQ-induced nephrotoxicity and tendinopathy. By the same reasoning, dioxygenase inhibition by FQ was predicted to stabilize transcription factor HIF-1α by inhibition of the oxygen-dependent hypoxia-inducible transcription factor prolyl hydroxylation. In dramatic contrast to this prediction, HIF-1α protein was eliminated by FQ treatment. We explored possible mechanisms for this unexpected effect and show that FQ inhibit HIF-1α mRNA translation. Thus, FQ antibiotics induce global epigenetic changes, inhibit collagen maturation, and block HIF-1α accumulation. We suggest that these mechanisms explain the classic renal toxicities and peculiar tendinopathies associated with FQ antibiotics. PMID:26205818

  17. The effect of gamma-rays on the hemoglobin of whole-body irradiated mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashry, H. A.; Selim, N. S.; El-Behay, A. Z.

    1994-07-01

    Changes in the UV-visible absorption spectrum of mouse hemoglobin as a result of whole body irradiation were studied. White albino adult mice were exposed to a Cs-137 γ-source at a dose rate of 47.5 Gy/h to different absorbed dose values ranging from 1 to 8 Gy. Blood specimens were taken 24 h after irradiation. The UV-visible absorption spectra of hemoglobin of irradiated and control mice were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The obtained results showed significant changes in the bands measured at 340 nm, in the Soret band measured at 410 nm, also, the α- and β-bands measured at 537 and 572 nm showed significant decrease in intensity with the absorbed dose increase. The absorbance measured at 630 nm showed no significant changes. The radiation effect on the animal hemoglobin was discussed on the basis of the obtained results.

  18. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  19. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  20. Predicting hemoglobin levels in whole blood donors using transition models and mixed effects models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To optimize the planning of blood donations but also to continue motivating the volunteers it is important to streamline the practical organization of the timing of donations. While donors are asked to return for donation after a suitable period, still a relevant proportion of blood donors is deferred from donation each year due to a too low hemoglobin level. Rejection of donation may demotivate the candidate donor and implies an inefficient planning of the donation process. Hence, it is important to predict the future hemoglobin level to improve the planning of donors’ visits to the blood bank. Methods The development of the hemoglobin prediction rule is based on longitudinal (panel) data from blood donations collected by Sanquin (the only blood product collecting and supplying organization in the Netherlands). We explored and contrasted two popular statistical models, i.e. the transition (autoregressive) model and the mixed effects model as plausible models to account for the dependence among subsequent hemoglobin levels within a donor. Results The predictors of the future hemoglobin level are age, season, hemoglobin levels at the previous visits, and a binary variable indicating whether a donation was made at the previous visit. Based on cross-validation, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) for male donors are 0.83 and 0.81 for the transition model and the mixed effects model, respectively; for female donors we obtained AUC values of 0.73 and 0.72 for the transition model and the mixed effects model, respectively. Conclusion We showed that the transition models and the mixed effects models provide a much better prediction compared to a multiple linear regression model. In general, the transition model provides a somewhat better prediction than the mixed effects model, especially at high visit numbers. In addition, the transition model offers a better trade-off between sensitivity and specificity when varying the cut

  1. Bohr effect of avian hemoglobins: Quantitative analyses based on the Wyman equation.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde O

    2016-12-07

    The Bohr effect data for bar-headed goose, greylag goose and pheasant hemoglobins can be fitted with the Wyman equation for the Bohr effect, but under one proviso: that the pKa of His146β does not change following the T→R quaternary transition. This assumption is based on the x-ray structure of bar-headed goose hemoglobin, which shows that the salt-bridge formed between His146β and Asp94β in human deoxyhemoglobin is not formed in goose deoxyhemoglobin. When the Bohr data for chicken hemoglobin were fitted by making the same assumption, the pKa of the NH3(+) terminal group of Val1α decreased from 7.76 to 6.48 following the T→R transition. When the data were fitted without making any assumption, the pKa of the NH3(+) terminal group increased from 7.57 to 7.77 following the T→R transition. We demonstrate that avian hemoglobin Bohr data are readily fitted with the Wyman equation because avian hemoglobins lack His77β. From curve-fitting to Bohr data we estimate the pKas of the NH3(+) terminal group of Val1α in the R and T states to be 6.33±0.1 and 7.22±0.1, respectively. We provide evidence indicating that these pKas are more accurate than estimates from kinetic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ranolazine and Its Effects on Hemoglobin A1C.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Lindsey; Hurren, Kathryn; Brenner, Michael

    2016-05-01

    To review the antihyperglycemic effect of ranolazine in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). An EMBASE search was conducted between January 1966 through December 2015 using the search termsranolazine, diabetes, andhemoglobin A1C(A1C). Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. A search of clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify unpublished studies assessing ranolazine in diabetes. All English-language observational and randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of ranolazine on A1C were evaluated. Four published and 3 unpublished trials were identified. In all except 1 study, ranolazine 750 to 1000 mg twice daily was associated with a statistically significant decrease in A1C compared with placebo (placebo-corrected change in A1C: -0.28 to -0.7). In the trial in which a significant difference was not observed, patients assigned to ranolazine received a lower maintenance metformin dose compared with patients not assigned to ranolazine. A greater percentage of patients randomized to ranolazine achieved an A1C<7% compared with the placebo group (41.2%-59% vs 25.7%-49%). Ranolazine was not associated with an increase in the incidence of hypoglycemia and was well tolerated overall. The mechanism for lowering of A1C has not been determined. Ranolazine therapy may decrease A1C among patients with T2DM without an increase in hypoglycemia. For patients with T2DM and chronic stable angina, ranolazine may be of use given its utility in cardiovascular disease and benefit in A1C lowering. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  4. Effects of lead and cadmium co-exposure on hemoglobin in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Hao; Li, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhu, Guoying; Jin, Taiyi

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) show adverse effects on hemoglobin. But most studies are focussed on one single agent. In this study, we observed the main and interactive effects of Cd and Pb on the hemoglobin level in a Chinese population. A total of 308 persons (202 women and 106 men), living in controlled and polluted areas, were included in this study. Blood and urine were collected to determine the levels of hemoglobin (Hb), Cd, Pb, and urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (UNAG). The Cd and Pb level of subjects living in the polluted area were significantly higher compared to those living in the control area (p<0.05). The level of hemoglobin was declined with the increasing BPb (p<0.05) and BCd in women. The Hb of women and men with the highest level of BCd and BPb were decreased by 8.3g/L and 10.7 g/L compared to those with the lowest level of BCd and BPb, respectively. The Hb level of those women and men with the highest level of UNAG decreased by 4.2g/L and 17.2g/L compared with those with low level of UNAG, respectively. Hb was negatively associated with BPb, BCd, and UNAG. This study evidenced that Cd and Pb can influence Hb level. In addition, our study shows that Cd and Pb may have interactive effects on Hb and Hb level was correlated with tubular dysfunction caused by Cd and Pb exposure.

  5. Toxic effects of Karenia mikimotoi extracts on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yan, Tian; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2011-07-01

    Karenia is one of the most harmful and representative red tide genus in a temperate zone. Blooms caused by this genus have resulted in massive fish death in the South China Sea and the East China Sea. However, the potential effects of this dinoflagellate on human health through the transfer of toxins via marine food webs, and the mechanisms of toxicity, are still unknown. Therefore, we examined the toxic effects of a strain of K. mikimotoi (isolated from the South China Sea) on the proliferation and morphology of four mammalian cell lines (two normal cell lines and two cancer cell lines). In addition, we carried out a preliminary investigation on the mechanism of toxicity of the alga. The results show that the polar lipid-soluble component of K. mikimotoi significantly inhibited proliferation of the four cell lines, and resulted in the cells becoming spherical, swollen and damaged. The result of Annexin V and PI double-staining confirmed that cell membranes were disrupted. The malonaldehyde (MDA) contents in the medium of the four cell lines treated with the polar-lipid extracts all increased significantly, which indicates that the polar-lipid toxins produced by K. mikimotoi could adversely affect mammalian cells by inducing lipid peroxidation. We conclude that K. mikimotoi is a potential threat to human health, and the comprehensive effect of this dinoflagellate and its mechanisms should be investigated further.

  6. [Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on mammalian spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Susa, Martina; Pavicić, Ivan

    2007-12-01

    This article reviews studies about the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic (RF EM) fields on male reproductive system and reproductive health in mammals. According to current data, there are almost 4 million active mobile phone lines in Croatia while this number has risen to 2 billion in the world. Increased use of mobile technology raises scientific and public concern about possible hazardous effects of RF fields on human health. The effects of radiofrequencies on reproductive health and consequences for the offspring are still mainly unknown. A number of in vivo and in vitro studies indicated that RF fields could interact with charged intracellular macromolecular structures. Results of several laboratory studies on animal models showed how the RF fields could affect the mammalian reproductive system and sperm cells. Inasmuch as, in normal physiological conditions spermatogenesis is a balanced process of division, maturation and storage of cells, it is particularly vulnerable to the chemical and physical environmental stimuli. Especially sensitive could be the cytoskeleton, composed of charged proteins; actin, intermedial filaments and microtubules. Cytoskeleton is a functional and structural part of the cell that has important role in the sperm motility, and is actively involved in the morphologic changes that occur during mammalian spermiogenesis.

  7. Maternal Hemoglobin Concentration and Pregnancy Outcome: A Study of the Effects of Elevation in El Alto, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, Elise M.

    2011-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is often under-diagnosed in developing countries, specifically in pregnant populations in regions of high altitude. Hemoglobin levels are not consistently adjusted for elevation, and therefore many anemic patients are left undiagnosed. The purpose of this study was to incorporate current parameters for diagnosing anemia in pregnancy at high altitudes, and to evaluate the effects of appropriately adjusted hemoglobin concentrations on pregnancy outcome. A few studies have examined the effect of elevation on hemoglobin status, and other studies have considered the effects of anemia of pregnancy; however, there is a lack of data demonstrating that altitude-adjusted hemoglobin levels accurately predict pregnancy outcome. Using the Student t-Test, multiple linear regression, and ANOVA statistical analyses, various factors of pregnancy outcome were compared between anemic and non-anemic groups, as defined by hemoglobin cut-off levels adjusted for trimester of pregnancy and altitude. When appropriate adjustments were used, maternal anemia was associated with lower infant Apgar scores at both one minute and five minutes after birth, as well as complication of labor, lower gestational age at birth, and higher parity. This study demonstrates the importance of altitude and trimester specific adjustments to maternal hemoglobin levels in order to accurately diagnose anemia in pregnancy. In addition, a clear correlation is seen between maternal hemoglobin level and pregnancy outcome. PMID:22399871

  8. Blood lead: Its effect on trace element levels and iron structure in hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C.; Li, Y.; Li, Y. L.; Zou, Y.; Zhang, G. L.; Normura, M.; Zhu, G. Y.

    2008-08-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate its effects on trace elements and the iron structure in hemoglobin. Blood samples were collected from rats that had been exposed to lead. The concentration of trace elements in whole blood and blood plasma was determined by ICP-MS and the results indicate that lead exists mainly in the red blood cells and only about 1-3% in the blood plasma. Following lead exposure, the concentrations of zinc and iron in blood decrease, as does the hemoglobin level. This indicates that the heme biosynthetic pathway is inhibited by lead toxicity and that lead poisoning-associated anemia occurs. The selenium concentration also decreases after lead exposure, which may lead to an increased rate of free radical production. The effect of lead in the blood on iron structure in hemoglobin was determined by EXAFS. After lead exposure, the Fe-O bond length increases by about 0.07 Å and the Fe-Np bond length slightly increases, but the Fe-N ɛ bond length remains unchanged. This indicates that the blood content of Hb increases, but that the content of HbO 2 decreases.

  9. Effects of laser acupoint irradiation on blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Liu; Guo-Xin, Xiong; Li-Ping, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and physical fitness in type 2 diabetes mellitus, 44 cases of type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into a control group and a treatment group. All patients in both groups were given a drug treatment. The Hegu, Quchi and Zusanli acupoints of patients in the treatment group were then irradiated daily for 15 d with a 10 MW semiconductor laser. Before and after treatment, patients in both groups underwent a variety of tests and measurements: a two-hour postprandial blood glucose test; a glycosylated hemoglobin test and body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and body fat percentage (BFP) measurements. The data detected after treatment greatly decreased in the treatment group and was significantly different from that in the control group. It is shown that the acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can improve two-hour postprandial blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and some physical fitness measurements in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  10. Effects of naphthalene on the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen uptake of daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Crider, J.Y.; Wilhm, J.; Harman, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    In addition to acute testing for survival of Daphnia magna exposed to naphthalene, various physiological tests were made. Short term studies were conducted to calculate LC50 values and physiological responses. Daphnia of 24 h were fed initially 0.25 ml food/l and the pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature, conductivity, swimming movements, and the number of survivors were determined at 0, 24, and 48 h. These experiments were run at least three times and the dosage-mortality curves were determined by the use of probit and regression analyses. Physiological studies were made for concentrations of 1, 5, and 10 mg/l. Oxygen consumption of Daphnia was measured polarographically and a carboxyhemoglobin method was used to measure total hemoglobin. The hemoglobin concentrations of the treated organisms decreased from 102 nmoles/animal at 1 mg/l naphthalene to 67 nmoles/animal at 9 mg/l. Oxygen uptake decreased from 37 nmoles/animal/h at 1 mg/l to 28 nmoles/animal/h at8 mg/l. Results show that hemoglobin concentration and oxygen uptake may be useful tools in assessing water quality and its effects on the biota. (JMT)

  11. Global allostery model of hemoglobin. Modulation of O(2) affinity, cooperativity, and Bohr effect by heterotropic allosteric effectors.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Takashi; Park, Sung-Ick; Tsuneshige, Antonio; Imai, Kiyohiro; Kanaori, Kenji

    2002-09-13

    The O(2) equilibria of human adult hemoglobin have been measured in a wide range of solution conditions in the presence and absence of various allosteric effectors in order to determine how far hemoglobin can modulate its O(2) affinity. The O(2) affinity, cooperative behavior, and the Bohr effect of hemoglobin are modulated principally by tertiary structural changes, which are induced by its interactions with heterotropic allosteric effectors. In their absence, hemoglobin is a high affinity, moderately cooperative O(2) carrier of limited functional flexibility, the behaviors of which are regulated by the homotropic, O(2)-linked T/R quaternary structural transition of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux/Perutz model. However, the interactions with allosteric effectors provide such "inert" hemoglobin unprecedented magnitudes of functional diversities not only of physiological relevance but also of extreme nature, by which hemoglobin can behave energetically beyond what can be explained by the Monod-Wyman-Changeux/Perutz model. Thus, the heterotropic effector-linked tertiary structural changes rather than the homotropic ligation-linked T/R quaternary structural transition are energetically more significant and primarily responsible for modulation of functions of hemoglobin.

  12. The optimal target hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ritz, E; Schwenger, V

    2000-07-01

    There is still controversy concerning the optimal target hemoglobin during treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Some evidence suggests that hemoglobin concentrations higher than currently recommended lead to improvements in cognitive function, physical performance, and rehabilitation. At least in patients with advanced cardiac disease, however, one controlled trial failed to show a benefit from normalizing predialysis hemoglobin concentrations. In contrast, preliminary observations in three additional studies (albeit with limited statistical power) failed to show adverse cardiovascular effects from normalization of hemoglobin, but definite benefit with respect to quality of life, physical performance, and cardiac geometry. These observations are consistent with the notion that hemoglobin concentrations higher than those recommended by the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative Anemia Work Group are beneficial, at least in patients without advanced cardiac disease.

  13. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gianluca; Setoh, Peipei; Yoshida, Sachine; Kuroda, Kumi O

    2015-01-01

    Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favor their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g., mothers' automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries), and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the neurobiological mechanisms governing social bonding and cooperation in humans by focusing on maternal carrying and its beneficial effect on mother-infant interaction in mammalian species (e.g., in humans, big cats, and rodents). These studies show that infants have a specific calming response to maternal carrying. A human infant carried by his/her walking mother exhibits a rapid heart rate decrease, and immediately stops voluntary movement and crying compared to when he/she is held in a sitting position. Furthermore, strikingly similar responses were identified in mouse rodents, who exhibit immobility, diminished ultra-sonic vocalizations and heart rate. In general, the studies described in the current review demonstrate the calming effect of maternal carrying to be comprised of a complex set of behavioral and physiological components, each of which has a specific postnatal time window and is orchestrated in a well-matched manner with the maturation of the infants. Such reactions could have been evolutionarily adaptive in mammalian mother-infant interactions. The findings have implications for parenting practices in developmentally normal populations. In addition, we propose that infants' physiological response may be useful in clinical assessments as we discuss possible implications on early screening for child psychopathology (e.g., autism spectrum disorders and perinatal brain disorders).

  14. Quinones: reactions with hemoglobin, effects within erythrocytes and potential for antimalarial development

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this research was to characterize the interactions of some simple quinone like compounds with purified hemoglobin and to study the effects of these compounds within erythrocytes. It is proposed that these sorts of agents can have an antimalarial effect. The simplest compounds chosen for study were benzoquinone, methylquinone (toluquinone) and hydroquinone. When /sup 14/C-quinone was reacted with purified hemoglobin (Hb) there was rapid binding of the first two moles of substrate per Hb molecule. An unusual property of the modified Hb's is that in the presence of a redox sensitive agent such as cytochrome c they are capable of generating superoxide anions. Within erythrocytes, quinone and toluquinone which differ only by a single methyl group have completely different effects. Toluquinone causes the cells to hemolyse and the effect was enhanced when the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase was inhibited; the effect was diminished when scavengers of activated oxygen such as histidine, mannitol and vital E were present. Benzoquinone on the other hand did not cause the cells to hemolyse and instead appeared to protect the cells from certain hemolytic stresses. Growth of malaria parasites in erythrocytes has been shown to be inhibited by activated forms of oxygen, also some quinone like agents in the past have been shown to inhibit the parasite's metabolism. An initial experiment with erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites showed that quinone and toluquinone could both inhibit the growth rate of parasites.

  15. Mutual effects of proton and sodium chloride on oxygenation of liganded human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Lepeshkevich, Sergei V; Dzhagarov, Boris M

    2005-12-01

    The different effects of pH and NaCl on individual O2-binding properties of alpha and beta subunits within liganded tetramer and dimer of human hemoglobin (HbA) were examined in a number of laser time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. A previously proposed approach [Dzhagarov BM & Lepeshkevich SV (2004) Chem Phys Lett390, 59-64] was used to determine the extent of subunit dissociation rate constant difference and subunit affinity difference from a single flash photolysis experiment. To investigate the effect of NaCl concentration on the association and dissociation rate constants we carried out a series of experiments at four different concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m NaCl) over the pH range of the alkaline Bohr effect. As the data suggest, the individual properties of the alpha and beta subunits within the completely liganded tetrameric hemoglobin did not depend on pH under salt-free conditions. However, different effects NaCl on the individual kinetic properties of the alpha and beta subunits were revealed. Regulation of the O2-binding properties of the alpha and beta subunits within the liganded tetramer is proposed to be attained in two quite different ways.

  16. Hemoglobin electrophoresis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an abnormal form of hemoglobin associated with sickle cell anemia . In people with this condition, the red blood ... symptoms are much milder than they are in sickle cell anemia. Other, less common, abnormal Hb molecules cause other ...

  17. Hemoglobin (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... called heme, which binds oxygen. In the lungs, oxygen is exchanged for carbon dioxide. Abnormalities of an individual's hemoglobin value can indicate defects in the normal balance between red blood cell production and destruction. Both low and high values can ...

  18. Hemoglobin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera. Current Opinion in Hematology [Internet]. 2016 Mar [cited 2017 Feb 1]; 23(2): ... Function of Hemoglobin. New England Journal of Medicine [Internet]. 1998 Jan 22 [cited 2017 Feb 1]; 338: ...

  19. Effects of polymerization on the oxygen carrying and redox properties of diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M S; Ryan, B B; Cashon, R E; Alayash, A I

    1995-04-27

    Human hemoglobin site specifically cross-linked with bis(3,5-dibromosalicyl)fumarate results in a low oxygen affinity hemoglobin-based red cell substitute (alpha-DBBF). Polymerization of alpha-DBBF by bis(maleoylglycylamide) polyethylene glycol (BMAA-PEG) yields poly alpha-DBBF which offers the added benefits of reduced renal clearance and increased retention in the vascular circulation. Oxygen equilibrium curves for poly alpha-DBBF are slightly left-shifted (higher O2 affinity) compared to those of alpha-DBBF; with a diminished cooperativity and a reduced Bohr effect. In rapid mixing experiments (oxygen dissociation and carbon monoxide binding), poly alpha-DBBF exhibits a several fold increase in the overall rate of deoxygenation and carbon monoxide binding kinetics over its cross-linked counterpart. The rate of nitric oxide binding to the oxidized form of poly alpha-DBBF shows little or no change compared to the intramolecularly cross-linked derivative. The reduction of cyanomet poly alpha-DBBF by dithionite is several fold faster than that of HbA0 and alpha-DBBF whereas the slow subsequent cyanide dissociation from the ferrous iron remained unchanged among all proteins. The propensity of poly alpha-DBBF for auto-oxidation is slightly enhanced over alpha-DBBF whereas the extent of oxidative modification by hydrogen peroxide is very similar. Polymerization appears to selectively modify ligand interactions and redox kinetics of the tetrameric cross-linked form which reflects a possibly more open heme pocket. The data suggests that changes in oxygenation properties of hemoglobin brought about by a given modification are not necessarily predictive of other functional changes.

  20. An Order-Disorder Transition Plays a Role in Switching Off the Root Effect in Fish Hemoglobins*

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Alessandro; Vitagliano, Luigi; Merlino, Antonello; Sica, Filomena; Marino, Katia; Verde, Cinzia; di Prisco, Guido; Mazzarella, Lelio

    2010-01-01

    The Root effect is a widespread property among fish hemoglobins whose structural basis remains largely obscure. Here we report a crystallographic and spectroscopic characterization of the non-Root-effect hemoglobin isolated from the Antarctic fish Trematomus newnesi in the deoxygenated form. The crystal structure unveils that the T state of this hemoglobin is stabilized by a strong H-bond between the side chains of Asp95α and Asp101β at the α1β2 and α2β1 interfaces. This unexpected finding undermines the accepted paradigm that correlates the presence of this unusual H-bond with the occurrence of the Root effect. Surprisingly, the T state is characterized by an atypical flexibility of two α chains within the tetramer. Indeed, regions such as the CDα corner and the EFα pocket, which are normally well ordered in the T state of tetrameric hemoglobins, display high B-factors and non-continuous electron densities. This flexibility also leads to unusual distances between the heme iron and the proximal and distal His residues. These observations are in line with Raman micro-spectroscopy studies carried out both in solution and in the crystal state. The findings here presented suggest that in fish hemoglobins the Root effect may be switched off through a significant destabilization of the T state regardless of the presence of the inter-aspartic H-bond. Similar mechanisms may also operate for other non-Root effect hemoglobins. The implications of the flexibility of the CDα corner for the mechanism of the T-R transition in tetrameric hemoglobins are also discussed. PMID:20610398

  1. Effects of Non-Thermal Plasma on Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Kelly, Crystal M.; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Torabi, Behzad; Alekseev, Oleg; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces no heat, so its effects can be selective. In order to exploit the potential for clinical applications, including wound healing, sterilization, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of non-thermal plasma with living tissues is required. Using mammalian cells in culture, it is shown here that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects that range from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis. It is also shown that these effects are primarily due to formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have utilized γ-H2AX to detect DNA damage induced by non-thermal plasma and found that it is initiated by production of active neutral species that most likely induce formation of organic peroxides in cell medium. Phosphorylation of H2AX following non-thermal plasma treatment is ATR dependent and ATM independent, suggesting that plasma treatment may lead to replication arrest or formation of single-stranded DNA breaks; however, plasma does not lead to formation of bulky adducts/thymine dimers. PMID:21283714

  2. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant.

  3. Specific cation effects on hemoglobin aggregation below and at physiological salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Medda, Luca; Carucci, Cristina; Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W; Monduzzi, Maura; Salis, Andrea

    2013-12-10

    Turbidity titrations are used to study the ion specific aggregation of hemoglobin (Hb) below and physiological salt concentration in the pH range 4.5-9.5. At a salt concentration 50 mM cations promote Hb aggregation according to the order Rb(+) > K(+) ~ Na(+) > Cs(+) > Li(+). The cation series changes if concentration is increased, becoming K(+) > Rb(+) > Na(+) > Li(+) > Cs(+) at 150 mM. We interpret the puzzling series by assuming that the kosmotropic Li(+) will bind to kosmotropic carboxylates groups-according to the law of matching water affinities (LMWA)-whereas the chaotropic Cs(+) will bind to uncharged protein patches due to its high polarizability. In fact, both mechanisms can be rationalized by invoking previously neglected ionic nonelectrostatic forces. This explains both adsorption to uncharged patches and the LMWA as a consequence of the simultaneous action of electrostatic and dispersion forces. The same interpretation applies to anions (with chaotropic anions binding to chaotropic amine groups). The implications extend beyond hemoglobin to other, still unexplained, ion specific effects in biological systems.

  4. Interactions of human hemoglobin with charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and effect of counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Goutam; Panicker, Lata

    2014-12-01

    Human hemoglobin is an important metalloprotein. It has tetrameric structure with each subunit containing a `heme' group which carries oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood. In this work, we have investigated the interactions of human hemoglobin (Hb) with charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and the effect of counterions, in aqueous medium. Several techniques like DLS and ζ-potential measurements, UV-vis, fluorescence, and CD spectroscopy have been used to characterize the interaction. The nanoparticle size was measured to be in the range of 20-30 nm. Our results indicated the binding of Hb with both positively as well as negatively charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles in neutral aqueous medium which was driven by the electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions. The electrostatic binding interaction was not seen in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. We have also observed that the `heme' groups of Hb remained unaffected on binding with charged nanoparticles, suggesting the utility of the charged ligand-functionalized nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  5. Effects of coiling on the micromechanics of the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hongxue; Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The cochlea transduces sound-induced vibrations in the inner ear into electrical signals in the auditory nerve via complex fluid–structure interactions. The mammalian cochlea is a spiral-shaped organ, which is often uncoiled for cochlear modelling. In those few studies where coiling has been considered, the cochlear partition was often reduced to the basilar membrane only. Here, we extend our recently developed hybrid analytical/numerical micromechanics model to include curvature effects, which were previously ignored. We also use a realistic cross-section geometry, including the tectorial membrane and cellular structures of the organ of Corti, to model the apical and basal regions of a guinea-pig cochlea. We formulate the governing equations of the fluid and solid domains in a curvilinear coordinate system. The WKB perturbation method is used to treat the propagation of travelling waves along the coiled cochlear duct, and the O(1) system of the governing equations is solved in the transverse plane using finite-element analysis. We find that the curvature of the cochlear geometry has an important functional significance; at the apex, it greatly increases the shear gain of the cochlear partition, which is a measure of the bending efficiency of the outer hair cell stereocilia. PMID:16849192

  6. The effect of ascetic acid on mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Oana C; Trujillo, Antoinette; Sanders, Claire K; Burnett, Kassidy S; Freyer, James P; Mourant, Judith R

    2010-01-01

    Effects of the contrast agent, acetic acid, on mammalian cells are studied using light scattering measurements, viability and fluorescence pH assays. Results depend on whether cells are in PBS or are live and metabolizing. Acetic acid is a contrast agent used to aid the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Typically 3% or 5% acetic acid is applied to the swface of the cervix and areas of the tissue that turn 'acetowhite' are considered more likely to be precancerous. The mechanism of action of acetic acid has never been understood in detail, although there are several hypotheses. One is that a decrease in pH causes cytokeratins in epithelial cells to polymerize. We will present data demonstrating that this is not the sole mechanism of acetowhitening. Another hypothesis is that a decrease in pH in the nucleus causes deacetylation of the histones which in turn results in a dense chromatin structure. Relevant to this hypothesis we have measured the internal pH of cells. Additional goals of this work are to understand what physical changes result in acetowhitening, to understand why there is variation in how cells respond to acetic acid, and to investigate how acetowhitening affects the light scatter properties measured by a fiber-optic probe we have developed for cervical cancer diagnostics.

  7. Effects of Tetrodotoxin on the Mammalian Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The human genome encodes nine functional voltage-gated Na+ channels. Three of them, namely Nav1.5, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9, are resistant to nanomolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX; IC50 ≥ 1 μM). The other isoforms, which are predominantly expressed in the skeletal muscle and nervous system, are highly sensitive to TTX (IC50 ~ 10 nM). During the last two decades, it has become evident that in addition to the major cardiac isoform Nav1.5, several of those TTX sensitive isoforms are expressed in the mammalian heart. Whereas immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods demonstrated functional expression in various heart regions, the physiological importance of those isoforms for cardiac excitation in higher mammals is still debated. This review summarizes our knowledge on the systemic cardiovascular effects of TTX in animals and humans, with a special focus on cardiac excitation and performance at lower concentrations of this marine drug. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that TTX sensitive Na+ channels, detected more recently in various heart tissues, are not involved in excitation phenomena in the healthy adult heart of higher mammals. PMID:20411124

  8. Hemoglobin variants detected by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) analysis and the effects on HbA1c measurements.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Nadzimah Mohd; Thevarajah, M; Yean, Chew Yee

    2010-04-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) A1c is a tool widely used to monitor long-term glycemic control in diabetic patients. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA1c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoassay in patients who were detected to have hemoglobin variant after HbA1c analysis. We compared the HbA1c values measured using the Arkray Adams A1c HA-8160 (HPLC method) and Roche Cobas Integra (immunoturbidimetric method) from diabetic patients who were diagnosed with hemoglobin variants. Forty-three diabetic patients were diagnosed with hemoglobin variants: 13 elevated Hb F, 12 Hb E trait, seven Hb S trait, seven Hb D trait, two Hb E / beta-Thalassemia, one Hb C trait, and one homozygous Hb S. Knowledge of hemoglobin variants affecting HbA1c measurements is essential, in order to avoid mismanagement of diabetic patients.

  9. The effect of gastrointestinal parasitism on blood copper and hemoglobin levels in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Endoparasitism is a problem in Trinidad, as it is in most tropical countries. Parasite infection has been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of swayback disease (which is also prevalent in Trinidad), but the mode of action has not been clearly defined, although it has been suggested that parasites interfere with the absorption of copper from the gastrointestinal tract. The objectives of the study were to assess the effect of endoparasitism on blood copper levels and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in sheep in Trinidad. Copper was administered intramuscularly to parasite infected and noninfected animals. The results showed that parasitism has a depressing effect on blood copper and Hb levels, even when administered parenterally. It is concluded that parasitism can aggravate existing hypocupremia and possibly influence the expression of swayback disease. PMID:16363328

  10. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  11. Intracellular expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin in Aspergillus terreus to alleviate the effect of a short break in aeration during culture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hui; Li, Ywan-Feng; Huang, Min-Chang; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2004-07-01

    A continuous supply of O(2) is important for itaconic acid production in Aspergillus terreus. Any interruption of aeration significantly reduces itaconic acid production. To overcome this effect, A. terreus M8 was transformed with the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene (vgb) which, as shown by Southern hybridization, was integrated into the recipient chromosome. The activity of the expressed hemoglobin was confirmed by a CO-difference spectrum. During itaconic acid production, the effect of a break in aeration during cultivation in the transformant with the vgb gene is alleviated. Additionally, the transformant shows improved itaconic acid production.

  12. Therapeutic effect of Colla corii asini on improving anemia and hemoglobin compositions in pregnant women with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfang; He, Hui; Yang, Lilin; Li, Xiangyi; Li, Daocheng; Luo, Songping

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is no consensus on treating anemia in pregnant thalassemia patients. In China, Colla corii asini (CCA) has been widely used for treating anemia for more than 2000 years. However, its clinical application in the thalassemia population is limited by a lack of quantitative evidence. The present study aims to investigate the therapeutic effect of CCA in increasing hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and improving abnormal hemoglobin compositions in pregnant patients with β-thalassemia. Seventy-two pregnant patients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to either the treatment group or control group. Patients in the treatment group were given 15 g of CCA, while the control group were observed and followed up without any treatment. Levels of Hb, serum iron (SI), serum ferritin (SF) and three types of Hb components [adult hemoglobin (HbA), fetal hemoglobin (HbF), minor adult hemoglobin (HbA2)] were measured before and after treatment. Treatment with CCA led to a significant increase of Hb. The major Hb component induced by CCA was HbA, while levels of both HbA2 and HbF dropped after treatment. CCA treatment significantly increased SI, while SF remained unaffected. Our data suggest that CCA can improve anemia and optimize Hb components in pregnant patients with thalassemia without affecting iron reserves.

  13. Effects of lead on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, growth, hemoglobin content, and reproduction in Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Berglind, R.; Dave, G.; Sjoebeck, M.L.

    1985-04-01

    The effects of continuous exposure to lead for various periods and recovery in clean water on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) activity, hemoglobin content, growth, and reproduction were studied in Daphnia magna. Steady-state inhibition of ALA-D activity was reached within 2 days in 16, 64, and 256 micrograms Pb liter-1, but restoration in clean water was prolonged in relation to previous exposure. In spite of the inhibition of ALA-D activity hemoglobin content increased after 2 days in 16 and 24 micrograms Pb liter-1. Furthermore, hemoglobin content in previously exposed animals increased during recovery in clean water. Maximum hemoglobin content (2.9 times control value) was found after 2 days recovery of animals exposed to 64 micrograms Pb liter-1. These findings suggest that some enzyme(s) other than ALA-D in the biosynthetic pathway of hemoglobin formation is (are) more sensitive to lead. Growth, in contrast to reproduction, was stimulated by low concentrations of lead (less than 64 micrograms Pb liter-1), although in 256 micrograms Pb liter-1 growth was also significantly impaired. After 19 days the 16 and 50% reproductive impairment concentrations were less than or equal to 1 and 10 micrograms Pb liter-1, respectively.

  14. Effect of altitude on oxygen binding by hemoglobin and on organic phosphate levels

    PubMed Central

    Lenfant, Claude; Torrance, John; English, Eugenia; Finch, Clement A.; Reynafarje, Cesar; Ramos, Jose; Faura, Jose

    1968-01-01

    The relationship between oxygen dissociation and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in the red cell has been studied in subjects moving from low to high altitude and vice versa. Within 24 hr following the change in altitude there was a change in hemoglobin affinity for oxygen; this modification therefore represents an important rapid adaptive mechanism to anoxia. A parallel change occurred in the organic phosphate content of the red cell. While this study does not provide direct evidence of a cause-effect relationship, the data strongly suggest that with anoxia, the observed rise in organic phosphate content of the red cell is responsible for increased availability of oxygen to tissues. Images PMID:5725278

  15. Investigation of the effect of hemoglobin F and A levels on development of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Erdöl, Hidayet; Hacioglu, Dilek; Kola, Mehmet; Türk, Adem; Aslan, Yakup

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of hemoglobin F (HbF) and hemoglobin A (HbA) levels on development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in premature infants. In this prospective study, blood samples were collected from the side of the heel of 49 premature infants at postnatal months 0, 1, 2, and 3. HbF and HbA levels were measured in all samples and analyzed statistically. Furthermore, correlation analysis was performed regarding development of ROP, blood transfusion, and HbF and HbA levels. A total of 49 infants were included. The mean gestational age of the premature infants was 30.9 ± 2.7 weeks (range, 25-35 weeks); mean birth weight, 1542 ± 582 g (range, 520-3240 g). Of the 49 premature infants, stage 1 ROP or above developed in 26 (53%). Mean HbF levels were lower at postnatal months 1 and 2 in premature infants with ROP compared to those without ROP (P = 0.013 and 0.02, respectively); however, mean HbA levels were higher in the infants with ROP than the others (P = 0.034 and 0.029, respectively). Analysis of covariance that ignored transfusion revealed no difference between the means of Hb variants in the infants with and without ROP (P = 0.572 and 0.486). Blood transfusion significantly altered the levels of HbF and HbA in premature infants, and Hb variants have no direct effect on development of ROP. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Hemoglobin A1c Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nitin; Mishra, T.K.; Singh, Tejinder

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in India. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used in diabetic patients as an index of glycemic control reflecting glucose levels of the previous 3 months. Like blood sugar levels, HbA1c levels are also affected by the presence of variant hemoglobins, hemolytic anemias, nutritional anemias, uremia, pregnancy, and acute blood loss. However, reports on the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels are inconsistent. We conducted a study to analyze the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels and to assess whether treatment of iron deficiency anemia affects HbA1c levels. Methods Fifty patients confirmed to have iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in this study. HbA1c and absolute HbA1c levels were measured both at baseline and at 2 months after treatment, and these values were compared with those in the control population. Results The mean baseline HbA1c level in anemic patients (4.6%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (5.5%, p<0.05). A significant increase was observed in the patients' absolute HbA1c levels at 2 months after treatment (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.73 g/dL, p<0.01). There was a significant difference between the baseline values of patients and controls (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.74 g/dL, p<0.01). Conclusions In contrast to the observations of previous studies, ours showed that HbA1c levels and absolute HbA1c levels increased with treatment of iron deficiency anemia. This could be attributable to nutritional deficiency and/or certain unknown variables. Further studies are warranted. PMID:22259774

  17. Effects of extreme hemodilution with hemoglobin-based O2 carriers on microvascular pressure.

    PubMed

    Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G; Winslow, Robert M; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2005-05-01

    A surface-modified polyethylene glycol-conjugated human hemoglobin (MP4) and alpha alpha-cross-linked human hemoglobin (alpha alpha Hb) were used to restore oxygen carrying capacity in conditions of extreme hemodilution (hematocrit 11%) in the hamster window model preparation. Changes in microvascular function were analyzed in terms of effects on capillary pressure and functional capillary density (FCD). MP4, at 1.0 +/- 0.2 g/dl blood concentration, significantly lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) below baseline (99.6 +/- 7.6 mmHg) to 82.4 +/- 6.9 mmHg (P < 0.05) and decreased of FCD to 70 +/- 9%. alpha alpha Hb caused a greater recovery in MAP to 94.4 +/- 6.2 mmHg and lowered FCD to 62 +/- 8%. However, differences between alpha alpha Hb and MP4 in FCD were not statistically significant. Capillary pressures were in the ranges of 17-21 mmHg for MP4 and 15-19 mmHg for alpha alpha Hb, with both significantly lower than baseline (P < 0.05). Pressure in 80-microm-diameter arterioles was significantly increased with alpha alpha Hb relative to MP4 (P < 0.05). These results were compared with previous findings on the relation between capillary pressure and FCD; they supported the concept of a relationship between FCD and capillary pressure. Measurement of changes in arteriolar diameter, microvascular blood flow, and FCD show that there was no statistical difference between using alpha alpha Hb and MP4 in extreme hemodilution. Microvascular resistance in arterioles with a diameter range of 70-80 microm showed an increase relative to control with alpha alpha Hb, whereas MP4 caused a decrease.

  18. Effect of the N-terminal residues on the quaternary dynamics of human adult hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shanyan; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-01

    The protein dynamics of human hemoglobin following ligand photolysis was studied by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra of two kinds of recombinant hemoglobin expressed in Escherichia coli, normal recombinant hemoglobin and the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant, were compared with those of human adult hemoglobin (HbA) purified from blood. A frequency shift of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] band was observed in the time-resolved spectra of all three hemoglobin samples, indicative of tertiary and quaternary changes in the protein following photolysis. The spectral changes of the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant were distinct from those of HbA in the tens of microseconds region, whereas the spectral changes of normal recombinant hemoglobin were similar to those of HbA isolated from blood. These results demonstrated that a structural change in the N-termini is involved in the second step of the quaternary structure change of hemoglobin. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the allosteric pathway of HbA.

  19. Comparative In Vivo Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers (HBOC) with Varying Prooxidant and Physiological Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Ioana; Sevastre, Bogdan; Hathazi, Denisa; Scurtu, Florina; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    A series of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier candidates (HBOC), previously noted for their differences in prooxidative and physiological reactivity, were compared in terms of the negative effects displayed upon injection in Wistar rats. At the concentrations tested, antioxidant strategies based on albumin as well as based on rubrerythrin appear to offer observable physiological advantages. PMID:27097326

  20. Comparative In Vivo Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers (HBOC) with Varying Prooxidant and Physiological Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Toma, Vlad Al; Farcaș, Anca D; Roman, Ioana; Sevastre, Bogdan; Hathazi, Denisa; Scurtu, Florina; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    A series of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier candidates (HBOC), previously noted for their differences in prooxidative and physiological reactivity, were compared in terms of the negative effects displayed upon injection in Wistar rats. At the concentrations tested, antioxidant strategies based on albumin as well as based on rubrerythrin appear to offer observable physiological advantages.

  1. Mammalian island biogeography: effects of area, isolation and vagility.

    PubMed

    Lomolino, Mark V

    1984-03-01

    In this paper I reviewed mammalian biogeography for 19 archipelagoes and tested the applicability of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography to mammalian faunas in general. The species-area and species-isolation relationships of terrestrial mammals were consistent with the basic predictions of the equilibrium theory. The z-values for the species-area relationship did not differ significantly from Preston's canonical value of 0.26 (P>0.50), and the modal z-value for non-volant mammals was 0.25. Moreover, z-values increased with isolation and decreased with vagility of the fauna in question. Furthermore, the strength of the species-isolation correlation was negatively correlated with island area and vagility (P<0.001).

  2. Interaction between hypericin and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Vardapetyan, H R; Martirosyan, A S; Tiratsuyan, S G; Hovhannisyan, A A

    2010-10-05

    In the present work the hypericin interaction with hemoglobin was studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy both under incubation in dark and visible light exposure. An absorption reduction in Soret band of hemoglobin (407 nm) was revealed under the photodynamic influence and incubation in dark with hypericin that had hypericin concentration and time dependent manner. Hypericin reduced the intensity of the hemoglobin emission peaks at 334 and 421 nm, correlating with hypericin concentration, incubation and irradiation time. An obvious increase in electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin was observed under the incubation with hypericin. Simultaneously, a partial conversion of hemoglobin to met-hemoglobin and a pH decrease in hemoglobin solution were detected. Structural changes of hemoglobin caused by hypericin were accompanied by a change in peroxidase activity of the protein. Thus under the hypericin influence hemoglobin properties as a hydrogen peroxide detector could be improved and an effective determination of peroxide formation could be achieved. This makes hemoglobin an attractive 'recognition' element for construction of third-generation biosensors.

  3. Alkaline Bohr effect of bird hemoglobins: the case of the flamingo.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Teresa; Manconi, Barbara; Podda, Gabriella; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene; Giardina, Bruno

    2007-08-01

    The hemoglobin (Hb) substitution His-->Gln at position alpha89, very common in avian Hbs, is considered to be responsible for the weak Bohr effect of avian Hbs. Phoenicopterus ruber ruber is one of the few avian Hbs that possesses His at alpha89, but it has not been functionally characterized yet. In the present study the Hb system of the greater flamingo (P. ruber roseus), a bird that lives in Mediterranean areas, has been investigated to obtain further insight into the role played by the alpha89 residue in determining the strong reduction of the Bohr effect. Functional analysis of the two purified Hb components (HbA and HbD) of P. ruber roseus showed that both are characterized by high oxygen affinity in the absence of organic phosphates, a strong modulating effect of inositol hexaphosphate, and a reduced Bohr effect. Indeed, in spite of the close phylogenetic relationship between the two flamingo species, structural analysis based on tandem mass spectrometry of the alpha(A) chain of P. ruber roseus Hb showed that a Gln residue is present at position alpha89.

  4. Effects of Iron Supplementation and Activity on Serum Iron Depletion and Hemoglobin Levels in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooter, G. Rankin; Mowbray, Kathy W.

    1978-01-01

    Research revealed that a four-month basketball training program did not significantly alter serum iron, total iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, and percent saturation levels in female basketball athletes. (JD)

  5. Effects of Iron Supplementation and Activity on Serum Iron Depletion and Hemoglobin Levels in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooter, G. Rankin; Mowbray, Kathy W.

    1978-01-01

    Research revealed that a four-month basketball training program did not significantly alter serum iron, total iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, and percent saturation levels in female basketball athletes. (JD)

  6. Clinical Course of Two Children with Unstable Hemoglobins: The Effect of Hydroxyurea Therapy.

    PubMed

    Loovers, Harriët M; Tamminga, Nienke; Mulder, André B; Tamminga, Rienk Y J

    2016-09-01

    Case reports on the effect of hydroxyurea (HU) therapy for unstable hemoglobins (Hbs) are sparse; only three adult cases have been reported. We report for the first time on the effect of HU therapy in children carrying unstable Hbs. The first case concerns a female child with a familial history of chronic hemolytic anemia. She was diagnosed with Hb Volga (HBB: c.83C>A) at the age of 7 months. At age 6, treatment options were reconsidered due to increasing fatigue and decreasing Hb concentration. The second case also concerns a female child with chronic hemolytic anemia and icterus since the age of 5. She was diagnosed with Hb Köln (HBB: c.295G>A) at the age of 9. At age 10, treatment options were reconsidered due to decreased general condition and poor school performance. Both children were started on HU therapy. The child with Hb Volga showed reduced clinical symptoms and increased average Hb concentrations. She has been on HU therapy for over 7 years at preparation of this manuscript. The child with Hb Köln showed decreasing Hb concentrations upon start of therapy; clinical symptoms did not improve. Therapy was discontinued after 3½ months. The Hb Volga case report suggests that HU therapy could improve clinical symptoms in some patients with unstable Hbs. Based on these and previously published cases, it was speculated that response can be predicted by the percentage of Hb F and reticulocyte counts.

  7. Effects of pharmacological ascorbate on hemoglobin-induced cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Ding, Yun; Tian, Rong; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Jianfa; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2016-11-01

    The high heme content in red meat is associated with an increased risk of developing cancer. Pharmacologic concentrations of ascorbate can specifically kill a wide range of cancer cells. In this study, the impact of ascorbate at pharmacologic concentrations on hemoglobin (Hb)-modulated human hepatoma HepG2 cell survival was investigated. It was found that HepG2 cells were proliferated by Hb (5-25μM), but killed by high pharmacologic concentrations of ascorbate (2-10mM). Although ascorbate at the low pharmacologic concentration (0.5mM) alone exhibited insignificant effect on cell viability, it effectively inhibited Hb (10μM)-induced cancer cell proliferation. The mechanism of this cytotoxicity was based on the production of extracellular H2O2 and involved transition iron. The influence of ascorbate on Hb-dependent redox reactions (i.e. the oxidative stability of Hb and its cytotoxic ferryl intermediate) was further investigated to illustrate the reaction mechanism of ascorbate toxicity, where H2O2 was generated in the reaction of ascorbate with Hb. Furthermore, circular dichroism demonstrated no significant change in the secondary structure of Hb after ascorbate addition and molecular docking revealed binding modes of ascorbate with Hb. These results demonstrated that ascorbate could possess anti-cancer activity through interfering in Hb-dependent redox reactions.

  8. Effect of succinic acid monoethyl ester on hemoglobin glycation and tail tendon collagen properties in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2008-06-01

    Succinic acid monoethyl ester (EMS) was recently proposed as an insulinotropic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of EMS and metformin administration on tail collagen content and its characteristics in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetic rats. EMS was administered intraperitoneally for 30 days to normal and diabetic rats. In the diabetic rats, a significant increase in the levels of glucose, glycated hemoglobin, hydroxyproline, collagen content, extent glycation, fluorescence, neutral salt, acid and pepsin soluble collagen content was absorbed with a significant decrease in the level of insulin, hemoglobin in streptozotocin-nicotinamide diabetic rats. Moreover, a daily administration of nonglucidic nutrient EMS and metformin significantly decreased the levels of glucose, glycated hemoglobin, hydroxyproline, collagen content, extent glycation, fluorescence, neutral salt, acid and pepsin soluble collagen content, whereas it increased insulin, hemoglobin levels in diabetic rats. The positive influence of nonglucidic nutrient on both collagen content and its properties suggests a potential mechanism for the ability of EMS to delay diabetic complications.

  9. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Nadishka; Kaur, Manmeet; Nair, Smitha; Malmstrom, Jenny; Goldstone, David; Negron, Leonardo; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Domigan, Laura J.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (−20 to 80 °C) and pHs (2–10), and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products. PMID:28398221

  10. Effect of chromium supplementation on glycated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Raynold V; Phung, Olivia J

    2015-02-13

    Chromium (Cr) is a trace element involved in glucose homeostasis. We aim to evaluate and quantify the effects of Cr supplementation on A1C and FPG in patients with T2DM. A systematic literature search of Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library (from database inception to 11/2014) with no language restrictions sought RCTs or cohort studies evaluating Cr supplementation in T2DM vs control and reporting either change in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Meta-analysis was conducted on each subtype of Cr supplement separately, and was analyzed by random effects model to yield the weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was assessed by using the I(2) statistic. A total of 14 RCTs (n=875 participants, mean age range: 30 to 83 years old, 8 to 24 weeks of follow-up) were identified (Cr chloride: n=3 study, Cr picolinate: n=5 study, brewer's yeast: n=4 study and Cr yeast: n=3 study). Compared with placebo, Cr yeast, brewer's yeast and Cr picolinate did not show statistically significant effects on A1C. Furthermore, compared to control, Cr chloride, Cr yeast and Cr picolinate showed no effect on FPG, however, brewer's yeast showed a statistically significant decrease in FPG -19.23 mg/dL (95% CI=-35.30 to -3.16, I(2)=21%, n=137). Cr supplementation with brewer's yeast may provide marginal benefits in lowering FPG in patients with T2DM compared to placebo however it did not have any effect on A1C.

  11. Prediction of hemoglobin in blood donors using a latent class mixed-effects transition model.

    PubMed

    Nasserinejad, Kazem; van Rosmalen, Joost; de Kort, Wim; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2016-02-20

    Blood donors experience a temporary reduction in their hemoglobin (Hb) value after donation. At each visit, the Hb value is measured, and a too low Hb value leads to a deferral for donation. Because of the recovery process after each donation as well as state dependence and unobserved heterogeneity, longitudinal data of Hb values of blood donors provide unique statistical challenges. To estimate the shape and duration of the recovery process and to predict future Hb values, we employed three models for the Hb value: (i) a mixed-effects models; (ii) a latent-class mixed-effects model; and (iii) a latent-class mixed-effects transition model. In each model, a flexible function was used to model the recovery process after donation. The latent classes identify groups of donors with fast or slow recovery times and donors whose recovery time increases with the number of donations. The transition effect accounts for possible state dependence in the observed data. All models were estimated in a Bayesian way, using data of new entrant donors from the Donor InSight study. Informative priors were used for parameters of the recovery process that were not identified using the observed data, based on results from the clinical literature. The results show that the latent-class mixed-effects transition model fits the data best, which illustrates the importance of modeling state dependence, unobserved heterogeneity, and the recovery process after donation. The estimated recovery time is much longer than the current minimum interval between donations, suggesting that an increase of this interval may be warranted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Captopril Reverses the Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Polymerized Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ronghua; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; You, Zhen; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linhui; Li, Chen; Zhu, Da; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Huan; Chen, Yanfang; Gong, Gu; Feng, Yuan; Dian, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may increase the risk of myocardial infarction and death. We studied the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on HBOC-induced adverse cardiovascular outcomes and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Results: With a dog cardiopulmonary bypass model, we demonstrated that a high-dose HBOC (3%, w/v) did not reduce—but aggravated—cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. Animals administered a high-dose HBOC experienced coronary artery constriction and depression of cardiac function. Exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells to high-dose HBOC caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased endothelial cell necrosis/apoptosis, and elevated NAD(P)H oxidase expression (gp91phox, p47phox, p67phox, and Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All observed adverse outcomes could be suppressed by the ACE inhibitor captopril (100 μM). Co-incubation with free radical scavenger tempol or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin had no effect on captopril action, suggesting that the positive effects of captopril are ROS- and NAD(P)H oxidase dependent. ACE inhibition by captopril also contributed to these effects. In addition, bioavailable nitrite oxide (NO) reduced by high-dose HBOC was preserved by captopril. Furthermore, HBOC, at concentrations greater than 0.5%, inhibited large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner, although captopril failed to improve current activity, providing additional evidence that captopril's effects are mediated by the endothelium, but not by the smooth muscle. Innovation and Conclusion: Captopril alleviates high-dose HBOC-induced endothelial dysfunction and myocardial toxicity, which is mediated by synergistic depression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit overproduction and increases in vascular NO bioavailability. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2095

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril reverses the adverse cardiovascular effects of polymerized hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zhou, Ronghua; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; You, Zhen; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linhui; Li, Chen; Zhu, Da; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Huan; Chen, Yanfang; Gong, Gu; Feng, Yuan; Dian, Ke; Liu, Jin

    2014-11-20

    Cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may increase the risk of myocardial infarction and death. We studied the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on HBOC-induced adverse cardiovascular outcomes and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. With a dog cardiopulmonary bypass model, we demonstrated that a high-dose HBOC (3%, w/v) did not reduce-but aggravated-cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. Animals administered a high-dose HBOC experienced coronary artery constriction and depression of cardiac function. Exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells to high-dose HBOC caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased endothelial cell necrosis/apoptosis, and elevated NAD(P)H oxidase expression (gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All observed adverse outcomes could be suppressed by the ACE inhibitor captopril (100 μM). Co-incubation with free radical scavenger tempol or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin had no effect on captopril action, suggesting that the positive effects of captopril are ROS- and NAD(P)H oxidase dependent. ACE inhibition by captopril also contributed to these effects. In addition, bioavailable nitrite oxide (NO) reduced by high-dose HBOC was preserved by captopril. Furthermore, HBOC, at concentrations greater than 0.5%, inhibited large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner, although captopril failed to improve current activity, providing additional evidence that captopril's effects are mediated by the endothelium, but not by the smooth muscle. Captopril alleviates high-dose HBOC-induced endothelial dysfunction and myocardial toxicity, which is mediated by synergistic depression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit overproduction and increases in vascular NO bioavailability.

  14. Renal Handling of Circulating and Renal-Synthesized Hepcidin and Its Protective Effects against Hemoglobin-Mediated Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Wetzels, Jack F M; Verweij, Vivienne G M; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Pertijs, Jeanne C L M; van der Wijst, Jenny; Thévenod, Frank; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-09-01

    Urinary hepcidin may have protective effects against AKI. However, renal handling and the potential protective mechanisms of hepcidin are not fully understood. By measuring hepcidin levels in plasma and urine using mass spectrometry and the kidney using immunohistochemistry after intraperitoneal administration of human hepcidin-25 (hhep25) in C57Bl/6N mice, we showed that circulating hepcidin is filtered by the glomerulus and degraded to smaller isoforms detected in urine but not plasma. Moreover, hepcidin colocalized with the endocytic receptor megalin in proximal tubules, and compared with wild-type mice, megalin-deficient mice showed higher urinary excretion of injected hhep25 and no hepcidin staining in proximal tubules that lack megalin. This indicates that hepcidin is reaborbed in the proximal tubules by megalin dependent endocytosis. Administration of hhep25 concomitant with or 4 hours after a single intravenous dose of hemoglobin abolished hemoglobin-induced upregulation of urinary kidney injury markers (NGAL and KIM-1) and renal Interleukin-6 and Ngal mRNA observed 24 hours after administration but did not affect renal ferroportin expression at this point. Notably, coadministration of hhep25 and hemoglobin but not administration of either alone greatly increased renal mRNA expression of hepcidin-encoding Hamp1 and hepcidin staining in distal tubules. These findings suggest a role for locally synthesized hepcidin in renal protection. Our observations did not support a role for ferroportin in hhep25-mediated protection against hemoglobin-induced early injury, but other mechanisms of cellular iron handling may be involved. In conclusion, our data suggest that both systemically delivered and locally produced hepcidin protect against hemoglobin-induced AKI.

