Science.gov

Sample records for mammals current status

  1. The current status of evidence for and against postnatal oogenesis in mammals: a case of ovarian optimism versus pessimism?

    PubMed

    Tilly, Jonathan L; Niikura, Yuichi; Rueda, Bo R

    2009-01-01

    Whether or not oogenesis continues in the ovaries of mammalian females during postnatal life was heavily debated from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s. However, in 1951 Lord Solomon Zuckerman published what many consider to be a landmark paper summarizing his personal views of data existing at the time for and against the possibility of postnatal oogenesis. In Zuckerman's opinion, none of the evidence he considered was inconsistent with Waldeyer's initial proposal in 1870 that female mammals cease production of oocytes at or shortly after birth. This conclusion rapidly became dogma, and remained essentially unchallenged until just recently, despite the fact that Zuckerman did not offer a single experiment proving that adult female mammals are incapable of oogenesis. Instead, 20 years later he reemphasized that his conclusion was based solely on an absence of data he felt would be inconsistent with the idea of a nonrenewable oocyte pool provided at birth. However, in the immortal words of Carl Sagan, an "absence of evidence is not evidence of absence." Indeed, building on the efforts of a few scientists who continued to question this dogma after Zuckerman's treatise in 1951, we reported several data sets in 2004 that were very much inconsistent with the widely held belief that germ cell production in female mammals ceases at birth. Perhaps not surprisingly, given the magnitude of the paradigm shift being proposed, this work reignited a vigorous debate that first began more than a century ago. Our purpose here is to review the experimental evidence offered in recent studies arguing support for and against the possibility that adult mammalian females replenish their oocyte reserve. "Never discourage anyone who continually makes progress, no matter how slow."-Plato (427-347 BC).

  2. The current status of evidence for and against postnatal oogenesis in mammals: a case of ovarian optimism versus pessimism?

    PubMed

    Tilly, Jonathan L; Niikura, Yuichi; Rueda, Bo R

    2009-01-01

    Whether or not oogenesis continues in the ovaries of mammalian females during postnatal life was heavily debated from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s. However, in 1951 Lord Solomon Zuckerman published what many consider to be a landmark paper summarizing his personal views of data existing at the time for and against the possibility of postnatal oogenesis. In Zuckerman's opinion, none of the evidence he considered was inconsistent with Waldeyer's initial proposal in 1870 that female mammals cease production of oocytes at or shortly after birth. This conclusion rapidly became dogma, and remained essentially unchallenged until just recently, despite the fact that Zuckerman did not offer a single experiment proving that adult female mammals are incapable of oogenesis. Instead, 20 years later he reemphasized that his conclusion was based solely on an absence of data he felt would be inconsistent with the idea of a nonrenewable oocyte pool provided at birth. However, in the immortal words of Carl Sagan, an "absence of evidence is not evidence of absence." Indeed, building on the efforts of a few scientists who continued to question this dogma after Zuckerman's treatise in 1951, we reported several data sets in 2004 that were very much inconsistent with the widely held belief that germ cell production in female mammals ceases at birth. Perhaps not surprisingly, given the magnitude of the paradigm shift being proposed, this work reignited a vigorous debate that first began more than a century ago. Our purpose here is to review the experimental evidence offered in recent studies arguing support for and against the possibility that adult mammalian females replenish their oocyte reserve. "Never discourage anyone who continually makes progress, no matter how slow."-Plato (427-347 BC). PMID:18753611

  3. [Current views on vision of mammals].

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, T V

    2012-01-01

    In the review, research data are presented on mammals' vision including visual pigments, color and contrast vision, and visual behaviour in different species. It is shown that in course of evolution mammals were gradually losing the elements of daylight cone vision system that are typical of other vertebrates. In monotremes, visual pigments SWS2 (cone blue-sensitive 2) and MWS/LWS (green/red-sensitive) are still present, as well as rod RH1. Theria, except some primates, also have two cone visual pigments: SWS1 (ultraviolet/violet or blue-sensitive 1) and MWS/LWS along with rod RH1. Humans and some other higher primates evolved the new visual pigment, MWS, and acquired trichromatic vision. Marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and some species of other orders have lost also the visual pigment SWS1, probably due to specificity of processing the information received by these cones. Current view on mammals' vision with two cone pigments and rods is presented. Data on maximum spectral sensitivity of visual pigments in different species and orders are given along with data on spatial contrast sensation. High visual acuity has been acquired by ungulates, artiodactyls, and primates, while the highest one--by humans with their specialized fovea. PMID:23330397

  4. [Current views on vision of mammals].

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, T V

    2012-01-01

    In the review, research data are presented on mammals' vision including visual pigments, color and contrast vision, and visual behaviour in different species. It is shown that in course of evolution mammals were gradually losing the elements of daylight cone vision system that are typical of other vertebrates. In monotremes, visual pigments SWS2 (cone blue-sensitive 2) and MWS/LWS (green/red-sensitive) are still present, as well as rod RH1. Theria, except some primates, also have two cone visual pigments: SWS1 (ultraviolet/violet or blue-sensitive 1) and MWS/LWS along with rod RH1. Humans and some other higher primates evolved the new visual pigment, MWS, and acquired trichromatic vision. Marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and some species of other orders have lost also the visual pigment SWS1, probably due to specificity of processing the information received by these cones. Current view on mammals' vision with two cone pigments and rods is presented. Data on maximum spectral sensitivity of visual pigments in different species and orders are given along with data on spatial contrast sensation. High visual acuity has been acquired by ungulates, artiodactyls, and primates, while the highest one--by humans with their specialized fovea.

  5. The Marine Mammal Protection Act at 40: status, recovery, and future of U.S. marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Roman, Joe; Altman, Irit; Dunphy-Daly, Meagan M; Campbell, Caitlin; Jasny, Michael; Read, Andrew J

    2013-05-01

    Passed in 1972, the Marine Mammal Protection Act has two fundamental objectives: to maintain U.S. marine mammal stocks at their optimum sustainable populations and to uphold their ecological role in the ocean. The current status of many marine mammal populations is considerably better than in 1972. Take reduction plans have been largely successful in reducing direct fisheries bycatch, although they have not been prepared for all at-risk stocks, and fisheries continue to place marine mammals as risk. Information on population trends is unknown for most (71%) stocks; more stocks with known trends are improving than declining: 19% increasing, 5% stable, and 5% decreasing. Challenges remain, however, and the act has generally been ineffective in treating indirect impacts, such as noise, disease, and prey depletion. Existing conservation measures have not protected large whales from fisheries interactions or ship strikes in the northwestern Atlantic. Despite these limitations, marine mammals within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone appear to be faring better than those outside, with fewer species in at-risk categories and more of least concern.

  6. The Marine Mammal Protection Act at 40: status, recovery, and future of U.S. marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Roman, Joe; Altman, Irit; Dunphy-Daly, Meagan M; Campbell, Caitlin; Jasny, Michael; Read, Andrew J

    2013-05-01

    Passed in 1972, the Marine Mammal Protection Act has two fundamental objectives: to maintain U.S. marine mammal stocks at their optimum sustainable populations and to uphold their ecological role in the ocean. The current status of many marine mammal populations is considerably better than in 1972. Take reduction plans have been largely successful in reducing direct fisheries bycatch, although they have not been prepared for all at-risk stocks, and fisheries continue to place marine mammals as risk. Information on population trends is unknown for most (71%) stocks; more stocks with known trends are improving than declining: 19% increasing, 5% stable, and 5% decreasing. Challenges remain, however, and the act has generally been ineffective in treating indirect impacts, such as noise, disease, and prey depletion. Existing conservation measures have not protected large whales from fisheries interactions or ship strikes in the northwestern Atlantic. Despite these limitations, marine mammals within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone appear to be faring better than those outside, with fewer species in at-risk categories and more of least concern. PMID:23521536

  7. Current Status of Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragile, P. Chris

    2014-09-01

    As the title suggests, the purpose of this chapter is to review the current status of numerical simulations of black hole accretion disks. This chapter focuses exclusively on global simulations of the accretion process within a few tens of gravitational radii of the black hole. Most of the simulations discussed are performed using general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) schemes, although some mention is made of Newtonian radiation MHD simulations and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The goal is to convey some of the exciting work that has been going on in the past few years and provide some speculation on future directions.

  8. Property and current clinical applications of mammal hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Lv, S-H; Rong, S-F; Cai, B-G; Guan, S-M; Li, Q-Q

    2015-10-01

    Hyaluronidase (Hyal), which is related to mammalian diseases, is greatly significant for mammal. It is the major enzyme for degrading hyaluronan (HA), which is a linear high molecular polymer that is ubiquitous in mammalian extracellular matrix. Previous studies suggested that the levels of Hyals play significant roles in predicting, determining and curing many diseases. This review summarizes previous studies on the classification and biophysical and therapeutic applications of mammalian Hyals and focuses on the current medicinal and clinical applications of Hyals. PMID:26531287

  9. ALMA Pipeline: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaga, H.; Humphreys, E.; Indebetouw, R.; Villard, E.; Kern, J.; Davis, L.; Miura, R. E.; Nakazato, T.; Sugimoto, K.; Kosugi, G.; Akiyama, E.; Muders, D.; Wyrowski, F.; Williams, S.; Lightfoot, J.; Kent, B.; Momjian, E.; Hunter, T.; ALMA Pipeline Team

    2015-12-01

    The ALMA Pipeline is the automated data reduction tool that runs on ALMA data. Current version of the ALMA pipeline produces science quality data products for standard interferometric observing modes up to calibration process. The ALMA Pipeline is comprised of (1) heuristics in the form of Python scripts that select the best processing parameters, and (2) contexts that are given for book-keeping purpose of data processes. The ALMA Pipeline produces a "weblog" that showcases detailed plots for users to judge how each step of calibration processes are treated. The ALMA Interferometric Pipeline was conditionally accepted in March 2014 by processing Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 data sets. From Cycle 2, ALMA Pipeline is used for ALMA data reduction and quality assurance for the projects whose observing modes are supported by the ALMA Pipeline. Pipeline tasks are available based on CASA version 4.2.2, and the first public pipeline release called CASA 4.2.2-pipe has been available since October 2014. One can reduce ALMA data both by CASA tasks as well as by pipeline tasks by using CASA version 4.2.2-pipe.

  10. Bioartificial liver: current status.

    PubMed

    Pless, G; Sauer, I M

    2005-11-01

    Liver failure remains a life-threatening syndrome. With the growing disparity between the number of suitable donor organs and the number of patients awaiting transplantation, efforts have been made to optimize the allocation of organs, to find alternatives to cadaveric liver transplantation, and to develop extracorporeal methods to support or replace the function of the failing organ. An extracorporeal liver support system has to provide the main functions of the liver: detoxification, synthesis, and regulation. The understanding that the critical issue of the clinical syndrome in liver failure is the accumulation of toxins not cleared by the failing liver led to the development of artificial filtration and adsorption devices (artificial liver support). Based on this hypothesis, the removal of lipophilic, albumin-bound substances, such as bilirubin, bile acids, metabolites of aromatic amino acids, medium-chain fatty acids, and cytokines, should be beneficial to the clinical course of a patient in liver failure. Artificial detoxification devices currently under clinical evaluation include the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS), Single-Pass Albumin Dialysis (SPAD), and the Prometheus system. The complex tasks of regulation and synthesis remain to be addressed by the use of liver cells (bioartificial liver support). The Extracorporeal Liver Assist Device (ELAD), HepatAssist, Modular Extracorporeal Liver Support system (MELS), and the Amsterdam Medical Center Bioartificial Liver (AMC-BAL) are bioartificial systems. This article gives a brief overview on these artificial and bioartificial devices and discusses remaining obstacles.

  11. Sinoprobe Datacenter Development: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y.; Dong, S.; Chen, Z.; Chen, G.; Cheng, M.

    2011-12-01

    The project of the Sinoprobe datacenter development is to build new IT infrastructures needed to store, visualize and manage all the data acquired by SinoProbe program.The SinoProbe data center is designed using service-oriented architecture (SOA) principles. More specifically, service component architecture (SCA) is used to implement sinoprobe data services. It also uses various advanced technologies such as Java/JEE for the platform, PostgresSQL/PostGIS for the data storage, ApacheDS for LDAP, CoachDB for the medadata storage, GeoServer for the GIS services, ExtJs and OpenLayer for the Ajax framework, and Apache Shiro for the security framework. Through the integration and development of various technologies used, the major services of the datacenter system are implemented including the security infrastructure services (user authentication and authorization), metadata services, data warehouse stores, data services, GIS services, and web portal. There are also visualization components including the development of a virtual globe to replace the currently used Google Earth. This poster presents the current status of the SinoProbe data center development, and the detailed discussion of the system.

  12. Current and Future Patterns of Global Marine Mammal Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Kaschner, Kristin; Tittensor, Derek P.; Ready, Jonathan; Gerrodette, Tim; Worm, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial distribution of taxa is an important prerequisite for the preservation of biodiversity, and can provide a baseline against which to measure the impacts of climate change. Here we analyse patterns of marine mammal species richness based on predictions of global distributional ranges for 115 species, including all extant pinnipeds and cetaceans. We used an environmental suitability model specifically designed to address the paucity of distributional data for many marine mammal species. We generated richness patterns by overlaying predicted distributions for all species; these were then validated against sightings data from dedicated long-term surveys in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, the Northeast Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Model outputs correlated well with empirically observed patterns of biodiversity in all three survey regions. Marine mammal richness was predicted to be highest in temperate waters of both hemispheres with distinct hotspots around New Zealand, Japan, Baja California, the Galapagos Islands, the Southeast Pacific, and the Southern Ocean. We then applied our model to explore potential changes in biodiversity under future perturbations of environmental conditions. Forward projections of biodiversity using an intermediate Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) temperature scenario predicted that projected ocean warming and changes in sea ice cover until 2050 may have moderate effects on the spatial patterns of marine mammal richness. Increases in cetacean richness were predicted above 40° latitude in both hemispheres, while decreases in both pinniped and cetacean richness were expected at lower latitudes. Our results show how species distribution models can be applied to explore broad patterns of marine biodiversity worldwide for taxa for which limited distributional data are available. PMID:21625431

  13. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    During the past decade, zirconia-based ceramics have been successfully introduced into the clinic to fabricate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), along with a dental computer-aided/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. In this article (1) development of dental ceramics, (2) the current status of dental CAD/CAM systems, (3) CAD/CAM and zirconia restoration, (4) bond between zirconia and veneering ceramics, (5) bond of zirconia with resin-based luting agents, (6) surface finish of zirconia restoration and antagonist enamel wear, and (7) clinical evaluation of zirconia restoration are reviewed. Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) showed better mechanical properties and superior resistance to fracture than other conventional dental ceramics. Furthermore, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline and alumina nanocomposites (Ce-TZP/A) had the highest fracture toughness and had resistance to low-temperature aging degradation. Both zirconia-based ceramics have been clinically available as an alternative to the metal framework for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Marginal adaptation of zirconia-based FDPs is acceptable for clinical application. The most frequent clinical complication with zirconia-based FDPs was chipping of the veneering porcelain that was affected by many factors. The mechanism for the bonding between zirconia and veneering ceramics remains unknown. There was no clear evidence of chemical bonding and the bond strength between zirconia and porcelain was lower than that between metal and porcelain. There were two alternatives proposed that might avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. One was hybrid-structured FDPs comprising CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain parts adhering to a CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia framework. Another option was full-contour zirconia FDPs using high translucent zirconia. Combined application of silica coating and/or silane coupler, and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate is

  14. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    During the past decade, zirconia-based ceramics have been successfully introduced into the clinic to fabricate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), along with a dental computer-aided/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. In this article (1) development of dental ceramics, (2) the current status of dental CAD/CAM systems, (3) CAD/CAM and zirconia restoration, (4) bond between zirconia and veneering ceramics, (5) bond of zirconia with resin-based luting agents, (6) surface finish of zirconia restoration and antagonist enamel wear, and (7) clinical evaluation of zirconia restoration are reviewed. Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) showed better mechanical properties and superior resistance to fracture than other conventional dental ceramics. Furthermore, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline and alumina nanocomposites (Ce-TZP/A) had the highest fracture toughness and had resistance to low-temperature aging degradation. Both zirconia-based ceramics have been clinically available as an alternative to the metal framework for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Marginal adaptation of zirconia-based FDPs is acceptable for clinical application. The most frequent clinical complication with zirconia-based FDPs was chipping of the veneering porcelain that was affected by many factors. The mechanism for the bonding between zirconia and veneering ceramics remains unknown. There was no clear evidence of chemical bonding and the bond strength between zirconia and porcelain was lower than that between metal and porcelain. There were two alternatives proposed that might avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. One was hybrid-structured FDPs comprising CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain parts adhering to a CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia framework. Another option was full-contour zirconia FDPs using high translucent zirconia. Combined application of silica coating and/or silane coupler, and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate is

  15. Brain size is correlated with endangerment status in mammals.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Eric S

    2016-02-24

    Increases in relative encephalization (RE), brain size after controlling for body size, comes at a great metabolic cost and is correlated with a host of cognitive traits, from the ability to count objects to higher rates of innovation. Despite many studies examining the implications and trade-offs accompanying increased RE, the relationship between mammalian extinction risk and RE is unknown. I examine whether mammals with larger levels of RE are more or less likely to be at risk of endangerment than less-encephalized species. I find that extant species with large levels of encephalization are at greater risk of endangerment, with this effect being strongest in species with small body sizes. These results suggest that RE could be a valuable asset in estimating extinction vulnerability. Additionally, these findings suggest that the cost-benefit trade-off of RE is different in large-bodied species when compared with small-bodied species. PMID:26888034

  16. Status of current IPH applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-03-01

    The US Department of Energy has funded a series of field tests since 1977 to gain operational experience in the application of solar energy to industrial process heat requirements. To date, 34 design studies or actual installations have been funded utilizing technologies ranging from flat plates to line-focus concentrators to central receiver industrial systems. The types of solar systems include hot air, hot water, and steam production applied to a broad spectrum of industrial processes. The program elements are identified and put in perspective relative to transport fluid, temperature level, and size of the solar field. The status of these programs ranges from design studies to operational systems. Solar enhanced oil recovery and repowering have been studied. The chronological history of each program is tabulated. (LEW)

  17. History and status of introduced mammals and impacts to breeding seabirds on the California channel and Northwestern Baja California Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McChesney, G.J.; Tershy, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    The California Channel Islands, U.S.A., and Northwestern Baja California Islands, Mexico, host important breeding populations of several seabird species, including the endemic Black-vented Shearwater (Puffinus opisthomelas) and Xantus' Murrelet (Synthliboramphus hypoleucus). Mammals introduced to nearly all of the islands beginning in the late 1800s to early 1900s include: cats (Felis catus), dogs (Canis familiaris), Black Rats (Rattus rattus), rabbits and hares (Leporidae), goats (Capra hirca), sheep (Ovis ones), and other grazers. Cats, dogs and rats are seabird predators, grazers such as goats and sheep cause habitat degredation, and rabbits destroy habitat and compete with hole-nesting seabirds. Cats, which were introduced to at least 19 islands and currently occur on ten islands, have had the greatest impacts on seabirds, including the extinction of the endemic Guadalupe Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma macrodactyla). Cats are known to have eliminated or severely reduced colonies of Black-vented Shearwaters, Cassin's Auklets (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) and Xantus' Murrelets. Black Rats have occurred on a minimum of seven islands and have reduced numbers of small, hole-nesting alcids on at least one island. At many islands, defoliation and erosion caused by rabbits and large grazing mammals has been severe. Their effects on seabirds are not well documented but potentially are serious. Impacts from introduced mammals have been most severe on islands with no native mammalian predators. On the Northwestern Baja California Islands, temporary and permanent human settlements have led to a greater diversity and source of introductions. Programs to remove introduced mammals and to reduce the possibility of future introductions are needed to restore seabird populations and to preserve the biodiversity of the region. Surveys are needed particularly on the Northwestern Baja California Islands to update the status and distribution of seabirds and to further assess impacts from

  18. Transungual drug delivery: current status.

    PubMed

    Elkeeb, Rania; AliKhan, Ali; Elkeeb, Laila; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-01-15

    Topical therapy is highly desirable in treating nail disorders due to its localized effects, which results in minimal adverse systemic events and possibly improved adherence. However, the effectiveness of topical therapies is limited by minimal drug permeability through the nail plate. Current research on nail permeation that focuses on altering the nail plate barrier by means of chemical treatments, penetration enhancers as well as physical and mechanical methods is reviewed. A new method of nail sampling is examined. Finally limitations of current ungual drug permeability studies are briefly discussed. PMID:19819318

  19. Transungual drug delivery: current status.

    PubMed

    Elkeeb, Rania; AliKhan, Ali; Elkeeb, Laila; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-01-15

    Topical therapy is highly desirable in treating nail disorders due to its localized effects, which results in minimal adverse systemic events and possibly improved adherence. However, the effectiveness of topical therapies is limited by minimal drug permeability through the nail plate. Current research on nail permeation that focuses on altering the nail plate barrier by means of chemical treatments, penetration enhancers as well as physical and mechanical methods is reviewed. A new method of nail sampling is examined. Finally limitations of current ungual drug permeability studies are briefly discussed.

  20. The Current Status of Japanese Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Russell

    A study of the current status of Japanese Americans is divided into three sections. Following a brief introduction, a background section provides an overview of Japanese American history, population size and socioeconomic measures, and selected social characteristics. A second section looks in greater depth at socioeconomic status as reported in…

  1. Current status of transarterial radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Mahnken, Andreas H

    2016-01-01

    Unresectable primary and secondary liver malignancies present a major problem in the treatment of solid tumors. Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) is an increasingly used technique for treating various types of malignant liver tumors. This approach is appealing, as the mechanism of action is independent from other loco-regional treatments and potentially complementary to systemic therapies. There are two commercially available products in use for TARE: 90Y-resin and 90Y-glass microspheres. Currently available data indicates TARE so be safe and effective in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver disease. In HCC the results compare well with chemoembolization, while the role of TARE in combination with kinase inhibitors has yet to be established. Current data on TARE in metastatic liver disease is promising, but there is a strong need for prospective randomized trials comparing TARE and modern chemotherapeutic regimen to support the growing role of TARE in metastatic liver disease. PMID:27247711

  2. Current status of renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Suranyi, M. G.; Hall, B. M.

    1990-01-01

    The success rate of renal transplantation has improved considerably during the past decade, with substantial improvements in both graft and patient survival. The quality of graft function, however, and not graft survival alone is increasingly determining the standards by which transplantation outcome is being judged. As the demand for kidney transplants continues to rise and transplants are being offered to an ever-increasing number of patients, organs are being sought from new supply pools and efforts are being made to use current resources more efficiently. Improvements in clinical management have allowed short-term complications such as infection and rejection to be better prevented or better diagnosed and treated. Fundamental advances in the understanding of the immunologic processes underlying both allograft rejection and acceptance and the introduction of new immunosuppressive agents have allowed a better use of drug therapy and have moved the goal of acquired transplant tolerance closer to attainment. With improved initial transplant success rates, the long-term transplantation outcome is becoming more important. The role of tissue matching in preventing chronic rejection is becoming more appreciated, and the long-term risks of malignancy, arteriosclerosis, and chronic rejection are being better recognized and managed. PMID:2191502

  3. Nanodosimetry: Principle and Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2011-05-05

    Due to the success of theoretical track structure Monte Carlo simulations, showing that features of ionization patterns on the nanometer level are important for the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation, several new methods for experimental track structure investigations have been developed in recent years. These methods all use the principle of density scaling in low-pressure gas to probe track structure in macroscopic dimensions, ideally with single-ionization resolution. The new field of experimental track structure investigation, which has been called nanodosimetry, can be approached in two ways: (1) the number of ionizations in a defined, ideally wall-less, sensitive volume is registered per single primary particle and cluster size distributions are obtained, or (2) the full track structure of an ion track segment is 'imaged'. Existing nanodosimetric methods are based on the first approach, but a track structure imaging detector is currently under development at Loma Linda University. This contribution will review the principle and existing technical approaches to nanodosimetry and will give an outlook on future developments and applications.

  4. The status of neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1987-11-01

    The situation of particle physics today is quite puzzling. On the one hand, the Standard Model (SM) of strong and electroweak interactions is consistent with all confirmed experimental data but theoretically rather unsatisfactory. On the other hand, none of the many theoretical speculations which try to go beyond the SM has (yet) received the slightest experimental support. The solution to this dilemma can only come from new data: either from the detection of a new particle threshold at high energy colliders, or from the appearance of some small discrepancy in high-precision experiments. A crucial sector for testing the SM and its extensions is that of neutral currents (NC), where an impressive amount of data has been collected in recent years. While waiting for the next generation of experiments, it is certainly useful to take stock of our knowledge, determining the NC parameters as precisely as we can and putting limits on possible deviations from the SM. The present talk contains the results of a recent analysis along these lines: the first part illustrates how a set of 'model-independent' parameters can be extracted from the available NC data, the second part particularizes the analysis to the SM and to some superstring-inspired models with an additional Z' in their low-energy spectrum. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  6. Current status of methods for shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Current methods used in shielding analysis and recent improvements in those methods are discussed. The status of methods development is discussed based on needs cited at the 1977 International Conference on Reactor Shielding. Additional areas where methods development is needed are discussed.

  7. CDMS experiment: current status and future

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    We present the current status of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS). The five tower detector array, total 30 detectors, are running stable since October 2006. We have accumulated more than 900 kg-days of low background data. We also summarize the prospect of SuperCDMS project.

  8. Lung xenotransplantation: recent progress and current status.

    PubMed

    Harris, Donald G; Quinn, Kevin J; Dahi, Siamak; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Pierson, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has undergone important progress in controlling initial hyperacute rejection in many preclinical models, with some cell, tissue, and organ xenografts advancing toward clinical trials. However, acute injury, driven primarily by innate immune and inflammatory responses, continues to limit results in lung xenograft models. The purpose of this article is to review the current status of lung xenotransplantation--including the seemingly unique challenges posed by this organ-and summarize proven and emerging means of overcoming acute lung xenograft injury.

  9. Current Status of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velonas, Vicki M.; Woo, Henry H.; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; Assinder, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of cancer-related death of men globally. Since its introduction, there has been intense debate as to the effectiveness of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test as a screening tool for PCa. It is now evident that the PSA test produces unacceptably high rates of false positive results and is not prognostic. Here we review the current status of molecular biomarkers that promise to be prognostic and that might inform individual patient management. It highlights current efforts to identify biomarkers obtained by minimally invasive methods and discusses current knowledge with regard to gene fusions, mRNA and microRNAs, immunology, and cancer-associated microparticles. PMID:23708103

  10. Lung Xenotransplantation: Recent Progress and Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Donald G.; Quinn, Kevin J.; Dahi, Siamak; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has undergone important progress in controlling initial hyperacute rejection in many pre-clinical models, with some cell, tissue, and organ xenografts advancing toward clinical trials. However, acute injury, driven primarily by innate immune and inflammatory responses, continues to limit results in lung xenograft models. The purpose of this article is to review the current status of lung xenotransplantation – including the seemingly unique challenges posed by this organ – and summarize proven and emerging means of overcoming acute lung xenograft injury. PMID:25040467

  11. Intersputnik - Current status and future options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, H. R.; Swensrud, S. B.

    1985-06-01

    Current status of the Soviet-sponsored international satellite network (Intersputnik) is reviewed, and recent developments and options for its expansion are analyzed. Satellite network, transponder assignments, and lists of current and potential network members are presented. The recent technological achievements include the use of Ku band transponders; reception of TV signals on a 1.3 m dish; use of delta modulation for telephone transmission satellite; and steerable spot beams. The most likely area for expansion of the network is television transmissions, mainly with exploits of the Third World TV market for one-way flow of documentaries and academic courses, and news exchange. Other options are digital science and data transmission, and international videoconferencing.

  12. [Current status of medical education in Chile].

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    The Chilean Academy of Medicine published a "Report on the Current Status of Medical Education in Chile". This report reviews the history of medical education in this country and its close relationship with the Health Care System, public and private; highlights the main changes that took place during the last 25 years in superior and medical education; provides information on the 26 currently existing Medical Schools; refers to the availability of medical doctors and specialists; discusses the mechanisms that control the quality of institutions involved and their programs; and summarizes the results of the Annual National Medical Examination. The members of the Committee on Superior Education of the Academy provided a critical analysis of medical education in Chile and recommendations on how to improve it.

  13. MIRI telescope simulator (MTS) current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, F. J.; Eiriz, V.; Alcacera, M. A.; Aricha, A.; Balado, A.; Barandiaran, J.; Berenguer, T.; Diaz, E.; Figueroa, I.; Gonzalez, L. M.; Lopez, R.; Menendez, M.; Bernardo, A. M.; Reina, M.; Sanchez, A.; Garcia, G.; Jimenez, A.; Colombo, M.; Canchal, M. R.; Rodriguez, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    MTS (MIRI telescope simulator) is the Spanish contribution to the JWST Project. MTS is a part of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the Assembly Integration and Verification (AIV) and Calibration phase of the MIRI instrument at the RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) facilities. Briefly, MTS main objetive consists on delivering a diffraction-limited test beam, including the obscuration and mask pattern, to the MIRI instrument that reproduces the output beam of the JWST in environmental conditions similar to those corresponding to the flight. In this work, the current status of the project is reported on. Mainly, after a description of the whole instrument and the optomechanical performances required, the paper will be focused on the current status of the purchase and characterization of certain critical elements belonging to the different subsystems. The first step has been the verification of the thermoelastic behaviour of its structure, employing a mass prototype. Both extensometer measurements and optical measurements with alignment mirror cubes have been carried out during a thermal vacuum test of this MTS prototype. The correlation of the measurements, optically and mechanically, will provide a better knowledge of the structure behavior and will be used to define the integration process.

  14. Gravitational wave astronomy: the current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, ChunNong; Wen, LinQing; Chu, Qi; Fang, Qi; Cai, RongGen; Gao, JiangRui; Lin, XueChun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, ZongHong; Reitze, David H.; Arai, Koji; Zhang, Fan; Flaminio, Raffaele; Zhu, XingJiang; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N.; Shannon, Ryan M.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Gao, Wei; Xu, Peng; Bian, Xing; Cao, ZhouJian; Chang, ZiJing; Dong, Peng; Gong, XueFei; Huang, ShuangLin; Ju, Peng; Luo, ZiRen; Qiang, Li'E.; Tang, WenLin; Wan, XiaoYun; Wang, Yue; Xu, ShengNian; Zang, YunLong; Zhang, HaiPeng; Lau, Yun-Kau; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2015-12-01

    In the centenary year of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, this paper reviews the current status of gravitational wave astronomy across a spectrum which stretches from attohertz to kilohertz frequencies. Sect. 1 of this paper reviews the historical development of gravitational wave astronomy from Einstein's first prediction to our current understanding the spectrum. It is shown that detection of signals in the audio frequency spectrum can be expected very soon, and that a north-south pair of next generation detectors would provide large scientific benefits. Sect. 2 reviews the theory of gravitational waves and the principles of detection using laser interferometry. The state of the art Advanced LIGO detectors are then described. These detectors have a high chance of detecting the first events in the near future. Sect. 3 reviews the KAGRA detector currently under development in Japan, which will be the first laser interferometer detector to use cryogenic test masses. Sect. 4 of this paper reviews gravitational wave detection in the nanohertz frequency band using the technique of pulsar timing. Sect. 5 reviews the status of gravitational wave detection in the attohertz frequency band, detectable in the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background, and discusses the prospects for detection of primordial waves from the big bang. The techniques described in sects. 1-5 have already placed significant limits on the strength of gravitational wave sources. Sects. 6 and 7 review ambitious plans for future space based gravitational wave detectors in the millihertz frequency band. Sect. 6 presents a roadmap for development of space based gravitational wave detectors by China while sect. 7 discusses a key enabling technology for space interferometry known as time delay interferometry.

  15. Status and challenges for conservation of small mammal assemblages in South America.

    PubMed

    Kelt, Douglas A; Meserve, Peter L

    2014-08-01

    South America spans about 44° latitude, covers almost 18 million km(2) , and is second only to Africa in continental mammal species richness. In spite of this richness, research on the status of this fauna and on the nature and magnitude of contemporary threats remains limited. Distilling threats to this diverse fauna at a continental scale is challenging, in part because of the limited availability of rigorous studies. Recognizing this constraint, we summarize key threats to small mammals in South America, emphasizing the roles of habitat loss and degradation, direct persecution, and the increasing threat of climate change. We focus on three regional 'case studies': the tropical Andes, Amazonia and adjacent lowland regions, and the southern temperate region. We close with a brief summary of recent findings at our long-term research site in north-central Chile as they pertain to projected threats to this fauna. Habitat alteration is a pervasive threat that has been magnified by market forces and globalization (e.g. extensive agricultural development in Amazonia), and threatens increasing numbers of populations and species. Climate change poses even greater threats, from changes in rainfall and runoff regimes and resulting changes in vegetative structure and composition to secondary influences on fire dynamics. It is likely that many changes have yet to be recognized, but existing threats suggest that the future may bring dramatic changes in the distribution of many mammal taxa, although it is not clear if key habitat elements (vegetation) will respond as rapidly as climatic factors, leading to substantial uncertainty. Climate change is likely to result in 'winners' and 'losers' but available information precludes detailed assessment of which species are likely to fall into which category. In the absence of long-term monitoring and applied research to characterize these threats more accurately, and to develop strategies to reduce their impacts, managers already are

  16. 42 CFR 411.104 - Current employment status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Current employment status. 411.104 Section 411.104... Covered Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.104 Current employment status. (a) General rule. An individual has current employment status if— (1) The individual is actively working as an...

  17. 42 CFR 411.104 - Current employment status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Current employment status. 411.104 Section 411.104... Covered Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.104 Current employment status. (a) General rule. An individual has current employment status if— (1) The individual is actively working as an...

  18. 42 CFR 411.104 - Current employment status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Current employment status. 411.104 Section 411.104... Covered Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.104 Current employment status. (a) General rule. An individual has current employment status if— (1) The individual is actively working as an...

  19. Colletotrichum – current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, P.F.; Damm, U.; Johnston, P.R.; Weir, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    A review is provided of the current state of understanding of Colletotrichum systematics, focusing on species-level data and the major clades. The taxonomic placement of the genus is discussed, and the evolution of our approach to species concepts and anamorph-teleomorph relationships is described. The application of multilocus technologies to phylogenetic analysis of Colletotrichum is reviewed, and selection of potential genes/loci for barcoding purposes is discussed. Host specificity and its relation to speciation and taxonomy is briefly addressed. A short review is presented of the current status of classification of the species clusters that are currently without comprehensive multilocus analyses, emphasising the orbiculare and destructivum aggregates. The future for Colletotrichum biology will be reliant on consensus classification and robust identification tools. In support of these goals, a Subcommission on Colletotrichum has been formed under the auspices of the International Commission on Taxonomy of Fungi, which will administer a carefully curated barcode database for sequence-based identification of species within the BioloMICS web environment. PMID:23136460

  20. Colletotrichum - current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P F; Damm, U; Johnston, P R; Weir, B S

    2012-09-15

    A review is provided of the current state of understanding of Colletotrichum systematics, focusing on species-level data and the major clades. The taxonomic placement of the genus is discussed, and the evolution of our approach to species concepts and anamorph-teleomorph relationships is described. The application of multilocus technologies to phylogenetic analysis of Colletotrichum is reviewed, and selection of potential genes/loci for barcoding purposes is discussed. Host specificity and its relation to speciation and taxonomy is briefly addressed. A short review is presented of the current status of classification of the species clusters that are currently without comprehensive multilocus analyses, emphasising the orbiculare and destructivum aggregates. The future for Colletotrichum biology will be reliant on consensus classification and robust identification tools. In support of these goals, a Subcommission on Colletotrichum has been formed under the auspices of the International Commission on Taxonomy of Fungi, which will administer a carefully curated barcode database for sequence-based identification of species within the BioloMICS web environment.

  1. The SOLAR-C mission: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Tsuneta, Saku; Hara, Hirohisa; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Kusano, Kanya; Sakao, Taro; Sekii, Takashi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2011-10-01

    Two mission concepts (plan A: out-of-ecliptic mission and plan B: high resolution spectroscopic mission) have been studied for the next Japanese-led solar mission Solar-C, which will follow the scientific success of the Hinode mission. The both mission concepts are concluded as equally important and attractive for the promotion of space solar physics. In the meantime we also had to make efforts for prioritizing the two options, in order to proceed to next stage of requesting the launch of Solar-C mission at the earliest opportunity. This paper briefly describes the two mission concepts and the current status on our efforts for prioritizing the two options. More details are also described for the plan B option as the first-priority Solar-C mission. The latest report from the Solar-C mission concept studies was documented as "Interim Report on the Solar-C Mission Concept."

  2. Current status of Nanonex nanoimprint solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hua; Kong, Linshu; Li, Mingtao; Steere, Colby; Koecher, Larry

    2004-05-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has the advantage of high-throughput, sub-10 nm resolution and low cost [1]. It has been included into 2003 ITRS as the Next Generation Lithography (NGL) for 45 nm node [2]. This paper summarized current status of Nanonex imprint technologies. Nanonex imprint process includes thermal nanoimprint (T-NIL) and photo-curable nanoimprint (P-NIL). Both T-NIL and P-NIL utilized a proprietary air cushion press (ACP), which has the advantage of ultra-uniformity, low lateral stress, less damage to the mold and substrate, and higher alignment accuracy. Nanonex Corporation delivers user-friendly nanoimprint lithography tools and solutions for both experts and non-experts of micro and nanofabrication. Nanoimprint machines, resists, molds and processes have been developed and are available today.

  3. Spaceborne GPS: Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting GPS technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor--it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on-board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-2000 GPS flight experiments, and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  4. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Iaccarino, Vittorio Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  5. Current status of toxoplasmosis vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kur, Józef; Holec-Gasior, Lucyna; Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elzbieta

    2009-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by an intracellular protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, is widespread throughout the world. The disease is of major medical and veterinary importance, being a cause of congenital disease and abortion in humans and domestic animals. In addition, recently it has gained importance owing to toxoplasma encephalitis in AIDS patients. In the last few years, there has been considerable progress towards the development of a vaccine for toxoplasmosis, and a vaccine based on the live-attenuated S48 strain was developed for veterinary uses. However, this vaccine is expensive, causes side effects and has a short shelf life. Furthermore, this vaccine may revert to a pathogenic strain and, therefore, is not suitable for human use. Various experimental studies have shown that it may be possible to develop a vaccine against human toxoplasmosis. Recent progress in knowledge of the protective immune response generated by T. gondii and the current status of development of a vaccine for toxoplasmosis are highlighted.

  6. Current status of silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Cruz, N I

    1991-08-01

    The current status of the silicone breast implants which have recently come under scrutiny by the FDA and received much unfavorable media coverage is reviewed. The gel-filled breast implants which in 1976 were "grandfathered" by the FDA have now been required to provide scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness by July 9, 1991. The possible risks of silicone breast implants include capsular contracture, interference with early tumor detection by routine mammography, development of sarcomas in laboratory animals (no human cases are reported), silicone gel leakage and connective tissue disease. In the less frequently used polyurethane covered implants, the degradation of the polyurethane to diaminotoluene (TDA) has caused liver cancer in laboratory animals, yet at present, this type of implant has been voluntarily removed from the market by the manufacturer. After reviewing the available evidence, the American Society of Plastic Surgery still considers silicone breast implants reliable and safe. PMID:1816782

  7. Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT): Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2003-04-01

    After an effort of nearly a half century the CTBT was approved by the U.N. on September 10, 1996. Out of 185 member nations (at the time), 158 voted in favor, 3 against, and the remaining either abstained or were diplomatically absent. In spite of such an overwhelming support of the international community, the CTBT may well remain on paper. The reason being that one of the opposing nations, India, is considered a "threshold Nuclear Nation" and must approve the treaty to enter into force according to the rules of Conference of Disarmament (CD). India's U.N. representative said that her country would "never sign this unequal treaty, not now, not later." "Unequal" because it does not provide a time table for elimination of the existing nuclear weapons, testing of weapons, etc., which favor nuclear states. This paper will provide details of the above issues and the current status of the CTBT.

  8. Tackling dengue fever: Current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; El-Kafrawy, Sherif; Sohrab, Sayed S; Desprès, Philippe; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Azhar, Esam

    2015-01-01

    According to recent statistics, 96 million apparent dengue infections were estimated worldwide in 2010. This figure is by far greater than the WHO prediction which indicates the rapid spread of this disease posing a growing threat to the economy and a major challenge to clinicians and health care services across the globe particularly in the affected areas.This article aims at bringing to light the current epidemiological and clinical status of the dengue fever. The relationship between genetic mutations, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the pathophysiology of disease progression will be put into perspective. It will also highlight the recent advances in dengue vaccine development.Thus far, a significant progress has been made in unraveling the risk factors and understanding the molecular pathogenesis associated with the disease. However, further insights in molecular features of the disease and the development of animal models will enormously help improving the therapeutic interventions and potentially contribute to finding new preventive measures for population at risk.

  9. Spaceborne GPS Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense, is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor-it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed on spacecraft and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on- board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-1999 GPS flight experiments and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  10. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: Current status and long-term prospective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Thorsteinson, L.; Koster, B.J.; Rowles, T.

    1997-01-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed.

  11. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: current status and long-term prospective.

    PubMed

    Becker, P R; Wise, S A; Thorsteinson, L; Koster, B J; Rowles, T

    1997-05-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding, Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed. PMID:9159892

  12. Current status of pig liver xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ekser, Burcin; Markmann, James F; Tector, A Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The shortage of organs from deceased human donors is a major problem limiting the number of organs transplanted each year and results in the death of thousands of patients on the waiting list. Pigs are currently the preferred species for clinical organ xenotransplantation. Progress in genetically-engineered (GE) pig liver xenotransplantation increased graft and recipient survival from hours with unmodified pig livers to up to 9 days with normal to near-normal liver function. Deletion of genes such as GGTA1 (Gal-knockout pigs) or adding genes such as human complement regulatory proteins (hCD55, hCD46 expressing pigs) enabled hyperacute rejection to be overcome. Although survival up to 9 days was recorded, extended pig graft survival was not achieved due to lethal thrombocytopenia. The current status of GE pig liver xenotransplantation with world experience, potential factors causing thrombocytopenia, new targets on pig endothelial cells, and novel GE pigs with more genes deletion to avoid remaining antibody response, such as beta1,4-N-acetyl galactosaminyl transferase 2 (β4GalNT2), are discussed.

  13. Nanomedicines as cancer therapeutics: current status.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Sohail; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Ramazani, Farshad; Singh, Anjali; Rahman, Ziyaur; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Storm, Gert; Kok, Robbert J

    2013-05-01

    As of 21st century, cancer is arguably the most complex and challenging disease known to mankind and an inevitable public health concern of this millennium. Nanotechnology, suitably amalgamated with cancer research, has ushered an era of highly personalized and safer medicines which can improve cancer diagnosis and therapy. A wide variety of nanomedicines are currently under investigation, including polymeric/non-polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, lipid- and micelle-based nanoparticles. The bases of these nanomedicines in reducing toxicity associated with cancer therapy are their ability to carry a large payload and multivalent-ligand targeting. This imparts specificity for targeting the tissues as well as bypass resistance mechanisms. The major hurdles on these future medicines are potential toxicity of nanoparticles, which imposes the need of extensive regulatory evaluation before nanomedicines could be utilized as cancer therapeutics. This review highlights nanopharmaceuticals that have been investigated in oncology for various applications (diagnosis, therapeutic delivery and theranostics). It also discusses the effects of nano-sized materials on tissues/organ functions, the possibility of overcoming multi-drug resistance by using nanomedicines and their current clinical status.

  14. [Current progress and future direction in the biology of ovarian germ stem cells in mammals].

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-Hui; Guo, Kun; Zheng, Ping

    2012-12-01

    Whether or not oogenesis continues after birth in mammalian ovaries remains controversial. Since the 1950's, it has been generally accepted that oogenesis takes place during embryogenesis in mammals and ceases at birth. At birth, germ cells in mammalian ovaries have progressed to the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase and have formed primordial follicles with surrounding somatic cells. These primordial follicles represent follicle reserves of the reproductive life. However, this view has been recently challenged by a growing body of evidence showing the isolation and propagation of germ stem cells from mouse and human ovaries. These ovarian germ stem cells are capable of regenerating functional oocytes when transplanted back into recipient ovaries. Despite the discovery of the potential germ stem cells in mammalian ovaries, it remains uncertain whether these cells exist and function in ovaries under physiological conditions. Herein we review the current progress and future direction in this infant area.

  15. Arctic marine mammal population status, sea ice habitat loss, and conservation recommendations for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Kristin L; Stern, Harry; Kovacs, Kit M; Lowry, Lloyd; Moore, Sue E; Regehr, Eric V; Ferguson, Steven H; Wiig, Øystein; Boveng, Peter; Angliss, Robyn P; Born, Erik W; Litovka, Dennis; Quakenbush, Lori; Lydersen, Christian; Vongraven, Dag; Ugarte, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Arctic marine mammals (AMMs) are icons of climate change, largely because of their close association with sea ice. However, neither a circumpolar assessment of AMM status nor a standardized metric of sea ice habitat change is available. We summarized available data on abundance and trend for each AMM species and recognized subpopulation. We also examined species diversity, the extent of human use, and temporal trends in sea ice habitat for 12 regions of the Arctic by calculating the dates of spring sea ice retreat and fall sea ice advance from satellite data (1979-2013). Estimates of AMM abundance varied greatly in quality, and few studies were long enough for trend analysis. Of the AMM subpopulations, 78% (61 of 78) are legally harvested for subsistence purposes. Changes in sea ice phenology have been profound. In all regions except the Bering Sea, the duration of the summer (i.e., reduced ice) period increased by 5-10 weeks and by >20 weeks in the Barents Sea between 1979 and 2013. In light of generally poor data, the importance of human use, and forecasted environmental changes in the 21st century, we recommend the following for effective AMM conservation: maintain and improve comanagement by local, federal, and international partners; recognize spatial and temporal variability in AMM subpopulation response to climate change; implement monitoring programs with clear goals; mitigate cumulative impacts of increased human activity; and recognize the limits of current protected species legislation.

  16. Arctic marine mammal population status, sea ice habitat loss, and conservation recommendations for the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Harry; Kovacs, Kit M.; Lowry, Lloyd; Moore, Sue E.; Regehr, Eric V.; Ferguson, Steven H.; Wiig, Øystein; Boveng, Peter; Angliss, Robyn P.; Born, Erik W.; Litovka, Dennis; Quakenbush, Lori; Lydersen, Christian; Vongraven, Dag; Ugarte, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arctic marine mammals (AMMs) are icons of climate change, largely because of their close association with sea ice. However, neither a circumpolar assessment of AMM status nor a standardized metric of sea ice habitat change is available. We summarized available data on abundance and trend for each AMM species and recognized subpopulation. We also examined species diversity, the extent of human use, and temporal trends in sea ice habitat for 12 regions of the Arctic by calculating the dates of spring sea ice retreat and fall sea ice advance from satellite data (1979–2013). Estimates of AMM abundance varied greatly in quality, and few studies were long enough for trend analysis. Of the AMM subpopulations, 78% (61 of 78) are legally harvested for subsistence purposes. Changes in sea ice phenology have been profound. In all regions except the Bering Sea, the duration of the summer (i.e., reduced ice) period increased by 5–10 weeks and by >20 weeks in the Barents Sea between 1979 and 2013. In light of generally poor data, the importance of human use, and forecasted environmental changes in the 21st century, we recommend the following for effective AMM conservation: maintain and improve comanagement by local, federal, and international partners; recognize spatial and temporal variability in AMM subpopulation response to climate change; implement monitoring programs with clear goals; mitigate cumulative impacts of increased human activity; and recognize the limits of current protected species legislation. PMID:25783745

  17. Arctic marine mammal population status, sea ice habitat loss, and conservation recommendations for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Kristin L; Stern, Harry; Kovacs, Kit M; Lowry, Lloyd; Moore, Sue E; Regehr, Eric V; Ferguson, Steven H; Wiig, Øystein; Boveng, Peter; Angliss, Robyn P; Born, Erik W; Litovka, Dennis; Quakenbush, Lori; Lydersen, Christian; Vongraven, Dag; Ugarte, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Arctic marine mammals (AMMs) are icons of climate change, largely because of their close association with sea ice. However, neither a circumpolar assessment of AMM status nor a standardized metric of sea ice habitat change is available. We summarized available data on abundance and trend for each AMM species and recognized subpopulation. We also examined species diversity, the extent of human use, and temporal trends in sea ice habitat for 12 regions of the Arctic by calculating the dates of spring sea ice retreat and fall sea ice advance from satellite data (1979-2013). Estimates of AMM abundance varied greatly in quality, and few studies were long enough for trend analysis. Of the AMM subpopulations, 78% (61 of 78) are legally harvested for subsistence purposes. Changes in sea ice phenology have been profound. In all regions except the Bering Sea, the duration of the summer (i.e., reduced ice) period increased by 5-10 weeks and by >20 weeks in the Barents Sea between 1979 and 2013. In light of generally poor data, the importance of human use, and forecasted environmental changes in the 21st century, we recommend the following for effective AMM conservation: maintain and improve comanagement by local, federal, and international partners; recognize spatial and temporal variability in AMM subpopulation response to climate change; implement monitoring programs with clear goals; mitigate cumulative impacts of increased human activity; and recognize the limits of current protected species legislation. PMID:25783745

  18. Epilepsy Surgery: Current Status and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    KAWAI, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of surgical treatment of epilepsy and introduces the ongoing challenges. Seizure outcome of resective surgery for focal seizures associated with focal lesions is satisfactory. Particularly for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, surgical treatment should be considered from the earlier stage of the disease. Meanwhile, surgical outcome in nonlesional extratemporal lobe epilepsy is still to be improved using various approaches. Disconnective surgeries reduce surgical complications of extensive resections while achieving equivalent or better seizure outcomes. Multiple subpial transection is still being modified expecting a better outcome by transection to the vertical cortices along the sulci- and multi-directional transection from a single entry point. Hippocampal transection is expected to preserve memory function while interrupting the abnormal epileptic synchronization. Proper selection or combination of subdural and depth electrodes and a wide-band analysis of electroencephalography may improve the accurate localization of epileptogenic region. Patients for whom curative resective surgery is not indicated because of generalized or bilateral multiple nature of their epilepsies, neuromodulation therapies are options of treatment which palliate their seizures. PMID:25925752

  19. Current status of drug information centers.

    PubMed

    Beaird, S L; Coley, R M; Crea, K A

    1992-01-01

    The current status of drug information centers in the United States and trends that have developed over the past two decades were studied. In February 1990, questionnaires were sent to 218 pharmacist-operated drug information centers nationwide. The centers were identified through previously published directories and the ASHP electronic bulletin board PharmNet. The survey consisted of 182 questions designed to gather updated data on each drug information center. Responses to each question were coded individually, and data were analyzed by using a statistical analysis program. One hundred fifty-four drug information centers responded; of these, 130 provided usable responses. The results showed that the number of drug information centers has increased compared with earlier surveys. Also, the centers handle substantially larger workloads. Few drug information centers indicate a fee-for-service system. Computer use and online searching by drug information centers have increased. Most of the centers participate in the formal education of pharmacy students. Increases in the number of drug information centers and in their workload substantiate the growing importance of these centers to the health-care professions.

  20. Current Status of the Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, M.; LMT Team

    2014-03-01

    I will briefly describe the current status of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT), the near-term plans for the telescope and the initial suite of instrumentation. I will also summarize some of the results of the Early Science Phase that took place in the summer of 2013. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between Mexico and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50m-diameter millimeter-wave radio telescope. Construction activities are complete at the 4600m LMT site on the summit of Volcan Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. First light with the LMT (inner 32mdiameter) was successfully conducted in June and July of 2011, as well as the Early Science Phase in May-July 2013 with observations at both the 3 and 1.1mm wave-bands. The LMT antenna, outfitted with its initial complement of scientific instruments, will be a world-leading scientific research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  1. Tackling dengue fever: Current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; El-Kafrawy, Sherif; Sohrab, Sayed S; Desprès, Philippe; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Azhar, Esam

    2015-01-01

    According to recent statistics, 96 million apparent dengue infections were estimated worldwide in 2010. This figure is by far greater than the WHO prediction which indicates the rapid spread of this disease posing a growing threat to the economy and a major challenge to clinicians and health care services across the globe particularly in the affected areas.This article aims at bringing to light the current epidemiological and clinical status of the dengue fever. The relationship between genetic mutations, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the pathophysiology of disease progression will be put into perspective. It will also highlight the recent advances in dengue vaccine development.Thus far, a significant progress has been made in unraveling the risk factors and understanding the molecular pathogenesis associated with the disease. However, further insights in molecular features of the disease and the development of animal models will enormously help improving the therapeutic interventions and potentially contribute to finding new preventive measures for population at risk. PMID:26645066

  2. Current status of mini-gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Mahawar, Kamal K.; Kumar, Parveen; Carr, William RJ; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Mini-gastric bypass (MGP) is a promising bariatric procedure. Tens of thousands of this procedure have been performed throughout the world since Rutledge performed the first procedure in the United States of America in 1997. Several thousands of these have even been documented in the published scientific literature. Despite a proven track record over nearly two decades, this operation continues to polarise the bariatric community. A large number of surgeons across the world have strong objections to this procedure and do not perform it. The risk of symptomatic (bile) reflux, marginal ulceration, severe malnutrition, and long-term risk of gastric and oesophageal cancers are some of the commonly voiced concerns. Despite these expressed fears, several advantages such as technical simplicity, shorter learning curve, ease of revision and reversal, non-inferior weight loss and comorbidity resolution outcomes have prompted some surgeons to advocate a wider adoption of this procedure. This review examines the current status of these controversial aspects in the light of the published academic literature in English. PMID:27251826

  3. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core–shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier.

  4. Slings in iatrogenic male incontinence: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Fabrizio; Schenone, M.; Giberti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The increasing number of prostatectomies entails an increasing number of patients suffering from iatrogenic incontinence despite improved surgical techniques. The severity of this problem often requires invasive treatments such as periurethral injection of bulking agents, artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, and sub-urethral sling positioning. The artificial urethral sphincter has represented, until today, the gold standard but, in the recent years, sling systems have been investigated as minimally invasive alternative options. Today, three different sling procedures are commonly performed: bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems. The aim of this review is to critically report the current status of sling systems in the treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched and all articles between 1974 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: With regard to bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems, cure rates ranged between 58.0% and 86.0%, 55.5% and 73.0%, and 40.0% and 63.0%, respectively, while major complication rates ranged between 0 and 14.5%, 10.0 and 22.2%, and 0 and 10.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Suburethral slings are the only alternative techniques which can be favorably compared with the AUS, showing more advantages with respect to AUS implantations which are mainly represented by a quick and less invasive approach, low morbidity, and low costs. In spite of the difficulty in identifying the most effective sling procedure, overall, sling systems can be recommended for patients with persistent mild or moderate incontinence. However, the indication can also be extended to patients with severe incontinence, after appropriate counseling, allowing AUS implantation in the event of sling failure. PMID:20877609

  5. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core-shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier. PMID:27459210

  6. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core-shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier.

  7. Beagle 2: Mission to Mars - Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Pillinger, C. T.; Wright, I. P.; Morgan, G. H.; Yau, D.; Stewart, J. L. C.; Leese, M. R.; Praine, I. J.; Sheridan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Beagle 2 is a 72 kg probe (with a 32 kg lander) developed in the United Kingdom for inclusion on the European Space Agency's 2003 Mars Express. Beagle 2 was launched on June 2, 2003 with Mars Express on a Soyuz-Fregat rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Beagle 2 landed on Mars on December 25th, 2003 in Isidis Planitia (approx. 10.7 N and 268.6 W), a large sedimentary basin that overlies the boundary between ancient highlands and northern plains. Isidis Planitia, the third largest impact basin on Mars, which is possibly filled with sediment deposited at the bottom of long-standing lakes or seas, offers an ideal environment for preserving traces of life. The team is awaiting signals from the Beagle 2 lander at the time when this abstract was written. Current status of the mission will be reported. Beagle 2 was developed to search for organic material and other volatiles on and below the surface of Mars in addition to the study of the inorganic chemistry and mineralogy. Several fundamental properties can be used to determine the existence of an active or past biology on any planet, Earth or Mars. Beagle 2's targets for investigation included: (a) The presence of water, or the existence of minerals deposited from water to show that water was present, even if only transiently; (b) The detection of carbonaceous debris, the remains of organisms that might have lived in water or were washed to a final resting place by the action of water; (c) The structure of organic matter, to demonstrate that it might have been synthesized for a biological purpose; (d) The recognition of isotopic fractionation between carbonaceous phases (organic vs inorganic carbon phases), a condition which on Earth suggests that life emerged nearly 4 billion years ago.

  8. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory natural products: current status.

    PubMed

    Jachak, Sanjay M

    2006-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are of huge therapeutic benefit in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and various types of inflammatory conditions. The target for these drugs is cyclooxygenase (COX), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the conversion of arachidonic acid into inflammatory prostaglandins. COX-2 selective inhibitors are believed to have the same anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic activities as that of nonselective inhibitor NSAIDs with little or none of the gastrointestinal side effects. Thus, in the last 6-7 years several selective COX-2 inhibitors including coxibs were discovered and introduced into clinic. Recent reports evidence that selective COX-2 inhibitor such as rofecoxib, can lead to thrombotic cardiovascular events through inhibition of prostacyclin formation in the infracted heart. This has resulted in withdrawal of rofecoxib from the clinic in September 2004. Moreover, the COX-2/COX-1 selectivity ratio is vital in the design of COX-2 inhibitory drugs, as it is clear from rofecoxib, which is more than 50-fold COX-2 selective. After looking at all above mentioned facts, natural product-based compounds seem better as these compounds are generally supposed to be devoid of severe side effects. The literature indicates that natural product-based compounds are mainly COX-1 selective. Through minor semi-synthetic changes in the structures, their selectivity towards COX-2 can be increased. The present review article addresses natural product COX inhibitors of plant and marine origin, reported during last ten years and their advantages, possible leads for further development and current status. In addition we describe our experience in the characterization, design and synthesis of potential natural COX inhibitors. PMID:16529558

  9. Current Status of Nuclear Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2015-12-01

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as 4He, 7Li, 9Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate students interested in

  10. Current status of injectable oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Zuck, T F; Riess, J G

    1994-01-01

    In this review the current status of what commonly are termed "blood substitutes" is discussed. The term blood substitute is a misnomer because the formulations under development at this time transport respiratory gases but do not perform the metabolic, regulatory, and protective functions of blood. Either hemoglobin or a perfluorochemical form the base to transport oxygen; the advantages and disadvantages of each base are discussed. The availability of a blood substitute in the U.S. will require approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and, by law, both its efficacy and safety must be demonstrated prior to approval. Showing efficacy of any blood substitute is complicated by the oxygen reserve and the compensatory mechanisms to acute blood loss in man. The challenge is to prove that the administration of these formulations offer clinical advantages compared with replacement of volume alone. Several efficacy models, the most attractive among them being perioperative hemodilution, should provide data that would bring these formulations into clinical practice. When hemoglobin is not within the favorable environment of the red cell, whether the hemoglobin is derived from expression vectors developed through recombinant biotechnology or from lysed human red cells, it acquires a left-shifted oxygen disassociation curve. Further, because the tetramer disassociates when injected intravenously and the resulting dimers are cleared rapidly from the circulation by the kidneys, intravascular dwell time is brief. Hemoglobins have been modified chemically and linked intramolecularly, intermolecularly, and to macromolecules to correct these problems. While these manipulations have normalized the p50 and extended the dwell time significantly, some toxicity problems remain unresolved. The binding of nitric oxide to hemoglobin preparations and the presumably resultant systemic and pulmonary hypertension observed in animals may be the most difficult to overcome, although the

  11. Anatomy of the human mammary gland: Current status of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Geddes, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Mammary glands are unique to mammals, with the specific function of synthesizing, secreting, and delivering milk to the newborn. Given this function, it is only during a pregnancy/lactation cycle that the gland reaches a mature developmental state via hormonal influences at the cellular level that effect drastic modifications in the micro- and macro-anatomy of the gland, resulting in remodeling of the gland into a milk-secretory organ. Pubertal and post-pubertal development of the breast in females aids in preparing it to assume a functional state during pregnancy and lactation. Remarkably, this organ has the capacity to regress to a resting state upon cessation of lactation, and then undergo the same cycle of expansion and regression again in subsequent pregnancies during reproductive life. This plasticity suggests tight hormonal regulation, which is paramount for the normal function of the gland. This review presents the current status of knowledge of the normal macro- and micro-anatomy of the human mammary gland and the distinct changes it undergoes during the key developmental stages that characterize it, from embryonic life through to post-menopausal age. In addition, it discusses recent advances in our understanding of the normal function of the breast during lactation, with special reference to breastmilk, its composition, and how it can be utilized as a tool to advance knowledge on normal and aberrant breast development and function. Finally, anatomical and molecular traits associated with aberrant expansion of the breast are discussed to set the basis for future comparisons that may illuminate the origin of breast cancer.

  12. Critical Consciousness: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Roderick J.; Diemer, Matthew A.; Voight, Adam M.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors consider Paulo Freire's construct of critical consciousness (CC) and why it deserves more attention in research and discourse on youth political and civic development. His approach to education and similar ideas by other scholars of liberation aims to foster a critical analysis of society--and one's status within…

  13. The Current Status of Statewide Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Deneen; Kurshan, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    Describes the status of educational telecommunications networks operated and funded by state government agencies to support K-12 programs. Summaries of a 1993 survey and other recent studies are presented together with recommendations for network infrastructure, instruction, transport, funding, and evaluation development. (Contains 12 references.)…

  14. Counselling International Students in Turkish Universities: Current Status and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektas, Dilek Yelda

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the current status of international students and counselling services provided at Turkish universities is addressed. Firstly, a brief history of counselling and counselling services in Turkish universities is examined, leading to a consideration of the current status of international students and counselling services.…

  15. The Current Status of STEM Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the current Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education research base through an analysis of articles from eight journals focused on the STEM disciplines. Analyzed are both practitioner and research publications to determine the current scope of STEM education research, where current STEM education…

  16. [Current status and industrialization of transgenic tomatoes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao-Xue; Chen, Xiu-Ling

    2011-09-01

    In this review, the progress in transgenic tomato research, including disease and insect resistance, herbicide resistance, stress tolerance, long-term storage, quality improvement, and male sterility, were described. The recent researches on producing heterologous proteins using transgenic tomatoes were also reviewed. Furthermore, the industrialization status and problems of transgenic tomatoes were analyzed and the prospects of both research and industrialization in transgenic tomatoes were discussed.

  17. The proton spin contents'': Current status perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ta-Pei . Dept. of Physics); Li, Ling-Fong . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    The present status of the phenomenological and theoretical interpretation of the EMC result on the polarized deep elastic scattering is reviewed. We focus our discussion on the possibility of a significant gluonic contribution to the proton spin via the axial anomaly. We contrast the variant perspectives on this question: the viewpoint that stresses the interpretation in terms of the parton distributions vs the one that concentrates on the matrix elements of local operators. Some remarks concerning the validity of OZI rule for the strange quark are also included. 53 refs.

  18. Current status of herbal product: Regulatory overview

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    A review of the regulatory status of herbal drugs/products was done for few countries forming part of Asia, Africa, America, Europe, and Australia, to understand various categories under which the trade of herbal products is permitted and their premarketing requirements. A critical assessment was done, to know the hindrances in the process of harmonization of herbal products. It has been found that there is a lack of harmonization in the regulatory requirements of herbal products internationally, besides the issues of availability of herbs and their conservation. These are hindering the international trade and growth of the herbal products segment. PMID:26681886

  19. Current status of herbal product: Regulatory overview.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    A review of the regulatory status of herbal drugs/products was done for few countries forming part of Asia, Africa, America, Europe, and Australia, to understand various categories under which the trade of herbal products is permitted and their premarketing requirements. A critical assessment was done, to know the hindrances in the process of harmonization of herbal products. It has been found that there is a lack of harmonization in the regulatory requirements of herbal products internationally, besides the issues of availability of herbs and their conservation. These are hindering the international trade and growth of the herbal products segment.

  20. Radiation Metabolomics: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Smrithi S.; Uppal, Medha; Randhawa, Subeena; Cheema, Mehar S.; Aghdam, Nima; Usala, Rachel L.; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Dritschilo, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) disrupts normal metabolic processes in cells and organs by inducing complex biological responses that interfere with gene and protein expression. Conventional dosimetry, monitoring of prodromal symptoms, and peripheral lymphocyte counts are of limited value as organ- and tissue-specific biomarkers for personnel exposed to radiation, particularly, weeks or months after exposure. Analysis of metabolites generated in known stress-responsive pathways by molecular profiling helps to predict the physiological status of an individual in response to environmental or genetic perturbations. Thus, a multi-metabolite profile obtained from a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolomics platform offers potential for identification of robust biomarkers to predict radiation toxicity of organs and tissues resulting from exposures to therapeutic or non-therapeutic IR. Here, we review the status of radiation metabolomics and explore applications as a standalone technology, as well as its integration in systems biology, to facilitate a better understanding of the molecular basis of radiation response. Finally, we draw attention to the identification of specific pathways that can be targeted for the development of therapeutics to alleviate or mitigate harmful effects of radiation exposure. PMID:26870697

  1. Bone Densitometry: Current Status and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Nicola; Ward, Kate

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the concept of what determines bone strength and fracture risk and how this can be quantified using current technologies. We describe bone densitometry measurement techniques that are currently available and consider the strengths and limitations of each technique, with particular emphasis on paediatric scanning. Magnetic resonance imaging is reviewed, as it is one of the newer technologies applied to assessment of the growing skeleton. The role of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography in the clinical assessment of bone health in children is considered, and their current diagnostic application is reviewed. PMID:26138836

  2. Current Status of Astrophysics of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Igor

    2016-03-01

    I will review the current instrumentation and recent results. I will discuss which measurements have to be done in the near future to significantly advance our knowledge about the phenomenon of cosmic rays, their sources, and their interactions with the interstellar medium. A support from NASA APRA Grant No. NNX13AC47G is greatly acknowledged.

  3. SOFIA: Science Vision and Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Scott D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation details the science and status of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). SOFIA is a 2.5 m Telescope designed to fit into a modified Boeing 747SP aircraft. It will have imaging and spectroscopy from .03 micron to 1.6 mm, emphasizing the obscured infrared spectrum (i.e., 30-300 micron). It will fly between 39,000 to 45,000 feet, above over 99.8 % of the water vapor which obscures the infrared from other ground based telescopes. Since it is on a ground based airplane, the instrumentation can be interchangeable between flights, it can fly anywhere and anytime. Diagrams show an overview of the observatory, the optical layout, and a comparison of SOFIA with the other major IR Imaging spectroscopic Space Observatories. Pictures include a shot of the installation of the primary mirror, and the Telescope instrument interface. Charts show the first generation instruments, and their ranges of spectral observation. Also the presentation reviews the science questions that SOFIA's instruments will assist in reviewing.

  4. Graphene Mechanics: Current Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Galiotis, Costas; Frank, Otakar; Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Sfyris, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of 2D materials such as monolayer graphene are of extreme importance for several potential applications. We summarize the experimental and theoretical results to date on mechanical loading of freely suspended or fully supported graphene. We assess the obtained axial properties of the material in tension and compression and comment on the methods used for deriving the various reported values. We also report on past and current efforts to define the elastic constants of graphene in a 3D representation. Current areas of research that are concerned with the effect of production method and/or the presence of defects upon the mechanical integrity of graphene are also covered. Finally, we examine extensively the work related to the effect of graphene deformation upon its electronic properties and the possibility of employing strained graphene in future electronic applications. PMID:25898069

  5. An independent Cepheid distance scale: Current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G., III

    1980-01-01

    An independent distance scale for Cepheid variables is discussed. The apparent magnitude and the visual surface brightness, inferred from an appropriate color index, are used to determine the angular diameter variation of the Cepheid. When combined with the linear displacement curve obtained from the integrated radial velocity curve, the distance and linear radius are determined. The attractiveness of the method is its complete independence of all other stellar distance scales, even though a number of practical difficulties currently exist in implementing the technique.

  6. Current Status of Hybrid Bearing Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    Advances in material development and processing have led to the introduction of ceramic hybrid bearings for many applications. The introduction of silicon nitride hybrid bearings into the high pressure oxidizer turbopump, on the space shuttle main engine, led NASA to solve a highly persistent and troublesome bearing problem. Hybrid bearings consist of ceramic balls and steel races. The majority of hybrid bearings utilize Si3N4 balls. The aerospace industry is currently studying the use of hybrid bearings and naturally the failure modes of these bearings become an issue in light of the limited data available. In today s turbine engines and helicopter transmissions, the health of the bearings is detected by the properties of the debris found in the lubrication line when damage begins to occur. Current oil debris sensor technology relies on the magnetic properties of the debris to detect damage. Since the ceramic rolling elements of hybrid bearings have no metallic properties, a new sensing system must be developed to indicate the system health if ceramic components are to be safely implemented in aerospace applications. The ceramic oil debris sensor must be capable of detecting ceramic and metallic component damage with sufficient reliability and forewarning to prevent a catastrophic failure. The objective of this research is to provide a background summary on what is currently known about hybrid bearing failure modes and to report preliminary results on the detection of silicon nitride debris, in oil, using a commercial particle counter.

  7. Iron bath smelting - current status and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Currently there is a worldwide effort to develop an iron and steelmaking process which uses coal directly rather than coke for reduction and energy. The most promising of the new processes is Bath Smelting in which coal, iron ore and oxygen or air are reacted in an iron bath. Research and development of the process is underway in Europe, Australia, Japan and the USA; while other countries are planning work for the near future. A brief description of the processes and the current state of their development is briefly discussed. The current state of knowledge on the critical basic phenomena which control bath smelting are reviewed. The major production limiting processes, reduction of iron oxide, heat transfer and slag foaming are discussed. A simple reduction model is presented which predicts how the production rate will vary with operating parameters and estimates the rate itself. From the foam index for smelting slags, and the gas generation for the specific operating conditions, the foam height in the process can be estimated. Coke in the slag can significantly reduce slag foaming. Future developments are briefly discussed. 15 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Novel products for haemostasis - current status.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, J; Albert, T

    2014-05-01

    Currently, new clotting factor concentrates are becoming available or are in advanced clinical studies that will significantly improve the treatment of patients with Haemophilia A or Haemophilia B. Various technologies are applied to extend half-life and/or allow for alternative routes of administration, e.g. subcutaneous route. Today, the advances for recombinant factor IX are significantly with half-life extensions to up to 100 h, allowing substitution intervals of 1-2 weeks. For recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) products the effect so far is only moderate, as the half-life extension is limited to about 15-18 h by the clearance of FVIII through its binding to von Willebrand factor. However, novel products applying new technologies with significantly extended half-life are already at the horizont, as a bispecific antibody that mimics FVIII. The pharmacokinetic improvements of the new products will lead to a revision of our current treatment regimens, with regard to intended trough levels, number of tolerated bleeds and likely will drive a greater individualization of regimens. Clearly, the potential of anti drug antibody response for these modified proteins must not be higher than with our current products. Another challenge are the increasingly diverse biochemical characteristics of the new products, that have to be considered when determining potencies and also when monitoring treatment in patients with the various available assays. Despite these challenges, the new products will significantly improve treatment and quality of life for our patients with haemophilia.

  9. Current Status of On-Site Wastewater Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senn, Charles L.

    1978-01-01

    Wastewater management is becoming an important environmental issue nationally. This article reports the history and current status of wastewater management. Regulatory programs are discussed with specific state examples. Needs assessment is also included. (MA)

  10. Current status of the implantable LVAD.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, Sagar; Moore, Ryan; Ambur, Vishnu; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2016-09-01

    With the ongoing shortage of available organs for heart transplantation, mechanical circulatory support devices have been increasingly utilized for managing acute and chronic heart failure that is refractory to medical therapy. In particular, the introduction of the left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) has revolutionized the field. In this review, we will discuss a brief history of the LVAD, available devices, current indications, patient selection, complications, and outcomes. In addition, we will discuss recent outcomes and advancements in the field of noncardiac surgery in the LVAD patient. Finally, we will discuss several topics for surgical consideration during LVAD implantation. PMID:27270581

  11. Molecular Imaging of Inflammation: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Dima A

    2016-08-01

    The ability to image inflammation in vivo can improve our understanding of the pathophysiology underlying various disease etiologies, including cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegeneration. A great wealth of preclinical and translational research has been and is currently being developed to decipher the involvement of the immune system in disease pathophysiology, quantify the course of a disease, and visualize the potential detrimental effects of excessive inflammation. Down the road, the ultimate goal is to have clinical noninvasive in vivo imaging biomarkers of inflammation that will help diagnose disease, establish prognosis, and gauge response to preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27173159

  12. Space law - Current status and issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of space law over the past 25 years is surveyed, with attention also given to the procedures that were followed. The treaties now in existence are given, as are issues currently before the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. Projections that were made 25 years ago are discussed in the light of subsequent developments. It is noted that nearly all the technological advances in space activities forecast 25 years ago have come to pass. Various provisions of the 1967 Outer Space Principles Treaty relating to stricture against weapons and the militarization of space are discussed.

  13. [Current status and future of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Date, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Lung transplantation has been a widely accepted treatment modality for patients with end-stage chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). COPD is the most frequent indication for lung transplantation according to the report from International Society for Lung and Heart Transplantation. However, it is a minor population in Japan. A total of 204 lung transplants have been performed in Japan to date. Among them, 10 patients were suffering from severe COPD. Nine of them received cadaveric lung transplantation and one received living-donor lobar lung transplantation. All are currently alive during follow-up period of 3-87 months.

  14. Chemoprevention in Barrett's Esophagus: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Muhammad H; Baruah, Anushka; Kossak, Sarah K; Buttar, Navtej S

    2015-06-01

    Chemoprevention in Barrett's esophagus is currently applied only in research settings. Identifying pathways that can be targeted by safe, pharmaceutical or natural compounds is key to expanding the scope of chemoprevention. Defining meaningful surrogate markers of cancer progression is critical to test the efficacy of chemopreventive approaches. Combinatorial chemoprevention that targets multiple components of the same pathway or parallel pathways could reduce the risk and improve the efficacy of chemoprevention. Here we discuss the role of chemoprevention as an independent or an adjuvant management option in BE-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26021201

  15. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  16. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  17. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: current status.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and kidney failure. Randomized prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extrarenal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical end points. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess kidney damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  18. [Current status of anthrax or black fever].

    PubMed

    Chantal, J

    1997-01-01

    Although anthrax is one of the oldest recognized infectious diseases in the world, it remains widespread particularly in tropical zones such as Africa. The impact of this major zoonoses is further enhanced by the fact that the pulmonary form can be used for biological warfare. Recently there has been a revival of interest in anthrax and research has benefited greatly from advances in molecular biology. The main factors accounting for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis have been elucidated. The author reports current data concerning pathogenesis, epidemiology and diagnosis and reviews progress made in the field of prophylaxis especially with regard to vaccines. PMID:9513179

  19. Current Status of Adult Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, J. A.; Orndorff, D. O.; Patty, C. A.; Scott, M. A.; Price, H. L.; Hamlin, L. F.; Williams, T. L.; Uribe, J. S.; Deviren, V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To review the current literature for the nonoperative and operative treatment for adult spinal deformity. Recent Findings With more than 11 million baby boomers joining the population of over 60 years of age in the United States, the incidence of lumbar deformity is greatly increasing. Recent literature suggests that a lack of evidence exists to support the effectiveness of nonoperative treatment for adult scoliosis. In regards to operative treatment, current literature reports a varying range of improved clinical outcomes, curve correction, and complication rates. The extension of fusion to S1 compared with L5 and lower thoracic levels compared with L1 remains a highly controversial topic among literature. Summary Most adult deformity patients never seek nonoperative or operative treatment. Of the few that seek treatment, many can benefit from nonoperative treatment. However, in selected patients who have failed nonoperative treatment and who are candidates for surgical intervention, the literature reflects positive outcomes related to surgical intervention as compared with nonoperative treatment despite varying associated ranges in morbidity and mortality rates. If nonoperative therapy fails in addressing a patient's complaints, then an appropriate surgical procedure that relieves neural compression, corrects excessive sagittal or coronal imbalance, and results in a solidly fused, pain-free spine is warranted. PMID:24436852

  20. Landsat sensor performance: history and current status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Storey, James C.; Williams, Darrel L.; Irons, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The current Thematic Mapper (TM) class of Landsat sensors began with Landsat-4, which was launched in 1982. This series continued with the nearly identical sensor on Landsat-5, launched in 1984. The final sensor in the series was the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), which was carried into orbit in 1999. Varying degrees of effort have been devoted to the characterization of these instruments and data over the past 22 years. Extensive short-lived efforts early in the history, very limited efforts in the middle years, and now a systematic program for continuing characterization of all three systems are apparent. Currently, both the Landsat-5 TM and the Landsat-7 ETM+ are operational and providing data. Despite 20+ years of operation, the TM on Landsat-5 is fully functional, although downlinks for the data are limited. Landsat-7 ETM+ experienced a failure of its Scan Line Corrector mechanism in May 2003. Although there are gaps in the data coverage, the data remain of equivalent quality to prefailure data. Data products have been developed to fill these gaps using other ETM+ scenes.

  1. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  2. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Current status of optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Inami, Shigenobu; Wang, Zuoyan; Ming-Juan, Zhang; Takano, Masamichi; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2011-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry that use near-infrared light in real-time, and allows cross-sectional in-situ visualization of the vessel wall at the microscopic level. OCT provides 10-fold higher resolution than intravascular ultrasound which is currently the most used modality for intra-coronary imaging. OCT offers the obvious advantages when characterizing precise plaque microstructure and distinguishing various type of plaques. OCT is also being assessed for its potential role in the understanding of neointimal coverage, vascular healing and the progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vasculature after stenting on the micron scale. These unique capabilities could be helpful in guiding coronary management and interventions. Recent improvement in next generation OCT technology, such as frequency-domain OCT, will allow for a simple imaging procedure, providing more useful information and complementing other modalities on both clinical and research applications for the cardiologists. PMID:24122583

  4. Current status of carbapenemases in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Maya, Juan J; Ruiz, Sory J; Blanco, Victor M; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Guzman-Blanco, Manuel; Labarca, Jaime; Salles, Mauro; Quinn, John P; Villegas, Maria V

    2013-07-01

    Enterobacteriaceae and non fermenting Gram-negative bacilli have become a threat to public health, in part due to their resistance to multiple antibiotic classes, which ultimately have led to an increase in morbidity and mortality. β-lactams are currently the mainstay for combating infections caused by these microorganisms, and β-lactamases are the major mechanism of resistance to this class of antibiotics. Within the β-lactamases, carbapenemases pose one of the gravest threats, as they compromise one of our most potent lines of defense, the carbapenems. Carbapenemases are being continuously identified worldwide; and in Latin America, numerous members of these enzymes have been reported. In this region, the high incidence of reports implies that carbapenemases have become a menace and that they are an issue that must be carefully studied and analyzed. PMID:23879607

  5. RICH upgrade: Current status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, A.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The second long shutdown of the LHC is currently scheduled to begin in 2018. During this period the LHCb experiment with all its sub-detectors will be upgraded in order to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 10^{33} cm-2s-1 and to read out data at a rate of 40MHz into a flexible software-based trigger. The Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) system will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream detector. Tests of the prototype of the smallest constituent of the new RICH system have been performed during testbeam sessions at the Test Beam Facility SPS North Area (CERN) in Autumn 2014.

  6. Stuttering: Current Status of Theory and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boberg, Einer; Webster, William G.

    1990-01-01

    When people become concerned about stuttering, either their own or their child's, they typically seek help from their family physician or pediatrician. Characteristics and effects of stuttering can help the physician determine whether the child's speech patterns are within normal range or could be early warning signs of stuttering. Referral to a speech-language pathologist should be considered when any of the following are noted: excessive part-word repetitions or sound prolongations; signs of tension, such as lip tremors, facial grimaces, or breath holding associated with speech; indications of embarrassment or apprehension; and a tendency to withdraw from speech opportunities. The authors briefly review theories on the causes of stuttering, describe current therapy, and identify some specialized treatment centres. PMID:21233985

  7. Current status of automated breast ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Jung; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee

    2015-01-01

    Breast ultrasonography (US) is currently considered the first-line examination in the detection Epub ahead of print and characterization of breast lesions. However, conventional handheld US (HHUS) has several limitations such as operator dependence and the requirement of a considerable amount of radiologist time for whole-breast US. Automated breast US (ABUS), recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for screening purposes, has several advantages over HHUS, such as higher reproducibility, less operator dependence, and less required physician time for image acquisition. In addition, ABUS provides both a coronal view and a relatively large field of view. Recent studies have reported that ABUS is promising in US screening for women with dense breasts and can potentially replace handheld second-look US in a preoperative setting. PMID:25971900

  8. Current status of automated breast ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Jung; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee

    2015-07-01

    Breast ultrasonography (US) is currently considered the first-line examination in the detection and characterization of breast lesions. However, conventional handheld US (HHUS) has several limitations such as operator dependence and the requirement of a considerable amount of radiologist time for whole-breast US. Automated breast US (ABUS), recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for screening purposes, has several advantages over HHUS, such as higher reproducibility, less operator dependence, and less required physician time for image acquisition. In addition, ABUS provides both a coronal view and a relatively large field of view. Recent studies have reported that ABUS is promising in US screening for women with dense breasts and can potentially replace handheld second-look US in a preoperative setting.

  9. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future.

  10. Current Status of Renal Denervation in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexander; Bakris, George L

    2016-11-01

    Over the past 7 years, prospective cohorts and small randomized controlled studies showed that renal denervation therapy (RDN) in patients with resistant hypertension is safe but associated with variable effects on BP which are not substantially better than medical therapy alone. The failure of the most rigorously designed randomized sham-control study, SYMPLICITY HTN-3, to meet the efficacy endpoints has raised several methodological concerns. However, recently reported studies and ongoing trials with improved procedural characteristics, identification of patients with true treatment-resistant hypertension on appropriate antihypertensive regimens further explore potential benefits of RDN. The scope of this review is to summarize evidence from currently completed studies on RDN and discuss future perspectives of RDN therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. PMID:27614466

  11. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  12. Current status of carbapenemases in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Maya, Juan J; Ruiz, Sory J; Blanco, Victor M; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Guzman-Blanco, Manuel; Labarca, Jaime; Salles, Mauro; Quinn, John P; Villegas, Maria V

    2013-07-01

    Enterobacteriaceae and non fermenting Gram-negative bacilli have become a threat to public health, in part due to their resistance to multiple antibiotic classes, which ultimately have led to an increase in morbidity and mortality. β-lactams are currently the mainstay for combating infections caused by these microorganisms, and β-lactamases are the major mechanism of resistance to this class of antibiotics. Within the β-lactamases, carbapenemases pose one of the gravest threats, as they compromise one of our most potent lines of defense, the carbapenems. Carbapenemases are being continuously identified worldwide; and in Latin America, numerous members of these enzymes have been reported. In this region, the high incidence of reports implies that carbapenemases have become a menace and that they are an issue that must be carefully studied and analyzed.

  13. Sagebrush ecosystems: current status and trends.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beever, E.A.; Connelly, J.W.; Knick, S.T.; Schroeder, M.A.; Stiver, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    The sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) biome has changed since settlement by Europeans. The current distribution, composition and dynamics, and disturbance regimes of sagebrush ecosystems have been altered by interactions among disturbance, land use, and invasion of exotic plants. In this chapter, we present the dominant factors that have influenced habitats across the sagebrush biome. Using a large-scale analysis, we identified regional changes and patterns in “natural disturbance”, invasive exotic species, and influences of land use in sagebrush systems. Number of fires and total area burned has increased since 1980 across much of the sagebrush biome. Juniper (Juniperus spp.) and pinyon (Pinus spp.) woodlands have expanded into sagebrush habitats at higher elevations. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), an exotic annual grass, has invaded much of lower elevation, more xeric sagebrush landscapes across the western portion of the biome. Consequently, synergistic feedbacks between habitats and disturbance (natural and human-caused) have altered disturbance regimes, plant community dynamics and contributed to loss of sagebrush habitats and change in plant communities. Habitat conversion to agriculture has occurred in the highly productive regions of the sagebrush biome and influenced up to 56% of the Conservation Assessment area. Similarly, urban areas, and road, railroad, and powerline networks fragment habitats, facilitate predator movements, and provide corridors for spread of exotic species across the entire sagebrush biome. Livestock grazing has altered sagebrush habitats; the effects of overgrazing combined with drought on plant communities in the late 1880s and early 1900s still influences current habitats. Management of livestock grazing has influenced sagebrush ecosystems by habitat treatments to increase forage and reduce sagebrush and other plant species unpalatable to livestock. Fences, roads, and water developments to manage livestock movements have further

  14. Fluoride dentifrices: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Mellberg, J R

    1991-02-01

    Toothpastes have developed from the poorly effective formulations using incompatible abrasive systems to the highly effective products now being given credit for the decline in dental caries in most developed countries. The earliest toothpastes used sodium fluoride but this was soon replaced by stannous fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and amine fluoride. Monofluorophosphate has the advantage that it is compatible with a wide variety of abrasive systems. Although most toothpastes world-wide currently contain monofluorophosphate, sodium fluoride formulations are growing in availability because of the development of compatible abrasives. Clinical caries trials have indicated that, with proper formulation, there is little or no difference in effectiveness among toothpastes prepared with different fluoride agents, but that increasing the fluoride concentration will enhance the anti-caries effect. The addition of other active agents to fluoride toothpaste has been a relatively recent occurrence, and it is important to be assured that they do not interfere with the anti-caries activity of fluoride. Pyrophosphate, a calculus control agent, is one additive that was considered to be a potential problem; however, human and animal tests have shown that both caries and calculus inhibiting effects can be obtained from a single formulation. With the use of modern methodology to evaluate toothpaste formulations before clinical trials, many new products containing anti-calculus and other agents will probably become available in the coming years.

  15. Current status of the ITER MSE diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuh, Howard; Levinton, F.; La Fleur, H.; Foley, E.; Feder, R.; Zakharov, L.

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. is providing ITER with a Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic to provide a measurement to guide reconstructions of the plasma q-profile. The diagnostic design has gone through many iterations, driven primarily by the evolution of the ITER port plug design and the steering of the heating beams. The present two port, three view design viewing both heating beams and the DNB has recently passed a conceptual design review at the IO. The traditional line polarization (MSE-LP) technique employed on many devices around the world faces many challenges in ITER, including strong background light and mirror degradation. To mitigate these effects, a multi-wavelength polarimeter and high resolution spectrometer will be used to subtract polarized background, while retroreflecting polarizers will provide mirror calibration concurrent with MSE-LP measurements. However, without a proven plasma-facing mirror cleaning technique, inherent risks to MSE-LP remain. The high field and high beam energy on ITER offers optimal conditions for a spectroscopic measurement of the electric field using line splitting (MSE-LS), a technique which does not depend on mirror polarization properties. The current design is presented with a roadmap of the R&D needed to address remaining challenges. This work is supported by DOE contracts S009627-R and S012380-F.

  16. Single port radical prostatectomy: current status.

    PubMed

    Martín, Oscar Darío; Azhar, Raed A; Clavijo, Rafael; Gidelman, Camilo; Medina, Luis; Troche, Nelson Ramirez; Brunacci, Leonardo; Sotelo, René

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the current literature on single port radical prostatectomy (LESS-RP). Single port radical prostatectomy laparoendoscopic (LESS-RP) has established itself as a challenge for urological community, starting with the proposal of different approaches: extraperitoneal, transperitoneal and transvesical, initially described for laparoscopy and then laparoscopy robot-assisted. In order to improve the LESS-RP, new instruments, optical devices, trocars and retraction mechanisms have been developed. Advantages and disadvantages of LESS-RP are controversial, while some claim that it is a non-trustable approach, regarding the low cases number and technical difficulties, others acclaim that despite this facts some advantages have been shown and that previous described difficulties are being overcome, proving this is novel proposal of robotics platform, the Da Vinci SP, integrating the system into "Y". The LESS-RP approach gives us a new horizon and opens the door for rapid standardization of this technique. The few studies and short series available can be result of a low interest in the application of LESS-RP in prostate, probably because of the technical complexity that it requires. The new robotic platform, the da Vinci SP, shows that it is clear that the long awaited evolution of robotic technologies for laparoscopy has begun, and we must not lose this momentum.

  17. Current Status of ASTRO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.

    2000-12-01

    The ASTRO-F is the second infrared astronomy mission of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). The ASTOR-F is a 70-cm cooled telescope dedicated to infrared sky survey. It will be launched with ISAS's launch vehicle M-V, into a sun-synchronous polar orbit. The current programed launch date is February, 2004. One of the two focal-plane instruments, the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS), will survey the entire sky in the wavelength range from 50 to 200 micron with a sensitivity much higher than that of the IRAS survey. The other one, the Infrared Camera (IRC), employs large-format detector arrays and will take very deep images of wide sky regions in the near and mid infrared range. New infrared source catalogs provided by the ASTRO-F will give a valuable base for the further research by large space missions like the HII/L2. The ASTRO-F project is now in a design-fixing phase. The flight model design will be finalized within this year, based on the results of various tests using a structure model and a thermal model of the satellite, and also electrical protomodels of each component. The flight model fabrication will be completed in 2001. It will be launched at the beginning of 2004, after system tests and refurbishment over two years.

  18. Current status of tritium calorimetry at TLK

    SciTech Connect

    Buekki-Deme, A.; Alecu, C.G.; Kloppe, B.; Bornschein, B.