  15. Salt, phosphate and the Bohr effect at the hemoglobin beta chain C terminus studied by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Louie, G; Englander, J J; Englander, S W

    1988-06-20

    Hydrogen exchange experiments using functional labeling and fragment separation methods were performed to study interactions at the C terminus of the hemoglobin beta subunit that contribute to the phosphate effect and the Bohr effect. The results show that the H-exchange behavior of several peptide NH at the beta chain C terminus is determined by a transient, concerted unfolding reaction involving five or more residues, from the C-terminal His146 beta through at least Ala142 beta, and that H-exchange rate can be used to measure the stabilization free energy of interactions, both individually and collectively, at this locus. In deoxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, the removal of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) or pyrophosphate (loss of a salt to His143 beta) speeds the exchange of the beta chain C-terminal peptide NH protons by 2.5-fold (at high salt), indicating a destabilization of the C-terminal segment by 0.5 kcal of free energy. Loss of the His146 beta 1 to Asp94 beta 1 salt link speeds all these protons by 6.3-fold, indicating a bond stabilization free energy of 1.0 kcal. When both these salt links are removed together, the effect is found to be strictly additive; all the protons exchange faster by 16-fold indicating a loss of 1.5 kcal in stabilization free energy. Added salt is slightly destabilizing when DPG is present but provides some increased stability, in the 0.2 kcal range, when DPG is absent. The total allosteric stabilization energy at each beta chain C terminus in deoxy hemoglobin under these conditions is measured to be 3.8 kcal (pH 7.4, 0 degrees C, with DPG). In oxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, stability at the beta chain C terminus is essentially independent of salt concentration, and the NES modification, which in deoxy hemoglobin blocks the His146 beta to Asp94 beta salt link, has no destabilizing effect, either at high or low salt. These results appear to show that the His146 beta salt link, which participates importantly in the

  16. Effect of Selenium Supplements on Hemoglobin Concentration and Morbidity among HIV-1–Infected Tanzanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kupka, Roland; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Aboud, Said; Hertzmark, Ellen; Spiegelman, Donna; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2009-01-01

    Selenium deficiency may increase risks of anemia and morbidity among people with human immunodeficiency virus infection. We therefore investigated the effect of selenium supplements (200 µg of selenomethionine) on these end points among 915 pregnant Tanzanian women. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at baseline (at 12–27 weeks of gestation) and at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, and morbidity data were collected during monthly visits to the clinic. Selenium supplements had no effect on hemoglobin concentrations during follow-up (mean difference, 0.05 g/dL; 95% confidence interval, −0.07 to 0.16 g/dL) but reduced diarrheal morbidity risk by 40% (relative risk, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.42–0.84). There was no effect on the other morbidity end points. PMID:19368503

  17. Effects of Stroma Free Hemoglobin on Blood Pressure and Renal Function in the Hypotensive Rat: Potential Role of Nitric Oxide Inactivation by Hemoglobin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    METHODS Male Sprague-Dawley rats ( Charles River , Wilmington, MA), weighing between 250-350g were used for all experiments. Rats were fed regular Purina...BONAVENTURA. Cell-free hemoglobin reverses the endotoxin mediated hyporesponsivity of rat aortic rings to a-adrenergic agents. Biochem. Biophys

  18. The Bohr effect of hemoglobin intermediates and the role of salt bridges in the tertiary/quaternary transitions.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Benazzi, L; Perrella, M

    2001-04-27

    Understanding mechanisms in cooperative proteins requires the analysis of the intermediate ligation states. The release of hydrogen ions at the intermediate states of native and chemically modified hemoglobin, known as the Bohr effect, is an indicator of the protein tertiary/quaternary transitions, useful for testing models of cooperativity. The Bohr effects due to ligation of one subunit of a dimer and two subunits across the dimer interface are not additive. The reductions of the Bohr effect due to the chemical modification of a Bohr group of one and two alpha or beta subunits are additive. The Bohr effects of monoliganded chemically modified hemoglobins indicate the additivity of the effects of ligation and chemical modification with the possible exception of ligation and chemical modification of the alpha subunits. These observations suggest that ligation of a subunit brings about a tertiary structure change of hemoglobin in the T quaternary structure, which breaks some salt bridges, releases hydrogen ions, and is signaled across the dimer interface in such a way that ligation of a second subunit in the adjacent dimer promotes the switch from the T to the R quaternary structure. The rupture of the salt bridges per se does not drive the transition.

  19. The effects of diaspirin-crosslinked hemoglobin on the assessment of immunohematology profiles.

    PubMed

    Reppucci, A J; Mattia-Goldberg, C; Przybelski, R J; Kuczerepa, P R; Balma, D L

    1997-01-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted on the in vitro effects of diaspirin-crosslinked hemoglobin (DCLHb) in biochemical, hematologic, hemostatic, and blood banking (immunohematologic) methods. The absence of red cell antigens or plasma and/or serum antibodies allows DCLHb to be used as "universal-donor" material. This study evaluates the effects of DCLHb on the accurate assessment of the immunohematologic profile (ABO and Rh blood grouping, antibody screen, and crossmatching). DCLHb, 7.4 g per dL in an electrolyte solution, was mixed in vitro with human whole blood, representing the blood types A Rh-positive. A Rh-negative, B Rh-positive, B Rh-negative, O Rh-positive, O Rh-negative, and AB Rh-positive. Two concentrations of DCLHb were tested: 10-percent (0.74 g/dL) and 30-percent (2.22 g/dL). Controls were prepared by adding a 5-percent albumin solution to aliquots of whole blood in volumes equivalent to those used in preparing the DCLHb dilutions. Serum and/or red cell suspensions from these admixed samples were analyzed for their ABO and Rh blood groups, the presence of unexpected antibodies (antibody screen), and compatibility in crossmatch testing. DCLHb added to whole blood in vitro had no effect on the accurate interpretation of the immunohematologic profile. DCLHb does not appear to inhibit the true response or crossreact in the analysis of blood grouping, antibody screening, or crossmatching. In addition, the red color of DCLHb (up to 2.22 g/dL) did not obscure the visual reading for agglutination.

  20. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A. Wang, Jian Z.; Zhang Dongqing; Montebello, Joseph F.; Grecula, John C.; Lo, Simon S.; Fowler, Jeffery M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.

  1. The effects of classic altitude training on hemoglobin mass in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, N B; Völzke, C; Prommer, N; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Frese, F; Spahl, O; Eastwood, A; Stray-Gundersen, J; Schmidt, W

    2013-05-01

    Aim of the study was to determine the influence of classic altitude training on hemoglobin mass (Hb-mass) in elite swimmers under the following aspects: (1) normal oscillation of Hb-mass at sea level; (2) time course of adaptation and de-adaptation; (3) sex influences; (4) influences of illness and injury; (5) interaction of Hb-mass and competition performance. Hb-mass of 45 top swimmers (male 24; female 21) was repeatedly measured (~6 times) over the course of 2 years using the optimized CO-rebreathing method. Twenty-five athletes trained between one and three times for 3-4 weeks at altitude training camps (ATCs) at 2,320 m (3 ATCs) and 1,360 m (1 ATC). Performance was determined by analyzing 726 competitions according to the German point system. The variation of Hb-mass without hypoxic influence was 3.0 % (m) and 2.7 % (f). At altitude, Hb-mass increased by 7.2 ± 3.3 % (p < 0.001; 2,320 m) and by 3.8 ± 3.4 % (p < 0.05; 1,360 m). The response at 2,320 m was not sex-related, and no increase was found in ill and injured athletes (n = 8). Hb-mass was found increased on day 13 and was still elevated 24 days after return (4.0 ± 2.7 %, p < 0.05). Hb-mass had only a small positive effect on swimming performance; an increase in performance was only observed 25-35 days after return from altitude. In conclusion, the altitude (2,320 m) effect on Hb-mass is still present 3 weeks after return, it decisively depends on the health status, but is not influenced by sex. In healthy subjects it exceeds by far the oscillation occurring at sea level. After return from altitude performance increases after a delay of 3 weeks.

  2. Effects of fecal sampling on preanalytical and analytical phases in quantitative fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rapi, Stefano; Berardi, Margherita; Cellai, Filippo; Ciattini, Samuele; Chelazzi, Laura; Ognibene, Agostino; Rubeca, Tiziana

    2017-07-24

    Information on preanalytical variability is mandatory to bring laboratories up to ISO 15189 requirements. Fecal sampling is greatly affected by lack of harmonization in laboratory medicine. The aims of this study were to obtain information on the devices used for fecal sampling and to explore the effect of different amounts of feces on the results from the fecal immunochemical test for hemoglobin (FIT-Hb). Four commercial sample collection devices for quantitative FIT-Hb measurements were investigated. The volume of interest (VOI) of the probes was measured from diameter and geometry. Quantitative measurements of the mass of feces were carried out by gravimetry. The effects of an increased amount of feces on the analytical environment were investigated measuring the Hb values with a single analytical method. VOI was 8.22, 7.1 and 9.44 mm3 for probes that collected a target of 10 mg of feces, and 3.08 mm3 for one probe that targeted 2 mg of feces. The ratio between recovered and target amounts of devices ranged from 56% to 121%. Different changes in the measured Hb values were observed, in adding increasing amounts of feces in commercial buffers. The amounts of collected materials are related to the design of probes. Three out 4 manufacturers declare the same target amount using different sampling volumes and obtaining different amounts of collected materials. The introduction of a standard probes to reduce preanalytical variability could be an useful step for fecal test harmonization and to fulfill the ISO 15189 requirements.

  3. Mammalian Toxicity of Munition Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses. Part I. Trinitroglycerin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-25

    administrations. In addition, the protective effect of methylene blue on TNG induced methemoglobinemia was investigated. 2. Material and Methods A total of 16 young...hemoglobin concentrations. To study any protective effect on methemogloblu formation, 3 mg/kg of methylene blue (USP water solution for injection) was I9...increased to 3.0% at 2 hours. At this time, 3 mg/kg of methylene blue was injected intravenously to each dog. Instead of increasing quickly to a peak, the

  4. N-terminal acetylation and protonation of individual hemoglobin subunits: Position-dependent effects on tetramer strength and cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Yagami, Takeshi; Willey, Ronald J.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Popowicz, Anthony; Manning, Lois R.; Manning, James M.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of alanine (Ala) or acetyl serine (AcSer) instead of the normal Val residues at the N-terminals of either the α- or the β-subunits of human adult hemoglobin confers some novel and unexpected features on the protein. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that these substitutions were correct and that they were the only ones. Circular dichroism studies indicated no global protein conformational changes, and isoelectric focusing showed the absence of impurities. The presence of Ala at the N-terminals of the α-subunits of liganded hemoglobin results in a significantly increased basicity (increased pKa values) and a reduction in the strength of subunit interactions at the allosteric tetramer–dimer interface. Cooperativity in O2 binding is also decreased. Substitution of Ala at the N-terminals of the β-subunits gives neither of these effects. The substitution of Ser at the N terminus of either subunit leads to its complete acetylation (during expression) and a large decrease in the strength of the tetramer–dimer allosteric interface. When either Ala or AcSer is present at the N terminus of the α-subunit, the slope of the plot of the tetramer–dimer association/dissociation constant as a function of pH is decreased by 60%. It is suggested that since the network of interactions involving the N and C termini of the α-subunits is less extensive than that of the β-subunits in liganded human hemoglobin disruptions there are likely to have a profound effect on hemoglobin function such as the increased basicity, the effects on tetramer strength, and on cooperativity. PMID:15929996

  5. The effect of a standardized protocol for iron supplementation to blood donors low in hemoglobin concentration.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Karin; Bork, Nanna; Asmussen, Lisa

    2008-04-01

    Iron deficiency leading to low hemoglobin concentration (cHb) is a common problem for blood donors as well as for blood banks. A standardized protocol offering iron supplementation based on P-ferritin determination may help to reduce the problem and retain donors. This was a prospective study where 879 blood donors, presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation, were included. The predonation cHb result was read after donation. The donors received 50 iron tablets (JernC or Ferrochel, 100 or 25 mg elemental iron, respectively), and samples for P-ferritin, mean corpuscular volume, and control of cHb were secured. Based on a P-ferritin level of less than 60 microg per L, 20 iron tablets were offered after all following donations. Mean cHb was 7.6 mmol per L (122 g/L) and 8.2 mmol per L (132 g/L) in women and men, respectively. In 80 percent of the women and 48 percent of the men, iron stores were low (P-ferritin < or = 30 microg/L). In the donors returning once or twice, an increase in cHb and P-ferritin was seen. Fifteen donors were permanently deferred due to disease and 36 due to low cHb, but 2 years after the start of the study, 79 percent of the women and 85 percent of the men were still active donors. A standardized protocol offering iron supplementation and simple oral and written advice based on P-ferritin measurements is effective in normalizing cHb and retaining donors presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation.

  6. Effect of hemoglobin- and Perflubron-based oxygen carriers on common clinical laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Ma, Z; Monk, T G; Goodnough, L T; McClellan, A; Gawryl, M; Clark, T; Moreira, P; Keipert, P E; Scott, M G

    1997-09-01

    Polymerized hemoglobin solutions (Hb-based oxygen carriers; HBOCs) and a second-generation perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion (Perflubron) are in clinical trials as temporary oxygen carriers ("blood substitutes"). Plasma and serum samples from patients receiving HBOCs look markedly red, whereas those from patients receiving PFC appear to be lipemic. Because hemolysis and lipemia are well-known interferents in many assays, we examined the effects of these substances on clinical chemistry, immunoassay, therapeutic drug, and coagulation tests. HBOC concentrations up to 50 g/L caused essentially no interference for Na, K, Cl, urea, total CO2, P, uric acid, Mg, creatinine, and glucose values determined by the Hitachi 747 or Vitros 750 analyzers (or both) or for immunoassays of lidocaine, N-acetylprocainamide, procainamide, digoxin, phenytoin, quinidine, or theophylline performed on the Abbott AxSym or TDx. Gentamycin and vancomycin assays on the AxSym exhibited a significant positive and negative interference, respectively. Immunoassays for TSH on the Abbott IMx and for troponin I on the Dade Stratus were unaffected by HBOC at this concentration. Tests for total protein, albumin, LDH, AST, ALT, GGT, amylase, lipase, and cholesterol were significantly affected to various extents at different HBOC concentrations on the Hitachi 747 and Vitros 750. The CK-MB assay on the Stratus exhibited a negative interference at 5 g/L HBOC. HBOC interference in coagulation tests was method-dependent-fibrometer-based methods on the BBL Fibro System were free from interference, but optical-based methods on the MLA 1000C exhibited interferences at 20 g/L HBOC. A 1:20 dilution of the PFC-based oxygen carrier (600 g/L) caused no interference on any of these chemistry or immunoassay tests except for amylase and ammonia on the Vitros 750 and plasma iron on the Hitachi 747.

  7. Hemoglobin C disease

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is a type of hemoglobinopathy. The disease is caused by a problem with ...

  8. Effects of simulated weightlessness on mammalian development. Part 1: Development of clinostat for mammalian tissue culture and use in studies on meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolegemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on three aspects of mammalian reproduction: oocyte development, fertilization, and early embryogenesis was studied. Zero-gravity conditions within the laboratory by construction of a clinostat designed to support in vitro tissue culture were simulated and the effects of simulated weightlessness on meiotic maturation in mammalian oocytes using mouse as the model system were studied. The timing and frequency of germinal vesicule breakdown and polar body extrusion, and the structural and numerical properties of meiotic chromosomes at Metaphase and Metaphase of meiosis are assessed.

  9. Effects of vulture declines on facultative scavengers and potential implications for mammalian disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Ogada, D L; Torchin, M E; Kinnaird, M F; Ezenwa, V O

    2012-06-01

    Vultures (Accipitridae and Cathartidae) are the only known obligate scavengers. They feed on rotting carcasses and are the most threatened avian functional group in the world. Possible effects of vulture declines include longer persistence of carcasses and increasing abundance of and contact between facultative scavengers at these carcasses. These changes could increase rates of transmission of infectious diseases, with carcasses serving as hubs of infection. To evaluate these possibilities, we conducted a series of observations and experimental tests of the effects of vulture extirpation on decomposition rates of livestock carcasses and mammalian scavengers in Kenya. We examined whether the absence of vultures changed carcass decomposition time, number of mammalian scavengers visiting carcasses, time spent by mammals at carcasses, and potential for disease transmission at carcasses (measured by changes in intraspecific contact rates). In the absence of vultures, mean carcass decomposition rates nearly tripled. Furthermore, the mean number of mammals at carcasses increased 3-fold (from 1.5 to 4.4 individuals/carcass), and the average time spent by mammals at carcasses increased almost 3-fold (from 55 min to 143 min). There was a nearly 3-fold increase in the mean number of contacts between mammalian scavengers at carcasses without vultures. These results highlight the role of vultures in carcass decomposition and level of contact among mammalian scavengers. In combination, our findings lead us to hypothesize that changes in vulture abundance may affect patterns of disease transmission among mammalian carnivores. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peetsch, Alexander; Greulich, Christina; Braun, Dieter; Stroetges, Christian; Rehage, Heinz; Siebers, Bettina; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Spherical silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized in a co-precipitation route from calcium nitrate/silver nitrate and ammonium phosphate in a continuous process and colloidally stabilized by carboxymethyl cellulose. Nanoparticles with 0.39 wt% silver content and a diameter of about 50-60 nm were obtained. The toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells were determined by viability tests and determination of the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Three mammalian cells lines, i.e. human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocytes and T-lymphocytes), and two prokaryotic strains, i.e. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles and silver acetate showed similar effect toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells with toxic silver concentrations in the range of 1-3 μg mL(-1).

  11. Recombinant Hemoglobins as Artificial Oxygen Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Fronticelli, Clara; Koehler, Raymond C.; Brinigar, William S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the approaches we have taken to construct a) mutant hemoglobins with different oxygen affinities, and b) mutant hemoglobins and myoglobins that polymerize to high molecular weight aggregates in an effort to prevent extravasation and the associated vasoactivity. In vivo testing indicates that exchange transfusion of polymeric hemoglobins in mice does not result in vasoactivity and that polymeric hemoglobins are effective oxygen carriers to ischemic tissues irrespective of their oxygen affinity and cooperativity. PMID:17364470

  12. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  13. Effects of mutations on the molecular dynamics of oxygen escape from the dimeric hemoglobin of Scapharca inaequivalvis.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Kevin; Papagiannopoulos, Tasso; Olsen, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Like many hemoglobins, the structure of the dimeric hemoglobin from the clam Scapharca inaequivalvis is a "closed bottle" since there is no direct tunnel from the oxygen binding site on the heme to the solvent.  The proximal histidine faces the dimer interface, which consists of the E and F helicies.  This is significantly different from tetrameric vertebrate hemoglobins and brings the heme groups near the subunit interface. The subunit interface is also characterized by an immobile, hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules.  Although there is data which is consistent with the histidine gate pathway for ligand escape, these aspects of the structure would seem to make that pathway less likely. Locally enhanced sampling molecular dynamics are used here to suggest alternative pathways in the wild-type and six mutant proteins. In most cases the point mutations change the selection of exit routes observed in the simulations. Exit via the histidine gate is rarely seem although oxygen molecules do occasionally cross over the interface from one subunit to the other. The results suggest that changes in flexibility and, in some cases, creation of new cavities can explain the effects of the mutations on ligand exit paths.

  14. Localized Control of Ligand Binding in Hemoglobin: Effect of Tertiary Structure on Picosecond Geminate Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. M.; Scott, T. W.; Fisanick, G. J.; Simon, S. R.; Findsen, E. W.; Ondrias, M. R.; MacDonald, V. W.

    1985-07-01

    The picosecond geminate rebinding of molecular oxygen was monitored in a variety of different human, reptilian, and fish hemoglobins. The fast (100 to 200 picoseconds) component of the rebinding is highly sensitive to protein structure. Both proximal and distal perturbations of the heme affect this rebinding process. The rebinding yield for the fast process correlates with the frequency of the stretching motion of the iron-proximal histidine mode (vFe-His) observed in the transient Raman spectra of photodissociated ligated hemoglobins. The high-affinity R-state species exhibit the highest values for vFe-His and the highest yields for fast rebinding, whereas low affinity R-state species and T-state species exhibit lower values of vFe-His and correspondingly reduced yields for this geminate process. These findings link protein control of ligand binding with events at the heme.

  15. When herbivores eat predators: predatory insects effectively avoid incidental ingestion by mammalian herbivores.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Inbar, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The direct trophic links between mammalian herbivores and plant-dwelling insects have been practically ignored. Insects are ubiquitous on plants consumed by mammalian herbivores and are thus likely to face the danger of being incidentally ingested by a grazing mammal. A few studies have shown that some herbivorous hemipterans are able to avoid this peril by dropping to the ground upon detecting the heat and humidity on the mammal's breath. We hypothesized that if this risk affects the entire plant-dwelling insect community, other insects that share this habitat are expected to develop similar escape mechanisms. We assessed the ability of three species (adults and larvae) of coccinellid beetles, important aphid predators, to avoid incidental ingestion. Both larvae and adults were able to avoid incidental ingestion effectively by goats by dropping to the ground, demonstrating the importance of this behavior in grazed habitats. Remarkably, all adult beetles escaped by dropping off the plant and none used their functional wings to fly away. In controlled laboratory experiments, we found that human breath caused 60-80% of the beetles to drop. The most important component of mammalian herbivore breath in inducing adult beetles and larvae to drop was the combination of heat and humidity. The fact that the mechanism of dropping in response to mammalian breath developed in distinct insect orders and disparate life stages accentuates the importance of the direct influence of mammalian herbivores on plant-dwelling insects. This direct interaction should be given its due place when discussing trophic interactions.

  16. When Herbivores Eat Predators: Predatory Insects Effectively Avoid Incidental Ingestion by Mammalian Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Inbar, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The direct trophic links between mammalian herbivores and plant-dwelling insects have been practically ignored. Insects are ubiquitous on plants consumed by mammalian herbivores and are thus likely to face the danger of being incidentally ingested by a grazing mammal. A few studies have shown that some herbivorous hemipterans are able to avoid this peril by dropping to the ground upon detecting the heat and humidity on the mammal's breath. We hypothesized that if this risk affects the entire plant-dwelling insect community, other insects that share this habitat are expected to develop similar escape mechanisms. We assessed the ability of three species (adults and larvae) of coccinellid beetles, important aphid predators, to avoid incidental ingestion. Both larvae and adults were able to avoid incidental ingestion effectively by goats by dropping to the ground, demonstrating the importance of this behavior in grazed habitats. Remarkably, all adult beetles escaped by dropping off the plant and none used their functional wings to fly away. In controlled laboratory experiments, we found that human breath caused 60–80% of the beetles to drop. The most important component of mammalian herbivore breath in inducing adult beetles and larvae to drop was the combination of heat and humidity. The fact that the mechanism of dropping in response to mammalian breath developed in distinct insect orders and disparate life stages accentuates the importance of the direct influence of mammalian herbivores on plant-dwelling insects. This direct interaction should be given its due place when discussing trophic interactions. PMID:23424674

  17. Use of home hemoglobin A1c test kits to monitor the effectiveness of diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Rector, T S; Venus, P J; Thayer, S R

    2001-05-01

    Periodic measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is highly recommended for people with diabetes to determine whether their blood glucose is adequately controlled. Quality improvement programs initiated by health plans often focus on ensuring that HbA1c is being monitored in members with diabetes. To focus improvement efforts on members with poor blood glucose control, health plans need to know which members have high HbA1c levels. Recent development of home test kits provides another opportunity for health plans to help members measure their HbA1c and to identify members with high levels. A sample of members from two health plans who were sent HbA1c self-test kits in January 2000 participated in a telephone interview. To understand why members did or did not use self-test kits sent by their health plans, the survey focused on perceived ease of use, outcomes, and normative beliefs. In the group of 380 members who were interviewed, 170 (45%) used the kit. HbA1c values were > 8 mg/dl in 43%. Among the 170 who used the kit, 160 said that they would use the kit. Their most common reason for using the kit was to find out how well their blood glucose was being controlled (48%). Convenience (12%) was the next most frequent reason for using the kit. Among the 210 members who did not use the kit, 81 members said that they would not or were not sure if they would when interviewed. Their most frequent reason for not using the kit was duplication of tests done by physicians (34%). Others were too busy (12%), wanted to talk with their physician (11%), or had difficulty using the kit (11%). Because the majority of health plan members did not use the kit and the majority who did use the kit had HbA1c levels < 8 mg/dl, sending home test kits to members did not result in a high yield of members with elevated HbA1c levels. Physicians' support for use of the kits and efforts to make kits easier to use might increase use. Efforts to avoid duplication of physicians' measurements

  18. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  19. The effect of oral iron with or without multiple micronutrients on hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin response among nonpregnant Cambodian women of reproductive age: a 2 x 2 factorial, double-blind, randomized controlled supplementation trial.

    PubMed

    Karakochuk, Crystal D; Barker, Mikaela K; Whitfield, Kyly C; Barr, Susan I; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Devlin, Angela M; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Houghton, Lisa A; Prak, Sophonneary; Hou, Kroeun; Chai, Tze Lin; Stormer, Ame; Ly, Sokhoing; Devenish, Robyn; Oberkanins, Christian; Pühringer, Helene; Harding, Kimberly B; De-Regil, Luz M; Kraemer, Klaus; Green, Tim J

    2017-07-01

    Background: Despite a high prevalence of anemia among nonpregnant Cambodian women, current reports suggest that iron deficiency (ID) prevalence is low. If true, iron supplementation will not be an effective anemia reduction strategy.Objective: We measured the effect of daily oral iron with or without multiple micronutrients (MMNs) on hemoglobin concentration in nonpregnant Cambodian women screened as anemic.Design: In this 2 × 2 factorial, double-blind, randomized trial, nonpregnant women (aged 18-45 y) with hemoglobin concentrations ≤117 g/L (capillary blood) were recruited from 26 villages in Kampong Chhnang province and randomly assigned to receive 12 wk of iron (60 mg; Fe group), MMNs (14 other micronutrients; MMN group), iron plus MMNs (Fe+MMN group), or placebo capsules. A 2 × 2 factorial intention-to-treat analysis with the use of a generalized mixed-effects model was used to assess the effects of iron and MMNs and the interaction between these factors. Results: In July 2015, 809 women were recruited and 760 (94%) completed the trial. Baseline anemia prevalence was 58% (venous blood). Mean (95% CI) hemoglobin concentrations at 12 wk in the Fe, MMN, Fe+MMN, and placebo groups were 121 (120, 121), 116 (116, 117), 123 (122, 123), and 116 (116, 117) g/L, with no iron × MMN interaction (P = 0.66). Mean (95% CI) increases in hemoglobin were 5.6 g/L (3.8, 7.4 g/L) (P < 0.001) among women who received iron (n = 407) and 1.2 g/L (-0.6, 3.0 g/L) (P = 0.18) among women who received MMNs (n = 407). The predicted proportions (95% CIs) of women with a hemoglobin response (≥10 g/L at 12 wk) were 19% (14%, 24%), 9% (5%, 12%), 30% (24%, 35%), and 5% (2%, 9%) in the Fe, MMN, Fe+MMN, and placebo groups, respectively.Conclusions: Daily iron supplementation for 12 wk increased hemoglobin in nonpregnant Cambodian women; however, MMNs did not confer additional significant benefit. Overall, ∼24% of women who received iron responded after 12 wk; even fewer would be likely

  20. Effects of pH, CO2 and organic phosphates on oxygen affinity of sea turtle hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Lutz, P L; Lapennas, G N

    1982-04-01

    The affinities of adult-type hemoglobins of green (Chelonia mydas) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtles were determined at 25.7 degrees C as a function of pH, PCO2 and each of the organic phosphates found in erythrocytes of these species (ATP, IHP (substitute for IPP) and DPG). Each species showed a single hemoglobin band in cellulose acetate electrophoresis which isoelectric focusing resolved into one major and three minor components having isoelectric points near pH 7.2. Oxygen binding curves were recorded using a modified 'Hemoscan' (Instrument Division, Travenol Laboratories, Savage, MD). Hemolysates were kept saturated with CO during preparation to prevent methemoglobin formation. CO was driven off immediately before performing each oxygen binding determination, using the photodissociative effect of the Hemoscan light beam. In both species, phosphate-free hemoglobin has higher affinity than whole blood, and had lower pH sensitivity. CO2 (37 Torr) reduces affinity, particularly in the green sea turtle, and eliminates pH sensitivity. Each organic phosphate tested reduces affinity, with IHP being most effective at a given concentration and DPG least effective. Organic phosphates are most effective at low pH, and restore both pH sensitivity and oxygen affinity to whole-blood levels taking into account the difference between plasma and intracellular pH. Reasons are suggested why the organic phosphate effect was not detected in a previous study. Hemolysates of both species are distinctive in giving upward-curving Hill plots, with n = 1 asymptotes at low saturation that are insensitive to pH, CO2 and organic phosphates. The oxygen affinities corresponding to these asymptotes are about 100 Torr in both species. Results are compared to oxygen dissociation curves obtained from whole blood.

  1. Functional measurements on carboxymethylated hemoglobin, a potential blood substitute: effects of sodium chloride on pH values that influence the alkaline Bohr effect.

    PubMed

    Manning, L R; Fantl, W J; Manning, J M

    1990-01-01

    The leakage of chloride from electrodes during measurements of the alkaline Bohr effect of hemoglobin (by the proton release method) amounted to 1-5 mM concentration of the anion depending on the type of electrode employed. This concentration, together with the amount of chloride found to be intrinsically bound to hemoglobin (0.2-0.6 mM), could mask the contribution of chloride to various hemoglobin functions. In addition, the concentration of chloride was found to affect the pH of buffers as measured either with a pH meter or with the dye, cresol red. Thus, for 20 mM phosphate buffer, the pH was lowered almost 0.4 pH units in the presence of 0.30 M chloride. For Tris-acetate buffer, the same concentration of chloride led to an increase in pH of about 0.05 units.

  2. Delayed treatment of hemoglobin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Regan, Raymond F; Rogers, Bret

    2003-01-01

    Hemoglobin is an oxidative neurotoxin that may contribute to cell injury after CNS trauma and hemorrhagic stroke. Prior studies have demonstrated that concomitant treatment with iron-chelating antioxidants prevents its neurotoxicity. However, the efficacy of these agents when applied hours after hemoglobin has not been determined, and is the subject of the present investigation. Consistent with prior observations, an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, detected by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin oxidation, was observed when mixed neuronal/astrocyte cultures prepared from mouse cortex were exposed to hemoglobin alone. However, this oxidative stress developed slowly. A significant increase in the dichlorofluorescein signal compared with control, untreated cultures was not observed until four hours after addition of hemoglobin, and was followed by loss of membrane integrity and propidium iodide staining. Treating cultures with the 21-aminosteroid U74500A or the ferric iron chelator deferoxamine four hours after initiating hemoglobin treatment markedly attenuated reactive oxygen species production within 2 h. Continuous exposure to 5 micro M hemoglobin for 24 h resulted in death of about three-quarters of neurons, without injuring astrocytes. Most neuronal loss was prevented by concomitant treatment with U74500A; its effect was not significantly attenuated if treatment was delayed for 2-4 h, and it still prevented over half of neuronal death if treatment was delayed for 8 h. Similar neuroprotection was produced by delayed treatment with deferoxamine or the lipid-soluble iron chelator phenanthroline. None of these agents had any effect on neuronal death when added to cultures 12 h after hemoglobin. These results suggest that hemoglobin is a potent but slowly-acting neurotoxin. The delayed onset of hemoglobin neurotoxicity may make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Effect of an intravenous iron dextran regimen on iron stores, hemoglobin, and erythropoietin requirements in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, L; Uhthoff, T; Tierney, M; Nadler, S

    1998-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of delayed or diminished response to erythropoietin (EPO) in hemodialysis patients. Although oral iron is often prescribed to replete iron stores, this approach to iron supplementation may not be adequate with chronic EPO therapy. Intravenous (IV) iron dextran may be an effective alternative approach to replete iron stores and may facilitate more cost-effective use of EPO. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an IV iron dextran regimen that consisted of a loading dose phase followed by monthly maintenance doses of iron dextran. The effect of this regimen on iron stores, hemoglobin, and EPO doses was evaluated. This was an open prospective study in adult hemodialysis patients who were iron deficient as defined by a serum ferritin less than 100 ng/mL or transferrin saturation (TSAT) of less than 20%. Patients were loaded with 1 g iron dextran in five divided doses and then received monthly maintenance doses of 100 mg for the 4-month study period. Values of serum ferritin, TSAT, hemoglobin, and EPO dose were followed for the 4-month study period. Thirty hemodialysis patients receiving EPO were identified as being iron deficient and were enrolled in the study. The mean serum ferritin increased significantly from 49 ng/mL at baseline to 225 ng/mL at the end of the study period (P < 0.0001). Mean TSAT also increased significantly from 27% to 33% (P = 0.002). Values for hemoglobin did not change significantly during the study period; however, there was a significant reduction in EPO dose from a mean baseline dose of 112 U/kg/wk to 88 U/kg/wk at the end of the study period (P = 0.009). Seventeen patients experienced an increase in hemoglobin or a decrease in EPO dose. Economic analysis showed that approximately $580 (Cdn) per patient per year could be saved by use of IV iron dextran. The administration of the IV iron dextran regimen in the iron-deficient hemodialysis population was effective at repleting and maintaining iron stores

  4. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant.

  5. The Effect of Hemoglobin Levels on Mortality in Pediatric Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kevin F; Walker, Andrew M; Gilfoyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is increasing evidence of adverse outcomes associated with blood transfusions for adult traumatic brain injury patients. However, current evidence suggests that pediatric traumatic brain injury patients may respond to blood transfusions differently on a vascular level. This study examined the influence of blood transfusions and anemia on the outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury patients. Design. A retrospective cohort analysis of severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients was undertaken to investigate the association between blood transfusions and anemia on patient outcomes. Measurements and Main Results. One hundred and twenty patients with severe traumatic brain injury were identified and included in the analysis. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 and the mean hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission was 115.8 g/L. Forty-three percent of patients (43%) received at least one blood transfusion and the mean hemoglobin before transfusion was 80.1 g/L. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that anemia and the administration of packed red blood cells were not associated with adverse outcomes. Factors that were significantly associated with mortality were presence of abusive head trauma, increasing PRISM score, and low GCS after admission. Conclusion. In this single centre retrospective cohort study, there was no association found between anemia, blood transfusions, and hospital mortality in a pediatric traumatic brain injury patient population.

  6. Nanomolar detection of methylparaben by a cost-effective hemoglobin-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hajian, A; Ghodsi, J; Afraz, A; Yurchenko, O; Urban, G

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the development of a new biosensor for methylparaben determination using electrocatalytic properties of hemoglobin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The voltammetric oxidation of methylparaben by the proposed biosensor in phosphate buffer (pH=7.0), a physiological pH, was studied and it was confirmed that methylparaben undergoes a one electron-one proton reaction in a diffusion-controlled process. The biosensor was fabricated by carbon paste electrode modified with hemoglobin and multiwalled carbon nanotube. Based on the excellent electrochemical properties of the modified electrode, a sensitive voltammetric method was used for determination of methylparaben within a linear range from 0.1 to 13μmolL(-1) and detection limit of 25nmolL(-1). The developed biosensor possessed accurate and rapid response to methylparaben and showed good sensitivity, stability, and repeatability. Finally, the applicability of the proposed biosensor was verified by methylparaben evaluation in various real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrophysiological effects of risperidone in mammalian cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Bagi, Zsolt; Pacher, Pál; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Fülöp, László; Kecskeméti, Valéria; Nánási, Péter P

    2002-10-01

    In this study, the effects of risperidone, the widely used antipsychotic drug, on isolated canine ventricular myocytes and guinea-pig papillary muscles were analyzed using conventional microelectrode and whole cell voltage-clamp techniques. Risperidone concentration-dependently lengthened action potential duration in guinea-pig papillary muscles (EC(50)=0.29+/-0.02 micro M) and single canine ventricular myocytes (EC(50)=0.48+/-0.14 micro M). This effect was reversible, showed reverse rate dependence, and it was most prominent on the terminal portion of repolarization. No significant effect of risperidone on the resting membrane potential, action potential amplitude or maximum rate of depolarization was observed. In voltage-clamped canine ventricular myocytes risperidone caused concentration-dependent block of the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current ( I(Kr)), measured as outward current tails at -40 mV, with an IC(50) of 0.92+/-0.26 micro M. Suppression of I(Kr) was not associated with changes in activation or deactivation kinetics. High concentration of risperidone (10 micro M) suppressed also the slow component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current ( I(Ks)) by 9.6+/-1.5% at +50 mV. These effects of risperidone developed rapidly and were readily reversible. Risperidone had no significant effect on the amplitude of other K(+) currents ( I(K1) and I(to)). The inhibition of cardiac I(Kr) current by risperidone may explain the cardiac side-effects observed occasionally with the drug. Our results suggest that risperidone displays class III antiarrhythmic properties, and as such, may produce QTc prolongation, especially in patients with long QT syndrome. Therefore, in psychotic patients having also cardiac disorders, ECG control may be suggested during risperidone therapy.

  8. Collateral effects of antibiotics on mammalian gut microbiomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics are an essential component of the modern lifestyle. They improve our lives by treating disease, preventing disease, and in the case of agricultural animals by improving feed efficiency. However, antibiotic usage is not without collateral effects. The development and spread of antibiot...

  9. Study of radiation effects on mammalian cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1968-01-01

    Radiation effect on single cells and cell populations of Chinese hamster lung tissue is studied in vitro. The rate and position as the cell progresses through the generation cycle shows division delay, changes in some biochemical processes in the cell, chromosomal changes, colony size changes, and loss of reproductive capacity.

  10. Oncogenic and mutagenic effects of UV in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    Ultraviolet light is present in the solar system and can cause major biological effects. The potential cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects of UV have been studied at cellular and molecular level. Using cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts (C3H10T1/2), we investigated the induction of mutation and transformation by UV and/or X-rays. Studies were also done with normal human mammary epithelial cells for cell inactivation and mutation induction. Curvlinear dose-response curves were observed for mutation and oncogenic transformation. The interaction between UV and X-rays depends on the sequence of exposure. When UV was given following X-irradiation, there was an additive effect. When UV was given prior to X-irradiation, however, there was a synergistic effect for both cell inactivation and transformation. The basic lesion(s) important for somatic mutation and transformation remains to be determined, and the fundamental mechanism(s) of UV and ionizing radiation interaction remains to be elucidated.

  11. [EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES OF PLANT HORMONES ON MAMMALIAN CELLS].

    PubMed

    Vildanova, M S; Smirnova, E A

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones are signal molecules of different chemical structure, secreted by plant cells and acting at low concentrations as regulators of plant growth and differentiation. Certain plant hormones are similar to animal hormones or can be produced by animal cells. A number of studies show that the effect of biologically active components of plant origin including plant/phytohormones is much wider than was previously thought, but so far there are no objective criteria for assessing the influence of phytohormones on the physiological state of animal cells. Presented in the survey data show that plant hormones, which have different effects on plant growth and development (jasmonic, abscisic and gibberellic acids), are not neutral to the cells of animal origin, and animal cells response to them may be either positive or negative.

  12. Effect of thymol on calcium handling in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Szentandrássy, Norbert; Szigeti, Gyula; Szegedi, Csaba; Sárközi, Sándor; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Csernoch, László; Kovács, László; Nánási, Péter P; Jóna, István

    2004-01-02

    Concentration-dependent effects of thymol on calcium handling were studied in canine and guinea pig cardiac preparations (Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts, canine ventricular trabeculae, canine sarcoplasmic reticular vesicles and single ryanodine receptors). Thymol induced a concentration-dependent negative inotropic action in both canine and guinea pig preparations (EC(50) = 297 +/- 12 microM in dog). However, low concentrations of thymol reduced intracellular calcium transients in guinea pig hearts without decreasing contractility. At higher concentrations both calcium transients and contractions were suppressed. In canine sarcoplasmic reticular vesicles thymol induced rapid release of calcium (V(max) = 0.47 +/- 0.04 nmol s(-1), EC(50) = 258 +/- 21 microM, Hill coefficient = 3.0 +/- 0.54), and decreased the activity of the calcium pump (EC(50) = 253 +/- 4.7 microM, Hill coefficient = 1.62 +/- 0.05). Due to the less sharp concentration-dependence of the ATPase inhibition, this effect was significant from 50 microM, whereas the thymol-induced calcium release only from 100 microM. In single ryanodine receptors incorporated into artificial lipid bilayer thymol induced long lasting openings, having mean open times increased with 3 orders of magnitude, however, the specific conductance of the channel remained unaltered. This effect of thymol was not voltage-dependent and failed to prevent the binding of ryanodine. In conclusion, the negative inotropic action of thymol can be explained by reduction in calcium content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum due to the combination of the thymol-induced calcium release and inhibition of the calcium pump. The calcium-sensitizer effect, observed at lower thymol concentrations, indicates that thymol is likely to interact with the contractile machinery also.

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Hladik, Daniela; Tapio, Soile

    Epidemiological studies on the atomic-bomb survivors, cancer survivors and occupational cohorts provide strong evidence for multifaceted damage to brain after ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced late effects may manifest as brain tumors or cognitive impairment. Decreased neurogenesis and differentiation, alteration in neural structure and synaptic plasticity as well as increased oxidative stress and inflammation are suggested to contribute to adverse effects in the brain. In addition to neural stems cells, several brain-specific mature cell types including endothelial and glial cells are negatively affected by ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced enhancement of endothelial cell apoptosis results in disruption of the vascular system and the blood brain barrier. Activated microglia create inflammatory environment that negatively affects neuronal structures and results in decreased synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in radiation-induced brain injury remain elusive, first strategies for prevention and amelioration are being developed. Drug-based prevention and treatment focus mainly on the inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation. Cell replacement therapy holds great promise as first animal studies using transplantation of neural stem cells to irradiated brain have been successful in restoring memory and cognition deficits. This review summarizes the epidemiological and biological data on radiation-induced brain damage and describes prevention and therapy methods to avoid and ameliorate these adverse effects, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity and hemodynamic effects after single dose administration of MalPEG-hemoglobin (MP4) in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Young, Mark A; Malavalli, Ashok; Winslow, Nancy; Vandegriff, Kim D; Winslow, Robert M

    2007-06-01

    Maleimide-polyethylene glycol-modified (MalPEG) hemoglobin, 4.3 g/dL (MP4; Hemospan), is a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier consisting of human hemoglobin (Hb) modified with maleimide polyethylene glycol. This study evaluates the potential toxicity and hemodynamic actions of a single dose of MP4 administered by exchange transfusion to rhesus monkeys. Monkeys were administered MP4 (21 mL/kg, or approximately 30% of estimated blood volume) or an equivalent volume of lactated Ringer's solution (LR). In the toxicity study, blood samples were obtained predose and 3, 7, and 13 days after dosing for clinical chemistry and hematology. Animals were euthanized for complete necropsy and histopathology on day 3 or day 13. A separate group of animals was used for evaluation of arterial pressure, core temperature, and electrocardiogram, by telemetry, for 7 days after dosing with MP4. The results demonstrate no significant toxicity, with only modest, transient elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) on day 3. Mild anemia caused by hemodilution was observed at each time point in both groups, but to a slightly greater degree in the MP4-treated animals. Histologic observations included foamy or vacuolated macrophages in the spleen and marrow of the sternum, rib, and femur, representing the accumulation of test article or a metabolite. In the telemetry study, no changes occurred in arterial pressure, heart rate, or electrocardiogram attributable to administration of MP4 at any time for 7 days after administration. These results demonstrate that MP4 is safe and is without hemodynamic effects when administered as an exchange transfusion of 30% of estimated blood volume.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of resin components on cultured mammalian fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hanks, C T; Strawn, S E; Wataha, J C; Craig, R G

    1991-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the cytotoxic concentrations of 11 components of resin composites on monolayers of cultured Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts, to study the inhibitory effects of these components on DNA synthesis, total protein content, and protein synthesis, and to determine whether effects were reversible when the components were withdrawn from the medium. These data were reported as concentrations which inhibited 10% (ID10) and 50% (ID50) of a particular metabolic process as well as the range of concentrations over which cell metabolism was irreversibly inhibited. For any individual component, the ID50 values for all three metabolic parameters were of the same magnitude. The same was true for the ranges of irreversibility. Ethoxylated Bis-phenol A dimethacrylate (E-BPA) was the most toxic molecule of the group (ID50 being between 1 and 10 mumol/L). The ID50 concentrations for three of the components, including Bis-GMA, UDMA, TEGDMA, and Bis-phenol A, ranged between 10 and 100 mumol/L, while the ID50 values of three components (N,N dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine, camphoroquinone, and N,N dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) were above 100 mumol/L. The concentrations to which the cells and tissues are exposed in vivo are not known. This study should help to identify the concentrations of organic composite components which pose clinical cytotoxic hazards.

  16. Some effects of lead at mammalian neuromuscular junction

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.B.; Bornstein, J.C.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of lead on transmitter release was investigated in a rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation using conventional microelectrode techniques. Lead reduced the number of quanta released by a nerve stimulus (m) in a dose-dependent fashion. As extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration ((Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub 0/) was varied in the absence of lead, a linear relationship between ln(m) and ln((Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub 0/) was obtained. Lead shifted the relationship between ln(m) and ln((Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub 0/) to the right without altering the slope. This suggested lead competed with Ca/sup 2 +/, which was confirmed by using a modified Lineweaver-Burk plot. Lead inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/ entry into frog sympathetic preganglionic nerve terminals, and a similar mechanism may underlie this present finding; such a mechanism, however, could not explain all the observed actions of lead. Lead increased the frequency of spontaneous quantal release in a dose-dependent manner, and 10/sup -4/ M lead doubled the magnitude of facilitation of evoked release seen with five stimuli at 60 Hz. It is suggested that these effects result from inhibition of some, or all, of the nerve terminal's Ca/sup 2 +/ sequestration mechanisms.

  17. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  18. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-01

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  19. Effects of methylphenidate (Ritalin) on mammalian myocardial ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Henderson, T A; Fischer, V W

    1995-01-01

    Previous observations have indicated lamellated ultrastructural lesions in the myocardium of a patient treated with methylphenidate (Ritalin) hydrochloride (MPH). A causal relationship between MPH exposure and these membranous changes was tested in the myocardium of rats and mice. Following injection of varying doses of MPH for different periods, myocardial ultrastructure was examined and lesions were quantified by stereological techniques. Myocardial tissue also was stained using techniques selective for acid phosphatase and for sarcoplasmic reticulum to identify possible pathogenetic mechanisms. MPH induced membrane accumulations and lamellations which were not membrane-bound and did not react for acid phosphatase, but stained positively for sarcoplasmic reticulum. Both lesions were highly focal, surrounded by normal appearing myocardial tissue. Lamellations were evident at the earliest timepoints examined and appeared to occur without lysosomal involvement. Lesions were still apparent 12 weeks after terminating MPH. These data suggest that MPH may have persistent, cumulative effects on the myocardium.

  20. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV micrometers-1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p3n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p3n is high.

  1. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV micrometers-1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p3n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p3n is high.

  2. The effect of a nutrition education program on the nutritional knowledge, hemoglobin levels, and nutritional status of Nicaraguan adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa; Rodriguez, Claudia; Lumbi, Laura; Ailinger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a community-based nutrition education program on the nutritional knowledge, hemoglobin levels, and nutritional status of Nicaraguan adolescent girls and the nutritional knowledge of their mothers. Self-care deficit nursing theory was used in this study. This longitudinal study used a mixed quantitative/qualitative design to study the effect of the nutrition education program. The nonprobability sample consisted of 182 adolescent girls and 67 of their mothers. The setting for the study was a community (barrio) in Managua, Nicaragua. INTERVENTION/MEASUREMENT: A team of nurse and nutrition researchers created the nutrition education program designed to improve girls' and mother's nutrition-related self-care operations. Data collection was carried out for 4 years for girls and 2 years for mothers in Managua, Nicaragua, using questionnaires, a HemoCue, and anthropometric measures. The findings of this study were that girls' and mothers' nutritional knowledge scores significantly improved in most cases after participation in the nutrition intervention program. Girls' hemoglobin levels did not significantly improve and their nutritional status findings were mixed. Girls and mothers described what dietary changes girls made and why.

  3. Effects of PEG-PLA-nano Artificial Cells Containing Hemoglobin on Kidney Function and Renal Histology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zun Chang; Chang, Thomas M.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study is to investigate the long-term effects of PEG-PLA nano artificial cells containing hemoglobin (NanoRBC) on renal function and renal histology after 1/3 blood volume top loading in rats. The experimental rats received one of the following infusions: NanoRBC in Ringer lactate, Ringer lactate, stroma-free hemoglobin (SFHB), polyhemoglobin (PolyHb), autologous rat whole blood (rat RBC). Blood samples were taken before infusions and on days 1, 7 and 21 after infusions for biochemistry analysis. Rats were sacrificed on day 21 after infusions and kidneys were excised for histology examination. Infusion of SFHB induced significant decrease in renal function damage evidenced by elevated serum urea, creatinine and uric acid throughout the 21 days. Kidney histology in SFHb infusion group revealed focal tubular necrosis and intraluminal cellular debris in the proximal tubules, whereas the glomeruli were not observed damaged. In all the other groups, NanoRBC, PolyHb, Ringer lactate and rat RBC, there were no abnormalities in renal biochemistry or histology. In conclusion, injection of NanoRBC did not have adverse effects on renal function nor renal histology. PMID:18979292

  4. THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC ACIDS ON MAMMALIAN TUBERCLE BACILLI

    PubMed Central

    Dubos, René J.

    1950-01-01

    The growth of tubercle bacilli in vitro was inhibited by the addition of the sodium salts of very low concentrations of certain organic acids to a variety of liquid and agar culture media containing whole serum or serum albumin. Capric acid was the most active of the compounds tested, but inhibition of growth occurred also with the shorter aliphatic acids. Lactic acid was also growth-inhibitory, whereas the keto and dicarboxylic acids tested were inactive in this respect. The inhibitory activity of the aliphatic acids and of lactic acid increased as the pH of the medium was lowered by addition of HCl. It was greater in media enriched with serum or with oleic acid-albumin complex, but was otherwise fairly independent of the composition of the medium. The inhibitory effect appears to be bacteriostatic rather than bactericidal and to depend upon a disturbance of the normal metabolic processes of the bacilli. Some of the long chain fatty acids caused a marked enhancement of growth when used in low concentrations and in admixture with enough serum albumin to overcome their toxicity. The significance of these findings is discussed with reference to the survival and multiplication of tubercle bacilli in vivo within inflammatory and caseous areas, which are known to be often acidic and to contain high concentrations of organic acids. PMID:14778913

  5. Effect of Gravity on the Mammalian Cell Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y.; Gonda, Steven

    1995-01-01

    The effect of human cell immersed in culture liquid under a micro-gravity environment has been investigated. The study is based on the numerical simulation of the configuration of human cell affected by the time dependent variation of gravity acceleration ranging from 10(exp -3) to 2 g(sub o) (g(sub o) = 9.81 m/s(exp 2)) in 15 seconds. Both the free floating cell and the cell contacted to the upper and lower inclined walls imposed by the time-dependent reduced gravity acceleration are considered in this study. The results show that the cell configuration changes from spherical to horizontally elongated ellipsoid for both the free floating cell and the cell sitting on the lower inclined wall while the cell configuration varies from spherical to vertically elongated ellipsoid for the cell hanging to the upper inclined wall when the gravity acceleration increases. Experimental observations, carried out of human cells exposed to the variation of gravity levels, show that the results of experimental observations agree exactly with the theoretical model computation described in this paper. These results sre significant for humans exposed to the micro-gravity environment.

  6. Biological Effects of Trichoderma harzianum Peptaibols on Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Joanna; Ritieni, Alberto; Mikkola, Raimo; Grigoriev, Pavel A.; Pócsfalvi, Gabriella; Andersson, Maria A.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S.

    2004-01-01

    Trichoderma species isolated from water-damaged buildings were screened for toxicity by using boar sperm cells as indicator cells. The crude methanolic cell extract from Trichoderma harzianum strain ES39 inhibited the boar sperm cell motility at a low exposure concentration (50% effective concentration, 1 to 5 μg [dry weight] ml of extended boar semen−1). The same exposure concentration depleted the boar sperm cells of NADH2. Inspection of the exposed boar sperm cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed damage to the plasma membrane. By using the black lipid membrane technique, it was shown that the semipurified metabolites (eluted from a SepPak C18 cartridge) of T. harzianum strain ES39 induced voltage-dependent conductivity. The high-performance liquid chromatography-purified metabolites of T. harzianum strain ES39 dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) of human lung epithelial carcinoma cells (cell line A549). The semipurified metabolites (eluted from a SepPak C18 cartridge) of T. harzianum strain ES39 were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and nanoflow electrospray ionization MS revealed five major peptaibols, each of which contained 18 residues and had a mass ranging from 1,719 to 1,775 Da. Their partial amino acid sequences were determined by collision-induced dissociation tandem MS. PMID:15294840

  7. Importance of Many-Body Effects in the Kernel of Hemoglobin for Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Cédric; O'Regan, David D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Kotliar, Gabriel; Payne, Mike C.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a mechanism for binding of diatomic ligands to heme based on a dynamical orbital selection process. This scenario may be described as bonding determined by local valence fluctuations. We support this model using linear-scaling first-principles calculations, in combination with dynamical mean-field theory, applied to heme, the kernel of the hemoglobin metalloprotein central to human respiration. We find that variations in Hund’s exchange coupling induce a reduction of the iron 3d density, with a concomitant increase of valence fluctuations. We discuss the comparison between our computed optical absorption spectra and experimental data, our picture accounting for the observation of optical transitions in the infrared regime, and how the Hund’s coupling reduces, by a factor of 5, the strong imbalance in the binding energies of heme with CO and O2 ligands.

  8. Effective ethanol production from whey powder through immobilized E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Sar, Taner; Stark, Benjamin C; Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem

    2017-03-04

    Ethanol production from whey powder was investigated by using free as well as alginate immobilized E. coli and E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) in both shake flask and fermenter cultures. Media with varying levels of whey (lactose contents of 3%, 5%, 8% or 15%) and yeast extract (0.3% or 0.5%) were evaluated with fermentation times of 48-96 h. Immobilization and VHb expression resulted in higher ethanol production with all media; the increases ranged from 2% to 89% for immobilization and from 2% to 182% for VHb expression. It was determined that growth medium containing 8% lactose with 0.5% yeast extract yielded the highest ethanol production for free or immobilized strains, with or without VHb expression, in both shake flask and fermenter cultures. Immobilization with alginate was found to be a promising process for ethanol production by VHb-expressing ethanologenic E. coli.

  9. Effective ethanol production from whey powder through immobilized E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Taner; Stark, Benjamin C.; Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ethanol production from whey powder was investigated by using free as well as alginate immobilized E. coli and E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) in both shake flask and fermenter cultures. Media with varying levels of whey (lactose contents of 3%, 5%, 8% or 15%) and yeast extract (0.3% or 0.5%) were evaluated with fermentation times of 48–96 h. Immobilization and VHb expression resulted in higher ethanol production with all media; the increases ranged from 2% to 89% for immobilization and from 2% to 182% for VHb expression. It was determined that growth medium containing 8% lactose with 0.5% yeast extract yielded the highest ethanol production for free or immobilized strains, with or without VHb expression, in both shake flask and fermenter cultures. Immobilization with alginate was found to be a promising process for ethanol production by VHb-expressing ethanologenic E. coli. PMID:27579556

  10. Effects of the plant growth regulator, chlormequat, on mammalian fertility.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Martin T; Danielsen, Viggo

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the consequences of exposure to chlormequat, a plant growth regulator, on reproduction in mammals. Plant growth regulators are chemicals used to manipulate plant growth, flowering and fruit yield. In grain crops, plant growth regulators are applied to promote sturdier growth and reduce the risk of lodging. Chlormequat is the most common plant growth regulator. Maximum residue limits of chlormequat in food products are 10 mg/kg in oat and pear, 3 mg/kg in wheat and rye, and 0.5 mg/kg in milk. In Denmark, results from experiments with pigs in the late 1980s showed sows that display impaired reproduction, mainly impaired oestrus, when fed grain from crop treated with chlormequat. Subsequently, the advisory body to the Danish pig industry recommended limiting the use of grain (maximum 30% of diet energy) from crop treated with chlormequat given to breeding stock due to the risk of reproduction problems. More recently, experiments have been conducted to evaluate the influence of chlormequat-treated wheat crop on reproductive function in male and female mice. These experiments showed that epididymal spermatozoa from mice on feed or water containing chlormequat had compromised fertilizing competence in vitro, while reproduction in female mice was not compromised. The estimated intake of chlormequat in the pig (0.0023 mg/kg bw/day) and the mouse (0.024 mg/kg bw/day) experiments was below the acceptable daily intake of 0.05 mg/kg bw/day. Reports from the industry do not show any effects at these low levels.

  11. Contrasting effects of different mammalian herbivores on sagebrush plant communities.

    PubMed

    Veblen, Kari E; Nehring, Kyle C; McGlone, Christopher M; Ritchie, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory by both grazing and browsing ungulates shapes the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, and both types of herbivory have been implicated in major ecosystem state changes. Despite the ecological consequences of differences in diets and feeding habits among herbivores, studies that experimentally distinguish effects of grazing from spatially co-occurring, but temporally segregated browsing are extremely rare. Here we use a set of long-term exclosures in northern Utah, USA, to determine how domestic grazers vs. wild ungulate herbivores (including browsers and mixed feeders) affect sagebrush-dominated plant communities that historically covered ~62 million ha in North America. We sampled plant community properties and found that after 22 years grazing and browsing elicited perceptible changes in overall plant community composition and distinct responses by individual plant species. In the woody layer of the plant community, release from winter and spring wild ungulate herbivory increased densities of larger Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata, ssp. wyomingensis) at the expense of small sagebrush, while disturbance associated with either cattle or wild ungulate activity alone was sufficient to increase bare ground and reduce cover of biological soil crusts. The perennial bunchgrass, bottlebrush squirretail (Elymus elymoides), responded positively to release from summer cattle grazing, and in turn appeared to competitively suppress another more grazing tolerant perennial grass, Sandberg's blue grass (Poa secunda). Grazing by domestic cattle also was associated with increased non-native species biomass. Together, these results illustrate that ungulate herbivory has not caused sagebrush plant communities to undergo dramatic state shifts; however clear, herbivore-driven shifts are evident. In a dry, perennial-dominated system where plant community changes can occur very slowly, our results provide insights into potential long

  12. Contrasting Effects of Different Mammalian Herbivores on Sagebrush Plant Communities

    PubMed Central

    Veblen, Kari E.; Nehring, Kyle C.; McGlone, Christopher M.; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory by both grazing and browsing ungulates shapes the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, and both types of herbivory have been implicated in major ecosystem state changes. Despite the ecological consequences of differences in diets and feeding habits among herbivores, studies that experimentally distinguish effects of grazing from spatially co-occurring, but temporally segregated browsing are extremely rare. Here we use a set of long-term exclosures in northern Utah, USA, to determine how domestic grazers vs. wild ungulate herbivores (including browsers and mixed feeders) affect sagebrush-dominated plant communities that historically covered ~62 million ha in North America. We sampled plant community properties and found that after 22 years grazing and browsing elicited perceptible changes in overall plant community composition and distinct responses by individual plant species. In the woody layer of the plant community, release from winter and spring wild ungulate herbivory increased densities of larger Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata, ssp. wyomingensis) at the expense of small sagebrush, while disturbance associated with either cattle or wild ungulate activity alone was sufficient to increase bare ground and reduce cover of biological soil crusts. The perennial bunchgrass, bottlebrush squirretail (Elymus elymoides), responded positively to release from summer cattle grazing, and in turn appeared to competitively suppress another more grazing tolerant perennial grass, Sandberg’s blue grass (Poa secunda). Grazing by domestic cattle also was associated with increased non-native species biomass. Together, these results illustrate that ungulate herbivory has not caused sagebrush plant communities to undergo dramatic state shifts; however clear, herbivore-driven shifts are evident. In a dry, perennial-dominated system where plant community changes can occur very slowly, our results provide insights into potential long

  13. Hemoglobin Brigham (α2Aβ2100 Pro→Leu). HEMOGLOBIN VARIANT ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL ERYTHROCYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Lokich, Jacob J.; Moloney, William C.; Bunn, H. Franklin; Bruckheimer, Sally M.; Ranney, Helen M.

    1973-01-01

    Erythrocytosis associated with the presence of a hemoglobin with increased oxygen affinity has been reported for 10 hemoglobin variants, most of which demonstrate altered electrophoretic mobility. Several members of a family were found to have erythrocytosis, and both the whole blood and the hemoglobin exhibited increased oxygen affinity. Phosphate-free hemoglobin solutions had a normal Bohr effect and reactivity to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The electrophoretic properties of the hemoglobin were normal, but on peptide mapping of a tryptic digest of the isolated β-chains, a normal βT11 peptide and an abnormal βT11 with greater Rf were seen. Analysis of the abnormal peptide showed the substitution of leucine for the normal proline at β100 (helical residue G2). The hemoglobin variant, designated Hb Brigham, serves to emphasize the necessity for detailed evaluation of the structure and function of hemoglobin in familial erythrocytosis even with electrophoretically “normal” hemoglobin. PMID:4719677

  14. The effect of quaternary structure on the kinetics of conformational changes and nanosecond geminate rebinding of carbon monoxide to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, L.P.; Hofrichter, J.; Henry, E.R.; Eaton, W.A. ); Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Kitagishi, Keiko; Yonetani, Takashi )

    1988-04-01

    To determine the effect of quaternary structure on the individual kinetic steps in the binding of carbon monoxide to the {alpha} subunit of hemoglobin, time-resolved absorption spectra were measured after photodissociation of carbon monoxide from a hemoglobin tetramer in which cobalt was substituted for iron in the {beta} subunits. Cobalt porphyrins do not bind carbon monoxide. Spectra were measured in the Soret region at room temperature after time delays that varied from a few nanoseconds to the completion of ligand rebinding at about 100 ms. The results show that the liganded molecule is in the R state, but can be almost completely switched into the T state by the allosteric effectors inositol hexaphosphate and bezafibrate. The geminate yield, which is the probability that the ligand rebinds to the heme from within the protein, is found to be 40% for the R state and <1% for the T state. According to the simplest kinetic model, these results indicate that carbon monoxide enters the protein in the R and T quaternary conformations at the same rate, and that the 60-fold decrease in the overall binding rate, of carbon monoxide to the {alpha} subunit in the T state compared to the R state is almost completely accounted for by the decreased probability of binding after the ligand has entered the protein. The results further suggest that the low probability for the T state results from a decreased binding rate to the heme and not from an increased rate of return of the ligand to the solvent.

  15. Positive Effect of Large Birth Intervals on Early Childhood Hemoglobin Levels in Africa Is Limited to Girls: Cross-Sectional DHS Study

    PubMed Central

    Afeworki, Robel; Smits, Jeroen; Tolboom, Jules; van der Ven, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background Short birth intervals are independently associated with increased risk of adverse maternal, perinatal, infant and child outcomes. Anemia in children, which is highly prevalent in Africa, is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Birth spacing is advocated as a tool to reduce anemia in preschool African children, but the role of gender differences and contextual factors has been neglected. The present study aims to determine to what extent the length of preceding birth interval influences the hemoglobin levels of African preschool children in general, as well as for boys and girls separately, and which contextual factors thereby play a crucial role. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study uses data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted between 2003 and 2011 in 20 African countries. All preschool children aged 6–59 months with a valid hemoglobin measurement and a preceding birth interval of 7–72 months as well as their corresponding multigravida mothers aged 21–49 years were included in the study. Hemoglobin levels of children and mothers were measured in g/l, while birth intervals were calculated as months difference between consecutive births. Multivariate analyses were done to examine the relationship between length of preceding birth interval and child hemoglobin levels, adjusted for factors at the individual, household, community, district, and country level. A positive linear relationship was observed between birth interval and the 49,260 included children’s hemoglobin level, whereby age and sex of the child, hemoglobin level of the mother, household wealth, mother’s education and urbanization of place of residence also showed positive associations. In the interaction models, the effect of a month increase in birth interval is associated with an average increase of 0.025 g/l in hemoglobin level (P = 0.001) in girls, while for boys the effect was not significant. In addition, for girls, the effect

  16. Comparative effectiveness of a prenatal medical food to prenatal vitamins on hemoglobin levels and adverse outcomes: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan; Hermes, Amy; Phillips, Diane; Daoud, Yahya A; Hanna, Sylvia

    2011-02-01

    The role of folate in pregnancy is well established, with most prenatal vitamins (PNVs) on the market containing at least 800 μg of folic acid. Folic acid must be converted in the body to L-methylfolate, the natural and biologically active form of folate. The role of vitamin B(12) in pregnancy is less characterized, and most PNV formulations contain only 0 to 12 μg. The present study was undertaken to evaluate whether taking a prenatal medical food containing L-methylfolate and much higher doses of vitamin B(12) results in higher hemoglobin levels and thus, a lower incidence of anemia during pregnancy. The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate the effects of the prenatal medical food versus standard PNVs on hemoglobin levels and adverse outcomes throughout pregnancy. For this retrospective analysis, we reviewed the charts of female patients taking either a prenatal medical food or standard PNV during pregnancy. Hemoglobin levels measured at initiation of prenatal care, end of second trimester, and delivery were recorded. Patients who had received additional iron supplementation, beyond that contained in the prenatal medical food or PNV they were taking and before anemia screening at the end of the second trimester, were excluded from the study. Fisher exact test, χ(2) test, student t test, and ANOVA were used to evaluate differences between the treatment groups. Data were analyzed from 112 charts: 58 patients (51.8%) were taking the prenatal medical food; 54 patients (48.2%) were taking standard PNVs. Mean (SD) age at first prenatal visit was 27 (4.6) years in the medical food group and 28.8 (3.5) years in the PNV group (P = 0.024). Mean (SD) body mass indices were 29.1 (6.5) and 31.7 (8.9) in the medical food and PNV groups, respectively (P = NS). In the medical food group, 35 women (60.3%) were white/Caucasian, 17 (29.3%) were African American, and 6 (10.4%) were of other races. In the PNV group, 24 women (44.4%) were white/Caucasian, 25 (46

  17. Human hemoglobin genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  18. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ju Young; Park, Keun Young; Kim, Byung Joon; Hwang, Won Min; Kim, Dong Ho; Lim, Dong Mee

    2016-03-01

    Most type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. For 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 μg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 μg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV), body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively), while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289). In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively). Effects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  19. Reproducing the Hemoglobin Saturation Profile, a Marker of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI Effect, at the Microscopic Level.

    PubMed

    Hadjistassou, Constantinos; Moyle, Keri; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    The advent of functional MRI in the mid-1990s has catalyzed progress pertaining to scientific discoveries in neuroscience. With the prospect of elucidating the physiological aspect of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) effect we present a computational capillary-tissue system capable of mapping venous hemoglobin saturation- a marker of the BOLD hemodynamic response. Free and facilitated diffusion and convection for hemoglobin and oxygen are considered in the radial and axial directions. Hemoglobin reaction kinetics are governed by the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve. Brain activation, mimicked by dynamic transitions in cerebral blood velocity (CBv) and oxidative metabolism (CMRO2), is simulated by normalized changes in m = (ΔCBv/CBv)/(ΔCMRO2/CMRO2) of values 2, 3 and 4. Venous hemoglobin saturation profiles and peak oxygenation results, for m = 2, based upon a 50% and a 25% increase in CBv and CMRO2, respectively, lie within physiological limits exhibiting excellent correlation with the BOLD signal, for short-duration stimuli. Our analysis suggests basal CBv and CMRO2 values of 0.6 mm/s and 200 μmol/100g/min. Coupled CBv and CMRO2 responses, for m = 3 and m = 4, overestimate peak hemoglobin saturation, confirming the system's responsiveness to changes in hematocrit, CBv and CMRO2. Finally, factoring in neurovascular effects, we show that no initial dip will be observed unless there is a time delay in the onset of increased CBv relative to CMRO2.

  20. Neonatal screening for α-thalassemia by cord hemoglobin Barts: how effective is it?

    PubMed

    Wu, M-Y; Xie, X-M; Li, J; Li, D-Z

    2015-10-01

    It has long been recognized that the hemoglobin (Hb) Bart's in cord blood is an accurate indicator of α-thalassemia and that the level of Hb Bart's was increased accordingly with the increasing numbers of the defective α-genes. This study used an automatic capillary electrophoresis system to determine the Hb Bart's levels in cord blood. Molecular analyses were used to detect various genotypes of α-thalassemia. Sixty-nine of the total 1169 newborns were found to have an increased Hb Bart's in cord blood, in whom the diagnosis of α-thalassemia was confirmed by the DNA analysis. The remaining 1100 newborns had no detectable Hb Bart's at birth; among these, 45 carriers of silent α-thalassemia were diagnosed by DNA analysis. All the 45 cases had only the -α(3.7) deletion genotype. For newborns of one α-gene mutation, especially for 3.7-kb deletion, the method based on Hb Bart's is inadequate and is therefore not reliable for screening. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sulfide-Binding Hemoglobins: Effects of Mutations on Active-Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Alberti, S.; Bacelo, D. E.; Binning, R. C.; Echave, J.; Chergui, M.; Lopez-Garriga, J.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of Hemoglobin I (HbI) from the clam Lucina pectinata, from wild-type sperm whale (SW) myoglobin, and from the L29F/H64Q/V68F triple mutant of SW, both unligated and bound to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), have been studied in molecular dynamics simulations. Features that account for differences in H2S affinity among the three have been examined. Our results verify the existence of an unusual heme rocking motion in unligated HbI that can promote the entrance of large ligands such as H2S. The FQF-mutant partially reproduces the amplitude and relative orientation of the motion of HbI's heme group. Therefore, besides introducing favorable electrostatic interactions with H2S, the three mutations in the distal pocket change the dynamic properties of the heme group. The active-site residues Gln-64(E7), Phe-43(CD1), and His-93(F8) are also shown to be more flexible in unligated HbI than in FQF-mutant and SW. Further contributions to H2S affinity come from differences in hydrogen bonding between the heme propionate groups and nearby amino acid residues. PMID:16782787

  2. Effects of Global Warming on Ancient Mammalian Communities and Their Environments

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Larisa R. G.; Feranec, Robert S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Current global warming affects the composition and dynamics of mammalian communities and can increase extinction risk; however, long-term effects of warming on mammals are less understood. Dietary reconstructions inferred from stable isotopes of fossil herbivorous mammalian tooth enamel document environmental and climatic changes in ancient ecosystems, including C3/C4 transitions and relative seasonality. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use stable carbon and oxygen isotopes preserved in fossil teeth to document the magnitude of mammalian dietary shifts and ancient floral change during geologically documented glacial and interglacial periods during the Pliocene (∼1.9 million years ago) and Pleistocene (∼1.3 million years ago) in Florida. Stable isotope data demonstrate increased aridity, increased C4 grass consumption, inter-faunal dietary partitioning, increased isotopic niche breadth of mixed feeders, niche partitioning of phylogenetically similar taxa, and differences in relative seasonality with warming. Conclusion/Significance Our data show that global warming resulted in dramatic vegetation and dietary changes even at lower latitudes (∼28°N). Our results also question the use of models that predict the long term decline and extinction of species based on the assumption that niches are conserved over time. These findings have immediate relevance to clarifying possible biotic responses to current global warming in modern ecosystems. PMID:19492043

  3. Effects of global warming on ancient mammalian communities and their environments.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Larisa R G; Feranec, Robert S; MacFadden, Bruce J

    2009-06-03

    Current global warming affects the composition and dynamics of mammalian communities and can increase extinction risk; however, long-term effects of warming on mammals are less understood. Dietary reconstructions inferred from stable isotopes of fossil herbivorous mammalian tooth enamel document environmental and climatic changes in ancient ecosystems, including C(3)/C(4) transitions and relative seasonality. Here, we use stable carbon and oxygen isotopes preserved in fossil teeth to document the magnitude of mammalian dietary shifts and ancient floral change during geologically documented glacial and interglacial periods during the Pliocene (approximately 1.9 million years ago) and Pleistocene (approximately 1.3 million years ago) in Florida. Stable isotope data demonstrate increased aridity, increased C(4) grass consumption, inter-faunal dietary partitioning, increased isotopic niche breadth of mixed feeders, niche partitioning of phylogenetically similar taxa, and differences in relative seasonality with warming. Our data show that global warming resulted in dramatic vegetation and dietary changes even at lower latitudes (approximately 28 degrees N). Our results also question the use of models that predict the long term decline and extinction of species based on the assumption that niches are conserved over time. These findings have immediate relevance to clarifying possible biotic responses to current global warming in modern ecosystems.

  4. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N + beam on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Han, Wei; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N +) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N + beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A L cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 × 10 14 N +/cm 2), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 × 10 14 N +/cm 2, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N + beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 × 10 14 N +/cm 2. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59- mutants induced by 5-20 keV N + beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various ionising radiations.

  5. Effects of indigo carmine intravenous injection on noninvasive and continuous total hemoglobin measurement with using the Revision L sensor.

    PubMed

    Isosu, Tsuyoshi; Obara, Shinju; Hakozaki, Takahiro; Imaizumi, Tsuyoshi; Iseki, Yuzo; Mogami, Midori; Ohashi, Satoshi; Ikegami, Yukihiro; Kurosawa, Shin; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    The effects of intravenous injection of indigo carmine on noninvasive and continuous total hemoglobin (SpHb) measurement were retrospectively evaluated with the Revision L sensor. The subjects were 18 patients who underwent elective gynecologic surgery under general anesthesia. During surgery, 5 mL of 0.4 % indigo carmine was injected intravenously, and changes in SpHb concentrations between before and after the injection were evaluated. The mean age was 52.4 ± 12.8 years. Before injection, the median SpHb level was 10.1 (range, 6.8-13.4) g/dL. The results demonstrated no change in SpHb concentration between before and after indigo carmine injection as detected by the Revision L sensor. SpHb measurements as determined with the Revision L sensor were not affected, even after the intravenous injection of indigo carmine.

  6. Differential Effect of Glycosylated Hemoglobin Value and Antidiabetic Treatment on the Risk of 30-day Readmission Following a Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Bonanad, Clara; Navarro, Juan Paulo; Bondanza, Lourdes; Artero, Ana; Ventura, Silvia; Núñez, Eduardo; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan; Real, José

    2015-10-01

    In patients with heart failure and type 2 diabetes, low glycosylated hemoglobin has been related with higher risk of mortality but information regarding morbidity is scarce. We sought to evaluate the association between glycosylated hemoglobin and 30-day readmission in patients with type 2 diabetes and acute heart failure. Glycosylated hemoglobin was measured before discharge in 835 consecutive patients with acute heart failure and type 2 diabetes. Cox regression analysis adapted for competing events was used. Mean (standard deviation) age was 72.9 (9.6) years and median glycosylated hemoglobin was 7.2% (6.5%-8.0%). Patients treated with insulin or insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides were 41.1% and 63.2% of the cohort, respectively. At 30 days post-discharge, 109 (13.1%) patients were readmitted. A multivariate analysis revealed that the effect of glycosylated hemoglobin on the risk of 30-day readmission was differentially affected by the type of treatment (P for interaction<.01). Glycosylated hemoglobin (per 1% decrease) was inversely associated with higher risk in those receiving insulin (hazard ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.86; P=.003) or insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides (hazard ratio = 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.80; P=.001). Conversely, glycosylated hemoglobin (per 1% increase) had no effect in non-insulin dependent diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-1.17; P=.897) or even a positive effect in patients not receiving insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides (hazard ratio = 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.22; P=.011). In acute heart failure, glycosylated hemoglobin showed to be inversely associated to higher risk of 30-day readmission in insulin-dependent or those treated with insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides. A marginal effect was found in the rest. Whether this association reflects a treatment-related effect or a surrogate of more advanced disease should be clarified in further studies. Copyright © 2014

  7. Formation of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine in human hemoglobin-effect of lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Chiang, Su-Yin; Huang, Tai-Hung; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Chen, Yi-Lung; Kuo, Hsien-Wen; Hsieh, Chih-Liang

    2004-04-11

    The formation of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine (HEV) in hemoglobin has been considered as a biomarker to assess exogenous and endogenous exposures to ethylene oxide (EO) and/or ethylene (ET). Factors associated with daily exposures to such compounds might significantly affect the formation of HEV. Tobacco smoke containing EO elicited a significant increase in the levels of HEV amongst smokers, although other factors related to lifestyles may warrant further studies. The objective of this study was to specifically analyze HEV using a modified Edman degradation technique in order to study the association between lifestyle related factors (smoking, second-hand smoke exposure, tea and alcohol consumption) and HEV formation in vivo. Total of 148 Taiwanese volunteers with no history of occupational exposure to either EO or ET were recruited in this study. The HEV levels for smokers (204 +/- 151 pmol HEV/g globin, n = 70 ) were greater than those for non-smokers (57 +/- 46 pmol HEV/g globin, n = 78), HEV level increasing with the number of cigarettes smoked by subjects per day with a rate of 8.8 pmol HEV/g globin per cigarettes per day. Further analysis revealed that the rate of HEV formation in our study subjects was significantly associated with the number of daily cigarettes smoked (P < 0.001), but was not associated with tea or alcohol consumption, second-hand smoke exposure, subject age, or subject gender. These results suggest that the significantly higher levels of HEV for smokers than for non-smokers were mainly due to subject exposure to EO contained in cigarette smoke.

  8. Effect of dialysis dose and membrane flux on hemoglobin cycling in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    He, Liyu; Fu, Min; Chen, Xian; Liu, Hong; Chen, Xing; Peng, Xiaofei; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming

    2015-04-01

    Many studies found that hemoglobin (Hb) fluctuation was closely related to the prognosis of the maintenance hemodialysis patients. We investigated the association of factors relating dialysis dose and dialyzer membrane with Hb levels. We undertook a randomized clinical trial in 140 patients undergoing thrice-weekly dialysis and assigned patients randomly to a standard or high dose of dialysis; Hb level was measured every month for 12 months. In the standard-dose group, the mean (±SD) urea reduction ratio was 65.1% ± 7.3%, the single-pool Kt/V was 1.26 ± 0.11, and the equilibrated Kt/V was 1.05 ± 0.09; in the high-dose group, the values were 73.5% ± 8.7%, 1.68 ± 0.15, and 1.47 ± 0.11, respectively. The standard deviation (SD) and residual SD (liner regression of Hb) values of Hb were significantly higher in the standard-dose group and low-flux group. The percentage achievement of target Hb in the high-dose dialysis group and high-flux dialyzer group was significantly higher than the standard-dose group and low-flux group, respectively. Patients undergoing hemodialysis thrice weekly appear to have benefit from a higher dialysis dose than that recommended by current KDQQI (Kidney Disease Qutcome Quality Initiative) guidelines or from the use of a high-flux membrane, which is in favor of maintaining stable Hb levels.

  9. Effects of Sleep Disorders on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ahmet; Ünalacak, Murat; Bilge, Uğur; Yildiz, Pinar; Güler, Seda; Selçuk, Engin Burak; Bilgin, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have reported the presence of sleep disorders in approximately 50–70% of diabetic patients, and these may contribute to poor glycemic control, diabetic neuropathy, and overnight hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sleep disorders in diabetic patients, and to investigate possible relationships between scores of these sleep disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and diabetic parameters (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], and lipid levels). Methods: We used the Berlin questionnaire (BQ) for OSAS, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to determine the frequency of sleep disorders and their possible relationships with fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and lipid levels. Results: The study included 585 type 2 diabetic patients admitted to family medicine clinics between October and December 2014. Sleep, sleep quality, and sleep scores were used as the dependent variables in the analysis. The ESS scores showed that 54.40% of patients experienced excessive daytime sleepiness, and according to the PSQI, 64.30% experienced poor-quality sleep. The BQ results indicated that 50.20% of patients were at high-risk of OSAS. HbA1c levels correlated significantly with the ESS and PSQI results (r = 0.23, P < 0.001 and r = 0.14, P = 0.001, respectively), and were significantly higher in those with high-risk of OSAS as defined by the BQ (P < 0.001). These results showed that HbA1c levels were related to sleep disorders. Conclusions: Sleep disorders are common in diabetic patients and negatively affect the control of diabetes. Conversely, poor diabetes control is an important factor disturbing sleep quality. Addressing sleep disturbances in patients who have difficulty controlling their blood glucose has dual benefits: Preventing diabetic complications caused by sleep disturbance and improving diabetes control. PMID:26668142

  10. Plasma clearance of hemoglobin and haptoglobin in mice and effect of CD163 gene targeting disruption.

    PubMed

    Etzerodt, Anders; Kjolby, Mads; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Maniecki, Maciej; Svendsen, Pia; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2013-06-10

    In humans, plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and the macrophage receptor CD163 promote a fast scavenging of hemoglobin (Hb). In the present study, we have compared the mouse and human CD163-mediated binding and uptake of Hb and HpHb complex in vitro and characterized the CD163-mediated plasma clearance of Hb in CD163 gene knockout mice and controls. Contrary to human Hp, mouse Hp did not promote high-affinity binding to CD163. This difference between mouse and man was evident both by analysis of the binding of purified proteins and by ligand uptake studies in CD163-transfected cells. Plasma clearance studies in mice showed a fast clearance (half-life few minutes) of fluorescently labeled mouse Hb with the highest uptake in the kidney and liver. HPLC analysis of serum showed that the clearance curve exhibited a two-phase decay with a faster clearance of Hb than plasma-formed HpHb. In CD163-deficient mice, the overall clearance of Hb was slightly slower and followed a one-phase decay. In conclusion, mouse Hp does not promote high-affinity binding of mouse Hb to CD163, and noncomplexed mouse Hb has a higher CD163 affinity than human Hb has. Moreover, CD163-mediated uptake in mice seems to only account for a part of the Hb clearance. The new data further underscore the fact that the Hp system in man seems to have a broader and more sophisticated role. This has major implications in the translation of data on Hb metabolism from mouse to man.

  11. Clinical effectiveness of hemoglobin spray (Granulox®) as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sharon D.; Elg, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemoglobin spray (Granulox®) comprises purified hemoglobin and is a novel approach for increasing oxygen availability in the wound bed in diabetic foot ulcer patients. Its mode of action is to bind oxygen from the atmosphere and diffuse it into the wound bed to accelerate wound healing in slow-healing wounds. Patients and methods Wound healing outcomes, that is, wound size, pain, percentage of slough, and exudate levels, were compared retrospectively to a similar cohort of patients treated over the same period the previous year. The same inclusion and exclusion criteria applied to both groups. Results All 20 (100%) hemoglobin spray-treated patients and 15 (75%) control patients experienced some wound healing by week 4, with 5 (25%) and 1 (5%), respectively, achieving complete wound closure. At week 4, mean wound size reduction was 63% in the hemoglobin spray group versus 26% for controls, increasing to 95% reduction at week 28 in the hemoglobin spray group versus 63% for controls (p<0.05 at all timepoints). Hemoglobin spray was associated with substantially lower pain scores using a 10-cm visual analogue scale, with 19/19 patients (100%) being pain-free from week 12 onwards, compared to 6/18 patients (33%) in the control group. At week 28, 2/18 patients (11%) in the control group still had pain. Both groups had similar baseline slough levels, but hemoglobin spray-treated wounds had slough completely eliminated after 4 weeks versus 10% mean reduction in the control group (p<0.001). Hemoglobin spray was associated with markedly reduced exudate levels; within 4 weeks, no patients had high exudate levels in the hemoglobin spray group versus 5 in the control group. Conclusion Standard wound care plus hemoglobin spray results in improvements in wound closure, wound size reduction, pain, slough, and exudate levels compared to control patients for chronic diabetic foot ulcer treatment. PMID:27829487

  12. The effect of exposure to nanoparticles and nanomaterials on the mammalian epigenome.

    PubMed

    Sierra, M I; Valdés, A; Fernández, A F; Torrecillas, R; Fraga, M F

    Human exposure to nanomaterials and nanoparticles is increasing rapidly, but their effects on human health are still largely unknown. Epigenetic modifications are attracting ever more interest as possible underlying molecular mechanisms of gene-environment interactions, highlighting them as potential molecular targets following exposure to nanomaterials and nanoparticles. Interestingly, recent research has identified changes in DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and noncoding RNAs in mammalian cells exposed to nanomaterials and nanoparticles. However, the challenge for the future will be to determine the molecular pathways driving these epigenetic alterations, the possible functional consequences, and the potential effects on health.

  13. The effect of exposure to nanoparticles and nanomaterials on the mammalian epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, MI; Valdés, A; Fernández, AF; Torrecillas, R; Fraga, MF

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to nanomaterials and nanoparticles is increasing rapidly, but their effects on human health are still largely unknown. Epigenetic modifications are attracting ever more interest as possible underlying molecular mechanisms of gene–environment interactions, highlighting them as potential molecular targets following exposure to nanomaterials and nanoparticles. Interestingly, recent research has identified changes in DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and noncoding RNAs in mammalian cells exposed to nanomaterials and nanoparticles. However, the challenge for the future will be to determine the molecular pathways driving these epigenetic alterations, the possible functional consequences, and the potential effects on health. PMID:27932878

  14. Development of a simple assay system for protein-stabilizing efficiency based on hemoglobin protection against denaturation and measurement of the cooperative effect of mixing protein stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyu; Manabe, Yoshiyuki; Minamoto, Naoya; Saiki, Naoka; Fukase, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    We have elucidated the cooperative stabilization of proteins by sugars, amino acids, and other protein-stabilizing agents using a new and simple assay system. Our system determines the protein-stabilizing ability of various compounds by measuring their ability to protect hemoglobin from denaturation. Hemoglobin denaturation was readily measured by quantitative changes in its ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum. The efficiency of our assay was confirmed using various sugars such as trehalose and sucrose that are known to be good protein stabilizers. We have also found that mixtures of two different types of protein stabilizers resulted in a cooperative stabilizing effect on protein.

  15. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  16. Effects of Epoetin Alfa Titration Practices, Implemented After Changes to Product Labeling, on Hemoglobin Levels, Transfusion Use, and Hospitalization Rates.

    PubMed

    Molony, Julia T; Monda, Keri L; Li, Suying; Beaubrun, Anne C; Gilbertson, David T; Bradbury, Brian D; Collins, Allan J

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about epoetin alfa (EPO) dosing at dialysis centers after implementation of the US Medicare prospective payment system and revision of the EPO label in 2011. Retrospective cohort study. Approximately 412,000 adult hemodialysis patients with Medicare Parts A and B as primary payer in 2009 to 2012 to describe EPO dosing and hemoglobin patterns; of these, about 70,000 patients clustered in about 1,300 dialysis facilities to evaluate facility-level EPO titration practices and patient-level outcomes in 2012. Facility EPO titration practices when hemoglobin levels were <10 and >11g/dL (grouped treatment variable) determined from monthly EPO dosing and hemoglobin level patterns. Patient mean hemoglobin levels, red blood cell transfusion rates, and all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates using a facility-based analysis. Monthly EPO dose and hemoglobin level, red blood cell transfusion rates, and all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates. Monthly EPO doses declined across all hemoglobin levels, with the greatest decline in patients with hemoglobin levels < 10g/dL (July-October 2011). In 2012, nine distinct facility titration practices were identified. Across groups, mean hemoglobin levels differed slightly (10.5-10.8g/dL) but within-patient hemoglobin standard deviations were similar (∼0.68g/dL). Patients at facilities implementing greater dose reductions and smaller dose escalations had lower hemoglobin levels and higher transfusion rates. In contrast, patients at facilities that implemented greater dose escalations (and large or small dose reductions) had higher hemoglobin levels and lower transfusion rates. There were no clinically meaningful differences in all-cause or cause-specific hospitalization events across groups. Possibly incomplete claims data; excluded small facilities and those without consistent titration patterns; hemoglobin levels reported monthly; inferred facility practice from observed dosing. Following

  17. NIR Raman spectra of whole human blood: Effects of laser-induced and in vitro hemoglobin denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Lemler, P.; Premasiri, W. R.; DelMonaco, A.; Ziegler, L. D.

    2013-01-01

    Care must be exercised in the use of Raman spectroscopy for the identification of blood in forensic applications. The 785 nm excited Raman spectra of dried whole human blood are shown to be exclusively due to oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) or related hemoglobin denaturation products. Raman spectra of whole blood are reported as a function of incident 785 nm laser power and features attributable to heme aggregates are observed for fluences on the order of 104 W/cm2 and 20 sec signal collection times. In particular, the formation of this local heating induced heme aggregate product is indicated by a red-shifting of several heme porphyrin ring vibrational bands, the appearance of a large broad band at 1248 cm−1, the disappearance of the Fe-O2 stretching and bending bands, and the observation of a large overlapping fluorescence. This denaturation product is also observed in the low power excited Raman spectrum of older ambient air exposed bloodstains (≥ two weeks). The 785 nm excited Raman spectrum of methemoglobin whole blood is reported and increasing amounts of this natural denaturation product can also be identified in dried whole blood Raman spectra particularly when the blood has been stored prior to drying. These results indicate that to use 785 nm excited Raman spectra as an identification methodology for forensic applications to maximum effectiveness, incident laser powers need to be kept low to eliminate variable amounts of heme aggregate spectral components contributing to the signal and the natural aging process of hemoglobin denaturation needs to be accounted for. This also suggests that there is a potential opportunity for 785 nm excited Raman to be a sensitive indicator of dried bloodstain age at crime scenes. PMID:24162820

  18. Heat treatment of human esophageal tissues: Effect on esophageal cancer detection using oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Si, J. L.; Wei, H. J.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Guo, X.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, L. Q.; Li, X. Y.

    2011-03-01

    The main objective of the present work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the esophageal cancer detection using the diffuse reflectance (DR) spectral intensity ratio R540/R575 of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) absorption bands to distinguish the epithelial tissues of normal human esophagus and moderately differentiated esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at different heat treatment temperature of 20, 37, 42, 50, and 60°C, respectively. The DR spectra for the epithelial tissues of the normal esophagus and ESCC in vitro at different heat-treatment temperature in the wavelength range 400-650 nm were measured with a commercial optical fiber spectrometer. The results indicate that the average DR spectral intensity overall enhancement with concomitant increase of heat-treatment temperature for the epithelial tissues of normal esophagus and ESCC, but the average DR spectral intensity for the normal esophageal epithelial tissues is relatively higher than that for ESCC epithelial tissues at the same heat-treatment temperature. The mean R540/R575 ratios of ESCC epithelial tissues were always lower than that of normal esophageal epithelial tissues at the same temperature, and the mean R540/R575 ratios of the epithelial tissues of the normal esophagus and ESCC were decreasing with the increase of different heat-treatment temperatures. The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios between the epithelial tissues of normal esophagus and ESCC were 13.33, 13.59, 11.76, and 11.11% at different heat-treatment temperature of 20, 37, 42, and 50°C, respectively. These results also indicate that the DR intensity ratio R540/R575 of the hemoglobin bands is a useful tool for discrimination between the epithelial tissues of normal esophagus and ESCC in the temperature range from room temperature to 50°C, but it was non-effective at 60°C or over 60°C.

  19. NIR Raman spectra of whole human blood: effects of laser-induced and in vitro hemoglobin denaturation.

    PubMed

    Lemler, P; Premasiri, W R; DelMonaco, A; Ziegler, L D

    2014-01-01

    Care must be exercised in the use of Raman spectroscopy for the identification of blood in forensic applications. The Raman spectra of dried whole human blood excited at 785 nm are shown to be exclusively due to oxyhemoglobin or related hemoglobin denaturation products. Raman spectra of whole blood are reported as a function of the incident 785-nm-laser power, and features attributable to heme aggregates are observed for fluences on the order of 10(4) W/cm(2) and signal collection times of 20 s. In particular, the formation of this local-heating-induced heme aggregate product is indicated by a redshifting of several heme porphyrin ring vibrational bands, the appearance of a large broad band at 1,248 cm(-1), the disappearance of the Fe-O2 stretching and bending bands, and the observation of a large overlapping fluorescence band. This denaturation product is also observed in the low-power-excitation Raman spectrum of older ambient-air-exposed bloodstains (2 weeks or more). The Raman spectrum of methemoglobin whole blood excited at 785 nm is reported, and increasing amounts of this natural denaturation product can also be identified in Raman spectra of dried whole blood particularly when the blood has been stored prior to drying. These results indicate that to use 785-nm-excitation Raman spectra as an identification method for forensic applications to maximum effect, incident laser powers need to be kept low to eliminate variable amounts of heme aggregate spectral components contributing to the signal and the natural aging process of hemoglobin denaturation needs to be accounted for. This also suggests that there is a potential opportunity for 785-nm-excitation Raman spectra to be a sensitive indicator of the age of dried bloodstains at crime scenes.

  20. Effects of Insecticidal Ketones Present in Mint Plants on GABAA Receptor from Mammalian Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela Eugenia; Marin, Leticia Delgado; García, Daniel Asmed

    2017-01-01

    The genus Mentha, an important member of the Lamiaceae family, is represented by many species commonly known as mint. The insecticidal activity of Mentha oil and its main components has been tested and established against various insects/pests. Among these, the ketone monoterpenes that are most common in different Mentha species demonstrated insect toxicity, with pulegone being the most active, followed by carvone and menthone. Considering that the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) is one of the main insecticide targets on neurons, and that pulegone would modulate the insect GABA system, it may be expected that the insecticidal properties of Mentha ketones are mediated by their interaction with this receptor. In order to discern the pharmacological actions of these products when used as insecticides on mammalian organisms, we evaluated the pharmacologic activity of ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, on native GABAA-R from rats. Determination of ketones effects on allosterically enhanced benzodiazepine binding, using primary cultures of cortical neurons, which express functional receptors and MTT assay to evaluate their cell toxicity. Our results seem to indicate that ketone components of Mentha, with proven repellent or insecticide activity, were able to behave as GABAA-R negative allosteric modulators in murine cells and consequently could exhibit convulsant activity in mammalians. Only pulegone at the highest assayed concentration (2 mM) showed a significant reduction in cell viability after exposure for 24 hr. The present results strongly suggest that the ketone components of Mentha are able to exhibit convulsant activity in mammalian organisms, but functional assays and in vivo experiments would be necessary to corroborate this proposed action. The pharmacological activity of insecticide ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, was evaluated on native GABAA receptor from mammalian neurons.All studied compounds: pulegone, menthone and dihydrocarvone, were

  1. Effects of Insecticidal Ketones Present in Mint Plants on GABAA Receptor from Mammalian Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela Eugenia; Marin, Leticia Delgado; García, Daniel Asmed

    2017-01-01

    Background: The genus Mentha, an important member of the Lamiaceae family, is represented by many species commonly known as mint. The insecticidal activity of Mentha oil and its main components has been tested and established against various insects/pests. Among these, the ketone monoterpenes that are most common in different Mentha species demonstrated insect toxicity, with pulegone being the most active, followed by carvone and menthone. Considering that the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) is one of the main insecticide targets on neurons, and that pulegone would modulate the insect GABA system, it may be expected that the insecticidal properties of Mentha ketones are mediated by their interaction with this receptor. Objective: In order to discern the pharmacological actions of these products when used as insecticides on mammalian organisms, we evaluated the pharmacologic activity of ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, on native GABAA-R from rats. Materials and Methods: Determination of ketones effects on allosterically enhanced benzodiazepine binding, using primary cultures of cortical neurons, which express functional receptors and MTT assay to evaluate their cell toxicity. Results: Our results seem to indicate that ketone components of Mentha, with proven repellent or insecticide activity, were able to behave as GABAA-R negative allosteric modulators in murine cells and consequently could exhibit convulsant activity in mammalians. Only pulegone at the highest assayed concentration (2 mM) showed a significant reduction in cell viability after exposure for 24 hr. Conclusion: The present results strongly suggest that the ketone components of Mentha are able to exhibit convulsant activity in mammalian organisms, but functional assays and in vivo experiments would be necessary to corroborate this proposed action. SUMMARY The pharmacological activity of insecticide ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, was evaluated on native GABAA receptor from mammalian

  2. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  3. pH effects on the binding of oxygen to non-vertebrate monomeric hemoglobins. A linked function model.

    PubMed

    Saroff, Harry A

    2004-07-07

    Monomeric invertabrate hemoglobins with high oxygen affinity usually contain a tyrosine in the distal region of the heme. This feature has stimulated investigations revealing that one of the properties resulting from the presence of the distal tyrosines is a decreased off rate on the binding of oxygen, thus developing the high affinity. Despite that fact that the pK value of the tyrosine group differs significantly from the groups it replaces little attention has been paid to the pH dependence of the binding of oxygen to the high affinity hemoglobins. Such a pH dependence has been reported on two of the monomeric hemoglobins with relatively low oxygen affinity and one monomeric hemoglobin of intermediate affinity. The pH data of these hemoglobins has been analysed with a linked function model involving the hydrogen ion. pK values required for the low-affinity hemoglobins vary from 4.5 to 7.5. When applied to the high-affinity hemoglobins, the linked function model provides reasonable values for the binding parameters. These pK values vary from 3.0 to 9.0.

  4. Antigenotoxic effect of allicin against SCEs induced by methyl methanesulphonate in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Afzal, Mohammad

    2004-04-01

    Allicin, one of the sulphur compounds of garlic (Allium sativum), possesses antioxidant and thiol disulphide exchange activity and is also shown to cause a variety of activities potentially useful for human health. In this investigation, the effect of 1,5,10 and 20 microM of allicin was determined for inhibiting the rate of SCE induced by 60 microM of MMS. Cultured human lymphocytes from two female donors were used for the experiment. The levels of SCEs were lowered by allicin suggesting its antigenotoxic activity in mammalian cells in vitro.

  5. Effects of quercetin on hemoglobin-dependent redox reactions: relationship to iron-overload rat liver injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nai-Hao; Chen, Chao; He, Ying-Jie; Tian, Rong; Xiao, Qiang; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids have been widely reported to protect liver injury in iron-overload diseases, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action is dependent on their antioxidant effects, including free radical scavenging and metal-chelating. In this study, in contrast to the significant decrease in iron content, quercetin (Qu) from lower diet (0.3%, w/w) showed pro-oxidant ability on protein carbonyl formation and exhibited unobvious effect on iron-overload rat liver injury. Furthermore, the anti- and pro-oxidant activities of Qu on hemoglobin (Hb)-dependent redox reactions (i.e. the oxidative stability of Hb and its cytotoxic ferryl intermediate, Hb-induced protein oxidation) were investigated to illustrate the elevated protein oxidation in lower Qu-treated iron-overload rat. It was found that superoxide (O₂·⁻) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were generated during the reaction between Qu and Hb. Qu, however, effectively reduced ferryl intermediate back to ferric Hb in a biphasic kinetic reaction. Moreover, Qu could significantly aggravate Hb-H₂O₂-induced protein oxidation at low concentrations and exhibit protective effects at high concentrations. Different from the classic antioxidant mechanisms of Qu, the dual effects on Hb redox reactions in vitro, therefore, may provide new insights into the physiological and pharmacological implications of Qu with iron-overload disease.

  6. Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring: A Rapid, Reliable, and Cost-Effective Method Following Total Joint Replacement.

    PubMed

    Martin, J Ryan; Camp, Christopher L; Stitz, Amber; Young, Ernest Y; Abdel, Matthew P; Taunton, Michael J; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-03-02

    Noninvasive hemoglobin (nHgb) monitoring was initially introduced in the intensive care setting as a means of rapidly assessing Hgb values without performing a blood draw. We conducted a prospective analysis to compare reliability, cost, and patient preference between nHgb monitoring and invasive Hgb (iHgb) monitoring performed via a traditional blood draw. We enrolled 100 consecutive patients undergoing primary or revision total hip or total knee arthroplasty. On postoperative day 1, nHgb and iHgb values were obtained within thirty minutes of one another. iHgb and nHgb values, cost, patient satisfaction, and the duration of time required to obtain each reading were recorded. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was utilized to evaluate the agreement of the two Hgb measurement methods. Paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were utilized to compare mean Hgb values, time, and pain for all readings. The mean Hgb values did not differ significantly between the two measurement methods: the mean iHgb value (and standard deviation) was 11.3 ± 1.4 g/dL (range, 8.2 to 14.3 g/dL), and the mean nHgb value was 11.5 ± 1.8 g/dL (range, 7.0 to 16.0 g/dL) (p = 0.11). The CCC between the two Hgb methods was 0.69. One hundred percent of the patients with an nHgb value of ≥ 10.5 g/dL had an iHgb value of >8.0 g/dL. The mean time to obtain an Hgb value was 0.9 minute for the nHgb method and 51.1 minutes for the iHgb method (p < 0.001). At our institution, the cost of iHgb monitoring is approximately $28 per blood draw compared with $2 for each nHgb measurement, resulting in a savings of $26 per Hgb assessment when the noninvasive method is used. Noninvasive Hgb monitoring was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and preferred by patients compared with iHgb monitoring. Providers could consider screening total joint arthroplasty patients with nHgb monitoring and only order iHgb measurement if the nHgb value is <10.5 g/dL. If this protocol had been applied to

  7. Cytotoxic Effects of Tropodithietic Acid on Mammalian Clonal Cell Lines of Neuronal and Glial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Heidi; Vocke, Farina; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The marine metabolite tropodithietic acid (TDA), produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria, is known for its broad antimicrobial activity. TDA is of interest not only as a probiotic in aquaculture, but also because it might be of use as an antibacterial agent in non-marine or non-aquatic environments, and thus the potentially cytotoxic influences on eukaryotic cells need to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to investigate its effects on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a cells and OLN-93 cells as model systems for nerve cells and glia. The data show that in both cell lines TDA exerted morphological changes and cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 0.3–0.5 µg/mL (1.4–2.4 µM). Furthermore, TDA caused a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and the induction of the small heat shock protein HSP32/HO-1, which is considered as a sensor of oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca2+-levels, the disturbance of the microtubule network, and the reorganization of the microfilament system. Hence, mammalian cells are a sensitive target for the action of TDA and react by the activation of a stress response resulting in cell death. PMID:26633426

  8. The Hemoglobin E Thalassemias

    PubMed Central

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Weatherall, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is an extremely common structural hemoglobin variant that occurs at high frequencies throughout many Asian countries. It is a β-hemoglobin variant, which is produced at a slightly reduced rate and hence has the phenotype of a mild form of β thalassemia. Its interactions with different forms of α thalassemia result in a wide variety of clinical disorders, whereas its coinheritance with β thalassemia, a condition called hemoglobin E β thalassemia, is by far the most common severe form of β thalassemia in Asia and, globally, comprises approximately 50% of the clinically severe β-thalassemia disorders. PMID:22908199

  9. The hemoglobin E thalassemias.

    PubMed

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Weatherall, David J

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is an extremely common structural hemoglobin variant that occurs at high frequencies throughout many Asian countries. It is a β-hemoglobin variant, which is produced at a slightly reduced rate and hence has the phenotype of a mild form of β thalassemia. Its interactions with different forms of α thalassemia result in a wide variety of clinical disorders, whereas its coinheritance with β thalassemia, a condition called hemoglobin E β thalassemia, is by far the most common severe form of β thalassemia in Asia and, globally, comprises approximately 50% of the clinically severe β-thalassemia disorders.

  10. [Effectiveness of weekly iron supplementation on hemoglobin concentration, nutritional status and development of infants of public daycare centers in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Eickmann, Sophie H; Brito, Cristiana M M; Lira, Pedro I C; Lima, Marilia C

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzed the effectiveness of weekly iron supplementation on hemoglobin concentration, nutritional status, and mental and motor development of infants at four public daycare centers in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil. This was a before-after intervention study conducted with weekly iron supplementation for six months in a sample of 76 infants in the 4 to 24 month age group, from February to December 2005. Mental and motor development was assessed through the Bayley Scale of Infant Development II. After supplementation, a significant increase was observed in hemoglobin concentration in the group of infants with initial hemoglobin level < or = 9.5g/dL (p = 0.001). There was also a significant increase in the mean weight-for-length z-score, but the opposite was found for length-for-age. No difference was observed in the developmental indices. We conclude that weekly iron supplementation was effective for increasing hemoglobin concentration in infants with lower initial levels, but no impact on infant development was observed.

  11. The evolution of polar fish hemoglobin: a phylogenetic analysis of the ancestral amino acid residues linked to the root effect.

    PubMed

    Verde, Cinzia; Parisi, Elio; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    Originating from a benthic ancestor, the suborder Notothenioidei (the dominant fish fauna component of the Antarctic sea) underwent a remarkable radiation, which led notothenioids to fill several niches. The ecological importance of notothenioids in Antarctica and their biochemical adaptations have prompted great efforts to study their physiology and phylogeny, with special attention to the evolutionary adaptation of the oxygen-transport system. We herewith report the evolutionary history of alpha- and beta-globins under the assumption of the molecular clock hypothesis as a basis for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships among species. These studies have been extended to fish species of other latitudes, including the Arctic region. The northern and southern polar oceans have very different characteristics; indeed, in many respects the Antarctic and Arctic ichthyofaunas are more dissimilar than similar. Our results show that the inferred phylogeny of Arctic and Antarctic globins is different. Taking advantage of the wealth of information collected on structure and function of hemoglobins, we have attempted to investigate the evolutionary history of an important physiological feature in fish, the Root effect. The results suggest that the amino acid residues reported to play a key role in the Root effect may be regarded as ancestor characters, but the lack of this effect in extant species can hardly be associated with the presence of synapomorphies.

  12. An insect-tapeworm model as a proxy for anthelminthic effects in the mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, Ian David; Fredensborg, Brian L; Jensen, Per M; Kapel, Christian M O; Meyling, Nicolai V

    2015-07-01

    Invertebrate models provide several important advantages over their vertebrate counterparts including fewer legislative stipulations and faster, more cost-effective experimental procedures. Furthermore, various similarities between insect and mammalian systems have been highlighted. To obtain maximum use of invertebrate models in pharmacology, their fidelity as analogues of vertebrate systems requires verification. We utilised a flour beetle (Tenebrio molitor)-tapeworm (Hymenolepis diminuta) model to evaluate the efficacy of known anthelmintic compounds, praziquantel, mebendazole and levamisole against H. diminuta cysticercoid larvae in vitro. Inhibition of cysticercoid activity during the excystation procedure was used as a proxy for worm removal. The effects of the three compounds mirrored their relative efficacy in treatment against adult worms in mammalian systems; however, further study is required to determine the fidelity of this model in relation to dose administered. The model precludes comparison of consecutive daily administration of pharmaceuticals in mammals due to cysticercoids not surviving outside of the host for multiple days. Treatment of beetles in vivo, followed by excystation of cysticercoids postdissection could potentially allow for such comparisons. Further model validation will include analysis of pharmaceutical efficacy in varying H. diminuta isolates and pharmaceutical dilution in solvents other than water. Notwithstanding, our results demonstrate that this model holds promise as a method to efficiently identify promising new cestocidal candidates.

  13. Metabolomics analysis reveals large effects of gut microflora on mammalian blood metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Wikoff, William R.; Anfora, Andrew T.; Liu, Jun; Schultz, Peter G.; Lesley, Scott A.; Peters, Eric C.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Although it has long been recognized that the enteric community of bacteria that inhabit the human distal intestinal track broadly impacts human health, the biochemical details that underlie these effects remain largely undefined. Here, we report a broad MS-based metabolomics study that demonstrates a surprisingly large effect of the gut “microbiome” on mammalian blood metabolites. Plasma extracts from germ-free mice were compared with samples from conventional (conv) animals by using various MS-based methods. Hundreds of features were detected in only 1 sample set, with the majority of these being unique to the conv animals, whereas ≈10% of all features observed in both sample sets showed significant changes in their relative signal intensity. Amino acid metabolites were particularly affected. For example, the bacterial-mediated production of bioactive indole-containing metabolites derived from tryptophan such as indoxyl sulfate and the antioxidant indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) was impacted. Production of IPA was shown to be completely dependent on the presence of gut microflora and could be established by colonization with the bacterium Clostridium sporogenes. Multiple organic acids containing phenyl groups were also greatly increased in the presence of gut microbes. A broad, drug-like phase II metabolic response of the host to metabolites generated by the microbiome was observed, suggesting that the gut microflora has a direct impact on the drug metabolism capacity of the host. Together, these results suggest a significant interplay between bacterial and mammalian metabolism. PMID:19234110

  14. Long-Term Stored Hemoglobin-Vesicles, a Cellular Type of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier, Has Resuscitative Effects Comparable to That for Fresh Red Blood Cells in a Rat Model with Massive Hemorrhage without Post-Transfusion Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Keishi; Sakai, Hiromi; Otagiri, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbV), encapsulating highly concentrated human hemoglobin in liposomes, were developed as a substitute for red blood cells (RBC) and their safety and efficacy in transfusion therapy has been confirmed in previous studies. Although HbV suspensions are structurally and physicochemically stabile for least 1-year at room temperature, based on in vitro experiments, the issue of whether the use of long-term stored HbV after a massive hemorrhage can be effective in resuscitations without adverse, post-transfusion effects remains to be clarified. We report herein on a comparison of the systemic response and the induction of organ injuries in hemorrhagic shock model rats resuscitated using 1-year-stored HbV, freshly packed RBC (PRBC-0) and by 28-day-stored packed RBC (PRBC-28). The six-hour mortality after resuscitation was not significantly different among the groups. Arterial blood pressure and blood gas parameters revealed that, using HbV, recovery from the shock state was comparable to that when PRBC-0 was used. Although no significant change was observed in serum parameters reflecting liver and kidney injuries at 6 hours after resuscitation among the three resuscitation groups, results based on Evans Blue and protein leakage in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological findings indicated that HbV as well as PRBC-0 was less predisposed to result in a post-transfusion lung injury than PRBC-28, as evidenced by low levels of myeloperoxidase accumulation and subsequent oxidative damage in the lung. The findings reported herein indicate that 1-year-stored HbV can effectively function as a resuscitative fluid without the induction of post-transfused lung injury and that it is comparable to fresh PRBC, suggesting that HbV is a promising RBC substitute with a long shelf-life. PMID:27798697

  15. Effects of pressure on visible spectra of complexes of myoglobin, hemoglobin, cytochrome c, and horse radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ogunmola, G B; Zipp, A; Chen, F; Kauzmann, W

    1977-01-01

    The spectra of the ferric form of most heme proteins [metmyoglobin, methemoglobin, horse radish peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), and ferricytochrome c at pH 1.5] are converted from high-spin (open crevice) structure to low-spin (closed crevice) form under pressure. Pressures up to 8000 kg/cm2 (780 MPa) have no effect on the spectra of high-spin ferro- and ferricytochrome c, which have a closed crevice structure at pH 7.0. Spectra of deoxy-ferromyoglobin and deoxy-ferrohemoglobin are reduced in intensity, but pressure does not change the positions of the absorption maxima. Cyanide ion prevents pressure-induced spectral changes in metmyoglobin and methemoglobin up to 8000 kg/cm2. Carbon monoxide (with a high affinity for the ferro heme iron) has a similar effect on ferromyoglobin and ferrohemoglobin. The pressure required to cause spectral changes in the heme proteins falls in the order, cytochrome c (pH 7.0) greater than horse radish peroxidase greater than myoglobin greater than hemoglobin. We have calculated a volume change of --50 cm3/mol associated with the configurational change accompanying the reformation of the iron-methionine bond in cytochrome c at low pH.

  16. Effects of carbon source and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) on the production of beta-galactosidase in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Khleifat, Khaled M; Abboud, Muayad M; Al-Mustafa, Ahmed H; Al-Sharafa, Khalid Y

    2006-10-01

    At fixed concentration (0.5%), lactose and galactose acted as inducers while glucose and other tested carbon sugars showed repression effects on beta-galactosidase production in Enterobacter aerogenes strain. The expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene (vgb) in this bacterial strain managed to overcome the repression effects as well as improving the induction of beta-galactosidase formation by carbon sources. In parallel, the bacterial O(2) consumption was increased correspondingly to the vgb induction of beta-galactosidase synthesis. When Enterobacter aerogenes strains were grown at the incubation temperature 42 degrees C, about 5-fold higher enzyme productivity was obtained than with a similar incubation at 37 degrees C. The bacterial growth expressed as biomass yield had a different optimum temperature and was not influenced to the same extent by variations in the carbon sources. These data are discussed in terms of proposed enhancement in beta-galactosidase productivity by vgb expression as well as its significance to improve the technology of whey processing.

  17. The Effects of Ginger on Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-I and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khandouzi, Nafiseh; Shidfar, Farzad; Rajab, Asadollah; Rahideh, Tayebeh; Hosseini, Payam; Mir Taheri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, a total of 41 type 2 diabetic patients randomly were assigned to ginger or placebo groups (22 in ginger group and 19 in control group), received 2 g/day of ginger powder supplement or lactose as placebo for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde were analyzed before and after the intervention. Ginger supplementation significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in ginger group in comparison to baseline, as well as control group, while it increased the level of apolipoprotein A-I (p<0.05). It seems that oral administration of ginger powder supplement can improves fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. So it may have a role in alleviating the risk of some chronic complications of diabetes. PMID:25561919

  18. The effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin a1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein a-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Khandouzi, Nafiseh; Shidfar, Farzad; Rajab, Asadollah; Rahideh, Tayebeh; Hosseini, Payam; Mir Taheri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, a total of 41 type 2 diabetic patients randomly were assigned to ginger or placebo groups (22 in ginger group and 19 in control group), received 2 g/day of ginger powder supplement or lactose as placebo for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde were analyzed before and after the intervention. Ginger supplementation significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in ginger group in comparison to baseline, as well as control group, while it increased the level of apolipoprotein A-I (p<0.05). It seems that oral administration of ginger powder supplement can improves fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. So it may have a role in alleviating the risk of some chronic complications of diabetes.

  19. The effect of zinc and vitamin C supplementation on hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and immune response in patients with Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Zen Rahfiludin, M; Ginandjar, Praba

    2013-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax infection in humans can relapse and is associated with iron deficiency. The immune response plays an important role in preventing relapse. In this study we analyzed the effect of zinc and vitamin C supplementation on hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and immune response in patients with P. vivax malaria. We measured immune response by examining interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels. Subjects were divided into either treatment or control groups. The treatment group received daily zinc and vitamin C supplementation for 45 days. Compliance with supplement consumption was recorded weekly. After 45 days of supplementation, IFN-gamma and IL-1 levels were remeasured. All study subjects in both groups had normal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The hemoglobin levels increased only in the supplementation group (p=0.011), while hematocrit levels increased in both the supplementation (p=0.001) and control (p=0.023) groups. IFN-gamma decreased slightly in the supplementation group, but the change was not significant (p=0.688). IL-10 increased slightly in both the supplementation and the control groups, but the change were not significant (p=0.421 and p=0.556, respectively), suggesting the elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were unrelated to immune response.

  20. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  1. Immunomodulatory and radioprotective effects of lignans derived from fresh nutmeg mace (Myristica fragrans) in mammalian splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Checker, Rahul; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Sharma, Deepak; Gupta, Sumit; Variyar, Prasad; Sharma, Arun; Poduval, T B

    2008-05-01

    Recently, the lignans present in the aqueous extract of fresh nutmeg mace (aril of the fruit of Myristica fragrans) were shown to possess antioxidant properties in cell free systems and protected PUC18 plasmid against radiation-induced DNA damage. The present report describes the immunomodulatory and radiomodifying properties of lignans present in the aqueous extract of fresh nutmeg mace in mammalian splenocytes. These macelignans (ML) inhibited the proliferation of splenocytes in response to polyclonal T cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A). This inhibition of proliferation was due to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and augmentation of apoptosis as shown by increase in pre G1 cells. The increase in activation induced cell death by ML was dose dependent. It was found to inhibit the transcription of IL-2 and IL-4 genes in response to Con A. The production of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma cytokines was significantly inhibited by ML in Con A-stimulated lymphocytes in a dose dependent manner. ML protected splenocytes against radiation-induced intracellular ROS production in a dose dependent manner. ML was not cytotoxic towards lymphocytes. On the contrary, it significantly inhibited the radiation-induced DNA damage in splenocytes as indicated by decrease in DNA fragmentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the antioxidant, radioprotective and immunomodulatory effects of lignans in mammalian cells.