    2015-03-15

    Inside a tritium facility, calorimetry is an important analytical method as it is the only reference method for accountancy (it is based on the measurement of the heat generated by the radioactive decay). Presently, at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK), 4 calorimeters are in operation, one of isothermal type and three of inertial guidance control type (IGC). The volume of the calorimeters varies between 0.5 and 20.6 liters. About two years ago we started an extensive work to improve our calorimeters with regard to reliability and precision. We were forced to upgrade 3 of our 4 calorimeters due to the outdated interfaces and software. This work involved creating new LabView programs driving the devices, re-tuning control loops and replacing obsolete hardware components. In this paper we give a review on the current performance of our calorimeters, comparing it to recently available devices from the market and in the literature. We also show some ideas for a next generation calorimeter based on experiences with our IGC calorimeters and other devices reported in the literature. (authors)

  19. Current status of robotic surgery in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The da Vinci S surgical system (Intuitive Surgical) was approved as a medical device in 2009 by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Robotic surgery has since been used in gastrointestinal, thoracic, gynecological, and urological surgeries. In April 2012, robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) was first approved for insurance coverage. Since then, RALP has been increasingly used, with more than 3,000 RALP procedures performed by March 2013. By July 2014, 183 institutions in Japan had installed the da Vinci surgical system. Other types of robotic surgeries are not widespread because they are not covered by public health insurance. Clinical trials using robotic partial nephrectomy and robotic gastrectomy for renal and gastric cancers, respectively, have recently begun as advanced medical treatments to evaluate health insurance coverage. These procedures must be evaluated for efficacy and safety before being covered by public health insurance. Other types of robotic surgery are being evaluated in clinical studies. There are several challenges in robotic surgery, including accreditation, training, efficacy, and cost. The largest issue is the cost-benefit balance. In this review, the current situation and a prospective view of robotic surgery in Japan are discussed. PMID:25763120

  20. Current status of neuronal cell xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Vadori, Marta; Aron Badin, Romina; Hantraye, Philippe; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    Neural cell transplantation has long been considered as an option for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, several patients with Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have been treated with human fetal-derived neurons with disparate results. However, the limited efficacy to date combined with the scarce availability of human fetal tissues and ethical concerns render this procedure inapplicable to a wide population scale. With a view to overcoming these shortcomings, transplantation of pig-derived cell precursors has been proposed and applied in preclinical and clinical trials. Recently long-term survival (more than 18 months) associated with clinical efficacy has been reported following transplantation of genetically engineered porcine neural precursors in fully immunosuppressed primate recipients. Despite the promising results obtained to date, several questions remain unanswered. In particular, the ideal xenogeneic cell-products to transplant, the extent of the immune response against the implanted xenograft and the most suitable therapeutic strategies to improve engraftment are all issues that still need to be thoroughly addressed. The present review describes the current knowledge in the pig-to-primate xenotransplantation field. In this context, recent data on human-to-nonhuman primate xenogeneic stem cell-based treatments for neurological disorders are discussed. PMID:26403068

  1. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  2. Current Status of VHTR Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Richard Wright; William Windes; Steve Herring; Richard Schultz; Paul Humrickhouse

    2010-10-01

    Abstract – High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) featuring particle fuel reached the stage of commercial deployment in the mid-1980s with the Fort St.Vrain and Thorium HochTemperatur Reaktor feeding electricity to the grids in the United States and West Germany, respectively. The technology was then adopted by Japan and China with the operation of the High Temperature Test Reactor in Oarai, Japan and the High Temperature Reactor (HTR-10) in China. Increasing the outlet temperature of the HTGR to even higher temperatures above 900°C will improve the thermodynamic efficiency of the system and enable application of a new class of gas reactor, the very high temperature reactor, to provide process heat, electricity, and hydrogen to chemical industries with the attendant benefits of improved energy security and reduced CO2 emissions. However, the increase in coolant outlet temperature presents a number of technical challenges associated with fuel, materials, power conversion, and analysis methods for the reactor and hydrogen production. The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a broad program of research and development with a goal of addressing the technical challenges over a broad range of outlet temperatures as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This paper describes the research and development activities that are currently underway to realize the technologies needed for an HTGR that features outlet temperatures of 750 to 950°C.

  3. HPV vaccine: Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sushil; Biswas, Manash; Jose, Tony

    2015-01-01

    HPV Vaccine was introduced to prevent cervical cancer known to be caused by infection with one or more of the high risk subtypes of the Human papilloma virus (HPV). Since introduction, trials have proven its efficacy in preventing Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) beyond doubt and its effectiveness in preventing cervical cancer though presumptive is reasonably certain as per mathematical modelling. It also prevents other HPV related anogenital and oropharyngeal malignancies in both sexes. HPV vaccines have courted many controversies related to its efficacy, safety, ideal age of vaccination, use in HPV infected individuals and use in males. The currently available vaccines are based on L1 Viral like particles (VLP) and hence highly species specific, thermolabile, costly and are purely prophylactic. The quest for a cheaper, thermostable and broad spectrum vaccine has led to many newer prophylactic vaccines. Therapeutic vaccines were born out of the inescapable necessity considering high HPV related morbidity projected in the non HPV naïve population. Therapeutic vaccines would immediately reduce this burden and also help in the management of HPV related cancers alone or as part of combination strategies. Ongoing research is aimed at a total control over HPV related malignancies in the near future. PMID:25859081

  4. Splatalogue - Motivation, Current Status, Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remijan, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation of powerful radio and millimeter/submillimeter observatories (e.g. EVLA, ALMA, & Herschel) require extensive resources to help identify spectral line transitions. We describe the compilation of the most complete spectral line database currently assembled for this purpose. The Splatalogue is a tool available to the astronomical community that is a comprehensive transition-resolved compilation of observed, measured and calculated spectral lines databases available including JPL, CDMS, Lovas/NIST, Lovas SLAIM, the Toyama Microwave Atlas and the observational data from the Ohio State University. To these databases we have run diagnostics for overlaps on transitions, frequencies, formulae and chemical names and have come up with a common way to display and designate each individual species. Splatalogue also contains atomic and recombination lines, template spectra, and is completely VO-compliant, queryable under the IVOA SLAP standard. It also recommends one frequency for use by the astronomical community for each observed transition of known astronomical molecules. The details of the database, how users can get access to the database through the php web interface or via an API, and how it will be used for the ALMA archive, observing tool and data reduction packages will be presented.

  5. Current status of sexing mammalian spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Seidel, George E; Garner, Duane L

    2002-12-01

    Thousands of offspring have now been produced via artificial insemination with spermatozoa sexed by flow cytometry and cell sorting. We are unaware of any other practical approach to sexing spermatozoa that maintains fertility. Accuracy of sexing usually is 85-95% in most species, but somewhat lower with human spermatozoa. Spermatozoa are sexed in series, one at a time, at routine rates of about 3000 live spermatozoa of each sex per second for most species, and nearly twice that rate under optimal conditions for some species. Owing to various constraints and statistical considerations, there appears to be an upper theoretical limit to sexing spermatozoa of about 10,000 live spermatozoa of each sex per second with current methodology. About a quarter of the spermatozoa processed are sexed; the rest are discarded in the process or lost due to logistical constraints. Spermatozoa undergo some damage during sorting, although much less in terms of viability than with routine cryopreservation; fertility is lower with sexed than control spermatozoa. Offspring from sexed spermatozoa appear to have no more abnormalities than do controls, and both groups grow and thrive similarly. Despite high costs and complex procedures, sexing spermatozoa, usually followed by cryopreservation, is being used commercially for cattle and horse production in several countries, and is used to produce girls to avoid X-chromosome-linked genetic diseases. PMID:12537000

  6. Single port radical prostatectomy: current status.

    PubMed

    Martín, Oscar Darío; Azhar, Raed A; Clavijo, Rafael; Gidelman, Camilo; Medina, Luis; Troche, Nelson Ramirez; Brunacci, Leonardo; Sotelo, René

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the current literature on single port radical prostatectomy (LESS-RP). Single port radical prostatectomy laparoendoscopic (LESS-RP) has established itself as a challenge for urological community, starting with the proposal of different approaches: extraperitoneal, transperitoneal and transvesical, initially described for laparoscopy and then laparoscopy robot-assisted. In order to improve the LESS-RP, new instruments, optical devices, trocars and retraction mechanisms have been developed. Advantages and disadvantages of LESS-RP are controversial, while some claim that it is a non-trustable approach, regarding the low cases number and technical difficulties, others acclaim that despite this facts some advantages have been shown and that previous described difficulties are being overcome, proving this is novel proposal of robotics platform, the Da Vinci SP, integrating the system into "Y". The LESS-RP approach gives us a new horizon and opens the door for rapid standardization of this technique. The few studies and short series available can be result of a low interest in the application of LESS-RP in prostate, probably because of the technical complexity that it requires. The new robotic platform, the da Vinci SP, shows that it is clear that the long awaited evolution of robotic technologies for laparoscopy has begun, and we must not lose this momentum. PMID:27072150

  7. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  8. Current status of surgery in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C William; Moy, Ronald L; Roenigk, Randall K; Roenigk, Henry H; Spencer, James M; Tierney, Emily P; Bartus, Cynthia L; Bernstein, Robert M; Brown, Marc D; Busso, Mariano; Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Kent, Kathryn M; Krueger, Nils; Landau, Marina; Leonard, Aimee L; Mandy, Stephen H; Rohrer, Thomas E; Sadick, Neil S; Wiest, Luitgard G

    2013-12-01

    An article titled "Current issues in dermatologic office-based surgery" was published in the JAAD in October 1999 (volume 41, issue 4, pp. 624-634). The article was developed by the Joint American Academy of Dermatology/American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Liaison Committee. A number of subjects were addressed in the article including surgical training program requirements for dermatology residents and selected advances in dermatologic surgery that had been pioneered by dermatologists. The article concluded with sections on credentialing, privileging, and accreditation of office-based surgical facilities. Much has changed since 1999, including more stringent requirements for surgical training during dermatology residency, and the establishment of 57 accredited Procedural Dermatology Fellowship Training Programs. All of these changes have been overseen and approved by the Residency Review Committee for Dermatology and the Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education. The fertile academic environment of academic training programs with interaction between established dermatologic surgeons and fellows, as well as the inquisitive nature of many of our colleagues, has led to the numerous major advances in dermatologic surgery, which are described herein.

  9. Current status of laser applications in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipper, Ansgar; Thomas, Stephen; Durek, C.; Jocham, Dieter

    1993-05-01

    The overall development of laser use in urology is recessing. The reasons are the refinement of methods of radical surgery and the continuing development of alternative technologies involving electric current. Taking the cost factor into account, are lasers still opportune in medicine? The answer is definitely yes. Cost reduction in medical practice without quality loss is only possible with effective methods of minimally invasive surgery. Continuing investigation of cutting, welding, coagulating and ablating instruments is justified. Competition of lasers to other technologies can only be beneficial to the cause. But where are the highlights of laser applications? The unsurpassed utilization of optical properties of lasers lie in the concept of photodynamic therapies and in optical feedback mechanisms for laser applications. The combination of lasers with three dimensional visualization of the treatment area by ultrasound (TULIP-procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia) is a novel approach in laser application. The further development of these treatment modalities will reveal the true benefit of laser technology in urological applications.

  10. Current status of PHOBOS{at}RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R. |; PHOBOS Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    Four experiments are currently approved for the first measurements with colliding heavy ion beams from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) which is scheduled to come into operation in Spring 1999. These experiments are named STAR, Phoenix, PHOBOS and Brahms. It is expected that central collisions of 100 GeV/u Au + Au at RHIC will lead to energy densities far above any so far attained in the laboratory and it is suspected and hoped that this situation will lead to qualitatively new physics perhaps associated with the creation of a large volume containing a plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons. All four experiments attempt to search for signatures of new physics through combinations of measurements of quantities such as the multiplicity of produced particles, the average transverse momentum of these particles, fluctuations in their multiplicity distribution, their flavor composition, the size scales of the volume from which they are emitted, mass shifts and changes in the decay widths of resonances which decay inside the high energy density volume etc. The PHOBOS detector addresses these issues with a Multiplicity Array which covers the pseudo-rapidity region {minus}5.3 {le} {eta} {le} 5.3 with a coverage of 85% of 4{pi} and also incorporates a Vertex Detector. The Multiplicity Array is complemented by two Multi-Particle Spectrometers, each of which cover the range 0.5 {le} {eta} {le} 1.5 and azimuthal angle range {Delta}{phi} = 11{degree}. Various trigger and monitor detectors complete PHOBOS.

  11. Captive breeding of pangolins: current status, problems and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Hua, Liushuai; Gong, Shiping; Wang, Fumin; Li, Weiye; Ge, Yan; Li, Xiaonan; Hou, Fanghui

    2015-01-01

    Pangolins are unique placental mammals with eight species existing in the world, which have adapted to a highly specialized diet of ants and termites, and are of significance in the control of forest termite disaster. Besides their ecological value, pangolins are extremely important economic animals with the value as medicine and food. At present, illegal hunting and habitat destruction have drastically decreased the wild population of pangolins, pushing them to the edge of extinction. Captive breeding is an important way to protect these species, but because of pangolin's specialized behaviors and high dependence on natural ecosystem, there still exist many technical barriers to successful captive breeding programs. In this paper, based on the literatures and our practical experience, we reviewed the status and existing problems in captive breeding of pangolins, including four aspects, the naturalistic habitat, dietary husbandry, reproduction and disease control. Some recommendations are presented for effective captive breeding and protection of pangolins. PMID:26155072

  12. Captive breeding of pangolins: current status, problems and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Hua, Liushuai; Gong, Shiping; Wang, Fumin; Li, Weiye; Ge, Yan; Li, Xiaonan; Hou, Fanghui

    2015-01-01

    Pangolins are unique placental mammals with eight species existing in the world, which have adapted to a highly specialized diet of ants and termites, and are of significance in the control of forest termite disaster. Besides their ecological value, pangolins are extremely important economic animals with the value as medicine and food. At present, illegal hunting and habitat destruction have drastically decreased the wild population of pangolins, pushing them to the edge of extinction. Captive breeding is an important way to protect these species, but because of pangolin's specialized behaviors and high dependence on natural ecosystem, there still exist many technical barriers to successful captive breeding programs. In this paper, based on the literatures and our practical experience, we reviewed the status and existing problems in captive breeding of pangolins, including four aspects, the naturalistic habitat, dietary husbandry, reproduction and disease control. Some recommendations are presented for effective captive breeding and protection of pangolins.

  13. Captive breeding of pangolins: current status, problems and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Liushuai; Gong, Shiping; Wang, Fumin; Li, Weiye; Ge, Yan; Li, Xiaonan; Hou, Fanghui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pangolins are unique placental mammals with eight species existing in the world, which have adapted to a highly specialized diet of ants and termites, and are of significance in the control of forest termite disaster. Besides their ecological value, pangolins are extremely important economic animals with the value as medicine and food. At present, illegal hunting and habitat destruction have drastically decreased the wild population of pangolins, pushing them to the edge of extinction. Captive breeding is an important way to protect these species, but because of pangolin’s specialized behaviors and high dependence on natural ecosystem, there still exist many technical barriers to successful captive breeding programs. In this paper, based on the literatures and our practical experience, we reviewed the status and existing problems in captive breeding of pangolins, including four aspects, the naturalistic habitat, dietary husbandry, reproduction and disease control. Some recommendations are presented for effective captive breeding and protection of pangolins. PMID:26155072

  14. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  15. Current radiological status of Utirik Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L

    1998-08-01

    A preliminary radiological survey was conducted at Utirik Atoll in 1978 as part of the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS). A dose assessment based on these limited data indicated a relatively low dose of about 0.12 mSv to people living on Utirik in 1978 (Robison et al., 1982). A much more detailed radiological survey was conducted in April of both 1993 and 1994. Aerial photos of the islands of Utirik Atoll were taken as part of the 1978 NMIRS. The sampling grids for the 1993 and 1994 surveys are shown overlaid on these aerial photos in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. External gamma measurements and a collection of either drinking coconuts or copra coconuts were made at each location. Pandanus, breadfruit, lime, and banana were collected where available. Ground water was collected in 1993/94 from four wells on Utirik Island and two wells on Aon Island. Surface soil and soil profiles were collected at some of the grid points on each of the islands at the atoll in 1993/94. A comparison of the number of samples collected in 1978 and 1993/94 are shown in Table 1. A detailed listing of the samples collected in the 1993/94 radiological survey at Utirik Atoll is given in Table 2. The number of vegetation samples collected in 1993/94 is nearly a factor of 7 greater than in 1978. Soil samples collected in 1993/94 exceeded the number collected in 1978 by more than a factor of 4. Consequently, extensive data are now available for the islands at Utirik Atoll and form the basis for the current dose assessment for the atoll.

  16. Hormonal contraception. Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Holinka, C F

    1994-09-30

    Hormonal contraception was pioneered by Gregory Pincus in the 1950s. Today, hormonal contraception is accepted as having a highly favorable benefit/risk profile. There is, however, a need for the development of new contraceptive methods to broaden the range of choices and enhance motivation and compliance in users. With the staggering rate of increase in the world's population, the number of contraceptive users in developing countries is expected to increase from 381 million in 1990 to 567 million in the year 2000. This will require substantial supplies of inexpensive contraceptives and the development of new and improved methods. The use of contraceptives is an asset to women's health, which can be jeopardized by the risks of pregnancy, as well as to the psychological and social well-being of mother and child. Oral contraceptives also have noncontraceptive health benefits such as protecting against endometrial cancer, uterine fibroids, menorrhagia, benign breast disease, anemia, ovarian cancer, functional ovarian cysts, dysmenorrhea, ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis, and bone loss. The new low-dose formulations are considered to be very safe for most healthy, nonsmoking women of reproductive age. Therefore, current research efforts are focused on new delivery methods, such as vaginal rings, rather than on the development of new hormonally active steroids. Nonoral contraceptive methods which avoid first-pass effects on the liver are being developed or improved. These include implants, vaginal rings, vaginally applied pills, and progestogen-containing IUDs. Contraceptive research is also focusing on immunologic interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both men and women. This may spawn as yet unforseen methods of molecular modulation of sperm-ovum interactions which would result in the inhibition of implantation.

  17. [Immunooncology in Urologic Cancers: Current Status].

    PubMed

    Grimm, M-O

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are establishing itselves as a new systemic treatment option (in addition to chemotherapy and targeted therapy) for metastatic tumours. (Re)activating the immune system, these antibodies may lead to impressive remissions lasting for a long time in some patients. Regarding urological tumours, the anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab (Opdivo(®)) has been approved this year for advanced, previously treated renal cell carcinoma. In the United States, Atezolizumab (Tecentriq(®)) has been approved for metastatic urothelial carcinoma after platinum-based chemotherapy. In patients pre-treated with antiangiogenic drugs, Nivolumab has achieved a higher rate of remission (25 vs. 5%) and a 5.4-month increase in overall survival compared with Everolimus. An indirect comparison with chemotherapy demonstrates an increased remission rate (15%) and an increased 1-year survival rate (37%) for urothelial carcinoma after platinum-based chemotherapy with Atezolizumab. The frequency of side-effects resulting from these treatments is comparatively low. However, some patients experience what is called immune-mediated side-effects, which must be recognised and treated in a timely manner. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are being tested in numerous ongoing phase III clinical trials and have the potential to replace current first-line treatment options for metastatic tumours such as urothelial and renal cell carcinoma. These trials are also investigating anti-PD-1/anti-PD-L1 antibodies in combination with CTLA4 immune checkpoint inhibitors or antiangiogenic treatments. Approval trials are also investigating the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in the adjuvant setting. PMID:27680188

  18. Current status of thoracic dorsal sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Welch, E; Geary, J

    1984-01-01

    This article summarizes over 20 years of experience (1962 to 1982) with cervical sympathectomy (thoracic dorsal sympathectomy) in 46 patients undergoing 68 sympathectomies. All operations were performed through an anterior supraclavicular approach. Indications for surgery were intractable Raynaud's disease (26 patients), atherosclerotic obliterative arterial disease (five), causalgia (five), posttraumatic sympathetic dystrophy (seven), collagen vascular disorders (eight), hyperhidrosis (12), occupational-related digital thrombosis (four), and thrombosis secondary to intra-arterial injection (one). The incidence of complications and side effects, both temporary and permanent, including Horner's syndrome, is reviewed in detail. Particular reference is made to the various surgical techniques of managing the stellate ganglion; four patients had two-third to three-fourth resection of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 thoracic ganglion, two had preservation of the stellate ganglion and resection of the T-2 through T-4 ganglia, seven had excision of the entire stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, seven had resection of the lower third of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, and 48 had removal of the lower half of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 ganglion. The study reviews the literature germane to anatomic considerations and suggests revisions in current texts and atlases. By retrospective analysis of the records and a follow-up questionnaire, which provided an 86% follow-up (average 8.4 years), the paper points to the distinctive clinical characteristics of the different groups within the population undergoing the operation and provides guidelines for patient selection and conclusions on the place for this operation in the management of vascular diseases involving the upper extremity. PMID:6481864

  19. Current Status of NASA's Heavy Lift Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies since the Apollo Program of the 1960s have highlighted the benefits of - and the need for - a national heavy lift launch capability to support human exploration, science, national security, and commercial development of space. NASA's most recent and most refined effort to develop that heavy lift capability is the Ares V. Ares V is a key element of NASA's Constellation Program. It s overall goal s part of approved national space policy is to retire the Space Shuttle and develop its successor, complete the International Space Station, and resume human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), beginning with exploration of the Moon as a step to other destinations in the Solar System. Ares V s first role is that of cargo vehicle to carry a lunar lander into Earth orbit, rendezvous with astronauts launched on the smaller Ares I crew launch vehicle, and perform the trans lunar injection (TLI) mission to send the mated crew and lander vehicles to the Moon. The design reference missions (DRMs) envisioned for it also include direct lunar cargo flights and a human Mars mission. Although NASA's priority from the start of the Constellation Program to the present has been development of the Ares I and Orion crew vehicle to replace the retiring Shuttle fleet, the Ares team has made significant progress in understanding the performance, design trades, technology needs, mission scenarios, ground and flight operations, cost, and other factors associated with heavy lift development. The current reference configuration was selected during the Lunar Capabilities Concept Review (LCCR) in fall 2008. That design has served since then as a point of departure for further refinements and trades among five participating NASA field centers. Ares V development to date has benefited from progress on the Ares I due to commonality between the vehicles. The Ares I first stage completed a successful firing of a 5-segment solid rocket motor. The Ares I-X launch Numerous studies

  20. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2007

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; KL Gaustad

    2007-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests.

  1. Helicopter Rotor Noise Prediction: Background, Current Status, and Future Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter noise prediction is increasingly important. The purpose of this viewgraph presentation is to: 1) Put into perspective the recent progress; 2) Outline current prediction capabilities; 3) Forecast direction of future prediction research; 4) Identify rotorcraft noise prediction needs. The presentation includes an historical perspective, a description of governing equations, and the current status of source noise prediction.

  2. Lung cancer: Current status and prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, C.F.; Carr, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 papers. Some of the titles are: Activation of cellular ras genes in human neoplasms; The valve of definitive radiation therapy of unresectable squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the lung; Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer, and Current status of immunotherapy for lung cancer.

  3. Temperature signature of high latitude Atlantic boundary currents revealed by marine mammal-borne sensor and Argo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grist, Jeremy P.; Josey, Simon A.; Boehme, Lars; Meredith, Michael P.; Davidson, Fraser J. M.; Stenson, Garry B.; Hammill, Mike O.

    2011-08-01

    Results from the development and analysis of a novel temperature dataset for the high latitude North-West Atlantic are presented. The new 1° gridded dataset (“ATLAS”) has been produced from about 13,000 Argo and 48,000 marine mammal (hooded seal, harp seal, grey seal and beluga) profiles spanning 2004-8. These data sources are highly complementary as marine mammals greatly enhance shelf region coverage where Argo floats are absent. ATLAS reveals distinctive boundary current related temperature minima in the Labrador Sea (-1.1°C) and at the east Greenland coast (1.8°C), largely absent in the widely-used Levitus'09 and EN3v2a datasets. The ATLAS 0-500 m average temperature is lower than Levitus'09 and EN3v2a by up to 3°C locally. Differences are strongest from 0-300 m and persist at reduced amplitude from 300-500 m. Our results clearly reveal the value of marine mammal-borne sensors for a reliable description of the North-West Atlantic at a time of rapid change.

  4. Changing motivations during migration: linking movement speed to reproductive status in a migratory large mammal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navinder J; Ericsson, Göran

    2014-06-01

    A challenge in animal ecology is to link animal movement to demography. In general, reproducing and non-reproducing animals may show different movement patterns. Dramatic changes in reproductive status, such as the loss of an offspring during the course of migration, might also affect movement. Studies linking movement speed to reproductive status require individual monitoring of life-history events and hence are rare. Here, we link movement data from 98 GPS-collared female moose (Alces alces) to field observations of reproductive status and calf survival. We show that reproductive females move more quickly during migration than non-reproductive females. Further, the loss of a calf over the course of migration triggered a decrease in speed of the female. This is in contrast to what might be expected for females no longer constrained by an accompanying offspring. The observed patterns demonstrate that females of different reproductive status may have distinct movement patterns, and that the underlying motivation to move may be altered by a change in reproductive status during migration.

  5. Chemical Reaction Engineering: Current Status and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudukovic, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Chemical Reaction Engineering (CRE) as the discipline that quantifies the interplay of transport phenomena and kinetics in relating reactor performance to operating conditions and input variables. Addresses the current status of CRE in both academic and industrial settings and outlines future trends. (TW)

  6. Special Education History, Current Status and Future: India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antony, Pavan John

    2013-01-01

    Education of all children in public schools, including those with disabilities, continues to be an unresolved issue in many countries around the globe. While education of all children is mandated by law and considered a basic human right in many countries, the current status of implementation varies. India, for example, is an ancient country that…

  7. Counseling in Malaysia: History, Current Status, and Future Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, Ching Mey; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the history of counseling in Malaysia, provides an update of its current status, and discusses some anticipated future trends for the profession in light of recent developments in the country. Counseling in Malaysia began with school guidance in the 1960s and has now achieved recognition as a profession in…

  8. Current Status of the General College's Career Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Bruce, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    These articles review the current status of General College's 11 career development programs: (1) Certificate in Aging Studies, an extension program geared toward those working with the elderly or seeking entry to the field of aging; (2) Aviation, consisting of seven one-level aviation courses which are applicable to all General College degrees;…

  9. Current Backpack Weight Status for Primary Schoolchildren in Colima, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo-Buenrostro, Bertha Alicia; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Sánchez-Ramírez, Carmen Alicia; Cruz, Sergio Adrián Montero; Vásquez, Clemente; Mora-Brambila, Ana Bertha; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram P.; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the current status of backpack weight in primary schoolchildren in Colima, Mexico, in relation to gender, school grade level, and body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 240 randomly selected children from 20 primary schools. The participating children's parents signed statements of…

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography: History, Current Status, and Laboratory Work

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Michelle L.; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Kagemann, Larry; Xu, Juan; Folio, Lindsey S.

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has become widespread in ophthalmology over the past 15 years, because of its ability to visualize ocular structures at high resolution. This article reviews the history of OCT imaging of the eye, its current status, and the laboratory work that is driving the future of the technology. PMID:21493951

  11. Current status and future research in motion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.K.

    1995-07-01

    There have been numerous research efforts in the field of motion planning, resulting in many theoretical and practical results. We review the current status of existing motion planning algorithms, evaluate their completeness and efficiencies on modern computers, and suggest fruitful future research directions.

  12. 42 CFR 411.104 - Current employment status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... defines “self-employment income” for social security purposes. (e) Special Rule: members of religious... Covered Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.104 Current employment status. (a) General rule... employer for more than 6 months, is not receiving disability benefits from Social Security, and has...

  13. Refugee Issues: Current Status and Directions for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Gary; And Others

    A comprehensive review of current refugee policy and program issues is provided in this paper, which is intended to serve both as a status report and a guide to developing an agenda for the future. Chapter I deals with early warning as to potential refugee movements, mass asylum, and interim assistance. Chapter II discusses and analyzes four types…

  14. Current status of quantitative rotational spectroscopy for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Wlodarczak, Georges; Colmont, Jean-Marcel; Rohart, Francois

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing of rotational transitions in the Earth's atmosphere has become an important method for the retrieval of geophysical temperatures, pressures and chemical composition profiles that requires accurate spectral information. This paper highlights the current status of rotational data that are useful for atmospheric measurements, with a discussion of the types the rotational lineshape measurements that are not generally available in either online repository.

  15. Current status of fusion-relevant covariance data

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.W.

    1994-09-12

    The following review of the current status of formatted data covariance files and their multigroup processing is a contribution to the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ``Improved Evaluations and Integral Data Testing for FENDL,`` to be held at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany, 12--16 September 1994. The draft agenda of this meeting lists as Item 6 the ``assessment of present status and role of uncertainty files, their processing and sensitivity studies related to FENDL.`` We conclude that this is an important and timely topic and recommend needed actions in this field.

  16. Current status of chemically synthesized inhibitors of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Cardile, Anthony P; Mayers, Douglas L; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    The current Ebola virus outbreak is unprecedented in its scope and international impact. Given that there are currently no approved antivirals to treat Ebola virus, there is urgency to conduct more rapid development and evaluation of Ebola antivirals. Recently, the World Health Organization identified a number of antivirals as high priority to include AVI-6002 (AVI-7537 and AVI-7539), BCX4430, brincidofovir, favipiravir, and TKM-100802. This review describes these chemically synthesized inhibitors of Ebola virus, relevant patent development and gives an update on their current status.

  17. Current status of chemically synthesized inhibitors of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Cardile, Anthony P; Mayers, Douglas L; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    The current Ebola virus outbreak is unprecedented in its scope and international impact. Given that there are currently no approved antivirals to treat Ebola virus, there is urgency to conduct more rapid development and evaluation of Ebola antivirals. Recently, the World Health Organization identified a number of antivirals as high priority to include AVI-6002 (AVI-7537 and AVI-7539), BCX4430, brincidofovir, favipiravir, and TKM-100802. This review describes these chemically synthesized inhibitors of Ebola virus, relevant patent development and gives an update on their current status. PMID:25808170

  18. Interatomic (Intermolecular) Decay Processes in Clusters: Current Status and Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Averbukh, V.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2007-11-29

    Since their theoretical prediction a decade ago, interatomic (intermolecular) Coulombic decay (ICD) and related processes have been in the focus of intensive theoretical and experimental research. The spectacular progress in this direction has been stimulated both by the fundamental importance of the new electronic decay phenomena and by the exciting possibility of their practical application, for example in spectroscopy. We review the current status of the research of interatomic (intermolecular) decay phenomena in clusters and discuss some perspectives of this new field.

  19. Current Status of Protein Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Pedro E.M.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Summary The current status of classical force fields for proteins is reviewed. These include additive force fields as well as the latest developments in the Drude and AMOEBA polarizable force fields. Parametrization strategies developed specifically for the Drude force field are described and compared with the additive CHARMM36 force field. Results from molecular simulations of proteins and small peptides are summarized to illustrate the performance of the Drude and AMOEBA force fields. PMID:25330958

  20. Current status of protein force fields for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Pedro E M; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    The current status of classical force fields for proteins is reviewed. These include additive force fields as well as the latest developments in the Drude and AMOEBA polarizable force fields. Parametrization strategies developed specifically for the Drude force field are described and compared with the additive CHARMM36 force field. Results from molecular simulations of proteins and small peptides are summarized to illustrate the performance of the Drude and AMOEBA force fields.

  1. The current status of Zika virus in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Zika virus currently poses a global threat and is a major public health issue throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. However, Zika virus infections in humans have also been observed in other regions, including Southeast Asia, where arboviral diseases are very common. In this study, we summarize the current status of Zika virus in Southeast Asia. This review aims to provide an overview of the current situation and also to suggest ways of adequately managing the emergence of Zika virus in Southeast Asia. METHODS: The literature searching for the reports on Zika virus in Southeast Asia was done using standard database PubMed and the re-analysis and summarization on the reports was done. RESULTS: A limited number of reports have addressed Zika virus disease in Southeast Asia, but it is has been confirmed that a problem already exists. Individual case reports and outbreaks of Zika virus have been confirmed in Southeast Asia. Several reports have also described patients becoming infected after visiting Southeast Asia. In addition, the concurrent circulation of Zika virus with other arboviruses has been confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: As a tropical region with a high prevalence of arboviral diseases, the emergence of Zika virus in Southeast Asia is a major concern. It is essential for local medical personnel to recognize this disease. Given the status of Southeast Asia as a globally important tourist destination, continuous updates on the status of Zika virus in Southeast Asia are required and should be incorporated into global health advisories regarding travel. PMID:27336445

  2. Current Status and Perspectives of Cysticercosis and Taeniasis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review describes recent epidemiological trends in cysticercosis and taeniasis in Japan. Some of the topics discussed herein were presented at the first symposium on "Current perspectives of Taenia asiatica researches", that was held in Osong in Chungbuk Province, South Korea, in October 2011 and organized by Prof. K. S. Eom, Chungbuk National University School of Medicine. To better understand the trends in the occurrence of cysticercosis and taeniasis in Japan, clinical cases reported in 2005 have been updated. In addition, the current status of Taenia asiatica infections successively occurring in Japan since 2010 is also discussed. PMID:23467264

  3. Death education within health education: current status, future directions.

    PubMed

    Crase, D

    1981-12-01

    A national survey was conducted among 205 university level divisions/departments of health education to determine the current status of death education courses within the health education field. Forty-nine college and university health educators currently teaching the course returned usable instruments. Death education receives the same credit, utilizes similar grading systems and is generally managed much like other academic courses. Since the discipline is in its infancy and many teachers are relatively unprepared, respondents called for greater quality control and improved professional preparation. Several concerns accompanying the growth of death education were identified.

  4. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  5. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; N N Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  6. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future (September 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, AS; Choudhury, S; Ermold, BD; Gaustad, KL

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; KL Gaustad

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  8. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future (November 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, AS; Choudhury, S; Ermold, BD: Gaustad, KL

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  9. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into four sections: (1) news about ingests currently under development, (2) current production ingests, (3) future ingest development plans, and (4) information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  10. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  11. Current status and challenge of Human Parasitology teaching in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chun-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2012-11-01

    Parasitic infection profile in China has been changed greatly with the rapid economic development in China since the 1980s, such as the tremendous decreased infection rate of the soil-borne helminthiasis, the elimination of filariasis, the control of malaria, and the initiation to eradicate malaria in 2020. Some food-borne parasitic infections have increased such as Clonorchiasis, Cysticercosis, and Echinococcosis, probably because of the increased chances of eating out. This trend directly affected the status of Human Parasitology teaching in medical universities, such as the shorten length of this course, re-adjusted contents structure and teaching manners, even the change of the name of this course. In this paper, we analyzed the current status and challenges of Human Parasitology teaching in medical universities, and discussed the requisite contents and manners in course delivery and measures to improve the quality of Human Parasitology teaching in China.

  12. Current status and challenge of Human Parasitology teaching in China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chun-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infection profile in China has been changed greatly with the rapid economic development in China since the 1980s, such as the tremendous decreased infection rate of the soil-borne helminthiasis, the elimination of filariasis, the control of malaria, and the initiation to eradicate malaria in 2020. Some food-borne parasitic infections have increased such as Clonorchiasis, Cysticercosis, and Echinococcosis, probably because of the increased chances of eating out. This trend directly affected the status of Human Parasitology teaching in medical universities, such as the shorten length of this course, re-adjusted contents structure and teaching manners, even the change of the name of this course. In this paper, we analyzed the current status and challenges of Human Parasitology teaching in medical universities, and discussed the requisite contents and manners in course delivery and measures to improve the quality of Human Parasitology teaching in China. PMID:23265609

  13. Assessment of extracellular fluid volume and fluid status in hemodialysis patients: current status and technical advances.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yanna; Zhu, Fansan; Kotanko, Peter

    2012-07-01

    The assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECV) and fluid status is both important and challenging in hemodialysis patients. Extracellular fluid is distributed in two major sub-compartments: interstitial fluid and plasma. A variety of methods are used to assess the ECV, with tracer dilution techniques considered gold standard. However, ECV defined as the distribution space of bromide, sodium, chloride, and ferrocyanide appears to be larger than the distribution volume of inulin and sucrose, suggesting a partial distribution into the intracellular volume. Relative blood volume monitoring, measurement of inferior vena cava diameter by ultrasound and biochemical markers are indirect methods, which do not reflect the ECV and fluid status accurately. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) techniques enable assessment of ECV and intracellular volume. Currently, BIS appears to be the most practical method for assessing ECV volume and fluid status in dialysis patients.

  14. Community-based dental education: history, current status, and future.

    PubMed

    Formicola, Allan J; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the history, current status, and future direction of community-based dental education (CBDE). The key issues addressed include the reasons that dentistry developed a different clinical education model than the other health professions; how government programs, private medical foundations, and early adopter schools influenced the development of CBDE; the societal and financial factors that are leading more schools to increase the time that senior dental students spend in community programs; the impact of CBDE on school finances and faculty and student perceptions; and the reasons that CBDE is likely to become a core part of the clinical education of all dental graduates.

  15. The current status of women in physics in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Najat K.; Kazmili, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    Women's representation in physics in Tanzania is generally low. Various studies have shown that Tanzanian girls face obstacles to realizing their educational and intellectual capabilities. The situation is even worse in the field of physics because of the perception that the subject is too difficult. The number of women in physics at the university level is highly associated with their number in secondary school level as well as their performance. This paper analyzes the current status of women engaged in physics in Tanzania in the academic and research institutions.

  16. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27698896

  17. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers.

  18. Block-structured grids for complex aerodynamic configurations: Current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Parlette, Edward B.

    1995-01-01

    The status of CFD methods based on the use of block-structured grids for analyzing viscous flows over complex configurations is examined. The objective of the present study is to make a realistic assessment of the usability of such grids for routine computations typically encountered in the aerospace industry. It is recognized at the very outset that the total turnaround time, from the moment the configuration is identified until the computational results have been obtained and postprocessed, is more important than just the computational time. Pertinent examples will be cited to demonstrate the feasibility of solving flow over practical configurations of current interest on block-structured grids.

  19. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  20. Current status of the Taiwan Photon Source project

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Lin

    2014-03-05

    The progress of establishment of a high brightness and low emittance mid-energy storage ring is reported. The status of the 3 GeV Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) currently under construction will be presented. The progress on the civil construction, manufacturing of machine components, as well as the opportunity of using low emittace synchrotron source and phase I beamlines at TPS will be mentioned. The future planning of phase II beamlines and related research will be sketched. Future developments will be also briefly outlined.

  1. MicroRNAs of parasites: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Tuo, Wenbin; Gao, Hongwei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2010-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding small RNAs regulating gene expression in eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The complex life cycles of parasites may require the ability to respond to environmental and developmental signals through miRNA-mediated gene expression. Over the past 17 years, thousands of miRNAs have been identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and other parasites. Here, we review the current status and potential functions of miRNAs in protozoan, helminths, and arthropods, and propose some perspectives for future studies.

  2. Laser refractive surgery: a review and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiushi; Keates, Richard H.; Hill, Richard A.; Berns, Michael W.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of corneal refractive surgery is to modify the anterior surface of the cornea for the correction of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The air-tear film interface is a powerful refractive surface. Small changes in the curvature can induce large shifts in refractive power. The exquisite nature of laser-tissue interaction with corneal tissue allows successful application of lasers for refractive surgery. Numerous systems have been developed for clinical applications. An overview is provided of the current clinical and research status of laser refractive surgery.

  3. Current status of the measurement of the anapole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Dong; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hood, Jonathan; Orozco, Luis

    2009-05-01

    We present the current status of the experimental effort towards the measurement of the anapole moment in different isotopes of francium. The anapole is a parity-violating, time-reversal conserving nuclear moment that arises from the weak interaction among nucleons. Due to the electromagnetic interaction between electrons and nucleons, atomic physics gives the unique possibility to probe the weak interaction in the low energy regime. Our experimental scheme involves driving a parity forbidden E1 transition between hyperfine ground states in a series of francium isotopes inside a blue detuned dipole trap at the electric antinode of a microwave cavity. The experiment will make use of the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF. The system is currently being tested with rubidium.

  4. The Current Status of Medical Marijuana in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Medical marijuana is currently a controversial issue in medicine. There are strong pro and con opinions but relatively little scientific data on which to base medical decisions. The unfortunate scheduling of marijuana in class I has limited research and only serves to fuel the controversy. This article will review the history of laws to regulate drugs in the United States in the 20th century to provide context for the current status of medical marijuana. It will include the rationale for opposing medical marijuana laws and the problem of the Schedule I inclusion of marijuana as well as other drugs. It will examine the problems associated with smoking raw marijuana and review other routes of administration. Finally, it examines the inadvisability of medicine's promotion of smoked marijuana. PMID:24765557

  5. FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY IN INDIA CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Shah, L.P.

    1999-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is a developing superspeciality in India and other SAARC countries. After a brief historical review, the paper describes the current status of forensic psychiatry in India and compares it with the development in this field in Europe and America. It takes the stock of current scenario in three different areas viz., i) legal and clinical ii) teaching and training and Hi) research. It deliberates on need for teaching this subject at the undergraduate and the postgraduate medical and legal courses and necessity of full time consultants devoted to the practice of forensic psychiatry. It focuses on the recent developments in the field of forensic psychiatry like enactment of Narcotic and Psychotropic Substance Act (1985), Mental Health Act (1987), Juvenile Justice Act (1989), Act for the Disabled (1994) and the Consumer Protection Act (1986). The paper also recommends some strategies for teaching, training, research and future developments in this field. PMID:21455388

  6. Current status of surrogacy in Japan and uterine transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Banno, Kouji; Mihara, Makoto; Iida, Takuya; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproductive technology (ART) have made it possible to circumvent many causes of male and female infertility. The right to have a child by ART has been respected for infertile couples. However, there are currently no legal regulations concerning ART in Japan, and this has resulted in social and ethical problems. Surrogacy involves particularly complex medical, ethical, social, and legal issues, and is frequently focused on as a major social concern. Uterine transplantation (UTx) is a potential alternative for young women with uterine factor infertility due to hysterectomy for treatment of a malignant uterine tumor or massive blood loss after delivery, or because of a congenital disease such as Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster syndrome. UTx has been examined in experimental animals as a basis for establishment of fecundity for young women with uterine factor infertility. In this review, we focus on surrogacy in Japan and UTx research, and discuss the current status and concerns in this field. PMID:21632170

  7. Current status of surrogacy in Japan and uterine transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Banno, Kouji; Mihara, Makoto; Iida, Takuya; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproductive technology (ART) have made it possible to circumvent many causes of male and female infertility. The right to have a child by ART has been respected for infertile couples. However, there are currently no legal regulations concerning ART in Japan, and this has resulted in social and ethical problems. Surrogacy involves particularly complex medical, ethical, social, and legal issues, and is frequently focused on as a major social concern. Uterine transplantation (UTx) is a potential alternative for young women with uterine factor infertility due to hysterectomy for treatment of a malignant uterine tumor or massive blood loss after delivery, or because of a congenital disease such as Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster syndrome. UTx has been examined in experimental animals as a basis for establishment of fecundity for young women with uterine factor infertility. In this review, we focus on surrogacy in Japan and UTx research, and discuss the current status and concerns in this field.

  8. The ILLIAC IV memory system: Current status and future possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    The future needs of researchers who will use the Illiac were examined and the requirements they will place on the memory system were evaluated. Various alternatives to replacing critical memory components were considered with regard to cost, risk, system impact, software requirements, and implementation schedules. The current system, its performance and status, and the limitations it places on possible enhancements are discussed as well as the planned enhancements to the Illiac processor. After a brief technology survey, different implementations are presented for each system memory component. Three different memory systems are proposed to meet the identified needs of the Illiac user community. These three alternatives differ considerably with respect to storage capacity and accessing capabilities, but they all offer significant improvements over the current system. The proposed systems and their relative merits are analyzed.

  9. Antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease: current status

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Darren Lowell; Ponda, Punita

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are common chronic disorders that not only have a major impact on the quality of life but are also potentially life-threatening. Treatment modalities that are currently favored have conferred significant clinical benefits, but they may have considerable side effects. An optimal treatment strategy for autoimmune disease would specifically target disease-associated antigens and limit systemic side effects. Similar to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis, antigen-specific immunotherapy for autoimmune disease aims to induce immune deviation and promote tolerance to specific antigens. In this review, we present the current status of studies and clinical trials in both human and animal hosts that use antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease. PMID:27471707

  10. Recombinant DNA in Japan: current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The goals of the report are to evaluate the current status of Japanese Recombinant DNA Biotechnology, and to suggest ways to improve the use of the Japanese biotechnology literature. Abstracts and titles of papers presented at Japanese scientific meetings held from November 1987 to November 1988 were evaluated and translated to give the reader an overall idea of the areas in which Japanese researchers are active. In general, Japanese recombinant DNA technology is on a par with that in the U.S. - there is no technology lead on either side. The author recommends that U.S. bio-researchers should read the Japanese language literature, particularly in applied areas, since the abstracts of meetings held in Japan in Japanese are a good source of current, concise information.