  2. Anti-tumor effects of dehydroaltenusin, a specific inhibitor of mammalian DNA polymerase {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Naoki; Kokai, Yasuo; Ohtani, Seiji; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kuriyama, Isoko; Kamisuki, Shinji; Takahashi, Shunya; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sato, Noriyuki; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki . E-mail: mizushin@nutr.kobegakuin.ac.jp

    2007-01-12

    In the screening of selective inhibitors of eukaryotic DNA polymerases (pols), dehydroaltenusin was found to be an inhibitor of pol {alpha} from a fungus (Alternaria tennuis). We succeeded in chemically synthesizing dehydroaltenusin, and the compound inhibited only mammalian pol {alpha} with IC{sub 50} value of 0.5 {mu}M, and did not influence the activities of other replicative pols such as pols {delta} and {epsilon}, but also showed no effect on pol {alpha} activity from another vertebrate, fish, or from a plant species. Dehydroaltenusin also had no influence on the other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. The compound also inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cells with LD{sub 50} values of 38.0-44.4 {mu}M. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HeLa cells, dehydroaltenusin was shown to be a promising suppressor of solid tumors. Histopathological examination revealed that increased tumor necrosis and decreased mitotic index were apparently detected by the compound in vivo. Therefore, dehydroaltenusin could be of interest as not only a mammalian pol {alpha}-specific inhibitor, but also as a candidate drug for anti-cancer treatment.

  3. Hemosomegenesis and hemoglobin biosynthesis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Brunner Júnior, A; de Rizzo, E; Morena, D D; Cianciarullo, A M; Jared, C; Morena, P

    1992-08-01

    1. Ultrastructural observations on maturing rabbit embryo erythroid cells led to the finding of hemoglobinized organelles distinguishable from mitochondria due to their highly dense matrix, two or three longitudinally arranged double lamellae, and smaller diameters. Intraorganellar 50-60 A particles identical to those contained in the hemoglobinized cytoplasm were found. 2. Their hemoglobin (Hb) content was demonstrated by electrophoresis of the concentrated supernatant from the isolated, washed, and osmotically lysed organellar fraction. We have proposed that these organelles are the sites for heme integration into the globin (G) polypeptide chains and subunits assembly. The term hemosome has been suggested for such entities. 3. This hypothesis has been sustained by several analytical and experimental works based on the postulation that hemosomes should be found at higher frequencies where the Hb biosynthesis rate is more intensive, or where the induction of this biosynthesis is always dependent on the formation of hemosomes. 4. Maturing erythroid cells of the circulating embryo blood contain hemosomes in higher frequency than in liver erythroid cells, coinciding with the higher Hb biosynthesis rate in peripheral blood than in the liver. In bleeding anemia, the decay of Hb concentration parallels the reduction of the mean number of hemosomes per reticulocyte, in comparison with normal reticulocytes. 5. In HeLa cells and epithelial cultured cells induced to synthesize Hb, it was shown that this biosynthesis is ever concomitant with the formation of hemosomes and depends on the presence of erythropoietin, as occurs in erythroid cells. 6. Studies on hemosomegenesis and Hb biosynthesis experimentally effected in epithelial cultured cells, allowed the interpretation of the sequence of events leading to hemosome formation in maturing erythroid cells. Simultaneously with iron uptake, mitochondria differentiate to lamellated bodies and, successively, expansions rise for

  4. Hepatoprotective effects of Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase] on alcohol-damaged primary rat hepatocyte culture in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenhua; Bian, Yuzhu; Wang, Zhenghui; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2017-02-01

    We have prepared a novel nanobiotherapeutic, Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase], which not only transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide but also a therapeutic antioxidant. Our previous study in a severe sustained 90 min hemorrhagic shock rat model shows that it has a hepatoprotective effect. We investigate its hepatoprotective effect further in this present report using an alcohol-damaged primary hepatocyte culture model. Results show that it significantly reduced ethanol-induced AST release, lipid peroxidation, and ROS production in rat primary hepatocytes culture. It also significantly enhanced the viability of ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Thus, the result shows that Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase] also has some hepatoprotective effects against alcohol-induced injury in in vitro rat primary hepatocytes cell culture. This collaborate our previous observation of its hepatoprotective effect in a severe sustained 90-min hemorrhagic shock rat model.

  5. STERIC FACTORS MODERATE CONFORMATIONAL FLUIDITY AND CONTRIBUTE TO THE HIGH PROTON SENSITIVITY OF ROOT EFFECT HEMOGLOBINS

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Friedman, Joel; Siburt, Claire J. Parker; Kraiter, Daniel; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2011-01-01

    The structural basis of the extreme pH dependence of oxygen binding to Root effect Hbs is a long-standing puzzle in the field of protein chemistry. A previously unappreciated role of steric factors in the Root effect was revealed by a comparison of pH effects on oxygenation and oxidation processes in human Hb relative to Spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) and Carp (Cyprinodon carpio) Hbs. The Root effect confers five-fold increased pH sensitivity to oxygenation of Spot and Carp Hbs relative to Hb A0 in the absence of anionic effectors, and even larger relative elevations of pH sensitivity of oxygenation in the presence of 0.2 M phosphate. Remarkably, the Root effect was not evident in the oxidation of the Root effect Hbs. This finding rules out pH-dependent alterations in the thermodynamic properties of the heme iron, measured in the anaerobic oxidation reaction, as the basis of the Root effect. The alternative explanation supported by these results is that the elevated pH sensitivity of oxygenation of Root effect Hbs is attributable to globin-dependent steric effects that alter oxygen affinity by constraining conformational fluidity, but which have little influence on electron exchange via the heme edge. This elegant mode of allosteric control can regulate oxygen affinity within a given quaternary state, in addition to modifying the T-R equilibrium. Evolution of Hb sequences that result in proton-linked steric barriers to heme oxygenation could provide a general mechanism to account for the appearance of the Root effect in the structurally diverse Hbs of many species. PMID:21745602

  6. The Effects of Dietary Iron and Capsaicin on Hemoglobin, Blood Glucose, Insulin Tolerance, Cholesterol, and Triglycerides, in Healthy and Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Ibarra, Adriana; Huerta, Miguel; Villalpando-Hernández, Salvador; Ríos-Silva, Mónica; Díaz-Reval, María I; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Mancilla, Evelyn; Trujillo, Xóchitl

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the effects of dietary iron, and the compound capsaicin, on hemoglobin as well as metabolic indicators including blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Our animal model was the Wistar rat, fed a chow diet, with or without experimentally induced diabetes. Diabetic males were fed control, low, or high-iron diets, the latter, with or without capsaicin. Healthy rats were fed identical diets, but without the capsaicin supplement. We then measured the parameters listed above, using the Student t-test and ANOVA, to compare groups. Healthy rats fed a low-iron diet exhibited significantly reduced total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, compared with rats fed a control diet. Significantly reduced blood lipid was also provoked by low dietary iron in diabetic rats, compared with those fed a control diet. Insulin, and glucose tolerance was only improved in healthy rats fed the low-iron diet. Significant increases in total cholesterol were found in diabetic rats fed a high-iron diet, compared with healthy rats fed the same diet, although no statistical differences were found for triglycerides. Hemoglobin levels, which were not statistically different in diabetic versus healthy rats fed the high-iron diet, fell when capsaicin was added. Capsaicin also provoked a fall in the level of cholesterol and triglycerides in diabetic animals, versus diabetics fed with the high iron diet alone. In conclusion, low levels of dietary iron reduced levels of serum triglycerides, hemoglobin, and cholesterol, and significantly improved insulin, and glucose tolerance in healthy rats. In contrast, a high-iron diet increased cholesterol significantly, with no significant changes to triglyceride concentrations. The addition of capsaicin to the high-iron diet (for diabetic rats) further reduced levels of hemoglobin, cholesterol, and triglycerides. These results suggest that capsaicin, may be suitable for the treatment of elevated hemoglobin

  7. The Effects of Dietary Iron and Capsaicin on Hemoglobin, Blood Glucose, Insulin Tolerance, Cholesterol, and Triglycerides, in Healthy and Diabetic Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Villalpando-Hernández, Salvador; Ríos-Silva, Mónica; Díaz-Reval, María I.; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Mancilla, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to assess the effects of dietary iron, and the compound capsaicin, on hemoglobin as well as metabolic indicators including blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Materials and Methods Our animal model was the Wistar rat, fed a chow diet, with or without experimentally induced diabetes. Diabetic males were fed control, low, or high-iron diets, the latter, with or without capsaicin. Healthy rats were fed identical diets, but without the capsaicin supplement. We then measured the parameters listed above, using the Student t-test and ANOVA, to compare groups. Results Healthy rats fed a low-iron diet exhibited significantly reduced total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, compared with rats fed a control diet. Significantly reduced blood lipid was also provoked by low dietary iron in diabetic rats, compared with those fed a control diet. Insulin, and glucose tolerance was only improved in healthy rats fed the low-iron diet. Significant increases in total cholesterol were found in diabetic rats fed a high-iron diet, compared with healthy rats fed the same diet, although no statistical differences were found for triglycerides. Hemoglobin levels, which were not statistically different in diabetic versus healthy rats fed the high-iron diet, fell when capsaicin was added. Capsaicin also provoked a fall in the level of cholesterol and triglycerides in diabetic animals, versus diabetics fed with the high iron diet alone. In conclusion, low levels of dietary iron reduced levels of serum triglycerides, hemoglobin, and cholesterol, and significantly improved insulin, and glucose tolerance in healthy rats. In contrast, a high-iron diet increased cholesterol significantly, with no significant changes to triglyceride concentrations. The addition of capsaicin to the high-iron diet (for diabetic rats) further reduced levels of hemoglobin, cholesterol, and triglycerides. These results suggest that capsaicin, may be suitable

  8. Primary structure and functional properties of the hemoglobin from the free-tailed bat Tadarida brasiliensis (Chiroptera). Small effect of carbon dioxide on oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, T; Rücknagel, K P; Weber, R E; Koop, B F; Braunitzer, G

    1987-06-01

    The hemoglobin of the Free-Tailed Bat Tadarida brasiliensis (Microchiroptera) comprises two components (Hb I and Hb II) in nearly equal amounts. Both hemoglobins have identical beta-chains, whereas the alpha-chains differ in having glycine (Hb I) or aspartic acid (Hb II) in position 115 (GH3). The components could be isolated by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and separated into the globin chains by chromatography on carboxymethyl-cellulose CM-52. The sequences have been determined by Edman degradation with the film technique or the gas phase method (the alpha I-chains with the latter method only), using the native chains and tryptic peptides, as well as the C-terminal prolyl-peptide obtained by acid hydrolysis of the Asp-Pro bond in the beta-chains. The comparison with human hemoglobin showed 18 substitutions in the alpha-chains and 24 in the beta-chains. In the alpha-chains one amino-acid exchange involves an alpha 1/beta 1-contact. In the beta-chains one heme contact, three alpha 1/beta 1- and one alpha 1/beta 2-contacts are substituted. A comparison with other chiropteran hemoglobin sequences shows similar distances to Micro- and Megachiroptera. The oxygenation characteristics of the composite hemolysate and the two components, measured in relation to pH, Cl-, and 2,3-bis-phosphoglycerate, are described. The effect of carbon dioxide on oxygen affinity is considerably smaller than that observed in human hemoglobin, which might be an adaptation to life under hypercapnic conditions.

  9. Effects of hemoglobin level on myocardial washout rate of thallium-201 in patients with normal myocardial perfusion assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Sumimoto, Yoji; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ishibashi, Ken; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-04-05

    Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is often performed even in patients with suspected coronary artery disease complicated by anemia. We assessed the effects of hemoglobin level on myocardial washout rate of Thallium-201 (Tl-201) in patients with normal myocardial perfusion assessed by SPECT. The study population consisted of 231 patients with summed stress score of zero on SPECT. The mean myocardial washout rate of Tl-201 in the left ventricle was calculated from the stress and the redistribution Bull's eye map. Hematological test was performed within 2 weeks before gated SPECT. There were 135 male and 96 female patients with a mean age of 72.6 ± 9.0 years. The mean hemoglobin was 12.9 ± 1.9 mg/dl; the median was 13.2 mg/dl and the range was 8.0-16.5 mg/dl. There was a significant inverse correlation between hemoglobin level and myocardial washout rate of Tl-201 (r = -0.45, p < 0.001). Univariate linear regression analysis showed that age, female, body mass index, serum creatinine, hemoglobin, end-diastolic volume, and ejection fraction were associated with myocardial washout rate of Tl-201. Multivariate analysis showed that only hemoglobin was the independent predictor of myocardial washout rate of Tl-201 (β = -0.35, p < 0.001). Our data suggested that anemia was a major determinant of increased myocardial washout rate of Tl-201 in patients with normal myocardial perfusion on SPECT.

  10. Fluid resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhage using a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier: effect of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Wang, Xu; Bradbury, Nicole; Moon-Massat, Paula F; Freilich, Daniel; Auker, Charles; McCarron, Richard; Scultetus, Anke; Stern, Susan A

    2013-02-01

    Animal models of combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) suggest a benefit of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC)-based resuscitation, but their use remains controversial, and little is known of the specific effects of TBI and high-pressure (large arterial injury) bleeding on resuscitation. We examine the effect of TBI and aortic tear injury on low-volume HBOC resuscitation in a swine polytrauma model and hypothesize that HBOC-based resuscitation will improve survival in the setting of aortic tear regardless of the presence of TBI. Anesthetized swine subjected to HS with aortic tear with or without fluid percussion TBI underwent equivalent limited resuscitation with HBOC, lactated Ringer's solution, or HBOC + nitroglycerine (vasoattenuated HBOC) and were observed for 6 h. There was no independent effect of TBI on survival time after adjustment for fluid type, and there was no interaction between TBI and resuscitation fluid type. However, total catheter hemorrhage volume required to reach target shock blood pressure was less with TBI (14.0 mL · kg(-1) [confidence interval, 12.4-15.6 mL · kg(-1)]) versus HS only (21.0 mL · kg(-1) [confidence interval, 19.5-22.5 mL · kg(-1)]), with equivalent lactate accumulation. Traumatic brain injury did not affect survival in this polytrauma model, but less hemorrhage was required in the presence of TBI to achieve an equivalent degree of shock suggesting globally impaired cardiovascular response to hemorrhage in the presence of TBI. There was also no benefit of HBOC-based fluid resuscitation over lactated Ringer's solution, contrary to models using liver injury as the source of hemorrhage, considering wound location is of paramount importance when choosing resuscitation strategy.

  11. Microcirculatory effects of a hyperviscous hemoglobin-based solution administered intravenously in dogs with experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Peruski, Ann M; Cooper, Edward S; Butler, Amy L

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether increasing the viscosity of a standard hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrying solution (HBOC) would offset its associated vasoconstrictive effects and result in improved microvascular perfusion in healthy splenectomized dogs with experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock. 12 male American Foxhounds. Each dog underwent anesthesia and splenectomy. Shock was induced by controlled hemorrhage until a mean arterial blood pressure of 40 mm Hg was achieved and maintained for 60 minutes. Dogs were then randomly assigned to receive either a standard or hyperviscous HBOC (6 dogs/group). Sidestream dark-field microscopy was used to assess the effects of shock and HBOC administration on the microcirculation of the buccal mucosa and the jejunal serosa. Video recordings of the microcirculation were collected before shock was induced (baseline) and at intervals up to 180 minutes following HBOC administration. Vascular analysis software was used to compute microcirculatory variables. Compared with baseline findings, hemorrhagic shock resulted in decreases in all microvascular variables in the buccal mucosa and the jejunal serosa. At all time points following HBOC administration, microvascular variables were similar to initial values and no significant differences between treatment groups were detected. At all time points following HBOC administration, blood and plasma viscosities in dogs treated with the hyperviscous solution were significantly higher than values in dogs receiving the standard solution. In splenectomized dogs with experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock, administration of a hyperviscous HBOC did not significantly affect microvascular variables, compared with effects of a standard HBOC. Microcirculatory flow returned to baseline values in both treatment groups, suggesting that marked HBOC-associated vasoconstriction did not occur.

  12. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P < 0.001). Mean fasting blood glucose reduced by 28.1 ± 12.5 and HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R =0.52), and strong positive correlation between FBS before intervention and FBS reduction (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R = 0.70). This study demonstrated that our alternative low glycemic load diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  13. Is hemoglobin A1c level effective in predicting the prognosis of Fournier gangrene?

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Haluk; Bayrak, Omer; Erturhan, Sakip; Borazan, Ersin; Koc, Mustafa Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of immune failure and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) association on the mortality and morbidity of the Fournier's Gangrene (FG), and interrelatedly, the usability of HbA1c level in the prediction of prognosis. Materials and Methods: The data of 38 patients with the diagnosis of FG were investigated retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups as patients with DM (Group 1, n = 18) and non-diabetics (Group 2, n = 20). The patients in group 1 were also divided into two subgroups as patients with HbA1c value ≥7 (Group 1a) and HbA1c value <7 (Group 1b). Results: The mean age of all 38 male patients was 66.3 ± 6.4 years. The initial symptoms were scrotal rash and swelling (n = 20, 52.6%), high fever (>38°C) (n = 22, 57.8%), purulent discharge from genital or perineal areas (n = 13, 34.2%), skin bruises (n = 11, 28.9%) and general state disorder in five patients that were admitted from day care center (13.1%). DM, as the most often comorbid disease, was detected in 18 patients (47.3%). Six patients (15.7%) were deceased during the follow-up period. Conclusion: In the present study, the researchers determined that diabetic patients with HbA1c level of 7 or higher had worse prognosis, and increased mortality. PMID:27453658

  14. Low affinity PEGylated hemoglobin from Trematomus bernacchii, a model for hemoglobin-based blood substitutes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Conjugation of human and animal hemoglobins with polyethylene glycol has been widely explored as a means to develop blood substitutes, a novel pharmaceutical class to be used in surgery or emergency medicine. However, PEGylation of human hemoglobin led to products with significantly different oxygen binding properties with respect to the unmodified tetramer and high NO dioxygenase reactivity, known causes of toxicity. These recent findings call for the biotechnological development of stable, low-affinity PEGylated hemoglobins with low NO dioxygenase reactivity. Results To investigate the effects of PEGylation on protein structure and function, we compared the PEGylation products of human hemoglobin and Trematomus bernacchii hemoglobin, a natural variant endowed with a remarkably low oxygen affinity and high tetramer stability. We show that extension arm facilitated PEGylation chemistry based on the reaction of T. bernacchii hemoglobin with 2-iminothiolane and maleimido-functionalyzed polyethylene glycol (MW 5000 Da) leads to a tetraPEGylated product, more homogeneous than the corresponding derivative of human hemoglobin. PEGylated T. bernacchii hemoglobin largely retains the low affinity of the unmodified tetramer, with a p50 50 times higher than PEGylated human hemoglobin. Moreover, it is still sensitive to protons and the allosteric effector ATP, indicating the retention of allosteric regulation. It is also 10-fold less reactive towards nitrogen monoxide than PEGylated human hemoglobin. Conclusions These results indicate that PEGylated hemoglobins, provided that a suitable starting hemoglobin variant is chosen, can cover a wide range of oxygen-binding properties, potentially meeting the functional requirements of blood substitutes in terms of oxygen affinity, tetramer stability and NO dioxygenase reactivity. PMID:22185675

  15. Effect of biosynthetic manipulation of heme on insolubility of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.A.; Kallio, P.T.; Bailey, J.E.

    1994-07-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobulin (VHb) is accumulated at high levels in both soluble and insoluble forms when expressed from its native promoter on a pUC19-derived plasmid in Escherichia coli. Examination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that the insoluble form uniformly lacks the heme prosthetic group (apoVHb). The purified soluble form contains heme (holoVHb) and is spectroscopically indistinguishable from holoVHb produced by Vitreoscilla cells. This observation suggested that a relationship may exist between the insolubility of apoVHb and biosynthesis of heme. To examine this possibility, a series of experiments were conducted to chemically and genetically manipulate the formation and conversion of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a key intermediate in heme biosynthesis. Chemical perturbations involved supplementing the growth medium with the intermediate ALA and the competitive inhibitor levulinic acid which freely cross the cell barrier. Genetic manipulations involved amplifying the gene dosage for the enzymes ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase. Results from both levulinic acid and ALA supplementations indicate that the level of soluble holoVHb correlates with the heme level but that the level of insoluble apoVHb does not. The ratio of soluble to insoluble VHb also does not correlate with the level of total VHb accumulated. The effect of amplifying ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase gene dosage is complex and may involve secondary factors. Results indicate that the rate-limiting step of heme biosynthesis in cells overproducing VHb does not lie at ALA synthesis, as it reportedly does in wild-type E. coli. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Extrapulmonary effects of inhaled nitric oxide: role of reversible S-nitrosylation of erythrocytic hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Timothy J; Doctor, Allan

    2006-04-01

    Early applications of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), typically in the treatment of diseases marked by acute pulmonary hypertension, were met by great enthusiasm regarding the purported specificity of iNO: vasodilation by iNO was specific to the lung (without a change in systemic vascular resistance), and within the lung, NO activity was said to be confined spatially and temporally by Hb within the vascular lumen. Underlying these claims were classical views of NO as a short-lived paracrine hormone that acts largely through the heme groups of soluble guanylate cyclase, and whose potential activity is terminated on encountering the hemes of red blood cell (RBC) Hb. These classical views are yielding to a broader paradigm, in which NO-related signaling is achieved through redox-related NO adducts that endow NO synthase products with the ability to act at a distance in space and time from NO synthase itself. Evidence supporting the biological importance of such stable NO adducts is probably strongest for S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), in which NO binds to critical cysteine residues in proteins or peptides. The circulating RBC is a major SNO reservoir, and RBC Hb releases SNO-related bioactivity peripherally on O2 desaturation. These new paradigms describing NO transport also provide a plausible mechanistic understanding of the increasingly recognized peripheral effects of inhaled NO. An explanation for the peripheral actions of inhaled NO is discussed here, and the rationale and results of attempts to exploit the "NO delivery" function of the RBC are reviewed.

  17. Effects of egg and vitamin A supplementation on hemoglobin, retinol status and physical growth levels of primary and middle school students in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiaoyang; Wei, Xiaoping; Tang, Xianqiang; Jiang, Hongpeng; Fan, Zhen; Yu, Qin; Chen, Jie; Liu, Youxue; Li, Tingyu

    2013-01-01

    Lack of protein and vitamin A influences the growth of student in impoverished mountain areas. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of egg and vitamin A supplementation on hemoglobin, serum retinol and anthropometric indices of 10-18 years old students of a low socioeconomic status. A total number of 288 students from four boarding schools were randomly selected by using cluster sampling method in Chongqing, and they were assigned into supplement group and control group non-randomly. Students in supplement group received a single 200,000 international units vitamin A and 1 egg/day (including weekends) for 6 months. The control group did not receive any supplementation. We measured hemoglobin, serum retinol and height and weight at baseline and after supplementation. The supplementation increased the mean hemoglobin concentration by 7.13 g/L compared with 1.38 g/L in control group (p<0.001), the mean serum retinol concentration by 0.31 μmol/L compared with 0.09 μmol/L in the control group (p=0.005), the mean height-for-age z score by 0.05 compared with 0.03 in the control group (p=0.319), the mean weight-for-age z score by 0.05 compared with -0.12 in the control group (p<0.001). Our results revealed that egg and vitamin A supplementation is an effective, convenient, and practical method to improve the levels of hemoglobin, serum retinol and prevent the deterioration of growth in terms of weight for primary and middle school students from outlying poverty-stricken areas. Our intervention did not have a beneficial effect on linear growth.

  18. Mixtures of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers and perfluorocarbons exhibit a synergistic effect in oxygenating hepatic hollow fiber bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Palmer, Andre F

    2010-02-15

    Hepatic hollow fiber (HF) bioreactors are being developed for use as bioartificial liver assist devices (BLADs). In general, BLADs suffer from O(2) limited transport, which reduces their performance. This modeling study seeks to investigate if O(2) carrying solutions consisting of mixtures of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs) can enhance O(2) transport to hepatocytes cultured in the extra capillary space (ECS) of HF bioreactors. We simulated supplementing the circulating cell culture media stream of the HF bioreactor with a mixture containing these two types of oxygen carriers (HBOCs and PFCs). A mathematical model was developed based on the dimensions and physical characteristics of a commercial HF bioreactor. The resulting set of partial differential equations, which describes fluid transport; as well as, mass transport of dissolved O(2) in the pseudo-homogeneous PFC/water phase and oxygenated HBOC, was solved to yield the O(2) concentration field in the three HF domains (lumen, membrane and ECS). Our results show that mixtures of HBOC and PFC display a synergistic effect in oxygenating the ECS. Therefore, the presence of both HBOC and PFC in the circulating cell culture media dramatically improves transport of O(2) to cultured hepatocytes. Moreover, the in vivo O(2) spectrum in a liver sinusoid can be recapitulated by supplementing the HF bioreactor with a mixture of HBOCs and PFCs at an inlet pO(2) of 80 mmHg. Therefore, we expect that PFC-based oxygen carriers will be more efficient at transporting O(2) at higher O(2) levels (e.g., at an inlet pO(2) of 760 mmHg, which corresponds to pure O(2) in equilibrium with aqueous cell culture media at 1 atm). 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Single breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide: effects of adjustment for inspired volume dead space, carbon dioxide, hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Viegi, G; Baldi, S; Begliomini, E; Ferdeghini, E M; Pistelli, F

    1998-01-01

    In order to assess the additive effects of taking into account dead space volume (VD), carbon dioxide, hemoglobin (Hb) and carboxyhemoglobin on computation of single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCOsb), we sequentially applied all the corrections recommended by the 1987 American Thoracic Society (ATS) document on DLCOsb standardization. We used data from 739 men (333 nonsmokers and 406 current smokers) and 475 women (403 nonsmokers and 72 current smokers) who underwent measurement of DLCOsb in the decade 1985-1994 at the Lung Function Laboratory of our institute. With respect to the unadjusted DLCOsb value, significant small differences were found for all the corrected formulas, ranging from -0.18 to 1.48 ml/min/mm Hg in men and from -0.24 to 1.57 ml/min/mm Hg in women. After computing the percent change of DLCOsb [(unadjusted-adjusted value) x 100/unadjusted value], we observed that the correction for VD caused an underestimation of DLCOsb of about 5.8% in men and 7.7% in women. However, when all the corrections were considered, these figures decreased to about 0.9% in males and 2.9% in females. Regarding specifically the correction for Hb, the adjusted value was slightly lower in men, while it was some-what higher in women, with respect to the unadjusted DLCOsb. In conclusion, the corrections suggested by ATS in the computation of DLCOsb, when considered altogether, seem to account for a limited proportion of test variability in usual clinical conditions, especially in males.

  20. O2-Filled Swimbladder Employs Monocarboxylate Transporters for the Generation of O2 by Lactate-Induced Root Effect Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Takahiro; Kato, Akira; Ogoshi, Maho; Ookata, Kayoko; Munakata, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Yoko; Islam, Zinia; Doi, Hiroyuki; Romero, Michael F.; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2012-01-01

    The swimbladder volume is regulated by O2 transfer between the luminal space and the blood In the swimbladder, lactic acid generation by anaerobic glycolysis in the gas gland epithelial cells and its recycling through the rete mirabile bundles of countercurrent capillaries are essential for local blood acidification and oxygen liberation from hemoglobin by the “Root effect.” While O2 generation is critical for fish flotation, the molecular mechanism of the secretion and recycling of lactic acid in this critical process is not clear. To clarify molecules that are involved in the blood acidification and visualize the route of lactic acid movement, we analyzed the expression of 17 members of the H+/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family in the fugu genome and found that only MCT1b and MCT4b are highly expressed in the fugu swimbladder. Electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that MCT1b is a high-affinity lactate transporter whereas MCT4b is a low-affinity/high-conductance lactate transporter. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that (i) MCT4b expresses in gas gland cells together with the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH at high level and mediate lactic acid secretion by gas gland cells, and (ii) MCT1b expresses in arterial, but not venous, capillary endothelial cells in rete mirabile and mediates recycling of lactic acid in the rete mirabile by solute-specific transcellular transport. These results clarified the mechanism of the blood acidification in the swimbladder by spatially organized two lactic acid transporters MCT4b and MCT1b. PMID:22496829

  1. Syntheses of nicotinamide riboside and derivatives: effective agents for increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianle; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Sauve, Anthony A

    2007-12-27

    A new two-step methodology achieves stereoselective synthesis of beta-nicotinamide riboside and a series of related amide, ester, and acid nucleosides. Compounds were prepared through a triacetylated-nicotinate ester nucleoside, via coupling of either ethylnicotinate or phenylnicotinate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-ribofuranose. Nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, O-ethylnicotinate riboside, O-methylnicotinate riboside, and several N-alkyl derivatives increased NAD+ concentrations from 1.2-2.7-fold in several mammalian cell lines. These findings establish bioavailability and potent effects of these nucleosides in stimulating the increase of NAD+ concentrations in mammalian cells.

  2. Phylogeny of Echinoderm Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ana B.; Herman, Joseph L.; Elphick, Maurice R.; Kober, Kord M.; Janies, Daniel; Linchangco, Gregorio; Semmens, Dean C.; Bailly, Xavier; Vinogradov, Serge N.; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genomic information has revealed that neuroglobin and cytoglobin are the two principal lineages of vertebrate hemoglobins, with the latter encompassing the familiar myoglobin and α-globin/β-globin tetramer hemoglobin, and several minor groups. In contrast, very little is known about hemoglobins in echinoderms, a phylum of exclusively marine organisms closely related to vertebrates, beyond the presence of coelomic hemoglobins in sea cucumbers and brittle stars. We identified about 50 hemoglobins in sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, and used Bayesian inference to carry out a molecular phylogenetic analysis of their relationship to vertebrate sequences, specifically, to assess the hypothesis that the neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages are also present in echinoderms. Results The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus encodes several hemoglobins, including a unique chimeric 14-domain globin, 2 androglobin isoforms and a unique single androglobin domain protein. Other strongylocentrotid genomes appear to have similar repertoires of globin genes. We carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses of 52 hemoglobins identified in sea urchin, brittle star and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, using different multiple sequence alignment methods coupled with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. The results demonstrate that there are two major globin lineages in echinoderms, which are related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages. Furthermore, the brittle star and sea cucumber coelomic hemoglobins appear to have evolved independently from the cytoglobin lineage, similar to the evolution of erythroid oxygen binding globins in cyclostomes and vertebrates. Conclusion The presence of echinoderm globins related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages suggests that the split between neuroglobins and cytoglobins occurred in the deuterostome ancestor shared by echinoderms and

  3. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on hemoglobin concentration in children with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency-related anemia.

    PubMed

    Miniero, Roberto; Altomare, Federica; Rubino, Mario; Matarazzo, Patrizia; Montanari, Claudio; Petri, Antonella; Raiola, Giuseppe; Bona, Gianni

    2012-08-01

    Normocytic-normochromic anemia (NC/NC) has been attributed to impaired bone marrow erythropoiesis in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients. Moreover, the GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis has been implicated in erythropoiesis regulation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we evaluated the incidence of NC/NC anemia in 279 children (196 boys), median age 10.52 years, with isolated idiopathic GH deficiency, and the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on hemoglobin levels. At 6-month intervals, we recorded the Hb standard deviation score (Hb-SDS), the IGF-1-SDS, weight, height, and pubertal stage. Forty-one boys and 7 girls had NC/NC anemia before starting substitutive therapy (-2.59 SD). The Hb-SDS was significantly increased (P<0.05) after 12 months of rhGH therapy. The effect of rhGH continued up to 48 months (-0.39 SD), at which point all children had normal hemoglobin values. In conclusion, rhGH therapy resulted in normal hemoglobin values in all children enrolled in the study. These data support the concept that the GH/IGF-1 axis promotes erythropoiesis in vivo.

  4. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  5. Effects of Diaspirin Crosslinked Hemoglobin (DCLHb) on microcirculation and local tissue pO2 of striated skin muscle following resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Hungerer, Sven; Nolte, Dirk; Botzlar, Andreas; Messmer, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    The hemoglobin based oxygen carrier (HBOC) Diaspirin Crosslinked Hemoglobin (DCLHb) has been developed to substitute not only the blood volume, but also to restore the oxygen-carrying properties of blood during hemorrhagic shock. However, it has been suggested that HBOCs may enhance the formation of free oxygen radicals through the release of free iron ions via the Haber-Weiss reaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DCLHb on the microcirculation, leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction and local tissue oxygenation in striated skin muscle of Syrian golden hamsters during and after resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. In particular we focused on the local tissue oxygenation after resuscitation with DCLHb (hemoglobin content 10 g%) compared to resuscitation using autologous blood diluted to a hemoglobin content of 10 g%. Hemorrhagic shock was induced for 45 minutes by bleeding the animals at a rate of 33 ml/kg BW maintaining a mean arterial pressure of 30 +/- 5 mmHg. Animals were resuscitated either with 33 ml/kg BW 6% Dextran-60.000 or with 10 g% DCLHb. The control group received shed blood diluted with Ringers to a hemoglobin content of 10 g%. Intravital microscopy was used for investigation of the microcirculatory parameters and a multiwire platinum surface electrode for measurement of local tissue pO2 in striated skin muscle in the dorsal skinfold chamber of Syrian golden hamsters. Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock with 10 g% AUB revealed significant increase of leukocytes rolling in postcapillary venules at 30 to 120 minutes after resuscitation compared to baseline values. DCLHb turned out to reduce the number of firmly adherent leukocytes after resuscitation compared to 10 g% AUB. Microvascular permeability as an indicator for functional endothelial integrity revealed no significant differences between the groups. DCLHb and 10 g% AUB led to a significant increase in local tissue oxygenation after resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock

  6. FTIR assessment of the effect of Ginkgo biloba leave extract (EGb 761) on mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Eman M; Aly, Eman M; Mahmoud, Sherif S; Talaat, Mona S; Sallam, Abdel Sattar M

    2011-09-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract has been therapeutically used for several decades to increase peripheral and cerebral blood flow as well as for the treatment of dementia. The extract contains multiple compounds such as flavonoids and terpenoids that are thought to contribute to its neuroprotective and vasotropic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged administration of EGb 761, up to 10 weeks, on mammalian retina using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Two main groups were involved in this study: the normal group (n = 10); and EGb-administrated group (n = 50) that received-orally-a dose of 40 mg/kg/day EGb 761. The results demonstrated that EGb administration was associated with different beneficial effects on the retinal constituents especially the underlying amide I protein secondary structure components as well as the NH-OH region. It concluded that the optimum daily administration period of EGb (40 mg/kg) for ophthalmic applications that targeting the retina ranges from 5 to 8 weeks.

  7. Effect of telemedicine on glycated hemoglobin in diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Labib Imran; Wiebe, Natasha; Ehteshami-Afshar, Arash; Liu, Yuanchen; Dianati-Maleki, Neda; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Manns, Braden J; Tonelli, Marcello

    2017-03-06

    Telemedicine, the use of telecommunications to deliver health services, expertise and information, is a promising but unproven tool for improving the quality of diabetes care. We summarized the effectiveness of different methods of telemedicine for the management of diabetes compared with usual care. We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases (to November 2015) and reference lists of existing systematic reviews for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing telemedicine with usual care for adults with diabetes. Two independent reviewers selected the studies and assessed risk of bias in the studies. The primary outcome was glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) reported at 3 time points (≤ 3 mo, 4-12 mo and > 12 mo). Other outcomes were quality of life, mortality and episodes of hypoglycemia. Trials were pooled using randomeffects meta-analysis, and heterogeneity was quantified using the I(2) statistic. From 3688 citations, we identified 111 eligible RCTs (n = 23 648). Telemedicine achieved significant but modest reductions in HbA1C in all 3 follow-up periods (difference in mean at ≤ 3 mo: -0.57%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.74% to -0.40% [39 trials]; at 4-12 mo: -0.28%, 95% CI -0.37% to -0.20% [87 trials]; and at > 12 mo: -0.26%, 95% CI -0.46% to -0.06% [5 trials]). Quantified heterogeneity (I(2) statistic) was 75%, 69% and 58%, respectively. In meta-regression analyses, the effect of telemedicine on HbA1C appeared greatest in trials with higher HbA1C concentrations at baseline, in trials where providers used Web portals or text messaging to communicate with patients and in trials where telemedicine facilitated medication adjustment. Telemedicine had no convincing effect on quality of life, mortality or hypoglycemia. Compared with usual care, the addition of telemedicine, especially systems that allowed medication adjustments with or without text messaging or a Web portal, improved HbA1C but not other clinically

  8. Effect of telemedicine on glycated hemoglobin in diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Labib Imran; Wiebe, Natasha; Ehteshami-Afshar, Arash; Liu, Yuanchen; Dianati-Maleki, Neda; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Manns, Braden J.; Tonelli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telemedicine, the use of telecommunications to deliver health services, expertise and information, is a promising but unproven tool for improving the quality of diabetes care. We summarized the effectiveness of different methods of telemedicine for the management of diabetes compared with usual care. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases (to November 2015) and reference lists of existing systematic reviews for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing telemedicine with usual care for adults with diabetes. Two independent reviewers selected the studies and assessed risk of bias in the studies. The primary outcome was glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) reported at 3 time points (≤ 3 mo, 4–12 mo and > 12 mo). Other outcomes were quality of life, mortality and episodes of hypoglycemia. Trials were pooled using randomeffects meta-analysis, and heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. RESULTS: From 3688 citations, we identified 111 eligible RCTs (n = 23 648). Telemedicine achieved significant but modest reductions in HbA1C in all 3 follow-up periods (difference in mean at ≤ 3 mo: −0.57%, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.74% to −0.40% [39 trials]; at 4–12 mo: −0.28%, 95% CI −0.37% to −0.20% [87 trials]; and at > 12 mo: −0.26%, 95% CI −0.46% to −0.06% [5 trials]). Quantified heterogeneity (I2 statistic) was 75%, 69% and 58%, respectively. In meta-regression analyses, the effect of telemedicine on HbA1C appeared greatest in trials with higher HbA1C concentrations at baseline, in trials where providers used Web portals or text messaging to communicate with patients and in trials where telemedicine facilitated medication adjustment. Telemedicine had no convincing effect on quality of life, mortality or hypoglycemia. INTERPRETATION: Compared with usual care, the addition of telemedicine, especially systems that allowed medication adjustments with or without text

  9. Renovation of a drop embryo cultures system by using refined mineral oil and the effect of glucose and/or hemoglobin added to a serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungtae; Cho, Meeyoung; Kim, Eunjung; Kim, Taemin; Lee, Changkyu; Han, Jaeyong; Lim, Jeongmook

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether refining mineral oil and the addition of hemoglobin and/or glucose to a serum-free medium could improve in vitro-development of embryos cultured in a chemically semi-defined microdroplet culture system. Block strain, outbred (ICR) mouse 1- or 2-cell embryos were cultured in 5 microl droplets of Chatot, Ziomek and Bavister medium overlaid with mineral oil of different types, and preimplantation development to the blastocyst stage was subsequently monitored. In the experiment 1, either Sigma (M-8410) or BDH (GPR) mineral oil with or without washing was used for embryo culture and, distilled water (DW) or culture medium was used as a washing agent. As results, better (P<0.0001) development of 1-cell embryos was found in the Sigma than in the BDH; more blastocysts developed in Sigma oil washed with culture medium than in the others (37% vs. 0%). Subsequently, 1- (experiment 2) or 2-cell (experiment 3) embryos were cultured in the droplets overlaid with medium-washed Sigma oil, to which 0.001 mg/ml hemoglobin and/or 5.6 mM glucose were supplemented at the 1-cell and the 4-cell stages, respectively. Regardless of embryo stages, blastocyst formation was significantly improved by the addition of hemoglobin (54 to 48% vs. 42 to 31% in 1-cell and 83 to 78% vs. 65 to 68% in 2-cell embryos) and this effect was independent of glucose addition. In conclusion, the selection and washing of mineral oil, and the addition of hemoglobin is beneficial for improving the efficacy of a drop embryo culture system using a serum-free medium.

  10. Effect of maleimide-polyethylene glycol hemoglobin (MP4) on hemodynamics and acid-base status after uncontrolled hemorrhage in anesthetized swine: comparison with crystalloid and blood.

    PubMed

    Young, Mark A; Riddez, Louis; Kjellström, B Thomas; Winslow, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    Maleimide-polyethylene glycol hemoglobin, 4.3 g/dL (MP4), is a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier consisting of native human hemoglobin modified with maleimide polyethylene glycol. This study evaluated resuscitation with MP4 after uncontrolled hemorrhage in anesthetized swine, and compared the effects of MP4 alone with those of standard-of-care crystalloid or crystalloid + blood. Pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane and hemorrhaged 250 mL by controlled withdrawal, which was followed by a 5-mm tear in the abdominal aorta. Three groups of pigs (n = 7 each) were randomized after aortic tear to receive 500 mL of MP4, unlimited Ringer's acetate (RA), or 2 L of RA + 250 mL of autologous blood. Measurements included arterial and pulmonary artery pressures, central venous and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, cardiac output, renal blood flow, urine output, arterial and venous blood gases, lactate concentration, and hemoglobin. Animals were monitored for 150 minutes after hemorrhage. Average body weight (22-24 kg) and hemorrhage volume (28-34 mL/kg) were similar in the three groups. The nadir of mean arterial pressure (23-25 mm Hg) and base excess (-3 to -4 mEq/L) after hemorrhage were similar in all groups, indicating equivalent shock in the three groups. Two hours after administration of MP4, arterial pressure and base excess were significantly improved compared with those of animals administered RA or RA + blood, despite a significantly lower volume of infused fluids (MP4 = 36 +/- 2 mL/kg; RA = 224 +/- 28 mL/kg; RA + blood = 110 +/- 10 mL/kg), and a significantly lower total hemoglobin than achieved with RA + blood. Arterial pressure did not rise above baseline values, cardiac output was not diminished, and systemic vascular resistance was unchanged after administration of MP4, indicating the lack of cardiac effects or peripheral vasoconstriction. These data demonstrate that resuscitation with a small volume of MP4 induces recovery from hemorrhage without

  11. Hemoglobin-Based Nanoarchitectonic Assemblies as Oxygen Carriers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Duan, Li; Li, Junbai

    2016-02-10

    Safe and effective artificial oxygen carriers are the subject of great interest due to the problems of traditional blood transfusion and enormous demand in clinical use. In view of its unique oxygen-transport ability and normal metabolic pathways, hemoglobin is regarded as an ideal oxygen-carrying unit. With advances in nano-biotechnology, hemoglobin assemblies as artificial oxygen carriers achieve great development. Here, recent progress on hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers is highlighted in view of two aspects: acellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers and cellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. These novel oxygen carriers exhibit advantages over traditional carriers and will greatly promote research on reliable and feasible oxygen carriers.

  12. Effects of Simultaneous Radiofrequency Radiation and Chemical Exposure of Mammalian Cells. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    genotoxic chemical will result in an alteration of the genotoxic activity of the chemical alone., For 4-hr pulsed wave RP.F exposures at 2.45 GHz...RFR) in the microwave range, and specifically at 2.45 GHz (pulsed wave ), at moderate power levels and specific absorption rates, was genotoxic in...a) that RFR by itself is genotoxic to mammalian cells in vitro; and b) that a simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to RFR during treatment with a

  13. Effect of alternate energy substrates on mammalian brain metabolism during ischemic events.

    PubMed

    Koppaka, S S; Puchowicz; LaManna, J C; Gatica, J E

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of brain metabolism and cerebral blood flow involves complex control systems with several interacting variables at both cellular and organ levels. Quantitative understanding of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous brain control mechanisms during internal and external stimuli requires the development and validation of a computational (mathematical) model of metabolic processes in brain. This paper describes a computational model of cellular metabolism in blood-perfused brain tissue, which considers the astrocyte-neuron lactate-shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis. The model structure consists of neurons, astrocytes, extra-cellular space, and a surrounding capillary network. Each cell is further compartmentalized into cytosol and mitochondria. Inter-compartment interaction is accounted in the form of passive and carrier-mediated transport. Our model was validated against experimental data reported by Crumrine and LaManna, who studied the effect of ischemia and its recovery on various intra-cellular tissue substrates under standard diet conditions. The effect of ketone bodies on brain metabolism was also examined under ischemic conditions following cardiac resuscitation through our model simulations. The influence of ketone bodies on lactate dynamics on mammalian brain following ischemia is studied incorporating experimental data.

  14. Plasticizer endocrine disruption: Highlighting developmental and reproductive effects in mammals and non-mammalian aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Wallace, Sarah J; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valerie S

    2015-08-01

    Due to their versatility, robustness, and low production costs, plastics are used in a wide variety of applications. Plasticizers are mixed with polymers to increase flexibility of plastics. However, plasticizers are not covalently bound to plastics, and thus leach from products into the environment. Several studies have reported that two common plasticizers, bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, induce adverse health effects in vertebrates; however few studies have addressed their toxicity to non-mammalian species. The aim of this review is to compare the effects of plasticizers in animals, with a focus on aquatic species. In summary, we identified three main chains of events that occur in animals exposed to BPA and phthalates. Firstly, plasticizers affect development by altering both the thyroid hormone and growth hormone axes. Secondly, these chemicals interfere with reproduction by decreasing cholesterol transport through the mitochondrial membrane, leading to reduced steroidogenesis. Lastly, exposure to plasticizers leads to the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, the increase of fatty acid oxidation, and the reduction in the ability to cope with the augmented oxidative stress leading to reproductive organ malformations, reproductive defects, and decreased fertility.

  15. Effect of pH on Structural Changes in Perch Hemoglobin that Can Alter Redox Stability and Heme Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mark P.; Aranda, IV, Roman; He, Cai; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-01-07

    pH can be manipulated to alter the oxidative stability of fish-based foods during storage. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the ability of reduced pH to cause structural changes in fish hemoglobins that lead to enhanced oxidative degradation. Decreasing pH from 8.0 to 6.3 and 5.7 created a large channel for solvent entry into the heme crevice of perch hemoglobin beta chains. The proton-induced opening of this channel occurred between site CD3 and the heme-6-propionate. Solvent entry into the heme crevice can enhance metHb formation and hemin loss, processes that accelerate lipid oxidation. Reduced pH also decreased the distance between Ile at E11 in one of the alpha chains and the ligand above the heme iron atom. This sterically displaces O{sub 2} and protonated O{sub 2} which increases metHb formation. These studies demonstrate that pH reduction causes structural changes in perch hemoglobin which increase oxidative degradation of the heme pigment.

  16. Effects of crosslinking on the thermal stability of hemoglobin. I. The use of bis(3,5-dibromosalicyl) fumarate.

    PubMed

    White, F L; Olsen, K W

    1987-10-01

    The double-headed aspirin, bis(3,5-dibromosalicyl) fumarate, has been used to crosslink hemoglobin A between Lys 82 beta 1 and Lys 82 beta 2 (J. A. Walder et al. (1979) Biochemistry 18,4265). Denaturation experiments were used to compare the stability of this crosslinked protein to that of hemoglobin A. Thermal denaturations, done in 0.01 M 4-morpholine-propanesulfonic acid, pH 7, containing 0.9 M guanidine to prevent precipitation at high temperatures, were monitored by changes in absorbance between 190 and 650 nm using a diode array spectrophotometer. The sample was heated from 25 to 70 degrees C at 0.3 degrees C/min. The data were analyzed by using both a two-state model and a novel first derivative method. As expected, methemoglobin A had a single, broad transition with a midpoint of 40.7 degrees C. The crosslinked methemoglobin showed a transition at 57.1 degrees C. Two minor transitions, one of which was apparently due to residual unmodified hemoglobin, were also observed in the crosslinked sample. Thus, a single crosslink between only two of the four subunits can lead to a significantly more stable molecule. These results can be explained by Le Chatelier's principle, since crosslinking prevents dissociation of the beta-subunits and, thereby, holds the entire tetramer together.

  17. Effect of lanthanum on voltage-dependent gating of a cloned mammalian neuronal potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, J; Daenens, P

    1997-02-28

    The effect of the trivalent cation lanthanum (La3+) on voltage-dependent gating of a cloned mammalian neuronal Kv1.1 potassium channel was studied under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. La3+ (100 microM) was found to decrease the potassium currents at all test potentials and to shift the midpoint of the fraction open channels/membrane voltage curve by approximately +20 mV. The opening and closing time constants of Kv1.1 channels were empirically fitted with a 4th power Hodgkin-Huxley formalism, or with mono- and multi-exponentials. It was found that La3+ slowed down the kinetics of activation, speeded up those of deactivation, and shifted the opening kinetics by approximately + 60 mV. Interestingly, all these parameters of channel gating were not affected equally by La3+. Furthermore, amplitudes of the inward tail currents evoked at potentials more negative than the potassium equilibrium potential (E(K+)) were more strongly inhibited by La3+ than those of the outward tail currents evoked at potentials more positive than E(K+). This suggests voltage-dependent block and binding of La3+ to the Kv1.1 channel protein. We conclude that these actions cannot be explained in terms of surface charge considerations alone. Our results provide evidence for a direct interaction with the potassium channel protein, shedding new light on the mechanism of action of this lanthanide.

  18. The effects of nerve stimulation and hemicholinium on synaptic vesicles at the mammalian neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S. F.; Kwanbunbumpen, Suthiwan

    1970-01-01

    1. Electron micrographs of nerve terminals in rat phrenic nerve—diaphragm preparations have been studied. This has been done before and after prolonged nerve stimulation. The effectiveness of nerve stimulation has been monitored by intracellular micro-electrode recordings from the muscle cells. 2. Characteristic changes in the form and distribution of the nerve terminal mitochondria were noted after nerve stimulation. 3. Synaptic vesicle numbers in the region of nerve terminal less than 1800 Å from the synaptic cleft were significantly greater in tissue taken 2 and 3 min after nerve stimulation, than in unstimulated preparations. 4. The long and short diameters of the synaptic vesicle profiles less than 1800 Å from the synaptic cleft were measured. Analysis of the distribution of the diameters indicated synaptic vesicles to be basically spherical structures. Estimates of synaptic vesicle volume were made from the measurements. Synaptic vesicle volume was significantly reduced in tissue taken 2 and 4 min following nerve stimulation. 5. If hemicholinium, a compound which inhibits acetylcholine synthesis, was present during the period of nerve stimulation, much greater reductions in synaptic vesicle volume occurred. Synaptic vesicle numbers in the region of nerve terminal less than 1800 Å from the synaptic cleft were also reduced, compared with unstimulated control preparations. 6. These results are regarded as support for the hypothesis that the synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals at the mammalian neuromuscular junction represent stores of the transmitter substance, acetylcholine. ImagesABABPlate 2AB PMID:5503879

  19. Effect of mammalian kidney osmolytes on the folding pathway of sheep serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Dar, Mohammad Aasif; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2017-04-01

    Recently, we had published that urea-induced denaturation curves of optical properties of sheep serum albumin (SSA) are biphasic with a stable intermediate that has characteristics of molten globule (MG) state. In this study, we have extended the work by carrying out urea- and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturations of SSA in the presence of naturally occurring mammalian kidney osmolytes, namely, sorbitol, myo-inositol and glycine betaine. We have observed that all these osmolytes (i) transform this biphasic transition into a co-operative, two-state transition and (ii) increase the stability of the protein in terms of midpoint of denaturation (Cm) and Gibbs free energy change in the absence of both denaturants (ΔGD(0)). The relative effectiveness of different osmolytes on the stability of SSA follows the order: glycine betaine>myo-inositol>sorbitol. In this paper, we also report that kidney osmolytes destabilize MG state by shifting the equilibrium, native state↔MG state toward the left. This study will be helpful in understanding the existence of osmolytes in kidney and their role in folding of kidney proteins soaked with urea.

  20. The effect of antidiuretic hormone on solute flows in mammalian collecting tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1972-01-01

    These experiments were intended to evaluate the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-dependent reflection coefficients of urea, sucrose, and NaCl in cortical and outer medullary collecting tubules isolated from mammalian kidney. In one group of experiments, the ADH-dependent osmotic water flows, when the perfusing solutions contained hypotonic NaCl solutions, were indistinguishable from control observations when either urea or sucrose replaced, in part, NaCl in isotonic bathing solutions (cortical collecting tubules). Similarly, both in cortical and outer medullary collecting tubules exposed to ADH, there was zero net osmotic volume flow when a portion of the NaCl in the bathing and/or perfusing solutions was replaced by either sucrose or urea, so long as the perfusing and bathing solutions were isosmolal. Taken together, these observations suggest that the ADH-dependent reflection coefficients of NaCl, urea, and sucrose, in these tubules, were identical. Since the effective hydrodynamic radii of urea and sucrose are, respectively, 1.8 and 5.2 A, it is likely that σi, for urea, sucrose, and NaCl, was unity. In support of this, the diffusion permeability coefficient (PDi cm sec-1) of urea was indistinguishable from zero. Since the limiting sites for urea penetration were the luminal interfaces of the tubules, these data are consistent with the view that ADH increases diffusional water flow across such interfaces. Images PMID:5057132

  1. Genomic imprinting is a parental effect established in mammalian germ cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiajun

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon in which either the paternal or the maternal allele of imprinted genes is expressed in somatic cells. It is unique to eutherian mammals, marsupials, and flowering plants. It is absolutely required for normal mammalian development. Dysregulation of genomic imprinting can cause a variety of human diseases. About 150 imprinted genes have been identified so far in mammals and many of them are clustered such that they are coregulated by a cis-acting imprinting control region, called the ICR. One hallmark of the ICR is that it contains a germ line-derived differentially methylated region that is methylated on the paternal chromosome or on the maternal chromosome. The DNA methylation imprint is reset in the germ line and differential methylation at an ICR is restored upon fertilization. The DNA methylation imprint is resistant to a genome-wide demethylation process in early embryos and is stably maintained in postimplantation embryos. Maintenance of the DNA methylation imprint is dependent on two distinct maternal effect genes (Zfp57 and PGC7/Stella). In germ cells, around midgestation, the DNA methylation imprint is erased and undergoes another round of the DNA methylation imprint cycle that includes erasure, resetting, restoration, and maintenance of differential DNA methylation.

  2. Effects of Friedreich's ataxia GAA repeats on DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandok, Gurangad S.; Patel, Mayank P.; Mirkin, Sergei M.

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a common hereditary degenerative neuro-muscular disorder caused by expansions of the (GAA)n repeat in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The expanded repeats from parents frequently undergo further significant length changes as they are passed on to progeny. Expanded repeats also show an age-dependent instability in somatic cells, albeit on a smaller scale than during intergenerational transmissions. Here we studied the effects of (GAA)n repeats of varying lengths and orientations on the episomal DNA replication in mammalian cells. We have recently shown that the very first round of the transfected DNA replication occurs in the lack of the mature chromatin, does not depend on the episomal replication origin and initiates at multiple single-stranded regions of plasmid DNA. We now found that expanded GAA repeats severely block this first replication round post plasmid transfection, while the subsequent replication cycles are only mildly affected. The fact that GAA repeats affect various replication modes in a different way might shed light on their differential expansions characteristic for FRDA. PMID:22262734

  3. Effects of simulated microgravity on mammalian fertilization and preimplantation embryonic development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Y; Sasaki, S; Kubota, Y; Ikeuchi, T; Hayashi, Y; Kohri, K

    2000-12-01

    To study the effects of simulated microgravity on mammalian fertilization and preimplantation embryonic development in vitro with the use of a horizontal clinostat device. Controlled animal study. Research laboratory at a university medical school. B6D2F1 (C57BL/6 x DBA/2) and ICR mice between 8 and 10 weeks old. The first experiment was performed to investigate whether gravity is required for fertilization in vitro under three conditions: clinostat rotation, rotational control, and stationary control. In the second experiment, one-cell embryos were cultured under each condition and their morphology and viability were assessed at 96 hours. The fertilized numbers and embryonic numbers at the morula and blastocyst stages were recorded in each condition. In the first experiment, there were no statistically significant differences in the efficiency of achieving normal fertilization in vitro among the conditions. In the second experiment, there was a statistically significant decrease in the number of embryos reaching the morula and blastocyst stages after 96 hours in culture under clinostat rotation. These results suggest that the process of fertilization in vitro is not sensitive to the gravitational vector. However, the possibility exists that the frequency of early embryonic lethality is increased by microgravity.

  4. Effect of Smoking During Radiotherapy, Respiratory Insufficiency, and Hemoglobin Levels on Outcome in Patients Irradiated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Setter, Cornelia M.S.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of smoking during radiotherapy (RT), respiratory insufficiency before RT, hemoglobin levels during RT, and additional factors on overall survival, locoregional control (LRC), and metastasis-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The following factors were investigated in 181 patients who underwent RT for non-small-cell lung cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, histologic type, grade, T/N stage, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, respiratory insufficiency before RT, pack-years, smoking during RT, and hemoglobin levels during RT. Additionally, in the 129 patients who did not undergo surgery, the effect of the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2) (<60 Gy vs. 60 Gy vs. >60 Gy) on outcome was investigated. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with a lower T stage (p = 0.004), lower N stage (p 0.040), surgery (p = 0.010), and no respiratory insufficiency (p = 0.023). A Karnofsky performance score >70 achieved borderline significance (p = 0.056). Improved LRC was associated with a lower T stage (p = 0.007) and no smoking during RT (p = 0.029). Improved metastasis-free survival was associated with lower T stage (p < 0.001) and lower N stage (p < 0.001). In those patients who did not undergo surgery, an EQD2 of {>=}60 Gy was associated with a better outcome than an EQD2 of <60 Gy. Furthermore, an EQD2 >60 Gy resulted in better LRC than did an EQD2 of {<=}60 Gy. Conclusions: Smoking during RT had a significant effect on LRC, but we did not find that hemoglobin levels or respiratory insufficiency significantly affected LRC or metastasis-free survival in our patient population. Furthermore, our data suggest a dose-effect relationship in those patients who did not undergo surgery.