  11. Current status of Paragonimus and paragonimiasis in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Romero, Daniel; Castañeda, Byron; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    A review of national and international publications on paragonimiasis in Ecuador, epidemiological records from the Ministry of Public Health and unpublished research data was conducted to summarise the current status of the parasite/disease. The purpose of the review is to educate physicians, policy-makers and health providers on the status of the disease and to stimulate scientific investigators to conduct further research. Paragonimiasis was first diagnosed in Ecuador 94 years ago and it is endemic to both tropical and subtropical regions in 19 of 24 provinces in the Pacific Coast and Amazon regions. Paragonimus mexicanus is the only known species in the country, with the mollusc Aroapyrgus colombiensis and the crabs Moreirocarcinus emarginatus, Hypolobocera chilensis and Hypolobocera aequatorialis being the primary and secondary intermediate hosts, respectively. Recent studies found P. mexicanus metacercariae in Trichodactylus faxoni crabs of the northern Amazon. Chronic pulmonary paragonimiasis is commonly misdiagnosed and treated as tuberculosis and although studies have demonstrated the efficacy of praziquantel and triclabendazole for the treatment of human infections, neither drug is available in Ecuador. Official data recorded from 1978-2007 indicate an annual incidence of 85.5 cases throughout the 19 provinces, with an estimated 17.2% of the population at risk of infection. There are no current data on the incidence/prevalence of infection, nor is there a national control programme. PMID:25410987

  12. Active Debris Removal: Current Status of Activities in CNES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnal, Christophe; Ruault, Jean-Marc; Desjean, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    Most of the ongoing studies led at worldwide level, mainly through IADC Actions, conclude that in order to keep a stable Low Earth Orbit environment in the coming decades, it may be necessary to retrieve some 5 to 10 large objects annually. These operations, known as Active Debris Removal (ADR), raise a huge amount of difficulties in numerous domains: political, legal, insurance, defense, financing and, last but not least, technical questions. The current paper aims at reviewing the current status of the ADR activities led by CNES both at National and Multi-lateral level. The first question which is raised is that of the high level requirements to be applied. What are the requirements coming from the operators; do we want to stabilize the environment, decrease it or could we accept some increase over the years; when do we have to act; can we baseline random reentry of such large objects or do we have to stick to controlled destructive reentries?… There may not yet be clear answers to these points, so efforts at international level are required. The second part of the paper deals with the potential solutions at system level. Numerous possibilities can be identified, depending on the size of the launcher and of the strategy selected to de-orbit the debris. Large space tugs visiting some 10 debris or small dedicated chasers launched as piggyback are among the solutions which have been traded. The currently preferred solution is described in details. The third part of the paper is devoted to the chaser-debris operations themselves, following five key functions; - the long range rendezvous, - the short range rendezvous up to contact, - the mechanical interfacing of the debris, - its control by the chaser, when required, - the de-orbiting maneuver itself. For each of these functions, the current status of available technologies is described, enabling the identification of the most critical ones requiring additional R&T effort and subsequent demonstrations. Among them

  13. [Cord blood transplantation: current status and new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    Cord blood (CB) has been an alternative stem cell source for patients with a wide variety of hematological diseases. When compared with unrelated bone marrow transplantation (u-BMT), obvious advantages of CB are the rapid availability and tolerance of 2 HLA antigen mismatch, which have increased the chances of transplantation for patients who lack a suitable donor or need urgent transplantation. Although higher rates of engraftment failure as compared to other stem cell sources after cord blood transplantation (CBT) have been a serious concern, the mechanisms underlying these failures have gradually been clarified by analyzing accumulated clinical data, thereby contributing to improvement of engraftment. Recent large-scale retrospective comparisons of clinical outcomes between CBT and u-BMT from HLA-matched donors have obtained comparable results, and moreover, results of CBT have been promising even in elderly patients and those in non-remission status. This review describes the current status of CBT and problems to be solved, along with discussion of developing strategies aimed at improving patient outcomes. PMID:27076239

  14. [Renaissance of immuno-oncology for urological tumors : Current status].

    PubMed

    Grimm, M-O; Winkler, Y; Fetter, I; Oppel-Heuchel, H

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors, immunotherapy has gained new importance in oncology. Current research is focused on the cytotoxic T‑lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoints. The CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab (melanoma) as well as the PD-1 antibodies nivolumab (melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma) and pembrolizumab (melanoma) are approved for the treatment of metastatic disease in Europe. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (re)activate the immune system against cancer cells and appear to be more effective than current standards for many tumors. The toxicity profile is favorable but involves new so-called immune-related side effects, which need to be recognized and treated in time. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are also currently being tested in uro-oncology in phase 3 trials relevant for approval status. Based on this it is to be expected that immune checkpoint inhibitors will become a new standard (as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy) in the early lines of therapy in the near future and replace the previous standard therapies, particularly for metastasized renal cell carcinoma and urothelial cancer.

  15. Health Inequalities Policy in Korea: Current Status and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-il

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, health inequalities have become an important public health concern and the subject of both research and policy attention in Korea. Government reports, as well as many epidemiological studies, have provided evidence that a wide range of health outcomes and health-related behaviors are socioeconomically patterned, and that the magnitude of health inequalities is even increasing. However, except for the revised Health Plan 2010 targets for health equity, few government policies have explicitly addressed health inequalities. Although a number of economic and social policies may have had an impact on health inequalities, such impact has scarcely been evaluated. In this review, we describe the current status of research and policy on health inequalities in Korea. We also suggest future challenges of approaches and policies to reduce health inequalities and highlight the active and intensive engagement of many policy sectors and good evidence for interventions that will make meaningful reduction of health inequalities possible. PMID:22661869

  16. Remote sensing using GNSS signals: Current status and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Feng, G. P.; Gleason, S.

    2011-05-01

    The refracted, reflected and scattered signals of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) have been successfully used to remotely sense the Earth's surface and atmosphere. It has demonstrated its potential to sense the atmosphere and ionosphere, ocean, land surfaces (including soil moisture) and the cryosphere. These new measurements, although in need of refinement and further validation in many cases, can be used to complement existing techniques and sensors, e.g., radiosonde, ionosonde, radar altimetry and synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This paper presents the current status and new developments of remote sensing using GNSS signals as well as its future directions and applications. Some notable emerging applications include monitoring sea ice, dangerous sea states, ocean eddy and storm surges. With the further improvement of the next generation multi -frequency GNSS systems and receivers and new space-based instruments utilizing GNSS reflections and refractions, new scientific applications of GNSS are expected in various environment remote sensing fields in the near future.

  17. Targeted radiotherapy with gold nanoparticles: current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Korideck, Houari; Zygmanski, Piotr; Cormack, Robert A; Berbeco, Ross; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the treatment of cancer and other diseases with ionizing radiation. The ultimate goal of RT is to destroy all the disease cells while sparing healthy tissue. Towards this goal, RT has advanced significantly over the past few decades in part due to new technologies including: multileaf collimator-assisted modulation of radiation beams, improved computer-assisted inverse treatment planning, image guidance, robotics with more precision, better motion management strategies, stereotactic treatments and hypofractionation. With recent advances in nanotechnology, targeted RT with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is actively being investigated as a means to further increase the RT therapeutic ratio. In this review, we summarize the current status of research and development towards the use of GNPs to enhance RT. We highlight the promising emerging modalities for targeted RT with GNPs and the corresponding preclinical evidence supporting such promise towards potential clinical translation. Future prospects and perspectives are discussed. PMID:24978464

  18. Current research status, databases and application of single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Javed, R; Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent form of DNA variation in the genome. SNPs are genetic markers which are bi-allelic in nature and grow at a very fast rate. Current genomic databases contain information on several million SNPs. More than 6 million SNPs have been identified and the information is publicly available through the efforts of the SNP Consortium and others data bases. The NCBI plays a major role in facillating the identification and cataloging of SNPs through creation and maintenance of the public SNP database (dbSNP) by the biomedical community worldwide and stimulate many areas of biological research including the identification of the genetic components of disease. In this review article, we are compiling the existing SNP databases, research status and their application. PMID:21717869

  19. Current status of SK-Gd project and EGADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chenyuan; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Supernova Relic Neutrino (SRN) has not been observed yet because of its low event rate and high background. By adding gadolinium into water Cherenkov detector, inverse beta decay will have two signals, the prompt one is positron signal and the delayed one is a ~8 MeV gamma cascade from neutron capture on gadolinium. By this way, background for SRN can be largely reduced by detecting prompt and delayed signals coincidently, and Super-K will also have the ability to distinguish neutrino and anti-neutrino. SK-Gd is a R&D project proposed to dissolve gadolinium into Super-K. As a part of it, EGADS, a 200 ton water Cherenkov detector was built in Kamioka mine. Current status of SK-Gd project and the physics work being performed in EGADS will be presented here.

  20. Current status and future prospects of toxicogenomics in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Fahlman, Richard P; Michail, Karim; Siraki, Arno G

    2014-05-01

    In drug discovery and development (DDD), the efficacy, safety and cost of new chemical entities are the main concerns of the pharmaceutical industry. Continuously updated and stricter recommendations imposed by regulatory authorities result in greater challenges being faced by the industry. Reliable high-throughput techniques integrated with well-designed analytical tools at all stages of DDD (termed 'next-generation DDD') could be a possible approach to obtaining new drug approval by cutting costs as well as ensuring the highest level of patient safety. In this review, we describe the various components of holistic toxicogenomics with examples of applications, and discuss the various analytical tools and platforms to illustrate the current status and prospects of next-generation DDD.

  1. [Thirdhand smoke: current research status and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Hang, Bo; Cheng, Senping; Xia, Yankai; Mao, Jianhua

    2015-04-01

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is defined as residual tobacco components that remain on indoor surfaces after tobacco has been smoked, such as walls furniture, and dust particles, which are re-emitted into the air. THS also includes secondary pollutants generated from the reaction of surface residual smoke compounds with reactive indoor air pollutants. THS is a new hidden health hazard, with infants and children being most at risk of higher exposure. This article summarized the aging process of secondhand smoke and the mechanism of generation of THS; reviewed the current status of research on THS regarding its chemical constituents, physical and chemical properties, biological toxicity, as well as degree of pollution in China and other countries; and finally provided the perspectives on the future study of THS.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Mimetics: the Past, Current Status and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Elbers, L P B; Kastelein, J J P; Sjouke, B

    2016-03-01

    The association between thyroid hormone status and plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol has raised the awareness for the development of thyroid hormone mimetics as lipid-lowering agents. The discovery of the two main types of thyroid hormone receptors (α and β) as well as the development of novel combinatorial chemistry providing organ specificity has drastically improved the selectivity of these compounds. In the past decades, several thyroid hormone mimetics have been investigated with the purpose of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. However, until now, none of the thyromimetics reached the stage of completing a phase III clinical trial without deleterious side effects. Here, we review the currently available literature on thyromimetics investigated for the treatment of dyslipidemia, their rise, their downfall and the challenges for the development of novel agents.

  3. Current Backpack Weight Status for Primary Schoolchildren in Colima, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Olmedo-Buenrostro, Bertha Alicia; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Sánchez-Ramírez, Carmen Alicia; Cruz, Sergio Adrián Montero; Vásquez, Clemente; Mora-Brambila, Ana Bertha; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram P; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita L

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the current status of backpack weight in primary schoolchildren in Colima, Mexico, in relation to gender, school grade level, and body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 240 randomly selected children from 20 primary schools. The participating children's parents signed statements of informed consent. Descriptive statistics, the χ(2) test, Student's t-test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used. The mean age was 8.55 ± 2 years (range: 5-12 years). Seventy-eight percent of the schoolchildren presented with a backpack overload that was greater than 10% of their body weight. No significant differences were found in relation to gender. Four out of every five schoolchildren presented with backpack overload, exposing them to a potential health problem. Education and public policy prevention strategies for this situation should be implemented in Mexico and other regions of the world with the same problem. PMID:26416767

  4. Cognitive behavioral therapy: current status and future research directions.

    PubMed

    McMain, Shelley; Newman, Michelle G; Segal, Zindel V; DeRubeis, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an umbrella term that includes a diverse group of treatments, is defined by a strong commitment to empiricism. While CBT has a robust empirical base, areas for improvement remain. This article reviews the status of the current empirical base and its limitations, and presents future directions for advancement of the field. Ultimately, studies are needed that will identify the predictors, mediators, and moderators of treatment response in order to increase knowledge on how to personalize interventions for each client and to strengthen the impact of CBT. Efforts to advance the dissemination and implementation of CBT, innovative approaches such as practice-oriented research, and the advantages of incorporating new and existing technologies, are discussed as well.

  5. [Current status of hyperthermia for deep-seated tumors].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, M; Abe, M

    1989-03-01

    The current status of hyperthermia for deep-seated tumor is reviewed. Heating methods include external heating, intraluminal heating and interstitial heating, all of which have inherent advantages and disadvantages. Hyperthermia alone has significant effects on deep-seated tumors. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has been widely applied, resulting in 10-15% complete regression and 10-40% partial regression in the treatment of locally advanced tumors. The response rate of thermoradiotherapy was higher than that of radiotherapy for tumors in the brain, rectum and esophagus in the non-randomized study. The clinical application of thermochemotherapy is increasing and its effect is demonstrated in the prevention and treatment of peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancers. Reports of serious complications are rare. The technology for deep-heating and thermometry, and the new criteria for the assessment of thermotherapy for deep-seated tumors seems a promising new treatment modality.

  6. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  7. Cognitive behavioral therapy: current status and future research directions.

    PubMed

    McMain, Shelley; Newman, Michelle G; Segal, Zindel V; DeRubeis, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an umbrella term that includes a diverse group of treatments, is defined by a strong commitment to empiricism. While CBT has a robust empirical base, areas for improvement remain. This article reviews the status of the current empirical base and its limitations, and presents future directions for advancement of the field. Ultimately, studies are needed that will identify the predictors, mediators, and moderators of treatment response in order to increase knowledge on how to personalize interventions for each client and to strengthen the impact of CBT. Efforts to advance the dissemination and implementation of CBT, innovative approaches such as practice-oriented research, and the advantages of incorporating new and existing technologies, are discussed as well. PMID:25689506

  8. Underground coal gasification: a brief review of current status

    SciTech Connect

    Shafirovich, E.; Varma, A.

    2009-09-15

    Coal gasification is a promising option for the future use of coal. Similarly to gasification in industrial reactors, underground coal gasification (UCG) produces syngas, which can be used for power generation or for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels and other valuable chemical products. As compared with conventional mining and surface gasification, UCG promises lower capital/operating costs and also has other advantages, such as no human labor underground. In addition, UCG has the potential to be linked with carbon capture and sequestration. The increasing demand for energy, depletion of oil and gas resources, and threat of global climate change lead to growing interest in UCG throughout the world. In this article, we review the current status of this technology, focusing on recent developments in various countries.

  9. Selected marine mammals of Alaska: species accounts with research and management recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book is the result of a need seen by the Marine Mammal Commission for a current summary of the biology and status of ten species of Alaskan marine mammals, including recommendations for research and management. Its purpose is to serve as a reference and working document as conservation and management plans are developed and implemented for the ten species.

  10. Current Status of the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) to date and the current development status of the system. NORS is an element of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) used to resupply the ISS with Nitrogen and Oxygen following the impending retirement of the Space Shuttle. The paper will discuss why NASA is developing NORS, including a summary of other concepts considered, and other related concepts currently being developed by NASA. The current system architecture will be described, along with a summary of the current design of the NORS. The overall programmatic schedule of the NORS in the context of the upcoming shuttle retirement and future launch vehicle development will also be presented. Finally, the paper will examine the significant technical challenges encountered during the requirements and preliminary design phase of NORS development. A key challenge to the development of NORS is the international shipment - and associated regulations - of pressurized Oxygen, which is necessary due to the use of launch vehicles based in Japan and French Guiana to send NORS gasses to the ISS. The storage and use of relatively large quantities of high pressure (41,000 kPa) Oxygen and Nitrogen within the ISS, which is unprecedented both on the ISS and other space vehicles, has had a significant impact on the design and architecture of the system. The high pressure of the system also poses unique thermal considerations, which has led to the development of a heater system for thermal conditioning of high pressure gas to avoid thermal impacts on downstream hardware. The on-orbit envelope allocated to the NORS has changed (gotten smaller) and has impacted both the design and architecture of the system. Finally, the balance of safety considerations associated with these high pressure gasses, particularly high pressure Oxygen, with the functionality of the system has profoundly impacted the form

  11. IAA multilingual space dictionary, current status and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo; McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Candel, Danielle; Ninomiya, Keiken; Contant, Jean-Michel

    2015-12-01

    Terminology is a key issue for a better understanding among people using various languages. Since 1986, when the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) multilingual terminology database committee on astronautics was formed, the committee and its successor IAA study groups on the IAA multilingual space dictionary have made a continuous effort to construct a multilingual dictionary database on astronautical terms. In 2002, the dictionary was computerized using a database server and some recent internet technologies. The database is accessible from all over the world via the internet. You can search for terms at your home and office using a web browser installed on the computer with an internet connection. Since then, the number of terms and languages included in the database has increased. The current version includes about 3500 terms in 22 languages. The flexibility of the database enables the addition and the revision of new terms without much effort. The computerization has also demonstrated another possibility to utilize the database. When total of four paper books about the multilingual space terminology were published on the 50th anniversary of IAA in 2010, one of the lexicon books was edited by a computer program which accessed to the database. In this paper, the authors present the current status of the IAA multilingual database as well as the future possibilities on the utilization of the database.

  12. Uas for Geo-Information Current Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarbrink, R. B.

    2011-09-01

    Recent and ongoing developments of state-of-the-art sensor technologies have resulted in smaller and lighter photogrammetric cameras with IMU, lidar scanners and other sensors that can now be integrated with and mounted on the larger Light UAS. This paper describes as an example the successful automatic flight of the 50-megapixel DigiCAM with AEROcontrol IMU developed by IGI flown on Geocopter's GC-201 unmanned helicopter system. The operational and technical requirements of UAS defined in new legislation remain however the safeguard to protect people and costly sensor payload assets. The current prospects of UAS-g face additional challenges related to end-user awareness and the return on investment. The current status of UAS legislation is given in this paper. This legislation justifies UAS-g operations of mapping coastal zones, forests, agricultural fields, and open mines. Sooner return on investment happens when the UAS legislation will be opening up airspace over urban areas (Class 2 approved UAS-g), to longer distances (BLOS operations), and to higher altitudes. UAS-g flights then become feasible to the maximum extent for cadastral mapping of larger areas, oil and gas pipeline monitoring, power line surveys, dike inspection, and highway and railway mapping.

  13. Current status of preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kenji; Sueoka, Kou; Iino, Kotaro; Senba, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mariko; Mizuguchi, Yuki; Izumi, Yoko; Sato, Suguru; Nakabayashi, Akira; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective study aimingto clarify the current status of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in Japan. Our data were collected from 12 facilities between September 2004 and September 2012, and entered into a database. A majority of PGD in Japan was performed for balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities in couples with recurrent miscarriage. PGD for monogenic diseases was performed only in two facilities. The average maternal age was 38 years for monogenic diseases and 40 years for chromosomal abnormalities. Overall there have been671 cycles to oocyte retrieval reported. Of these cycles, 85% (572 cycles)were for chromosomal abnormalities, and 15% (99 cycles) for monogenic diseases. Diagnosis rates in the current study were 70.8% for monogenic diseases and 94.0% for chromosomal abnormalities. Rates of embryo transfer of PGD were 62.7% for monogenic diseases and 25.5% for chromosomal abnormalities. Clinical pregnancy rates per embryo transfer were 12.0% for monogenic diseases and 35.6% for chromosomal abnormalities. Our study is the first PGD report from all facilities which had the approval of the ethics committee of the Japanese Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology. We have built a basis for gathering continuous PGD data in Japan. PMID:26124570

  14. Current Status and Research into Overcoming Limitations of Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kwack, Won Gun; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic investigation has a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Since 2001, capsule endoscopy (CE) has been available for small-bowel exploration and is under continuous development. During the past decade, CE has achieved impressive improvements in areas such as miniaturization, resolution, and battery life. As a result, CE is currently a first-line tool for the investigation of the small bowel in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and is a useful alternative to wired enteroscopy. Nevertheless, CE still has several limitations, such as incomplete examination and limited diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. To resolve these problems, many groups have suggested several models (e.g., controlled CO2 insufflation system, magnetic navigation system, mobile robotic platform, tagging and biopsy equipment, and targeted drug-delivery system), which are in development. In the near future, new technological advances will improve the capabilities of CE and broaden its spectrum of applications not only for the small bowel but also for the colon, stomach, and esophagus. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current status of CE and to review the ongoing development of solutions to address its limitations. PMID:26855917

  15. The current status of the Canadian home fitness test.

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the Canadian Home Fitness Test is reviewed. This simple procedure was originally conceived for the mass testing of fitness levels and for home use as a motivational tool in exercise programmes. The test is carried out on a double 8 inch step (such as a domestic staircase) at an age and sex-specific rhythm set by a long-playing record. Fitness is assessed from a combination of test-duration and the radial or carotid pulse count immediately following exercise. Use of the procedure by upwards of 500,000 Canadians is reviewed in relaltion to its safety, validity and practicality. To date, there have been no serious complications. In home use, there is inevitably limited precision, although with practice subjects can learn to count their pulse rate and step in time to the music; further, the test seems well received, achieving its prime objective of stimulating an interest in physical activity and endurance fitness. When the procedure is carried out by a paramedical worker, with e.c.g. recording of the exercise heart rate, it provides at least as good an estimate of maximum oxygen intake as other sub-maximal procedure; the main area of current controversy is interpretation of abnormal stress e.c.g. records, and it is suggested this problem could be resolved by the appropriate training and certification of interested family physicans and paramedical workers. Images p114-a PMID:7407449

  16. Current status and future trends in telepathology and digital pathology

    PubMed Central

    Chordia, Trupti Dinesh; Vikey, Ashok; Choudhary, Anuraag B; Samdariya, Yashpal; Chordia, Dipti Samdariya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the current status and future trends in telepathology (TP) and digital pathology (DP) in central India. Materials and Methods: A self-constructed questionnaire including 12 questions was designed with five specialists, to improve the design ambiguity. The study was conducted through postal and online survey consisting of 12 questions and sent to 300 histopathologists. Results: A total of 247 histopathologists answered the survey. The overall response rate was 81%. 98% pathologists felt the need for TP and DP. 34% pathologists used digital photomicrographic images in routine practice. Utilization of DP in most efficient way was observed by 48% pathologists mainly for the purpose of teaching in academic institutions. 82% believed that TP is helpful to take an expert opinion whereas only26% believed that a second opinion has to be taken. With respect to limitations, 67% pathologists believed that its cost-effective whereas 51% revealed high use of TP in next 5 years. Conclusions: Our survey shows that as the field evolves, pathologists are more towards welcoming TP and DP, provided frequent workshops and training programs are conducted. The results of this survey indicates that pathology staff across central India currently utilize gross digital images for educational or academic purposes. They also revealed that technology will be required in near future applications in academics, consultation and for medico-legal purposes. PMID:27601805

  17. Plutonium metal exchange program : current status and statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, L.; Eglin, J. L.; Michalak, S. E.; Picard, R. R.; Temer, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plutonium (Pu) Metal Sample Exchange program was conducted to insure the quality and intercomparability of measurements such as Pu assay, Pu isotopics, and impurity analyses. The Rocky Flats program was discontinued in 1989 after more than 30 years. In 2001, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) reestablished the Pu Metal Exchange program. In addition to the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston, six Department of Energy (DOE) facilities Argonne East, Argonne West, Livermore, Los Alamos, New Brunswick Laboratory, and Savannah River are currently participating in the program. Plutonium metal samples are prepared and distributed to the sites for destructive measurements to determine elemental concentration, isotopic abundance, and both metallic and nonmetallic impurity levels. The program provides independent verification of analytical measurement capabilies for each participating facility and allows problems in analytical methods to be identified. The current status of the program will be discussed with emphasis on the unique statistical analysis and modeling of the data developed for the program. The discussion includes the definition of the consensus values for each analyte (in the presence and absence of anomalous values and/or censored values), and interesting features of the data and the results.

  18. Radio Astronomy in Malaysia: Current Status and Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, N.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, U. F. S. U.; Umar, R.; Hassan, M. S. R.; Rosli, Z.; Hamidi, Z. S.; Ibrahim, Z. A.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we will present the current status of radio astronomical research and outreach in Malaysia. We will also present a short history of our research group, which is currently the only radio astronomical facility in Malaysia. Our group is called the Radio Cosmology Research Lab and was established in 2005 by Dr Zamri Zainal Abidin and Prof Dr Zainol Abidin Ibrahim. We will discuss the future plans for this group including our keen interest in being part of a more global network of radio astronomers. We are already an active member of the South-East Asia Astronomy Network (SEAAN) and aims to have a radio astronomical facility in order to join the Global Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) as well becoming a research hub for the future Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project. We will also present some of the scientific goals of our group including providing a platform for radio astronomers to be able to do observations of weak and high red-shifted radio objects such as galaxy clusters and supernovae.

  19. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-Ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords "PBD", "pancreaticoduodenectomy", and "obstructive jaundice". Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  20. Current status and future trends in telepathology and digital pathology

    PubMed Central

    Chordia, Trupti Dinesh; Vikey, Ashok; Choudhary, Anuraag B; Samdariya, Yashpal; Chordia, Dipti Samdariya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the current status and future trends in telepathology (TP) and digital pathology (DP) in central India. Materials and Methods: A self-constructed questionnaire including 12 questions was designed with five specialists, to improve the design ambiguity. The study was conducted through postal and online survey consisting of 12 questions and sent to 300 histopathologists. Results: A total of 247 histopathologists answered the survey. The overall response rate was 81%. 98% pathologists felt the need for TP and DP. 34% pathologists used digital photomicrographic images in routine practice. Utilization of DP in most efficient way was observed by 48% pathologists mainly for the purpose of teaching in academic institutions. 82% believed that TP is helpful to take an expert opinion whereas only26% believed that a second opinion has to be taken. With respect to limitations, 67% pathologists believed that its cost-effective whereas 51% revealed high use of TP in next 5 years. Conclusions: Our survey shows that as the field evolves, pathologists are more towards welcoming TP and DP, provided frequent workshops and training programs are conducted. The results of this survey indicates that pathology staff across central India currently utilize gross digital images for educational or academic purposes. They also revealed that technology will be required in near future applications in academics, consultation and for medico-legal purposes.

  1. Exotic Mammal Laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is an evolving field in veterinary medicine, and there is an increased interest in using laparoscopic techniques in nondomestic mammals, including zoo animals, wildlife, and exotic pets. The aim of this article is to summarize the approach to laparoscopic procedures, including instrumentation, patient selection and preparation, and surgical approaches, and to review the current literature on laparoscopy in exotic mammals.

  2. Mammals in Our Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Examines how humans have treated mammals throughout history. Identifies both the problems facing animals and the corrective efforts that are currently underway. Student activities include stories, games, a scavenger hunt, a mural, a puzzle, and a survey focusing on mammals. (ML)

  3. Acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging: current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Kloska, Stephan P; Wintermark, Max; Engelhorn, Tobias; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2010-03-01

    Cerebral stroke is one of the most frequent causes of permanent disability or death in the western world and a major burden in healthcare system. The major portion is caused by acute ischemia due to cerebral artery occlusion by a clot. The minority of strokes is related to intracerebral hemorrhage or other sources. To limit the permanent disability in ischemic stroke patients resulting from irreversible infarction of ischemic brain tissue, major efforts were made in the last decade. To extend the time window for thrombolysis, which is the only approved therapy, several imaging parameters in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been investigated. However, the current guidelines neglect the fact that the portion of potentially salvageable ischemic tissue (penumbra) is not dependent on the time window but the individual collateral blood flow. Within the last years, the differentiation of infarct core and penumbra with MRI using diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and perfusion imaging (PI) with parameter maps was established. Current trials transform these technical advances to a redefined patient selection based on physiological parameters determined by MRI. This review article presents the current status of MRI for acute stroke imaging. A special focus is the ischemic stroke. In dependence on the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, the basic principle and diagnostic value of different MRI sequences are illustrated. MRI techniques for imaging of the main differential diagnoses of ischemic stroke are mentioned. Moreover, perspectives of MRI for imaging-based acute stroke treatment as well as monitoring of restorative stroke therapy from recent trials are discussed.

  4. Water Pollutional Status and Current in Shanghai Seacoast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Li, W.; Wang, T.; An, Y.; Fei, M.; Wu, T.; Xu, M.

    2006-12-01

    The pollutants in Shanghai sea area come mainly from Changjiang river, Huangpu river and city wastewater discharging in coast. To research the status and current of water pollution in Shanghai sea-area, the data of Shanghai water qualities are extracted from authorized communiques and reports on ocean, environment and water in 1981-2005, which include pollutant discharging of city wastewater, Changjiang river and Huangpu river. It can be found, the discharging pollutant flux in month from Changjiang Estuary was around 25.9-209.6 tons in recent years, with the minimal at the end of winter and maximal in the summer, the difference between winter and summer was 2.3-8.1 times. There was relationship between discharging pollutant flux and runoff in Changjiang river for seasons, but no relationship for years. The discharging pollutant flux from Huangpu river is about 1.2%-4% from Changjiang river contemporarily. The city wastewater, which includes industry wastewater and living wastewater, was around 1775-2420 million tons per year in past 25 years. The industry wastewater was decreasing with year. The concentrations of cyanide, heavy metal and arsenic in the industry wastewater were controlled to a low level from 2000. The living wastewater was increasing with year for past 25 years. The main pollutant in living wastewater was organic compound. There was relationship between discharging of living wastewater and population. The averaging living wastewater per person-year was increase 2.7 times in past 25 years, the largest increasing ratio in one year on living wastewater per person-year was 20%. In the pollutants discharged to Shanghai sea-area in recent years, the organic compound from city wastewater was about 8%-25% from Changjiang river; the heavy metal from city wastewater was less than 0.03% from Changjiang river. The pollutants in Shanghai sea-area were mainly nitrogen compound, phosphate and oil. The pollutional status in Shanghai sea-area was the most seriously

  5. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Sang Sik; Han, Hyuck Dong; Hwang, Jung Hye; Hwang, Kyung Joo; Kang, In Soo; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Ki Chul; Kim, Tak; Kwon, Hyuck Chan; Lee, Won Don; Lee, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyu Sup; Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Yu Il; Min, Eung Gi; Moon, Hwa Sook; Moon, Shin Yong; Roh, Sung Il; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Great advances have been made in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby was born in Korea in the year of 1985. However, it deserve to say that the invaluable data from fertility centers may serve as a useful source to find out which factors affect successful IVF outcome and to offer applicable information to infertile patients and fertility clinics. This article intended to report the status of ART in 2009 Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology surveyed. The current survey was performed to assess the status and success rate of ART performed in Korea, between January 1 and December 31, 2009. Reporting forms had been sent out to IVF centers via e-mail, and collected by e-mail as well in 2012. With International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies recommendation, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and non-ICSI cases have been categorized and also IVF-ET cases involving frozen embryo replacement have been surveyed separately. Seventy-four centers have reported the treatment cycles initiated in the year of 2009, and had performed a total of 27,947 cycles of ART treatments. Among a total of 27,947 treatment cycles, IVF and ICSI cases added up to 22,049 (78.9%), with 45.3% IVF without ICSI and 54.7% IVF with ICSI, respectively. Among the IVF and ICSI patients, patients confirmed to have achieved clinical pregnancy was 28.8% per cycle with oocyte retrieval, and 30.9% per cycle with embryo transfer. The most common number of embryos transferred in 2009 is three embryos (40.4%), followed by 2 embryos (28.4%) and a single embryo transferred (13.6%). Among IVF and ICSI cycles that resulted in multiple live births, twin pregnancy rate was 45.3% and triple pregnancy rate was 1.1%. A total of 191 cases of oocyte donation had been performed to result in 25.0% of live birth rate. Meanwhile, a total of 5,619 cases of frozen embryo replacement had been performed with 33.7% of clinical

  6. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2009.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Min; Chun, Sang Sik; Han, Hyuck Dong; Hwang, Jung Hye; Hwang, Kyung Joo; Kang, In Soo; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Ki Chul; Kim, Tak; Kwon, Hyuck Chan; Lee, Won Don; Lee, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyu Sup; Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Yu Il; Min, Eung Gi; Moon, Hwa Sook; Moon, Shin Yong; Roh, Sung Il; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-11-01

    Great advances have been made in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby was born in Korea in the year of 1985. However, it deserve to say that the invaluable data from fertility centers may serve as a useful source to find out which factors affect successful IVF outcome and to offer applicable information to infertile patients and fertility clinics. This article intended to report the status of ART in 2009 Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology surveyed. The current survey was performed to assess the status and success rate of ART performed in Korea, between January 1 and December 31, 2009. Reporting forms had been sent out to IVF centers via e-mail, and collected by e-mail as well in 2012. With International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies recommendation, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and non-ICSI cases have been categorized and also IVF-ET cases involving frozen embryo replacement have been surveyed separately. Seventy-four centers have reported the treatment cycles initiated in the year of 2009, and had performed a total of 27,947 cycles of ART treatments. Among a total of 27,947 treatment cycles, IVF and ICSI cases added up to 22,049 (78.9%), with 45.3% IVF without ICSI and 54.7% IVF with ICSI, respectively. Among the IVF and ICSI patients, patients confirmed to have achieved clinical pregnancy was 28.8% per cycle with oocyte retrieval, and 30.9% per cycle with embryo transfer. The most common number of embryos transferred in 2009 is three embryos (40.4%), followed by 2 embryos (28.4%) and a single embryo transferred (13.6%). Among IVF and ICSI cycles that resulted in multiple live births, twin pregnancy rate was 45.3% and triple pregnancy rate was 1.1%. A total of 191 cases of oocyte donation had been performed to result in 25.0% of live birth rate. Meanwhile, a total of 5,619 cases of frozen embryo replacement had been performed with 33.7% of clinical

  7. Current Status of the DPOSS Effort at Caltech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odewahn, S. C.

    1998-05-01

    We discuss the current status of a three-color survey of fields of the digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (DPOSS). Eventually, the DPOSS catalogs will be released to the astronomical community. The final catalog will contain an estimated minimum of 50,000,000 (50 million) galaxies, and over 2,000,000,000 (2 billion) stars, down to the equivalent blue limiting magnitude of 22., and with star-galaxy classifications accurate to 90% or better down to the equivalent blue magnitude of 21. An important addition is a program to collect extensive CCD calibration data in the Gunn gri system with the Palomar 60". This represents a considerable advance over other, currently existing optical sky surveys based on large-format photographic plates. A great variety of scientific projects should become possible using this major data set, including the following: studies of galaxy clustering and of the large-scale structure in the low-redshift universe, as tests of structure formation models; galaxy counts at moderate depth, as a function of magnitudes, colors, and morphology, to be used in tests of galaxy evolution over the past few Gigayears; a search for high redshift (z > 4) quasars, and active galactic nuclei at lower redshifts; mass optical identifications of radio, IR, and x-ray sources; generation of objectively defined catalogs of clusters and groups of galaxies; a search for previously unknown sparse globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies; cataloging of low surface brightness galaxies; a search for objects with peculiar colors or variability; and many others. In particular, we review efforts to perform automatic galaxy classification using artificial neural network image classifiers. This powerful technique is used to map a multivariate photometric parameter space to the revised Hubble system of galaxy classification. We present a new morphological classification approach using Fourier image models to identify barred and ringed spiral systems.

  8. The current status of orbital experiments for UHECR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Casolino, M.; Garipov, G. K.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Gorodetzky, P.; Khrenov, B. A.; Klimov, P. A.; Morozenko, V. S.; Sakaki, N.; Saprykin, O. A.; Sharakin, S. A.; Takizawa, Y.; Tkachev, L. G.; Yashin, I. V.; Zotov, M. Yu

    2015-08-01

    Two types of orbital detectors of extreme energy cosmic rays are being developed nowadays: (i) TUS and KLYPVE with reflecting optical systems (mirrors) and (ii) JEM-EUSO with high- transmittance Fresnel lenses. They will cover much larger areas than existing ground-based arrays and almost uniformly monitor the celestial sphere. The TUS detector is the pioneering mission developed in SINP MSU in cooperation with several Russian and foreign institutions. It has relatively small field of view (±4.5°), which corresponds to a ground area of 6.4 • 103 km2. The telescope consists of a Fresnel-type mirror-concentrator (∼ 2 m2) and a photo receiver (a matrix of 16 x 16 photomultiplier tubes). It is to be deployed on the Lomonosov satellite, and is currently at the final stage of preflight tests. Recently, SINP MSU began the KLYPVE project to be installed on board of the Russian segment of the ISS. The optical system of this detector contains a larger primary mirror (10 m2), which allows decreasing the energy threshold. The total effective field of view will be at least ±14° to exceed the annual exposure of the existing ground-based experiments. Several configurations of the detector are being currently considered. Finally, JEM-EUSO is a wide field of view (±30°) detector. The optics is composed of two curved double-sided Fresnel lenses with 2.65 m external diameter, a precision diffractive middle lens and a pupil. The ultraviolet photons are focused onto the focal surface, which consists of nearly 5000 multi-anode photomultipliers. It is developed by a large international collaboration. All three orbital detectors have multi-purpose character due to continuous monitoring of various atmospheric phenomena. The present status of development of the TUS and KLYPVE missions is reported, and a brief comparison of the projects with JEM-EUSO is given.

  9. Current status of the IGT RENUGAS{reg_sign} process

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, F.S.; Carty, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    The RENUGAS process was specifically developed for pressurized fluidized bed gasification of biomass to produce either an industrial fuel gas or a chemical synthesis gas depending on air- or oxygen-blown operation. The RENUGAS gasifier is a single state fluidized bed reactor with a deep bed of inert solids that provide stable fluidization behavior and needed heat capacity for efficient transfer of energy released by the combustion to the endothermic devolatilization and gasification reactions. The use of a deep single-stage bed of inert solids yields high carbon conversion and low production of oils and tars. The 11 metric tons per day RENUGAS process development unit built at IGT under a USDOE program, has been tested under various operating conditions with a variety of feedstocks from RdF to woody and herbaceous biomass. Currently, the PDU is being used to test hot gas cleanup for power turbines in support of the Hawaii demonstration gasifier. Biomass conversions of over 95% were achieved for most biomass tested. The successful demonstration of the PDU tests resulted in RENUGAS being selected for further scaleup a 91 metric ton per day demonstration gasifier being constructed in Hawaii by the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR); a research program being conducted by Westinghouse Electric to validate a hot gas cleanup system for operation of the RENUGAS gasifier with a gas turbine; and the feasibility study of a 70-80 Megawatt combined cycle power plant using an air blown RENUGAS gasifier with alfalfa stems as the feedstock. In this paper, the development of the IGT RENUGAS process from a concept in 1977 to its status in three current programs is discussed.

  10. Neural Synchrony in Cortical Networks: History, Concept and Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Pipa, Gordon; Lima, Bruss; Melloni, Lucia; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf

    2009-01-01

    Following the discovery of context-dependent synchronization of oscillatory neuronal responses in the visual system, the role of neural synchrony in cortical networks has been expanded to provide a general mechanism for the coordination of distributed neural activity patterns. In the current paper, we present an update of the status of this hypothesis through summarizing recent results from our laboratory that suggest important new insights regarding the mechanisms, function and relevance of this phenomenon. In the first part, we present recent results derived from animal experiments and mathematical simulations that provide novel explanations and mechanisms for zero and nero-zero phase lag synchronization. In the second part, we shall discuss the role of neural synchrony for expectancy during perceptual organization and its role in conscious experience. This will be followed by evidence that indicates that in addition to supporting conscious cognition, neural synchrony is abnormal in major brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. We conclude this paper with suggestions for further research as well as with critical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:19668703

  11. The Current Status and Future Prospects for the GRACE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapley, Byron; Flechtner, Frank; Watkins, Michael; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Boening, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The twin satellites of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) were launched on March 17, 2002 and have operated for over 13 years. The mission objectives are to sense the spatial and temporal variations of the Earth's mass through its effects on the gravity field at the GRACE satellite altitude. The major cause of the time varying mass is water motion and the GRACE mission has provided a continuous decade long measurement sequences which characterizes the seasonal cycle of mass transport between the oceans, land, cryosphere and atmosphere; its inter-annual variability; and the climate driven secular, or long period, mass transport signals. In 2012, the RLO5 solution, based on a complete reanalysis of the mission data, data release, was initiated. The monthly solutions from this effort were released in mid-2013 with the mean fields following in 2014 and 2015. The mission is entering the final phases of operations. The current mission operations strategy emphasizes extending the mission lifetime to achieve mission overlap with the GRACE Follow On Mission. This presentation will review the mission status and the projections for mission lifetime, summarize plans for the RL 06 data re-analysis, describe the issues that influence the operations philosophy and discuss the impact the operations may have on the scientific data products.

  12. Current Status and Tasks in Development of Cable Recycling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezure, Takashi; Goto, Kazuhiko

    This paper shows current status and tasks in development of cable recycling technology and it’s items to be solved. Electric cable recycle system has been activated especially for copper conductor recycle in Japan. Previously removed cable coverings materials were mainly land filled. But landfill capacity is decreased and limited in recent years, at the same time, recycle technology was highly developed. A cable recycle technology has 4 tasks. (1) Applying new high efficiency separation system instead of electrostatic and gravity methods to classify mixed various kind of plastics materials including recently developed ecological material (ex PE, PVC, Rubber), (2) Removing heavy metal, especially lead from PVC material, (3) Treatment of optical glass fiber core, which has possibility going to be harmful micro particles, and (4) Establishment of social recycle system for electric wire and cable. Taking action for these tasks shall be proceeded under environmentally sensitive technology together with local government, user, manufacturer, and waste-disposal company on cost performance basis.

  13. Medical telerobotic systems: current status and future trends.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Sotiris; Christoforou, Eftychios G; Panayides, Andreas S; Voskarides, Sotos; Novales, Cyril; Nouaille, Laurence; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Vieyres, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Teleoperated medical robotic systems allow procedures such as surgeries, treatments, and diagnoses to be conducted across short or long distances while utilizing wired and/or wireless communication networks. This study presents a systematic review of the relevant literature between the years 2004 and 2015, focusing on medical teleoperated robotic systems which have witnessed tremendous growth over the examined period. A thorough insight of telerobotics systems discussing design concepts, enabling technologies (namely robotic manipulation, telecommunications, and vision systems), and potential applications in clinical practice is provided, while existing limitations and future trends are also highlighted. A representative paradigm of the short-distance case is the da Vinci Surgical System which is described in order to highlight relevant issues. The long-distance telerobotics concept is exemplified through a case study on diagnostic ultrasound scanning. Moreover, the present review provides a classification into short- and long-distance telerobotic systems, depending on the distance from which they are operated. Telerobotic systems are further categorized with respect to their application field. For the reviewed systems are also examined their engineering characteristics and the employed robotics technology. The current status of the field, its significance, the potential, as well as the challenges that lie ahead are thoroughly discussed. PMID:27520552

  14. Current Status of Carl Sagan Observatory in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Ibarra, A.

    The current status of Observatory "Carl Sagan" (OCS) of University of Sonora is presented. This project was born in 1996 focused to build a small solar-stellar observatory completely operated by remote control. The observatory will be at "Cerro Azul", a 2480 m peak in one of the best regions in the world for astronomical observation, at the Sonora-Arizona desert. The OCS, with three 16 cm solar telescopes and a 55 cm stellar telescope is one of the cheapest observatories, valuated in US200,000 Added to its scientific goals to study solar coronal holes and Supernovae Type 1A, the OCS has a strong educative and cultural program in Astronomy to all levels. At the end of 2001, we started the Program "Constelacion", to build small planetariums through all the countries with a cost of only US80,000. Also, the webcast system for transmission of the solar observations from the prototype OCS at the campus, was expanded to webcast educational programs in Astronomy since July of this year, including courses and diplomats for Latin American people. All of these advances are exposed here.

  15. Saliva proteome research: current status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Benjamin L; Cooper-White, Justin; Punyadeera, Chamindie K

    2013-09-01

    Human saliva harbours proteins of clinical relevance and about 30% of blood proteins are also present in saliva. This highlights that saliva can be used for clinical applications just as urine or blood. However, the translation of salivary biomarker discoveries into clinical settings is hampered by the dynamics and complexity of the salivary proteome. This review focuses on the current status of technological developments and achievements relating to approaches for unravelling the human salivary proteome. We discuss the dynamics of the salivary proteome, as well as the importance of sample preparation and processing techniques and their influence on downstream protein applications; post-translational modifications of salivary proteome and protein: protein interactions. In addition, we describe possible enrichment strategies for discerning post-translational modifications of salivary proteins, the potential utility of selected-reaction-monitoring techniques for biomarker discovery and validation, limitations to proteomics and the biomarker challenge and future perspectives. In summary, we provide recommendations for practical saliva sampling, processing and storage conditions to increase the quality of future studies in an emerging field of saliva clinical proteomics. We propose that the advent of technologies allowing sensitive and high throughput proteome-wide analyses, coupled to well-controlled study design, will allow saliva to enter clinical practice as an alternative to blood-based methods due to its simplistic nature of sampling, non-invasiveness, easy of collection and multiple collections by untrained professionals and cost-effective advantages. PMID:22612344

  16. Soil contamination in China: current status and mitigation strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ma, Yibing; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Tang, Zhong; McGrath, Steve P

    2015-01-20

    China faces great challenges in protecting its soil from contamination caused by rapid industrialization and urbanization over the last three decades. Recent nationwide surveys show that 16% of the soil samples, 19% for the agricultural soils, are contaminated based on China’s soil environmental quality limits, mainly with heavy metals and metalloids. Comparisons with other regions of the world show that the current status of soil contamination, based on the total contaminant concentrations, is not worse in China. However, the concentrations of some heavy metals in Chinese soils appear to be increasing at much greater rates. Exceedance of the contaminant limits in food crops is widespread in some areas, especially southern China, due to elevated inputs of contaminants, acidic nature of the soil and crop species or cultivars prone to heavy metal accumulation. Minimizing the transfer of contaminants from soil to the food chain is a top priority. A number of options are proposed, including identification of the sources of contaminants to agricultural systems, minimization of contaminant inputs, reduction of heavy metal phytoavailability in soil with liming or other immobilizing materials, selection and breeding of low accumulating crop cultivars, adoption of appropriate water and fertilizer management, bioremediation, and change of land use to grow nonfood crops. Implementation of these strategies requires not only technological advances, but also social-economic evaluation and effective enforcement of environmental protection law. PMID:25514502

  17. Current status of animal welfare and animal rights in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiaqi; Bayne, Kathryn; Wang, Jianfei

    2013-11-01

    In the past few years, new social passions have sparked on the Chinese mainland. At the centre of these burgeoning passions is a focus on animal welfare, animal treatment, and even animal rights, by the public and academic sectors. With China's rapid economic changes and greater access to information from around the world, societal awareness of animal issues is rising very fast. Hastening this paradigm shift were several highly public incidents involving animal cruelty, including exposés on bear bile harvesting for traditional Chinese medicine, the thousands of dogs rescued from China's meat trade, and the call to boycott shark fin soup and bird nest soup. This article outlines the current status of campaigning by animal advocates in China (specifically the animal rights movement) from three interlinked perspectives: wildlife conservation, companion animal protection, and laboratory animal protection. By reviewing this campaigning, we attempt to present not only the political and social impact of the concept of animal rights, but also the perceptions of, and challenges to, animal rights activities in China.