  5. Hemoglobin parameters from diffuse reflectance data.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Judith R; Marina, Oana C; Hebert, Tiffany M; Kaur, Gurpreet; Smith, Harriet O

    2014-03-01

    Tissue vasculature is altered when cancer develops. Consequently, noninvasive methods of monitoring blood vessel size, density, and oxygenation would be valuable. Simple spectroscopy employing fiber optic probes to measure backscattering can potentially determine hemoglobin parameters. However, heterogeneity of blood distribution, the dependence of the tissue-volume-sampled on scattering and absorption, and the potential compression of tissue all hinder the accurate determination of hemoglobin parameters. We address each of these issues. A simple derivation of a correction factor for the absorption coefficient, μa, is presented. This correction factor depends not only on the vessel size, as others have shown, but also on the density of blood vessels. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the dependence of an effective pathlength of light through tissue which is parameterized as a ninth-order polynomial function of μa. The hemoglobin bands of backscattering spectra of cervical tissue are fit using these expressions to obtain effective blood vessel size and density, tissue hemoglobin concentration, and oxygenation. Hemoglobin concentration and vessel density were found to depend on the pressure applied during in vivo acquisition of the spectra. It is also shown that determined vessel size depends on the blood hemoglobin concentration used.

  6. Different sensitivities of cultured mammalian cells towards aphidicolin-enhanced DNA effects in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Bausinger, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The comet assay in combination with the polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin (APC) has been used to measure DNA excision repair activity, DNA repair kinetics and individual DNA repair capacity. Since APC can enhance genotoxic effects of mutagens measured by the comet assay, this approach has been proposed for increasing the sensitivity of the comet assay in human biomonitoring. The APC-modified comet assay has mainly been performed with human blood and it was shown that it not only enhances the detection of DNA damage repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) but also damage typically repaired by base excision repair (BER). Recently, we reported that in contrast to blood leukocytes, A549 cells (a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line) seem to be insensitive towards the repair-inhibiting action of APC. To further elucidate the general usefulness of the APC-modified comet assay for studying repair in cultured mammalian cells, we comparatively investigated further cell lines (HeLa, TK6, V79). DNA damage was induced by BPDE (benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide) and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) in the absence and presence of APC (3 or 15μM). APC was either added for 2h together with the mutagen or cells were pre-incubated for 30min with APC before the mutagen was added. The results indicate that the cell lines tested differ fundamentally with regard to their sensitivity and specificity towards the repair-inhibiting effect of APC. The actual cause for these differences is still unclear but potential molecular explanations are discussed. Irrespective of the underlying mechanism(s), our study revealed practical limitations of the use of the APC-modified comet assay.

  7. Long-Term Single and Joint Effects of Excessive Daytime Napping on the HOMA-IR Index and Glycosylated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Pang, Xiuyu; Zhang, Qiao; Qu, Qiannuo; Hou, Zhigang; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Lin; Na, Guanqiong; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Changhao; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the duration of daytime napping and its effect combined with night sleep deprivation on the risk of developing high HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) index and disadvantageous changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. A total of 5845 diabetes-free subjects (2736 women and 3109 men), 30 to 65 years of age, were targeted for this cohort study since 2008. Multiple adjusted Cox regression models were performed to evaluate the single and joint effects of daytime napping on the risk of an elevated HbA1c level and high HOMA-IR index. After an average of 4.5 years of follow-up, >30 minutes of daytime napping was significantly associated with an increased risk of an elevated HbA1c level (>6.5%) in men and women (all P trend < 0.05). Hazard ratios (HRs) for an HbA1c level between 5.7% and 6.4% were also significant in the entire cohort and women, but nonsignificant in men. HRs (95% confidence interval, CIs) for the high HOMA-IR index in the entire cohort, men, and women were 1.33 (1.10–1.62), 1.46 (1.08–1.98), and 1.47 (1.12–1.91), respectively. The combination of sleep deprivation with no naps or >30 minutes napping and the combination of no sleep deprivation with >30 minutes daytime napping were all associated with an HbA1c level >6.5% (HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.24–3.51; HR = 4.00, 95% CI = 2.03–7.90; and HR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.29–3.27, respectively). No sleep deprivation combined with >30 minutes daytime napping correlated with a high risk of an HbA1c level between 5.7% and 6.4% and high HOMA-IR index (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.48–3.02; and HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.10–1.65, respectively). Daytime napping >30 minutes was associated with a high risk of an elevated HbA1c level and high HOMA-IR index. No sleep deprivation combined with napping >30 minutes carries a risk of abnormal glucose metabolism. Sleep deprivation combined with

  8. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  9. Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Mammalian Development. Part 2: Meiotic Maturation of Mouse Oocytes During Clinostat Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the role of gravity in basic cellular processes that are important during development, the effects of a simulated microgravity environment on mammalian gametes and early embryos cultured in vitro are examined. A microgravity environment is simulated by use of a clinostat, which essentially reorients cells relative to the gravity vector. Initial studies have focused on assessing the effects of clinostat rotation on the meiotic progression of mouse oocytes. Modifications centered on providing the unique in vitro culture of the clinostat requirements of mammalian oocytes and embryos: 37 C temperature, constant humidity, and a 5% CO2 in air environment. The oocytes are observed under the dissecting microscope for polar body formation and gross morphological appearance. They are then processed for cytogenetic analysis.

  10. Biphasic effect of bimoclomol on calcium handling in mammalian ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Nánási, Péter P; Sárközi, Sándor; Szigeti, Gyula; Jóna, István; Szegedi, Csaba; Szabó, Ágnes; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szigligeti, Péter; Körtvély, Ágnes; Csernoch, László; Kovács, László; Jednákovits, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Concentration-dependent effects of bimoclomol, the novel heat shock protein coinducer, on intracellular calcium transients and contractility were studied in Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig hearts loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator dye Fura-2. Bimoclomol had a biphasic effect on contractility: both peak left ventricular pressure and the rate of force development significantly increased at a concentration of 10 nM or higher. The maximal effect was observed between 0.1 and 1 μM, and the positive inotropic action disappeared by further increasing the concentration of bimoclomol. The drug increased systolic calcium concentration with a similar concentration-dependence. In contrast, diastolic calcium concentration increased monotonically in the presence of bimoclomol. Thus low concentrations of the drug (10–100 nM) increased, whereas high concentrations (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of intracellular calcium transients.Effects of bimoclomol on action potential configuration was studied in isolated canine ventricular myocytes. Action potential duration was increased at low (10 nM), unaffected at intermediate (0.1–1 μM) and decreased at high (10–100 μM) concentrations of the drug.In single canine sarcoplasmic calcium release channels (ryanodine receptor), incorporated into artificial lipid bilayer, bimoclomol significantly increased the open probability of the channel in the concentration range of 1–10 μM. The increased open probability was associated with increased mean open time. The effect of bimoclomol was again biphasic: the open probability decreased below the control level in the presence of 1 mM bimoclomol.Bimoclomol (10 μM–1 mM) had no significant effect on the rate of calcium uptake into sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles of the dog, indicating that in vivo calcium reuptake might not substantially be affected by the drug.In conclusion, the positive inotropic action of bimoclomol is likely due to the activation of the

  11. The lack of consistent diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin infusion blood pressure effects in the US and EU traumatic hemorrhagic shock clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Edward P; Philbin, Nora B; Koenigsberg, Max D; Gao, Weihua

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin solutions have demonstrated a pressor effect that could adversely affect hemorrhagic shock patient resuscitation through accelerated hemorrhage, diminished perfusion, or inadequate resuscitation. Data from two parallel, multicenter traumatic hemorrhagic shock clinical trials in 17 US emergency departments and in 27 EU prehospital systems using diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin (DCLHb), a hemoglobin-based resuscitation fluid. In the 219 patients, patients were 37 years old, 64% sustained blunt injury, 48% received DCLHb, and 36% expired. Although mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure values differed at 2 of the 10 measured time points, blood pressure (BP) curve analysis showed no SBP, diastolic blood pressure, or MAP differences based on treatment. Although SBP values 160 and 120 mmHg or greater were 2.2x and 2.6x more frequently noted in survivors, they were not more common with DCLHb use or in DCLHb patients who expired in US study nonsurvivors or in any EU study patients. Systolic blood pressure values 160 and 120 mmHg or greater were 2.8x and 1.3x more frequently noted in DCLHb survivors as compared with normal saline survivors. Only 3% of the BP variation noted could be attributed to DCLHb use, and as expected, injury severity and baseline physiologic status were stronger predictors. In the United States alone, treatment group was not correlated by regression with BP at any time point. Neither mean BP readings nor elevated BP readings were correlated with DCLHb treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients. As such, no clinically demonstrable DCLHb pressor effect could be directly related to the adverse mortality outcome observed in the US study.

  12. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  13. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  14. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors.

  15. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  16. Cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of soluble chromium compounds on mammalian cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Levis, A. G.; Majone, F.

    1979-01-01

    The inhibition of cell growth, the reduction of cell survival and the induction of chromosome aberrations and of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) have been determined in cultured hamster cell lines (BHK and CHO) treated with 11 water-soluble compounds of hexavalent and trivalent chromium. All Cr6+ compounds inhibit growth of BHK cells and reduce survival of CHO cells to levels comparable to those obtained only after exposure to 100--1000 times higher Cr3+ concentrations. The cytotoxicity curves obtained with the different Cr6+ compounds are almost overlapping, whereas marked differences of activity are noticeable among Cr3+ compounds. Giant cells are obtained after exposure to Cr6+ and Cr3+ compounds, as shown by the rise of DNA and RNA per cell, and are due to the blockage of the cell cycle without sudden inhibition of macromolecular syntheses. Both Cr6+ and Cr3+ compounds are able to induce chromosome aberrations, whereas Cr3+ is absolutely incapable of inducing SCE, only Cr6+ being active. The frequency of chromosome aberrations is increased about 10-fold after exposure to 1.0 micrograms/ml Cr6+, whereas it is only doubled after treatment with up to 150 micrograms/ml Cr3+. On the other hand, in spite of the sensitivity of CHO cells to the induction of SCE by mitomycin C, the frequency of SCE hardly doubles after exposure to Cr6+ compounds. The present data confirm that Cr6+ compounds are characterized by a marked cytotoxicity and clastogenic action on mammalian cell cultures and show that Cr3+ compounds, though cytotoxic only at extremely high concentrations and not increasing the frequency of SCE, are not completely without cytogenetic effect, as they are able to induce chromosome aberrations. PMID:497104

  17. Genotoxic effects of fly ash in bacteria, mammalian cells and animals

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.L.; Connor, T.H.; Harper, J.B.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S. )

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of fossil fuels has raised concerns about possible deleterious health effects of the final combustion product, fly ash. Seven ash samples from coal sources obtained from Battelle Columbus Laboratories were evaluated in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay to determine their mutagenic potential. While dimethyl sulfoxide extracts of five samples showed no mutagenicity, sample 102 caused an increase in the number of revertants per plate over controls in TA100 and TA98 with activation by liver homogenate (2-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively), and without (2-fold and 6-fold). This ash was thus evaluated in whole animal studies. Animals treated by inhalation or oral gavage were assayed for the presence of mutagens in the urine, micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes, and chromosomal aberrations in metaphase bone marrow cells. Those animals treated by inhalation were also examined for local damage in the lung. The assay for mutagens in the urine was negative as shown by the Ames assay with TA100 and TA98 and there was no increase in micronuclei or in metaphase aberrations. Histological sections from the animals treated by inhalation did not show the presence of particles, macrophage infiltrations and generalized lung damage. We tested the same fly ash with an in vitro cell transformation assay with the cell line Balb/c 3T3 subclone A31-1-13. Although there was not an increase in Type III foci, there was a dose-dependent increase of Type II foci in the treated cells over the controls. In one assay, there was approximately a 14-fold increase in Type II foci in the highest dose (2 mg/ml) compared to the solvent control. One other ash sample induced cell transformation without being markedly cytotoxic, while a third sample was highly toxic but did not induce transformation.

  18. Genotoxic effects of fly ash in bacteria, mammalian cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Morris, D L; Connor, T H; Harper, J B; Ward, J B; Legator, M S

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of fossil fuels has raised concerns about possible deleterious health effects of the final combustion product, fly ash. Seven ash samples from coal sources obtained from Battelle Columbus Laboratories were evaluated in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay to determine their mutagenic potential. While dimethyl sulfoxide extracts of five samples showed no mutagenicity, sample 102 caused an increase in the number of revertants per plate over controls in TA100 and TA98 with activation by liver homogenate (2-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively), and without (2-fold and 6-fold). This ash was thus evaluated in whole animal studies. Animals treated by inhalation or oral gavage were assayed for the presence of mutagens in the urine, micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes, and chromosomal aberrations in metaphase bone marrow cells. Those animals treated by inhalation were also examined for local damage in the lung. The assay for mutagens in the urine was negative as shown by the Ames assay with TA100 and TA98 and there was no increase in micronuclei or in metaphase aberrations. Histological sections from the animals treated by inhalation did not show the presence of particles, macrophage infiltrations and generalized lung damage. We tested the same fly ash with an in vitro cell transformation assay with the cell line Balb/c 3T3 subclone A31-1-13. Although there was not an increase in Type III foci, there was a dose-dependent increase of Type II foci in the treated cells over the controls. In one assay, there was approximately a 14-fold increase in Type II foci in the highest dose (2 mg/ml) compared to the solvent control. One other ash sample induced cell transformation without being markedly cytotoxic, while a third sample was highly toxic but did not induce transformation.

  19. Effects of lead shot ingestion on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, hemoglobin concentration, and serum chemistry in bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pattee, O.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Mulhern, B.

    1981-01-01

    Lead shot ingestion by bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is considered to be widespread and has been implicated in the death of eagles in nature. It was recently demonstrated under experimental conditions that ingestion of as few as 10 lead shot resulted in death within 12 to 20 days. In the present study hematological responses to lead toxicity including red blood cell ALAD activity, hemoglobin concentration and 23 different blood serum chemistries were examined in five captive bald eagles that were unsuitable for rehabilitation and release. Eagles were dosed by force-feeding with 10 lead shot; they were redosed if regurgitation occurred. Red blood cell ALAD activity was inhibited by nearly 80% within 24 hours when mean blood lead concentration had increased to 0.8 parts per million (ppm). By the end of 1 week there was a significant decrease (20-25%) in hematocrit and hemoglobin, and the mean blood lead concentration was over 3 ppm. Within as little as 1-2 weeks after dosing, significant elevations in serum creatinine and serum alanine aminotransferase occurred, as well as a significant decrease in the ratio of serum aspartic aminotransferase to serum alanine aminotransferase. The mean blood lead concentration was over 5 ppm by the end of 2 weeks. These changes in serum chemistry may be indicative of kidney and liver alterations.

  20. Effects of solution environment on mammalian cell fermentation broth properties: enhanced impurity removal and clarification performance.

    PubMed

    Westoby, Matthew; Chrostowski, James; de Vilmorin, Philippe; Smelko, John Paul; Romero, Jonathan K

    2011-01-01

    The processing of recombinant proteins from high cell density, high product titer cell cultures containing mammalian cells is commonly performed using tangential flow microfiltration (MF). However, the increased cellular debris present in these complex feed streams can prematurely foul the membrane, adversely impacting MF capacity and throughput. In addition, high cell density cell culture streams introduce elevated levels of process-related impurities, which increase the burden on subsequent purification operations to remove these complex media components and impurities. To address this challenge, an evaluation of mammalian cell culture broth buffer properties was examined to determine if enhanced impurity removal and clarification performance could be achieved. A framework is presented here for establishing optimized mammalian cell culture buffer conditions, involving trade-offs between product recovery and purification and improved clarification at manufacturing-scale production. A reduction in cell culture broth pH to 4.7-5.0 induced flocculation and impurity precipitation which increased the average feed particle-size. These conditions led to enhanced impurity removal and improved MF throughput and filter capacity for several mammalian systems. Feed conditions were further optimized by controlling ionic composition along with pH to improve product recovery from high cell density/high product titer cell cultures. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of Nucleopolyhedrosis Virus on Selected Mammalian Predators of the Gypsy Moth

    Treesearch

    R.A. Lautenschlager; C.H. Kircher; J.D. Podgwaite

    1977-01-01

    Nucleopolyhedrosis virus (NPV) of the gypsy moth was fed to three mammalian predators of the insect: the white-footed mouse, the short-tailed shrew, and the Virginia opposum in the form of NPV-infected 5th instar gypsy moth larvae, polyhedral inclusion bodies (PIB's) mixed in dog food and PIB's mixed in a standard spray formulation. The total amount of NPV...

  2. Effect of Low-Dose Ferrous Sulfate vs Iron Polysaccharide Complex on Hemoglobin Concentration in Young Children With Nutritional Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R; Adix, Leah; Zhang, Song; Gao, Ang; McCavit, Timothy L

    2017-06-13

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) affects millions of persons worldwide, and is associated with impaired neurodevelopment in infants and children. Ferrous sulfate is the most commonly prescribed oral iron despite iron polysaccharide complex possibly being better tolerated. To compare the effect of ferrous sulfate with iron polysaccharide complex on hemoglobin concentration in infants and children with nutritional IDA. Double-blind, superiority randomized clinical trial of infants and children aged 9 to 48 months with nutritional IDA (assessed by history and laboratory criteria) that was conducted in an outpatient hematology clinic at a US tertiary care hospital from September 2013 through November 2015; 12-week follow-up ended in January 2016. Three mg/kg of elemental iron once daily as either ferrous sulfate drops or iron polysaccharide complex drops for 12 weeks. Primary outcome was change in hemoglobin over 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included complete resolution of IDA (defined as hemoglobin concentration >11 g/dL, mean corpuscular volume >70 fL, reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent >25 pg, serum ferritin level >15 ng/mL, and total iron-binding capacity <425 μg/dL at the 12-week visit), changes in serum ferritin level and total iron-binding capacity, adverse effects. Of 80 randomized infants and children (median age, 22 months; 55% male; 61% Hispanic white; 40 per group), 59 completed the trial (28 [70%] in ferrous sulfate group; 31 [78%] in iron polysaccharide complex group). From baseline to 12 weeks, mean hemoglobin increased from 7.9 to 11.9 g/dL (ferrous sulfate group) vs 7.7 to 11.1 g/dL (iron complex group), a greater difference of 1.0 g/dL (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.6 g/dL; P < .001) with ferrous sulfate (based on a linear mixed model). Proportion with a complete resolution of IDA was higher in the ferrous sulfate group (29% vs 6%; P = .04). Median serum ferritin level increased from 3.0 to 15.6 ng/mL (ferrous sulfate) vs 2.0 to 7.5 ng/mL (iron complex) over

  3. Effects of crosslinking on the thermal stability of hemoglobins. II. The stabilization of met-, cyanomet-, and carbonmonoxyhemoglobins A and S with bis(3,5-dibromosalicyl) fumarate.

    PubMed

    Yang, T; Olsen, K W

    1988-03-01

    Hemoglobins A and S were crosslinked between Lys 82 beta 1 and Lys 82 beta 2 using bis (3,5-dibromosalicyl) fumarate (J. A. Walder et al. (1979) Biochemistry 18, 4265). Thermal denaturation experiments were used to compare the stabilities of the met, cyanomet, and carbonmonoxy forms of these crosslinked hemoglobins to the corresponding uncrosslinked proteins. Uncrosslinked carbonmonoxy- and cyanomethemoglobins had transition temperatures about 11 degrees C higher than the corresponding met samples. The increase in denaturation temperature (Tm) due to crosslinking was 15 degrees C for the methemoglobins, 10 degrees C for the cyanomethemoglobins, and 4 degrees C for the carbonmonoxy ones. There was no significant difference in stability between the met and carbonmonoxy crosslinked proteins. In order of increasing stability the samples were: met Hb S less than met Hb A less than CO Hb S less than CO Hb A = CN-met Hb A less than met XL-Hb S = CO XL-Hb S less than met XL-Hb A = CO XL-Hb A less than CN-met XL-Hb A. The slight decrease in the stability of Hb S (beta 6 Glu----Val) compared to Hb A can be explained by the replacement of an external ionic group by a hydrophobic residue in Hb S. In mixtures of crosslinked and normal Hb A, the Tm of the uncrosslinked material was slightly increased by the presence of the more stable crosslinked hemoglobin. The effects of both crosslinking and cyanide or carbon monoxide binding can be explained by Le Chatelier's principle since both would favor the native form of the protein.

  4. Effect of the chest wall on the measurement of hemoglobin concentrations by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy in normal breast and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Nobuko; Ueda, Yukio; Nasu, Hatsuko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Takehara, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yutaka; Sakahara, Harumi

    2016-11-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy using near-infrared light have great potential in the assessment of tumor vasculature. We previously measured hemoglobin concentrations in breast cancer using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy system. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the chest wall on the measurement of hemoglobin concentrations in normal breast tissue and cancer. We measured total hemoglobin (tHb) concentration in both cancer and contralateral normal breast using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy system in 24 female patients with breast cancer. Patients were divided into two groups based on menopausal state. The skin-to-chest wall distance was determined using ultrasound images obtained with an ultrasound probe attached to the spectroscopy probe. The apparent tHb concentration of normal breast increased when the skin-to-chest wall distance was less than 20 mm. The tHb concentration in pre-menopausal patients was higher than that in post-menopausal patients. Although the concentration of tHb in cancer tissue was statistically higher than that in normal breast, the contralateral normal breast showed higher tHb concentration than cancer in 9 of 46 datasets. When the curves of tHb concentrations as a function of the skin-to-chest wall distance in normal breast were applied for pre- and post-menopausal patients separately, all the cancer lesions plotted above the curves. The skin-to-chest wall distance affected the measurement of tHb concentration of breast tissue by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy. The tHb concentration of breast cancer tissue was more precisely evaluated by considering the skin-to-chest wall distance.

  5. Effect of the hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier HBOC-201 on laboratory instrumentation: cobas integra, chiron blood gas analyzer 840, Sysmex SE-9000 and BCT.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A; Peek, D; Scholten, R; Moreira, P; Gawryl, M; Clark, T; Westerhuis, L

    1999-01-01

    As part of a clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of the hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrier (HBOC) HBOC-201 (an ultrapurified, stroma-free bovine hemoglobin product, Biopure, Cambridge, MA, USA) on our routine clinical chemistry analyzer (Cobas Integra, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland ), blood gas analyzer (Chiron 840, Chiron Diagnostics Corporation, East Walpole, MA, USA), routine hemocytometry analyzer (Sysmex SE-9000, TOA Medical Electronics Co Ltd., Kobe, Japan), hemostasis analyzer (BCT, Dade-Behring, Marburg, Germany) and bloodbanking system (Dia-Med-ID Micro Typing System, DiaMed AG, Cressier, Switzerland). The maximum tested concentration of HBOC-201 was 65 g/l. Of the 27 routine clinical chemistry tests challenged with HBOC-201, bilirubin-direct, creatine kinase MB-fraction (CK-MB), creatine kinase (CK), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), magnesium and uric acid were influenced by even low concentrations of HBOC-201. These tests were excluded from use on the plasma of patients treated with HBOC-201. Since the non-availability of the cardiac marker CK-MB may lead to problems in acute situations, we introduced the qualitative Trop T-test (Boehringer Mannheim), which was not influenced. The applicability of another nine tests was limited by the concentration of the HBOC-201 in the patients' plasma. No interference of HBOC-201 in routine hemocytometry, hemostasis-analysis and red-blood cell agglutination detection (blood-bank tests) was observed. Although immediate patient-care was not compromised, routine use of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers will have a strong impact on logistical management. The development of robust laboratory tests free from the interference of the pigmented oxygen carriers should therefore precede its introduction into routine transfusion medicine.

  6. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkiss, R.J.; Stratford, M.R.; Watfa, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol.

  7. Cardiopulmonary bypass in the newborn: effects of circulatory cell-free hemoglobin and hyperoxia evaluated in a novel rat pup model.

    PubMed

    Jungner, Åsa; Vallius, Suvi; Bruschettini, Matteo; Romantsik, Olga; Gram, Magnus; Ley, David

    2017-10-04

    Infants with congenital heart defects (CHD) are at risk for white matter brain injury. This novel rat pup model characterizes the systemic effects of intravasal cell-free hemoglobin and hyperoxia, hypothesizing that immature endogenous scavenging systems relate to increased vulnerability to conditions present during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Plasma pharmacokinetics of cell-free human hemoglobin (Hb) was determined after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in postnatal day 6 (P6) rat pups. Cell-free hemoglobin degradation, scavenger- and oxidative stress responses in altered oxygen environments were evaluated in P6 rat pups exposed to i.p. cell-free Hb or vehicle and subjected to hyperoxia or normoxia for 24 h. Plasma and liver were analyzed for free heme, haptoglobin, hemopexin, heme-oxygenase 1, and 8-OHdG at 3-120 h post-injection. Baseline scavenging properties were evaluated in P0-P12 rat pups. Cell-free Hb displayed peak plasma concentrations of 3.6 ± 0.5 mg/mL (mean ± SD) at 3 h post-administration. Animals exposed to cell-free Hb demonstrated a 30-fold increase in plasma haptoglobin and a decrease in plasma hemopexin to 1/6 of concentrations observed in pups exposed to vehicle. Exposure to cell-free Hb and hyperoxia mediated increased plasma concentrations of free heme (72.7 ± 19.5 μM, mean ± SD) compared to exposure to cell-free Hb and normoxia (49.3 ± 13.1 μM) at 3 h, and an elevated hepatic mRNA expression of heme-oxygenase 1. mRNA expression of haptoglobin and hemopexin was increased in animals exposed to hemoglobin with a mitigated response in pups exposed to hemoglobin and hyperoxia. Animals exposed to hyperoxia displayed an increase in hepatic transcription of scavenger proteins at 24 h. Combined exposure to cell-free Hb and hyperoxia mediated an increased DNA-oxidation at 6 h, whereas all insults conveyed a decrease in DNA-oxidation at 120 h. In this study, we present a novel rat pup model with scavenging

  8. Transcriptional activity and biological effects of mammalian estrogen receptor ligands on three hepatic estrogen receptors in Mozambique tilapia.

    PubMed

    Davis, L K; Katsu, Y; Iguchi, T; Lerner, D T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2010-10-01

    Like other fish species, Mozambique tilapia has three forms of estrogen receptor, ERα, ERβ1, and ERβ2. A primary function of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in oviparous species is the hepatic induction of the yolk precursor protein, vitellogenin (Vg). To characterize the roles of ERs in Vg production, transactivation assays and an in vivo study were carried out utilizing agonists for mammalian ERα and ERβ, and an antagonist for mammalian ERα, propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), diarylpropionitrile (DPN), and methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (MPP), respectively. ERα was more sensitive and responsive to PPT than ERβ1 or ERβ2 in transactivation assays. All ER isoforms indicated equivalent responsiveness to DPN compared with E(2), although sensitivity to DPN was lower. MPP exhibited antagonistic action on transactivation of all ER isoforms and reduced the E(2) effect on Vg and ERα 48h post-injection. DPN increased ERα and Vg expression and plasma Vg post-injection, whereas PPT was without effect; DPN seems to stimulate Vg production through activation of ERα. The ligand binding domain of all tilapia ER forms shares only 60-65% amino acid identity with human ERα and ERβ. This, together with our results, clearly indicates that agonistic or antagonistic characteristics of PPT, DPN and MPP cannot be extrapolated from mammalian to piscine ERs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of the Chronic Mammalian Toxicological Effects of TNT (twenty-Four Month Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Study of Trinitrotoluene (TNT) in the Fischer 344 Rat). Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    developed by USAMBRDL that Includes " effects " studies on laboratory and domestic animals, wildlife species, aquatic organisms, plants , and economically...i, - o IITRI Project No. L6116-Study No. 9 (V) DETERMINATION OF THE CHRONIC MAMMALIAN (0 TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TNT (Twenty-four Month Chronic...Cassfrcation) DETERMI NAT I ON OF THE CHRONI C MAMMALIAN TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TNT Tenty-four month Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Study of

  10. A hospital policy change toward delayed cord clamping is effective in improving hemoglobin levels and anemia status of 8-month-old Peruvian infants.

    PubMed

    Gyorkos, Theresa W; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Blouin, Brittany; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Casapía, Martín; Aguilar, Eder; Silva, Hermánn; Joseph, Serene A; Penny, Mary E

    2012-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a hospital policy change toward delayed cord clamping on infant hemoglobin (Hb) levels and anemia status at 4 and 8 months of age. A cohort of Peruvian mothers and infants, originating from a pre/post study investigating a change in hospital policy from early to delayed cord clamping, was followed until 8 months postpartum. Infant hemoglobin levels and anemia status were measured at 4 and 8 months postpartum. Following the hospital policy change, adjusted mean infant Hb levels improved by 0.89 gdl(-1) [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.57-1.22] and anemia was significantly reduced (aOR = 0.38; 95% CI 0.19-0.78) at 8 months postpartum. A hospital policy change toward delayed cord clamping is effective in improving Hb levels and the anemia status of 8-month-old infants. Prior to scaling-up this intervention, issues related to training, monitoring, safety, additional long-term benefits and specific local conditions should be investigated.

  11. Angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors on angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Rahul A; Feldman, Adam S; Paul, Elahna; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Walker, T Gregory

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on angiomyolipomas (AMLs) in a case series of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. METHODS: All patients who underwent catheter angiography prior to and following mTOR inhibitor therapy (n = 3) were evaluated. All cross-sectional imaging studies were analyzed with three-dimensional volumetrics, and tumor volume curves for all three tissue compartments (soft tissue, vascular, and fat) were generated. Segmentation analysis tools were used to automatically create a region of interest (ROI) circumscribing the AML. On magnetic resonance images, the “fat only” map calculated from the in- and opposed-phase gradient recalled echo sequences was used to quantify fat volume within tumors. Tumor vascularity was measured by applying a thresholding tool within the ROI on post-contrast subtraction images. On computed tomography images, volume histogram analysis of Hounsfield unit was performed to quantify tumor tissue composition. The angiography procedures were also reviewed, and tumor vascularity based on pre-embolization angiography was characterized in a semi-quantitative manner. RESULTS: Patient 1 presented at the age of 15 with a 6.8 cm right lower pole AML and a 4.0 cm right upper pole AML. Embolization was performed of both tumors, and after a few years of size control, the tumors began to grow, and the patient was initiated on mTOR inhibitor therapy. There was an immediate reduction in the size of both lesions. The patient then underwent repeat embolization and discontinuation of mTOR inhibition, after which point there was a substantial regrowth in both tumors across all tissue compartments. Patient 2 presented at the age of 18 with a right renal AML. Following a brief period of tumor reduction after embolization, she was initiated on mTOR inhibitor therapy, with successful reduction in tumor size across all tissue compartments. As with patient 1

  12. Effect of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin expression on growth and specific tissue plasminogen activator productivity in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, G.J.; Bailey, J.E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that secretion of cloned proteins synthesized by recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells can be adenosine triphosphate (ATP) limited. Other research indicates that the presence of cloned Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) enhances ATP production in oxygen-limited Escherichia coli. To evaluate the influence of VHb expression on recombinant CHO cell productivity, the vhb gene has been fused to the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter and cloned in a CHO cell line previously engineered to express human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Western blot analysis confirms dexamethasone-inducible VHb expression in all of the clones tested. Batch cultivation experiments with one VHb-expressing clone and the parental CHO-tPA cells show a reduced specific growth rate in the VHb-expressing cells. The VHb-expressing clone exhibits specific tPA production 40 to 100% greater than the parental CHO-tPA culture.

  13. High oxygen affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Mangin, O

    2017-02-01

    High oxygen affinity hemoglobins are responsible for rare and heterogeneous autosomic dominant genetic diseases. They cause pure erythrocytosis, sometimes accountable for hyperviscosity and thrombosis, or hemolysis. Differential diagnoses must be first ruled out. The diagnosis is based on the identification of a decreased P50, and their possible characterization by cation exchange-high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Finally, genetic studies of the responsible globin chain gene will confirm the mutation. The prognosis mainly relies on the P50 decrease rate and on the hemoglobin cooperativity impairment. Disease management should be personalized, and it should primarily depend on smoking cessation and physical activity. Phlebotomy and platelet aggregation inhibitors' prescriptions can be discussed. There is no contraindication to flights, high-altitude conditions, or pregnancy. Nevertheless, blood donation must be prohibited. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased nitrite reductase activity of fetal versus adult ovine hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Arlin B.; Tiso, Mauro; Verma, Shilpa T.; Lo, Jennifer; Joshi, Mahesh S.; Azarov, Ivan; Longo, Lawrence D.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Power, Gordon G.

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nitrite, NO2−, serves as a circulating reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is activated during physiological and pathological hypoxia. One of the intravascular mechanisms for nitrite conversion to NO is a chemical nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin. The rate of NO production from this reaction is increased when hemoglobin is in the R conformation. Because the mammalian fetus exists in a low-oxygen environment compared with the adult and is exposed to episodes of severe ischemia during the normal birthing process, and because fetal hemoglobin assumes the R conformation more readily than adult hemoglobin, we hypothesized that nitrite reduction to NO may be enhanced in the fetal circulation. We found that the reaction was faster for fetal than maternal hemoglobin or blood and that the reactions were fastest at 50–80% oxygen saturation, consistent with an R-state catalysis that is predominant for fetal hemoglobin. Nitrite concentrations were similar in blood taken from chronically instrumented normoxic ewes and their fetuses but were elevated in response to chronic hypoxia. The findings suggest an augmented nitrite reductase activity of fetal hemoglobin and that the production of nitrite may participate in the regulation of vascular NO homeostasis in the fetus. PMID:19028797

  15. Effects of hemoglobin variants HbJ Bangkok, HbE, HbG Taipei, and HbH on analysis of glycated hemoglobin via ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Ming; Wen, Dong-Mei; Xu, Sheng-Nan; Suo, Ming-Huan; Chen, Ya-Qiong

    2017-04-13

    To explore the effects of HbJ Bangkok, HbE, HbG Taipei, and α-thalassemia HbH on the results of HbA1c assessment using ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (IE-HPLC). We enrolled five patients in which the results of the IE-HPLC HbA1c assay were inconsistent with the average levels of FBG. We performed hemoglobin capillary (Hb) electrophoresis using whole-blood samples. We also sequenced the genes encoding Hb using dideoxy-mediated chain termination and analyzed HbA1c using borate affinity HPLC (BA-HPLC) and turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay (TINIA). Two patients had the HbJ Bangkok variant. Hb genotypes of these patients were β(41-42) /β(J Bangkok) and β(N) /β(J Bangkok) , and the content of HbJ Bangkok was 93.9% and 52.4%, respectively. The remaining three patients had the following: HbE (β(N) /β(E) Hb genotype, 23.6% HbE content), HbG Taipei (β(N) /β(G Taipei) Hb genotype, 39.4% HbG Taipei content), and α-thalassemia HbH (6.1% HbH content, 2.8% Hb Bart's content). In the patients with β-thalassemia and HbJ Bangkok variants, the presence of the variants interfered with the results of HbA1c analyses using IE-HPLC and TINIA; in the remaining four patients, there was interference with the results of HbA1c IE-HPLC but not with the TINIA assay. There was no interference with BA-HPLC HbA1c results. HbJ Bangkok, HbE, HbG Taipei Hb, and α-thalassemia HbH disease cause varying degrees of interference with the analysis of HbA1c using IE-HPLC. In these patients, we suggest using methods free from such interference for the analysis of HbA1c and other indicators to monitor blood glucose levels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mammalian Collection on Noah's Ark: The Effects of Beauty, Brain and Body Size

    PubMed Central

    Frynta, Daniel; Šimková, Olga; Lišková, Silvie; Landová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The importance of today's zoological gardens as the so-called “Noah's Ark” grows as the natural habitat of many species quickly diminishes. Their potential to shelter a large amount of individuals from many species gives us the opportunity to reintroduce a species that disappeared in nature. However, the selection of animals to be kept in zoos worldwide is highly selective and depends on human decisions driven by both ecological criteria such as population size or vulnerability and audience-driven criteria such as aesthetic preferences. Thus we focused our study on the most commonly kept and bred animal class, the mammals, and we asked which factors affect various aspects of the mammalian collection of zoos. We analyzed the presence/absence, population size, and frequency per species of each of the 123 mammalian families kept in the worldwide zoo collection. Our aim was to explain these data using the human-perceived attractiveness of mammalian families, their body weight, relative brain size and species richness of the family. In agreement with various previous studies, we found that the body size and the attractiveness of mammals significantly affect all studied components of the mammalian collection of zoos. There is a higher probability of the large and attractive families to be kept. Once kept, these animals are presented in larger numbers in more zoos. On the contrary, the relative mean brain size only affects the primary selection whether to keep the family or not. It does not affect the zoo population size or the number of zoos that keep the family. PMID:23690985

  17. Mammalian collection on Noah's Ark: the effects of beauty, brain and body size.

    PubMed

    Frynta, Daniel; Šimková, Olga; Lišková, Silvie; Landová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The importance of today's zoological gardens as the so-called "Noah's Ark" grows as the natural habitat of many species quickly diminishes. Their potential to shelter a large amount of individuals from many species gives us the opportunity to reintroduce a species that disappeared in nature. However, the selection of animals to be kept in zoos worldwide is highly selective and depends on human decisions driven by both ecological criteria such as population size or vulnerability and audience-driven criteria such as aesthetic preferences. Thus we focused our study on the most commonly kept and bred animal class, the mammals, and we asked which factors affect various aspects of the mammalian collection of zoos. We analyzed the presence/absence, population size, and frequency per species of each of the 123 mammalian families kept in the worldwide zoo collection. Our aim was to explain these data using the human-perceived attractiveness of mammalian families, their body weight, relative brain size and species richness of the family. In agreement with various previous studies, we found that the body size and the attractiveness of mammals significantly affect all studied components of the mammalian collection of zoos. There is a higher probability of the large and attractive families to be kept. Once kept, these animals are presented in larger numbers in more zoos. On the contrary, the relative mean brain size only affects the primary selection whether to keep the family or not. It does not affect the zoo population size or the number of zoos that keep the family.

  18. The effects of non-thermal plasmas on selected mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Mathieu

    Non-thermal plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma medicine. Non-thermal plasma sources have the advantage that a number of electron-driven chemical reactions can be produced while maintaining the gas (heavy species) temperature low, thus enabling the treatment of temperature-sensitive surfaces such as polymers, tissues and live cells. In the fields of biology and medicine, non-thermal plasmas have been primarily used for the deposition or modification of biocompatible polymers and for sterilization. Recently, non-thermal plasmas have been used to treat tissues and cells. A new field of research has emerged, Plasma Medicine, which studies the effects of non-thermal plasmas on cells and tissues for clinical applications. The Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge torch (APGD-t), a non-thermal plasma source, built in our laboratory was used to study the effects of non-thermal plasmas on mammalian cells. In its first application, we indirectly used the APGD-t to deposit a plasma-polymer on a glass surface and studied its effects on cultured cells. It was shown that the cells grew preferentially on the plasma-polymer, and their proliferation rate increased. The second application of the APGD-t was to further investigate previous observations of cell permeabilization obtained by plasma treatments and to apply non-thermal plasmas to cell transfection. It was demonstrated that the APGD-t is able to locally transfect adherent cells. We estimated the diameter of the pores created to be below 10 nm and that the pores remain open for less than 5 seconds. However, while investigating the mechanisms involved in cell transfection we observed that the use of higher gas flows in the negative controls (using the APGD-t but with the plasma turned off) also resulted in cell transfection. To further study this phenomena, we

  19. Effect of Dietary Oxalate on the Gut Microbiota of the Mammalian Herbivore Neotoma albigula

    PubMed Central

    Oakeson, Kelly F.; Dale, Colin; Dearing, M. Denise

    2016-01-01

    Diet is one of the primary drivers that sculpts the form and function of the mammalian gut microbiota. However, the enormous taxonomic and metabolic diversity held within the gut microbiota makes it difficult to isolate specific diet-microbe interactions. The objective of the current study was to elucidate interactions between the gut microbiota of the mammalian herbivore Neotoma albigula and dietary oxalate, a plant secondary compound (PSC) degraded exclusively by the gut microbiota. We quantified oxalate degradation in N. albigula fed increasing amounts of oxalate over time and tracked the response of the fecal microbiota using high-throughput sequencing. The amount of oxalate degraded in vivo was linearly correlated with the amount of oxalate consumed. The addition of dietary oxalate was found to impact microbial species diversity by increasing the representation of certain taxa, some of which are known to be capable of degrading oxalate (e.g., Oxalobacter spp.). Furthermore, the relative abundances of 117 operational taxonomic units (OTU) exhibited a significant correlation with oxalate consumption. The results of this study indicate that dietary oxalate induces complex interactions within the gut microbiota that include an increase in the relative abundance of a community of bacteria that may contribute either directly or indirectly to oxalate degradation in mammalian herbivores. PMID:26896138

  20. Effects of large mammalian herbivores and ant symbionts on condensed tannins of Acacia drepanolobium in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ward, David; Young, Truman P

    2002-05-01

    Condensed tannins have been considered to be important inducible defenses against mammalian herbivory. We tested for differences in condensed tannin defenses in Acacia drepanolobium in Kenya over two years among different large mammalian herbivore treatments [total exclusion, antelope only, and megaherbivore (elephants and giraffes) + antelope] and with four different ant symbiont species on the trees. We predicted that (1) condensed tannin concentrations would be lowest in the mammal treatment with the lowest level of herbivory (total exclusion), (2) trees occupied by mutualist ants that protect the trees most aggressively would have lower levels of tannins, and (3) if chemical defense production is costly, there would be a trade-off between tannin concentrations, growth, and mechanical defenses. Mean tannin concentrations increased from total exclusion treatments to wildlife-only treatments to megaherbivore + antelope treatments. In 1997, condensed tannin concentrations were significantly lower in trees occupied by the ant Crematogaster nigriceps, the only ant species that actively removed axillary buds. Contrary to our prediction, trees occupied by ant species that protect the trees more aggressively against mammalian herbivores did not have lower overall levels of condensed tannins. There was no consistent evidence of a trade-off between tannin concentrations and growth rate, but there was a positive correlation between mean thorn length and mean tannin concentrations across species of ant inhabitants and across herbivore treatments in 1997. Contrary to our expectation, trees had higher tannin concentrations in the upper parts of the canopy where there is little herbivory by mammals.

  1. Multiple hemoglobins of the cutthroat trout, Salmo clarki.

    PubMed

    Southard, J N; Berry, C R; Farley, T M

    1986-07-01

    Nine hemoglobins were purified from blood of Salmo clarki by ion-exchange chromatography and preparative isoelectric focusing. The subunit structures of eight of the purified hemoglobins were studied by electrophoresis of globins in the presence of urea. Six are alpha 2 beta 2 tetramers while two appear to be heterotetramers of the type alpha alpha' beta 2 and alpha alpha' beta beta'. The effects of pH, nucleotides, and temperature on the oxygen equilibria of the purified hemoglobins were studied. Five hemoglobins with isoelectric points from 9.1 to 7.1 and one minor hemoglobin with an isoelectric point of 5.9 appear to have essentially identical oxygen binding properties. All have similar oxygen equilibria which are independent of pH and temperature and not affected by saturating amounts of ATP. Another minor hemoglobin with an isoelectric point below 5.9 has similar oxygen equilibria except for a possible pH dependence. Two hemoglobins, with isoelectric points of 6.5 and 6.4, have oxygen binding properties which are strongly pH and temperature dependent. Addition of ATP or GTP causes a large decrease in the oxygen affinity without affecting the cooperativity of oxygen binding. The effect of GTP is slightly greater than that of ATP. No significant differences were observed in the oxygen equilibria of these two hemoglobins. The red blood cells of S. clarki were found to contain large amounts of both ATP and GTP, with an ATP:GTP ratio of 3:1. Both nucleotides may be important modulators of hemoglobin oxygen affinity in S. clarki, in contrast to the situation in S. gairdneri, in which red blood cell GTP concentrations are considerably lower. The presence of six or possibly seven hemoglobins with identical oxygen binding properties in S. clarki suggests that, to a large extent, the physiological role of multiple hemoglobins in this species involves phenomena not directly related to the oxygen binding properties of the hemoglobins.

  2. Effects of resuscitation with polymerized porcine hemoglobin (pPolyHb) on hemodynamic stability and oxygen delivery in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Fang; Yan, Kunping; Pan, Wencan; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Huifang; Yan, Chengbin; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Hongli

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of polymerized porcine hemoglobin (pPolyHb) on hemodynamic stability and oxygen delivery in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Rats underwent controlled hemorrhage, resulting in the loss of 65% of their blood volume in 90 minutes. The results showed that pPolyHb was superior to hetastarch and saline, and similar to whole blood, in restoring hemodynamic stability and reversing anaerobic metabolism caused by hemorrhage. Furthermore, pPolyHb improved oxygen supply and increased blood oxygen content. These data suggest that pPolyHb can be effective in improving tissue perfusion under conditions of severe hemorrhagic shock.

  3. Effects of carbon monoxide (CO) delivery by a CO donor or hemoglobin on vascular hypoxia inducible factor 1α and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Chad E N; Alayash, Abdu I

    2012-01-01

    We examined carbon monoxide (CO) delivery by carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) or hemoglobin (Hb) on cellular oxygen sensing and mitochondrial respiration in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). CORM-2 reduced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in normoxic and hypoxic cells, but while Hb alone significantly reduced HIF-1α stabilization in hypoxic cells, CO delivered by Hb (Hb-CO) had no effect on HIF-1α stabilization. CO dose-dependently increased basal oxygen consumption and reduced overall mitochondrial respiratory capacity. Hb-CO increased basal oxygen consumption but did not alter respiratory capacity. Together, CO reduced ET-1, and, at low doses, had no effect on endothelial mitochondria oxygen consumption. CO ligation to Hb may be developed further as non-vasoactive oxygen therapeutic without compromising mitochondrial function.

  4. Effects of experimental reduction in nest micro-parasite and macro-parasite loads on nestling hemoglobin level in blue tits Parus caeruleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słomczyński, Robert; Kaliński, Adam; Wawrzyniak, Jarosław; Bańbura, Mirosława; Skwarska, Joanna; Zieliński, Piotr; Bańbura, Jerzy

    2006-09-01

    Theory suggests that macro- and micro-parasites may be important factors of selection for life-histories. They generate selection pressures by detrimental effects on host health. Nests of secondary cavity nesters provide a convenient habitat for an assemblage of parasites exploiting nestlings. In this study, natural blue tit Parus caeruleus nests (26) were replaced with clean artificial nests, twice during the nestling stage. This treatment caused an increase of 7-10.5 g/l in hemoglobin level of 12-day-old nestlings in comparison with control nestlings. Nestlings that developed in parasite-pathogen-free nests improved their health status. The experimental sterilization did not affect a morphometric index of condition. Potential effects on condition indices might be masked by trophic conditions.

  5. Sex differences and hemoglobin levels in relation to stroke outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kimberly, W Taylor; Lima, Fabricio O; O'Connor, Sydney; Furie, Karen L

    2013-02-19

    Women have worse outcomes after stroke compared to men. Since women have lower hemoglobin values, we examined whether hemoglobin levels may associate with worse stroke outcomes in women. We retrospectively studied 274 patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter study. We explored the relationship of hemoglobin with clinical outcome at 6 months, as measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Ordinal logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent effect of hemoglobin on clinical outcome, and to explore the influence of sex on that association. Women had a lower mean hemoglobin level (11.7 ± 1.8 g/dL) compared to men (13.3 ± 1.7 g/dL). Low hemoglobin was associated with worse 6-month mRS outcomes in univariate analysis (p < 0.001). Lower hemoglobin remained independently associated with poor outcome after adjustment for comorbid disease, stroke severity, age, and sex. The inclusion of hemoglobin in the model attenuated the independent effect of sex on outcome. Sex differences in stroke outcome are linked to lower hemoglobin level, which is more prevalent in women. Further examination of this potentially modifiable predictor is warranted.

  6. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  7. Studies on the contributions of steric and polarity effects to the H2S-binding properties of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dandan; Wang, Hui; Li, Haichao; Liu, Li; Li, Zhengqiang

    2017-01-01

    We have reported recently that Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) is a potential H2S receptor and storage molecule in bacterial metabolism. In this study, molecular cloning and site-directed mutagenesis were employed to investigate the structural basis for H2S binding. Association and dissociation rate constants (kon and koff) were determined using stopped-flow rapid-scanning spectrophotometry and compared with those for wild type VHb. Several unanticipated factors were found to govern H2S binding properties, due to the distinct structure of VHb. The results presented in this paper show that: i) bulkier residues at positions E7 and E11 decrease H2S binding accessibility, while the residue located at position B10 blocks bound H2S from escaping. ii) hydroxyl sidechains within the distal heme pocket reduce H2S reactivity to VHb; iii) Pro(E8) is involved in moving the E7-E10 loop region to trigger opening of the distal heme pocket to facilitate H2S binding.

  8. Effects of Overexpression of WRI1 and Hemoglobin Genes on the Seed Oil Content of Lepidium campestre.

    PubMed

    Ivarson, Emelie; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Ahlman, Annelie; Kanagarajan, Selvaraju; Bülow, Leif; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The wild species field cress (Lepidium campestre), belonging to the Brassicaceae family, has potential to be developed into a novel oilseed- and catch crop, however, the species needs to be further improved regarding some important agronomic traits. One of them is its low oil content which needs to be increased. As far as we know there is no study aiming at increasing the oil content that has been reported in this species. In order to investigate the possibility to increase the seed oil content in field cress, we have tried to introduce the Arabidopsis WRINKLED1 (AtWRI1) or hemoglobin (Hb) genes from either Arabidopsis thaliana (AtHb2) or Beta vulgaris (BvHb2) into field cress with the seed specific expression. The hypothesis was that the oil content would be increased by overexpressing these target genes. The results showed that the oil content was indeed increased by up to 29.9, 20.2, and 25.9% in the transgenic lines expressing AtWRI1, AtHb2, and BvHb2, respectively. The seed oil composition of the transgenic lines did not significantly deviate from the seed oil composition of the wild type plants. Our results indicate that genetic modification can be used in this wild species for its fast domestication into a future economically viable oilseed and catch crop.

  9. Effects of Overexpression of WRI1 and Hemoglobin Genes on the Seed Oil Content of Lepidium campestre

    PubMed Central

    Ivarson, Emelie; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Ahlman, Annelie; Kanagarajan, Selvaraju; Bülow, Leif; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2017-01-01

    The wild species field cress (Lepidium campestre), belonging to the Brassicaceae family, has potential to be developed into a novel oilseed- and catch crop, however, the species needs to be further improved regarding some important agronomic traits. One of them is its low oil content which needs to be increased. As far as we know there is no study aiming at increasing the oil content that has been reported in this species. In order to investigate the possibility to increase the seed oil content in field cress, we have tried to introduce the Arabidopsis WRINKLED1 (AtWRI1) or hemoglobin (Hb) genes from either Arabidopsis thaliana (AtHb2) or Beta vulgaris (BvHb2) into field cress with the seed specific expression. The hypothesis was that the oil content would be increased by overexpressing these target genes. The results showed that the oil content was indeed increased by up to 29.9, 20.2, and 25.9% in the transgenic lines expressing AtWRI1, AtHb2, and BvHb2, respectively. The seed oil composition of the transgenic lines did not significantly deviate from the seed oil composition of the wild type plants. Our results indicate that genetic modification can be used in this wild species for its fast domestication into a future economically viable oilseed and catch crop. PMID:28119714

  10. [Effect of sodium nitroprusside on hemoglobin oxygen binding properties of the blood during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Khodosovskiĭ, M N; Zinchuk, V V

    2012-05-01

    The parameters of blood oxygen transport were determined in rabbits during the hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (HIR) with or without sodium nitroprusside (SNP) administration. Hepatic ischemia was induced for 30 min by a. hepatica propria clamping, reperfusion lasted 120 min. Indices of blood oxygen transport (hemoglobin-oxygen affinity index (p50), pO2, pH, pCO2, HCO3-, TCO2, ABE, etc.) and nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) amounts were measured in blood during HIR. Animals were subdivided into two groups: 1st group--HIR; 2nd--HIR plus SNP infusion (SNP, Sigma, i.v. 10 mcmol/kg). The experiments had shown that HIR led to significant acidic changes in the acid-base balance and high blood p50. The SNP infusion in the 2nd group led to less changing in the p50 values during HIR which were accompanied with high NO(x) levels. We conclude that oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve shift leftwards after SNP administration promotes the maintenance liver during ischemia-reperfusion.

  11. Synthesis of “clickable” acylhomoserine lactone quorum sensing probes: unanticipated effects on mammalian cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; Yu, Jing; Struss, Anjali Kumari; Lowery, Colin A.; Zhu, Jie; Kim, Sook Kyung; Park, Junguk; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Janda, Kim D.

    2010-01-01

    Alkynyl- and azido-tagged 3-oxo-C12-acylhomoserine lactone probes have been synthesized to examine their potential utility as probes for discovering the mammalian protein target of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer, 3-oxo-C12-acylhomoserine lactone. Although such substitutions are commonly believed to be quite conservative, from these studies, we have uncovered a drastic difference in activity between the alkynyl- and azido-modified compounds, and provide an example where such structural modification has proved to be much less than conservative. PMID:21190852

  12. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hemoglobin level in older persons and incident Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Buchman, A.S.; Wilson, R.S.; Leurgans, S.E.; Bennett, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that level of hemoglobin is associated with incident Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: A total of 881 community-dwelling older persons participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project without dementia and a measure of hemoglobin level underwent annual cognitive assessments and clinical evaluations for AD. Results: During an average of 3.3 years of follow-up, 113 persons developed AD. In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, and education, there was a nonlinear relationship between baseline level of hemoglobin such that higher and lower levels of hemoglobin were associated with AD risk (hazard ratio [HR] for the quadratic of hemoglobin 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.11). Findings were unchanged after controlling for multiple covariates. When compared to participants with clinically normal hemoglobin (n = 717), participants with anemia (n = 154) had a 60% increased hazard for developing AD (95% CI 1.02–2.52), as did participants with clinically high hemoglobin (n = 10, HR 3.39, 95% CI 1.25–9.20). Linear mixed-effects models showed that lower and higher hemoglobin levels were associated with a greater rate of global cognitive decline (parameter estimate for quadratic of hemoglobin = −0.008, SE −0.002, p < 0.001). Compared to participants with clinically normal hemoglobin, participants with anemia had a −0.061 z score unit annual decline in global cognitive function (SE 0.012, p < 0.001), as did participants with clinically high hemoglobin (−0.090 unit/year, SE 0.038, p = 0.018). Conclusions: In older persons without dementia, both lower and higher hemoglobin levels are associated with an increased hazard for developing AD and more rapid cognitive decline. PMID:21753176

  14. [Hemoglobin H: laboratory identification].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, V S; de Araújo, J T

    1992-01-01

    Hemoglobin H (Hb H) disease is an alpha thalassemia form characterized by low synthesis of alpha chain and high beta chain concentration; this unbalance induces the beta chain tetramers formation. Hb H is relatively frequent in Thailand and Greece. Isolated cases have been reported in Chinese, Filipinos, Malaysians. In the Near East occasional cases were observed in Greek Cypriots and Jordanian Arabs. Hb H carriers were found in Italy, Spain, Canada, Indonesia and other countries. In Brazil there are descendants of Italians, Chinese and people of negro origin who are carriers of Hb H. We identified the Hb H by electrophoresis, instability and characteristic inclusion bodies.

  15. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  16. Properties of Hemoglobin Decolorized with a Histidine-Specific Protease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; de Roos, Andre; Schouten, Olaf; Zheng, Chaoya; Vink, Collin; Vonk, Brenda; Kliphuis, Annette; Schaap, Albert; Edens, Luppo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the application of Aspergilloglutamic peptidase (AGP) on porcine hemoglobin decolorization. AGP from fungus Aspergillus niger is identified to possess a high preference towards the histidine residues. As histidine residues in hemoglobin are known to coordinate the heme group within the globin molecule, we therefore hypothesized that incubating hemoglobin with a histidine-specific protease would efficiently separate the non-heme peptides from the heme-enriched peptides with a minimum degree of hydrolysis. AGP-decolored porcine hemoglobin hydrolysates were assessed on their functional (for example, color, emulsification, foaming, and water binding) and sensory properties. The results were compared with commercially available blood-derived proteins (subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates and plasma protein). It was observed that AGP is able to effectively decolor hemoglobin. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) increased less than 3% using AGP to achieve 90% color reduction of hemoglobin, whereas a DH increase of more than 20% is needed using subtilisin. The AGP-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (AGP-Hb) possess good emulsification, foaming, and water binding properties, which are better or comparable with the plasma protein, and much better than the subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (subtilisin-Hb). The model canned meat with addition of AGP-Hb showed the highest value in hardness, springiness, and chewiness from the texture analysis. Furthermore, the canned meat with AGP-Hb was found to have a better sensory profile than the ones with addition of subtilisin-Hb and plasma protein.

  17. Oxygen binding constants for human hemoglobin tetramers.

    PubMed

    Gill, S J; Di Cera, E; Doyle, M L; Bishop, G A; Robert, C H

    1987-06-30

    High-precision studies of oxygen binding in hemoglobin (HbA0) solutions at near-physiological concentrations (2-12 mM heme; pHs 7.0-9.1; various buffers) have led to an unanticipated result: an unmeasurably low contribution from the triply ligated species. We have obtained this result from new differential oxygen-binding measurements for human hemoglobin through the use of a thin-layer apparatus, which enables study of solutions at high Hb concentrations. The effect of tetramer dissociation into dimers, which becomes significant at hemoglobin concentrations below 1 mM in heme, is avoided. The analysis of the binding reactions is thus cast in terms of tetramer-binding polynomial written with overall Adair equilibrium constants which directly reflect the contributions of intermediate ligated species. The unmeasurable contribution of the triply ligated species renders the equilibrium constants of the third and fourth stepwise reactions practically undeterminable.