  18. Veterinary public health in India: current status and future needs.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, S; Singh, B B

    2015-12-01

    Veterinary public health (VPH) assumes huge significance in developing countries such as India. However, the implementation of VPH services throughout the country is still in its infancy. From 1970 onwards, many institutes, national and international organisations, professional societies, policies and personalities have contributed towards the development of VPH in India. Nevertheless, there is an urgent need to develop VPH still further as there are many issues, such as high population density, the re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens, environmental pollution and antimicrobial resistance, that require attention. The time has surely come to involve all stakeholders, ranging from primary producers (e.g., farmers) to policy-makers, so as to garner support for the holistic implementation of VPH services in India. To improve VPH activities and services, science-based policies enforced through stringent regulation are required to improve human, animal and environmental health. The emergence of the 'One Health' concept has ushered in new hopes for the resurrection of VPH in India. Applying tools such as the World Organisation for Animal Health (OlE) Day One Competencies and the OlE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS Tool) is essential to improve the quality of national Veterinary Services and to identify gaps and weaknesses in service provision, which can be remedied to comply with the OlE international standards. VPH initiatives started modestly but they continue to grow. The present review is focused on the current status and future needs of VPH in India.

  19. Current status and future perspectives of capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel capsule endoscopy (CE) was first introduced 15 years ago, and a large amount of literature has since been produced, focused on its indication, diagnostic yields, and safety. Guidelines that have made CE the primary diagnostic tool for small bowel disease have been created. Since its initial use in the small bowel, CE has been used for the esophagus, stomach, and colon. The primary indications for small bowel CE are obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, unexplained iron deficiency anemia, suspected Crohn's disease, small bowel tumors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug enteropathy, portal hypertensive enteropathy, celiac disease, etc. Colon CE provides an alternative to conventional colonoscopy, with possible use in colorectal cancer screening. Guidelines for optimal bowel preparation of CE have been suggested. The main challenges in CE are the development of new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for better visualization of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule, and the possibility of guiding and moving the capsule by an external motion controller. We review the current status and future directions of CE, and address all aspects of clinical practice, including the role of CE and long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:26884731

  20. Current status and future trends of medical physics in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin Nieto, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical Physics is an area that applies the principles of physics to medicine, particularly in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases using ionizing and nonionizing radiation. The main attractive of medical physics is that it has a direct impact on the quality and safety of medical care in humans; this social component with direct implications for the population is of high value for Mexico. This paper describes the concepts of medical physics, trends and the current status of this discipline as a profession, which is directly related to the efforts of clinical research. It is also described what is, in my opinion, the future of medical physics in Mexico, emphasizing the fact that this field requires a substantial boost from universities and hospitals to recruit highly qualified young medical physicists and the support from government agencies such as Secretaria de Salud, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado through clinical research projects that allow the necessary evolution of medical physics into the hospital setting.

  1. Veterinary public health in India: current status and future needs.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, S; Singh, B B

    2015-12-01

    Veterinary public health (VPH) assumes huge significance in developing countries such as India. However, the implementation of VPH services throughout the country is still in its infancy. From 1970 onwards, many institutes, national and international organisations, professional societies, policies and personalities have contributed towards the development of VPH in India. Nevertheless, there is an urgent need to develop VPH still further as there are many issues, such as high population density, the re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens, environmental pollution and antimicrobial resistance, that require attention. The time has surely come to involve all stakeholders, ranging from primary producers (e.g., farmers) to policy-makers, so as to garner support for the holistic implementation of VPH services in India. To improve VPH activities and services, science-based policies enforced through stringent regulation are required to improve human, animal and environmental health. The emergence of the 'One Health' concept has ushered in new hopes for the resurrection of VPH in India. Applying tools such as the World Organisation for Animal Health (OlE) Day One Competencies and the OlE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS Tool) is essential to improve the quality of national Veterinary Services and to identify gaps and weaknesses in service provision, which can be remedied to comply with the OlE international standards. VPH initiatives started modestly but they continue to grow. The present review is focused on the current status and future needs of VPH in India. PMID:27044147

  2. Collagen Cross-Linking: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Hovakimyan, Marine; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Stachs, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking (CXL) using UVA light and riboflavin (vitamin B2) was introduced as a clinical application to stabilize the cornea by inducing cross-links within and between collagen fibers. CXL has been investigated extensively and has been shown clinically to arrest the progression of keratoconic or post-LASIK ectasia. With its minimal cost, simplicity, and proven positive clinical outcome, CXL can be regarded as a useful approach to reduce the number of penetrating keratoplasties performed. Small case series have also indicated that CXL is beneficial in corneal edema by reducing stromal swelling behavior and in keratitis by inhibiting pathogen growth. Despite these encouraging results, CXL remains a relatively new method that is potentially associated with complications. Aspects such as side effects and recurrence rates have still to be elucidated. In light of the growing interest in CXL, our paper summarizes present knowledge about this promising approach. We have intentionally endeavored to include the more relevant studies from the recent literature to provide an overview of the current status of CXL. PMID:22288005

  3. Plague in Iran: its history and current status

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran. METHODS: In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred. RESULTS: This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today’s Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa. CONCLUSIONS: Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity. PMID:27457063

  4. [Current status of robotic surgery for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Suda, Koichi; Ishida, Yoshinori; Uyama, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    Robotic surgery was launched in Japan in 2000.In particular, the development of the da Vinci S Surgical System was a major breakthrough. It was introduced in Japan for the first time through our hospital in January 2009. Since then, the number of surgical robots used has been dramatically increasing, with up to approximately 160 robots all over the country. To date, we have performed more than 500 robotic surgeries, including 180 gastrectomies, at our hospital. Our data suggest that compared with the conventional laparoscopic approach, the use of the da Vinci Surgical System in minimally invasive gastrectomy for gastric cancer might improve short-term outcomes, particularly in terms of preventing postoperative local complications. Thus, we believe that use of surgical robots become increasingly beneficial for more extensive resections and operations that require more advanced skills, even though a couple of issues remain to be solved, such as long operative time, high cost, and limited experience and evidence. In this article, the current status and future perspectives regarding robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer are presented based on our experience and a review of the literature. PMID:25434438

  5. [Current status of surface water acidification in Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-yi; Kang, Rong-hua; Luo, Yao; Duan, Lei

    2013-05-01

    In order to evaluate the status of surface water acidification in Northeast China, chemical composition of 33 small streams was investigated in August, 2011. It was found that only a few waters located in Changbai Mountain had pH of lower than 6.0, and all waters had acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of higher than 0.2 meq x L(-1). This indicated that surface water acidification was not a regional environmental issue in Northeast China. HCO3- was the major anion, with SO4(2-) concentration mostly below 150 microeq x L(-1) and even much lower NO3- concentration. Low concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3- means no serious acid deposition in this area. However, the distribution of acidic forest soils, with low base cation weathering rate, could only provide limited buffering capacity for surface water to acidification in Northeast China, and the potential risk of water acidification still existed. Currently, acid deposition in Northeast Asia could hardly cause severe acidification of surface water. The neighboring countries should therefore not amplify the environmental impact by transboundary air pollutants from China.

  6. High-density matter: current status and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    There are many fascinating processes in the Universe which we observe in more and more in detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in the core-collapse supernova explosion, the one of the most violent events in the Universe. As the result, the densest objects in the Universe, neutron stars and/or black holes are created. Naturally, the physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. The current status of our knowledge of processes in the life of stars is far from adequate for their true understanding. We show that although many models have been constructed their detailed ability to describe observations is limited or non-existent. Furthermore the general failure of all models means that we cannot tell which are heading in the right direction. A possible way forward in modeling of high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC). This model has a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear forces and depends on very few adjustable parameters, strongly constrained by the underlying physics. Latest QMC results for compact objects and finite nuclei are presented.

  7. Current Status of Mimosa pigra L. Infestation in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Asyraf; Crawley, Micheal J.

    2011-01-01

    The status and distribution of Mimosa pigra L., a semi-aquatic invasive species in Peninsular Malaysia, were continuously assessed between 2004 and 2007. This assessment investigated its population stand density and related weed management activities. In total, 106 sites of 6 main habitat types i.e., construction site (CS), dam/ reservoir (DM), forest reserve (FR), plantation (PL), river bank/waterway (RB) and roadside (RD) were assessed, and 55 sites were recorded with M. pigra populations. A CS is the most likely habitat to be infested with M. pigra (16 out of 18 assessed sites have this weed), whereas none of the FR visited were found to harbour M. pigra. In terms of population stand density, 41 populations were in the low range of stand density (individual plant of ≤5 m−2), compared to only 9 populations in the high range of stand density (individual plant of >10 m−2). In general, the current impact of M. pigra infestation on natural habitats is relatively low, as its distribution is only confined to disturbed areas. However, continuous monitoring of this weed species is highly recommended, especially in the riparian zone and wetland habitats. PMID:24575208

  8. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  9. Current status of robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Obama, Kazutaka; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Although over 3000 da Vinci Surgical System (DVSS) devices have been installed worldwide, robotic surgery for gastric cancer has not yet become widely spread and is only available in several advanced institutions. This is because, at least in part, the advantages of robotic surgery for gastric cancer remain unclear. The safety and feasibility of robotic gastrectomy have been demonstrated in several retrospective studies. However, no sound evidence has been reported to support the superiority of a robotic approach for gastric cancer treatment. In addition, the long-term clinical outcomes following robotic gastrectomy have yet to be clarified. Nevertheless, a robotic approach can potentially overcome the disadvantages of conventional laparoscopic surgery if the advantageous functions of this technique are optimized, such as the use of wristed instruments, tremor filtering and high-resolution 3-D images. The potential advantages of robotic gastrectomy have been discussed in several retrospective studies, including the ability to achieve sufficient lymphadenectomy in the area of the splenic hilum, reductions in local complication rates and a shorter learning curve for the robotic approach compared to conventional laparoscopic gastrectomy. In this review, we present the current status and discuss issues regarding robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

  10. Pain behavior observation: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Keefe, F J

    2000-01-01

    Individuals who have pain engage in certain pain-related behaviors that tend to communicate their pain to others. There is growing recognition that the careful observation of such pain behaviors is an important component of a comprehensive pain assessment. This article provides an overview of the current status of behavioral observation methods used to assess pain behavior. The first half of this article describes and evaluates the most commonly used pain behavior observation methods. These include self-observation methods such as activity diaries, and direct observation methods such as the use of standard behavior sampling methods and naturalistic observation methods. The second half of the article discusses several important future clinical and research applications of pain behavior observation methods. The need to develop practical, clinical methods for incorporating pain behavior observation methods into practice settings is emphasized. Important future research topics include studying the social context of pain behavior (eg, by examining how spouses respond to displays of pain behavior), examining the predictive validity of pain behavior (ie, how observed pain behaviors predict future disability and impairment), and identifying pain behavior subgroups within heterogeneous chronic pain populations. Further development and refinement of pain behavior observation methods is likely to increase our understanding of the varied ways that patients adapt to persistent pain.

  11. [Current status of surface water acidification in Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-yi; Kang, Rong-hua; Luo, Yao; Duan, Lei

    2013-05-01

    In order to evaluate the status of surface water acidification in Northeast China, chemical composition of 33 small streams was investigated in August, 2011. It was found that only a few waters located in Changbai Mountain had pH of lower than 6.0, and all waters had acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of higher than 0.2 meq x L(-1). This indicated that surface water acidification was not a regional environmental issue in Northeast China. HCO3- was the major anion, with SO4(2-) concentration mostly below 150 microeq x L(-1) and even much lower NO3- concentration. Low concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3- means no serious acid deposition in this area. However, the distribution of acidic forest soils, with low base cation weathering rate, could only provide limited buffering capacity for surface water to acidification in Northeast China, and the potential risk of water acidification still existed. Currently, acid deposition in Northeast Asia could hardly cause severe acidification of surface water. The neighboring countries should therefore not amplify the environmental impact by transboundary air pollutants from China. PMID:23914517

  12. Current status and progress of pancreatic cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Quan-Jun; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is currently one of the most important public health problems in the world. Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with poor prognosis. As in most other countries, the health burden of pancreatic cancer in China is increasing, with annual mortality rates almost equal to incidence rates. The increasing trend of pancreatic cancer incidence is more significant in the rural areas than in the urban areas. Annual diagnoses and deaths of pancreatic cancer in China are now beyond the number of cases in the United States. GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates that cases in China account for 19.45% (65727/337872) of all newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer and 19.27% (63662/330391) of all deaths from pancreatic cancer worldwide. The population’s growing socioeconomic status contributes to the rapid increase of China’s proportional contribution to global rates. Here, we present an overview of control programs for pancreatic cancer in China focusing on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we describe key epidemiological, demographic, and socioeconomic differences between China and developed countries. Facts including no nationwide screening program for pancreatic cancer, delay in early detection resulting in a late stage at presentation, lack of awareness of pancreatic cancer in the Chinese population, and low investment compared with other cancer types by government have led to backwardness in China’s pancreatic cancer diagnosis and treatment. Finally, we suggest measures to improve health outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients in China. PMID:26185370

  13. Livestock in biomedical research: history, current status and future prospective.

    PubMed

    Polejaeva, Irina A; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Wells, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Livestock models have contributed significantly to biomedical and surgical advances. Their contribution is particularly prominent in the areas of physiology and assisted reproductive technologies, including understanding developmental processes and disorders, from ancient to modern times. Over the past 25 years, biomedical research that traditionally embraced a diverse species approach shifted to a small number of model species (e.g. mice and rats). The initial reasons for focusing the main efforts on the mouse were the availability of murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and genome sequence data. This powerful combination allowed for precise manipulation of the mouse genome (knockouts, knockins, transcriptional switches etc.) leading to ground-breaking discoveries on gene functions and regulation, and their role in health and disease. Despite the enormous contribution to biomedical research, mouse models have some major limitations. Their substantial differences compared with humans in body and organ size, lifespan and inbreeding result in pronounced metabolic, physiological and behavioural differences. Comparative studies of strategically chosen domestic species can complement mouse research and yield more rigorous findings. Because genome sequence and gene manipulation tools are now available for farm animals (cattle, pigs, sheep and goats), a larger number of livestock genetically engineered (GE) models will be accessible for biomedical research. This paper discusses the use of cattle, goats, sheep and pigs in biomedical research, provides an overview of transgenic technology in farm animals and highlights some of the beneficial characteristics of large animal models of human disease compared with the mouse. In addition, status and origin of current regulation of GE biomedical models is also reviewed.

  14. Current status of the laser diode array projector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Saylor, Daniel A.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes recent developments and the current status of the Laser Diode Array Projector (LDAP) Technology. The LDAP is a state-of-the-art dynamic infrared scene projector system capable of generating high resolution in-band infrared imagery at high frame rates. Three LDAPs are now operational at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command's (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC). These projectors have been used to support multiple Hardware-in-the-Loop test entries of various seeker configurations. Seeker configurations tested include an InSb 256 X $256 focal-plane array (FPA), an InSb 512 X 512 FPA, a PtSi 640 X 480 FPA, a PtSi 256 X 256 FPA, an uncooled 320 X 240 microbolometer FPA, and two dual field- of-view (FOV) seekers. Several improvements in the projector technology have been made since we last reported in 1997. The format size has been increased to 544 X 544, and 672 X 512, and it has been proven that the LDAP can be synchronized without a signal from the unit-under test (UUT). The control software has been enhanced to provide 'point and click' control for setup, calibration, image display, image capture, and data analysis. In addition, the first long-wave infrared (LWIR) LDAP is now operational, as well as a dual field of view LDAP which can change its FOV within 0.25 seconds. The projector is interfaced to a Silicon Graphics scene generation computer which is capable of real-time 3-D scene generation. Sample images generated with the projector and captured by an InSb FPA sensor are included in the text.

  15. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyu Sup

    2015-01-01

    Objective Great advances have been made in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby was born in Korea. This study was designed to report on the current status of ART therapy in South Korea between January 1 and December 31 of 2010. Methods A revised survey, originally developed by the International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies, was sent to all available ART centers via email in 2013. Fresh embryo transfer (FET) cases were categorized into standard IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injections. These cases, the thawing embryo transfer (TET) cases, and other related procedures were surveyed. Results Data from 30,785 ART procedures were provided by 78 clinics. Of the 28,200 cycles in which oocytes were retrieved, 92.2% of these cycles were completely transferred. In addition, 8,075 cycles were confirmed to be clinical pregnancies in the FET cycles, which represent a pregnancy rate of 28.6% per oocyte pick-up and 31.1% per embryo transfer. The most common number of embryos transferred in the FET was three embryos (37.3%) followed by two embryos (36.3%) and one embryo (14.0%). Of the 6,648 TET cycles transferred, 2,356 clinical pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography. The most common number of embryos in the TET group was two embryos (43.4%) followed by three embryos (25.4%) and one embryo (18.9%). Conclusion The clinical pregnancy rate per transfer in the FET cycles was similar in 2009 and 2010. Among the FET cycles where one or two embryos were transferred, the clinical pregnancy rate per transfer slightly increased from 2009 (28.7%) to 2010 (32.9%). PMID:25874168

  16. Genomic resources in fruit plants: an assessment of current status.

    PubMed

    Rai, Manoj K; Shekhawat, N S

    2015-01-01

    The availability of many genomic resources such as genome sequences, functional genomics resources including microarrays and RNA-seq, sufficient numbers of molecular markers, express sequence tags (ESTs) and high-density genetic maps is causing a rapid acceleration of genetics and genomic research of many fruit plants. This is leading to an increase in our knowledge of the genes that are linked to many horticultural and agronomically important traits. Recently, some progress has also been made on the identification and functional analysis of miRNAs in some fruit plants. This is one of the most active research fields in plant sciences. The last decade has witnessed development of genomic resources in many fruit plants such as apple, banana, citrus, grapes, papaya, pears, strawberry etc.; however, many of them are still not being exploited. Furthermore, owing to lack of resources, infrastructure and research facilities in many lesser-developed countries, development of genomic resources in many underutilized or less-studied fruit crops, which grow in these countries, is limited. Thus, research emphasis should be given to those fruit crops for which genomic resources are relatively scarce. The development of genomic databases of these less-studied fruit crops will enable biotechnologists to identify target genes that underlie key horticultural and agronomical traits. This review presents an overview of the current status of the development of genomic resources in fruit plants with the main emphasis being on genome sequencing, EST resources, functional genomics resources including microarray and RNA-seq, identification of quantitative trait loci and construction of genetic maps as well as efforts made on the identification and functional analysis of miRNAs in fruit plants.

  17. Autocollimators for Deflectometry: Current Status and Future Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-06-15

    The proliferation of autocollimator-based surface profilometers at synchrotron metrology laboratories worldwide necessitates a detailed understanding of the parameters influencing their angular response. A comprehensive overview of the current status of autocollimator characterization and calibration at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and its implications for their optimal application are provided, as well as information on future challenges and expected progress. Autocollimator-based deflectometric profilometers are in operation at the PTB, the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA, the BESSY II, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Germany, and the Diamond Light Source Ltd (DLS), UK. A continuous topic of research at the PTB is to investigate the factors influencing the angular response of autocollimators and to provide the most accurate calibration of the instruments to aid users in their application and manufacturers in their improvements [1-3]. At the PTB, the calibration of autocollimators is realized by a direct comparison of the devices with the primary angle reference standard [1]. With highly stable autocollimators, calibrations with standard measurement uncertainties of u = 0.003 arcsec (15 nrad) have been achieved [2,3]. The influence of a number of parameters on the angle measurement with autocollimators have been investigated in detail, such as the reflectivity of the surface under test (SUT), the diameter and shape of the aperture stop, its position both along the autocollimator's optical axis and perpendicular to it [2], as well as the optical path length of the autocollimator beam [3]. Extensive information on these errors and their minimization will be presented.

  18. Applicability of RNA interference in cancer therapy: Current status.

    PubMed

    Maduri, S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a manifestation of dysregulated gene function arising from a complex interplay of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes present in our body. Cancer has been constantly chased using various therapies but all in vain as most of them are highly effective only in the early stages of cancer. Recently, RNA interference (RNAi) therapy, a comparatively new entrant is evolving as a promising player in the battle against cancer due to its post-transcriptional gene silencing ability. The most alluring feature of this non-invasive technology lies in its utility in the cancer detection and the cancer treatment at any stage. Once this technology is fully exploited it can bring a whole new era of therapeutics capable of curing cancer at any stage mainly due to its ability to target the vital processes required for cell proliferation such as response to growth factors, nutrient uptake/synthesis, and energy generation. This therapy can also be used to treat stage IV cancer, the most difficult to treat till date, by virtue of its metastasis inhibiting capability. Recent research has also proved that cancer can even be prevented by proper modulation of physiological RNAi pathways and researchers have found that many nutrients, which are a part of routine diet, can effectively modulate these pathways and prevent cancer. Even after having all these advantages the potential of RNAi therapy could not be fully tapped earlier, due to many limitations associated with the administration of RNAi based therapeutics. However, recent advancements in this direction, such as the development of small interfering RNA (siRNA) tolerant to nucleases and the development of non-viral vectors such as cationic liposomes and nanoparticles, can overcome this obstacle and facilitate the clinical use of RNAi based therapeutics in the treatment of cancer. The present review focuses on the current status of RNAi therapeutics and explores their potential as future diagnostics and therapeutics against

  19. Current status of stroke epidemiology in Greece: a panorama.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadis, Angelo V; Zikić, Milorad

    2014-01-01

    Although strokes have been documented since about 3 millennia, they remain today as one of the leading causes of mortality, as well as of subsequent serious long-term physical and mental morbidity, among patients in many different countries all over the world. Greece presents an increase in mortality rates according to World Health Organization, and this fact underlines the need for early diagnosis and treatment, as well as, the need to implement effective prevention strategies for strokes. This review makes an effort to describe the current status of stroke epidemiological features, as well as to present the risk factors prevalent in Greece. The incidence rate is 261-319/100,000 based on the recent population based registry. Stroke appears to be more prevalent in men than in women, and the mean age of stroke onset in Greece is at 70 years of age. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors of stroke in the Greek population, while smoking is the most commonly documented modifiable risk factor in young adults with ischemic stroke. Similar to other parts of the world, ischemic stroke is the most common stroke type. The 28-day case fatality rate for men and women was 26.5%. The mean in-hospital cost per stroke patient was 3624.9 € and the mean rehabilitation cost of outpatients with stroke was 5553.3 €, while the cost proportion of hemorrhagic stroke is higher when compared to ischemic stroke. Stroke is a devastating condition with recognized challenges in identifying effective prevention programs. In Greece, limited data exists regarding the epidemiology of strokes. As a result, the need to conduct new studies and researches across the country is well documented.

  20. CURRENT STATUS OF INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRIC MONITORING IN UKRAINE.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Deniachenko, N; Makarovska, O; Mihailescu, L-C; Prykhodko, A; Voloskyi, V; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    About 50 000 workers are being occupationally exposed to radiation in Ukraine. Individual dosimetric monitoring (IDM) is provided by 77 dosimetry services and laboratories of very different scale with a number of monitored workers ranging from several persons to ∼9000. In the present work, the current status of personal dosimetry in Ukraine was studied. The First National Intercomparison (FNI) of the IDM labs was accompanied by a survey of the laboratory operation in terms of coverage, types of dosimetry provided, instrumentation and methodologies used, metrological support, data recording, etc. Totally, 34 laboratories responded to the FNI call, and 18 services with 19 different personal dosimetry systems took part in the intercomparison exercise providing 24 dosimeters each for blind irradiation to photons of 6 different qualities (ISO N-series X-rays, S-Cs and S-Co sources) in a dose range of 5-60 mSv. Performance of the dosimetry labs was evaluated according to ISO 14146 criteria of matching trumpet curves with H0 = 0.2 mSv. The test revealed that 8 of the 19 systems meet ISO 14146 criteria in full, 5 other labs show marginal performance and 6 laboratories demonstrated catastrophic quality of dosimetric results. Altogether, 18 participating labs provide dosimetric monitoring to 37 477 workers (about three-fourths of all occupationally exposed workers), usually on monthly (nuclear industry) or quarterly (rest of applications) basis. Of this number, 20 664 persons (55 %) receive completely adequate individual monitoring, and the number of personnel receiving IDM of inadequate quality counts 3054 persons. PMID:26979804

  1. Current status of stroke epidemiology in Greece: a panorama.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadis, Angelo V; Zikić, Milorad

    2014-01-01

    Although strokes have been documented since about 3 millennia, they remain today as one of the leading causes of mortality, as well as of subsequent serious long-term physical and mental morbidity, among patients in many different countries all over the world. Greece presents an increase in mortality rates according to World Health Organization, and this fact underlines the need for early diagnosis and treatment, as well as, the need to implement effective prevention strategies for strokes. This review makes an effort to describe the current status of stroke epidemiological features, as well as to present the risk factors prevalent in Greece. The incidence rate is 261-319/100,000 based on the recent population based registry. Stroke appears to be more prevalent in men than in women, and the mean age of stroke onset in Greece is at 70 years of age. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors of stroke in the Greek population, while smoking is the most commonly documented modifiable risk factor in young adults with ischemic stroke. Similar to other parts of the world, ischemic stroke is the most common stroke type. The 28-day case fatality rate for men and women was 26.5%. The mean in-hospital cost per stroke patient was 3624.9 € and the mean rehabilitation cost of outpatients with stroke was 5553.3 €, while the cost proportion of hemorrhagic stroke is higher when compared to ischemic stroke. Stroke is a devastating condition with recognized challenges in identifying effective prevention programs. In Greece, limited data exists regarding the epidemiology of strokes. As a result, the need to conduct new studies and researches across the country is well documented. PMID:25482257

  2. Support for international agricultural research: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, Robert S; Mohanty, Samarendu

    2010-11-30

    The success of the first Green Revolution in the form of abundant food supplies and low prices over the past two decades has diverted the world's attention from agriculture to other pressing issues. This has resulted in lower support for the agricultural research work primarily undertaken by the 15 research centers of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). The total support in real dollars for most of the last three decades has been more or less flat although the number of centers increased from 4 to 15. However, since 2000, the funding situation has improved for the CGIAR centers, with almost all the increase coming from grants earmarked for specific research projects. Even for some centers such as the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), the downward trend continued as late as 2006 with the budget in real dollars reaching the 1978 level of support. The recent food crisis has renewed the call for a second Green Revolution by revitalizing yield growth to feed the world in the face of growing population and a shrinking land base for agricultural use. The slowdown in yield growth because of decades of neglect in agricultural research and infrastructure development has been identified as the underlying reason for the recent food crisis. For the second Green Revolution to be successful, the CGIAR centers will have to play a complex role by expanding productivity in a sustainable manner with fewer resources. Thus, it is crucial to examine the current structure of support for the CGIAR centers and identify the challenges ahead in terms of source and end use of funds for the success of the second Green Revolution. The objective of this paper is to provide a historical perspective on the support to the CGIAR centers and to examine the current status of funding, in particular, the role of project-specific grants in rebuilding capacity of these centers. The paper will also discuss the nature of the support (unrestricted vs. project

  3. The current status of forensic science laboratory accreditation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Malkoc, Ekrem; Neuteboom, Wim

    2007-04-11

    Forensic science is gaining some solid ground in the area of effective crime prevention, especially in the areas where more sophisticated use of available technology is prevalent. All it takes is high-level cooperation among nations that can help them deal with criminality that adopts a cross-border nature more and more. It is apparent that cooperation will not be enough on its own and this development will require a network of qualified forensic laboratories spread over Europe. It is argued in this paper that forensic science laboratories play an important role in the fight against crime. Another, complimentary argument is that forensic science laboratories need to be better involved in the fight against crime. For this to be achieved, a good level of cooperation should be established and maintained. It is also noted that harmonization is required for such cooperation and seeking accreditation according to an internationally acceptable standard, such as ISO/IEC 17025, will eventually bring harmonization as an end result. Because, ISO/IEC 17025 as an international standard, has been a tool that helps forensic science laboratories in the current trend towards accreditation that can be observed not only in Europe, but also in the rest of the world of forensic science. In the introduction part, ISO/IEC 17025 states that "the acceptance of testing and calibration results between countries should be facilitated if laboratories comply with this international standard and if they obtain accreditation from bodies which have entered into mutual recognition agreements with equivalent bodies in other countries using this international standard." Furthermore, it is emphasized that the use of this international standard will assist in the harmonization of standards and procedures. The background of forensic science cooperation in Europe will be explained by using an existing European forensic science network, i.e. ENFSI, in order to understand the current status of forensic

  4. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  5. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  6. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  7. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  8. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  9. Current Status of the Problem of Cosmological Variability of Fundamental Physical Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshslovich, D.A.; Ivanchik, A.V.; Orlov, A.V.; Potekhin, A.Y.; Petitjean, P.

    We review the current status of the problem of cosmological variability of fundamental physical constants, provided by modern laboratory experiments, Oklo phenomena analysis, and especially astronomical observations.

  10. The current status of amphibian and reptile ecotoxicological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Bishop, C.A.; Linder, G.; Sparling, Donald W.; Linder, Greg L.; Bishop, Christine A.

    2000-01-01

    The extent of research conducted on the effects of contaminants on reptiles and amphibians has been scant compared to that of other vertebrate classes including fishes, birds and mammals. In a review of literature from 1972 until 1998 we found that only about 2.7% of the papers published on ecotoxicology in vertebrates concerned amphibians and 1.4% for reptiles. Most studies on amphibian ecotoxicology were on metals, pesticides, and acid deposition. For reptiles the greatest frequency of papers included metals, organochlorines, and others. In proportion to the taxonomic importance, far more papers were written on turtles than on other reptile orders. Most of the papers dealt with residues and very few dealt with effects of contaminant exposure.

  11. Current Status of Suomi NPP VIIRS Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.; Liu, H.; Zhang, H.; Huang, J.; Remer, L. A.; Ciren, P.; Huang, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was launched on October 28, 2011. It provides Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at two different spatial resolutions: a pixel level (~750 m at nadir) product called the Intermediate Product (IP) and an aggregated (~6 km at nadir) product called the Environmental Data Record (EDR). The VIIRS AOT is expected to provide continuity to the 10-km Aqua and Terra MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOT products that the air quality and public health community has been using. The VIIRS aerosol product suite also includes less mature products such as Suspended Matter (SM) and Aerosol Particle Size Parameter (APSP). An extensive validation of VIIRS best quality aerosol products with ground based L1.5 AERONET data shows that the AOT EDR product has an accuracy/precision of -0.01/0.11 and 0.01/0.08 over land and ocean respectively. Globally, VIIRS mean AOT EDR (0.20) is similar to Aqua MODIS (0.16) with some important regional and seasonal differences. Analysis of SM shows that the algorithm predominantly picks smoke both over land and ocean which is not in agreement with retrievals from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Space Observations (CALIPSO). Similarly, the Angstrom Exponent (AE) retrieval used as a proxy for particle size has no skill over land and only a marginal skill over ocean when compared to AERONET; although a bias of ~0.2 for over ocean retrievals meets specification (0.3), the correlation is low and the standard deviation is ~0.6 and does not meet specification (0.3). This evaluation places the VIIRS AOT product at the provisional maturity level (product is validated, may contain some errors, and ready for operational evaluation). However, several algorithm updates which include a better approach to retrieve surface reflectance are forthcoming. Current status of the aerosol

  12. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Harpreet S; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer's Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  13. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet S.; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  14. Current status of the HIBMC and results of representative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Niwa, Yasue; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Terashima, Kazuki; Arimura, Takeshi; Mima, Masayuki; Maeda, Takuya; Akagi, Takashi; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Baba, Masashi

    2009-07-25

    The proton radiotherapy (PRT) has been spreading, since 1990 when 250 MeV proton beams with rotation gantry was developed for medical use. On the other hand, carbon-ion radiotherapy (CRT) that has both physical and biological features is available at 4 facilities in the world. HIBMC is the only facility to be able to use both particles. From Apr 2001 to Dec 2008, 2486 patients were treated with PRT in 2030 patients or with CRT in 456. Treatment to the Head and Neck (H and N: in 405 patients), the lung (245), the liver (371), and the prostatic carcinoma (1059) was a major subject. The 2-year local control rates is 72% in H and N (n = 163, T1:9, T2:18, T3:36, T4:79, malignant melanoma 48, adenoid cystic carcinoma 35, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) 32, adenocarcinoma 14, others 34), 88% in lung (n = 116, T1:59, T2:42, T3:4, T4:6, SCC 30, adenocarcinoma 59, others 27), and 89% in liver cancer (n = 153, Proton: 130, carbon: 23). Biochemical disease free 3-year survival of 291 prostate cancer is 100% in 9 patients with initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level < = 4 ng/ml, 99% in 140 with PSA 4.1-10 ng/ml, 90% in 71 with PSA 10.1-20 ng/ml, and 79% in 71 with PSA>20 ng/ml. These results are excellent comparable or superior to those of surgery. Thus, particle therapy is sophisticated radiotherapy, however the only problem to prohibit the progress is high costs for construction and maintenance. Facilities at which both proton and carbon ion beams can be used, including the HIBMC, have to investigate the differential use. We started clinical randomized trial to compare both ion beams, and started biological examinations in a project aiming at the development of a laser driven proton radiotherapy. We stated about the current status of the HIBMC and the results of representative diseases.

  15. Current status of the HIBMC and results of representative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Niwa, Yasue; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Terashima, Kazuki; Arimura, Takeshi; Mima, Masayuki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Maeda, Takuya; Baba, Masashi; Akagi, Takashi; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2009-07-01

    The proton radiotherapy (PRT) has been spreading, since 1990 when 250 MeV proton beams with rotation gantry was developed for medical use. On the other hand, carbon-ion radiotherapy (CRT) that has both physical and biological features is available at 4 facilities in the world. HIBMC is the only facility to be able to use both particles. From Apr 2001 to Dec 2008, 2486 patients were treated with PRT in 2030 patients or with CRT in 456. Treatment to the Head and Neck (H&N: in 405 patients), the lung (245), the liver (371), and the prostatic carcinoma (1059) was a major subject. The 2-year local control rates is 72% in H&N (n = 163, T1:9, T2:18, T3:36, T4:79, malignant melanoma 48, adenoid cystic carcinoma 35, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) 32, adenocarcinoma 14, others 34), 88% in lung (n = 116, T1:59, T2:42, T3:4, T4:6, SCC 30, adenocarcinoma 59, others 27), and 89% in liver cancer (n = 153, Proton: 130, carbon: 23). Biochemical disease free 3-year survival of 291 prostate cancer is 100% in 9 patients with initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level < = 4 ng/ml, 99% in 140 with PSA 4.1-10 ng/ml, 90% in 71 with PSA 10.1-20 ng/ml, and 79% in 71 with PSA>20 ng/ml. These results are excellent comparable or superior to those of surgery. Thus, particle therapy is sophisticated radiotherapy, however the only problem to prohibit the progress is high costs for construction and maintenance. Facilities at which both proton and carbon ion beams can be used, including the HIBMC, have to investigate the differential use. We started clinical randomized trial to compare both ion beams, and started biological examinations in a project aiming at the development of a laser driven proton radiotherapy. We stated about the current status of the HIBMC and the results of representative diseases.

  16. Current status of the Fly's Eye Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meszaros, Laszlo; Pál, András; Jasko, Attila; Vida, Krisztián; Oláh, Katalin; Csepany, Gergely

    2015-08-01

    In this presentation we summarize the current status of the Fly's Eye project. This project aims to provide a low resolution and multiple-passband full-sky survey with an imaging cadence of a few minutes. Based on our earlier tests, we found that a novel type of astronomical telescope mount on a hexapod platform can provide the accuracy of sidereal tracking needed by our instrumentation. The fully configured Fly's Eye device contains 19 wide-field cameras equipped with fast focal ratio optics which are arranged in a mosaic form and have an effective resolution of 20 arcseconds per pixel. The scientific goal of this project is to continuously monitor stellar brightness variations in the full Sloan photometric system down to the magnitude of r=15 or the limit of apparent stellar confusion. The data acquisition will then cover roughly 6 magnitudes of the time domain, from the scales of minutes up to the several years of planned operations. Fly's Eye data yield is complementary to that of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope since the saturation magnitude of LSST is close to the faint limit of the Fly's Eye setup.One of the main scientific yields of this survey is to recover time-domains of photometric variability of stars with magnetic activity. These timescales range from minutes through hours to years, just like in the case of the Sun. If active stars are monitored continuously, the measurements will give us data in the broad time range of the magnetic phenomena. By now, the Sun is the only active star, on which we have full picture of the manifestation of the magnetic field. In the solar active nests spots, faculae, plages and flares are observed and their spatial correlation studied. The Fly's Eye device allows similar research on different kinds of active stars individually, observing in five bandpasses from ultraviolet to near-infrared (365 to 900 nm) which is unprecedented. The results give us a broader view of the magnetic activity of stars of different ages

  17. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet S.; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  18. Current Trends in Treatment of Status Epilepticus and Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Betjemann, John P

    2015-12-01

    Status epilepticus is a heterogeneous disorder with varied definitions and presentations. Taken together, all forms of status epilepticus carry significant morbidity and mortality, much of which is dictated by the underlying etiology. Generalized convulsive status epilepticus, which represents a common form, is a true neurologic emergency that requires emergent management. Treatment focuses on stabilizing the patient and aggressive medical management to achieve the timely termination of seizures. For other forms of status epilepticus including nonconvulsive and focal status epilepticus, the goal remains early seizure termination, but the use of intravenous medications should be weighed against the risks associated with these therapies. The diagnostic evaluation of status epilepticus is guided by the patient's history and should be broad, including a screen for toxins, electrolytes, structural abnormalities, and central nervous system infectious and autoimmune/inflammatory etiologies. Considerable research is still needed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms, consequences, and therapy of status epilepticus.

  19. Weight status and body image perceptions in adolescents: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Dana K; Reel, Justine J; Greenleaf, Christy

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence represents a pivotal stage in the development of positive or negative body image. Many influences exist during the teen years including transitions (eg, puberty) that affect one's body shape, weight status, and appearance. Weight status exists along a spectrum between being obese (ie, where one's body weight is in the 95th percentile for age and gender) to being underweight. Salient influences on body image include the media, which can target adolescents, and peers who help shape beliefs about the perceived body ideal. Internalization of and pressures to conform to these socially prescribed body ideals help to explain associations between weight status and body image. The concepts of fat talk and weight-related bullying during adolescence greatly contribute to an overemphasis on body weight and appearance as well as the development of negative body perceptions and dissatisfaction surrounding specific body parts. This article provides an overview of the significance of adolescent development in shaping body image, the relationship between body image and adolescent weight status, and the consequences of having a negative body image during adolescence (ie, disordered eating, eating disorders, and dysfunctional exercise). Practical implications for promoting a healthy weight status and positive body image among adolescents will be discussed. PMID:26347007

  20. Weight status and body image perceptions in adolescents: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Dana K; Reel, Justine J; Greenleaf, Christy

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence represents a pivotal stage in the development of positive or negative body image. Many influences exist during the teen years including transitions (eg, puberty) that affect one's body shape, weight status, and appearance. Weight status exists along a spectrum between being obese (ie, where one's body weight is in the 95th percentile for age and gender) to being underweight. Salient influences on body image include the media, which can target adolescents, and peers who help shape beliefs about the perceived body ideal. Internalization of and pressures to conform to these socially prescribed body ideals help to explain associations between weight status and body image. The concepts of fat talk and weight-related bullying during adolescence greatly contribute to an overemphasis on body weight and appearance as well as the development of negative body perceptions and dissatisfaction surrounding specific body parts. This article provides an overview of the significance of adolescent development in shaping body image, the relationship between body image and adolescent weight status, and the consequences of having a negative body image during adolescence (ie, disordered eating, eating disorders, and dysfunctional exercise). Practical implications for promoting a healthy weight status and positive body image among adolescents will be discussed.

  1. Weight status and body image perceptions in adolescents: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, Dana K; Reel, Justine J; Greenleaf, Christy

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence represents a pivotal stage in the development of positive or negative body image. Many influences exist during the teen years including transitions (eg, puberty) that affect one’s body shape, weight status, and appearance. Weight status exists along a spectrum between being obese (ie, where one’s body weight is in the 95th percentile for age and gender) to being underweight. Salient influences on body image include the media, which can target adolescents, and peers who help shape beliefs about the perceived body ideal. Internalization of and pressures to conform to these socially prescribed body ideals help to explain associations between weight status and body image. The concepts of fat talk and weight-related bullying during adolescence greatly contribute to an overemphasis on body weight and appearance as well as the development of negative body perceptions and dissatisfaction surrounding specific body parts. This article provides an overview of the significance of adolescent development in shaping body image, the relationship between body image and adolescent weight status, and the consequences of having a negative body image during adolescence (ie, disordered eating, eating disorders, and dysfunctional exercise). Practical implications for promoting a healthy weight status and positive body image among adolescents will be discussed. PMID:26347007

  2. MELiSSA Food Characterization general approach and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihreter, Martin; Chaerle, Laury; Secco, Benjamin; Molders, Katrien; van der Straeten, Dominique; Duliere, Eric; Pieters, Serge; Maclean, Heather; Dochain, Denis; Quinet, Muriel; Lutts, Stanley; Graham, Thomas; Stasiak, Michael; Rondeau Vuk, Theresa; Zheng, Youbin; Dixon, Mike; Laniau, Martine; Larreture, Alain; Timsit, Michel; Aronne, Giovanna; Barbieri, Giancarlo; Buonomo, Roberta; Veronica; Paradiso, Roberta; de Pascale, Stafania; Galbiati, Massimo; Troia, A. R.; Nobili, Matteo; Bucchieri, Lorenzo; Page, Valérie; Feller, Urs; Lasseur, Christophe

    . Available MELiSSA closed environment crop growth data were used to develop a first photosynthetic model representing the basic carbon fixation mechanisms. This model will be further elaborated in the course of this study to predict yield, oxygen production and transpi-ration. As an ultimate goal the model is intended to simulate the composition of the different plant organs (root, shoot, fruit/seed or tuber) for each crop under various conditions. For the validation of this model an extensive amount of data sets are needed. Current plant growth bench test setups will provide part of the required data. To gain more precise and detailed datasets, a highly closed plant growth chamber (Plant Characterization Unit, PCU) is under development. The PCU will provide accurate mass balances for carbon, water, oxygen and other elements with statistical reliability. This reliability is achieved through a high degree of closure and environment homogeneity. The PCU will also provide data for the above described plant characterization studies. The general work approach, the current status and future steps will be illustrated.

  3. Urinary tract stones--Part II: current status of treatment.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, C; Anson, K M; Patel, U

    2003-06-01

    The majority of renal and ureteric stones are now managed by minimally invasive techniques, for example nephrostomy, ureteral stents, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A multi-disciplinary approach is necessary, and this review examines the status of modern stone therapy and the contribution of the radiology department.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

  5. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, JC

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. Current status and perspectives of synchrotron radiation in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1996-11-01

    The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x-ray source for many medical applications. The present status of synchrotron angiography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy at laboratories around the world is reviewed and some future projections for these applications are addressed.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. Current Status of Teacher Shortage in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capa, Yesim; Loadman, William E.; Bryant, B. J.

    Every year the American Association of Employment in Education (AAEE) conducts a survey of the status of teacher supply and demand in the United States. In 2001, the 25th annual survey sent a survey instrument to 1,265 teacher preparation institutions to study the supply side of teacher availability, and responses were received from 494…

  16. The Current Status of Women Professors in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Haiqing

    1992-01-01

    Presents statistics on the status of female faculty members in China. Reports that in 1987, women comprised just over nine percent of the faculty. Indicates that women are most prevalent in the medical sciences and agronomy but scarcest in engineering and law. Predicts that more women will enter higher education careers. (SG)

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2006

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - December 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - August 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - July 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-02

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. Current status and future plans for NBS radiometric source standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostkowski, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    The accuracy and long-term stability of currently available NBS radiometric source standards are described. Current research efforts and expected results in this area are outlined. There are over ten NBS radiometric source standards currently available or under development that are of interest for solar measurements or for remote sensing of the earth. The standards and sources are classified and described in terms of the radiometric quantities they represent -- spectral radiance, spectral irradiance and irradiance.

  13. CURRENT STATUS OF ADVACATE PROCESS FOR FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The following report discusses current bench- and pilot-plant advances in preparation of ADVAnced siliCATE (ADVACATE) calcium silicate sorbentsfor flue gas desulfurization. It also discusses current bench- and pilot-plant advances in sorbent preparation. Fly ash was ground in a l...

  14. State Profiles: Current Status of Public Sector Labor Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labor Management Services Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Div. of Public Employee Labor Relations.

    This guide summarizes the coverage of public employees by state labor relations laws. For each state, the guide describes legal provisions, current situation, and current legislative activity. The report also includes data on population, public employment, work stoppages, and state revenues and expenditures. Agencies useful in gathering and…

  15. Biofuel production from microalgae as feedstock: current status and potential.

    PubMed

    Han, Song-Fang; Jin, Wen-Biao; Tu, Ren-Jie; Wu, Wei-Min

    2015-06-01

    Algal biofuel has become an attractive alternative of petroleum-based fuels in the past decade. Microalgae have been proposed as a feedstock to produce biodiesel, since they are capable of mitigating CO2 emission and accumulating lipids with high productivity. This article is an overview of the updated status of biofuels, especially biodiesel production from microalgae including fundamental research, culture selection and engineering process development; it summarizes research on mathematical and life cycle modeling on algae growth and biomass production; and it updates global efforts of research and development and commercialization attempts. The major challenges are also discussed.