  18. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-12-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  19. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  20. Modelling acute oral mammalian toxicity. 1. Definition of a quantifiable baseline effect.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Yana K; Cronin, Mark T D; Madden, Judith C; Schwöbel, Johannes A H

    2011-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) provide a useful tool to define a relationship between chemical structure and toxicity and allow for the prediction of the toxicity of untested chemicals. QSAR models based upon an anaesthetic or narcosis mechanism represent a baseline, or minimum, toxicity, i.e. unless a chemical acts by another, more specific, mechanism, its toxicity will be predicted by such models. The aim of this investigation was to develop baseline models for the acute toxicity of chemicals to mammals (rat and mouse) following the oral route of administration. The availability of such baseline toxicity models for mammalian species can provide a probe for testing new chemicals with respect to their molecular mechanism of toxicity. Multiple-regression type structure-toxicity relationships were derived . (i.e., from oral log LD(50)(-1) data for mammalian species (rat and mouse) and the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) of classic non-polar narcotics). Subsequently, these models were used to distinguish between reactive chemicals of different mechanistic domains and baseline toxic chemicals. Comparison of measured toxicity data for oral rat and mouse LD(50) with predictions from baseline QSAR provides a means of identifying mechanistic categories and for categorising more specific acute mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulatory mechanisms of hemoglobin oxygen affinity in acidosis and alkalosis

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, A. J.; Detter, J. C.; Lenfant, C.

    1971-01-01

    The recent reports of the effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) on hemoglobin affinity for oxygen suggested that this substance may play a role in man's adaptation to acidosis and alkalosis. A study of the effect of induced acidosis and alkalosis on the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve of normal man was therefore carried out, and the mechanisms involved in the physiological regulation of hemoglobin oxygen affinity examined. In acute changes of plasma pH there was no alteration in red cell 2,3-DPG content. However, there were changes in hemoglobin oxygen affinity and these correlated with changes in mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). With maintained acidosis and alkalosis, red cell 2,3-DPG content was altered and correlated with the changes in hemoglobin oxygen affinity. Both of these mechanisms shift the hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curve opposite to the direct pH (Bohr) effect, and providing the rate of pH change is neither too rapid nor too large, they counteract the direct pH effect and the in vivo hemoglobin oxygen affinity remains unchanged. It is also shown that approximately 35% of the change in hemoglobin oxygen affinity resulting from an alteration in red cell 2,3-DPG, is explained by effect of 2,3-DPG on the red cell pH. PMID:5545127

  2. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  3. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  4. Mammalian development in space.

    PubMed

    Ronca, April E

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  5. The effect of silver nanoparticles and silver ions on mammalian and plant cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiravova, Jana; Tomankova, Katerina Barton; Harvanova, Monika; Malina, Lukas; Malohlava, Jakub; Luhova, Lenka; Panacek, Ales; Manisova, Barbora; Kolarova, Hana

    2016-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are the most frequently applied nanomaterials. In our experiments, we tested AgNPs (size 27 nm) manufactured by the Tollens process. Physico-chemical methods (TEM, DLS, AFM and spectrophotometry) were used for characterization and imaging of AgNPs. The effects of AgNPs and Ag(+) were studied in two experimental models (plant and mammalian cells). Human keratinocytes (SVK14) and mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) cell lines were selected to evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effect on mammalian cells. Higher sensitivity to AgNPs and Ag(+) was observed in NIH3T3 than in SVK14 cells. AgNPs accumulated in the nucleus of NIH3T3 cells, caused DNA damage and increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Three genotypes of Solanum spp. (S. lycopersicum cv. Amateur, S. chmielewskii, S. habrochaites) were selected to test the toxicity of AgNPs and Ag(+) on the plant cells. The highest values of peroxidase activity and lipid peroxidation were recorded after the treatment of S. habrochaites genotype with AgNPs. Increased ROS levels were likely the reason for observed damaged membranes in S. habrochaites. We found that the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AgNPs depend not only on the characteristics of nanoparticles, but also on the type of cells that are treated with AgNPs.

  6. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  7. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  8. Effect of vitreoscilla hemoglobin and culture conditions on production of bacterial L-asparaginase, an oncolytic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Erenler, Sebnem O; Geckil, Hikmet

    2014-08-01

    L-asparaginase is a widely used cancer chemotherapy enzyme. The source for the enzyme with this property is mainly bacterial and its synthesis is strongly regulated by oxygen. In this study, we utilized two recombinant systems: one carried the gene (vgb) for the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb), a protein of prokaryotic origin which confers a highly efficient oxygen uptake to its host and the other carried the L-asparaginase gene (ansB). The host bacteria were Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of these three bacteria, all gram-negative, E. coli and its recombinant strain showed up to sevenfold higher L-asparaginase activity in lactose than in other carbon sources. Although, in this bacterium glycerol was the poorest source for L-asparaginase synthesis, it supported the highest biomass production. In glucose medium, L-asparaginase activity of E. aerogenes was about threefold higher than its vgb and ansB recombinants. ansB recombinant showed significantly higher enzyme levels than both host and vgb recombinants in glycerol and lactose media. In this bacterium, VHb/vgb clearly caused a decrease in the enzyme synthesis under all conditions. As seen for E. aerogens, glycerol was the most favorable carbon source for P. aeruginosa and its vgb strain in terms of both L-asparaginase synthesis and biomass production. The cultures grown in glycerol had more than two- and threefold biomass than in glucose and lactose, respectively, and up to elevenfold than in mannitol. Indeed, the highest biomass production for all bacteria and their recombinants was in glycerol. The VHb/vgb system is clearly advantageous for production of L-asparaginase in P. aeruginosa. The same, however, does not hold true for E. aerogenes.

  9. The effect of climbing Mount Everest on spleen contraction and increase in hemoglobin concentration during breath holding and exercise.

    PubMed

    Engan, Harald K; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica; Schagatay, Fanny; Schagatay, Erika

    2014-04-01

    Release of stored red blood cells resulting from spleen contraction improves human performance in various hypoxic situations. This study determined spleen volume resulting from two contraction-evoking stimuli: breath holding and exercise before and after altitude acclimatization during a Mount Everest ascent (8848 m). Eight climbers performed the following protocol before and after the climb: 5 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m during rest, 20 min oxygen respiration, 20 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m, three maximal-effort breath holds spaced by 2 min, 10 min ambient air respiration, 5 min of cycling at 100 W, and finally 10 min ambient air respiration. We measured spleen volume by ultrasound and capillary hemoglobin (HB) concentration after each exposure, and heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) continuously. Mean (SD) baseline spleen volume was unchanged at 213 (101) mL before and 206 (52) mL after the climb. Before the climb, spleen volume was reduced to 184 (83) mL after three breath holds, and after the climb three breath holds resulted in a spleen volume of 132 (26) mL (p=0.032). After exercise, the preclimb spleen volume was 186 (89) mL vs. 112 (389) mL) after the climb (p=0.003). Breath hold duration and cardiovascular responses were unchanged after the climb. We concluded that spleen contraction may be enhanced by altitude acclimatization, probably reflecting both the acclimatization to chronic hypoxic exposure and acute hypoxia during physical work.

  10. Unexpected effects of the alteration of structure and stability of myoglobin and hemoglobin in ammonium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Jha, Indrani; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2014-03-28

    The nature of solvent-biomolecule interactions is generally weak and non-specific. The addition of ionic liquids (ILs), which have emerged as a new class of solvents, strengthen the stability of some proteins whereas the same ILs weaken the stability of some other proteins. Although ILs are commonly used for the stabilization of biomolecules, the bimolecular interactions of their stabilization-destabilization is still an active subject of considerable interest and studies on this topic have been limited. To reveal the impact of ILs on the stability of proteins, a series of protic ILs possessing a tetra-alkyl ammonium cation [R4N](+) with a hydroxide [OH](-) anion were synthesized. In this study, we report the structural stability of heme proteins such as myoglobin (Mb) and hemoglobin (Hb) in a series of ammonium-based ILs such as tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide [(CH3)4N](+)[OH](-) (TMAH), tetraethyl ammonium hydroxide [(C2H5)4N](+)[OH](-) (TEAH), tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide [(C3H7)4N](+)[OH](-) (TPAH) and tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4N](+)[OH](-) (TBAH) by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies. Our experimental results reveal that less viscous ILs carrying smaller alkyl chain such as TMAH are strong destabilizers of the heme proteins as compared to the ILs carrying bulkier alkyl chains which are more viscous ILs, such as TBAH. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the addition of these ILs to the heme proteins decreases their thermal stability allowing the protein to be in an unfolded state at lower temperatures. Further, we describe the molecular-structural interaction of the heme proteins with the ILs (molecule like a ligand) by the PatchDocking method.

  11. Study of the Effects of Ultrasonic Waves on the Reproductive Integrity of Mammalian Cells Cultured in Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, B. I.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of monochromatic ultrasonic waves of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and, 3.3 MHz frequency on the colony-forming ability of mammalian cells (M3-1,V79, Chang's and T-1) cultured in vitro have been studied to determine the nature of the action of ultrasonic energy on biological systems at the cellular level. The combined effect of ultrasound and X-rays has also been studied. It is concluded: (1) Ultrasonic irradiation causes both lethal and sublethal damage. (2) There is a threshold dose rate for lethal effects. (3) The effectiveness of ultrasonic waves in causing cell death probably depends on the frequency and the amplitude of the waves for a given cell line, indicating a possible resonance phenomenon.

  12. Effects of weaning cereals with different phytate contents on hemoglobin, iron stores, and serum zinc: a randomized intervention in infants from 6 to 12 mo of age.

    PubMed

    Lind, Torbjörn; Lönnerdal, Bo; Persson, Lars-Ake; Stenlund, Hans; Tennefors, Catharina; Hernell, Olle

    2003-07-01

    Weaning foods frequently contain phytate, an inhibitor of iron and zinc absorption, which may contribute to the high prevalence of iron and zinc deficiency seen in infancy. The objective was to investigate whether either an extensive reduction in the phytate content of infant cereals or the use of milk-based, iron-fortified infant formula would improve iron and zinc status in infants. In a double-blind design, infants (n = 300) were randomly assigned to 3 cereal groups from 6 to 12 mo of age: commercial milk-based cereal drink (MCD) and porridge (CC group), phytate-reduced MCD and phytate-reduced porridge (PR group), or milk-based infant formula and porridge with the usual phytate content (IF group). Venous blood samples were collected at 6 and 12 mo. Dietary intake was recorded monthly. After the intervention, 267 infants remained in the analysis. Hemoglobin concentrations of < 110 g/L, serum ferritin concentrations of < 12 microg/L, and serum zinc concentrations of < 10.7 micromol/L had overall prevalences at baseline and 12 mo of 28% and 15%, 9% and 18%, and 22% and 27%, respectively. After the intervention, there were no significant differences in any measure of iron or zinc status between the CC and the PR groups. However, hemoglobin was significantly higher (120 g/L compared with 117 g/L; P = 0.012) and the prevalence of anemia was lower (13% compared with 23%; P = 0.06) in the PR group than in the IF group, which could be explained by differences in daily iron intake between the 2 groups. Extensive reduction in the phytate content of weaning cereals had little long-term effect on the iron and zinc status of Swedish infants.

  13. Methylseleninate is a substrate rather than an inhibitor of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. Implications for the antitumor effects of selenium.

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Gross, Jurgen H

    2002-03-22

    Biochemical and clinical evidence indicates that monomethylated selenium compounds are crucial for the tumor preventive effects of the trace element selenium and that methylselenol (CH(3)SeH) is a key metabolite. As suggested by Ganther (Ganther, H. E. (1999) Carcinogenesis 20, 1657-1666), methylselenol and its precursor methylseleninate might exert their effects by inhibition of the selenoenzyme thioredoxin reductase via the irreversible formation of a diselenide bridge. Here we report that methylseleninate does not act as an inhibitor of mammalian thioredoxin reductase but is in fact an excellent substrate (K(m) of 18 microm, k(cat) of 23 s(-1)), which is reduced by the enzyme according to the equation 2 NADPH + 2 H(+) + CH(3)SeO(2)H --> 2 NADP(+) + 2 H(2)O + CH(3)SeH. The selenium-containing product of this reaction was identified by mass spectrometry. Nascent methylselenol was found to efficiently reduce both H(2)O(2) and glutathione disulfide. The implications of these findings for the antitumor activity of selenium are discussed. Methylseleninate was a poor substrate not only for human glutathione reductase but also for the non-selenium thioredoxin reductases enzymes from Drosophila melanogaster and Plasmodium falciparum. This suggests that the catalytic selenocysteine residue of mammalian thioredoxin reductase is essential for methylseleninate reduction.

  14. Studies on the effects of microgravity on the ultrastructure and functions of cultured mammalian cells (L-6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Atsushige

    1993-01-01

    The human body consists of 10(exp 13) cells. Understanding the mechanisms by which the cells sense and respond to microgravity is very important as the basis for space biology. The cells were originally isolated aseptically from mammalian bodies and cultured in vitro. A set of cell culture vessels was developed to be applied to three kinds of space flight experiments. Experiment 1 is to practice the cell culture technique in a space laboratory and obtain favorable growth of the cells. Aseptic handling in tryspin treatment and medium renewal will be tested. The cells, following space flight, will be returned to the ground and cultured continuously to investigate the effects of space flight on the cellular characteristics. Experiment 2 is to examine the cytoskeletal structure of the cells under microgravity conditions. The cytoskeletal structure plays essential roles in the morphological construction, movements, axonal transport, and differentiation of the cells. The cells fixed during space flight will be returned and the cytoskeleton and ultrastructure observed using electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Experiment 3 is to study the cellular productivity of valuable substances. The waste medium harvested during space flight are returned and quantitated for the cellular products. The effects of microgravity on mammalian cells will be clarified from the various aspects.

  15. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  16. Serum Zinc Is a Major Predictor of Anemia and Mediates the Effect of Selenium on Hemoglobin in School-Aged Children in a Nationally Representative Survey in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Lisa A; Parnell, Winsome R; Thomson, Christine D; Green, Timothy J; Gibson, Rosalind S

    2016-09-01

    Zinc, selenium, and vitamin D status of New Zealand (NZ) school-aged children was examined in a national survey in 2002. To our knowledge, however, the role of these micronutrients as predictors of hemoglobin has not been explored despite plausible mechanisms for such relations. We examined the relations of iron, zinc, selenium, and vitamin D status with hemoglobin and anemia in children of New Zealand European and other (NZEO) ethnicity enrolled in the 2002 Children's Nutrition Survey and explored whether zinc mediated the relation between selenium and hemoglobin. Multivariate regression was performed to examine the relations of serum micronutrient biomarkers, acute inflammation, socioeconomic status, and body mass index (BMI) with hemoglobin and anemia of NZEO children aged 5-15 y (n = 503). A mediation analysis also investigated direct and indirect (through zinc) relations between selenium and hemoglobin. In total, 4.6% of the children were anemic, 3.2% had depleted iron stores, and none had iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of low serum zinc (<8.7-10.1 μmol/L depending on age and sex), selenium (<0.82 μmol/L), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (<50 nmol/L) was 14.1%, 22.9%, and 48.5%, respectively. Major predictors of hemoglobin were serum zinc, age, and BMI-for-age z score (P < 0.001); log ferritin and being female were also statistically significant (P < 0.05). Selenium had an indirect effect that was mediated by zinc, with a significant effect of selenium on zinc (P = 0.002) and zinc on hemoglobin (P < 0.001). Zinc was the only variable associated with anemia risk (OR: 5.49; 95% CI: 1.95, 15.46). Low serum zinc was an independent risk factor for anemia in NZEO school-aged children and mediated the effect of low selenium on hemoglobin. These findings emphasize the importance of considering multiple micronutrient deficiencies in addition to iron when interpreting anemia and of appreciating the mechanistic interactions that underlie these associations. © 2016

  17. Effect of substrate storage conditions on the stability of "Smart" films used for mammalian cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestein, Blake M.; Reed, Jamie A.; Canavan, Heather E.

    2017-01-01

    When poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAM) is tethered to a surface, it can induce the spontaneous release of a sheet of mammalian cells. The release of cells is a result of the reversible phase transition the polymer undergoes at its lower critical solution temperature (LCST). Many techniques are used for the deposition of pNIPAM onto cell culture substrates. Previously, we compared two methods of deposition (plasma polymerization, and co-deposition with a sol-gel). We proved that although both were technically appropriate for obtaining thermoresponsive pNIPAM films, the surfaces that were co-deposited with a sol-gel caused some disruption in cell activity. The variation of cell behavior could be due to the delamination of pNIPAM films leaching toxic chemicals into solution. In this work, we assessed the stability of these pNIPAM films by manipulating the storage conditions and analyzing the surface chemistry using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements over the amount of time required to obtain confluent cell sheets. From XPS, we demonstrated that ppNIPAM (plasma polymerized NIPAM) films remains stable across all storage conditions while sol-gel deposition show large deviations after 48 h of storage. Cell response of the deposited films was assessed by investigating the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility. The 37 °C and high humidity storage affects sol-gel deposited films, inhibiting normal cell growth and proper thermoresponse of the film. Surface chemistry, thermoresponse and cell growth remained similar for all ppNIPAM surfaces, indicating these substrates are more appropriate for mammalian cell culture applications.

  18. Effect of age on heart rate, blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume and hemoglobin to exercise in Jeju crossbreed horses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Park, Yong-Soo

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the on heart rate, blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume (PCV) and hemoglobin (Hb) response after conducting exercise in endurance horses. A total of 20 healthy 3-9-years-old Jeju crossbreed mares (5.95 ± 2.24 year) of age and 312.65 ± 13.59 kg of weight) currently participating the endurance competition were used. The field tests selected for the experiment was gallop (approximately 8.3 m/s) along the selected 2.5 km course (a natural forest trail, not artificial road; a closed loop course). The horses were divided into three groups according to their age; 3-4 years of age (G1, 3.29 ± 0.49 year), 6-7 years of age (G2, 6.42 ± 0.53), and 8-9 years of age (G3, 8.50 ± 0.55). The measurements times for the heart rate, blood lactate concentration, PCV, and Hb analysis were conducted before exercise (T0), shortly after exercise (T1), 15 min after exercise (T2), and 30 min after exercise (T3), respectively. Data was analyzed using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) for repeated measures with times and groups. The results of the comparison depending on the passage of rest time after exercise suggest that the heart rate and blood lactate concentration of three groups at T2 significantly decreased compared to T1 (p < 0.001). PCV of the G2 and G3 groups were significantly decreased at T2 compared to T1 (p < 0.01). Hb values at G2 (p < 0.01) and G3 (p < 0.001) groups were significantly decreased at T2 as compared to T1. However, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, PCV and Hb level at T1 showed no difference in the comparison of horses from different age groups with the exception of G3 group in terms of heart rate. The physiologic and hematological responses of horses during recovery time after 2,500 m exercise with gallop were no significant difference among the groups. These data are useful as a response evaluation method for training of endurance horses.

  19. Do Sirtuins Promote Mammalian Longevity?: A Critical Review on Its Relevance to the Longevity Effect Induced by Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjoon; Mori, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRTs), a family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylases, are emerging as key molecules that regulate aging and age-related diseases including cancers, metabolic disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Seven isoforms of SIRT (SIRT1–7) have been identified in mammals. SIRT1 and 6, mainly localized in the nucleus, regulate transcription of genes and DNA repair. SIRT3 in the mitochondria regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics. Initial studies in yeasts, nematodes, and flies indicated a strong connection of SIRT with the life-prolonging effects of calorie restriction (CR), a robust experimental intervention for longevity in a range of organisms. However, subsequent studies reported controversial findings regarding SIRT roles in the effect of CR. This review describes the functional roles of mammalian SIRTs and discusses their relevance to mechanisms underlying the longevity effect of CR. PMID:23661364

  20. Hemoglobin senses body temperature.

    PubMed

    Artmann, G M; Digel, Ilya; Zerlin, K F; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch; Linder, Pt; Porst, D; Kayser, P; Stadler, A M; Dikta, G; Temiz Artmann, A

    2009-06-01

    When aspirating human red blood cells (RBCs) into 1.3 mum pipettes (DeltaP = -2.3 kPa), a transition from blocking the pipette below a critical temperature T(c) = 36.3 +/- 0.3 degrees C to passing it above the T(c) occurred (micropipette passage transition). With a 1.1 mum pipette no passage was seen which enabled RBC volume measurements also above T(c). With increasing temperature RBCs lost volume significantly faster below than above a T(c) = 36.4 +/- 0.7 (volume transition). Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) measurements of RBCs in autologous plasma (25 degrees C < or = T < or = 39.5 degrees C) showed a T (c) at 37.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C above which the COP rapidly decreased (COP transition). In NMR T(1)-relaxation time measurements, the T(1) of RBCs in autologous plasma changed from a linear (r = 0.99) increment below T(c) = 37 +/- 1 degrees C at a rate of 0.023 s/K into zero slope above T(c) (RBC T(1) transition). An amorphous hemoglobin-water gel formed in the spherical trail, the residual partial sphere of the aspirated RBC. At T(c), a sudden fluidization of the gel occurs. All changes mentioned above happen at a distinct T(c) close to body temperature. The T(c) is moved +0.8 degrees C to higher temperatures when a D(2)O buffer is used. We suggest a mechanism similar to a "glass transition" or a "colloidal phase transition". At T(c), the stabilizing Hb bound water molecules reach a threshold number enabling a partial Hb unfolding. Thus, Hb senses body temperature which must be inscribed in the primary structure of hemoglobin and possibly other proteins.

  1. Carrion fly-derived DNA as a tool for comprehensive and cost-effective assessment of mammalian biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Merkel, Kevin; Kutzner, Nadine; Kühl, Hjalmar; Boesch, Christophe; Kappeler, Peter M; Metzger, Sonja; Schubert, Grit; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale monitoring schemes are essential in assessing global mammalian biodiversity, and in this framework, leeches have recently been promoted as an indirect source of DNA from terrestrial mammal species. Carrion feeding flies are ubiquitous and can be expected to feed on many vertebrate carcasses. Hence, we tested whether fly-derived DNA analysis may also serve as a novel tool for mammalian diversity surveys. We screened DNA extracted from 201 carrion flies collected in tropical habitats of Côte d'Ivoire and Madagascar for mammal DNA using multiple PCR systems and retrieved DNA sequences from a diverse set of species (22 in Côte d'Ivoire, four in Madagascar) exploiting distinct forest strata and displaying a broad range of body sizes. Deep sequencing of amplicons generated from pools of flies performed equally well as individual sequencing approaches. We conclude that the analysis of fly-derived DNA can be implemented in a very rapid and cost-effective manner and will give a relatively unbiased picture of local mammal diversity. Carrion flies therefore represent an extraordinary and thus far unexploited resource of mammal DNA, which will probably prove useful for future inventories of wild mammal communities.

  2. THE RENAL HANDLING OF HEMOGLOBIN

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, H. Franklin; Jandl, James H.

    1969-01-01

    The fate of small doses of isotopically labeled isologous hemoglobin was studied in the rat. When haptoglobin depleted animals were given 2.0 mg of 59Fe hemoglobin intravenously, nearly half was trapped by the kidneys. Kidney 59Fe activity disappeared slowly over several weeks. Whatever iron was lost from the kidneys was largely reutilized. In contrast, the porphyrin of hemoglobin absorbed by the kidneys appeared to be rapidly catabolized, since 5 hr after the injection of 14C or 59Fe heme-labeled hemoglobin only a small fraction was recovered as hematin. Likewise, after injection of globin-labeled hemoglobin, rapid disappearance of kidney protein activity indicated that the absorbed globin was readily catabolized in situ. PMID:5778790

  3. Hemoglobin estimation by the HemoCue® portable hemoglobin photometer in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In resource poor settings where automated hematology analyzers are not available, the Cyanmethemoglobin method is often used. This method though cheaper, takes more time. In blood donations, the semi-quantitative gravimetric copper sulfate method which is very easy and inexpensive may be used but does not provide an acceptable degree of accuracy. The HemoCue® hemoglobin photometer has been used for these purposes. This study was conducted to generate data to support or refute its use as a point-of-care device for hemoglobin estimation in mobile blood donations and critical care areas in health facilities. Method EDTA blood was collected from study participants drawn from five groups: pre-school children, school children, pregnant women, non-pregnant women and men. Blood collected was immediately processed to estimate the hemoglobin concentration using three different methods (HemoCue®, Sysmex KX21N and Cyanmethemoglobin). Agreement between the test methods was assessed by the method of Bland and Altman. The Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the within subject variability of measured hemoglobin. Results Of 398 subjects, 42% were males with the overall mean age being 19.4 years. The overall mean hemoglobin as estimated by each method was 10.4 g/dl for HemoCue, 10.3 g/dl for Sysmex KX21N and 10.3 g/dl for Cyanmethemoglobin. Pairwise analysis revealed that the hemoglobin determined by the HemoCue method was higher than that measured by the KX21N and Cyanmethemoglobin. Comparing the hemoglobin determined by the HemoCue to Cyanmethemoglobin, the concordance correlation coefficient was 0.995 (95% CI: 0.994-0.996, p < 0.001). The Bland and Altman's limit of agreement was -0.389 - 0.644 g/dl with the mean difference being 0.127 (95% CI: 0.102-0.153) and a non-significant difference in variability between the two measurements (p = 0.843). After adjusting to assess the effect of other possible confounders such as sex, age and category

  4. Propofol Enhances Hemoglobin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cui, Guiyun; Li, Wenlu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been increasingly suggested that propofol protects against hypoxic-/ischemic-induced neuronal injury. As evidenced by hemorrhage-induced stroke, hemorrhage into the brain may also cause brain damage. Whether propofol protects against hemorrhage-induced brain damage remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of propofol on hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity in cultured mouse cortical neurons. METHODS Neurons were prepared from the cortex of embryonic 15-day-old mice. Hemoglobin was used to induce cytotoxicity in the neurons. The neurons were then treated with propofol for 4 hours. Cytotoxicity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase release assay. Caspase-3 activation was examined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the free radical scavenger U83836E was used to examine the potential involvement of oxidative stress in propofol’s effects on hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity. RESULTS We found that treatment with hemoglobin induced cytotoxicity in the neurons. Propofol enhanced hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity. Specifically, there was a significant difference in the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release between hemoglobin plus saline (19.84% ± 5.38%) and hemoglobin plus propofol (35.79% ± 4.41%) in mouse cortical neurons (P = 0.00058, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney U test, n = 8 in the control group or the treatment group). U83836E did not attenuate the enhancing effects of propofol on hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity in the neurons, and propofol did not significantly affect caspase-3 activation induced by hemoglobin. These data suggested that caspase-3 activation and oxidative stress might not be the underlying mechanisms by which propofol enhanced hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, these data suggested that the neuroprotective effects of propofol would be dependent on the condition of the brain injury, which will need to be confirmed in future studies. CONCLUSIONS These results from our current proof-of-concept study should

  5. Analysis of bicarbonate binding to crocodilian hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bauer, C; Forster, M; Gros, G; Mosca, A; Perrella, M; Rollema, H S; Vogel, D

    1981-08-25

    Crocodilian hemoglobin has a high intrinsic oxygen affinity but does not react with those organic phosphate esters that normally control the oxygen affinity of blood in higher vertebrates. Instead, its oxygen affinity is greatly lowered by CO2. The present study was undertaken to determine the nature of the CO2 binding to the hemoglobin of a crocodilian species, the Caiman, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The following parameters were measured: (a) carbamino compounds of deoxy- and oxyhemoglobin, (b) the effect of CO2 (at constant pH) on the oxygen affinity of Caiman hemoglobin, (c) total CO2 concentration of hemoglobin solutions at different pH and pCO2 values, and (d) the effect of CO2 on CD spectra of Caiman aquomethemoglobin. An analysis of the results of these measurements revealed that CO2 binding in the form of carbamate was not oxygen-linked and cannot, therefore, mediate the CO2 effect on the oxygen affinity. It was found, however, that 2 mol of bicarbonate can be bound/hemoglobin tetramer and that the association constant of the bicarbonate anion greatly depends upon the state of ligation. At pH 7.02 and 25 degrees C, a numerical value of 2.0 X 10(3) M-1 was obtained for deoxyhemoglobin, while for oxyhemoglobin no significant bicarbonate binding could be observed. At more alkaline pH (pH greater than or equal to 7.5), the association constant for deoxyhemoglobin decreases. Circular dichroism of Caiman aquomethemoglobin decreased considerably in the 287-nm region upon addition of CO2 at constant pH, an effect very similar to the one caused by inositol hexaphosphate in human aquomethemoglobin.

  6. Comparative study of the effect of BPA and its selected analogues on hemoglobin oxidation, morphological alterations and hemolytic changes in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maćczak, Aneta; Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to provoke many deleterious impacts on human health, and thus it is now successively substituted by BPA analogues, whose effects have been poorly investigated. Up to now, only one study has been realized to assess the effect of BPA on human erythrocytes, which showed its significant hemolytic and oxidative potential. Moreover, no study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of BPA analogues on red blood cells. The purpose of the present study was to compare the impact of BPA and its selected analogues such as bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on hemolytic and morphological changes and hemoglobin oxidation (methemoglobin formation) of human erythrocytes. The erythrocytes were incubated with different bisphenols concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 500μg/ml for 1, 4 and 24h. The compounds examined caused hemolysis in human erythrocytes with BPAF exhibiting the strongest effect. All bisphenols examined caused methemoglobin formation with BPA inducing the strongest oxidative potential. Flow cytometry analysis showed that all bisphenols (excluding BPS) induced significant changes in erythrocytes size. Changes in red blood cells shape were conducted using phase contrast microscopy. It was noticed that BPA and BPAF induced echinocytosis, BPF caused stomatocytosis, while BPS did not provoke significant changes in shape of red blood cells. Generally, the results showed that BPS, which is the main substituent of bisphenol A in polymers and thermal paper production, exhibited significantly lower disturbance of erythrocyte functions than BPA.

  7. INTRINSIC REGULATION OF HEMOGLOBIN EXPRESSION BY VARIABLE SUBUNIT INTERFACE STRENGTHS

    PubMed Central

    Manning, James M.; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Manning, Lois R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expression of the six types of human hemoglobin subunits over time is currently considered to be regulated mainly by transcription factors that bind to upstream control regions of the gene (the “extrinsic” component of regulation). Here we describe how subunit pairing and further assembly to tetramers in the liganded state is influenced by the affinity of subunits for one another (the “intrinsic” component of regulation). The adult hemoglobin dimers have the strongest subunit interfaces and the embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest with fetal hemoglobins of intermediate strength, corresponding to the temporal order of their expression. These variable subunit binding strengths and the attenuating effects of acetylation contribute to the differences with which these hemoglobin types form functional O2-binding tetramers consistent with gene switching. PMID:22129306

  8. Effect of extracellular osmolality on cell volume and resting metabolism in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Antolic, AnaMaria; Harrison, Rosemarie; Farlinger, Chris; Cermak, Naomi M; Peters, Sandra J; LeBlanc, Paul; Roy, Brian D

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to establish an in vitro mammalian skeletal muscle model to study acute alterations in resting skeletal muscle cell volume. Isolated, whole muscles [soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)] were dissected from Long-Evans rats and incubated for 60 min in Sigma medium 199 (1 g of resting tension, bubbled with 95% O(2)-5% O(2), 30 +/- 2 degrees C, and pH 7.4). Medium osmolality was altered to simulate hyposmotic (190 +/- 10 mmol/kg) or hyperosmotic conditions (400 +/- 10 mmol/kg), whereas an isosmotic condition (290 +/- 10 mmol/kg) served as a control. After incubation, relative water content of the muscle decreased with hyperosmotic and increased with hyposmotic condition in both muscle types (P < 0.05). The cross-sectional area of soleus type I and type II fibers increased (P < 0.05) in hyposmotic, whereas hyperosmotic exposure led to no detectable changes. The EDL type II fiber area decreased in the hyperosmotic condition and increased after hyposmotic exposure, whereas no change was observed in EDL type I fibers. Furthermore, exposure to the hyperosmotic condition in both muscle types resulted in decreased muscle ATP and phosphocreatine (P < 0.05) contents and increased creatine and lactate contents (P < 0.05) compared with control and hyposmotic conditions. This isolated skeletal muscle model proved viable and demonstrated that altering extracellular osmolality could cause acute alterations in muscle water content and resting muscle metabolism.

  9. Metabolic rate limits the effect of sperm competition on mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2013-01-01

    Sperm competition leads to increased sperm production in many taxa. This response may result from increases in testes size, changes in testicular architecture or changes in the kinetics of spermatogenesis, but the impact of each one of these processes on sperm production has not been studied in an integrated manner. Furthermore, such response may be limited in species with low mass-specific metabolic rate (MSMR), i.e., large-bodied species, because they cannot process energy and resources efficiently enough both at the organismic and cellular levels. Here we compare 99 mammalian species and show that higher levels of sperm competition correlated with a) higher proportions of seminiferous tubules, b) shorter seminiferous epithelium cycle lengths (SECL) which reduce the time required to produce sperm, and c) higher efficiencies of Sertoli cells (involved in sperm maturation). These responses to sperm competition, in turn, result in higher daily sperm production, more sperm stored in the epididymides, and more sperm in the ejaculate. However, the two processes that require processing resources at faster rates (SECL and efficiency of Sertoli cells) only respond to sperm competition in species with high MSMR. Thus, increases in sperm production with intense sperm competition occur via a complex network of mechanisms, but some are constrained by MSMR.

  10. The effects of weightlessness on the human organism and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, J; Bauer, J; Egli, M; Infanger, M; Wise, P; Ulbrich, C; Grimm, D

    2011-07-01

    It has always been a desire of mankind to conquest Space. A major step in realizing this dream was the completion of the International Space Station (ISS). Living there for several months confirmed early observations of short-term spaceflights that a loss of gravity affects the health of astronauts. Space medicine tries to understand the mechanism of microgravity-induced health problems and to conceive potent countermeasures. There are four different aspects which make space medicine appealing: i) finding better strategies for adapting astronauts to weightlessness; ii) identification of microgravity-induced diseases (e.g. osteoporosis, muscle atrophy, cardiac problems and others); iii) defining new therapies to conquer these diseases which will benefit astronauts as well as people on Earth in the end; and iv) on top of that, unveiling the mechanisms of weightlessness-dependent molecular and cellular changes is a requirement for improving space medicine. In mammalian cells, microgravity induces apoptosis and alters the cytoskeleton and affects signal transduction pathways, cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, migration and adhesion. This review focused on gravi-sensitive signal transduction elements and pathways as well as molecular mechanisms in human cells, aiming to understand the cellular changes in altered gravity. Moreover, the latest information on how these changes lead to clinically relevant health problems and current strategies of countermeasures are reviewed.

  11. The effect of hydroxyurea and trichostatin a on targeted nucleotide exchange in yeast and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Parekh-Olmedo, Hetal; Engstrom, Julia U; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-12-01

    Targeted nucleotide exchange (TNE) is a process by which a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide, partially complementary to a site in a chromosomal or an episomal gene directs the reversal of a single nucleotide at a specific site. To protect against nuclease digestion, the oligonucleotide is modified with derivative linkages among the terminal bases. We have termed these molecules modified single-stranded oligonucleotides (MSOs). Current models suggest that the reaction occurs in two steps. The first, DNA pairing, involves the alignment of the MSO with the target site and its assimilation into the target helix forming a D-loop. The second phase centers around the repair of a single base mismatch formed between the MSO and its complementary strand in the D-loop. Nucleotide exchange is promoted in all likelihood by the mismatch repair system. A critical feature of successful TNE is the accessibility of the target site for the MSO and the factors that increase the dynamic nature of the chromatin that will likely increase the frequency. Here, we report that two factors, trichostatin A and hydroxyurea, elevate gene repair of a mutant hygromycin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a mutant eGFP gene in a mammalian cell line, MCF-10AT1 cells. Trichostatin A (TSA) acts by preventing the deacetylation of histones while hydroxyurea (HU) reduces the rate of replication. Both of these activities, by their very nature, create a more open configuration of the MSO into the target site.

  12. Effects of mammalian in utero heat stress on adolescent body temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jay S; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Sanz-Fernandez, M Victoria; Ross, Jason W; Selsby, Josh T; Lucy, Matt C; Safranski, Tim J; Rhoads, Rob P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2013-11-01

    In utero hyperthermia can cause a variety of developmental issues, but how it alters mammalian body temperature during adolescence is not well-understood. Study objectives were to determine the extent to which in utero hyperthermia affects future phenotypic responses to a heat load. Pregnant first parity pigs were exposed to thermal neutral (TN) or heat stress (HS) conditions during the entire gestation. Of the resultant offspring, 12 were housed in TN conditions, and 12 were maintained in HS conditions for 15 days. Adolescent pigs in HS conditions had increased rectal temperature and respiration rate (RR) compared to TN pigs, regardless of gestational treatment. Within the HS environment, no gestational difference in RR was detected; however, GHS pigs had increased rectal temperature compared to GTN pigs. As rectal temperature increased, GTN pigs had a more rapid increase in RR compared to the GHS pigs. Adolescent HS decreased nutrient intake, and body weight gain, but neither variable was statistically influenced by gestational treatments. In summary, in utero HS compromises the future thermoregulatory response to a thermal insult.

  13. Thermostability of mammalian brain ribosomes and the effects of nucleoside triphosphates on their heat-sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Grove, B K; Johnson, T C; Gilbert, B E

    1974-02-01

    Mammalian brain ribosomes were found to be heat-labile. On preincubation of the ribosomes at 37 degrees C, their ability to participate in polypeptide-synthesis reactions was substantially diminished. Despite the sensitivity of ribosomal protein synthesis to heat-inactivation, preincubation resulted in no significant alterations in ribosomal sedimentation profiles or changes in the integrity of the ribosomal RNA. The thermolability of brain ribosomes was shown to be associated with their inability to bind both template RNA and aminoacyl-tRNA. Similar experiments with brain ribosomal subunits demonstrated that the small (40S) subunit was more sensitive to heat-inactivation than the large (60S) subunit. The presence of ATP (1mm) protected ribosomes from thermal inactivation, although this protection was shown to be temporary. The protection appeared to be specific to nucleoside triphosphates, since GTP and UTP also stabilized ribosomes to thermal denaturation whereas nucleoside diphosphates (ADP) and nucleoside monophosphates (AMP and cyclic AMP) did not alter ribosomal sensitivity to heat. Although 1mm concentrations of nucleoside triphosphates protected ribosomes from heat-inactivation, the presence of higher concentrations resulted in complete inactivation of ribosomal activity.

  14. Concentration-dependent Effects of Nuclear Lamins on Nuclear Size in Xenopus and Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J.; Li, Xiaoyang; Nguyen, Thang; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology concerns the regulation of organelle size. While nuclear size is exquisitely controlled in different cell types, inappropriate nuclear enlargement is used to diagnose and stage cancer. Clarifying the functional significance of nuclear size necessitates an understanding of the mechanisms and proteins that control nuclear size. One structural component implicated in the regulation of nuclear morphology is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate lamin filaments that lines the inner nuclear membrane. However, there has not been a systematic investigation of how the level and type of lamin expression influences nuclear size, in part due to difficulties in precisely controlling lamin expression levels in vivo. In this study, we circumvent this limitation by studying nuclei in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, open biochemical systems that allow for precise manipulation of lamin levels by the addition of recombinant proteins. We find that nuclear growth and size are sensitive to the levels of nuclear lamins, with low and high concentrations increasing and decreasing nuclear size, respectively. Interestingly, each type of lamin that we tested (lamins B1, B2, B3, and A) similarly affected nuclear size whether added alone or in combination, suggesting that total lamin concentration, and not lamin type, is more critical to determining nuclear size. Furthermore, we show that altering lamin levels in vivo, both in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells, also impacts nuclear size. These results have implications for normal development and carcinogenesis where both nuclear size and lamin expression levels change. PMID:26429910

  15. Optimization of tetracycline-responsive recombinant protein production and effect on cell growth and ER stress in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jullian; Nivitchanyong, Tarangsri; Giblin, Christina; Ciccarone, Valentina; Judd, David; Gorfien, Stephen; Krag, Sharon S; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2005-09-20

    The inducible T-REx system and other inducible expression systems have been developed in order to control the expression levels of recombinant protein in mammalian cells. In order to study the effects of heterologous protein expression on mammalian host behavior, the gene for recombinant Human transferrin (hTf) was integrated into HEK-293 cells and expressed under the control of the T-REx inducible technology (293-TetR-Hyg-hTf) or using a constitutive promoter (293-CMV-hTf). A number of inducible clones with variable expression levels were identified for the T-REx system with levels of hTf for the high expressing clones nearly double those obtained using the constitutive cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The level of transferrin produced was found to increase proportionately with tetracycline concentration between 0 and 1 mug/mL with no significant increases in transferrin production above 1 mug/mL. As a result, the optimal induction time and tetracycline concentrations were determined to be the day of plating and 1 mug/mL, respectively. Interestingly, the cells induced to express transferrin, 293-TetR-Hyg-hTf, exhibited lower viable cell densities and percent viabilities than the uninduced cultures for multiple clonal isolates. In addition, the induction of transferrin expression was found to cause an increase in the expression of the ER-stress gene, BiP, that was not observed in the uninduced cells. However, both uninduced and induced cell lines containing the hTf gene exhibited longer survival in culture than the control cells, possibly as a result of the positive effects of hTf on cell survival. Taken together, these results suggest that the high level expression of complex proteins in mammalian cells can limit the viable cell densities of cells in culture as a result of cellular stresses caused by generating proteins that may be difficult to fold or are otherwise toxic to cells. The application of inducible systems such as the T-REx technology will allow us to

  16. Effects of antiretroviral drugs for prevention of HIV-mother-to-child transmission on hematological parameters and hemoglobin synthesis in HIV-uninfected newborns with and without thalassemia carrier.

    PubMed

    Wongnoi, Rotjanee; Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Sirivatanapa, Pannee; Phanpong, Chotiros; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2013-04-01

    The effects of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs administered to HIV-infected pregnancy on hematological parameters and hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis in ARV-exposed newborns with and without thalassemia carrier and of ARV drugs in worsening anemia in thalassemia carrier newborns are not well understood. Cord blood samples were collected from newborns of HIV-infected and -uninfected pregnancies. Hematological parameters and hemoglobin typing were analyzed by automated blood counter and capillary electrophoresis (CE), respectively. In the group of thalassemia carrier, the ARV-exposed newborns had significantly lower mean levels of red blood cell counts and hematocrit and had significantly higher mean levels of MCH than the ARV-unexposed newborns. Similar results were found in the group of newborns without thalassemia carrier. There were no statistical differences in mean levels of Hb-A₂, Hb-A, Hb-F and Hb-E (when applicable) in ARV-exposed and -unexposed newborns either with or without thalassemia carrier. However, ARV-exposed newborns who were thalassemia carriers had the lowest levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit when compared to the other groups. Therefore, ARV drugs used for prevention of HIV-mother-to-child transmission (HIV-MTCT) altered hematological parameters but did not affect hemoglobin synthesis in newborns with and without thalassemia carrier. However, thalassemia and ARV drugs might have synergetic effect in inducing severe anemia.

  17. High-fat diet-induced met-hemoglobin formation in rats prone (WOKW) or resistant (DA) to the metabolic syndrome: effect of CoQ10 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Patrick; Silvestri, Sonia; Brugè, Francesca; Tiano, Luca; Kloting, Ingrid; Falcioni, Giancarlo; Polidori, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on oxidative indexes in WistarOttawaKarlsburg W (WOKW) rats used as a model of metabolic syndrome in comparison with Dark Agouti (DA) rats used as a control strain. This syndrome is defined by the occurrence of two or more risk factors including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. Forty rats were used in the study and the effect of HFD was evaluated in terms of body weight and both hemoglobin and CoQ oxidative status. Moreover, 16 rats (8 of each strain) were supplemented with 3 mg/100 g b.w. of CoQ10 for 1 month in view of its beneficial properties in cardiovascular disease due to its antioxidant activity in the lipid environment. HFD promoted an increase in body weight, in particular in WOKW males, and in the methemoglobin (met-Hb) index in both strains. Moreover, HFD promoted endogenous CoQ10 oxidation. CoQ10 supplementation was able to efficiently counteract the HFD pro-oxidant effects, preventing met-Hb formation and CoQ oxidation.

  18. Induction of Hemoglobin Accumulation in Human K562 Cells by Hemin is Reversible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Ann; Erard, Francois; Schneider, Arthur B.; Schechter, Alan N.

    1981-04-01

    Twenty micromolar hemin causes no change in the rate of division of K562 cells but results in accumulation of 11 to 14 picograms of embryonic and fetal hemoglobins per cell. This effect is reversible, and hemoglobin induction in response to hemin, and loss of hemoglobin upon removal of hemin, can be cyclically repeated. The cells can be indefinitely subcultured in the presence of the inducer. Thus, the control of hemoglobin levels in K562 cells does not depend on irreversible differentiation.

  19. Ethylene oxide inhalation at different exposure-rates affects binding levels in mouse germ cells and hemoglobin. Possible explanation for the effect.

    PubMed

    Sega, G A; Brimer, P A; Generoso, E E

    1991-08-01

    Male mice were exposed to [3H]EtO by inhalation at different exposure rates (300 parts per million (ppm) of EtO for 1 h: 150 ppm for 2 h: 75 ppm for 4 h). The total exposure was fixed at 300 ppm-h. The amount of EtO binding to developing spermatogenic stages, to sperm DNA, to testis DNA and to hemoglobin was then measured as a function of the EtO exposure rate. Generally, as the exposure rate increased there was an increase in the amount of EtO binding to the targets. For example, alkylation of sperm from the caudal epididymides 6 d posttreatment, of DNA from the vas sperm (averaged over 4 time points), of testis DNA (90 min posttreatment), and of hemoglobin (averaged over 4 time points), was 2.0 +/- 0.2 (SD), 1.8 +/- 0.4, 2.9 +/- 0.3, and 1.5 +/- 0.1 times greater, respectively, after an exposure to 300 ppm for 1 h than after an exposure to 75 ppm for 4 h. The testicular DNA from animals exposed to 300 ppm of [3H]EtO for 1 h was also analyzed for the presence of N7-hydroxyethylguanine (N7HEG) and O6-hydroxyethylguanine (O6HEG). The half-life (T1 2) of the N7HEG in the testis DNA was calculated to be 2.8 d. This lesion was removed relatively rapidly from the testis DNA and was probably excised by enzymatic repair. No formation of O6HEG was detected in any of the testis DNA samples analyzed. Additional experiments showed that the exposure rate effect was the result of less total EtO being taken in by the mice over long exposure times compared to that taken in during shorter exposure times at higher concentrations. This result argues against the idea that the exposure rate effect is the result of physiological/enzymological changes affecting transport or metabolism of the chemical within the animals under different exposure rate conditions.

  20. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  1. Concentration-dependent Effects of Nuclear Lamins on Nuclear Size in Xenopus and Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J; Li, Xiaoyang; Nguyen, Thang; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L

    2015-11-13

    A fundamental question in cell biology concerns the regulation of organelle size. While nuclear size is exquisitely controlled in different cell types, inappropriate nuclear enlargement is used to diagnose and stage cancer. Clarifying the functional significance of nuclear size necessitates an understanding of the mechanisms and proteins that control nuclear size. One structural component implicated in the regulation of nuclear morphology is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate lamin filaments that lines the inner nuclear membrane. However, there has not been a systematic investigation of how the level and type of lamin expression influences nuclear size, in part due to difficulties in precisely controlling lamin expression levels in vivo. In this study, we circumvent this limitation by studying nuclei in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, open biochemical systems that allow for precise manipulation of lamin levels by the addition of recombinant proteins. We find that nuclear growth and size are sensitive to the levels of nuclear lamins, with low and high concentrations increasing and decreasing nuclear size, respectively. Interestingly, each type of lamin that we tested (lamins B1, B2, B3, and A) similarly affected nuclear size whether added alone or in combination, suggesting that total lamin concentration, and not lamin type, is more critical to determining nuclear size. Furthermore, we show that altering lamin levels in vivo, both in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells, also impacts nuclear size. These results have implications for normal development and carcinogenesis where both nuclear size and lamin expression levels change. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  3. Comparative study on thiol drugs' effect on tert-butyl hydroperoxide induced luminol chemiluminescence in human erythrocyte lysate and hemoglobin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sajewicz, Waldemar; Zalewska, Marta; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2015-02-01

    The current studies have investigated the effect of heterocyclic drugs with the single thiol group (thiamazole, mercaptopurine) and dithiol aliphatic drugs (dimercaptosuccinic acid, dithiothreitol) under oxidative stress conditions, using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH), in human erythrocyte lysate with the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence technique. Knowing that oxidative processes induced by t-BuOOH are triggered by (oxy)hemoglobin (Hb), the effect of different thiol drugs (RSH) on isolated human Hb oxidation to methemoglobin (MHb) and hemichromes (HChr) was further considered. Three types of chemiluminescence curves, fitting to logistic-exponential model, have been revealed under influence of RSH. Structure of the data (MHb and HChr production, and free radical activity of RSH) in Principal Component Analysis visualization and kinetic profiles of chemiluminescence integrate information in terms of the diversity of RSH reaction mechanisms depending on the specific molecular context of the given thiol: aliphatic or aromatic nature as well as the number and position of the -SH groups in the molecule. The study conducted in presented in vitro systems indicates the potential role of thiol drugs mediated toxicity in an oxidative stress dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of hemoglobin on the uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and /sup 3/H-choline chloride into porcine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Linnik, M.D.; Lee, T.J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries often follows subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH exposes hemoglobin (Hb) to cerebral arteries and Hb has been demonstrated to induce vasoconstriction as well as alter cerebrovascular neurogenic response characteristics. The effect of Hb on uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (/sup 3/H-NE) and /sup 3/H-choline chloride (/sup 3/H-ChCl) into porcine cerebral arteries was therefore examined. 0.5 to 50 ..mu..M porcine Hb caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-NE uptake into the anterior (ANT), internal carotid (IC) and middle cerebral (MC) arteries of the pig. IC/sub 50/ values for uptake inhibition were: ANT, 31 ..mu..M; IC, 34 ..mu..M; MC, 37 ..mu..M. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) in the same concentration range also caused a decrease in /sup 3/H-NE uptake. An examination of protein-ligand interactions using column chromatography demonstrated binding of /sup 3/H-NE by both Hb and PSA. This protein binding may be responsible for part of the uptake inhibition. Hb and PSA had little effect on /sup 3/H-ChCl uptake into these arteries.

  5. [Effects of surfactant and solvent on the encapsulation efficiency and size in using double emulsion method for preparing bovine hemoglobin loaded nanoparticles as blood substitutes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Yuan, Yuan; Shan, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Yan; Xu, Feng; Liu, Changsheng

    2009-02-01

    On the basis of previous researches, we have prepared Bovine hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles (HbP), using the double emulsion method. More mild dispersing treatment was employed during the primary and secondary emulsion; over 97% encapsulation efficiency (EE%) and an average size about 286 nm were achieved by using surfactants, screening solvents, as well as avoiding the traditional strong dispersing process. The value of Hydrophile-lipophile balance in oil phase exerted a significant effect on EE% and led to higher EE% when matched with the surfactants in outer aqueous phase. When compared with the sole solvent Span80, the mixed surfactants such as Poloxemer188/Span80 stabilized the emulsion more efficiently and increased the EE%. The higher concentration of surfactants resulted in higher EE% and narrower size distribution. But over some amount, the surfactants had no significant effect on EE%, resulting in larger size and polydispersity index (PDI). The appropriate removal rate of solvents contributes to higher EE%, smaller size and PDI.

  6. Simple, efficient, and cost-effective multiplex genotyping with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of hemoglobin beta gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Jiemsup, Surasak; Yongkiettrakul, Suganya; Kanjanakorn, Chompunut; Limwongse, Chanin; Wilairat, Prapon; Vanasant, Anusorn; Rungroj, Nanyawan; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2009-07-01

    A number of common mutations in the hemoglobin beta (HBB) gene cause beta-thalassemia, a monogenic disease with high prevalence in certain ethnic groups. As there are 30 HBB variants that cover more than 99.5% of HBB mutant alleles in the Thai population, an efficient and cost-effective screening method is required. Three panels of multiplex primer extensions, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were developed. The first panel simultaneously detected 21 of the most common HBB mutations, while the second panel screened nine additional mutations, plus seven of the first panel for confirmation; the third panel was used to confirm three HBB mutations, yielding a 9-Da mass difference that could not be clearly distinguished by the previous two panels. The protocol was both standardized using 40 samples of known genotypes and subsequently validated in 162 blind samples with 27 different genotypes (including a normal control), comprising heterozygous, compound heterozygous, and homozygous beta-thalassemia. Results were in complete agreement with those from the genotyping results, conducted using three different methods overall. The method developed here permitted the detection of mutations missed using a single genotyping procedure. The procedure should serve as the method of choice for HBB genotyping due to its accuracy, sensitivity, and cost-effectiveness, and can be applied to studies of other gene variants that are potential disease biomarkers.

  7. Effects of intermediates between vitamins K(2) and K(3) on mammalian DNA polymerase inhibition and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Jun; Irino, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Masayuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Kuriyama, Isoko; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Yoshida, Masaru

    2011-02-10

    Previously, we reported that vitamin K(3) (VK(3)), but not VK(1) or VK(2) (=MK-4), inhibits the activity of human DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we chemically synthesized three intermediate compounds between VK(2) and VK(3), namely MK-3, MK-2 and MK-1, and investigated the inhibitory effects of all five compounds on the activity of mammalian pols. Among these compounds, MK-2 was the strongest inhibitor of mammalian pols α, κ and λ, which belong to the B, Y and X families of pols, respectively; whereas VK(3) was the strongest inhibitor of human pol γ, an A-family pol. MK-2 potently inhibited the activity of all animal species of pol tested, and its inhibitory effect on pol λ activity was the strongest with an IC(50) value of 24.6 μM. However, MK-2 did not affect the activity of plant or prokaryotic pols, or that of other DNA metabolic enzymes such as primase of pol α, RNA polymerase, polynucleotide kinase or deoxyribonuclease I. Because we previously found a positive relationship between pol λ inhibition and anti-inflammatory action, we examined whether these compounds could inhibit inflammatory responses. Among the five compounds tested, MK-2 caused the greatest reduction in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute inflammation in mouse ear. In addition, in a cell culture system using mouse macrophages, MK-2 displayed the strongest suppression of the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, MK-2 was found to inhibit the action of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In an in vivo mouse model of LPS-evoked acute inflammation, intraperitoneal injection of MK-2 in mice led to suppression of TNF-α production in serum. In conclusion, this study has identified VK(2) and VK(3) intermediates, such as MK-2, that are promising anti-inflammatory candidates.

  8. Effects of Intermediates between Vitamins K2 and K3 on Mammalian DNA Polymerase Inhibition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Jun; Irino, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Masayuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Kuriyama, Isoko; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Yoshida, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that vitamin K3 (VK3), but not VK1 or VK2 (=MK-4), inhibits the activity of human DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we chemically synthesized three intermediate compounds between VK2 and VK3, namely MK-3, MK-2 and MK-1, and investigated the inhibitory effects of all five compounds on the activity of mammalian pols. Among these compounds, MK-2 was the strongest inhibitor of mammalian pols α, κ and λ, which belong to the B, Y and X families of pols, respectively; whereas VK3 was the strongest inhibitor of human pol γ, an A-family pol. MK-2 potently inhibited the activity of all animal species of pol tested, and its inhibitory effect on pol λ activity was the strongest with an IC50 value of 24.6 μM. However, MK-2 did not affect the activity of plant or prokaryotic pols, or that of other DNA metabolic enzymes such as primase of pol α, RNA polymerase, polynucleotide kinase or deoxyribonuclease I. Because we previously found a positive relationship between pol λ inhibition and anti-inflammatory action, we examined whether these compounds could inhibit inflammatory responses. Among the five compounds tested, MK-2 caused the greatest reduction in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute inflammation in mouse ear. In addition, in a cell culture system using mouse macrophages, MK-2 displayed the strongest suppression of the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, MK-2 was found to inhibit the action of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In an in vivo mouse model of LPS-evoked acute inflammation, intraperitoneal injection of MK-2 in mice led to suppression of TNF-α production in serum. In conclusion, this study has identified VK2 and VK3 intermediates, such as MK-2, that are promising anti-inflammatory candidates. PMID:21541047

  9. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies.