  16. The current status of the U.S. MTBE industry

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews the status of the MTBE industry from its beginnings as a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments and the need for the use of oxygenates in non-attainment areas. During 1990--93 three world scale merchant plants were constructed and in 1994 two more were brought on stream. The paper tabulates reasons why MTBE gained the lion`s share of the oxygenates market. Finally the paper discusses the problems that now plague the industry and their causes.

  17. Current Status and Future Technical Challenges for Tokamak Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N; Minervini, J; Okuno, K; Salpiero, E; Filatov, O

    2002-11-11

    Magnet technology for fusion in the last decade has been focusing mostly on the development of magnets for tokamaks--the most advanced fusion concept at the moment. The largest and the most complex tokamak under development is ITER. To demonstrate adequate design approaches to large magnets for ITER and to develop industrial capabilities, two large model coils and three insert coils, all using full-scale conductor, were built and tested by the international collaboration during 1994-2002. The status of the magnet technology and directions of future developments are discussed in this paper.

  18. Advanced Aerospace Tribological Systems - Current Status and Future Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The state of the art of space and aeronautics tribology, the current and future technology problems, and perceived needs for future missions are discussed. Mechanisms of liquid and solid lubrication, and liquid- and solid-lubrication factors are examined. Such current and future tribological problem areas as aerospace plane, space simulation, and accelerated testing are addressed. Consideration is also given to the following novel lubrication technologies: inerted lubrication systems, mist lubrication, vapor deposition, catalytically gas-generated carbon, dense thin films of solid lubricants, powder lubrication, and gas and magnetic bearings. Recommendations for ensuring the success of current and future space and aeronautics missions are presented.

  19. Status of high transport current ROEBEL assembled coated conductor cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldacker, Wilfried; Frank, Antje; Kudymow, Andrej; Heller, Reinhard; Kling, Andrea; Terzieva, Stanimira; Schmidt, Curt

    2009-03-01

    Assembling coated conductors (CC) into flat ROEBEL bars (RACC cable) was introduced in 2005 by the authors as a practicable method of reaching high transport currents in a low AC loss cable, which is a cable design suited for application in windings. The transport current of 1.02 kA in self-field at 77 K achieved so far, however, is still too low for several applications in electrical machinery such as larger transformers and generators/motors. A new cable concept for further increased currents was presented just recently. The goal of the new design was primarily to demonstrate the possibility of strongly increased transport currents without changing the important cable features for low AC losses. such as, for example, the transposition length of the strands. We present detailed investigations of the properties of this progressed cable design, which has threefold layered strands, an unchanged transposition pitch of 18.8 cm and finally the application of 45 coated conductors in the cable. A 1.1 m long sample (equivalent to six transposition lengths) was prepared from commercial Cu stabilized coated conductors purchased from Superpower. The measured new record DC transport current of the cable was 2628 A at 77 K in self-field (5 µV cm-1 criterion). The use of three slightly different current carrying batches of strand material (± 10%) was a special feature of the cable, which allowed for interesting investigations of current redistribution effects in the cable, by monitoring a representative strand of each batch during the critical current measurement. Although current redistribution effects showed a complex situation, the behaviour of the cable was found to be absolutely stable under all operational conditions, even above the critical current. The high self-field degradation of the critical current reached the order of 60% at 77 K, and could be modelled satisfactory with calculations based on a proven Biot-Savart-law approach, adapted to the specific boundary

  20. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Targeting to the hair follicles: current status and potential.

    PubMed

    Wosicka, Hanna; Cal, Krzysztof

    2010-02-01

    The pilosebaceous unit is a complex structure that undergoes a specific growth cycle and comprises a few important drug targeting sites. For example, drugs can be targeted to the bulge region with stem cells or to the sebaceous glands. Interest in pilosebaceous units is directed towards their utilization as reservoirs for localized therapy and also as a transport pathway for systemic drug delivery. Improved investigative methods, such as differential stripping, are being developed in order to determine follicular penetration. This article reviews relevant aspects of effective follicle-targeting formulations and delivery systems as well as the activity status of hair follicles, and variations in follicle size and distribution throughout various body regions. Each of these factors strongly affects follicular permeation. We provide examples of improved penetration of particle-based formulations and of a size-dependent manner of follicular penetration. Contradictions are also discussed, indicating the need for detailed future investigations. PMID:20060268

  2. Current Status of the GRACE Follow-On Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael; Flechtner, Frank; Webb, Frank; Landerer, Felix; Grunwald, Ludwig

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE Follow-On Mission has now advanced to the Assembly and Test Phase with the delivery of essentially all satellite subsystems and science instruments. As of the time of this abstract submission, the team continues to plan launch in 2017. The project team is conducting tests of satellite and instrument operation and performance and putting together updated simulations of expected performance on-orbit, including intersatellite ranging (both microwave and laser), accelerometer, thermal variability and deformation, and other errors. In addition, all required ground analysis software of the Science Data System is in development and testing at JPL, The UTCSR, and GFZ, in preparation for fully integrated end-to-end (international) testing from Level-1 through Level-3 data in the coming year. In this presentation, we will provide the detailed status of project integration and test, the latest simulations of science performance, and schedule for remaining project milestones.

  3. Current status of DNA vaccines in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B R

    2000-09-15

    DNA vaccination entails administration of the DNA itself encoding antigen to direct synthesis of the antigen directly in the target organism. The target organism's immune system recognizes the antigen, and generates humoral (antibody)- and/or cell-mediated immune response. DNA vaccines afford numerous advantages over conventional vaccines, including ease of production, stability and transport. They overcome the need to cultivate dangerous infectious agents, and provide a possibility to vaccinate against multiple pathogens in a single shot. DNA vaccination is beginning to be explored for many pathogens of veterinary interest. The status of DNA vaccines in poultry, livestock and companion animals is reviewed here. While examples of DNA vaccines being tested in the veterinary field are not numerous, the early studies highlight the potential DNA vaccinology offers in veterinary medicine.

  4. Current status of Clonorchis sinensis and clonorchiasis in China.

    PubMed

    Lai, De-Hua; Hong, Xiao-Kun; Su, Bi-Xiu; Liang, Chi; Hide, Geoff; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Xinbing; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The oriental liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, a pathogen causing clonorchiasis, is of major socio-economic importance in East Asia, including China, Korea and Vietnam. This parasite is now recognized as a biocarcinogen strongly linked to cholangiocarcinoma in humans. Here, we describe the status of clonorchiasis in China, where it has been estimated that more than 15 million patients are affected. This paper also summarizes the major advances in the field of clonorchiasis research during last decade, including diagnosis techniques, pathogenesis and genome/transcriptome/proteome studies in the last years. We strongly hope that our work can stimulate the governments of the countries or regions where clonorchiasis is endemic to pay more attention to this disease and establish related guidelines to prevent and control it. PMID:26740359

  5. Targeting to the hair follicles: current status and potential.

    PubMed

    Wosicka, Hanna; Cal, Krzysztof

    2010-02-01

    The pilosebaceous unit is a complex structure that undergoes a specific growth cycle and comprises a few important drug targeting sites. For example, drugs can be targeted to the bulge region with stem cells or to the sebaceous glands. Interest in pilosebaceous units is directed towards their utilization as reservoirs for localized therapy and also as a transport pathway for systemic drug delivery. Improved investigative methods, such as differential stripping, are being developed in order to determine follicular penetration. This article reviews relevant aspects of effective follicle-targeting formulations and delivery systems as well as the activity status of hair follicles, and variations in follicle size and distribution throughout various body regions. Each of these factors strongly affects follicular permeation. We provide examples of improved penetration of particle-based formulations and of a size-dependent manner of follicular penetration. Contradictions are also discussed, indicating the need for detailed future investigations.

  6. Current status of Clonorchis sinensis and clonorchiasis in China.

    PubMed

    Lai, De-Hua; Hong, Xiao-Kun; Su, Bi-Xiu; Liang, Chi; Hide, Geoff; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Xinbing; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The oriental liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, a pathogen causing clonorchiasis, is of major socio-economic importance in East Asia, including China, Korea and Vietnam. This parasite is now recognized as a biocarcinogen strongly linked to cholangiocarcinoma in humans. Here, we describe the status of clonorchiasis in China, where it has been estimated that more than 15 million patients are affected. This paper also summarizes the major advances in the field of clonorchiasis research during last decade, including diagnosis techniques, pathogenesis and genome/transcriptome/proteome studies in the last years. We strongly hope that our work can stimulate the governments of the countries or regions where clonorchiasis is endemic to pay more attention to this disease and establish related guidelines to prevent and control it.

  7. Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Au, Jennifer S.; Frenette, Catherine T.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. This cancer commonly arises against a background of chronic liver disease. As a result, a patient with HCC requires multidisciplinary care. Treatment options vary widely based on tumor burden and metastases. The most widely utilized staging system is the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system, which recommends treatments based on tumor size and the underlying liver disease and functional status of the patient. Treatment options range from surgical resection or transplantation to locoregional therapies with modalities such as radiofrequency ablation and transarterial chemoembolization to systemic chemotherapies. Future care involves the development of combination therapies that afford the best tumor response, further clarification of the patients best suited for therapies and the development of new oral chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26087860

  8. STS operations planning - Current status and outlook for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to the status of Space Shuttle operations planning and outlook for the period 1982-94, with some speculations on Shuttle-related space operations early in the next century. Attention is given to the evolution of Shuttle payload capabilities over the next five years. The following list of near-earth environment factors to be exploited by the Space Shuttle is given: (1) easy control of gravity; (2) absence of atmosphere; (3) a comprehensive view of the earth's surface and atmosphere; (4) isolation of hazardous processes from earth biosphere; (5) freely available light, heat and photovoltaic power; (6) an infinite natural reservoir for the disposal of radioactive waste products; and (7) a super-cold heat sink.

  9. Current status of cadmium as an environmental health problem

    SciTech Connect

    Jaerup, Lars Akesson, Agneta

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium is a toxic metal occurring in the environment naturally and as a pollutant emanating from industrial and agricultural sources. Food is the main source of cadmium intake in the non-smoking population. The bioavailability, retention and toxicity are affected by several factors including nutritional status such as low iron status. Cadmium is efficiently retained in the kidney (half-time 10-30 years) and the concentration is proportional to that in urine (U-Cd). Cadmium is nephrotoxic, initially causing kidney tubular damage. Cadmium can also cause bone damage, either via a direct effect on bone tissue or indirectly as a result of renal dysfunction. After prolonged and/or high exposure the tubular injury may progress to glomerular damage with decreased glomerular filtration rate, and eventually to renal failure. Furthermore, recent data also suggest increased cancer risks and increased mortality in environmentally exposed populations. Dose-response assessment using a variety of early markers of kidney damage has identified U-Cd points of departure for early kidney effects between 0.5 and 3 {mu}g Cd/g creatinine, similar to the points of departure for effects on bone. It can be anticipated that a considerable proportion of the non-smoking adult population has urinary cadmium concentrations of 0.5 {mu}g/g creatinine or higher in non-exposed areas. For smokers this proportion is considerably higher. This implies no margin of safety between the point of departure and the exposure levels in the general population. Therefore, measures should be put in place to reduce exposure to a minimum, and the tolerably daily intake should be set in accordance with recent findings.

  10. Helicopter noise prediction - The current status and future direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper takes stock of the progress, assesses the current prediction capabilities, and forecasts the direction of future helicopter noise prediction research. The acoustic analogy approach, specifically, theories based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equations, are the most widely used for deterministic noise sources. Thickness and loading noise can be routinely predicted given good plane motion and blade loading inputs. Blade-vortex interaction noise can also be predicted well with measured input data, but prediction of airloads with the high spatial and temporal resolution required for BVI is still difficult. Current semiempirical broadband noise predictions are useful and reasonably accurate. New prediction methods based on a Kirchhoff formula and direct computation appear to be very promising, but are currently very demanding computationally.

  11. Current status and advances in flash fire modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rew, P.J.; Deaves, D.M.; Madison, T.

    1995-12-31

    When a dispersing cloud of flammable vapor is ignited, it can burn in a number of different ways. A flash fire or cloud fire occurs if ignition takes place within the flammable region of a gas cloud, generally at a point remote from the source. A review of the modeling of flash fires (cloud fires) is presented. The present understanding of flash fires is discussed through reference to past incidents and current models. Full scale flash fire trials are reviewed, providing a database of relevant experimental data. Outline proposals are given for improving the current prediction methodologies for the direct (burn fatalities) and indirect (escalation) effects of flash fires.

  12. 42 CFR 411.104 - Current employment status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... orders and members of clergy—(1) Members of religious orders who have not taken a vow of poverty. A member of a religious order who has not taken a vow of poverty is considered to have current employment... orders who have taken a vow of poverty. A member of a religious order whose members are required to...

  13. Current Status in the Therapy of Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Philipp; Fricker, Gert; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic diseases, like viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Wilson’s disease, play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis and, hence, hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, the current treatment options and the molecular mechanisms of action of the drugs are summarized. Unfortunately, the treatment options for most of these hepatic diseases are limited. Since hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infections are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, they are the focus of the development of new drugs. The current treatment of choice for HBV/HCV infection is an interferon-based combination therapy with oral antiviral drugs, like nucleos(t)ide analogues, which is associated with improving the therapeutic success and also preventing the development of resistances. Currently, two new protease inhibitors for HCV treatment are expected (deleobuvir, faldaprevir) and together with the promising drug, daclatasvir (NS5A-inhibitor, currently in clinical trials), adequate therapy is to be expected in due course (circumventing the requirement of interferon with its side-effects), while in contrast, efficient HBV therapeutics are still lacking. In this respect, entry inhibitors, like Myrcludex B, the lead substance of the first entry inhibitor for HBV/HDV (hepatitis D) infection, provide immense potential. The pharmacokinetics and the mechanism of action of Myrcludex B are described in detail. PMID:24786290

  14. Current status and new directions in conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidwell, George H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: systems analysis branch questions; systems analysis; historical perspective; background technology; conceptual design/evaluation program organization; system integration/vehicle closure; conceptual design synthesis programs; numerical optimization/mathematical programming; and current R&D interests. The discussion is presented in viewgraph format.

  15. San Juan Fracture Characterization Project: Status and current results

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Daley, T.M.; Myer, L.R.; Nihei, K.; Queen, J.; Sinton, J.; Murphy, J.; Fortuna, M.; Lynn, H.B.; Imhoff, M.A.; Wilson, R.

    2001-02-26

    The overall objectives of this report are to extend current state-of-the-art 3-D imaging to extract the optimal information for fracture quantification and to develop next generation capability in fracture imaging for true 3-D imaging of the static and dynamic fracture properties.

  16. The Current State and Status of HRD Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Establishes a connection between the concepts of "learning organisation" and "human resources development". Design/methodology/approach: A brief and broad overview of the current state of human research development research. Findings: One conclusion to be reached is that the subject is healthy. Another conclusion is that human resource…

  17. Systematics of key phytopathogenic fusaria: Current status and future challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This brief review is intended to provide plant pathologists and other scientists, especially ones in Japan, with a current overview of the most important fusarial phytopathogens and mycotoxin producers. Knowledge of Fusarium species diversity and their evolutionary relationships has increased dramat...

  18. Current status in the therapy of liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Philipp; Fricker, Gert; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic diseases, like viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Wilson's disease, play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis and, hence, hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, the current treatment options and the molecular mechanisms of action of the drugs are summarized. Unfortunately, the treatment options for most of these hepatic diseases are limited. Since hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infections are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, they are the focus of the development of new drugs. The current treatment of choice for HBV/HCV infection is an interferon-based combination therapy with oral antiviral drugs, like nucleos(t)ide analogues, which is associated with improving the therapeutic success and also preventing the development of resistances. Currently, two new protease inhibitors for HCV treatment are expected (deleobuvir, faldaprevir) and together with the promising drug, daclatasvir (NS5A-inhibitor, currently in clinical trials), adequate therapy is to be expected in due course (circumventing the requirement of interferon with its side-effects), while in contrast, efficient HBV therapeutics are still lacking. In this respect, entry inhibitors, like Myrcludex B, the lead substance of the first entry inhibitor for HBV/HDV (hepatitis D) infection, provide immense potential. The pharmacokinetics and the mechanism of action of Myrcludex B are described in detail.

  19. Measles: Current Status and Outbreak Control on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amler, Robert W.; Orenstein, Walter A.

    1984-01-01

    The current effort to eliminate measles in the United States has caused record low levels of the disease. This strategy must continue to be applied in order to break the transmission of measles on college campuses through high immunization levels, promotion of rapid reporting of cases, and quick responses to outbreaks. (Author/DF)

  20. Business Education at Catholic Universities: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porth, Stephen J.; McCall, John J.; DiAngelo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Is business education at Catholic colleges and universities different than business education at secular institutions? This study assesses the current state of business education at Catholic colleges and universities based on a national survey of business school deans and faculty members and an audit of business unit web sites. Results suggest…

  1. Income Inequality and Health Status in the United States: Evidence from the Current Population Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Jennifer M.; Milyo, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Current Population Survey data on self-reported health status and income for the general population and those in poverty were analyzed. No consistent association was found between income inequality and individual health status. Previous findings of such an association were attributed to ecological fallacy or failure to control for individual…

  2. Chemotherapy in advanced bladder cancer: current status and future

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer occurs in the majority of cases in males. It represents the seventh most common cancer and the ninth most common cause of cancer deaths for men. Transitional cell carcinoma is the most predominant histological type. Bladder cancer is highly chemosensitive. In metastatic setting, chemotherapy based on cisplatin should be considered as standard treatment of choice for patients with good performance status (0-1) and good renal function-glomerular filtration rate (GFR) > 60 mL/min. The standard treatment is based on cisplatin chemotherapy regimens type MVAC, HD-MVAC, gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) or dose dense GC. In unfit patients, carboplatin based regimes; gemcitabine plus carboplatin or methotrexate plus carboplatin plus vinblastine (MCAVI) are reasonable options. The role of targeted therapies when used alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, or in maintenance, was evaluated; targeting angiogenesis seem to be very promising. The purpose of this literature review is to highlight the role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. PMID:21906310

  3. Current Status of Acanthamoeba in Iran: A Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    NIYYATI, Maryam; REZAEIAN, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Free-living amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba have an environmental distribution. Amoebic keratitis due to these protozoan parasites continue to rise in Iran and worldwide. In Iran, there are various researches regarding both morphological and molecular identification of Acanthamoeba spp. in environmental and clinical samples. However, there is no thorough review about Acanthamoeba genotypes and their distribution in environmental sources such as water, dust and biofilm in Iran. Besides, according to increasing cases of Amoebic keratitis in the region awareness regarding the pathogenic potential of these sight-threatening amoebae is of utmost importance. Methods: We conducted a thorough review based on the database sources such as MEDLINE, PubMed and Google scholar. No restrictions were placed on study date, study design or language of publication. We searched all valuable and relevant information considering the occurrence of the Acanthamoeba in both environmental and clinical samples. Results: According to our thorough review Acanthamoeba belonging to T4 genotype is the most prevalent type strain in environmental and clinical samples in several regions in Iran and worldwide, however, there are reports regarding Acanthamoeba belonging to other genotypes such as T2, T3, T5, T6 and T11 and the mentioned point could leads us to more researches with the goal of presenting the real genotype dominance of Acanthamoeba and related disease in the country. Conclusion: Overall, the present review will focus on present status of genotypes of Acanthamoeba in Iran during recent years. PMID:26246812

  4. Prostate cancer chemoprevention: Current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2007-11-01

    Chemoprevention is a strategy that aims to reduce the incidence and burden of cancer through the development of agents to prevent, reverse or delay the carcinogenic process. Prostate cancer is a suitable target for prevention because it has a high incidence and prevalence, as well as a long latency and disease-related mortality, and furthermore it is a disease in which lifestyle and environmental factors may play critical roles. The development of chemoprevention strategies against prostate cancer will have a huge impact, both medically and economically. Large-scale clinical trials suggest that some agents such as selenium, lycopene, soy, green tea, vitamins D and E, anti-inflammatory and inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase are effective in preventing prostate cancer. Although each agent has the potential to affect the natural history of the disease, it is important to develop strategies to strategically proceed for the design and selection of test agents in order to demonstrate clinical benefit with the minimum of adverse effects. Appropriate selection of agent(s), disease stage, trial design and endpoints is critical in selecting the most promising regimens to accomplish these goals. This review highlights the present status of prostate cancer chemoprevention and discusses future prospects for chemopreventive strategies that are safe and clinically beneficial.

  5. Current status of novel agents in advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal (GE) adenocarcinomas are highly lethal malignancies and despite multiple chemotherapy options, 5-year survival rates remain dismal. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment but patients are often limited by toxicity and poor performance status. Because of molecular heterogeneity, it is essential to classify tumors based on the underlying oncogenic pathways and develop targeted therapies that act on individual tumors. Trastuzumab, a human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody, was the first such agent shown to improve response rate, progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) when added to cisplatin based chemotherapy in patients with HER2 over-expressing GE junction (GEJ) and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, HER2 over expressing GE tumors are in the minority and the need for additional targeted agents is urgent. Though many agents are in development, incorporating targeted therapy in the treatment of GE cancers comes with a unique set of challenges. In this review, we outline oncogenic pathways relevant to GE adenocarcinomas, including HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and c-Met, and discuss recent trials with agents targeting these pathways. PMID:25642339

  6. The Chernobyl NPP decommissioning: Current status and alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Mikolaitchouk, H.; Steinberg, N.

    1996-08-01

    After the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986, many contradictory decisions were taken concerning the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) future. The principal source of contradictions was a deadline for a final shutdown of the Chernobyl NPP units. Alterations in a political and socioeconomic environment resulted in the latest decision of the Ukrainian Authorities about 2000 as a deadline for a beginning of the Chernobyl NPP decommissioning. The date seems a sound compromise among the parties concerned. However, in order to meet the data a lot of work should be done. First of all, a decommissioning strategy has to be established. The problem is complicated due to both site-specific aspects and an absence of proven solutions for the RBMK-type reactor decommissioning. In the paper the problem of decommissioning option selection is considered taking into account an influence of the following factors: relevant legislative and regulatory requirements; resources required to carry out decommissioning (man-power, equipment, technologies, waste management infrastructure, etc.); radiological and physical status of the plant, including structural integrity and predictable age and weather effects; impact of planned activities at the destroyed unit 4 and within the 30-km exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP; planed use of the site; socio-economic considerations.

  7. [Current Status of Translational Research on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In

    2016-09-25

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the incidence of some of its complications have risen strikingly over the last few decades. With the increase in our understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD along with the development of proton pump inhibitors, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD have changed dramatically over the past decade. However, GERD still poses a problem to many clinicians since the spectrum of the disease has evolved to encompass more challenging presentations such as refractory GERD and extra-esophageal manifestations. The aim of this article is to provide a review of available current translational research on GERD. This review includes acid pocket, ambulatory pH monitoring, impedance pH monitoring, mucosa impedance, and high resolution manometry. This article discusses current translational research on GERD. PMID:27646580

  8. Current status of mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Yilmaz, Hasan; Pellaton, Alain; Slater, Lee-Anne; Krings, Timo; Lovblad, Karl-Olof

    2015-02-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a morbid and disabling medical condition with a significant social and economic impact throughout the world. Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has been the first line treatment for patients presenting up to 4.5 hours after symptom onset for many years. Endovascular stroke treatment has been used successfully as rescue therapy after failed IVT; in patients with contraindications to rtPA or presenting outside the 4.5-hour window. The effectiveness of IVT is high for distal thrombi but significantly lower for proximal occlusions. Endovascular treatment has been revolutionized by the evolution from intra-arterial thrombolysis and first generation mechanical devices to the current generation of stent retrievers and aspiration systems with large bore catheters. These devices have been associated with excellent revascularization, improved clinical outcomes, shorter procedure times and reduced device and procedure related complications. We report the current literature, clinical standards and perspectives on mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke.

  9. [Electrostatic protection from cosmic radiation (the current status and prospects)].

    PubMed

    Riabova, T Ia

    1983-01-01

    Conduction currents of the vacuum atmosphere near the spacecraft were measured in an electrostatic shielding and an electrostatic shielding module in electrostatic fields of about 10(7) Wt/m at a voltage of 3 X 10(5) V onboard Cosmos-605, 690, 732 and 936. The resultant conduction currents (less than or equal to 10(-9) A/m2) give evidence that the vacuum environment has high electroinsulation properties which contradicts the concepts derived from ground-based studies. Using up-to-date high-voltage devices, it appears possible to develop an efficient electrostatic shielding which will be of a low weight and a low power consumption.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy today--an assessment of current status].

    PubMed

    Chaussy, C; Wilbert, D M

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is standard therapy for urolithiasis. With comparable technical principles, various lithotripters have been developed and are in routine use. Renal pelvic stones, calyceal stones, ureteral stones, and other special forms can be treated with varying results. Currently, the so-called clinically insignificant residual fragments and the recurrence of calculi are under discussion. Whereas the side effects of ESWL are well known, studies comparing ESWL with other endourological procedures are still lacking.

  11. Current Status of Functional Imaging in Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K.W.; Kaye, Walter H.

    2013-01-01

    Eating Disorders are complex psychiatric problems that involve biologic and psychological factors. Brain imaging studies provide insights how functionally connected brain networks may contribute to disturbed eating behavior, resulting in food refusal and altered body weight, but also body preoccupations and heightened anxiety. In this article we review the current state of brain imaging in eating disorders, and how such techniques may help identify pathways that could be important in the treatment of those often detrimental disorders. PMID:22532388

  12. Current status of stereoscopic 3D LCD TV technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hee-Jin

    2011-06-01

    The year 2010 may be recorded as a first year of successful commercial 3D products. Among them, the 3D LCD TVs are expected to be the major one regarding the sales volume. In this paper, the principle of current stereoscopic 3D LCD TV techniques and the required flat panel display (FPD) technologies for the realization of them are reviewed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Current status of clinical laser applications in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi; Sasaki, Katia Miyuki; Nagai, Shigeyuki; Schwarz, Frank; Yoshida, Itaru; Eguro, Toru; Zeredo, Jorge Luis; Izumi, Yuichi

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by bacterial infection. Laser treatment demonstrates specific characteristics that may be valuable in managing periodontal disease. In addition, lasers reduce stress and uncomfortable conditions for patients during and after treatment compared to other conventional tools. This article reviews the literature to describe the current clinical applications of lasers for gingival tissue management-including esthetic treatment, non-surgical and surgical periodontal pocket therapy, osseous surgery, and implant therapy.

  14. Large Antenna Control Methods: Current Status and Future Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Lin, Y. H.; Milman, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Current methods for control of large antennas, as well as future trends required for improved performance are addressed. Some of the target missions in which these methods would be used are: the Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) for communications; the Satellite Surveillance (SSS) for aircraft traffic control; the orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI), or QUASAT, for radio astronomy; and the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) for IR and submillimeter astronomy.

  15. Staging systems for hepatocellular carcinoma: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Akiyoshi; Onoda, Hiroshi; Fushiya, Nao; Koike, Kazuhiko; Nishino, Hirokazu; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health concern worldwide and the third cause of cancer-related death. Despite advances in treatment as well as careful surveillance programs, the mortality rates in most countries are very high. In contrast to other cancers, the prognosis and treatment of HCC depend on the tumor burden in addition to patient’s underlying liver disease and liver functional reserve. Moreover, there is considerable geographic and institutional variation in both risk factors attributable to the underlying liver diseases and the management of HCC. Therefore, although many staging and/or scoring systems have been proposed, there is currently no globally accepted system for HCC due to the extreme heterogeneity of the disease. The aim of this review is to focus on currently available staging systems as well as those newly reported in the literatures since 2012. Moreover, we describe problems with currently available staging systems and attempts to modify and/or add variables to existing staging systems. PMID:25848467

  16. WISM - A Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement: Past Accomplishments, Current Status, and Path Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonds, Quenton; Racette, Paul; Durham, Tim (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    Presented are the prior accomplishments, current status and path forward for GSFC's Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement (WISM). This work is a high level overview of the project, presented via Webinar to the IEEE young professionals.

  17. Personality disorders in the DSM-5: current status, lessons learned, and future challenges. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Widiger, Thomas A; Krueger, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    Provides an introduction to a special section of Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. The purpose of this special section is to provide a discussion of the current status, lessons learned, and future challenges for the classification of personality disorders.

  18. [Pharmacotherapeutical possibilities in mental disorders: current status in Serbia].

    PubMed

    Djukić-Dejanović, Slavica; Lečić-Toševski, Dušica; Mihajlović, Goran; Borovčanin, Milica; Simič-Vukomanovič, Ivana

    2011-12-01

    The new therapeutical approaches have direct implications on living in order to accomplish remission, stop further progression of illnesses or improve the quality of life. The life expectancy has been increased up to 10 years in the last 55 years, probably owing to the innovative drugs. The innovative drugs application in our everyday clinical practice should be analyzed, related to economical aspects and to the transitional status of a country, but also in the context of fears and misconceptions of therapists. The cost of therapy is not equal to the cost of prescribed drugs, however it also includes direct and indirect costs and medical and nonmedical burden. Countries in our region spend 4-7.3% of the total budget for antipsychotic drugs, while the costs in Serbia are about 1.5%. The new antipsychotics and the new formulations of the available antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia are pharmacoeconomically justified. On the other side, the substance abuse needs other strategies, including new substitution treatments. In our country only methadone maintenance therapy is available. It is necessary to provide adequate legislation to improve the process of drug registration. In the European Union it takes from 0 to 400 days for a drug to be registered, but in Serbia the process last longerthan 3 years. Important laws approved in 2006 and 2009, are only a part of the destigmatiazation of patients with mental disorders. Treatment guidelines also help in resolving these issues. Taking all of the above into consideration, the treatment of mental disorders with innovative drugs is financially justified, but still unreachable for patients in Serbia. The voice of the professionals should be heard in these matters in order to provide the adequate treatment of people with mental health problems.

  19. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyu Sup

    2016-01-01

    Objective The number of assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics, ART cycles, clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), and number of newborns conceived using ART have steadily increased in South Korea. This aim of this study was to describe the status of ART in South Korea between January 1 and December 31, 2011. Methods A localized online survey was created and sent to all available ART centers via email in 2015. Fresh embryo transfer (FET) cases were categorized depending on whether standard in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or half-ICSI procedures were used. Thawed embryo transfer (TET) and other related procedures were surveyed. Results Data from 36,990 ART procedures were provided by 74 clinics. Of the 30,410 cycles in which oocytes were retrieved, a complete transfer was performed in 91.0% (n=27,683). In addition, 9,197 cycles were confirmed to be clinical pregnancies in the FET cycles, representing a pregnancy rate of 30.2% per oocyte pick-up and 33.2% per ET. The most common number of embryos transferred in the FET procedures was three (38.1%), followed by two (34.7%) and one (14.3%). Of the 8,826 TET cycles, 3,137 clinical pregnancies (31.1%) were confirmed by ultrasonography. Conclusion While the overall clinical pregnancy rate for the TET cycles performed was lower than the rate reported in 2010 (31.1% vs. 35.4%), the overall CPR for the FET cycles was higher than in 2010 (33.2% in 2011 and 32.9% in 2010). The most common number of embryos transferred in FET cycles was three, as was the case in 2010. PMID:27104156

  20. Systemic therapy strategies for head-neck carcinomas: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, most of which are squamous cell tumours, have an unsatisfactory prognosis despite intensive local treatment. This can be attributed, among other factors, to tumour recurrences inside or outside the treated area, and metastases at more distal locations. These tumours therefore require not only the standard surgical and radiation treatments, but also effective systemic modalities. The main option here is antineoplastic chemotherapy, which is firmly established in the palliative treatment of recurrent or metastatic stages of disease, and is used with curative intent in the form of combined simultaneous or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable or advanced tumour stages. Neoadjuvant treatment strategies for tumour reduction before surgery have yet to gain acceptance. Induction chemotherapy protocols before radiotherapy have to date been used in patients at high risk of distant metastases or as an aid for decision-making (“chemoselection”) in those with extensive laryngeal cancers, prior to definitive chemoradiotherapy or laryngectomy. Triple-combination induction therapy (taxanes, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) shows high remission rates with significant toxicity and, in combination with (chemo-)radiotherapy, is currently being compared with simultaneous chemoradiotherapy; the current gold standard with regards to efficacy and long-term toxicity. A further systemic treatment strategy, called “targeted therapy”, has been developed to help increase specificity and reduce toxicity. An example of targeted therapy, EGFR-specific antibodies, can be used in palliative settings and, in combination with radiotherapy, to treat advanced head and neck cancers. A series of other novel biologicals such as signal cascade inhibitors, genetic agents, or immunotherapies, are currently being evaluated in large-scale clinical studies, and could prove useful in patients with advanced, recurring or metastatic head and neck cancers. When developing

  1. Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Grace M; Coleman, Anne L

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery aims to provide a medication-sparing, conjunctival-sparing, ab interno approach to intraocular pressure reduction for patients with mild-to-moderate glaucoma that is safer than traditional incisional glaucoma surgery. The current approaches include: increasing trabecular outflow (Trabectome, iStent, Hydrus stent, gonioscopy-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy, excimer laser trabeculotomy); suprachoroidal shunts (Cypass micro-stent); reducing aqueous production (endocyclophotocoagulation); and subconjunctival filtration (XEN gel stent). The data on each surgical procedure for each of these approaches are reviewed in this article, patient selection pearls learned to date are discussed, and expectations for the future are examined. PMID:26869753

  2. The current status of dental graduates in India

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Rawal, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    The dental profession is a noble profession. It takes years of devotion towards the subject of dentistry to get the graduate degree of Bachelor of Dental Surgery. However, even after such painstaking efforts the current situation of dental graduates in India is grave. There are a lot of issues that are the main cause for this problem. The dental graduates are in a state of crisis due to lack of support from the Government. If this situation continues it will lead to a negative effect on the integrity of the dental profession, and highly trained dental manpower of the country will go in vain. PMID:27200127

  3. [Current status and future perspectives of hepatocyte transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Maupoey, Javier; San Juan, Fernando; López, Rafael; Mir, Jose

    2014-02-01

    The imbalance between the number of potential beneficiaries and available organs, originates the search for new therapeutic alternatives, such as Hepatocyte transplantation (HT).Even though this is a treatment option for these patients, the lack of unanimity of criteria regarding indications and technique, different cryopreservation protocols, as well as the different methodology to assess the response to this therapy, highlights the need of a Consensus Conference to standardize criteria and consider future strategies to improve the technique and optimize the results.Our aim is to review and update the current state of hepatocyte transplantation, emphasizing the future research attempting to solve the problems and improve the results of this treatment.

  4. Scientific foundations of bioremediation: Current status and future needs

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.T.; Sayler, G.S.

    1993-11-01

    Bioremediation can be defined as a process that uses living organisms or their catalysts to enhance the rate or extent of pollutant destruction. In this context, bioremediation can be considered as a viable component of hazardous waste management technology. The major goal of waste management is to reduce the exposure of organisms or receiving environments to the effects of environmental contaminants. As bioremediation is currently practiced, the predominant organisms in use are microorganisms (bacteria and fungi), but potential developments of the technology also include the use of algae, plankton, protozoa, plants, and controlled or assembled ecosystems.

  5. Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Richter, Grace M; Coleman, Anne L

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery aims to provide a medication-sparing, conjunctival-sparing, ab interno approach to intraocular pressure reduction for patients with mild-to-moderate glaucoma that is safer than traditional incisional glaucoma surgery. The current approaches include: increasing trabecular outflow (Trabectome, iStent, Hydrus stent, gonioscopy-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy, excimer laser trabeculotomy); suprachoroidal shunts (Cypass micro-stent); reducing aqueous production (endocyclophotocoagulation); and subconjunctival filtration (XEN gel stent). The data on each surgical procedure for each of these approaches are reviewed in this article, patient selection pearls learned to date are discussed, and expectations for the future are examined.

  6. Stenting of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2010-08-15

    Minimally invasive image-guided insertion of self-expanding metal stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the current treatment of choice for palliation of malignant esophageal or gastroduodenal outlet obstructions. A concise review is presented of contemporary stenting practice of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and the procedures in terms of appropriate patient evaluation, indications, and contraindications for treatment are analyzed, along with available stent designs, procedural steps, clinical outcomes, inadvertent complications, and future technology. Latest developments include biodegradable polymeric stents for benign disease and radioactive or drug-eluting stents for malignant obstructions.

  7. Current status of animal-to-human transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Robert; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    The transplantation of animal organs into humans as a way of treating organ failure has been pursued for 100 years. Clinical xenotransplantation, as such, has always failed because the transplanted organ is rejected by the recipient. Recent advances in transplant immunology have revealed some mechanisms underlying the rejection of xenografts, and these discoveries have sparked efforts to use genetic engineering of animals and therapeutics directed at the recipient to overcome this problem. This communication reviews current understanding of the mechanisms of xenograft rejection and efforts to overcome rejection and other hurdles. PMID:16255645

  8. Porcine dermis implants in soft-tissue reconstruction: current status

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Neil J; Bryan, Nicholas; Hunt, John A; Daniels, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction for a variety of surgical conditions, such as abdominal wall hernia or pelvic organ prolapse, remains a challenge. There are numerous meshes available that may be simply categorized as either synthetic or biologic. Within biologic meshes, porcine dermal meshes have come to dominate the market. This review examines the current evidence for their use and the limitations of knowledge. Although there is increasing evidence to support their safety, long-term follow-up studies that support their efficacy are lacking. Numerous clinical trials that remain ongoing may help elucidate their precise role in soft-tissue reconstruction. PMID:24648721

  9. Residential energy demand models: Current status and future improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peabody, G.

    1980-12-01

    Two models currently used to analyze energy use by the residential sector are described. The ORNL model is used to forecast energy use by fuel type for various end uses on a yearly basis. The MATH/CHRDS model analyzes variations in energy expenditures by households of various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The essential features of the ORNL and MATH/CHRDS models are retained in a proposed model and integrated into a framework that is more flexible than either model. The important determinants of energy use by households are reviewed.

  10. Current status and future potential of transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prausnitz, Mark R; Mitragotri, Samir; Langer, Robert

    2004-02-01

    The past twenty five years have seen an explosion in the creation and discovery of new medicinal agents. Related innovations in drug delivery systems have not only enabled the successful implementation of many of these novel pharmaceuticals, but have also permitted the development of new medical treatments with existing drugs. The creation of transdermal delivery systems has been one of the most important of these innovations, offering a number of advantages over the oral route. In this article, we discuss the already significant impact this field has made on the administration of various pharmaceuticals; explore limitations of the current technology; and discuss methods under exploration for overcoming these limitations and the challenges ahead.

  11. Data Mining Activities for Bone Discipline - Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Johnston, S. L.; Arnaud, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The disciplinary goals of the Human Research Program are broadly discussed. There is a critical need to identify gaps in the evidence that would substantiate a skeletal health risk during and after spaceflight missions. As a result, data mining activities will be engaged to gather reviews of medical data and flight analog data and to propose additional measures and specific analyses. Several studies are briefly reviewed which have topics that partially address these gaps in knowledge, including bone strength recovery with recovery of bone mass density, current renal stone formation knowledge, herniated discs, and a review of bed rest studies conducted at Ames Human Research Facility.

  12. Current readings: Status of surgical treatment for endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Neely, Robert C; Leacche, Marzia; Shah, Jinesh; Byrne, John G

    2014-01-01

    Valve endocarditis is associated with high morbidity and mortality and requires a thorough evaluation including early surgical consultation to identify patients who may benefit from surgery. We review 5 recent articles that highlight the current debates related to best treatment strategies for valve endocarditis. Recent publications have focused on neurologic risk assessment, timing of surgery, and prognostic factors associated with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis. The initial patient assessment and management is best performed by a multidisciplinary team. Future investigations should focus on identifying surgical candidates early and the outcomes affected by replacement valve choice in both native and prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  13. Current status in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a practical view.

    PubMed

    Candel, Francisco Javier; Julián-Jiménez, Agustin; González-Del Castillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs are a current and widely spread trend in clinical practice because of it's a cost-effective option, it's associated with a greater comfort for the patient, a lower risk of nosocomial complications and an important cost saving for the health care system. OPAT is used for treating a wide range of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, osteoarticular infections, bacteraemia, endocarditis and complex intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections, even in presence of multiresistant microorganisms. Correct choice of antimicrobial agent and adequate patient selection are crucial for reaching therapeutic success and avoiding readmissions, treatment prolongation or treatment-related toxicity. The optimal antimicrobial for OPAT must be highly effective, have a long half-life and an adequate spectrum of action. Ceftriaxone and teicoplanin are currently the most prescribed antibiotics for OPAT, though daptomycin and ertapenem are also on the rise, due to their high efficiency, safety and wide spectrum of action. Antibiotics that are stable at room temperature can be administered through a continuous perfusion, though self-administration is preferable although it requires training of the patient or the caregiver. Factors that are most frequently associated with OPAT failure include advanced age, recent hospitalization and isolation of multiresistant microorganisms. PMID:27014770

  14. Medicinal foods from marine animals: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Pallela, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    The lifestyle of human being is changing day by day toward the simplified and more convenient way of living. Human wellbeing is majorly dependent on the daily food habits that are in accordance with the habits of individual community and the surrounding environments. Although the food habits are simplified and fashioned according to the current lifestyle, many of the Asians are still showing much importance to the naturally derived and traditional foods. One such medicinally important natural source is the foods from marine organisms, which are an important growing notion for the development of marine nutraceuticals and functional foods. In this context, we have already brought the recent trends and applications of marine algal (macro and micro) foods in my previous volume. The current preliminary chapter of this book volume on marine animals and microbes describes about the prospects of various marine animals and their derived substances/materials as medicinal foods. In addition, this chapter encourages the new researchers as well as various health communities to implement the marine animal-based medicinal foods and their applications.

  15. Current status of experimental therapeutics for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juna; Moon, Chulso

    2011-04-01

    As with many cancers, early detection of head and neck cancer increases a patient's survival rate. If diagnosed early, its five-year survival nears 90% with standard therapy alone. Unfortunately, the average survival rate for head and neck cancer is low due to the difficulty in early detection and achieving a sustainable response. Conventional treatments are not adequate for the majority of advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer patients because of the remarkable resistance of tumors to chemotherapy and radiation, and the situation is especially devastating for the first time treatment failure. The major limitations of these treatments are the lack of specificity for the tumor cell and unacceptable toxicity to the patient. As a result, current research in therapeutics for advanced, chemotherapy-resistant or recurrent head and neck cancer patients has focused on new treatment modalities that exploit biological differences between tumor and normal cells. These therapies include monoclonal antibodies, molecular inhibitors, gene therapy and photodynamic therapy. This article reviews the current preclinical and clinical evidence of these experimental therapeutics as they relate to head and neck cancer.

  16. Current status of transurethral thermotherapy at the Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Blute, M L; Larson, T R; Hanson, K A; King, B F

    1998-06-01

    With the ever-expanding elderly population in the United States, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become a widespread condition. Although surgical intervention (open prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate) was the typical management approach for BPH in the past, other options currently include drug therapy and transurethral thermotherapy, a minimally invasive procedure that involves the targeting of heat deep within the prostate transition zone while cooling the surrounding anatomic structures with circulating water. Two thermo-therapy-devices--the Prostatron and the T3 transurethral thermoablation therapy catheter--have been studied in randomized controlled clinical trials at the Mayo Clinic. Both devices were shown to be effective in a substantial subset of patients with BPH: symptom scores decreased, peak urinary flow rates increased, and total serum prostate-specific antigen levels increased, an indication of destruction of adenomatous tissue. All patients were able to complete the treatment without the need for general or regional anesthesia, and thermotherapy was associated with few postprocedural events. Although this therapeutic strategy is currently used selectively in patients with lateral lobe prostatic adenoma, improvements in technology and understanding of the thermoregulatory properties of the prostate should broaden the application of thermotherapy devices in the management of BPH.

  17. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care. PMID:26944066

  18. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care.

  19. Rheology of Rings: Current Status and Future Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Gregory

    Understanding the dynamics of circular or ring-like polymers has been a subject of investigation since the 1980s and is one which remains an area that is not fully understood. Part of the reason for this is the difficulty of making synthetic rings of sufficient size to establish the nature of the entanglement dynamics, if entanglements even exist in these materials. Furthermore, there is now strong evidence that small amounts of linear impurities can impact the dynamics. Hence, one of the major challenges to our understanding of ring dynamics is to make large molecular weight rings of sufficient purity that the dynamics of the rings themselves can be determined. In the present work the current state of understanding of the dynamics of rings is outlined and current work from our group of collaborators to make extremely large circular polymers using Echeverria Coli as a route to make pure rings (circular DNA) in sufficient quantity and size to determine the dynamics of these materials will be shown. First results of ring dynamics in dilute solution are presented and new results on concentrated and entangled solutions will be discussed. Remaining challenges will be elucidated. Partially supported by the John R. Bradford Endowment and the Paul Whitfield Horn Professorship at Texas Tech University.

  20. Prokaryote diversity and taxonomy: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2004-04-29

    The prokaryotes are by far the most abundant organisms inhabiting planet Earth. They are also by far the most diverse, both metabolically and phylogenetically; they encompass the Bacteria and the Archaea, two out of the three major divisions of living organisms. The current prokaryote species classification is based on a combination of genomic and phenotypic properties. The recommended cut-off value of 70% DNA-DNA similarity to delineate species signifies an extremely broad species definition for the prokaryotes compared with the higher eukaryotes. The number of validly named species of prokaryotes is currently slightly more than 6200. However, on the basis of small-subunit rDNA characterization of whole communities and other approaches, the more exact number of species present can be inferred to be at least two orders of magnitude larger. Classic culturing methods based on colony formation on agar are generally unsatisfactory for the recovery of bacteria from the environment. Many of the most abundant prokaryotes in nature have not yet been brought into culture. Some of these may thrive by means of as yet unknown modes of energy generation. Several novel methods have recently enabled the isolation of some interesting organisms of environmental significance. A better coverage of the prokaryote diversity on Earth depends on such innovative approaches, combined with appropriate funding.