  10. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies. PMID:24407431

  11. Seed-specific elevation of non-symbiotic hemoglobin AtHb1: beneficial effects and underlying molecular networks in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Seed metabolism is dynamically adjusted to oxygen availability. Processes underlying this auto-regulatory mechanism control the metabolic efficiency under changing environmental conditions/stress and thus, are of relevance for biotechnology. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins have been shown to be involved in scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) molecules, which play a key role in oxygen sensing/balancing in plants and animals. Steady state levels of NO are suggested to act as an integrator of energy and carbon metabolism and subsequently, influence energy-demanding growth processes in plants. Results We aimed to manipulate oxygen stress perception in Arabidopsis seeds by overexpression of the non-symbiotic hemoglobin AtHb1 under the control of the seed-specific LeB4 promoter. Seeds of transgenic AtHb1 plants did not accumulate NO under transient hypoxic stress treatment, showed higher respiratory activity and energy status compared to the wild type. Global transcript profiling of seeds/siliques from wild type and transgenic plants under transient hypoxic and standard conditions using Affymetrix ATH1 chips revealed a rearrangement of transcriptional networks by AtHb1 overexpression under non-stress conditions, which included the induction of transcripts related to ABA synthesis and signaling, receptor-like kinase- and MAP kinase-mediated signaling pathways, WRKY transcription factors and ROS metabolism. Overexpression of AtHb1 shifted seed metabolism to an energy-saving mode with the most prominent alterations occurring in cell wall metabolism. In combination with metabolite and physiological measurements, these data demonstrate that AtHb1 overexpression improves oxidative stress tolerance compared to the wild type where a strong transcriptional and metabolic reconfiguration was observed in the hypoxic response. Conclusions AtHb1 overexpression mediates a pre-adaptation to hypoxic stress. Under transient stress conditions transgenic seeds were able to keep low levels

  12. Diverse Non-genetic, Allele-Specific Expression Effects Shape Genetic Architecture at the Cellular Level in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chao; Ferris, Elliott; Cheng, Tong; Hörndli, Cornelia Stacher; Gleason, Kelly; Tamminga, Carol; Wagner, Janice D; Boucher, Kenneth M; Christian, Jan L; Gregg, Christopher

    2017-03-08

    Interactions between genetic and epigenetic effects shape brain function, behavior, and the risk for mental illness. Random X inactivation and genomic imprinting are epigenetic allelic effects that are well known to influence genetic architecture and disease risk. Less is known about the nature, prevalence, and conservation of other potential epigenetic allelic effects in vivo in the mouse and primate brain. Here we devise genomics, in situ hybridization, and mouse genetics strategies to uncover diverse allelic effects in the brain that are not caused by imprinting or genetic variation. We found allelic effects that are developmental stage and cell type specific, that are prevalent in the neonatal brain, and that cause mosaics of monoallelic brain cells that differentially express wild-type and mutant alleles for heterozygous mutations. Finally, we show that diverse non-genetic allelic effects that impact mental illness risk genes exist in the macaque and human brain. Our findings have potential implications for mammalian brain genetics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. More Refined Experiments with Hemoglobin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Phillippe

    1985-01-01

    Discusses materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained for experiments designed to make a numerical stepwise study of the oxygenation of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other oxygen carriers. (JN)

  14. More Refined Experiments with Hemoglobin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Phillippe

    1985-01-01

    Discusses materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained for experiments designed to make a numerical stepwise study of the oxygenation of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other oxygen carriers. (JN)

  15. Effects of maleimide-polyethylene glycol-modified human hemoglobin (MP4) on tissue necrosis in SKH1-hr hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Ole; Kirschner, M H; Lilienfein, H; Babilas, P; Steinau, H U; Andree, C; Daigeler, A; Stachon, A; Homann, H; Langer, S

    2009-03-17

    Tissue hypoxia after blood loss, replantation and flap reperfusion remains a challenging task in surgery. Normovolemic hemodilution improves hemorheologic properties without increasing oxygen carrying capacity. Red blood cell transfusion is the current standard of treatment with its attendant risks. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of the chemically modified hemoglobin, MP4, to reduce skin flap necrosis and its effect on selected blood markers and kidneys. Tissue ischemia was induced in the ear of hairless mice (n=26). Hemodilution was performed by replacing one third of blood volume with the similar amount of MP4, dextran, or blood. The extent of non-perfused tissue was assessed by intravital fluorescent microscopy. Of all groups, MP4 showed the smallest area of no perfusion (in percentage of the ear +/- SEM: 16.3% +/- 2.4), the control group the largest (22.4% +/- 3.5). Leukocytes showed a significant increase in the MP4 and dextran group (from 8.7 to 13.6 respectively 15.4*109/l). On histology no changes of the kidneys could be observed. MP4 causes an increase of leukocytes, improves the oxygen supply of the tissue and shows no evidence of renal impairment.

  16. Effects of maleimide-polyethylene glycol-modified human hemoglobin (MP4) on tissue necrosis in SKH1-hr hairless mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Tissue hypoxia after blood loss, replantation and flap reperfusion remains a challenging task in surgery. Normovolemic hemodilution improves hemorheologic properties without increasing oxygen carrying capacity. Red blood cell transfusion is the current standard of treatment with its attendant risks. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of the chemically modified hemoglobin, MP4, to reduce skin flap necrosis and its effect on selected blood markers and kidneys. Materials and methods Tissue ischemia was induced in the ear of hairless mice (n = 26). Hemodilution was performed by replacing one third of blood volume with the similar amount of MP4, dextran, or blood. The extent of non-perfused tissue was assessed by intravital fluorescent microscopy. Results Of all groups, MP4 showed the smallest area of no perfusion (in percentage of the ear ± SEM: 16.3% ± 2.4), the control group the largest (22.4% ± 3.5). Leukocytes showed a significant increase in the MP4 and dextran group (from 8.7 to 13.6 respectively 15.4*109/l). On histology no changes of the kidneys could be observed. Conclusion MP4 causes an increase of leukocytes, improves the oxygen supply of the tissue and shows no evidence of renal impairment. PMID:19380283

  17. Human Hp1-1 and Hp2-2 Phenotype-Specific Haptoglobin Therapeutics Are Both Effective In Vitro and in Guinea Pigs to Attenuate Hemoglobin Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lipiski, Miriam; Deuel, Jeremy W.; Baek, Jin Hyen; Engelsberger, Wolfgang R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Infusion of purified haptoglobin (Hp) functions as an effective hemoglobin (Hb) scavenging therapeutic in animal models of hemolysis to prevent cardiovascular and renal injury. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate the phenotype heterogeneity of human Hp proteins and suggest differing vascular protective potential imparted by the dimeric Hp1-1 and the polymeric Hp2-2. Results: In vitro experiments and in vivo studies in guinea pigs were performed to evaluate phenotype-specific differences in Hp therapeutics. We found no differences between the two phenotypes in Hb binding and intravascular compartmentalization of Hb in vivo. Both Hp1-1 and Hp2-2 attenuate Hb-induced blood pressure response and renal iron deposition. These findings were consistent with equal prevention of Hb endothelial translocation. The modulation of oxidative Hb reactions by the two Hp phenotypes was not found to be different. Both phenotypes stabilize the ferryl (Fe4+) Hb transition state, provide heme retention within the complex, and prevent Hb-driven low-density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation. Hb-mediated peroxidation of LDL resulted in endothelial toxicity, which was equally blocked by the addition of Hp1-1 and Hp2-2. Innovation and Conclusion: The present data do not provide support for the concept that phenotype-specific Hp therapeutics offer differential efficacy in mitigating acute Hb toxicity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1619–1633. PMID:23418677

  18. The effects of non-attendance information therapy on the control of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yarahmadi, Azam; Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Kachuei, Ali; Nouri, Rasoul; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Patient education plays an important role in the control of diabetes. Nonattendance education, enabling elimination of limitations caused by time and space and facilitating the relationship between patient and care liaison is an effective, simple, and cheap method. The aim of this study is determination of the effects of nonattendance information therapy on the control of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) in type 2 diabetic patients in Isfahan. The present study was an interventional semi experimental study with pretest and post-test and control groups. Statistical population were type 2 diabetics patients of the Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center, of whom 64 people were randomly selected and divided into intervention and control groups. First, the preliminary data were collected using the HbA1c test in patients. Then, the intervention group received training package and Short Message Service (SMS) for eight weeks. After one-month incubation period, HbA1c was again determined in both groups. Data were analyzed using t-test, paired t-test and Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests. Results showed that diabetes patients' HbA1c in the intervention group was significantly lower after the intervention through training packages and SMS service compared to before the intervention (P < 0.001). Comparison of the two groups showed that there was a significant difference in the HbA1C between the intervention and control groups (P = 0.048). Follow-up of education of patients with type 2 diabetes through training packages and SMS services had significant effects on the control of the patients' HbA1C. Also due to the low cost and high effectiveness of this method, it is recommended to health-care providers and treatment groups. This study also showed that having medical librarians along with treatment group can have a positive effect on the type 2 diabetic patients' health.

  19. Cellular bias on the microscale: probing the effects of digital microfluidic actuation on mammalian cell health, fitness and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Au, Sam H; Fobel, Ryan; Desai, Salil P; Voldman, Joel; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2013-08-01

    The potential benefits of using new technologies such as microfluidics for life science applications are exciting, but it is critical to understand and document potential biases imposed by these technologies on the observed results. Here, we report the first study of genome-level effects on cells manipulated by digital microfluidics. These effects were evaluated using a broad suite of tools: cell-based stress sensors for heat shock activation, single-cell COMET assays to probe changes in DNA integrity, and DNA microarrays and qPCR to evaluate changes in genetic expression. The results lead to two key observations. First, most DMF operating conditions tested, including those that are commonly used in the literature, result in negligible cell-stress or genome-level effects. Second, for DMF devices operated at high driving frequency (18 kHz) and with large driving electrodes (10 mm × 10 mm), there are significant damage to DNA integrity and differential genomic regulation. We hypothesize that these effects are caused by droplet heating. We recommend that for DMF applications involving mammalian cells that driving frequencies be kept low (≤ 10 kHz) and electrode sizes be kept small (≤ 5 mm) to avoid detrimental effects.

  20. Solid phase pegylation of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Suo, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Chunyang; Yu, Pengzhan; Lu, Xiuling; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2009-01-01

    A solid phase conjugation process was developed for attachment of polyethylene glycol to hemoglobin molecule. Bovine hemoglobin was loaded onto an ion exchange chromatography column and adsorbed by the solid medium. Succinimidyl carbonate mPEG was introduced in the mobile phase after the adsorption. Pegylation took place between the hemoglobin on the solid phase, and the pegylation reagent in the liquid phase. A further elution was carried out to separate the pegylated and the unpegylated protein. Analysis by HPSEC, SDS-PAGE, and MALLS demonstrated that the fractions eluted from the solid phase contained well-defined components. Pegylated hemoglobin with one PEG chain was obtained with the yield of 75%, in comparison to the yield of 30% in the liquid phase pegylation. The P(50) values of the mono-pegylated hemoglobin, prepared with SC-mPEG 5 kDa, 10 kDa and 20 kDa, were 19.97, 20.23 and 20.54 mmHg, which were much closer to the value of red blood cells than that of pegylated hemoglobin prepared with the conventional method.

  1. Weak binding gases as modulators of hemoglobin function

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B P; Saxena, A; North, B E

    1980-01-01

    Studies are reported in which the mechanisms of binding of inert gaseous agents to hemoglobin and myoglobin are investigated. Specific binding sites are mapped. Possible effects on sickle cell formation and oxygen binding are discussed. (ACR)

  2. Near-infrared absorbance measurements of hemoglobin solutions incubated with glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernovaya, Olga S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Meglinski, Igor; Ritchie, Laurie

    2007-02-01

    It is known that glucose influences on spectral properties of blood and hemoglobin and interacts with plasma proteins and hemoglobin in erythrocytes. Changes of optical properties of blood and hemoglobin at glucose concentration within physiological level are important for diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of presence of glucose and glycation of hemoglobin on absorbance of aqueous hemoglobin solutions with different glucose concentrations. Measurements were taken using spectrophotometer EQUINOX 55 (Bruker Optic GmbH) in a range 1000-1800 nm. Water has absorption bands in the near-infrared region which may be influenced by glucose presence. We have hypothesized that glucose and hemoglobin, especially glycated hemoglobin, may influence the absorption band of water in solution. The hemoglobin solutions with different amount of glucose (from 0 to 1000 mg/dl with a step 100 mg/dl) were incubated up to 28 days. Our measurements show that presence of glucose affects the spectra of aqueous hemoglobin solutions. The magnitude of absorbance depends on glucose concentration. At the beginning of incubation hemoglobin solution without glucose has the lowest absorbance magnitude, but after a rather long time of incubation (28 days) the absorbance of hemoglobin solutions with glucose become smaller compared to the absorbance of hemoglobin solution without glucose. This fact may be explained by assumption of hemoglobin glycation, when glucose molecules chemically bind to hemoglobin, and water binding to hemoglobin. In the case of water binding to hemoglobin molecules the amount of free water molecules in solution decreases, so the water aborbance is excepted to decrease.

  3. Error in noninvasive spectrophotometric measurement of blood hemoglobin concentration under conditions of blood loss.

    PubMed

    Naftalovich, Rotem; Naftalovich, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    SpHb to macro hemoglobin concentrations during blood loss due to the increasing effect of microcirculatory hemoglobin measurement on the mixed parameter, SpHb.

  4. Biophysical basis of hypoxic radioprotection by deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.T.; Hill, R.P.

    1986-08-01

    Perfusion with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin provides an effective method for inducing hypoxic radioprotection of normal tissues during radiation treatment of tumors. In this study, the dependence of P50, the half-saturation pressure of oxygen binding to dextran-hemoglobin, was analyzed as a function of solution temperature and pH. The variation of attainable radioprotection with P50, and with the amount of collateral blood entering into the perfused region, was calculated. Upon perfusion of canine gracilis muscle with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin, a rapid onset of extensive venous hypoxia was observed.

  5. Interrelationship among Fe-His Bond Strengths, Oxygen Affinities, and Intersubunit Hydrogen Bonding Changes upon Ligand Binding in the β Subunit of Human Hemoglobin: The Alkaline Bohr Effect.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Shigenori; Okumura, Miki; Saito, Kazuya; Ogura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Teizo; Nagai, Masako

    2017-03-07

    Regulation of the oxygen affinity of human adult hemoglobin (Hb A) at high pH, known as the alkaline Bohr effect, is essential for its physiological function. In this study, structural mechanisms of the alkaline Bohr effect and pH-dependent O2 affinity changes were investigated via (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and visible and UV resonance Raman spectra of mutant Hbs, Hb M Iwate (αH87Y) and Hb M Boston (αH58Y). It was found that even though the binding of O2 to the α subunits is forbidden in the mutant Hbs, the O2 affinity was higher at alkaline pH than at neutral pH, and concomitantly, the Fe-His stretching frequency of the β subunits was shifted to higher values. Thus, it was confirmed for the β subunits that the stronger the Fe-His bond, the higher the O2 affinity. It was found in this study that the quaternary structure of α(Fe(3+))β(Fe(2+)-CO) of the mutant Hb is closer to T than to the ordinary R at neutral pH. The retained Aspβ94-Hisβ146 hydrogen bond makes the extent of proton release smaller upon ligand binding from Hisβ146, known as one of residues contributing to the alkaline Bohr effect. For these T structures, the Aspα94-Trpβ37 hydrogen bond in the hinge region and the Tyrα42-Aspβ99 hydrogen bond in the switch region of the α1-β2 interface are maintained but elongated at alkaline pH. Thus, a decrease in tension in the Fe-His bond of the β subunits at alkaline pH causes a substantial increase in the change in global structure upon binding of CO to the β subunit.

  6. The evolution of Root effect hemoglobins in the absence of intracellular pH protection of the red blood cell: insights from primitive fishes.

    PubMed

    Regan, Matthew D; Brauner, Colin J

    2010-06-01

    The Root effect, a reduction in blood oxygen (O(2)) carrying capacity at low pH, is used by many fish species to maximize O(2) delivery to the eye and swimbladder. It is believed to have evolved in the basal actinopterygian lineage of fishes, species that lack the intracellular pH (pH(i)) protection mechanism of more derived species' red blood cells (i.e., adrenergically activated Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; betaNHE). These basal actinopterygians may consequently experience a reduction in blood O(2) carrying capacity, and thus O(2) uptake at the gills, during hypoxia- and exercise-induced generalized blood acidoses. We analyzed the hemoglobins (Hbs) of seven species within this group [American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), bowfin (Amia calva), mooneye (Hiodon tergisus), and pirarucu (Arapaima gigas)] for their Root effect characteristics so as to test the hypothesis of the Root effect onset pH value being lower than those pH values expected during a generalized acidosis in vivo. Analysis of the haemolysates revealed that, although each of the seven species displayed Root effects (ranging from 7.3 to 40.5% desaturation of Hb with O(2), i.e., Hb O(2) desaturation), the Root effect onset pH values of all species are considerably lower (ranging from pH 5.94 to 7.04) than the maximum blood acidoses that would be expected following hypoxia or exercise (pH(i) 7.15-7.3). Thus, although these primitive fishes possess Hbs with large Root effects and lack any significant red blood cell betaNHE activity, it is unlikely that the possession of a Root effect would impair O(2) uptake at the gills following a generalized acidosis of the blood. As well, it was shown that both maximal Root effect and Root effect onset pH values increased significantly in bowfin over those of the more basal species, toward values of similar magnitude to those of most of the more derived

  7. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  8. Reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent to detect thalassemia and thalassemic hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Sudmann, Å A; Piehler, A; Urdal, P

    2012-12-01

    Thalassemia and iron deficiency may both result in hypochromic microcytic anemia. Hematological algorithms that differentiate the two are mainly established in adult selected diagnostic groups. We aimed at creating an algorithm applicable in the presence of children, hemoglobin variants, and iron deficiency. Our study material constituted blood samples referred during 1 year for routine diagnostics of hemoglobinopathy. We included 443 samples, of which 37% were from children 3 months or older. We found β-thalassemia trait (n = 100), α-thalassemia (n = 75), combined α-/β-thalassemia (n = 14), hemoglobin variants (n = 42), and no-hemoglobinopathy (n = 207), of whom 107 had a ferritin at or below 20 μg/L. We included reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent, ferritin, and erythrocyte count in our algorithm. Our algorithm differentiated β-thalassemia trait from no-hemoglobinopathy with a sensitivity of 99% at 83% specificity. It performed better than other published algorithms when applied to all patient samples, while equally or moderately better in the 63% adult samples. Our algorithm also detected the clinically significant α-thalassemias, and most of the combined α-/β-thalassemias and thalassemic hemoglobin variants. Our algorithm efficiently differentiated thalassemia and thalassemic hemoglobin variants from iron deficiency in children and adults. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. [EFFECT OF LOW CARBOHYDRATE DIETS ON WEIGHT LOSS AND GLYCOSILATED HEMOGLOBIN IN PEOPLE WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Hernández Alcantara, Gloria; Jiménez Cruz, Arturo; Bacardí Gascón, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    some experts have suggested out that low carbohydrate diets (LCD) are more effective for weight loss and glycemic control. However, long term results are controversial. to review and analyze randomized control studies that evaluate the effect of LCD on weight and metabolic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes for a period equal to or greater than 10 months. a systematic review was conducted on randomized trials registered in PubMed, EBSCOhost and Scielo to May 15th 2015, published in English and Spanish, with the following search data: "diabetes mellitus" AND "carbohydrate restricted diet" OR "restricted carbohydrate diet" OR "low carbohydrate diet" AND "weight loss". four studies met the inclusion criteria. There were 444 participants between 18-70yo. Follow-up time ranged between 10 to 24 months. Three out of the four studies reported weight reduction with LCD. However, when LCD were compared with other diets no significant differences in weight loss or A1C levels were observed. this review showed that three of four studies on the LCD were effective for weight loss over a period of 10 to 24 months. However, there was no evidence showing better results than those observed with other diets. Nor, difference in A1C. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Hemoglobin stability: observations on the denaturation of normal and abnormal hemoglobins by oxidant dyes, heat, and alkali

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Ronald F.

    1970-01-01

    Several unstable mutant hemoglobins have alterations which affect areas of the molecule involved in the attachment of heme to globin. Loss of heme from globin has been demonstrated during the denaturation of some of these unstable mutants. The importance of heme ligands for the stability of hemoglobin was illustrated in the present experiments on the denaturation of several hemoglobins and hemoglobin derivatives by heat, oxidative dyes, and alkali. Heating of normal hemolysates diluted to 4 g of hemoglobin per 100 ml at 50°C for 20 hr in 0.05 M sodium phosphate, pH 7.4, caused precipitation of 23-54% of the hemoglobin. Dialysis against water or dilution of the sample decreased denaturation to 12-20%. Precipitation was decreased to less than 3.5% by the presence of 0.015 M potassium cyanide. Increasing the ionic strength of the medium increased precipitation. Cyanide prevented the formation of inclusion bodies when red cells containing unstable hemoglobin Philly, β35 tyr → phe, were incubated with the redox dye new methylene blue. Conversion to methemoglobin increased the rate of alkali denaturation of hemoglobin but the presence of potassium cyanide returned the denaturation rate to that of ferrohemoglobin. The ability of cyanide to decrease heat precipitation of hemoglobin may depend on a dimeric or tetrameric state of the hemoglobin molecule. Purified β-chains, which exist as tetramers, were stabilized but purified monomeric α-chains were not rendered more heat resistant by the ligand. Stabilization of hemoglobin by cyanide required binding of the ligand to only one heme of an αβ-dimer. Hemoglobin Gun Hill, an unstable molecule with heme groups present only on the α-chains was quite heat stable in the presence of cyanide. The binding of cyanide to the iron atom in methemoglobin is thought to be associated with increased planarity of the heme group and increased stability of the heme-globin complex. The stabilizing effect of cyanide in the above

  11. Grape polyphenols inhibit Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and potentiate the effects of gefitinib in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a combination of dietary grape polyphenols resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin (RQC), at low concentrations, was effective at inhibiting metastatic cancer progression. Herein, we investigate the molecular mechanisms of RQC in breast cancer and explore the potential of RQC as a potentiation agent for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapeutic gefitinib. Our in vitro experiments showed RQC induced apoptosis in gefitinib-resistant breast cancer cells via regulation of a myriad of proapoptotic proteins. Because the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is often elevated during development of anti-EGFR therapy resistance, the effect of RQC on the mTOR upstream effector Akt and the negative regulator AMP kinase (AMPK) was investigated. RQC was found to reduce Akt activity, induce the activation of AMPK, and inhibit mTOR signaling in breast cancer cells. Combined RQC and gefitinib decreased gefitinib resistant breast cancer cell viability to a greater extent than RQC or gefitinib alone. Moreover, RQC inhibited Akt and mTOR and activated AMPK even in the presence of gefitinib. Our in vivo experiments showed combined RQC and gefitinib was more effective than the individual treatments at inhibiting mammary tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. Therefore, RQC treatment inhibits breast cancer progression and may potentiate anti-EGFR therapy by inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling.

  12. Effect of space flight on the frequency of micronuclei and expression of stress-responsive proteins in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Mituo; Hirayama, Jun; Kato, Tomohisa; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Han, Zhen-Bo; Ishizaki, Kanji; Nishizawa, Kimiko; Suzuki, Fumio; Cannon, Thomas F; Fukui, Keiji; Shimazu, Toru; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Ishioka, Noriaki; Matsumiya, Hiroyuki

    2002-12-01

    Results of past space experiments suggest that the biological effect of space radiation could be enhanced under microgravity in some cases, especially in insects. To examine if such a synergistic effect of radiation and microgravity also exists in human cells, frequencies of chromosome instability and cellular levels of several stress-responsive proteins were analyzed in cultured human and rodent cells after space flight. Human (MCF7 and AT2KY), mouse (m5S) and hamster (SHE) cell lines were loaded on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95 mission) and grown during a 9-day mission. After landing, the micronuclei resulting from abnormal nuclear division and accumulation of stress-responsive proteins such as p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are involved in radiation-induced signal transduction cascades, were analyzed. The frequencies of micronuclei in all the four mammalian cell strains tested were not significantly different between flight and ground control samples. Also, the cellular amounts of p53, p21 (WAF1/SDI1/CIP1) and activated (phosphorylated) forms of three distinct MAPKs in MCF7 and m5S cells of flight samples were similar to those of ground control samples. These results indicated that any effect of space radiation, microgravity, or combination of both were not detectable, at least under the present experimental conditions.

  13. Fluid Resuscitation of Uncontrolled Hemorrhage Using a Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier: Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Wang, Xu; Bradbury, Nicole; Moon-Massat, Paula F.; Freilich, Daniel; Auker, Charles; McCarron, Richard; Scultetus, Anke; Stern, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Animal models of combined TBI and hemorrhagic shock (HS) suggest a benefit of HBOC-based resuscitation, but their use remains controversial and little is known of the specific effects of TBI and high-pressure (large arterial injury) bleeding on resuscitation. We examine the effect of TBI and aortic tear injury on low volume HBOC resuscitation in a swine polytrauma model and hypothesize that HBOC-based resuscitation will improve survival in the setting of aortic tear regardless of the presence of TBI. Methods Anesthetized swine subjected to HS with aortic tear +/− fluid percussion TBI underwent equivalent limited resuscitation with HBOC, LR, or HBOC+nitroglycerine (NTG) (vasoattenuated HBOC) and were observed for 6 hours. Results There was no independent effect of TBI on survival time after adjustment for fluid type and there was no interaction between TBI and resuscitation fluid type. However, total catheter hemorrhage volume required to reach target shock blood pressure was less with TBI (14.0 ml/kg [12.4, 15.6]) vs. HS-only (21.0 ml/kg [19.5, 22.5]), with equivalent lactate accumulation. Conclusion TBI did not affect survival in this polytrauma model, but less hemorrhage was required in the presence of TBI to achieve an equivalent degree of shock suggesting globally impaired cardiovascular response to hemorrhage in the presence of TBI. There was also no benefit of HBOC-based fluid resuscitation over LR, contrary to models using liver injury as the source of hemorrhage. Considering wound location is of paramount importance when choosing resuscitation strategy. PMID:23324891

  14. Role of uteroferrin in placental iron transport: effect of maternal iron treatment on fetal iron and uteroferrin content and neonatal hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ducsay, C A; Buhi, W C; Bazer, F W; Roberts, R M; Combs, G E

    1984-11-01

    Uteroferrin, an Fe-containing, progesterone-induced glycoprotein is involved in maternal to fetal Fe transport in swine. These studies examined the effect of im Fe injection of dam on conceptus and piglet Fe stores. In Exp. I, eight gilts were bred and assigned to either treatment I (no Fe injections) or treatment II (total of 22 mg iron-dextran/kg body weight on d 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 of gestation) and hysterectomized on d 90 to determine whether Fe injections increased Fe stores in the conceptus. Total Fe in allantoic fluid (P less than .10) as well as uteroferrin concentration (P less than .05) and total uteroferrin (P less than .05) in placentae were greater for gilts in treatment II. In Exp. II, 19 cross-bred sows were bred and assigned to treatments I and II (d 40, 50 and 60 of gestation), as in Exp. I, and treatment III (total of 22 mg iron-dextran/kg body weight on d 90, 100 and 110 of gestation) to determine effects of treatment on hemoglobin (Hb) values of the piglets at 8 +/- 1 h and d 4 postpartum. Piglets from treatment II had higher (P less than .01) Hb at 8 +/- 1 h, but not on d 4 postpartum. Experiment III was a replication of Exp. II except that Hb values were determined at 8 +/- 1 h, d 4 and d 7 postpartum. On d 7, piglets from treatment II had higher (P less than .05) Hb, but differences at 8 +/- 1 h and d 4 were not significant (P greater than .10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effect of the cellular-type artificial oxygen carrier hemoglobin vesicle as a resuscitative fluid for prehospital treatment: experiments in a rat uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock model.

    PubMed

    Seishi, Yasuhisa; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Sakai, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2012-08-01

    The hemoglobin vesicle (Hb-vesicle) is a cellular-type artificial oxygen carrier showing a resuscitative effect comparable to that of blood transfusion in several animal models. However, the efficacy of Hb-vesicles for resuscitation when the hemorrhage cannot be controlled remains unclear. Therefore, we used Hb-vesicles in a rat hemorrhagic shock model caused by continuous bleeding. For inducing uncontrolled hemorrhage, animals were heparinized and bled from the caudal artery. Fluid resuscitation was subsequently performed with five materials: Hb-vesicle suspension in a 5% albumin (Alb) solution (HbV), washed red blood cells (wRBC) in a 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solution, 5% Alb, 6% HES, and saline (Sal). During the experiment, all animals in the HbV and wRBC groups survived, whereas all those in the Alb and HES groups died. In the Sal group, five of seven animals died. In the HbV and wRBC groups, the heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and blood lactic acid levels were stabilized during resuscitation. Meanwhile, the hematocrit levels of the HbV, Alb, and HES groups showed sharp decreases (HbV: 6.8% ± 1.7%, Alb: 6.8% ± 0.8%, HES: 5.5% ± 0.7% at 100% total circulated blood volume; final hematocrit of the HbV group: 1.5% ± 0.5%). These results suggest that shocked animals can survive longer when the Hb-vesicle supply is maintained and that HbV showed a similar effect to wRBC in maintaining the circulating volume and oxygen metabolism. Continuous infusion of Hb-vesicles may extend the survival of trauma victims with uncontrolled hemorrhage until they have reached a trauma center.

  16. Development of an immunoassay to detect benzene adducts in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Grassman, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an immunoassay to detect the adducts formed in hemoglobin after exposure to benzene, which is known to cause bone marrow degeneration and acute myelogenous leukemia. The use of benzene-adduct detection as a biological monitoring method would permit measurement of low exposures and exposures sustained weeks earlier. The reactivity of hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite, with blood proteins and amino acids was investigated in order to decide which antigens and analytes were likely to be suitable for immunoassay development. The second section determined the combination of benzene-metabolite and antigen need to produce an immunoassay with the requisite low detection limit and specificity. The immunoassays with the best performance were tested on hemoglobin from benzene-exposed mice. In vitro studies showed that hydroquinone efficiently formed adducts with erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin but not with albumin. Adduction efficiency was greater in incubations using purified hemoglobin than whole blood. Cysteine accounted for 15 to 27% of the adducts formed by hydroquinone. The site of the other adducts were not identified although there was evidence that the hemoglobin heme was adducted. Adducts were found on only 1 of the 2 globin chains. Tryptic digestion of the globin failed to associate the adducts with a specific peptide. Antigens made from hydroquinone-adducted hemoglobin but not hydroquinone-adducted cysteines coupled to carrier proteins effectively elicited adduct-specific antibodies. Interference due to reactivity to hemoglobin was controlled by using uniform quantities of hemoglobin in all wells. The mid-range of the best assays were approximately 12 pmoles HQ per well. Antibodies directed toward hemoglobin adducted with the benzene metabolites phenol, catechol and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were also made. The performance of the anti-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were suitable for quantitative immunoassays.

  17. Accuracy of noninvasive hemoglobin and invasive point-of-care hemoglobin testing compared with a laboratory analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, N; Osea, E A; Martinez, G J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hemoglobin concentration is assessed to detect anemia and its associated morbidities. Hemoglobin is usually determined from venous or capillary blood samples run on a laboratory analyzer. However, this method requires a needle stick and results can be delayed. It also exposes caregivers to risks associated with needle sticks and blood exposure. Noninvasive hemoglobin determination would be of benefit to patients and caregivers because it would allow for quick and painless point-of-care assessment. Methods Hemoglobin determination from a noninvasive spot check hemoglobin device (Pronto-7 with SpHb, Masimo) and an invasive point-of-care device (HemoCue) was compared with venous blood samples run on a laboratory hematology analyzer. Results A total of 440 outpatients and healthy volunteers were included (mean age 36 years, 62% female). Compared with the hematology analyzer, the bias ± standard deviation of was −0.1 ± 1.1 g/dL for SpHb and −0.1 ± 1.6 g/dL for HemoCue. Conclusion Noninvasive hemoglobin testing with SpHb provided similar accuracy as invasive point-of-care hemoglobin testing and may enable more efficient and effective patient care. PMID:23809685

  18. Effect of high protein vs high carbohydrate intake on insulin sensitivity, body weight, hemoglobin A1c, and blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sargrad, Karin R; Homko, Carol; Mozzoli, Maria; Boden, Guenther

    2005-04-01

    Extremely low carbohydrate/high protein diets are popular methods of weight loss. Compliance with these diets is poor and long-term effectiveness and the safety of these diets for patients with type 2 diabetes is not known. The objective of the current study was to evaluate effects of less extreme changes in carbohydrate or protein diets on weight, insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, lipid levels), and renal function in obese inner-city patients with type 2 diabetes. Study patients were admitted to the General Clinical Research Center for 24 hours for initial tests including a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (for measurement of insulin sensitivity), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometric measurements (for assessment of body composition), indirect calorimetry (for measurement of REE), electronic blood pressure monitoring, and blood chemistries to measure blood lipids levels along with renal and hepatic functions. Six patients with type 2 diabetes (five women and one man) were randomly assigned to the high-protein diet (40% carbohydrate, 30% protein, 30% fat) and six patients (four women and two men) to the high-carbohydrate diet (55% carbohydrate, 15% protein, 30% fat). All patients returned to the General Clinical Research Center weekly for monitoring of food records; dietary compliance; and measurements of body weight, blood pressure, and blood glucose. After 8 weeks on these diets, all patients were readmitted to the General Clinical Research Center for the same series of tests. Twelve study patients were taught to select either the high-protein or high-carbohydrate diet and were followed for 8 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c, weight, and blood pressure were measured. Statistical significance was assessed using two-tailed Student's t tests and two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Both the high-carbohydrate and high-protein groups lost weight (-2.2+/-0.9 kg, -2.5+/-1.6 kg

  19. Effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on secondary metabolites in forage plants and potential consequences for multiple trophic responses involving mammalian herbivores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thines, Nicole J.; Bassman, John H.; Shipley, Lisa A.; Slusser, James R.

    2004-10-01

    Herbivores represent the interface between primary production and higher trophic levels. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on microbes, invertebrate herbivores, and detritivores has received limited study in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, although direct effects (e.g. melanoma, cataracts) on mammals have been documented, indirect effects (e.g., resulting from changes in plant chemistry) of enhanced UV-B on mammalian herbivores have not been evaluated. Although the diet of mammalian herbivores has little effect on nutritional quality for their associated predators, to the extent changes in plant chemistry affect aspects of population dynamics (e.g., growth, fecundity, densities), higher trophic levels can be affected. In this study, different forage species of varying inherent levels of key secondary metabolites are being grown in the field under either ambient or ambient plus supplemental UV-B radiation simulating a 15% stratospheric ozone depletion for Pullman, Washington. At various time intervals, foliage is being sampled and analyzed for changes in secondary metabolites and other attributes. Using controlled feeding trials, changes in plant secondary metabolites are being related to preference and digestibility in specialist and generalist mammalian hindgut herbivores, digestion in ruminants and non-ruminants, and to selected aspects of population dynamics in mammalian herbivores. Results suggest how UV-B-induced changes in plant secondary chemistry affect animal nutrition, and thus animal productivity in a range of mammalian herbivores. Reductions in palatability and digestibility of plant material along with reductions in fecundity and other aspects of population dynamics could have significant economic ramifications for farmers, ranchers and wildlife biologists.

  20. The Effects of Allicin, a Reactive Sulfur Species from Garlic, on a Selection of Mammalian Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Gruhlke, Martin C H; Nicco, Carole; Batteux, Frederic; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2016-12-26

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been used as a spice and medicinal plant since ancient times. Garlic produces the thiol-reactive defence substance, allicin, upon wounding. The effects of allicin on human lung epithelium carcinoma (A549), mouse fibroblast (3T3), human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), human colon carcinoma (HT29) and human breast cancer (MCF7) cell lines were tested. To estimate toxic effects of allicin, we used a standard MTT-test (methylthiazoltetrazolium) for cell viability and ³H-thymidine incorporation for cell proliferation. The glutathione pool was measured using monobromobimane and the formation of reactive species was identified using 2',7'-dichlorofluoresceine-diacetate. The YO-PRO-1 iodide staining procedure was used to estimate apoptosis. Allicin reduced cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. In the bimane test, it was observed that cells treated with allicin showed reduced fluorescence, suggesting glutathione oxidation. The cell lines tested differed in sensitivity to allicin in regard to viability, cell proliferation and glutathione oxidation. The 3T3 and MCF-7 cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis compared to the other cell types. These data show that mammalian cell lines differ in their sensitivity and responses to allicin.

  1. The Effects of Allicin, a Reactive Sulfur Species from Garlic, on a Selection of Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gruhlke, Martin C. H.; Nicco, Carole; Batteux, Frederic; Slusarenko, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been used as a spice and medicinal plant since ancient times. Garlic produces the thiol-reactive defence substance, allicin, upon wounding. The effects of allicin on human lung epithelium carcinoma (A549), mouse fibroblast (3T3), human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), human colon carcinoma (HT29) and human breast cancer (MCF7) cell lines were tested. To estimate toxic effects of allicin, we used a standard MTT-test (methylthiazoltetrazolium) for cell viability and 3H-thymidine incorporation for cell proliferation. The glutathione pool was measured using monobromobimane and the formation of reactive species was identified using 2′,7′-dichlorofluoresceine-diacetate. The YO-PRO-1 iodide staining procedure was used to estimate apoptosis. Allicin reduced cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. In the bimane test, it was observed that cells treated with allicin showed reduced fluorescence, suggesting glutathione oxidation. The cell lines tested differed in sensitivity to allicin in regard to viability, cell proliferation and glutathione oxidation. The 3T3 and MCF-7 cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis compared to the other cell types. These data show that mammalian cell lines differ in their sensitivity and responses to allicin. PMID:28035949

  2. Effect of Emetine on T-2 Toxin-Induced Inhibition of Protein Synthesis in Mammalian Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    dependent manner. The dose-response curves for these potent trichothecenes, deoxynivalenol , T-2 tetraol and verru- two effects were nearly identical...response of cells to T-2 To RecoPa y Tru tetraol, deoxynivalenol and verrucarol (fig. 5, D-F). Covetldw 0 1 4 8 As noted earlier, the data in figures 4 and... deoxynivalenol or T-2 tetraol. toxin-cell association was not a generalized nonspecific effect associated with any inhibitor of protein synthesis. Discussion

  3. Effects of Age, Hemoglobin Type and Parasite Strain on IgG Recognition of Plasmodium falciparum–Infected Erythrocytes in Malian Children

    PubMed Central

    Zeituni, Amir E.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Diakite, Mahamadou; Doumbia, Saibou; Moretz, Samuel E.; Diouf, Ababacar; Tullo, Gregory; Lopera-Mesa, Tatiana M.; Bess, Cameron D.; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Naturally-acquired antibody responses to antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) have been implicated in antimalarial immunity. To profile the development of this immunity, we have been studying a cohort of Malian children living in an area with intense seasonal malaria transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected plasma from a sub-cohort of 176 Malian children aged 3-11 years, before (May) and after (December) the 2009 transmission season. To measure the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) type on antibody responses, we enrolled age-matched HbAA, HbAS and HbAC children. To quantify antibody recognition of iRBCs, we designed a high-throughput flow cytometry assay to rapidly test numerous plasma samples against multiple parasite strains. We evaluated antibody reactivity of each plasma sample to 3 laboratory-adapted parasite lines (FCR3, D10, PC26) and 4 short-term-cultured parasite isolates (2 Malian and 2 Cambodian). 97% of children recognized ≥1 parasite strain and the proportion of IgG responders increased significantly during the transmission season for most parasite strains. Both strain-specific and strain-transcending IgG responses were detected, and varied by age, Hb type and parasite strain. In addition, the breadth of IgG responses to parasite strains increased with age in HbAA, but not in HbAS or HbAC, children. Conclusions/Significance Our assay detects both strain-specific and strain-transcending IgG responses to iRBCs. The magnitude and breadth of these responses varied not only by age, but also by Hb type and parasite strain used. These findings indicate that studies of acquired humoral immunity should account for Hb type and test large numbers of diverse parasite strains. PMID:24124591

  4. Effect of metformin glycinate on glycated hemoglobin A1C concentration and insulin sensitivity in drug-naive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Robles-Cervantes, José A; Ramos-Zavala, Maria G; Barrera-Durán, Carmelita; González-Canudas, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of metformin glycinate on glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) concentration and insulin sensitivity in drug-naive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 20 patients with drug-naive T2DM. Ten subjects received metformin glycinate (1,050.6 mg) once daily during the first month and force-titrated twice daily during the second month. Ten additional patients received placebo as the control group. Before and after the intervention, metabolic profile including A1C and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique) was estimated. A1C concentrations decreased significantly with metformin glycinate administration (8.0 ± 0.7% vs. 7.1 ± 0.9%, P = 0.008) before and after the intervention, respectively. There were significant differences in changes from baseline of A1C between groups (0.0 ± 0.7% vs. -1.0 ± 0.5% for placebo and metformin glycinate groups, respectively; P = 0.004). A reduction of ≥1% in A1C levels was reached in 60.0% of patients with metformin glycinate administration (P = 0.02). Insulin sensitivity was not modified by the intervention. Administration of metformin glycinate during a 2-month period showed a greater decrease in A1C concentrations than placebo in a selected group of drug-naive adult patients with T2DM.

  5. Effect of Metformin Glycinate on Glycated Hemoglobin A1c Concentration and Insulin Sensitivity in Drug-Naive Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Robles-Cervantes, José A.; Ramos-Zavala, Maria G.; Barrera-Durán, Carmelita; González-Canudas, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim This study evaluated the effect of metformin glycinate on glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) concentration and insulin sensitivity in drug-naive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects and Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 20 patients with drug-naive T2DM. Ten subjects received metformin glycinate (1,050.6 mg) once daily during the first month and force-titrated twice daily during the second month. Ten additional patients received placebo as the control group. Before and after the intervention, metabolic profile including A1C and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique) was estimated. Results A1C concentrations decreased significantly with metformin glycinate administration (8.0±0.7% vs. 7.1±0.9%, P=0.008) before and after the intervention, respectively. There were significant differences in changes from baseline of A1C between groups (0.0±0.7% vs. −1.0±0.5% for placebo and metformin glycinate groups, respectively; P=0.004). A reduction of ≥1% in A1C levels was reached in 60.0% of patients with metformin glycinate administration (P=0.02). Insulin sensitivity was not modified by the intervention. Conclusions Administration of metformin glycinate during a 2-month period showed a greater decrease in A1C concentrations than placebo in a selected group of drug-naive adult patients with T2DM. PMID:22974412

  6. The effects of lowering nighttime and breakfast glucose levels with sensor-augmented pump therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Chase, H Peter; Westfall, Emily; Slover, Robert; Huang, Suiying; Shin, John J; Kaufman, Francine R; Pyle, Laura; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-05-01

    This study determined the association of continuous glucose monitoring glucose (CGM-glucose) levels at different times of the day with improvement in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The potential application of these data is to focus effort to improve glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes. Data were analyzed from 196 patients with type 1 diabetes who were randomized to receive sensor-augmented pump therapy in the 1-year STAR 3 trial. CGM-glucose values and HbA1c levels from baseline and after 1 year were evaluated to determine associations of improvement in CGM-glucose at different times of the day with longitudinal improvement in HbA1c. Improvement in HbA1c levels after 1 year was related to improvement in mean CGM-glucose levels in daytime (6 a.m.-midnight), overnight (midnight-6 a.m.), and each mealtime period (P<0.0001 for each). In multivariable analysis, only improvement in breakfast meal period was associated with improvement in HbA1c after 1 year, explaining 59% of the HbA1c improvement using the partial R(2) test. Moreover, among those patients who only improved CGM-glucose in the overnight period there was an associated improvement in breakfast meal period CGM-glucose of 26 ± 22 mg/dL (P<0.01). Breakfast period glucose improvement had the greatest effect on lowering HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. Improving glucose control overnight resulted in subsequent improvement in the breakfast period. Although glucose control should be improved at all times, methods to improve overnight and post-breakfast glucose levels may be of primary importance in improving glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  7. Inhibitory effects of catechin derivatives on mammalian DNA polymerase and topoisomerase activities and mouse one-cell zygote development.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoko; Kuriyama, Isoko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the inhibitory activities against DNA polymerases (pols) and DNA topoisomerases (topos) by eight major green tea catechin derivatives (flavan-3-ols) were investigated. Some catechins inhibited mammalian pols (α and β) and human topos (I and II), with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) the strongest inhibitor of both enzyme types, showing IC(50) values of 3.8-21.5 and 2.0-20.0 μM, respectively. EGCg did not affect the activities of plant (cauliflower) pol α or prokaryotic pols and showed no effect on the activities of other DNA metabolic enzymes tested. Next, a method was established for assay of mouse one-cell zygote development inhibition, the catechin derivatives screened for bioactivity, and the inhibition was assessed and their effects ranked as: EGCg > GCg > Cg > others. In the mouse one-cell zygote assay, EGCg at 50 μM increased abnormal cells and 75 μM of EGCg-induced apoptosis. The observed ranking of catechin derivative inhibition effects against mouse one-cell zygote development in vivo was similar to their ranking by topo inhibition in vitro rather than by pol inhibition; therefore, topo inhibition might have been effecting zygote development inhibition. These results suggested that catechin derivatives indeed reached the nuclear DNA where topo inhibition can occur, thus causing the observed cellular effects. From these findings, this zygote development inhibition assay will be useful as an anti-pregnant agent screening. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential effects of fluoxetine enantiomers in mammalian neural and cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Magyar, János; Rusznák, Zoltán; Harasztosi, Csaba; Körtvély, Agnes; Pacher, Pál; Bányász, Tamás; Pankucsi, Csaba; Kovács, László; Szûcs, Géza; Nánási, Péter P; Kecskeméti, Valéria

    2003-04-01

    Racemic fluoxetine is a widely used SSRI antidepressant compound having also anticonvulsant effect. In addition, it was shown that it blocked several types of voltage gated ion channels including neural and cardiac calcium channels. In the present study the effects of enantiomers of fluoxetine (R(-)-fluoxetine and S(+)-fluoxetine) were compared on neuronal and cardiac voltage-gated Ca2+ channels using the whole cell configuration of patch clamp techniques, and the anticonvulsant action of these enantiomers was also evaluated in a mouse epilepsy model. In isolated pyramidal neurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus of the rat the effect of fluoxetine (S(+), R(-) and racemic) was studied on the Ca2+ channels by measuring peak Ba2+ current during ramp depolarizations. All forms of fluoxetine reduced the Ba2+ current of the pyramidal cells in a concentration-dependent manner, with a Kd value of 22.3+/-3.6 microM for racemic fluoxetine. This value of Kd was higher by one order of magnitude than found in cardiac myocytes with fluoxetine enantiomers (2.4+/-0.1 and 2.8+/-0.2 microM). Difference between the effects of the two enantiomers on neuronal Ba2+ current was observed only at 5 microM concentration: R(-)-fluoxetine inhibited 28+/-3% of the peak current, while S(+)-fluoxetine reduced the current by 18+/-2% (n=13, P<0.05). In voltage clamped canine ventricular cardiomyocytes both enantiomers of fluoxetine caused a reversible concentration-dependent block of the peak Ca2+ current measured at 0 mV. Significant differences between the two enantiomers in this blocking effect was observed at low concentrations only: S(+)-fluoxetine caused a higher degree of block than R(-)-fluoxetine (56.3+/-2.2% versus 49.1+/-2.2% and 95.5+/-0.9% versus 84.5+/-3.1% block with 3 and 10 microM S(+) and R(-)-fluoxetine, respectively, P<0.05, n=5). Studied in current clamp mode, micromolar concentrations of fluoxetine shortened action potential duration of isolated ventricular cells, while higher

  9. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  10. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  11. Radiation effects on the cell-cell communication of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depriest, Kendall Russell

    Recent observations of bystander effects in unirradiated cell populations have focused attention on cell-cell communication, particularly gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), as a means through which the bystander effect may be transmitted. The bystander expression of CDKN1A in unirradiated AG1522 human fibroblast cells observed in another laboratory was verified. The dose response of the bystander effect in the AG1522 cells showed that the effect had reached its maximum at the lowest alpha-particle fluence tested, 0.013 alpha/nuclei. To test potential mechanisms for communication to bystander cells, the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique was used. Only the rat liver epithelial cell line (Clone 9) exhibited GJIC based upon a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay, and there was no change in the rate constant for GJIC following exposure to low LET or high LET radiation. The fibroblast cell lines (AG1521, AG1522, and GM5758) showed no evidence of GJIC in three separate assays including immunohistochemistry. Lindane, an inhibitor of GJIC, eliminated the bystander expression of CDKN1A in AG1522 cells while octanol, another inhibitor of GJIC, did not change the bystander expression of the protein. The two chemicals act in different ways to disrupt GJIC and each one may alter other functions as well, so the elimination of the bystander effect by lindane apparently indicates that lindane is interfering with a bystander signaling mechanism that is not mediated by gap junctions. The lack of connexin localization in the cell membrane of the fibroblast cell lines and the elimination of the bystander expression by lindane, but not octanol, indicates that the bystander effect must be mediated by a non-GJIC mechanism. The experimental evidence suggests that the mediator of the bystander expression of CDKN1A in human diploid fibroblasts is most likely an extracellular signal, such as a cytokine, that acts in a calcium-dependent signal

  12. Hemoglobin Wayne Trait with Incidental Polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Ambelil, Manju; Nguyen, Nghia; Dasgupta, Amitava; Risin, Semyon; Wahed, Amer

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, caused by mutations in the globin genes, are one of the most common inherited disorders. Many of the hemoglobin variants can be identified by hemoglobin analysis using conventional electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography; however hemoglobin DNA analysis may be necessary in other cases for confirmation. Here, we report a case of a rare alpha chain hemoglobin variant, hemoglobin Wayne, in a 47-year-old man who presented with secondary polycythemia. Capillary zone electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography revealed a significant amount of a hemoglobin variant, which was further confirmed by hemoglobin DNA sequencing as hemoglobin Wayne. Since the patient was not homozygous for hemoglobin Wayne, which is associated with secondary polycythemia, the laboratory diagnosis in this case was critical in ruling out hemoglobinopathy as the etiology of his polycythemia.

  13. Co-oximetry interference by hemoglobin-based blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Ali, G S; Steinke, J M; Shepherd, A P

    2001-04-01

    The blood substitutes now being developed from molecularly modified hemoglobin interfere with a wide variety of clinical analyzers, but their effects on cooximeters are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of five hemoglobin-based blood substitutes on the measurements of eight different oximeters and cooximeters: the AVL Omni 6, the AVOXimeters 1000 and 4000, the Ciba Corning (now Bayer) CC270 CO-Oximeter, the Instrumentation Laboratory Synthesis 35, the IL482 and IL682 CO-Oximeters, and the Radiometer OSM3 Hemoximeter. The five blood substitutes in this study were obtained from Apex Bioscience (Research Triangle Park, NC), Baxter Healthcare Corp. (Deerfield, IL), Biopure Corp. (Cambridge, MA), Hemoglobin Therapeutics, and Hemosol, Inc. (Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada). A cooximeter control was used to compare the eight different instruments' measurements on unaltered human hemoglobin. The instruments yielded measurements of total hemoglobin concentration in undiluted blood substitutes that were generally not more variable than those on the control material. By contrast, when compared with readings on controls, the test instruments yielded measurements of the fractional concentrations of oxy-, deoxy-, carboxy-, and methemoglobin that showed greater instrument-to-instrument disparities and larger standard deviations about the all-instrument means. In some cases, the interference was even more obvious: five of six cooximeters gave negative carboxyhemoglobin readings on one particular product. Our findings indicate that the instruments will give less accurate but clinically useful measurements in the presence of these hemoglobin-based blood substitutes. We investigated the effects of five hemoglobin-based blood substitutes on the measurements of eight different cooximeters. Some blood substitutes caused obvious interference, such as negative carboxyhemoglobin readings; however, the findings indicate that cooximeters will generally give less accurate but

  14. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E.

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Cytotoxic Effects of Hexavalent and Trivalent Chromium on Mammalian Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Levis, A. G.; Bianchi, V.; Tamino, G.; Pegoraro, B.

    1978-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of hexavalent (k2Cr2O7) and trivalent (CrCl3) chromium compounds have been studied in cultured hamster fibroblasts (BHK line) and human epithelial-like cells (HEp line). K2Cr2O7 stimulates the uptake of labelled thymidine into the soluble intracellular pool (the stimulation of nucleoside uptake represents a specific effect of Cr6+) while Cr3+ always exerts an inhibitory action. DNA Synthesis is inhibited by treatment with both chromium compounds, but especially by K2Cr2O7. Moreover, the effective CrCl3 concentrations reduce the sensitivity of DNA and RNA to hydrolysis with perchloric acid. Treatments with k2Cr2O7 in balanced salt solution, where Cr6+ reduction is less marked, induce more pronounced cytotoxic effects than treatments in complete growth medium. HEp cells turned out to be more sensitive to K2Cr2O7 than BHK fibroblasts: in the former line TdR uptake is less stimulated, DNA synthesis and cell survival are more affected. Survival of BHK cells to K2Cr2O7 indicates a multi-hit mechanism of cell inactivation, the extrapolation number being about 10. On the basis of quantitative Cr determinations in the treatment solutions and in the treated cells, the cytotoxic effects of Cr are attributed to the action of Cr6+ at the plasma membrane level on the mechanisms involved in nucleoside uptake, and to the interaction of Cr3+ at the intracellular level with nucleophilic targets on the DNA molecule. PMID:205233

  16. Actions of mammalian insulin on a Neurospora variant: effects on intracellular metabolite levels as monitored by P-31 NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.J.; McKenzie, M.A.; Jordan, F.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-05-01

    Fourier transform P-31 NMR spectroscopy (81 MHz) was used to investigate the biochemical nature of insulin action upon the cell wall-deficient slime mutant of Neurospora crassa. Spectra of oxygenated, living cells (ca.10/sup 9//ml.) in late logarithmic-early stationary phase of growth were accumulated for approximately 20 min. (350-450 pulses). Pronounced differences were seen in the metabolite levels of cells cultured for 18-21 hours in the presence of insulin (100 nM) as compared to cells cultured in its absence. Differences in the insulin-grown cells included higher levels of sugar phosphates, inorganic (cytoplasmic) phosphate, NAD+/NADH and UDP-glucose (UDPG) compared to control cells, in which UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDPNAG) was the prominent sugar nucleotide. When 100 mM glucose was administered with insulin immediately prior to measurement, short term effects were seen. There were significant increases of sugar phosphates, inorganic phosphate, NAD+/NADH, phosphodiesters and UDPG relative to the case of glucose addition alone. These results are wholly consistent with the known influence of insulin upon mammalian metabolism: stimulation of glucose uptake, phosphorylation and oxidation, phosphatide synthesis and Pi uptake.

  17. Mutant quantity and quality in mammalian cells (AL) exposed to cesium-137 gamma radiation: effect of caffeine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuinness, S. M.; Shibuya, M. L.; Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We examined the effect of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) on the quantity and quality of mutations in cultured mammalian AL human-hamster hybrid cells exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation. At a dose (1.5 mg/ml for 16 h) that reduced the plating efficiency (PE) by 20%, caffeine was not itself a significant mutagen, but it increased by approximately twofold the slope of the dose-response curve for induction of S1- mutants by 137Cs gamma radiation. Molecular analysis of 235 S1- mutants using a series of DNA probes mapped to the human chromosome 11 in the AL hybrid cells revealed that 73 to 85% of the mutations in unexposed cells and in cells treated with caffeine alone, 137Cs gamma rays alone or 137Cs gamma rays plus caffeine were large deletions involving millions of base pairs of DNA. Most of these deletions were contiguous with the region of the MIC1 gene at 11p13 that encodes the S1 cell surface antigen. In other mutants that had suffered multiple marker loss, the deletions were intermittent along chromosome 11. These "complex" mutations were rare for 137Cs gamma irradiation (1/63 = 1.5%) but relatively prevalent (23-50%) for other exposure conditions. Thus caffeine appears to alter both the quantity and quality of mutations induced by 137Cs gamma irradiation.

  18. Mutant quantity and quality in mammalian cells (AL) exposed to cesium-137 gamma radiation: effect of caffeine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuinness, S. M.; Shibuya, M. L.; Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We examined the effect of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) on the quantity and quality of mutations in cultured mammalian AL human-hamster hybrid cells exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation. At a dose (1.5 mg/ml for 16 h) that reduced the plating efficiency (PE) by 20%, caffeine was not itself a significant mutagen, but it increased by approximately twofold the slope of the dose-response curve for induction of S1- mutants by 137Cs gamma radiation. Molecular analysis of 235 S1- mutants using a series of DNA probes mapped to the human chromosome 11 in the AL hybrid cells revealed that 73 to 85% of the mutations in unexposed cells and in cells treated with caffeine alone, 137Cs gamma rays alone or 137Cs gamma rays plus caffeine were large deletions involving millions of base pairs of DNA. Most of these deletions were contiguous with the region of the MIC1 gene at 11p13 that encodes the S1 cell surface antigen. In other mutants that had suffered multiple marker loss, the deletions were intermittent along chromosome 11. These "complex" mutations were rare for 137Cs gamma irradiation (1/63 = 1.5%) but relatively prevalent (23-50%) for other exposure conditions. Thus caffeine appears to alter both the quantity and quality of mutations induced by 137Cs gamma irradiation.

  19. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin renders Enterobacter aerogenes highly susceptible to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Geckil, Hikmet; Arman, Ahmet; Gencer, Salih; Ates, Burhan; Yilmaz, H Ramazan

    2004-12-01

    When expressed in heterologous microorganisms Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) acts as oxygen storage and causes a higher oxygen uptake. In this study, the effect of this protein on growth, sensitivity and antioxidant properties of Enterobacter aerogenes exposed to metal stress was investigated. The strain expressing VHb was more sensitive to mercury and cadmium as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for these metals was up to 2-fold lower in this strain than the host and the recombinant strain carrying a comparable plasmid. At lower concentrations than MIC, the metals partially limited growth and caused an inhibition proportional to metal concentration applied. The growth pattern of VHb expressing strain was also distinctly different from other two non-hemoglobin strains. The hemoglobin containing strain showed substantially higher superoxide dismuates (SOD) activity than the non-hemoglobin strains, while catalase levels were similar in all strains. All strains exposed to copper, however, showed similar MIC values, growth patterns, and SOD and catalase levels.

  20. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  1. Mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling pathway contributes to the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning against stroke.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Michelle; Sapolsky, Robert; Ji, Xunming; Zhao, Heng

    2014-09-01

    Whether the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is protective against brain injury from stroke or is detrimental is controversial, and whether it is involved in the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning (IPC) against stroke is unreported. Our study focuses on the protective role of mTOR against neuronal injury after stroke with and without IPC. We used both an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation model with a mixed neuronal culture and hypoxic postconditioning, as well as an in vivo stroke model with IPC. Rapamycin, a specific pharmacological inhibitor of mTOR, and mTOR short hairpin RNA lentiviral vectors were used to inhibit mTOR activity. A lentiviral vector expressing S6K1, a downstream molecule of mTOR, was used to confirm the protective effects of mTOR. Infarct sizes were measured and protein levels were examined by Western blot. We report that stroke resulted in reduced levels of phosphorylated proteins in the mTOR pathway, including S6K1, S6, and 4EBP1, and that IPC increased these proteins. mTOR inhibition, both by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and by mTOR short hairpin RNA, worsened ischemic outcomes in vitro and in vivo and abolished the protective effects of hypoxic postconditioning and IPC on neuronal death in vitro and brain injury size in vivo. Overexpression of S6K1 mediated by lentiviral vectors significantly attenuated brain infarction. mTOR plays a crucial protective role in brain damage after stroke and contributes to the protective effects of IPC. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-07-07

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers.

  3. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H. K.

    2011-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers. PMID:21490337

  4. Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.

    2004-01-01

    Two conflicting phenomena, bystander effect and adaptive response, are important in determining the biological responses at low doses of radiation and have the potential to impact the shape of the dose-response relationship. Using the Columbia University charged-particle microbeam and the highly sensitive AL cell mutagenic assay, we show here that non-irradiated cells acquire mutagenesis through direct contact with cells whose nuclei have been traversed with a single alpha particle each. Pretreatment of cells with a low dose of X-rays four hours before alpha particle irradiation significantly decreased this bystander mutagenic response. Results from the present study address some of the fundamental issues regarding both the actual target and radiation dose effect and can contribute to our current understanding in radiation risk assessment. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.

    2004-01-01

    Two conflicting phenomena, bystander effect and adaptive response, are important in determining the biological responses at low doses of radiation and have the potential to impact the shape of the dose-response relationship. Using the Columbia University charged-particle microbeam and the highly sensitive AL cell mutagenic assay, we show here that non-irradiated cells acquire mutagenesis through direct contact with cells whose nuclei have been traversed with a single alpha particle each. Pretreatment of cells with a low dose of X-rays four hours before alpha particle irradiation significantly decreased this bystander mutagenic response. Results from the present study address some of the fundamental issues regarding both the actual target and radiation dose effect and can contribute to our current understanding in radiation risk assessment. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Homozygous hemoglobin-E (Hb-EE) disease].

    PubMed

    Amendola, G; Danise, P; Di Palma, A; Franzese, M; Avino, D; D'Arco, A M

    2004-01-01

    The Authors report on a 16 year-old girl, of Cambodian descent, who was admitted to the hospital for hematuria. She showed a mild microcytic, hypochromic anemia with a normal iron balance; clinical examination was normal with neither pallor nor icterus nor splenomegaly; electrophoresis of hemoglobin yielded no hemoglobin A, a sligtly increased amount of HbF and a single band with a mobility similar to that of HbA2; the patient showed no evidence of overt increased hemolysis. With the DNA technology a final diagnosis of homozygous hemoglobin E was made. Hemoglobin E is the most common Hb variant among Southeast Asian populations. The Authors discuss on the benign nature of Hb-EE disease, pointing out that the presence of a single HbE gene in combination with that for beta-thalassemia leads generally to a disorder often comparable in severity to that of homozygous beta-thalassemia. With the recent migration of a high number of people from the countries, where HbE is extremely frequent, to the Western world (including Italy), this thalassemia syndrome is now a global health problem; therefore its knowledge is an important diagnostic challenge to all the experts involved in the care of thalassemic patients.

  7. Effects of Acute Administration of Ketorolac on Mammalian Vestibular Sensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP. PMID:23562034

  8. Effects of acute administration of ketorolac on mammalian vestibular sensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP.

  9. A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with hemoglobin A1c measurement.

    PubMed

    Little, Randie R; Roberts, William L

    2009-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used routinely to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus, as HbA1c is related directly to risks for diabetic complications. The accuracy of HbA1c methods can be affected adversely by the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants or elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The effect of each variant or elevated HbF must be examined with each specific method. The most common Hb variants worldwide are HbS, HbE, HbC, and HbD. All of these Hb variants have single amino acid substitutions in the Hb beta chain. HbF is the major hemoglobin during intrauterine life; by the end of the first year, HbF falls to values close to adult levels of approximately 1%. However, elevated HbF levels can occur in certain pathologic conditions or with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. In a series of publications over the past several years, the effects of these four most common Hb variants and elevated HbF have been described. There are clinically significant interferences with some methods for each of these variants. A summary is given showing which methods are affected by the presence of the heterozygous variants S, E, C, and D and elevated HbF. Methods are divided by type (immunoassay, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity, other) with an indication of whether the result is artificially increased or decreased by the presence of a Hb variant. Laboratorians should be aware of the limitations of their method with respect to these interferences. 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  10. A comparison of the effects of three GM corn varieties on mammalian health.

    PubMed

    de Vendômois, Joël Spiroux; Roullier, François; Cellier, Dominique; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2009-12-10

    We present for the first time a comparative analysis of blood and organ system data from trials with rats fed three main commercialized genetically modified (GM) maize (NK 603, MON 810, MON 863), which are present in food and feed in the world. NK 603 has been modified to be tolerant to the broad spectrum herbicide Roundup and thus contains residues of this formulation. MON 810 and MON 863 are engineered to synthesize two different Bt toxins used as insecticides. Approximately 60 different biochemical parameters were classified per organ and measured in serum and urine after 5 and 14 weeks of feeding. GM maize-fed rats were compared first to their respective isogenic or parental non-GM equivalent control groups. This was followed by comparison to six reference groups, which had consumed various other non-GM maize varieties. We applied nonparametric methods, including multiple pairwise comparisons with a False Discovery Rate approach. Principal Component Analysis allowed the investigation of scattering of different factors (sex, weeks of feeding, diet, dose and group). Our analysis clearly reveals for the 3 GMOs new side effects linked with GM maize consumption, which were sex- and often dose-dependent. Effects were mostly associated with the kidney and liver, the dietary detoxifying organs, although different between the 3 GMOs. Other effects were also noticed in the heart, adrenal glands, spleen and haematopoietic system. We conclude that these data highlight signs of hepatorenal toxicity, possibly due to the new pesticides specific to each GM corn. In addition, unintended direct or indirect metabolic consequences of the genetic modification cannot be excluded.

  11. Cellular uptake and toxicity effects of silver nanoparticles in mammalian kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Milić, Mirta; Leitinger, Gerd; Pavičić, Ivan; Zebić Avdičević, Maja; Dobrović, Slaven; Goessler, Walter; Vinković Vrček, Ivana

    2015-06-01

    The rapid progress and early commercial acceptance of silver-based nanomaterials is owed to their biocidal activity. Besides embracing the antimicrobial potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), it is imperative to give special attention to the potential adverse health effects of nanoparticles owing to prolonged exposure. Here, we report a detailed study on the in vitro interactions of citrate-coated AgNPs with porcine kidney (Pk15) cells. As uncertainty remains whether biological/cellular responses to AgNPs are solely as a result of the release of silver ions or whether the AgNPs themselves have toxic effects, we investigated the effects of Ag(+) on Pk15 cells for comparison. Next, we investigated the cellular uptake of both AgNPs and Ag(+) in Pk15 cells at various concentrations applied. The detected Ag contents in cells exposed to 50 mg l(-1) AgNPs and 50 mg l(-1) Ag(+) were 209 and 25 µg of Ag per 10(6) cells, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated that the Pk15 cells internalized AgNPs by endocytosis. Both forms of silver, nano and ionic, decreased the number of viable Pk15 cells after 24 h in a dose-dependent manner. In spite of a significant uptake into the cells, AgNPs had only insignificant toxicity at concentrations lower than 25 mg l(-1) , whereas Ag(+) exhibited a significant decrease in cell viability at one-fifth of this concentration. The Comet assay suggested that a rather high concentration of AgNP (above 25 mg l(-1) ) is able to induce genotoxicity in Pk15 cells. Further studies must seek deeper understanding of AgNP behavior in biological media and their interactions with cellular membranes.

  12. A Comparison of the Effects of Three GM Corn Varieties on Mammalian Health

    PubMed Central

    de Vendômois, Joël Spiroux; Roullier, François; Cellier, Dominique; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2009-01-01

    We present for the first time a comparative analysis of blood and organ system data from trials with rats fed three main commercialized genetically modified (GM) maize (NK 603, MON 810, MON 863), which are present in food and feed in the world. NK 603 has been modified to be tolerant to the broad spectrum herbicide Roundup and thus contains residues of this formulation. MON 810 and MON 863 are engineered to synthesize two different Bt toxins used as insecticides. Approximately 60 different biochemical parameters were classified per organ and measured in serum and urine after 5 and 14 weeks of feeding. GM maize-fed rats were compared first to their respective isogenic or parental non-GM equivalent control groups. This was followed by comparison to six reference groups, which had consumed various other non-GM maize varieties. We applied nonparametric methods, including multiple pairwise comparisons with a False Discovery Rate approach. Principal Component Analysis allowed the investigation of scattering of different factors (sex, weeks of feeding, diet, dose and group). Our analysis clearly reveals for the 3 GMOs new side effects linked with GM maize consumption, which were sex- and often dose-dependent. Effects were mostly associated with the kidney and liver, the dietary detoxifying organs, although different between the 3 GMOs. Other effects were also noticed in the heart, adrenal glands, spleen and haematopoietic system. We conclude that these data highlight signs of hepatorenal toxicity, possibly due to the new pesticides specific to each GM corn. In addition, unintended direct or indirect metabolic consequences of the genetic modification cannot be excluded. PMID:20011136

  13. The antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antigenotoxic effects of galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bacanlı, Merve; Başaran, A Ahmet; Başaran, Nurşen

    2016-07-27

    Phenolic compounds not only contribute to the sensory qualities of fruits and vegetables but also exhibit several health protective properties. Galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid are commonly used plant phenolics in folk medicine. In this study, the antioxidant capacities of galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid by the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay and the cytotoxic effects by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in V79 cells were investigated. The genotoxic potentials of galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid were evaluated by micronucleus (MN) and alkaline COMET assays in human lymphocytes and in V79 cells. Galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid (10, 100, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10 000, and 20 000 μM) were found to have antioxidant activities at the studied concentrations. IC50 values of galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid in V79 cells were found to be 275.48 μM, 2503.712 μM, and 224.85 μM, respectively. Galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid, at the all concentrations, have not exerted genotoxic effects and galangin, puerarin, and ursolic acid revealed a reduction in the frequency of MN and DNA damage induced by H2O2.

  14. Radiosensitizing effect of the histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid on various mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    CATE, ROSEMARIE TEN; KRAWCZYK, PRZEMEK; STAP, JAN; ATEN, JACOB A.; FRANKEN, NICOLAAS A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Agents that enhance the effectiveness of ionizing radiation have been investigated over many decades. A relatively new group of potential radiosensitizers consists of agents that inhibit histone acetyltransferases (HATs). This study evaluated the radiosensitizing properties of the HAT inhibitor anacardic acid (AA), used at a low-toxic concentration of 100 μM in V79, SW1573 and U2OS cells. Radiation survival curves were analyzed according to the linear quadratic model. Significant radiosensitization by AA was only obtained in U2OS cells. AA significantly increased the value of the linear parameter α, but not of the quadratic parameter β, indicating fixation of potentially lethal damage and an intact repair function of sublethal damage. The increase of the α value was also observed in SW1573 cells, but was not accompanied by a significant radiosensitization. A likely explanation for the enhancement of the α value may be an increase in the amount of lethal lesions due to the compacted chromatin structure. Despite the conflicting results of the radiosensitizing effect of AA in the three cell lines tested, the ability of AA to increase the α value suggests potential advantages for clinical application. PMID:22966377

  15. Variable effects of DNA-synthesis inhibitors upon DNA methylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nyce, J; Liu, L; Jones, P A

    1986-01-01

    Post-synthetic enzymatic hypermethylation of DNA was induced in hamster fibrosarcoma cells by the DNA synthesis inhibitors cytosine arabinoside, hydroxyurea and aphidicolin. This effect required direct inhibition of DNA polymerase alpha or reduction in deoxynucleotide pools and was not specific to a single cell type. At equivalently reduced levels of DNA synthesis, neither cycloheximide, actinomycin D nor serum deprivation affected DNA methylation in this way. The topoisomerase inhibitors nalidixic acid and novobiocin caused significant hypomethylation indicating that increased 5-mCyt content was not a necessary consequence of DNA synthesis inhibition. The induced hypermethylation occurred predominantly in that fraction of the DNA synthesized in the presence of inhibitor; was stable in the absence of drug; was most prominent in low molecular weight DNA representing sites of initiated but incomplete DNA synthesis; and occurred primarily within CpG dinucleotides, although other dinucleotides were overmethylated as well. Drug-induced CpG hypermethylation may be capable of silencing genes, an effect which may be relevant to the aberrantly expressed genes characteristic of neoplastic cells. PMID:3086840

  16. Predicting effective microRNA target sites in mammalian mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vikram; Bell, George W; Nam, Jin-Wu; Bartel, David P

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA targets are often recognized through pairing between the miRNA seed region and complementary sites within target mRNAs, but not all of these canonical sites are equally effective, and both computational and in vivo UV-crosslinking approaches suggest that many mRNAs are targeted through non-canonical interactions. Here, we show that recently reported non-canonical sites do not mediate repression despite binding the miRNA, which indicates that the vast majority of functional sites are canonical. Accordingly, we developed an improved quantitative model of canonical targeting, using a compendium of experimental datasets that we pre-processed to minimize confounding biases. This model, which considers site type and another 14 features to predict the most effectively targeted mRNAs, performed significantly better than existing models and was as informative as the best high-throughput in vivo crosslinking approaches. It drives the latest version of TargetScan (v7.0; targetscan.org), thereby providing a valuable resource for placing miRNAs into gene-regulatory networks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05005.001 PMID:26267216

  17. The effect of optical substrates on micro-FTIR analysis of single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Katia; Filik, Jacob; Frogley, Mark D; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2013-02-01

    The study of individual cells with infrared (IR) microspectroscopy often requires living cells to be cultured directly onto a suitable substrate. The surface effect of the specific substrates on the cell growth-viability and associated biochemistry-as well as on the IR analysis-spectral interference and optical artifacts-is all too often ignored. Using the IR beamline, MIRIAM (Diamond Light Source, UK), we show the importance of the substrate used for IR absorption spectroscopy by analyzing two different cell lines cultured on a range of seven optical substrates in both transmission and reflection modes. First, cell viability measurements are made to determine the preferable substrates for normal cell growth. Successively, synchrotron radiation IR microspectroscopy is performed on the two cell lines to determine any genuine biochemically induced changes or optical effect in the spectra due to the different substrates. Multivariate analysis of spectral data is applied on each cell line to visualize the spectral changes. The results confirm the advantage of transmission measurements over reflection due to the absence of a strong optical standing wave artifact which amplifies the absorbance spectrum in the high wavenumber regions with respect to low wavenumbers in the mid-IR range. The transmission spectra reveal interference from a more subtle but significant optical artifact related to the reflection losses of the different substrate materials. This means that, for comparative studies of cell biochemistry by IR microspectroscopy, it is crucial that all samples are measured on the same substrate type.

  18. Switching Patients with Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease from Oral Iron to Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Effects on Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Requirements, Costs, Hemoglobin and Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Di Gennaro, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD. Methods This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min), hemoglobin 11–12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin <100 μg/L or transferrin saturation <20%), who were regularly treated with oral iron and ESA during 6 months prior to inclusion. Study patients received an intravenous ferric carboxymaltose dose of 1,000 mg iron, followed by a 6-months ESA/ ferric carboxymaltose maintenance regimen (target: hemoglobin 12 g/dL, transferrin saturation >20%). Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint); number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints). Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD). Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; p<0.01). Hemoglobin increased by 0.7±0.3 g/dL, ferritin by 196.0±38.7 μg/L and transferrin saturation by 5.3±2.9% (month 6 vs. baseline; all p<0.01). No ferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study. Conclusion Among patients with ND

  19. Neuromuscular adaptations to sprint interval training and the effect of mammalian omega-3 fatty acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Evan J H; Stucky, Frédéric; Radonic, Peter W; Metherel, Adam H; Wolever, Thomas M S; Wells, Greg D

    2017-03-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) stimulates rapid metabolic adaptations within skeletal muscle but the nature of neuromuscular adaptions is unknown. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (N-3 PUFA) are suggested to enhance neuromuscular adaptations to exercise. We measured the neuromuscular adaptations to SIT (Study-1) and conducted a placebo-controlled randomized double blinded study to determine the effect of N-3 PUFA supplementation on neuromuscular adaptations to SIT (Study-2). In Study-1, seven active men (24.4 ± 2.6 years, VO2 peak 43.8 ± 8.7 ml kg min(-1)) completed 2-weeks of SIT with pre- and post-training 10 km cycling time trials (TT). In Study-2, 30 active men (24.5 ± 4.2 years, VO2 peak 41.0 ± 5.1 ml kg min(-1)) were randomly assigned to receive N-3 PUFA (2330 mg day(-1)) (n = 14) or olive oil (n = 16) during 2-weeks of SIT with pre- and post-training TTs. Four week post-training, a SIT session and TT were also performed. Change in neuromuscular function was assessed from resting twitches, quadriceps maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, and potentiated twitch force (Q tw). Study-1 showed that SIT did not elicit significant neuromuscular adaptations. Study-2 showed that N-3 PUFA supplementation had no significant effect on neuromuscular adaptations. Training caused lower MVC force [mean ± SD; N-3 PUFA -9 ± 11%, placebo -9 ± 13% (p < 0.05 time)] and Q tw peripheral fatigue [N-3 PUFA -10 ± 19%, placebo -14 ± 13% (p < 0.05 time)]. TT time was lower after training in all groups [Study-1 -10%, Study-2 N-3 PUFA -8%, placebo -12% (p < 0.05 time)]. Two weeks of SIT improved TT performance in the absence of measurable neuromuscular adaptations. N-3 PUFA supplementation had no significant effect on SIT training adaptations.

  20. Inotropic and arrhythmogenic effects of potassium-depleted solutions on mammalian cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, D A; Lederer, W J

    1979-01-01

    1. We have investigated the electrical and mechanical effects of reducing the bathing K concentration, K0, over the range from 4-0 mM in guinea-pig papillary muscle and in sheep Purkinje fibres. 2. In papillary muscle, reducing K0 to zero produces a negative shift in the resting potential and an initial increase in action potential duration. An increase of twitch tension ensues, followed by a reduction in actin potential duration and, eventually, an increase in tonic tension. This increase in tonic tension is often accompanied by a decrease of twitch tension. Finally, transient depolarizations and after contractions are produced. 3. In voltage clamped Purkinje fibres, K0 reduction decreases the slope conductance at the more negative potentials and reduces the pace-maker current, iK2. Twitch tension increases rapidly and voltage dependent tonic tension develops. After even very short exposures to very low K0 (1 mM and below), an oscillatory transient inward current and accompanying aftercontraction can be seen. The oscillatory transient inward current and aftercontraction are similar to those described for cardiotonic steroid intoxication by Kass, Lederer, Tsien & Weingart (1978). 4. Prolonged exposure to 0 K0 leads to the development of a slow current 'creep'. This current is activated by depolarization and has a reversal potential of -6.7 +/- 3.5 mV. The development of this creep current is accompanied by an increasing 'creep' in tonic tension with the same time course. On repolarization both the current creep and creep in tension recover with time courses still similar to each other. 5. Fluctuations appear in both the tension and current records during exposure to low K0. The tension and current fluctuations have similar principal frequencies (about 1 Hz). 6. Ca0 removal, substituting Ba0 for Ca0 or adding Mn0 (2 mM) can each remove the transient inward current, aftercontraction, fluctuations of current and tension, and creep current as well as the increase of

  1. The biology of mammalian parenting and its effect on offspring social development

    PubMed Central

    Rilling, James K.; Young, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    Parents know the transformative nature of having and caring for a child. Among many mammals, giving birth leads from an aversion to infant stimuli to irresistible attraction. Here, we review the biological mechanisms governing this shift in parental motivation in mammals. Estrogen and progesterone prepare the uterus for embryo implantation and placental development. Prolactin stimulates milk production, whereas oxytocin initiates labor and triggers milk ejection during nursing. These same molecules, interacting with dopamine, also activate specific neural pathways to motivate parents to nurture, bond with, and protect their offspring. Parenting in turn shapes the neural development of the infant social brain. Recent work suggests that many of the principles governing parental behavior and its effect on infant development are conserved from rodent to humans. PMID:25124431

  2. Effects of exogenous amines on mammalian cells, with particular reference to membrane flow.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, R T; Jessup, W; Roberts, C R

    1984-01-01

    We have reviewed the evidence that amines accumulate in intracellular vesicles of low pH, such as lysosomes and endosomes. There is consequent elevation of intravesicular pH, and inhibition of receptor-ligand dissociation often results from this pH change. We have argued that the capacity for fusion of such vesicles is also reduced by the high pH. We suggest that the variety of effects of amines on membrane flow and macromolecular transport we describe are at least partly due to such reduced fusion (Figs. 1 and 2). We propose that an internal low pH may facilitate heterologous vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-plasma membrane fusion. There is some evidence that clathrin can accelerate phospholipid vesicle fusion in vitro at low pH (Blumenthal et al., 1983) but no direct evidence on the role of intravesicular pH. This idea is consistent not only with the preceding discussion, but also with the fact that the intracellular membrane-bound compartments least involved in fusion events (e.g. mitochondria) are of neutral or alkaline internal pH. Membrane fusion is certainly required for the formation of vesicles at the periphery of the Golgi apparatus, and possibly earlier in the transport and processing of biosynthetic products in the Golgi (Bergeron et al., 1982). Thus the accumulation of amines in the Golgi may be responsible for several effects on the flow of macromolecules along their translocation pathways. The status of the plasma membrane in this view is complex. It might be argued that the pH dictating the fusion step in endocytosis is that of the extracellular fluid, in which case the inhibitory effects of amines on this process are not explained. However, the rapidity of acidification of the newly formed endocytic vesicles allows the possibility that plasma membrane invaginations might temporarily sequester areas which are of lower pH than that of the bulk extracellular fluid even before fusion, since the proton pumping enzyme(s) are probably present on the plasma

  3. The biology of mammalian parenting and its effect on offspring social development.

    PubMed

    Rilling, James K; Young, Larry J

    2014-08-15

    Parents know the transformative nature of having and caring for a child. Among many mammals, giving birth leads from an aversion to infant stimuli to irresistible attraction. Here, we review the biological mechanisms governing this shift in parental motivation in mammals. Estrogen and progesterone prepare the uterus for embryo implantation and placental development. Prolactin stimulates milk production, whereas oxytocin initiates labor and triggers milk ejection during nursing. These same molecules, interacting with dopamine, also activate specific neural pathways to motivate parents to nurture, bond with, and protect their offspring. Parenting in turn shapes the neural development of the infant social brain. Recent work suggests that many of the principles governing parental behavior and its effect on infant development are conserved from rodent to humans.

  4. Effects of dietary phytophenols on the expression of microRNAs involved in mammalian cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lançon, Allan; Michaille, Jean-Jacques; Latruffe, Norbert

    2013-10-01

    Besides synthesizing nutritive substances (proteins, fats and carbohydrates) for energy and growth, plants produce numerous non-energetic so-called secondary metabolites (mainly polyphenols) that allow them to protect themselves against infections and other types of hostile environments. Interestingly, these polyphenols often provide cells with valuable bioactive properties for the maintenance of their functions and homeostasis (signaling, gene regulation, protection against acquired or infectious diseases, etc.) both in humans and animals. Namely, from a nutritional point of view, and based on epidemiological data, it is now well accepted that the regular consumption of green vegetables, fruits and fibers has protective effects against the onset of cancer as well as of inflammatory, neurodegenerative, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, and consequently increases the overall longevity. In particular, grapevine plants produce large amounts of a wide variety of polyphenols. The most prominent of those-resveratrol-has been shown to impair or delay cardiovascular alterations, cancer, inflammation, aging, etc. Until recently, the molecular bases of the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol remained largely unclear despite numerous studies on a variety of signaling pathways and the transcriptional networks that they control. However, it has been recently proposed that the protective properties of resveratrol may arise from its modulation of small non-coding regulatory RNAs, namely microRNAs. The aim of this review is to present up-to-date data on the control of microRNA expression by dietary phytophenols in different types of human cells, and their impact on cell differentiation, cancer development and the regulation of the inflammatory response. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Effects of flanking base sequences on 5-bromodeoxyuridine mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kresnak, M T; Davidson, R L

    1991-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms of incorporation-dependent, 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-induced mutagenesis were analyzed in murine A9 cells that possess a single copy of the Escherichia coli gpt gene integrated into the chromosomal DNA as part of a shuttle vector. Four independently derived GPT- mutants with single base changes within the integrated gpt gene were utilized in BrdU-induced reversion analyses to test the relative mutability of guanine residues in four different settings: the 5' and 3' guanine residues of a GG doublet, the 3' guanine residue of a GGGG quartet, and the middle guanine residue of a GGG triplet. Two of the mutant lines possessed GG doublet sequences in which a GC----AT transition at either guanine residue of the doublet leads to restoration of GPT enzyme activity without restoring wild-type DNA sequence. Both lines were shown to be effectively reverted by BrdU incorporation-dependent mutagenesis, and sequencing of the gpt genes from numerous independently derived revertants of both lines demonstrated that greater than 90% of the revertants arose due to GC----AT transitions at the 3' guanine residue of the doublet. BrdU-induced reversion of two additional GPT- mutant lines demonstrated that the 3' guanine residue of a GGGG quartet is efficiently mutated, while the middle guanine residue of a GGG triplet sequence is at least 10-fold less mutable by BrdU incorporation-dependent mutagenesis than the 3' guanine residue of a GG doublet or GGGG quartet. All four mutant lines tested were equally revertible by treatment with the alkylating agent ethyl methane sulfonate. The results from this study define a sequence-specific mechanism for BrdU-induced, incorporation-dependent mutagenesis and demonstrate the use of reversion analysis for the determination of sequence specific effects at precise sites within a gene.

  6. Inhibitory effect of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, extracted from spinach using supercritical CO2, on mammalian DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Hiroshi; Musumi, Keiichi; Hada, Takahiko; Maeda, Naoki; Yonezawa, Yuko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2006-03-08

    We investigated the effective extraction of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from dried spinach (Spinacia oleracea) using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) with a modifier/entrainer. The yield of MGDG in the SC-CO(2) extract was not influenced by increasing temperature at a constant pressure, although the total extract yield was decreased. The total extract yield and MGDG yield in the extract from commercially purchased spinach (unknown subspecies), were greatly influenced by lower pressure. In a modifier (i.e., ethanol) concentration range of 2.5-20%, both the extract and MGDG yield increased as the ethanol concentration rose. The highest total extract yield (69.5 mg/g of spinach) and a good MGDG yield (16.3 mg/g of spinach) were obtained at 80 degrees C, 25 MPa, and 20% ethanol. The highest MGDG concentration (76.0% in the extract) was obtained at 80 degrees C, 25 MPa, and 2.5% ethanol, although the total extract yield under these conditions was low (5.2 mg/g of spinach). The optimal conditions for the extraction of MGDG were 80 degrees C, 20 MPa, and 10% ethanol. Of the 11 subspecies of spinach tested under these conditions, "Ujyou" had the highest concentration of MGDG. The total extract yield and MGDG concentration of Ujyou were 20.4 mg of the extract/g of spinach and 70.5%, respectively. The concentration of MGDG was higher in the SC-CO(2) extract than in the extract obtained using solvents such as methanol and n-hexane. The extract of Ujyou, which was the optimal subspecies for the extraction of MGDG, inhibited the activity of calf DNA polymerase alpha with IC(50) values of 145 microg/mL but was not effective against DNA polymerase beta.

  7. The effects of digitalis on intracellular calcium transients in mammalian working myocardium as detected with aequorin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J P

    1985-11-01

    The effects of positive inotropic agents on the amplitude and time course of the light signal and corresponding tension response were studied in cat and human working myocardium microinjected with the bioluminescent Ca2+ indicator aequorin. Distinctive patterns of light and tension responses were identified that are consistent with known actions of the various agents on the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, rate of uptake of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and sensitivity of the myofilaments to Ca2+. In common with most other inotropic drugs, the cardiotonic steroid, acetylstrophanthidin, in doses of 4 X 10(-7) to 2 X 10(-6)M increases the amount of Ca2+ available for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. However, in contrast to most other agents, acetylstrophanthidin does not affect the time course of the calcium transient. In common with changes in [Ca2+]o, acetylstrophanthidin does not alter the relationship between the amplitude of the aequorin light signal and developed tension, which, in contrast to caffeine and isoproterenol, indicates that the increase in tension is fully accounted for by the increase in systolic free calcium. These findings suggest that the cardiotonic steroids increase loading of intracellular calcium stores without affecting the kinetics of subcellular handling of Ca2+. In doses of 8 X 10(-7) to 2 X 10(-6)M, acetylstrophanthidin produces a calcium-overload state characterized by 'after-contractions' and 'after-glimmers' that are associated with the development of automatic and triggerable dysrhythmias. These studies provide direct evidence that the inotropic and toxic effects of digitalis on animal and human working myocardium are produced by changes in intracellular Ca2+.

  8. Using the effects of maternal nutritional indicators (hemoglobin and total protein) on baby's birth weight outcome to forecast a paradigm shift toward increased levels of non-communicable diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Ahmadu, Baba Usman; Yakubu, Nyandaiti; Yusuph, Haruna; Alfred, Marshall; Bazza, Buba; Lamurde, Abdullahi Suleiman

    2013-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition can lead to low birth weight in babies, which puts them at risk of developing non-communicable diseases later in life. Evidence from developed countries has shown that low birth weight is associated with a predisposition to higher rates of non-communicable diseases later in life. However, information on this is lacking in developing countries. Thus, this work studied the effects of maternal nutritional indicators (hemoglobin and total protein) on birth weight outcome of babies to forecast a paradigm shift toward increased levels of non-communicable diseases in children. Mother-baby pairs were enrolled in this study using systematic random sampling. Maternal haemogblobin and total proteins were measured using micro-hematocrit and biuret methods, and birth weights of their babies were estimated using the bassinet weighing scale. Of the 168 (100%) babies that participated in this study, 122 (72.6%) were delivered at term and 142 (84.5%) had normal birth weights. Mean comparison of baby's birth weight and maternal hemoglobin was not significant (P = 0.483), that for maternal total protein was also not significant (P = 0.411). Even though positive correlation coefficients were observed between birth weight of babies, maternal hemoglobin and total proteins, these were however not significant. Maternal nutrition did not contribute significantly to low birth weight in our babies. Therefore, association between maternal nutrition and low birth weight to predict future development of non-communicable diseases in our study group is highly unlikely. However, we recommend further work.

  9. Aerobic expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin improves the growth performance of CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Mariana; González-De la Rosa, Claudia H; Memún, Elisa; Sigala, Juan-Carlos; Lara, Alvaro R

    2017-03-01

    Inefficient carbon metabolism is a relevant issue during the culture of mammalian cells for the production of biopharmaceuticals. Therefore, cell engineering strategies to improve the metabolic and growth performance of cell lines are needed. The expression of Vitreoscilla stercoraria hemoglobin (VHb) has been shown to significantly reduce overflow metabolism and improve the aerobic growth of bacteria. However, the effects of VHb on mammalian cells have been rarely studied. Here, the impact of VHb on growth and lactate accumulation during CHO-K1 cell culture was investigated. For this purpose, CHO-K1 cells were transfected with plasmids carrying the vgb or gfp gene to express VHb or green fluorescence protein (GFP), respectively. VHb expression increased the specific growth rate and biomass yields on glucose and glutamine by 60 %, and reduced the amount of lactate produced per cell by 40 %, compared to the GFP-expression controls. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that VHb is distributed in the cytoplasm and organelles, which support the hypothesis that VHb could serve as an oxygen carrier, enhancing aerobic respiration. These results are useful for the development of better producing cell lines for industrial applications.

  10. The effects of the Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATX II) on membrane currents of isolated mammalian myocytes.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, G; Ravens, U

    1984-12-01

    The effects of Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATX II) on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in single myocytes isolated from guinea-pig or bovine ventricles. Addition of ATX II (2-20 nM) prolonged the action potential duration without a significant change in resting membrane potential. Concentrations of 40 nM-ATX II or more induced after-depolarizations and triggered automaticity. The effects were reversible after washing or upon addition of 60 microM-tetrodotoxin (TTX). 5 mM-Ni did not modify the effects. The single patch-electrode voltage-clamp technique of Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth (1981) was applied to record membrane currents in response to 8.4 S long depolarizations starting from a holding potential of -90 mV. Currents flowing later than 5 ms after the depolarizing step were analysed. The fast events could not be considered because of insufficient voltage homogeneity. After 2 min of exposure to ATX II (20 nM) the changes in net membrane currents were measured. The difference between the currents in the presence of ATX II and during control was defined as the 'ATX-II-induced current' (iATX). After 4 min of wash iATX disappeared. Within 10 S of exposure to 60 microM-TTX, iATX was blocked completely. At potentials positive to -60 mV, iATX was inwardly directed and decayed slowly but incompletely during the 8.4 S long depolarizing pulse. The rate of decay was faster during clamp pulses to more positive potentials. A high amplitude noise was superimposed on the current trace; its amplitude decreased with more positive potentials. We analysed the voltage dependence of iATX with 'isochronous' current-voltage relations. The 0.1 S isochrone of iATX was characterized by a 'threshold' for negative currents at -60 mV, a branch with a negative slope (k = -7 mV, potential of half-maximal activation (V0.5) = -38 mV, bovine cells) leading to a maximum inward current at -20 mV, and an ascending branch which led to an apparent reversal potential (Erev

  11. The effects of the Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATX II) on membrane currents of isolated mammalian myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, G; Ravens, U

    1984-01-01

    The effects of Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATX II) on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in single myocytes isolated from guinea-pig or bovine ventricles. Addition of ATX II (2-20 nM) prolonged the action potential duration without a significant change in resting membrane potential. Concentrations of 40 nM-ATX II or more induced after-depolarizations and triggered automaticity. The effects were reversible after washing or upon addition of 60 microM-tetrodotoxin (TTX). 5 mM-Ni did not modify the effects. The single patch-electrode voltage-clamp technique of Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth (1981) was applied to record membrane currents in response to 8.4 S long depolarizations starting from a holding potential of -90 mV. Currents flowing later than 5 ms after the depolarizing step were analysed. The fast events could not be considered because of insufficient voltage homogeneity. After 2 min of exposure to ATX II (20 nM) the changes in net membrane currents were measured. The difference between the currents in the presence of ATX II and during control was defined as the 'ATX-II-induced current' (iATX). After 4 min of wash iATX disappeared. Within 10 S of exposure to 60 microM-TTX, iATX was blocked completely. At potentials positive to -60 mV, iATX was inwardly directed and decayed slowly but incompletely during the 8.4 S long depolarizing pulse. The rate of decay was faster during clamp pulses to more positive potentials. A high amplitude noise was superimposed on the current trace; its amplitude decreased with more positive potentials. We analysed the voltage dependence of iATX with 'isochronous' current-voltage relations. The 0.1 S isochrone of iATX was characterized by a 'threshold' for negative currents at -60 mV, a branch with a negative slope (k = -7 mV, potential of half-maximal activation (V0.5) = -38 mV, bovine cells) leading to a maximum inward current at -20 mV, and an ascending branch which led to an apparent reversal potential (Erev

  12. Gene-Chemical Interactions in the Developing Mammalian Nervous System: Effects on Proliferation, Neurogenesis and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Donald A.; Opanashuk, Lisa; Zharkovsky, Aleksander; Weiss, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    The orderly formation of the nervous system requires a multitude of complex, integrated and simultaneously occurring processes. Neural progenitor cells expand through proliferation, commit to different cell fates, exit the cell cycle, generate different neuronal and glial cell types, and new neurons migrate to specified areas and establish synaptic connections. Gestational and perinatal exposure to environmental toxicants, pharmacological agents and drugs of abuse produce immediate, persistent or late-onset alterations in behavioral, cognitive, sensory and/or motor functions. These alterations reflect the disruption of the underlying processes of CNS formation and development. To determine the neurotoxic mechanisms that underlie these deficits it is necessary to analyze and dissect the complex molecular processes that occur during the proliferation, neurogenesis and differentiation of cells. This symposium will provide a framework for understanding the orchestrated events of neurogenesis, the coordination of proliferation and cell fate specification by selected genes, and the effects of well-known neurotoxicants on neurogenesis in the retina, hippocampus and cerebellum. These three tissues share common developmental profiles, mediate diverse neuronal activities and function, and thus provide important substrates for analysis. This paper summarizes four invited talks that were presented at the 12th International Neurotoxicology Association meeting held in Jerusalem, Israel during the summer of 2009. Donald A. Fox described the structural and functional alterations following low-level gestational lead exposure in children and rodents that produced a supernormal electroretinogram and selective increases in neurogenesis and cell proliferation of late-born retinal neurons (rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells), but not Müller glia cells, in mice. Lisa Opanashuk discussed how dioxin [TCDD] binding to the arylhydrocarbon receptor [AhR], a transcription factor that

  13. Stimulus and recording variables and their effects on mammalian vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sherri M.; Subramanian, Geetha; Avniel, Wilma; Guo, Yuqing; Burkard, Robert F.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2002-01-01

    Linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) measure the collective neural activity of the gravity receptor organs in the inner ear that respond to linear acceleration transients. The present study examined the effects of electrode placement, analog filtering, stimulus polarity and stimulus rate on linear VsEP thresholds, latencies and amplitudes recorded from mice. Two electrode-recording montages were evaluated, rostral (forebrain) to 'mastoid' and caudal (cerebellum) to 'mastoid'. VsEP thresholds and peak latencies were identical between the two recording sites; however, peak amplitudes were larger for the caudal recording montage. VsEPs were also affected by filtering. Results suggest optimum high pass filter cutoff at 100-300 Hz, and low pass filter cutoff at 10,000 Hz. To evaluate stimulus rate, linear jerk pulses were presented at 9.2, 16, 25, 40 and 80 Hz. At 80 Hz, mean latencies were longer (0.350-0.450 ms) and mean amplitudes reduced (0.8-1.8 microV) for all response peaks. In 50% of animals, late peaks (P3, N3) disappeared at 80 Hz. The results offer options for VsEP recording protocols. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Effects of subacute pyridostigmine administration on mammalian skeletal muscle function. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Deshpande, S.S.; Foster, R.E.; Maxwell, D.M.; Albuquerque, E.X.

    1992-12-31

    The subacute effects of pyridostigmine bromide were investigated on the contractile properties of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles. The cholinesterase inhibitor was delivered via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps (Alzet) at 9 microns g h-1 (low dose) or 60 micro g h-1 (high dose). Animals receiving high-dose pyridostigmine pumps exhibited marked alterations in muscle properties within the first day of exposure that persisted for the remaining 13 days. With 0.1 Hz stimulation, EDL twitch tensions of treated animals were elevated relative to control. Repetitive stimulation at frequencies > 1 Hz led a use-dependent depression in the amplitude of successive twitches during the train. Recovery from pyridostigmine was essentially complete by 1 day of withdrawal. Rats implanted with low-dose pyridostigmine pumps showed little or no alteration of in vivo twitch tensions during the entire 14 days of treatment. Diaphragm and EDL muscles excised from pyridostigmine-treated rats and tested in vitro showed no significant alterations in twitch and tetanic tensions and displayed the same sensitivity as muscles of control animals to subsequent pyridostigmine exposures. In the presence of atropine, subacutely administered pyridostigmine protected rats from two LD5O doses of the irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor, soman. In the absence of atropine, the LD50 of soman was not altered by subacute pyridostigmine treatment. Extensor digitorum longus; diaphragm; twitch tension; ACh release; subacute; Alzet pumps; tolerance; anticholinesterase; pyridostigmine; soman.

  15. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. PMID:25659933

  17. Modelling antibiotic and cytotoxic isoquinoline effects in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Alexander; Ohlsen, Knut; Menzel, Thomas; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Fischer, Adrien; Dörries, Kirsten; Selle, Martina; Lalk, Michael; Hantzschmann, Julia; Dittrich, Marcus; Liang, Chunguang; Bernhardt, Jörg; Ölschläger, Tobias A; Bringmann, Gerhard; Bruhn, Heike; Unger, Matthias; Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Lehmann, Leane; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Isoquinolines (IQs) are natural substances with an antibiotic potential we aim to optimize. Specifically, IQ-238 is a synthetic analog of the novel-type N,C-coupled naphthylisoquinoline (NIQ) alkaloid ancisheynine. Recently, we developed and tested other IQs such as IQ-143. By utilizing genome-wide gene expression data, metabolic network modelling and Voronoi tessalation based data analysis - as well as cytotoxicity measurements, chemical properties calculations and principal component analysis of the NIQs - we show that IQ-238 has strong antibiotic potential for staphylococci and low cytotoxicity against murine or human cells. Compared to IQ-143, systemic effects are less pronounced. Most enzyme activity changes due to IQ-238 are located in the carbohydrate metabolism. Validation includes metabolite measurements on biological replicates. IQ-238 delineates key properties and a chemical space for a good therapeutic window. The combination of analysis methods allows suggestions for further lead development and yields an in-depth look at staphylococcal adaptation and network changes after antibiosis. Results are compared to eukaryotic host cells.

  18. Beyond the detergent effect: a binding site for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in mammalian apoferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Renyu Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Mortazavi, Shirin R.; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2012-05-01

    Using X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) binds specifically to a pre-formed internal cavity in horse-spleen apoferritin. Although sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is widely used as an anionic detergent, it can also exert specific pharmacological effects that are independent of the surfactant properties of the molecule. However, structural details of how proteins recognize SDS are scarce. Here, it is demonstrated that SDS binds specifically to a naturally occurring four-helix bundle protein: horse apoferritin. The X-ray crystal structure of the apoferritin–SDS complex was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Å and revealed that the SDS binds in an internal cavity that has previously been shown to recognize various general anesthetics. A dissociation constant of 24 ± 9 µM at 293 K was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. SDS binds in this cavity by bending its alkyl tail into a horseshoe shape; the charged SDS head group lies in the opening of the cavity at the protein surface. This crystal structure provides insights into the protein–SDS interactions that give rise to binding and may prove useful in the design of novel SDS-like ligands for some proteins.

  19. Stimulus and recording variables and their effects on mammalian vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sherri M.; Subramanian, Geetha; Avniel, Wilma; Guo, Yuqing; Burkard, Robert F.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2002-01-01

    Linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) measure the collective neural activity of the gravity receptor organs in the inner ear that respond to linear acceleration transients. The present study examined the effects of electrode placement, analog filtering, stimulus polarity and stimulus rate on linear VsEP thresholds, latencies and amplitudes recorded from mice. Two electrode-recording montages were evaluated, rostral (forebrain) to 'mastoid' and caudal (cerebellum) to 'mastoid'. VsEP thresholds and peak latencies were identical between the two recording sites; however, peak amplitudes were larger for the caudal recording montage. VsEPs were also affected by filtering. Results suggest optimum high pass filter cutoff at 100-300 Hz, and low pass filter cutoff at 10,000 Hz. To evaluate stimulus rate, linear jerk pulses were presented at 9.2, 16, 25, 40 and 80 Hz. At 80 Hz, mean latencies were longer (0.350-0.450 ms) and mean amplitudes reduced (0.8-1.8 microV) for all response peaks. In 50% of animals, late peaks (P3, N3) disappeared at 80 Hz. The results offer options for VsEP recording protocols. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Conjugated polymers mediate effective activation of the Mammalian Ion Channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Lodola, F; Martino, N; Tullii, G; Lanzani, G; Antognazza, M R

    2017-08-16

    Selective and rapid regulation of ionic channels is pivotal to the understanding of physiological processes and has a crucial impact in developing novel therapeutic strategies. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are emerging as essential cellular switches that allow animals to respond to their environment. In particular, the Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1), besides being involved in the body temperature regulation and in the response to pain, has important roles in several neuronal functions, as cytoskeleton dynamics, injured neurons regeneration, synaptic plasticity. Currently available tools to modulate TRPV1 activity suffer from limited spatial selectivity, do not allow for temporally precise control, and are usually not reversible, thus limiting their application potential. The use of optical excitation would allow for overcoming all these limitations. Here, we propose a novel strategy, based on the use of light-sensitive, conjugated polymers. We demonstrate that illumination of a polymer thin film leads to reliable, robust and temporally precise control of TRPV1 channels. Interestingly, the activation of the channel is due to the combination of two different, locally confined effects, namely the release of thermal energy from the polymer surface and the variation of the local ionic concentration at the cell/polymer interface, both mediated by the polymer photoexcitation.

  1. Differential effects of temperature change and human impact on European Late Quaternary mammalian extinctions.

    PubMed

    Varela, Sara; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus Souza; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Storch, David

    2015-04-01

    Species that inhabited Europe during the Late Quaternary were impacted by temperature changes and early humans, resulting in the disappearance of half of the European large mammals. However, quantifying the relative importance that each factor had in the extinction risk of species has been challenging, mostly due to the spatio-temporal biases of fossil records, which complicate the calibration of realistic and accurate ecological niche modeling. Here, we overcome this problem by using ecotypes, and not real species, to run our models. We created 40 ecotypes with different temperature requirements (mean temperature from -20 °C to 25 °C and temperature range from 10 °C to 40 °C) and used them to quantify the effect of climate change and human impact. Our results show that cold-adapted ecotypes would have been highly affected by past temperature changes in Europe, whereas temperate and warm-adapted ecotypes would have been positively affected by temperature change. Human impact affected all ecotypes negatively, and temperate ecotypes suffered the greatest impacts. Based on these results, the extinction of cold-adapted species like Mammuthus primigenius may be related to temperature change, while the extinction of temperate species, like Crocuta crocuta, may be related to human impact. Our results suggest that temperature change and human impact affected different ecotypes in distinct ways, and that the interaction of both impacts may have shaped species extinctions in Europe. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The effects of the endocrine disruptors dithiocarbamates on the mammalian ovary with particular regard to mancozeb.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Sandra; Paro, Rita; Rossi, Gianna; Macchiarelli, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Many human-made chemicals are called endocrine disruptors (EDs) because they have the potential to disrupt endocrine functions in exposed organisms. Many EDs can disrupt hormonal homeostasis by interfering with hormone receptor recognition, binding and activation, while others act by still unknown mechanisms. Among the EDs specifically affecting the female reproductive system, those with steroidogenic/antisteroidogenic effects have been extensively studied and the mechanisms of toxicity clarified also at molecular level. For many others, information is restricted to few epidemiological data and in vivo/in vitro experiments with animal models. This is the case of the dithiocarbamates, and in particular of the fungicide mancozeb, an ethylenedithiocarbamate widely used to protect fruit and vegetables, ginseng included, because of its low acute toxicity in humans. Although the mechanism(s) by which mancozeb may specifically act on female reproductive organs are largely unknown, data on experimental animals in vivo have demonstrated that the fungicide can induce several disturbances on estrus cycle. When used in vitro at concentrations considered too low to cause human health injuries, the fungicide impairs mouse embryo development and meiotic spindle assembly. The possibility that the female germ cell (the oocyte) could be a specific target of mancozeb suggests a role for this fungicide as probable inductor of infertility also in exposed human populations.

  3. The effect of diet on the mammalian gut flora and its metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Rowland, I R; Mallett, A K; Wise, A

    1985-01-01

    The review will encompass the following points: A brief introduction to the role of the gut flora in the toxicology of ingested food components, contaminants, and additives, including known pathways of activation and detoxication of foreign compounds and the implication of the flora in enterohepatic circulation of xenobiotics. The advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of studying the gut flora (classical bacteriological techniques, metabolic and enzymological methods) will be critically discussed with special reference to their relevance to dietary, toxicological, and biochemical studies. Sources of nutrients available to the gut flora will be described including host products (mucus, sloughed mucosal cells, hormones, proteins) and exogenous nutrients derived from diet. An account of the problems involved in studies of dietary modification with special reference to the use of stock laboratory animal diets, purified diets, and human dietary studies. The influence of dietary modification on the flora will be assessed on the basis of changes in numbers and types of bacteria and their metabolic activity, drawing on data from human and animal studies. The effects of manipulation of the quantity and quality of protein, fat, and indigestible residues (fiber) of the diet will be described together with their possible implications for toxicity of ingested compounds.

  4. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Wu, L. J.; Liu, S. X.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

  5. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Wu, L J; Liu, S X; Vannais, D; Waldren, C A; Randers-Pehrson, G

    1997-04-15

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

  6. Induction of heme oxygenase in mammalian cells by mineral fibers: distinctive effect of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Hei, T K

    1996-04-01

    Exponentially growing human-hamster hybrid [AL] cells treated with a 40 micrograms/ml (8 micrograms/cm2) dose of UICC standard reference chrysotile fibers induced heme oxygenase (HO) protein with a maximum expression level at 8 h post-treatment. While the constitutive HO expression was detectable in non-treated AL cells, the protein level was increased approximately 4.5-fold in fiber-treated cells. The induction was dose-dependent at fiber concentration between 2.5 micrograms/ml (0.5 microgram/cm2) and 40 micrograms/ml (8 micrograms/cm2) with the induced HO concentrated mostly in the cytoplasm as shown by immunostaining. Several other types of mineral fibers examined including crocidolites, tremolites, and erionites also induced HO synthesis with varying degree of efficiency. In general, chrysotile and crocidolite were more efficient inducers of HO than tremolite and erionite when compared at fiber doses that resulted in approximately 50% survival (LD50) level. The effects of antioxidant enzymes on HO induction were examined by concurrent treatment of fiber-exposed cultures with SOD and catalase. Although addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase inhibited HO induction in a dose-dependent manner, they offered no protection on fiber-mediated clonogenic toxicity in the same population of treated cells. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by asbestos fibers play an essential role in the induction of HO and that different mineral fibers, when applied at equitoxic doses, often result in different oxidative stress status as determined by the induction of HO proteins.

  7. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Wu, L. J.; Liu, S. X.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

  8. Hemoglobin in a coacervate system.

    PubMed

    Ecanow, J; Ecanow, D; Ecanow, B

    1990-01-01

    Hemoglobin dissolved in a coacervate system shows the properties of a resuscitation fluid. In the coacervate system used, the equilibrium phase was the colloid rich phase. We propose a new definition of the coacervate phase to be that phase in a coacervate system which is most dissimilar to water in its physical chemical properties.

  9. Hemoglobin adducts and sister chromatid exchanges in hospital workers exposed to ethylene oxide: effects of glutathione S-transferase T1 and M1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yong, L C; Schulte, P A; Wiencke, J K; Boeniger, M F; Connally, L B; Walker, J T; Whelan, E A; Ward, E M

    2001-05-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is a genotoxic carcinogen with widespread uses as an industrial chemical intermediate and sterilant. We examined the effects of glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) and M1 (GSTM1) genotypes on the levels of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine (HEV) adducts in the erythrocytes and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in lymphocytes from a group of 58 operators of sterilizers that used EtO and nonexposed workers from nine hospitals in the United States and one hospital in Mexico City. Cumulative exposure to EtO was estimated during the 4-month period before the collection of blood samples. Results showed that EtO exposure was significantly associated with the levels of HEV adducts and SCE after adjusting for cigarette smoking and other potential confounders. A significantly higher HEV adduct level (0.17 +/- 0.03 versus 0.08 +/- 0.01, mean +/- SE; P = 0.02) but lower SCE frequency (5.31 +/- 0.39 versus 6.21 +/- 0.17; P = 0.04) was observed in subjects with homozygous deletion of the GSTT1 gene (null genotype) as compared with those with at least one copy of the gene (positive genotype). In multiple regression analysis, the GSTT1-null genotype was associated with an increase in HEV adduct level (beta = 1.62; P = 0.02) and a decrease in SCE frequency (beta = -1.25; P = 0.003) after adjusting for age, gender, race, education, cigarette smoking, and EtO exposure status. The inverse SCE-GSTT1 relationship remained unchanged when SCE was further examined in relation to HEV adducts as an indicator of the internal EtO dose. The GSTM1 genotype was not associated with the level of either HEV adduct or SCE. These data indicate that the GSTT1-null genotype is associated with increased formation of EtO-hemoglobin adducts in relation to occupational EtO exposure, suggesting that individuals with homozygous deletion of the GSTT1 gene may be more susceptible to the genotoxic effects of ETO: The unexpected finding of decreased SCEs, which is less clear, may be attributed to the

  10. The Effect of Periodontal Treatment on Hemoglobin A1c Levels of Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Han, Xu; Guo, Xiaojing; Luo, Xiaolong; Wang, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that periodontal treatment may affect glycemic control in diabetic patients. And several systematic reviews have been conducted to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on diabetes outcomes. Researches of this aspect are widely concerned, and several new controlled trials have been published. The aim of this study was to update the account for recent findings. Methods A literature search (until the end of January 2014) was carried out using various databases with language restriction to English. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was selected if it investigated periodontal therapy for diabetic subjects compared with a control group received no periodontal treatment for at least 3 months of the follow-up period. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and secondary outcomes were periodontal parameters included probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Results Ten trials of 1135 patients were included in the analysis. After the follow-up of 3 months, treatment substantially lowered HbA1c compared with no treatment after periodontal therapy (–0.36%, 95%CI, −0.52% to −0.19%, P<0.0001). Clinically substantial and statistically significant reduction of PPD and CAL were found between subjects with and without treatment after periodontal therapy (PPD −0.42 mm, 95%CI: −0.60 to −0.23, P<0.00001; CAL −0.34 mm, 95%CI: −0.52 to −0.16, P = 0.0002). And there is no significant change of the level of HbA1c at the 6-month comparing with no treatment (–0.30%, 95%CI, −0.69% to 0.09%, P = 0.13). Conclusions Periodontal treatment leads to the modest reduction in HbA1c along with the improvement of periodontal status in diabetic patients for 3 months, and this result is consistent with previous systematic reviews. And the effect of periodontal treatment on HbA1c cannot be observed at 6-month after treatment. PMID:25255331

  11. Effect of the synthesis of rice non-symbiotic hemoglobins 1 and 2 in the recombinant Escherichia coli TB1 growth

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Salgado, Emma; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) are widely distributed in land plants, including rice. These proteins are classified into type 1 (nsHbs-1) and type 2. The O 2-affinity of nsHbs-1 is very high mostly because of an extremely low O 2-dissociation rate constant resulting in that nsHbs-1 apparently do not release O 2 after oxygenation. Thus, it is possible that the in vivo function of nsHbs-1 is other than O 2-transport. Based on the properties of multiple Hbs it was proposed that nsHbs-1 could play diverse roles in rice organs, however the in vivo activity of rice nsHbs-1 has been poorly analyzed. An in vivo analysis for rice nsHbs-1 is essential to elucidate the biological function(s) of these proteins. Rice Hb1 and Hb2 are nsHbs-1 that have been generated in recombinant Es cherichia coli TB1. The rice Hb1 and Hb2 amino acid sequence, tertiary structure and rate and equilibrium constants for the reaction of O 2 are highly similar. Thus, it is possible that rice Hb1 and Hb2 function similarly in vivo. As an initial approach to test this hypothesis we analyzed the effect of the synthesis of rice Hb1 and Hb2 in the recombinant E. coli TB1 growth. Effect of the synthesis of the O 2-carrying soybean leghemoglobin a, cowpea leghemoglobin II and Vitreoscilla Hb in the recombinant E. coli TB1 growth was also analyzed as an O 2-carrier control. Our results showed that synthesis of rice Hb1, rice Hb2, soybean Lb a, cowpea LbII and Vitreoscilla Hb inhibits the recombinant E. coli TB1 growth and that growth inhibition was stronger when recombinant E. coli TB1 synthesized rice Hb2 than when synthesized rice Hb1. These results suggested that rice Hb1 and Hb2 could function differently in vivo. PMID:26973784

  12. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation

  13. Effects of Unmodified and Cross-Linked Stroma Free Hemoglobin Solutions on Blood Pressure and Renal Function in the Hypotensive Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-09

    polyethylene (PE-240) tubing and the femoral artery was cannulated with PE-50 tubing for blood pressure monitoring as well as blood sampling . The...of 30 minutes, two 20 minute control clearance periods were obtained during which blood pressure was measured continuously and urine collected for...Figure 3). The concentrations of total hemoglobin measured in blood samples obtained at the end of the experiment were no different between rats

  14. Potential role of ferric hemoglobin in MS pathogenesis: Effects of oxidative stress and extracellular methemoglobin or its degradation products on myelin components.

    PubMed

    Bamm, Vladimir V; Henein, Mary E L; Sproul, Shannon L J; Lanthier, Danielle K; Harauz, George

    2017-08-31

    There is a well-documented relationship between cerebral vasculature and multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions: abnormal accumulations of iron have been found in the walls of the dilated veins in cerebral MS plaques. The source of this iron is unknown, but could be related to the recognized phenomenon of capillary and venous hemorrhages leading to blood extravasation. In turn, hemorrhaging leading to hemolysis results in extracellular release of hemoglobin, a reactive molecule that could induce local oxidative stress, inflammation, and tissue damage. Our previous studies with a reduced form of hemoglobin (oxyHb) have demonstrated its ability to cause extensive lipid and protein oxidation in vitro, which would result in membrane destabilization. Here, we investigated in further detail the mechanism by which the more abundant oxidized form of extracellular hemoglobin (metHb), and dissoc