  1. Vaccines against human diarrheal pathogens: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Böhles, Nathalie; Böhles, Nathalie; Busch, Kim; Busch, Kim; Hensel, Michael; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, nearly 1.7 billion people per year contract diarrheal infectious diseases (DID) and almost 760 000 of infections are fatal. DID are a major problem in developing countries where poor sanitation prevails and food and water may become contaminated by fecal shedding. Diarrhea is caused by pathogens such as bacteria, protozoans and viruses. Important diarrheal pathogens are Vibrio cholerae, Shigella spp. and rotavirus, which can be prevented with vaccines for several years. The focus of this review is on currently available vaccines against these three pathogens, and on development of new vaccines. Currently, various types of vaccines based on traditional (killed, live attenuated, toxoid or conjugate vaccines) and reverse vaccinology (DNA/mRNA, vector, recombinant subunit, plant vaccines) are in development or already available. Development of new vaccines demands high levels of knowledge, experience, budget, and time, yet promising new vaccines often fail in preclinical and clinical studies. Efficacy of vaccination also depends on the route of delivery, and mucosal immunization in particular is of special interest for preventing DID. Furthermore, adjuvants, delivery systems and other vaccine components are essential for an adequate immune response. These aspects will be discussed in relation to the improvement of existing and development of new vaccines against DID.

  2. Drug treatment of obesity: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Ashish Kumar; Dahiya, Neha

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Obesity strains the healthcare systems and has profound economic and psychosocial consequences. Historically, pharmacotherapy for obesity has witnessed the rise and fall of several promising drug candidates that had to be eventually withdrawn due to unacceptable safety concerns. Currently four drugs are approved for chronic weight management in obese adults: orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate extended release and naltrexone/bupropion extended release. While lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate were approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2012, after a gap of 13 years following the licensing of orlistat, naltrexone/bupropion has been recently approved in 2014. This review provides a brief overview of these current therapeutic interventions available for management of obesity along with the evidence of their safety and efficacy. Additionally, several novel monotherapies as well as combination products are undergoing evaluation in various stages of clinical development. These therapies if proven successful will strengthen the existing armamentarium of antiobesity drugs and will be critical to combat the global public health crisis of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. PMID:25634851

  3. Liquid Acquisition Strategies for Exploration Missions: Current Status 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is currently developing the propulsion system concepts for human exploration missions to the lunar surface. The propulsion concepts being investigated are considering the use of cryogenic propellants for the low gravity portion of the mission, that is, the lunar transit, lunar orbit insertion, lunar descent and the rendezvous in lunar orbit with a service module after ascent from the lunar surface. These propulsion concepts will require the vapor free delivery of the cryogenic propellants stored in the propulsion tanks to the exploration vehicles main propulsion system (MPS) engines and reaction control system (RCS) engines. Propellant management devices (PMD s) such as screen channel capillary liquid acquisition devices (LAD s), vanes and sponges currently are used for earth storable propellants in the Space Shuttle Orbiter OMS and RCS applications and spacecraft propulsion applications but only very limited propellant management capability exists for cryogenic propellants. NASA has begun a technology program to develop LAD cryogenic fluid management (CFM) technology through a government in-house ground test program of accurately measuring the bubble point delta-pressure for typical screen samples using LO2, LN2, LH2 and LCH4 as test fluids at various fluid temperatures and pressures. This presentation will document the CFM project s progress to date in concept designs, as well ground testing results.

  4. Stent-Grafts for Unruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, John

    2006-06-15

    Aortic stent-grafts were introduced at the beginning of the 1990s as a less invasive method of dealing with aortic aneurysms in patients with poor cardiovascular reserve. The numbers of procedures performed worldwide has increased exponentially despite the current lack of any substantial evidence for long-term efficacy in comparison with the gold standard of open surgical grafting. This review summarizes the evolution of the abdominal aortic stent-graft, the techniques used for assessment and deployment, and the effect of the procedure on both the patient and the device. The recent publication of two national multicenter trials has confirmed that the endovascular technique confers a 2.5-fold reduction in 30-day mortality in comparison with open surgery. However, over 4 years of follow-up, there is a 3-fold increase in the risk of reintervention and the overall costs are 30% greater with endovascular repair. Although the improvement in aneurysm-related mortality persists in the mid-term, because of the initial reduction in perioperative mortality, the all-cause mortality rate at 4 years is actually no better than for open surgery. Longer-term data from the randomized trials are awaited as well as results from the latest trials utilizing state-of-the-art devices. Whilst the overall management of abdominal aortic aneurysms has undoubtedly benefited from the introduction of stent-grafts, open repair currently remains the gold standard treatment.

  5. Human papillomavirus: current status and issues of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Heena; Khan, Fahim H; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2014-02-01

    An association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of cervical cancer was initially suggested over 30 years ago, and today there is clear evidence that certain subtypes of HPV are the causative agents of such malignancies. Papillomaviruses make up a vast family that comprises hundreds of different viruses. These viruses infect epithelia in humans and animals and cause benign hyperproliferative lesions, commonly called warts or papillomas, which can occasionally progress to squamous cell cancer. HPV infections are considered the most common among sexually transmitted diseases. One of the most prevalent cancer types induced by HPV (mostly types 16 and 18) is cervical cancer. Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing this infectious disease. These prophylactic vaccines, based on virus-like particles (VLPs), are extremely effective in providing protection from infection in almost 100 % of cases. VLP vaccines of HPV are subunit vaccines consisting only of the major viral capsid protein of HPV. There are two types of vaccine available: bivalent vaccine (against HPV-16/18) and quadrivalent vaccine (against HPV-6/11/16/18). Second-generation prophylactic HPV vaccines, currently in clinical trials, may hold several merits over the current bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines, such as protection against additional oncogenic HPV types, less dependence on cold-chain storage and distribution, and non-invasive methods of delivery.

  6. The Current Status and Challenges for Upper Atmosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R. W.

    2009-05-01

    real-time data sources for specification and forecast models; (3) The application of a rigorous Kalman filter is not feasible and approximations are necessary; (4) The coupled physics-based models have uncertain parameters that need to be determined and/or have missing physics; and (5) Validation of data assimilation and coupled physics-based models requires massive independent data sets so that statistics can be done to determine the accuracy of the models. The status and challenges related to the development of data assimilation and coupled physics-based models will be discussed.

  7. Origins, current status, and future challenges of green chemistry.

    PubMed

    Anastas, Paul T; Kirchhoff, Mary M

    2002-09-01

    Over the course of the past decade, green chemistry has demonstrated how fundamental scientific methodologies can protect human health and the environment in an economically beneficial manner. Significant progress is being made in several key research areas, such as catalysis, the design of safer chemicals and environmentally benign solvents, and the development of renewable feedstocks. Current and future chemists are being trained to design products and processes with an increased awareness for environmental impact. Outreach activities within the green chemistry community highlight the potential for chemistry to solve many of the global environmental challenges we now face. The origins and basis of green chemistry chart a course for achieving environmental and economic prosperity inherent in a sustainable world. PMID:12234198

  8. Current Status of Thermal Ablation Treatments for Lung Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Shulman, Maria

    2010-01-01

    About 75% of lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates, either due to advanced disease or medical comorbidities. Furthermore, conventional treatments that can be offered to these patients are beneficial only to a small percentage of them. Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive treatment that is commonly used in this group of patients, and which has shown promising results. Currently, the most widely used ablation techniques in the treatment of lung malignancies are radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, and cryoablation. Although the most studied technique is RFA, recent studies with microwave ablation and cryoablation have shown some advantages over RFA. This article reviews the application of thermal ablation in the thorax, including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparison of ablation techniques. PMID:22550366

  9. Some medicinal plants with antiasthmatic potential: a current status

    PubMed Central

    Taur, Dnyaneshwar J; Patil, Ravindra Y

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that is rising in prevalence worldwide with the highest prevalence in industrialized countries. Asthma affect about 300 million people worldwide and it has been estimated that a further 100 million will be affected by 2025. Since the ancient times, plants have been exemplary sources of medicine. Current asthma therapy lack satisfactory success due to adverse effect, hence patients are seeking complementary and alternative medicine to treat their asthma. Ayurveda and other Indian literature mention the use of plants in various human ailments. India has about 45 000 plant species and among them several thousand are claimed to possess medicinal properties. Researches conducted in the last few decades on the plants mentioned in ancient literature or used traditionally for asthma have shown antiasthmatic, antihistaminic and antiallergic activity. This review reveals that some plants and their extract have antiasthmatic, antihistaminic, anticholinergic and antiallergic activity. PMID:23569804

  10. Current status and future developments of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xing; Feng, Lai; Akasaka, Takeshi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), a new class of hybrid molecules formed by encapsulation of metallic species inside fullerene cages, exhibit unique properties that differ distinctly from those of empty fullerenes because of the presence of metals and their hybridization effects via electron transfer. This critical review provides a balanced but not an exhaustive summary regarding almost all aspects of EMFs, including the history, the classification, current progress in the synthesis, extraction, isolation, and characterization of EMFs, as well as their physiochemical properties and applications in fields such as electronics, photovoltaics, biomedicine, and materials science. Emphasis is assigned to experimentally obtained results, especially the X-ray crystallographic characterizations of EMFs and their derivatives, rather than theoretical calculations, although the latter has indeed enhanced our knowledge of metal-cage interactions. Finally, perspectives related to future developments and challenges in the research of EMFs are proposed. (381 references).

  11. [Current status and future perspectives of hepatocyte transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Maupoey, Javier; San Juan, Fernando; López, Rafael; Mir, Jose

    2014-02-01

    The imbalance between the number of potential beneficiaries and available organs, originates the search for new therapeutic alternatives, such as Hepatocyte transplantation (HT).Even though this is a treatment option for these patients, the lack of unanimity of criteria regarding indications and technique, different cryopreservation protocols, as well as the different methodology to assess the response to this therapy, highlights the need of a Consensus Conference to standardize criteria and consider future strategies to improve the technique and optimize the results.Our aim is to review and update the current state of hepatocyte transplantation, emphasizing the future research attempting to solve the problems and improve the results of this treatment. PMID:24007980

  12. Current Status of Mycotoxin Analysis: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Gordon S

    2016-07-01

    It is over 50 years since the discovery of aflatoxins focused the attention of food safety specialists on fungal toxins in the feed and food supply. Since then, analysis of this important group of natural contaminants has advanced in parallel with general developments in analytical science, and current MS methods are capable of simultaneously analyzing hundreds of compounds, including mycotoxins, pesticides, and drugs. This profusion of data may advance our understanding of human exposure, yet constitutes an interpretive challenge to toxicologists and food safety regulators. Despite these advances in analytical science, the basic problem of the extreme heterogeneity of mycotoxin contamination, although now well understood, cannot be circumvented. The real health challenges posed by mycotoxin exposure occur in the developing world, especially among small-scale and subsistence farmers. Addressing these problems requires innovative approaches in which analytical science must also play a role in providing suitable out-of-laboratory analytical techniques. PMID:27455927

  13. [Current status and prospect of translational medicine in nanotechnology].

    PubMed

    Gao, Guang-yu; Chen, Mei-ling; Li, Ming-yuan; Yang, Zhen-bo; Li, Zhi-ping; Mei, Xing-guo

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, nanotechnologies have shown wide application foreground in the biomedical field of medicine laboratory tests, drug delivery, gene therapy and bioremediation. However, in recent years, nanomaterials have been labeled poisonous, because of the disputes and misunderstandings of mainstream views on their safety. Besides, for the barriers of technical issues in preparation like: (1) low efficacy (poor PK & PD and low drug loading), (2) high cost (irreproducibility and difficulty in scale up), little of that research has been successfully translated into commercial products. Currently, along with the new theory of "physical damage is the origin of nanotoxicity", biodegradability and biocompatibility of nanomaterials are listed as the basic principle of safe application of nanomaterials. Combining scientific design based on molecular level with precision control of process engineering will provide a new strategy to overcome the core technical challenges. New turning point of translational medicine in nanotechnology may emerge.

  14. Metagenomics and Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology: Current Status and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Satoshi; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches are now commonly used in microbial ecology to study microbial communities in more detail, including many strains that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory. Bioinformatic analyses make it possible to mine huge metagenomic datasets and discover general patterns that govern microbial ecosystems. However, the findings of typical metagenomic and bioinformatic analyses still do not completely describe the ecology and evolution of microbes in their environments. Most analyses still depend on straightforward sequence similarity searches against reference databases. We herein review the current state of metagenomics and bioinformatics in microbial ecology and discuss future directions for the field. New techniques will allow us to go beyond routine analyses and broaden our knowledge of microbial ecosystems. We need to enrich reference databases, promote platforms that enable meta- or comprehensive analyses of diverse metagenomic datasets, devise methods that utilize long-read sequence information, and develop more powerful bioinformatic methods to analyze data from diverse perspectives. PMID:27383682

  15. Immunotherapy for acne vulgaris: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    There is a high unmet clinical need for new and better treatments in acne vulgaris. Propionibacterium acnes has a strong proinflammatory activity and targets molecules involved in the innate cutaneous immunity, keratinocytes and sebaceous glands of the pilosebaceous follicle. The role of P. acnes in acne confers legitimacy on the possible benefits of immunization-based approaches, which may represent a solution for limiting the development of antibiotic-resistant P. acnes. Various immunization-based approaches have been developed over the last decades, including killed pathogen-based vaccines, vaccination against cell wall-anchored sialidase, monoclonal antibodies to the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson factor of P. acnes, anti-Toll-like receptors vaccines and natural antimicrobial peptides. This review summarizes the current evidence and explores the challenges to making this a realistic treatment option for the future.

  16. Therapeutic drug monitoring for imatinib: Current status and Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Brijesh; Gota, Vikram; Menon, Hari; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena; Patial, Pankaj; Banavali, S. D.

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib is the current gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent pharmacokinetic studies have shown considerable variability in trough concentrations of imatinib due to variations in its metabolism, poor compliance, or drug-drug interactions and highlighted its impact on clinical response. A trough level close to 1000 ng/mL, appears to be correlated with better cytogenetic and molecular responses. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) for imatinib may provide useful added information on efficacy, safety and compliance than clinical assessment alone and help in clinical decision making. It may be particularly helpful in patients with suboptimal response to treatment or treatment failure, severe or rare adverse events, possible drug interactions, or suspected nonadherence. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm relationship between imatinib plasma concentrations with response, and to define effective plasma concentrations in different patient populations. PMID:24516317

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring for imatinib: Current status and Indian experience.

    PubMed

    Arora, Brijesh; Gota, Vikram; Menon, Hari; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena; Patial, Pankaj; Banavali, S D

    2013-07-01

    Imatinib is the current gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent pharmacokinetic studies have shown considerable variability in trough concentrations of imatinib due to variations in its metabolism, poor compliance, or drug-drug interactions and highlighted its impact on clinical response. A trough level close to 1000 ng/mL, appears to be correlated with better cytogenetic and molecular responses. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) for imatinib may provide useful added information on efficacy, safety and compliance than clinical assessment alone and help in clinical decision making. It may be particularly helpful in patients with suboptimal response to treatment or treatment failure, severe or rare adverse events, possible drug interactions, or suspected nonadherence. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm relationship between imatinib plasma concentrations with response, and to define effective plasma concentrations in different patient populations.

  18. Current status of penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon

    2015-01-01

    Although disease-free survival remains the primary goal of prostate cancer treatment, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains a common complication that affects the quality of life. Even though several preventive and therapeutic strategies are available for ED after radical prostatectomy (RP), no specific recommendations have been made on the optimal rehabilitation or treatment strategy. Several treatment options are available, including phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, vacuum erection devices, intracavernosal or intraurethral prostaglandin injections, and penile prostheses. Urologists must consider more effective ways to establish optimal treatments for ED after RP. ED is an important issue among patients with prostate cancer, and many patients hope for early ED recovery after surgery. This review highlights the currently available treatment options for ED after RP and discusses the limitations of each. PMID:25685296

  19. Electroactive Biofilms: Current Status and Future Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Reguera, Gemma; Ringeisen, Bradley; Wang, Zhiwu; Feng, Yujie; Kim, Byung Hong

    2011-01-01

    Electroactive biofilms generated by electrochemically active microorganisms have many potential applications in bioenergy and chemicals production. This review assesses the effects of microbiological and process parameters on enrichment of such biofilms as well as critically evaluates the current knowledge of the mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer in BES systems. First we discuss the role of biofilm forming microorganisms vs. planktonic microorganisms. Physical, chemical and electrochemical parameters which dictate the enrichment and subsequent performance of the biofilms are discussed. Potential dependent biological parameters including biofilm growth rate, specific electron transfer rate and others and their relationship to BES system performance is assessed. A review of the mechanisms of electron transfer in BES systems is included followed by a discussion of biofilm and its exopolymeric components and their electrical conductivity. A discussion of the electroactive biofilms in biocathodes is also included. Finally, we identify the research needs for further development of the electroactive biofilms to enable commercial applications.

  20. Anal cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135

  1. Metagenomics and Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology: Current Status and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Satoshi; Yang, Ching-Chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-09-29

    Metagenomic approaches are now commonly used in microbial ecology to study microbial communities in more detail, including many strains that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory. Bioinformatic analyses make it possible to mine huge metagenomic datasets and discover general patterns that govern microbial ecosystems. However, the findings of typical metagenomic and bioinformatic analyses still do not completely describe the ecology and evolution of microbes in their environments. Most analyses still depend on straightforward sequence similarity searches against reference databases. We herein review the current state of metagenomics and bioinformatics in microbial ecology and discuss future directions for the field. New techniques will allow us to go beyond routine analyses and broaden our knowledge of microbial ecosystems. We need to enrich reference databases, promote platforms that enable meta- or comprehensive analyses of diverse metagenomic datasets, devise methods that utilize long-read sequence information, and develop more powerful bioinformatic methods to analyze data from diverse perspectives. PMID:27383682

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis: current status and new developments.

    PubMed

    Lissens, W; Sermon, K

    1997-08-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a very early form of prenatal diagnosis aimed at eliminating embryos carrying serious genetic diseases before implantation. To this end, two major technologies are in use: the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for monogenic diseases and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomal aberrations. In this review, a number of problems arising from the use of these technologies, as well as their possible solutions and new developments, are discussed. Concerning PCR, the phenomenon of allelic drop-out, as well as methods to reduce this problem, such as fluorescent PCR, are described. The advantages and disadvantages of sperm separation by flow cytometry as an adjunct to sex determination for the avoidance of X-linked disease are discussed. The application of FISH for aneuploidy detection is commented upon and the advances in cell recycling, in which PCR and FISH are combined, are analysed. Finally, diseases for which PGD is currently possible are summarized.

  3. Current status and future prospects of yellow fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew S; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever 17D vaccine is one of the oldest live-attenuated vaccines in current use that is recognized historically for its immunogenic and safe properties. These unique properties of 17D are presently exploited in rationally designed recombinant vaccines targeting not only flaviviral antigens but also other pathogens of public health concern. Several candidate vaccines based on 17D have advanced to human trials, and a chimeric recombinant Japanese encephalitis vaccine utilizing the 17D backbone has been licensed. The mechanism(s) of attenuation for 17D are poorly understood; however, recent insights from large in silico studies have indicated particular host genetic determinants contributing to the immune response to the vaccine, which presumably influences the considerable durability of protection, now in many cases considered to be lifelong. The very rare occurrence of severe adverse events for 17D is discussed, including a recent fatal case of vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease.

  4. [DNA methylation and demethylation: current status and future perspective].

    PubMed

    Dajun, Deng

    2014-05-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in cell differentiation, embryonic development, host adaptations to environmental factors, and pathogenesis through regulation of gene transcription and imprinting, X-inactivation, and defense of foreign genetic material invasion, is currently one of the hottest research fields on epigenetics. In the past few years, a number of important findings on DNA methylation have been achieved. These findings include discovery of TETs-catalyzed cytosine hydroxymethylation and its functions in the early embryonic development; the relationship between active and passive DNA demethylation; establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation patterns and their associations with histone modifications, chromatin configuration, polycomb group proteins and non-coding RNA bindings. DNA methylation has become a new potential biomarker and therapy target.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells and immunomodulation: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, F; Chiu, S M; Motan, D A L; Zhang, Z; Chen, L; Ji, H-L; Tse, H-F; Fu, Q-L; Lian, Q

    2016-01-01

    The unique immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) make them an invaluable cell type for the repair of tissue/ organ damage caused by chronic inflammation or autoimmune disorders. Although they hold great promise in the treatment of immune disorders such as graft versus host disease (GvHD) and allergic disorders, there remain many challenges to overcome before their widespread clinical application. An understanding of the biological properties of MSCs will clarify the mechanisms of MSC-based transplantation for immunomodulation. In this review, we summarize the preclinical and clinical studies of MSCs from different adult tissues, discuss the current hurdles to their use and propose the future development of pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs as an approach to immunomodulation therapy. PMID:26794657

  6. Aptamer Microarrays—Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Martin; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technologies are state of the art in biological research, which requires fast genome, proteome and transcriptome analysis technologies. Often antibodies are applied in protein microarrays as proteomic tools. Since the generation of antibodies against toxic targets or small molecules including organic compounds remains challenging the use of antibodies may be limited in this context. In contrast to this, aptamer microarrays provide alternative techniques to circumvent these limitations. In this article we review the latest developments in aptamer microarray technology. We discuss similarities and differences between DNA and aptamer microarrays and shed light on the post synthesis immobilization of aptamers including corresponding effects on the microarray performance. Finally, we highlight current limitations and future prospects of aptamer microarray technology.

  7. Aptamer Microarrays—Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Martin; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technologies are state of the art in biological research, which requires fast genome, proteome and transcriptome analysis technologies. Often antibodies are applied in protein microarrays as proteomic tools. Since the generation of antibodies against toxic targets or small molecules including organic compounds remains challenging the use of antibodies may be limited in this context. In contrast to this, aptamer microarrays provide alternative techniques to circumvent these limitations. In this article we review the latest developments in aptamer microarray technology. We discuss similarities and differences between DNA and aptamer microarrays and shed light on the post synthesis immobilization of aptamers including corresponding effects on the microarray performance. Finally, we highlight current limitations and future prospects of aptamer microarray technology. PMID:27600216

  8. Preparative Purification of Recombinant Proteins: Current Status and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Saraswat, Mayank; Ravidá, Alessandra; Holthofer, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Advances in fermentation technologies have resulted in the production of increased yields of proteins of economic, biopharmaceutical, and medicinal importance. Consequently, there is an absolute requirement for the development of rapid, cost-effective methodologies which facilitate the purification of such products in the absence of contaminants, such as superfluous proteins and endotoxins. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of a selection of key purification methodologies currently being applied in both academic and industrial settings and discuss how innovative and effective protocols such as aqueous two-phase partitioning, membrane chromatography, and high-performance tangential flow filtration may be applied independently of or in conjunction with more traditional protocols for downstream processing applications. PMID:24455685

  9. Current status of frameless anchored IUD for immediate intracesarean insertion.

    PubMed

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Goldstuck, Norman D; Hasskamp, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Immediate postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) insertion deserves great attention as it can provide immediate, timely and convenient contraception plus the added benefit of preventing repeat unintended pregnancies. Although women post vaginal delivery can benefit from immediate post-placenta contraception, women undergoing Cesarean section clearly need contraception, as an inter-delivery interval shorter than 18 months places them at a high risk for uterine rupture. The main drawback of currently available framed IUD devices for immediate postpartum insertion of an IUD is their high expulsion and displacement rates when inserted immediately postpartum after both vaginal and Cesarean delivery. Current research suggests that a brief window of opportunity exists of 10 minutes for insertion of conventional IUDs after which time expulsion rates both immediately and over time are greatly enhanced. This paper summarizes the current research conducted to overcome the expulsion problems associated with conventional T-shaped devices as well as through the use of an anchored frameless device. In the 1970s and 1980s, attempts were made to solve the expulsion problem by modifying existing devices, such as adding absorbable sutures (Delta-T) or additional appendages. These attempts proved to be clinically unsuccessful as the catgut suture added to the transverse arms did not provide sufficient resistance to prevent downward displacement and expulsion. An anchoring technique to suspend a copper IUD to the fundus of the uterus was developed in Belgium in the 1980s and has been the subject of extensive ongoing clinical research since 1985. Recently the frameless copper releasing anchor IUD, GyneFix, has been tested for postplacental insertion. Initially, the anchor was modified by the inclusion of a biodegradable cone which was added below the anchoring knot. Clinical studies confirmed the adequacy of this approach suggesting that it was technically possible to anchor an IUD

  10. Seismic structure of the moon - A summary of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A seismic model of the moon, refined from previous models with the aid of new data and analyses for seismic events recorded by four Apollo lunar seismic stations and a gravimeter, is outlined. The current model has five zones. The crust is 55-60 km thick. The surface is covered by regolith of varying thicknesses and low seismic velocity. The seismic Q's are extremely high. The upper mantle, 250 km thick, is characterized by seismic velocities close to those of the earth's upper mantle, and shear wave Q of about 4000. Tidally controlled deep moonquakes are concentrated near the boundary of the middle mantle, 600-700 km thick. A lower mantle extending to an undetermined depth is characterized by high attenuation of shear waves. The existence of a low-velocity core is only tentatively proposed.

  11. Biotechnological production of muconic acid: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Xie, Neng-Zhong; Liang, Hong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Muconic acid (MA), a high value-added bio-product with reactive dicarboxylic groups and conjugated double bonds, has garnered increasing interest owing to its potential applications in the manufacture of new functional resins, bio-plastics, food additives, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals. At the very least, MA can be used to produce commercially important bulk chemicals such as adipic acid, terephthalic acid and trimellitic acid. Recently, great progress has been made in the development of biotechnological routes for MA production. This present review provides a comprehensive and systematic overview of recent advances and challenges in biotechnological production of MA. Various biological methods are summarized and compared, and their constraints and possible solutions are also described. Finally, the future prospects are discussed with respect to the current state, challenges, and trends in this field, and the guidelines to develop high-performance microbial cell factories are also proposed for the MA production by systems metabolic engineering. PMID:24751381

  12. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    PubMed

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens. PMID:26960906

  13. Ligninolytic enzymes from Ganoderma spp: current status and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan-Wei; Cong, Wei-Ran; Su, Kai-Qi; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2013-11-01

    White-rot fungal species belonging to Ganoderma have long been used as medicinal mushrooms in many Asian countries. In recent years, however, attention is not just being paid to their pharmacological properties, but to their other potentially valuable features as well, including their secretion of enzymes which decompose lignin. The current literature regarding lignin-modifying enzymes from the genus Ganoderma, their potential uses, and the components, structures and processes of lignocellulose degradation are discussed. The ligninolytic enzymes from the genus Ganoderma, as well as the number of additional enzymes that participate in lignin degradation, are summarized; further, the potential applications of these enzymes are analyzed and probed in this article. This review will provide insight on the valuable applications of Ganoderma spp. and will serve as a useful reference on the use of lignocellulose degradation as a means of environmental protection.

  14. [Current status of dengue virus infections. Epidemiologic and pathogenetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Tolou, H; Baudon, D; Laroche, R

    1997-01-01

    The epidemiology of dengue fever is changing dramatically. The worldwide incidence is rising and clinical symptoms are worsening. Reports describing forms associated with hemorrhage or shock syndrome involving both children and adults are increasingly frequent in regions beyond Southeast Asia where the first cases were observed. Many mechanisms could be implicated in these changes including modifications of the virus, host, vector, or socioeconomic factors. Since no current model allows laboratory analysis of these mechanisms, observation of epidemics is still a major source of data. The findings of well conducted epidemiological studies allow not only assessment of morbidity and mortality in endemic areas and early detection of epidemic outbreaks but also evaluation of socioeconomic impact and effectiveness of control measures. Surveillance techniques must be chosen in function of prevailing local conditions. To ensure reliable results studies should be carried out in collaboration with an international network and a simple and accurate method of disease identification should be used.

  15. The current status of three-dimensional ultrasonography in gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chiou Li

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the most recent cross-sectional imaging modality to acquire three-dimensional (3D) capabilities. The reconstruction of volumetric US data for multiplanar display took a significantly longer time to develop in comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The current equipment for 3D-US is capable of producing high-resolution images in three different planes, including real-time surface-rendered images. The use of 3D-US in gynaecology was accelerated through the development of the endovaginal volume transducer, which allows the automated acquisition of volumetric US data. Although initially considered an adjunct to two-dimensional US, 3D-US is now the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of Müllerian duct anomalies and the location of intrauterine devices.

  16. Pharmacotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koji; Onda, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-05-01

    Several 'lines of therapy' that utilize cytotoxic agents and are driven by platinum-free intervals are the current standard of care for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. For patients with platinum-resistant disease, single agent chemotherapy (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, topotecan, gemcitabine or weekly paclitaxel) is the standard of care. For patients with platinum-sensitive disease, combination chemotherapy (carboplatin plus paclitaxel, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or gemcitabine) is the standard of care. In addition, antiangiogenic therapy using bevacizumab is an established option. Future directions could include 'lines of therapy' with biologic agents driven by specific biologic targets. Data from antiangiogenic agents (trebananib, pazopanib and cediranib), antifolate drugs (farletuzumab and vintafolide), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (olaparib and veliparib), mTOR inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and immune editing agents (nivolumab) have been summarized in this review.

  17. Bacteria in Nanoparticle Synthesis: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Microbial metal reduction can be a strategy for remediation of metal contaminations and wastes. Bacteria are capable of mobilization and immobilization of metals and in some cases, the bacteria which can reduce metal ions show the ability to precipitate metals at nanometer scale. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) using bacteria has emerged as rapidly developing research area in green nanotechnology across the globe with various biological entities being employed in synthesis of NPs constantly forming an impute alternative for conventional chemical and physical methods. Optimization of the processes can result in synthesis of NPs with desired morphologies and controlled sizes, fast and clean. The aim of this review is, therefore, to make a reflection on the current state and future prospects and especially the possibilities and limitations of the above mentioned bio-based technique for industries. PMID:27355054

  18. Genetic toxicology: current status of methods of carcinogen identification.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, R W; Zeiger, E

    1993-01-01

    A critical aspect of the efforts to relate the results of short-term genetic toxicity tests with those from long-term rodent tests for carcinogens is the quality and consistency of the studies conducted by the National Toxicology Program. Analysis of the results in relationship to chemical structure has shown that mutagenic potential is a primary risk factor for carcinogen identification. Chemicals positive in the Salmonella assay-generally possess "structural alerts" for electrophilic interactions, are predominantly represented among chemicals producing trans-species carcinogenic effects in rodents, and among those identified as carcinogenic to humans. Current efforts are aimed at defining toxicological, structural, and mechanistic properties of nonmutagens that are carcinogenic in rodents. PMID:8354178

  19. The Primordial Deuterium Abundance: Current Status and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, John

    2007-04-01

    Measurements of the abundances of the light nuclei (H, D, ^3He, ^4He, and ^7 Li) offer precise constraints on the cosmological parameters relevant to big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Deuterium is of particular interest, since, at the level of cosmological relevance, it is produced only during BBN. The advent of high resolution spectrographs on telescopes both on the ground and in space has enabled the measurement of the abundance of deuterium in a number of astrophysical environments, including those which give the primordial abundance, namely the absorption line systems seen toward distant quasars. In this talk, I will discuss the current state of the deuterium abundance, with a focus given to the primordial abundance, and will discuss the future roles deuterium can play in futher constraining physics during the epoch of BBN.

  20. Cardiac PET Perfusion Tracers: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Maddahi, Jamshid; Packard, René R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is increasingly used for non-invasive detection and evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the widespread use of PET MPI has been limited by shortcomings of the current PET perfusion tracers. Availability of these tracers is limited by need for an on-site (15O water and 13N ammonia) or nearby (13N ammonia) cyclotron or commitment to costly generators (82Rb). Due to short half-lives ranging from 76sec for 82Rb, to 2.1min for 15O water and 10min for 13N ammonia, their use in conjunction with treadmill exercise stress testing is either not possible (82Rb and 15O water) or is not practical (13N ammonia). Furthermore, the long positron range of 82Rb makes image resolution suboptimal and its low extraction limits its defect resolution. In recent years, development of an 18F labeled PET perfusion tracer has gathered considerable interest. The longer half-life of 18F (108 minutes) would make the tracer available as a unit dose from regional cyclotrons and allow use in conjunction with treadmill exercise testing. Furthermore, the short positron range of 18F would result in better image resolution. 18F flurpiridaz is by far the most thoroughly studied in animal models, and is the only F18-based PET MPI radiotracer currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Pre-clinical and clinical experience with 18F flurpiridaz demonstrated a high myocardial extraction fraction, high image and defect resolution, high myocardial uptake, slow myocardial clearance, and high myocardial-to-background contrast which was stable over time – important properties of an ideal PET MPI radiotracer. Pre-clinical data from other 18F labeled myocardial perfusion tracers are encouraging. PMID:25234078

  1. Assessment of the current status of basic nuclear data compilations

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    The Panel on Basic Nuclear Data Compilations believes that it is important to provide the user with an evaluated nuclear database of the highest quality, dependability, and currency. It is also important that the evaluated nuclear data are easily accessible to the user. In the past the panel concentrated its concern on the cycle time for the publication of A-chain evaluations. However, the panel now recognizes that publication cycle time is no longer the appropriate goal. Sometime in the future, publication of the evaluated A-chains will evolve from the present hard-copy Nuclear Data Sheets on library shelves to purely electronic publication, with the advent of universal access to terminals and the nuclear databases. Therefore, the literature cut-off date in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is rapidly becoming the only important measure of the currency of an evaluated A-chain. Also, it has become exceedingly important to ensure that access to the databases is as user-friendly as possible and to enable electronic publication of the evaluated data files. Considerable progress has been made in these areas: use of the on-line systems has almost doubled in the past year, and there has been initial development of tools for electronic evaluation, publication, and dissemination. Currently, the nuclear data effort is in transition between the traditional and future methods of dissemination of the evaluated data. Also, many of the factors that adversely affect the publication cycle time simultaneously affect the currency of the evaluated nuclear database. Therefore, the panel continues to examine factors that can influence cycle time: the number of evaluators, the frequency with which an evaluation can be updated, the review of the evaluation, and the production of the evaluation, which currently exists as a hard-copy issue of Nuclear Data Sheets.

  2. Nitric oxide and phytohormone interactions: current status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is currently considered a ubiquitous signal in plant systems, playing significant roles in a wide range of responses to environmental and endogenous cues. During the signaling events leading to these plant responses, NO frequently interacts with plant hormones and other endogenous molecules, at times originating remarkably complex signaling cascades. Accumulating evidence indicates that virtually all major classes of plant hormones may influence, at least to some degree, the endogenous levels of NO. In addition, studies conducted during the induction of diverse plant responses have demonstrated that NO may also affect biosynthesis, catabolism/conjugation, transport, perception, and/or transduction of different phytohormones, such as auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonates, and brassinosteroids. Although still not completely elucidated, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between NO and plant hormones have recently been investigated in a number of species and plant responses. This review specifically focuses on the current knowledge of the mechanisms implicated in NO–phytohormone interactions during the regulation of developmental and metabolic plant events. The modifications triggered by NO on the transcription of genes encoding biosynthetic/degradative enzymes as well as proteins involved in the transport and signal transduction of distinct plant hormones will be contextualized during the control of developmental, metabolic, and defense responses in plants. Moreover, the direct post-translational modification of phytohormone biosynthetic enzymes and receptors through S-nitrosylation will also be discussed as a key mechanism for regulating plant physiological responses. Finally, some future perspectives toward a more complete understanding of NO–phytohormone interactions will also be presented and discussed. PMID:24130567

  3. Current status and future opportunities for controlling acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Melmed, Shlomo; Vance, Mary Lee; Barkan, Ariel L; Bengtsson, Bengt-Ake; Kleinberg, David; Klibanski, Anne; Trainer, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    Growth-hormone (GH) secreting adenomas, including acromegaly, account for approximately one-sixth of all pituitary adenomas and are associated with mortality rates at least twice that of the general population. The ultimate goal of therapy for acromegaly is normalization of morbidity and mortality rates achieved through removal or reduction of the tumor mass and normalization of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels. Previously published efficacy results of current treatment modalities (surgery, conventional radiation, and medical therapy with dopamine agonists and somatostatin analogs) are often difficult to compare because of the different criteria used to define cure (some of which are now considered inadequate). For each of these modalities, pooled data from a series of acromegaly studies were reviewed for rates of IGF-I normalization, a currently accepted definition of cure. The results showed overall cure rates of approximately 10% for bromocriptine, 34% for cabergoline, 36% for conventional radiation, 50-90% for surgery for microadenomas and less than 50% for macroadenomas, and 54-66% for octreotide. These cure rates based on IGF-I normalization are generally less than those reported for cure based solely on GH levels. Novel new therapies for acromegaly include the somatostatin analog, lanreotide, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and pegvisomant, the first in its class of new GH receptor antagonists. Although it does not appear that Gamma Knife radiosurgery results in significantly higher cure rates or fewer complications, it does provide a notable improvement in delivery compared with conventional radiation. Early studies have reported IGF-I normalization in 48% of lanreotide-treated patients and up to 97% of pegvisomant-treated. PMID:12812311

  4. Current status on prevention and treatment of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Rosa M; Morán, Miguel; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; García-Estrada, Carlos; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2016-08-30

    Canine leishmaniasis (CanL) is a parasite-borne disease mainly induced by Leishmania infantum in the Old World and Leishmania chagasi (infantum) in the New World. CanL is a zoonosis transmitted by the bite of infected Phlebotominae flies that act as vectors. CanL is a very serious disease that usually produces death when remains untreated and can be a focus of transmission to other dogs or humans. Infected dogs and other domestic and wild animals act as reservoirs and are a real threat to uninfected/healthy dogs and humans in endemic areas where the sand flies are present. Prevention of new infections in dogs can help to stop the current increase of the disease in humans, reinforcing the concept of "One Health" approach. The management of CanL is being performed using prophylactic measures in healthy dogs - insecticides impregnated in collars or immunostimulants applied by spot-on devices - and chemotherapy in animals that suffer from the disease. Antimonials as first-line monotherapy have proven efficacy in reducing most of the clinical signs of CanL, but they need to be administered during several days, and no complete parasite clearance is achieved, favouring the presence of relapses among treated dogs. Therefore, new drugs, such as miltefosine, or combinations of this drug or antimonials with allopurinol are in the pipeline of clinical treatment of CanL. Recently, there has been an emergence of protective - prophylactic - and curative - autogenous vaccines - immunotherapy tools to face CanL, whose results are still under study. This review highlights the current use of preventive and eradicative weapons to fight against this disease, which is a scourge for dogs and a continuous threat to human beings. PMID:27523945

  5. Current status of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sangeetha M; Matthews, N Shaun

    2012-10-01

    In an era during which minimally invasive procedures are increasingly becoming the norm, arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) seems to be infrequently used for diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the TMJ. The reasons for this are not clear. The purpose of this study was to find out the current state of arthroscopy of the TMJ in the UK and, more specifically, how often it is used, the indications for its use, the level of experience of practising surgeons, and the reasons for not using it. Information was gathered between 2009 and 2010 from a postal and e-mail questionnaire to all oral and maxillofacial consultants in the UK. Of the 346 consultants, 215 (60%) responded to the questionnaire. Forty-two said that they currently used arthroscopy of the TMJ, and 33 of those (81%) have more than 5 years' experience. During the past year, a total of 8 consultants nationally have done 20 arthroscopies or more. Thirty-three of the procedures (81%) were done for both diagnosis and treatment. Lack of perceived need of patients and lack of interest in this specialty were the main reasons given for not doing arthroscopy, lack of training being a key secondary reason. The Storz and Olympus systems were the most commonly used within the UK. Results seem to support the opinion that arthroscopy of the TMJ is under-used, and consideration should be given to ensuring that trainees are instructed in its use, which is important in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the TMJ.

  6. Vaccines against Gonorrhea: Current status and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jerse, Ann E.; Bash, Margaret C.; Russell, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Gonorrhea occurs at high incidence throughout the world and significantly impacts reproductive health and the spread of human immunodeficiency virus. Current control measures are inadequate and seriously threatened by the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance. Progress on gonorrhea vaccines has been slow; however, recent advances justify significant effort in this area. Conserved vaccine antigens have been identified that elicit bactericidal antibodies and, or play key roles in pathogenesis that could be targeted by a vaccine-induced response. A murine genital tract infection model is available for systematic testing of antigens, immunization routes and adjuvants, and transgenic mice exist to relieve some host restrictions. Furthermore, mechanisms by which N. gonorrhoeae avoids inducing a protective adaptive response are being elucidated using human cells and the mouse model. Induction of a Th1 response in mice clears infection and induces a memory response, which suggests Th1-inducing adjuvants may be key in vaccine-induced protection. Continued research in this area should include human testing and clinical studies to confirm or negate findings from experimental systems and to define protective host factors. PMID:24016806

  7. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  8. The current status of occupational health in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueyan; Li, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to summarize the major health problems among Chinese workers, the strategies and measures for occupational hazards control, the network and organizations of occupational health administration, and the achievements and current challenges of occupational health in China. Results The situation of occupational health was found to be still serious in China. Enterprises with occupational hazards were widely distributed, the exposed population and cases of occupational diseases were numerous, and occupational risks were being transferred from the city to the countryside and from developed areas to developing ones. New emerging problems coexisted with traditional occupational hazards. Besides, a lack of occupational health services for migrant workers could be a major problem for a long time. Conclusions It is necessary to improve the fields related to occupational health, such as the supervision and administration of small- and medium-scale enterprises, research into key techniques for the prevention and control of occupational hazards, systems for the diagnosis and reporting of occupational diseases, and the training of health professionals. PMID:21432554

  9. Alternatives to animal testing: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Liebsch, Manfred; Grune, Barbara; Seiler, Andrea; Butzke, Daniel; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Pirow, Ralph; Adler, Sarah; Riebeling, Christian; Luch, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Center for Alternative Methods to Animal Experiments (ZEBET), an international symposium was held at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) in Berlin. At the same time, this symposium was meant to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the book "The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique" by Russell and Burch in 1959 in which the 3Rs principle (that is, Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement) has been coined and introduced to foster the development of alternative methods to animal testing. Another topic addressed by the symposium was the new vision on "Toxicology in the twenty-first Century", as proposed by the US-National Research Council, which aims at using human cells and tissues for toxicity testing in vitro rather than live animals. An overview of the achievements and current tasks, as well as a vision of the future to be addressed by ZEBET@BfR in the years to come is outlined in the present paper.

  10. Laccase applications in biofuels production: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kudanga, Tukayi; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize

    2014-08-01

    The desire to reduce dependence on the ever diminishing fossil fuel reserves coupled with the impetus towards green energy has seen increased research in biofuels as alternative sources of energy. Lignocellulose materials are one of the most promising feedstocks for advanced biofuels production. However, their utilisation is dependent on the efficient hydrolysis of polysaccharides, which in part is dependent on cost-effective and benign pretreatment of biomass to remove or modify lignin and release or expose sugars to hydrolytic enzymes. Laccase is one of the enzymes that are being investigated not only for potential use as pretreatment agents in biofuel production, mainly as a delignifying enzyme, but also as a biotechnological tool for removal of inhibitors (mainly phenolic) of subsequent enzymatic processes. The current review discusses the major advances in the application of laccase as a potential pretreatment strategy, the underlying principles as well as directions for future research in the search for better enzyme-based technologies for biofuel production. Future perspectives could include synergy between enzymes that may be required for optimal results and the adoption of the biorefinery concept in line with the move towards the global implementation of the bioeconomy strategy. PMID:24841120

  11. The Evolution of Process Safety: Current Status and Future Direction.

    PubMed

    Mannan, M Sam; Reyes-Valdes, Olga; Jain, Prerna; Tamim, Nafiz; Ahammad, Monir

    2016-06-01

    The advent of the industrial revolution in the nineteenth century increased the volume and variety of manufactured goods and enriched the quality of life for society as a whole. However, industrialization was also accompanied by new manufacturing and complex processes that brought about the use of hazardous chemicals and difficult-to-control operating conditions. Moreover, human-process-equipment interaction plus on-the-job learning resulted in further undesirable outcomes and associated consequences. These problems gave rise to many catastrophic process safety incidents that resulted in thousands of fatalities and injuries, losses of property, and environmental damages. These events led eventually to the necessity for a gradual development of a new multidisciplinary field, referred to as process safety. From its inception in the early 1970s to the current state of the art, process safety has come to represent a wide array of issues, including safety culture, process safety management systems, process safety engineering, loss prevention, risk assessment, risk management, and inherently safer technology. Governments and academic/research organizations have kept pace with regulatory programs and research initiatives, respectively. Understanding how major incidents impact regulations and contribute to industrial and academic technology development provides a firm foundation to address new challenges, and to continue applying science and engineering to develop and implement programs to keep hazardous materials within containment. Here the most significant incidents in terms of their impact on regulations and the overall development of the field of process safety are described. PMID:26979411

  12. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nirupama; Needles, Andrew; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionizing irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of preclinical and clinical ultrasound systems , the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. PMID:20541656

  13. Vaccines against gonorrhea: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Jerse, Ann E; Bash, Margaret C; Russell, Michael W

    2014-03-20

    Gonorrhea occurs at high incidence throughout the world and significantly impacts reproductive health and the spread of human immunodeficiency virus. Current control measures are inadequate and seriously threatened by the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance. Progress on gonorrhea vaccines has been slow; however, recent advances justify significant effort in this area. Conserved vaccine antigens have been identified that elicit bactericidal antibodies and, or play key roles in pathogenesis that could be targeted by a vaccine-induced response. A murine genital tract infection model is available for systematic testing of antigens, immunization routes and adjuvants, and transgenic mice exist to relieve some host restrictions. Furthermore, mechanisms by which Neisseria gonorrhoeae avoids inducing a protective adaptive response are being elucidated using human cells and the mouse model. Induction of a Th1 response in mice clears infection and induces a memory response, which suggests Th1-inducing adjuvants may be key in vaccine-induced protection. Continued research in this area should include human testing and clinical studies to confirm or negate findings from experimental systems and to define protective host factors.

  14. Current Status of Herbal Drugs in India: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Ashok D.B.; Devasagayam, Thomas P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Herbal drugs constitute a major share of all the officially recognised systems of health in India viz. Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha, Homeopathy and Naturopathy, except Allopathy. More than 70% of India’s 1.1 billion population still use these non-allopathic systems of medicine. Currently, there is no separate category of herbal drugs or dietary supplements, as per the Indian Drugs Act. However, there is a vast experiential-evidence base for many of the natural drugs. This offers immense opportunities for Observational Therapeutics and Reverse Pharmacology. Evidence-based herbals are widely used in the diverse systems and manufactured, as per the pharmacopoeial guidelines, by a well-organised industry. Significant basic and clinical research has been carried out on the medicinal plants and their formulations, with the state-of-the-art methods in a number of Institutes/Universities. There are some good examples. Indian medicinal plants also provide a rich source for antioxidants that are known to prevent/delay different diseased states. The antioxidant protection is observed at different levels. The medicinal plants also contain other beneficial compounds like ingredients for functional foods. Hence, the global knowledge about Ayurveda and Indian herbals will hopefully be enhanced by information on the evidence-base of these plants. This will yield rich dividends in the coming years. PMID:18392106

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia in children: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) accounts for 25% of pediatric leukemia and affects approximately 180 patients annually in Japan. The treatment outcome for pediatric AML has improved through advances in chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), supportive care, and optimal risk stratification. Currently, clinical pediatric AML studies are conducted separately according to the AML subtypes: de novo AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and myeloid leukemia with Down syndrome (ML-DS). Children with de novo AML are treated mainly with anthracyclines and cytarabine, in some cases with HSCT, and the overall survival (OS) rate now approaches 70%. Children with APL are treated with an all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-combined regimen with an 80-90% OS. Children with ML-DS are treated with a less intensive regimen compared with non-DS patients, and the OS is approximately 80%. HSCT in first remission is restricted to children with high-risk de novo AML only. To further improve outcomes, it will be necessary to combine more accurate risk stratification strategies using molecular genetic analysis with assessment of minimum residual disease, and the introduction of new drugs in international collaborative clinical trials. PMID:26645706

  16. Laparoscopic splenectomy for primary immune thrombocytopenia: Current status and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dong; Huang, Chen-Song; Huang, Shao-Bin; Zheng, Chao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated disorder affecting both adults and children, characterised by bleeding complications and low platelet counts. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for ITP, but only 20%-40% of cases achieve a stable response. Splenectomy is the main therapy for patients failing to respond to corticosteroids for decades, and about two-thirds of patients achieve a long-lasting response. Although some new drugs are developed to treat ITP as second-line therapies in recent years, splenectomy is still the better choice with less cost and more efficiency. Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) for ITP proves to be a safe technique associated with lower morbidity and faster recovery and similar hematological response when compared to traditional open splenectomy. Based on the unified hematological outcome criteria by current international consensus, the response rate of splenectomy should be reassessed. So far, there are not widely accepted preoperative clinical indicators predicting favorable response to LS. Since the patients undergoing surgery take the risk of complications and poor hematological outcome, the great challenge facing the doctors is to identify a reliable biomarker for predicting long-term outcome of splenectomy which can help make the decision of operation. PMID:27668071

  17. Balkan endemic nephropathy—current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlović, Nikola M.

    2013-01-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), originally described in 1956, is a unique familial, chronic renal disease encountered with a high-prevalence rate in Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The most prominent features of the disease are its endemic nature, long-incubation period, familial clustering of the disease and an unusually high incidence of associated upper urothelial cancer (UUC). There are no clear-cut data on BEN incidence and prevalence, since the studies carried out in different endemic areas yielded contradictory information. In spite of intermittent variations, the incidence of new cases has remained stable over time. It has been estimated that almost 100 000 people are at risk of BEN, whereas 25 000 have the disease. The clinical signs and symptoms of BEN are non-specific and often remain unrecognized for years. There are no pathognomonic diagnostic features of BEN, but the set of epidemiological, clinical and biochemical data along with the pattern of pathologic injury in the absence of any other renal diseases are highly suggestive of this entity. Although the aetiology has been extensively studied, fostering the publication of various hypotheses, only one of them has provided conclusive evidence related to the aetiology of BEN. Studies conducted over the past decade have provided particularly strong arguments that BEN and UUC are caused by chronic poisoning with aristolochic acids (AAs). In light of these later studies, one can raise the question whether AAs could be responsible for previously and currently widespread unrecognized global renal disease and UUC. PMID:26064484

  18. Nanotechnology in neurology: Genesis, current status, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ambesh, Paurush; Angeli, Daniel Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a promising, novel field of technological development. There is great potential in research and clinical applications for neurological diseases. Here we chronicle the inception of nanotechnology, discuss its integration with neurology, and highlight the challenges in current application. Some of the problems involving practical use of neuronanotechnology are direct biological toxicity, visualization of the nanodevice, and the short life expectancy of nanomachinery. Neuron cell therapy is an upcoming field for the treatment of challenging problems in neurology. Peptide nanofibers based on amphiphilic molecules have been developed that can autoregulate their structure depending on the conditions of the surrounding milieu. Such frameworks are promising for serving as drug delivery systems or communication bridges between damaged neurons. For common disabling diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and multiple sclerosis (MS), recent developments have seen revolutionary nanotech-based novelties, which are discussed here in detail. Bioimaging integrated with nanoneuromedicine has opened up new doors for cancer and infection therapeutics. PMID:26713006

  19. The current status of targeted radiotherapy in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gaze, M N

    1996-10-01

    Biologically targeted radiotherapy in clinical practice requires a molecule which has a relative specificity for tumour tissue--the missile--coupled to a radionuclide with appropriate physical characteristics--the warhead. When administered to a patient this combination should result in selective irradiation of the target tumour cells with relative sparing of normal tissues. Simple ions and small molecules which follow physiological pathways as either the natural substrates or analogues form the best examples of biological targeting. Clinically valuable results are seen with, for instance, iodine uptake by normal and malignant thyroid cells, incorporation of the calci-mimetic element strontium in areas of increased bone metabolism and accumulation of the catecholamine analogue meta-iodobenzylguanidine in neuroblastoma. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting vehicles has not proved to be a panacea, yet some patients with lymphoma, hepatoma and ovarian carcinoma have obtained benefit. Current clinical studies in targeted radiotherapy focus on the integration of radionuclide treatment with conventional treatments, and the optimization of such combined approaches. The development of modifications to offset the limitations inherent in the use of crude antibodies also offers an opportunity for improved clinical outcomes.

  20. Current Status Of The NAVSEA Synchronous Scanning Laser Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Garvis, Darrel; Kennedy, Randall; McRae, Thomas G.

    1988-12-01

    This paper constitutes an update on our efforts to develop an underwater laser-based imaging system (UWLIS). The work is being performed under contract from the Naval Sea Systems Command Office of Salvage and Diving (NAUSEA/00C) in order to provide instrumentation that will improve the visibility range available to deep-ocean (1500-6000 m) submersible vehicles during ocean-floor search-and-salvage operations. In general, these submersibles are remotely operated vehicles (ROV) that currently employ high-intensity floodlights and low-light-level TV cameras to produce video images of the seafloor, which are relayed to the mother ship to allow target identification. Often, these floodlight-based systems require that the ROV come within 6 to 10 m of the target in order to positively identify it. This poses both a risk of damaging the vehicle on outcropping seafloor terrain features and an increase in mission cost due to the time lost on maneuvering to identify false targets. Given that salvage-operation costs typically range from 1000 to 3000 per hour, a system that would improve the visibility range from 10 to 100 m would save thousands of dollars and greatly increase the probability of success of these missions.

  1. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  2. Current status and future directions of pharmacological therapy for acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Moisés; Espinosa, Etual; Ramírez, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic systemic disorder caused in the vast majority of cases by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and resulting in significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. The treatment of choice is the trans-sphenoidal resection of the adenoma, and although 80% of patients with microadenomas or confined macroadenomas achieve biochemical remission, the surgical success rate for patients harboring tumors with extrasellar extension is below 50%. Thus, a considerable proportion of patients will require some form of adjuvant treatment. Acromegaly can be approached pharmacologically by inhibiting GH secretion by the tumor (somatostatin analogues, dopamine agonists) or by antagonizing GH actions at its target tissues (GH receptor antagonists). The primary pharmacological treatment of acromegaly is increasingly gaining acceptance by both physicians and patients. The decision to use primary pharmacological treatment has to take into account the clinical characteristics of the patient (presence of comorbidities that significantly increase the surgical risk) and the biological nature of the adenoma (tumor size and location), as well as other aspects such as the availability of a pituitary surgeon and the cost of medications. This review provides a critical summary and update of the pharmacological treatment of acromegaly focusing both, on well-established agents and strategies as well as on novel compounds that are currently being developed.

  3. Current status of active surveillance in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mun Su

    2016-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) is a management strategy involving close monitoring the course of disease with the expectation to intervene if the cancer progress, in a super-selected group of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Determining AS candidates should be based on careful individualized weighing of numerous factors: life expectancy, general health condition, disease characteristics, potential side effects of treatment, and patient preference. Several protocols have been developed to determine insignificant PCa for choosing ideal AS candidates. Results regarding disease reclassification during AS have been also reported. In an effort to enhance accuracy during selection of AS candidate, there were several reports on using magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of insignificant PCa. Currently, there is an urgent need for further clinical studies regarding the criteria for recommending AS, the criteria for reclassification on AS, and the schedule for AS. Considering the racial differences in behavior of PCa between Western and Asian populations, more stringent AS protocols for Asian patients should be established from additional, well-designed, large clinical studies. PMID:26966722

  4. Current Status of Malaria and Potential for Control

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the world's worst health problems with 1.5 to 2.7 million deaths annually; these deaths are primarily among children under 5 years of age and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. Of significance, more people are dying from malaria today than 30 years ago. This review considers the factors which have contributed to this gloomy picture, including those which relate to the vector, the female anopheline mosquito; to human activity such as creating new mosquito breeding sites, the impact of increased numbers of people, and how their migratory behavior can increase the incidence and spread of malaria; and the problems of drug resistance by the parasites to almost all currently available antimalarial drugs. In a selective manner, this review describes what is being done to ameliorate this situation both in terms of applying existing methods in a useful or even crucial role in control and prevention and in terms of new additions to the antimalarial armory that are being developed. Topics covered include biological control of mosquitoes, the use of insecticide-impregnated bed nets, transgenic mosquitoes manipulated for resistance to malaria parasites, old and new antimalarial drugs, drug resistance and how best to maintain the useful life of antimalarials, immunity to malaria and the search for antimalarial vaccines, and the malaria genome project and the potential benefits to accrue from it. PMID:11148010

  5. The current status of biomarkers for predicting toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Aubrecht, Jiri; Boekelheide, Kim; Brewster, David W; Vaidya, Vishal S; Anderson, Linnea; Burt, Deborah; Dere, Edward; Hwang, Kathleen; Pacheco, Sara; Saikumar, Janani; Schomaker, Shelli; Sigman, Mark; Goodsaid, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are significant rates of attrition in drug development. A number of compounds fail to progress past preclinical development due to limited tools that accurately monitor toxicity in preclinical studies and in the clinic. Research has focused on improving tools for the detection of organ-specific toxicity through the identification and characterization of biomarkers of toxicity. Areas covered This article reviews what we know about emerging biomarkers in toxicology, with a focus on the 2012 Northeast Society of Toxicology meeting titled ‘Translational Biomarkers in Toxicology.’ The areas covered in this meeting are summarized and include biomarkers of testicular injury and dysfunction, emerging biomarkers of kidney injury and translation of emerging biomarkers from preclinical species to human populations. The authors also provide a discussion about the biomarker qualification process and possible improvements to this process. Expert opinion There is currently a gap between the scientific work in the development and qualification of novel biomarkers for nonclinical drug safety assessment and how these biomarkers are actually used in drug safety assessment. A clear and efficient path to regulatory acceptance is needed so that breakthroughs in the biomarker toolkit for nonclinical drug safety assessment can be utilized to aid in the drug development process. PMID:23961847

  6. Commercial nuclear reactors and waste: the current status

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, A.M.; Robinson, J.V.

    1980-04-01

    During the last five years, the declared size of the commercial light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power industry in the US has steadily decreased. As of January 1980, the total number of power plants had dropped to 191 from the 226 in December 31, 1974. At least another nine were cancelled in the last few months. This report was developed as the first of a series to track implications to waste management due to such changes in the declared size of the industry. For the presently declared size, key conclusions are: the declared reactors will peak at a capacity of 162 GWe and consume about 10/sup 6/ MTU as enrichment feed. As few as two repositories of about 100,000 MTHM capacity each would hold the waste. Predisposal storage (reactor basins and AFRs) would peak at less than 100,000 MTHM (in the year 2020) with one repository opening in the year 1997 and the other in the year 2020. Most of the 100,000 MTHM would have to be in AFR storage unless current practice regarding reactor basin size was radically changed.

  7. Percutaneous minimally invasive treatment of malignant biliary strictures: current status.

    PubMed

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2014-04-01

    The concept of percutaneous management of malignant biliary obstruction has not significantly changed in the last two decades and is based on the successful drainage of bile toward the duodenum, which normalizes liver function and prevents the development of cholangitis and sepsis. However, patient survival has changed slightly in the last two decades due to the advance of the diagnostic methods, chemo-radiotherapy protocols, and minimally invasive local control of the disease. Bare metal stents have not improved; however, newly developed covered biliary stents have been designed, and there is now evidence supporting their use in the clinical practice. However, other novel devices that may potentially offer benefit to patients with malignant biliary obstruction have been developed, such as drug-eluting biliary stents and intraductal ablation devices, and first feasibility trials have been published that offer encouraging results. These new technological developments, in combination with increased patient survival, bring new exciting data in this constantly developing area. The purpose of this review article is to investigate the latest published evidence on percutaneous minimal invasive palliation of malignant biliary disease and to delineate current trends.

  8. The acute hepatic porphyrias: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Siegesmund, Marko; van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne-Moniek; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; Frank, Jorge

    2010-10-01

    The porphyrias are predominantly inherited metabolic disorders, which result from a specific deficiency of one of the eight enzymes along the pathway of haem biosynthesis. Historically, they have been classified into hepatic and erythropoietic forms, based on the primary site of expression of the prevailing dysfunctional enzyme. From a clinical point of view, however, it is more convenient to subdivide them into acute and non-acute porphyrias, thereby primarily considering the potential occurrence of life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Unrecognised or untreated, such an acute porphyric attack is associated with a significant mortality of up to 10%. The acute hepatic porphyrias comprise acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Making a precise diagnosis may be difficult because the different types of porphyrias may show overlapping clinical and biochemical characteristics. To date, the therapeutic possibilities are limited and mainly symptomatic. In this overview we report on what is currently known about pathogenesis, clinic, diagnostics, and therapy of the acute hepatic porphyrias. We further point out actual and future challenges in the management of these diseases.

  9. Current Status of the Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be the most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. One particular fusion concept which seems to be particularly well suited for fusion propulsion applications is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM). An experimental GDM device has been constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the feasibility of this type of propulsion system. An initial shakedown of the device is currently underway with initial experiments slated to occur in late 2001. This device would operate at much higher plasma densities and with much larger L/D ratios than previous mirror machines. The high L/D ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. The high plasma density results in the plasma behaving much more like a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with 'loss cone' microinstabilities. The device has been constructed to allow a considerable degree of flexibility in its configuration thus permitting the experiment to grow over time without necessitating a great deal of additional fabrication.

  10. Current status of vaccine development for tularemia preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kee-Jong; Park, Pil-Gu; Seo, Sang-Hwan; Rhie, Gi-eun

    2013-01-01

    Tularemia is a high-risk infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Due to its high fatality at very low colony-forming units (less than 10), F. tularensis is considered as a powerful potential bioterrorism agent. Vaccine could be the most efficient way to prevent the citizen from infection of F. tularensis when the bioterrorism happens, but officially approved vaccine with both efficacy and safety is not developed yet. Research for the development of tularemia vaccine has been focusing on the live attenuated vaccine strain (LVS) for long history, still there are no LVS confirmed for the safety which should be an essential factor for general vaccination program. Furthermore the LVS did not show protection efficacy against high-risk subspecies tularensis (type A) as high as the level against subspecies holarctica (type B) in human. Though the subunit or recombinant vaccine candidates have been considered for better safety, any results did not show better prevention efficacy than the LVS candidate against F. tularensis infection. Currently there are some more trials to develop vaccine using mutant strains or nonpathogenic F. novicida strain, but it did not reveal effective candidates overwhelming the LVS either. Difference in the protection efficacy of LVS against type A strain in human and the low level protection of many subunit or recombinant vaccine candidates lead the scientists to consider the live vaccine development using type A strain could be ultimate answer for the tularemia vaccine development. PMID:23596588

  11. Juvenile fibromyalgia: current status of research and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Ting, Tracy V.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM) is a poorly understood chronic pain condition most commonly affecting adolescent girls. The condition is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and other associated symptoms, including fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, headaches, irritable bowel symptoms, dysautonomia and mood disorders such as anxiety and/or depression. In the past few years, there has been a greater focus on understanding JFM in adolescents. Research studies have provided insight into the clinical characteristics of this condition and its effect on both short-term and long-term psychosocial and physical functioning. The importance of early and effective intervention is being recognized, as research has shown that symptoms of JFM tend to persist and do not resolve over time as was previously believed. Efforts to improve treatments for JFM are underway, and new evidence strongly points to the potential benefits of cognitive–behavioural therapy on improving mood and daily functioning. Research into pharmacotherapy and other nonpharmacological options is in progress. Advancements in the understanding of adult fibromyalgia have paved the way for future studies on diagnosis, assessment and management of JFM. This Review focuses on our current knowledge of the condition, provides an update of the latest research advances, and highlights areas for further study. PMID:24275966

  12. Laparoscopic splenectomy for primary immune thrombocytopenia: Current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Huang, Chen-Song; Huang, Shao-Bin; Zheng, Chao-Xu

    2016-09-16

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated disorder affecting both adults and children, characterised by bleeding complications and low platelet counts. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for ITP, but only 20%-40% of cases achieve a stable response. Splenectomy is the main therapy for patients failing to respond to corticosteroids for decades, and about two-thirds of patients achieve a long-lasting response. Although some new drugs are developed to treat ITP as second-line therapies in recent years, splenectomy is still the better choice with less cost and more efficiency. Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) for ITP proves to be a safe technique associated with lower morbidity and faster recovery and similar hematological response when compared to traditional open splenectomy. Based on the unified hematological outcome criteria by current international consensus, the response rate of splenectomy should be reassessed. So far, there are not widely accepted preoperative clinical indicators predicting favorable response to LS. Since the patients undergoing surgery take the risk of complications and poor hematological outcome, the great challenge facing the doctors is to identify a reliable biomarker for predicting long-term outcome of splenectomy which can help make the decision of operation. PMID:27668071

  13. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms.

  14. Current Status and Prospects for Microbubbles in Ultrasound Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles have been developed over the past two decades to provide both improvements in imaging as well as new therapeutic applications. Microbubble contrast agents are used currently for clinical imaging where increased sensitivity to blood flow is required, such as echocardiography. These compressible spheres oscillate in an acoustic field, producing nonlinear responses which can be uniquely distinguished from surrounding tissue, resulting in substantial enhancements in imaging signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, with sufficient acoustic energy the oscillation of microbubbles can mediate localized biological effects in tissue including the enhancement of membrane permeability or increased thermal energy deposition. Structurally, microbubbles are comprised of two principal components – an encapsulating shell and an inner gas core. This configuration enables microbubbles to be loaded with drugs or genes for additional therapeutic effect. Application of sufficient ultrasound energy can release this payload, resulting in site-specific delivery. Extensive pre-clinical studies illustrate that combining microbubbles and ultrasound can result in enhanced drug delivery or gene expression at spatially selective sites. Thus, microbbubles can be used for imaging, for therapy, or for both simultaneously. In this sense, microbubbles combined with acoustics may be one of the most universal theranostic tools. PMID:23504911

  15. Liver transplantation for cholangiocarcinoma: Current status and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Sapisochín, Gonzalo; Fernández de Sevilla, Elena; Echeverri, Juan; Charco, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the biliary system that can be classified into intrahepatic (iCCA), perihiliar (phCCA) and distal. Initial experiences with orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for patients with iCCA and phCCA had very poor results and this treatment strategy was abandoned. In the last decade, thanks to a strict selection process and a neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol, the results of OLT for patients with non-resectable phCCA have been shown to be excellent and this strategy has been extended worldwide in selected transplant centers. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a growing disease in most countries and can be diagnosed both in cirrhotic and in non-cirrhotic livers. Even though OLT is contraindicated in most centers, recent investigations analyzing patients that were transplanted with a misdiagnosis of HCC and were found to have an iCCA have shown encouraging results. There is some information suggesting that patients with early stages of the disease could benefit from OLT. In this review we analyze the current state-of-the-art of OLT for cholangiocarcinoma as well as the new insights and future perspectives. PMID:26464755

  16. Personalized medicine in CLL: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in the Western Hemisphere. Despite advances in research and the development of effective treatment regimens, CLL is still largely an incurable disease. Although several prognostic factors have been identified in recent years, most of the new prognostic factors are not utilized, and treatment decisions are still based on clinical staging and limited use of cytogenetic analysis. Patients with advanced disease are treated at diagnosis, whereas others, regardless of their prognostic indicators, are offered treatment only at disease progression. Furthermore, treatment guidelines for elderly or “unfit” patients are unavailable because most CLL trials have included mostly younger, healthier patients. Given the heterogeneity of the clinical manifestations and prognosis of CLL, patients are likely to benefit from a personalized therapeutic approach. Recent advances in CLL pathobiology research, the use of high-throughput technologies, and most importantly, the introduction of novel targeted therapies with high efficacy and low toxicity are currently transforming the treatment of CLL. A personalized approach that includes early intervention in selected patients with CLL is likely to bring physicians closer to the goal of attaining cures in most patients with CLL. PMID:23879961

  17. Workaholism: An overview and current status of the research

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Cecilie Schou

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This article addresses the stable tendency of excessive and compulsive working (i.e., workaholism). The main aim is to provide an updated oversight of the research area related to definition, prevalence, assessment, causes, outcomes, intervention as well as proposed future research directions. The target-population is both researchers and clinicians. Methods: The findings are identified by narratively reviewing the literature. Results: Research into workaholism has expanded over the last two decades. Several screening instruments to identify workaholics have been developed. The vast majority of these are based on seemingly atheoretical foundations, lacking convergent validity with each other and with related constructs. Research generally shows that workaholism is related to impaired health and well-being as well as to conflicts between work and family life. Workaholism is probably caused and maintained by a range of factors, although solid empirical underpinnings for suggested antecedents are currently sparse. So far no well-evaluated interventions for workaholism exist. Conclusions: At present, workaholism as a construct lacks conceptual and empirical clarity. Future research efforts should prioritize longitudinal studies as well as studies incorporating unbiased, firm parameters of both health and behavior. PMID:25215209

  18. Companion diagnostics in oncology - current status and future aspects.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2013-01-01

    A large number of targeted anticancer drugs are currently under development and most of them will have a companion diagnostic linked to their use. If a diagnostic assay is developed in conjunction with a targeted anticancer drug, such an assay will later end up determining the conditions for the use of the drug after its approval. The assay then becomes a kind of 'gatekeeper' in relation to which patients should be treated with the drug in question. This 'gatekeeper' role implies that companion diagnostic assays must live up to the same regulatory standards and requirements known from drug development. The assays must have proven to be analytically robust and reliable and to have demonstrated clinical utility before they are routinely used in the clinic. In the drug-diagnostic codevelopment model, several 'traditional' study designs have been used to demonstrate clinical utility. However, if we are to benefit from the increasing knowledge provided by molecular oncology, new ways should be developed to demonstrate the clinical utility of drug-diagnostic combinations. The development of such an approach will require a rethinking at different levels and is likely to include a number of ethical, regulatory and practical challenges.

  19. Adrenal insufficiency and adrenal replacement therapy. Current status in Spain.

    PubMed

    Aulinas, Anna; Casanueva, Felipe; Goñi, Fernando; Monereo, Susana; Moreno, Basilio; Picó, Antonio; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Salvador, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco J; Webb, Susan M

    2013-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is a rare endocrine disease, associated to increased mortality if left untreated. It can be due to a primary failure of the adrenal glands (primary AI) or malfunctioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) (secondary AI). The lack of data on incidence/prevalence of adrenal insufficiency in Spain complicates any evaluation of the magnitude of the problem in our country. Initial symptoms are non-specific, so often there is a delay in diagnosis. Current therapy with available glucocorticoids is associated with decreased quality of life in patients with treated AI, as well as with increased mortality and morbidity, probably related to both over-treatment and lack of hydrocortisone, associated with non-physiological peaks and troughs of the drug over the 24 hours. The availability of a new drug with a modified dual release (immediate and retarded), that requires one only daily dose, improves and simplifies the treatment, increases compliance as well as quality of life, morbidity and possibly mortality. This revision deals with the knowledge on the situation both globally and in Spain, prior to the availability of this new drug.

  20. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  1. Laccase applications in biofuels production: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kudanga, Tukayi; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize

    2014-08-01

    The desire to reduce dependence on the ever diminishing fossil fuel reserves coupled with the impetus towards green energy has seen increased research in biofuels as alternative sources of energy. Lignocellulose materials are one of the most promising feedstocks for advanced biofuels production. However, their utilisation is dependent on the efficient hydrolysis of polysaccharides, which in part is dependent on cost-effective and benign pretreatment of biomass to remove or modify lignin and release or expose sugars to hydrolytic enzymes. Laccase is one of the enzymes that are being investigated not only for potential use as pretreatment agents in biofuel production, mainly as a delignifying enzyme, but also as a biotechnological tool for removal of inhibitors (mainly phenolic) of subsequent enzymatic processes. The current review discusses the major advances in the application of laccase as a potential pretreatment strategy, the underlying principles as well as directions for future research in the search for better enzyme-based technologies for biofuel production. Future perspectives could include synergy between enzymes that may be required for optimal results and the adoption of the biorefinery concept in line with the move towards the global implementation of the bioeconomy strategy.

  2. Current status of the advanced high temperature reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D. E.; Iias, D.; Quails, A. L.; Peretz, F. J.; Varma, V. K.; Bradley, E. C.; Cisneros, A. T.

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently under development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the U. S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR design option exploration is a multidisciplinary design effort that combines core neutronic and fuel configuration evaluation with structural, thermal, and hydraulic analysis to produce a reactor and vessel concept and place it within a power generation station. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity, as key technologies require further development and a logically complete integrated design has not been finalized. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. (authors)

  3. Current Status of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Ilas, Dan; Qualls, A L; Peretz, Fred J; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Bradley, Eric Craig; Cisneros, Anselmo T.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently under development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR design option exploration is a multidisciplinary design effort that combines core neutronic and fuel configuration evaluation with structural, thermal, and hydraulic analysis to produce a reactor and vessel concept and place it within a power generation station. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity, as key technologies require further development and a logically complete integrated design has not been finalized. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated.

  4. Molecular Diagnosis of Diarrhea: Current Status and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, James A; Operario, Darwin J

    2011-01-01

    Determining the microbiologic etiology of enteric infection remains an elusive goal. Conventional approaches, including culture, microscopy, and antigen-based tests have significant limitations such as limit of detection and the need for multiple procedures. Molecular diagnostics, especially PCR based tests, are rapidly changing research and practice in infectious diseases. Diarrheal disease, with its broad range of potential infectious etiologies, is well suited for multiplex molecular testing. This review highlights examples of currently employed molecular tests, as well as ways in which these tests can be applied in the future. The absence of a gold standard for the microbiologic cause of diarrhea means that the clinical significance of detected organisms may not always be clear. Conventional wisdom is that there should be one main pathogen causing diarrhea, however our thinking is challenged by increased detection of mixed infections. Thus, the successful incorporation of molecular diagnostics for diarrheal disease into practice will require both a careful understanding of the technical aspects and research to define their clinical utility. PMID:22116640

  5. The Evolution of Process Safety: Current Status and Future Direction.

    PubMed

    Mannan, M Sam; Reyes-Valdes, Olga; Jain, Prerna; Tamim, Nafiz; Ahammad, Monir

    2016-06-01

    The advent of the industrial revolution in the nineteenth century increased the volume and variety of manufactured goods and enriched the quality of life for society as a whole. However, industrialization was also accompanied by new manufacturing and complex processes that brought about the use of hazardous chemicals and difficult-to-control operating conditions. Moreover, human-process-equipment interaction plus on-the-job learning resulted in further undesirable outcomes and associated consequences. These problems gave rise to many catastrophic process safety incidents that resulted in thousands of fatalities and injuries, losses of property, and environmental damages. These events led eventually to the necessity for a gradual development of a new multidisciplinary field, referred to as process safety. From its inception in the early 1970s to the current state of the art, process safety has come to represent a wide array of issues, including safety culture, process safety management systems, process safety engineering, loss prevention, risk assessment, risk management, and inherently safer technology. Governments and academic/research organizations have kept pace with regulatory programs and research initiatives, respectively. Understanding how major incidents impact regulations and contribute to industrial and academic technology development provides a firm foundation to address new challenges, and to continue applying science and engineering to develop and implement programs to keep hazardous materials within containment. Here the most significant incidents in terms of their impact on regulations and the overall development of the field of process safety are described.

  6. Current status of water reuse systems in Korea.

    PubMed

    Noh, S; Kwon, I; Yang, H M; Choi, H L; Kim, H

    2004-01-01

    In Korea, the current water resources will fall short by 2.6 billion tons to meet the 38 billion ton water demand in the year 2020. To overcome the future water shortage, it is desirable to minimize water consumption and to reuse treated wastewater. There are a total of 99 on-site water-recycling systems in the country. The potential capacity of the 99 systems is 429 thousands tons/day, which is 3.6% of the total service water. Compared to other industrialized countries, the number of the water recycling systems in Korea is extremely small. This is mainly due to the following reasons. First, in Korea, any building with more than 60,000 m2 of total floor space is required to install a water reuse system by law. However, only less than 0.5% of the total buildings have more than 10,000 m2. Therefore, the regulation is ineffective and merely nominal. Second, service water is supplied at low charge (0.20 US-dollar/m3 water). The inexpensive service water often discourages people to recycle treated wastewater. Third, people still think recycled water is not clean enough and can cause diseases. Therefore, they should be informed that a well-maintained recycling system does not fail to produce water with high quality.

  7. Laparoscopic splenectomy for primary immune thrombocytopenia: Current status and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dong; Huang, Chen-Song; Huang, Shao-Bin; Zheng, Chao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated disorder affecting both adults and children, characterised by bleeding complications and low platelet counts. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for ITP, but only 20%-40% of cases achieve a stable response. Splenectomy is the main therapy for patients failing to respond to corticosteroids for decades, and about two-thirds of patients achieve a long-lasting response. Although some new drugs are developed to treat ITP as second-line therapies in recent years, splenectomy is still the better choice with less cost and more efficiency. Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) for ITP proves to be a safe technique associated with lower morbidity and faster recovery and similar hematological response when compared to traditional open splenectomy. Based on the unified hematological outcome criteria by current international consensus, the response rate of splenectomy should be reassessed. So far, there are not widely accepted preoperative clinical indicators predicting favorable response to LS. Since the patients undergoing surgery take the risk of complications and poor hematological outcome, the great challenge facing the doctors is to identify a reliable biomarker for predicting long-term outcome of splenectomy which can help make the decision of operation.

  8. Aldosterone synthase inhibitors in hypertension: current status and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Hargovan, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin aldosterone system is a critical mechanism for controlling blood pressure, and exerts most of its physiological effects through the action of angiotensin II. In addition to increasing blood pressure by increasing vascular resistance, angiotensin II also stimulates aldosterone secretion from the adrenal gland. Aldosterone acts to cause an increase in sodium and water reabsorption, thus elevating blood pressure. Although treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors initially lowers circulating aldosterone, with chronic treatment aldosterone levels increase back to baseline, a phenomenon termed aldosterone escape; aldosterone blockade may therefore give added value in the treatment of hypertension. The first mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist developed was spironolactone, but its use has been severely hampered by adverse (notably oestrogenic) effects. The more recently developed mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone exhibits a better adverse effect profile, although it is not devoid of effects similar to spironolactone. In addition, aldosterone activates non-genomic receptors that are not inhibited by either eplerenone or spironolactone. It is believed that deleterious organ remodelling is mediated by aldosterone via such non-genomic pathways. A new class of drugs, the aldosterone synthase inhibitors, is currently under development. These may offer a novel therapeutic approach for both lowering blood pressure and preventing the non-genomic effects of aldosterone. Here, we will review the cardiovascular effects of aldosterone and review the drugs available that target this hormone, with a particular focus on the aldosterone synthase inhibitors. PMID:24570839

  9. Diagnostic Methods for Platelet Bacteria Screening: Current Status and Developments

    PubMed Central

    Störmer, Melanie; Vollmer, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial contamination of blood components and the prevention of transfusion-associated bacterial infection still remains a major challenge in transfusion medicine. Over the past few decades, a significant reduction in the transmission of viral infections has been achieved due to the introduction of mandatory virus screening. Platelet concentrates (PCs) represent one of the highest risks for bacterial infection. This is due to the required storage conditions for PCs in gas-permeable containers at room temperature with constant agitation, which support bacterial proliferation from low contamination levels to high titers. In contrast to virus screening, since 1997 in Germany bacterial testing of PCs is only performed as a routine quality control or, since 2008, to prolong the shelf life to 5 days. In general, bacterial screening of PCs by cultivation methods is implemented by the various blood services. Although these culturing systems will remain the gold standard, the significance of rapid methods for screening for bacterial contamination has increased over the last few years. These new methods provide powerful tools for increasing the bacterial safety of blood components. This article summarizes the course of policies and provisions introduced to increase bacterial safety of blood components in Germany. Furthermore, we give an overview of the different diagnostic methods for bacterial screening of PCs and their current applicability in routine screening processes. PMID:24659944

  10. Mercury in the National Parks: Current Status and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, C.; Blett, T. F.; Morris, K.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed contaminant that can harm human and wildlife health, and threaten resources the National Park Service (NPS) is charged with protecting. Due in part to emissions and long-range transport from coal burning power plants, even remote national park environments receive mercury deposition from the atmosphere. Given the concern regarding mercury, there are and have been many mercury monitoring initiatives in national parks to determine the risk from mercury contamination. This includes the study of litter fall at Acadia National Park (Maine), snow at Mount Rainier National Park (Washington), heron eggs at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (Indiana), bat hair at Mammoth Cave National Park (Kentucky), and panthers at Everglades National Park (Florida). Wet deposition is also measured at 16 national parks as part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Network / Mercury Deposition Network. Results from these studies indicate that mercury deposition is increasing or is elevated in many national parks, and fish and other biota have been found to contain levels of mercury above toxicity thresholds for impacts to both humans and wildlife. Current research coordinated by the NPS Air Resources Division (ARD) in Denver, Colorado, on the effects of mercury includes broad-scale assessments of mercury in fish, dragonfly larvae, and songbirds across 30+ national parks. Fish provide the trophic link to human and wildlife health, dragonfly larvae can describe fine-scale differences in mercury levels, and songbirds shed light on the risk to terrestrial ecosystems. External project partners include the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Maine, and the Biodiversity Research Institute. In addition, the dragonfly project engages citizen scientists in the collection of dragonfly larvae, supporting the NPS Centennial Initiative by connecting people to parks and advancing the educational mission, and increasing public awareness about mercury impacts. Much of

  11. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery - current status and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Prashanth P; Rao, Pradeep P; Bhagwat, Sonali

    2011-01-01

    Scarless surgery is the Holy Grail of surgery and the very raison d’etre of Minimal Access Surgery was the reduction of scars and thereby pain and suffering of the patients. The work of Muhe and Mouret in the late 80s, paved the way for mainstream laparoscopic procedures and it rapidly became the method of choice for many intra-abdominal procedures. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is a very exciting new modality in the field of minimal access surgery which works for further reducing the scars of standard laparoscopy and towards scarless surgery. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) was developed for scarless surgery, but did not gain popularity due to a variety of reasons. NOTES stands for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery, a term coined by a consortium in 2005. NOTES remains a research technique with only a few clinical cases having been reported. The lack of success of NOTES seems to have spurred on the interest in single-incision laparoscopy as an eminently doable technique in the present with minimum visible scarring, rendering a ‘scarless’ effect. Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) is, a term coined by a multidisciplinary consortium in 2008 for single-incision laparoscopic surgery. These are complementary technologies with similar difficulties of access, lack of triangulation and inadequate instrumentation as of date. LESS seems to offer an advantage to surgeons with its familiar field of view and instruments similar to those used in conventional laparoscopy. LESS remains a evolving special technique used successfully in many a centre, but with a significant way to go before it becomes mainstream. It currently stands between standard laparoscopy and NOTES in the armamentarium of minimal access surgery. This article outlines the development of LESS giving an overview of all the techniques and devices available and likely to be available in the future. PMID:21197236

  12. Stem cells for spinal cord regeneration: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Sobani, Zain A.; Quadri, Syed A.; Enam, S. Ather

    2010-01-01

    Background: Nearly 11,000 cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) are reported in the United States annually. Current management options give a median survival time of 38 years; however, no rehabilitative measures are available. Stem cells have been under constant research given their ability to differentiate into neural cell lines replacing non functional tissue. Efforts have been made to establish new synapses and provide a conducive environment, by grafting cells from autologous and fetal sources; including embryonic or adult stem cells, Schwann cells, genetically modified fibroblasts, bone stromal cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells and combinations/ variants thereof. Methods: In order to discuss the underlying mechanism of SCI along with the previously mentioned sources of stem cells in context to SCI, a simple review of literature was conducted. An extensive literature search was conducted using the PubMed data base and online search engines and articles published in the last 15 years were considered along with some historical articles where a background was required. Results: Stem cell transplantation for SCI is at the forefront with animal and in vitro studies providing a solid platform to enable well-designed human studies. Olfactory ensheathing cells seem to be the most promising; whilst bone marrow stromal cells appear as strong candidates for an adjunctive role. Conclusion: The key strategy in developing the therapeutic basis of stem cell transplantation for spinal cord regeneration is to weed out the pseudo-science and opportunism. All the trials should be based on stringent scientific criteria and effort to bypass that should be strongly discouraged at the international level. PMID:21246060

  13. Current status of NADPH oxidase research in cardiovascular pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Castiñeiras-Landeira, María Isabel; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; González-Juanatey, José R; Álvarez, Ezequiel

    2013-01-01

    The implications of reactive oxygen species in cardiovascular disease have been known for some decades. Rationally, therapeutic antioxidant strategies combating oxidative stress have been developed, but the results of clinical trials have not been as good as expected. Therefore, to move forward in the design of new therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular disease based on prevention of production of reactive oxygen species, steps must be taken on two fronts, ie, comprehension of reduction-oxidation signaling pathways and the pathophysiologic roles of reactive oxygen species, and development of new, less toxic, and more selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitors, to clarify both the role of each NADPH oxidase isoform and their utility in clinical practice. In this review, we analyze the value of NADPH oxidase as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease and the old and new pharmacologic agents or strategies to prevent NADPH oxidase activity. Some inhibitors and different direct or indirect approaches are available. Regarding direct NADPH oxidase inhibition, the specificity of NADPH oxidase is the focus of current investigations, whereas the chemical structure-activity relationship studies of known inhibitors have provided pharmacophore models with which to search for new molecules. From a general point of view, small-molecule inhibitors are preferred because of their hydrosolubility and oral bioavailability. However, other possibilities are not closed, with peptide inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies against NADPH oxidase isoforms continuing to be under investigation as well as the ongoing search for naturally occurring compounds. Likewise, some different approaches include inhibition of assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex, subcellular translocation, post-transductional modifications, calcium entry/release, electron transfer, and genetic expression. High-throughput screens for any of these activities could provide new

  14. Dengue vaccines: challenges, development, current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Dar, L

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. The clinical spectrum of dengue, caused by any of the four serotypes of DENV, ranges from mild self-limiting dengue fever to severe dengue, in the form dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Increased rates of hospitalization due to severe dengue, during outbreaks, result in massive economic losses and strained health services. In the absence of specific antiviral therapy, control of transmission of DENV by vector management is the sole method available for decreasing dengue-associated morbidity. Since vector control strategies alone have not been able to satisfactorily achieve reduction in viral transmission, the implementation of a safe, efficacious and cost-effective dengue vaccine as a supplementary measure is a high public health priority. However, the unique and complex immunopathology of dengue has complicated vaccine development. Dengue vaccines have also been challenged by critical issues like lack of animal models for the disease and absence of suitable markers of protective immunity. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under phases of development, including live attenuated virus vaccines, live chimeric virus vaccines, inactivated virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, DNA vaccines and viral-vectored vaccines. Although some vaccine candidates have progressed from animal trials to phase II and III in humans, a number of issues regarding implementation of dengue vaccine in countries like India still need to be addressed. Despite the current limitations, collaborative effects of regulatory bodies like World Health Organization with vaccine manufacturers and policy makers, to facilitate vaccine development and standardize field trials can make a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine a reality in near future.

  15. Neuroprotection for ischaemic stroke: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Antonio; Ferrari, Federica; Villa, Roberto F

    2015-02-01

    Stroke is the third cause of death worldwide and the main cause of chronic, severe adult disability. We focus on acute ischaemic stroke, which accounts for approximately 80% of all strokes. The current therapy aims at restoring cerebral blood flow within a narrow time window in order to prevent damaging the "penumbra" which surrounds the infarct core. Intravenous thrombolysis remains the fundamental treatment worldwide, though not ideal for various restrictions and complications, limiting to 10% or less the percentage of patients treated within the appropriate time window. Neuroprotection is an alternative or adjunct approach to thrombolysis, targeting cerebral parenchyma in the acute ischaemic phase. Furthermore, neurorepair attempts to restore neuronal function in the after-stroke phase in those patients (treated or untreated) with significant impairment. In the past decades, the efficacy and safety of numerous candidate neuroprotective agents were shown in various animal stroke models. However, in clinical trials, promising pre-clinical studies have not been translated into positive outcomes. Our review will analyse the possible reasons for this failure and the new approaches and recommendations to overcome it, as well as novel strategies targeting additional events in ischaemia cascade. The combination of thrombolysis with pharmacological and non-pharmacological neuroprotective approaches has also been tested. Finally, the neurorepair strategy will be described with special emphasis on the role of cell-based therapies and ischaemic conditioning. Hopefully, the future therapy of ischaemic stroke will encompass a combination of neuroprotection (to stabilise penumbra), thrombolysis, antithrombotics (for secondary prevention) and neurorepair based on cell therapy plus rehabilitation.

  16. Current status of ceramic coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lacefield, W R

    1998-01-01

    There are various ceramic coatings available for dental implants. From a commercial standpoint, plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) is the most popular. These coatings are typically partially amorphous after processing and contain crystalline phases other than HA. Plasma-sprayed HA and the other bioactive ceramic coating materials have been shown to enhance bone apposition as compared with uncoated metal implants. Some of the other available materials include the bioglasses, other calcium phosphates such as fluorapatite and tricalcium phosphate, and the inert ceramics such as alumina. The plasma-spray process is not optimum for all types of ceramic coatings, because it is not suitable for coating porous surfaces; the exact control of structure and chemistry is difficult with this process, and bond strength is not as high as is desired for some applications. Alternative methods for coating include sol-gel processing, ion beam and radio frequency (RF) sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, hot isostatic pressing, and electrophoretic deposition. The use of osteoinductive agents in conjunction with ceramic-coated implants is of current interest, and the degree and type of bonding of these agents appear to vary with the composition of the ceramic coating. Because there seems to be no satisfactory means of incorporating osteoinductive agents into ceramic coatings during any of the conventional coating procedures, the best approach seems to be to diffuse the agents into the coating after processing. Other possibilities include the tethering of the agents to the surface of the ceramic by suitable organic molecules or the placing of the agent in some carrier material such as a cement, which is placed around the implants. PMID:10196808

  17. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    currently under development.

  18. Current status of urban wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q H; Yang, W N; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Jin, P K; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Yang, S J; Wang, Q; Wang, X C; Ao, D

    2016-01-01

    The study reported and analyzed the current state of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban China from the perspective of treatment technologies, pollutant removals, operating load and effluent discharge standards. By the end of 2013, 3508 WWTPs have been built in 31 provinces and cities in China with a total treatment capacity of 1.48×10(8)m(3)/d. The uneven population distribution between China's east and west regions has resulted in notably different economic development outcomes. The technologies mostly used in WWTPs are AAO and oxidation ditch, which account for over 50% of the existing WWTPs. According to statistics, the efficiencies of COD and NH3-N removal are good in 656 WWTPs in 70 cities. The overall average COD removal is over 88% with few regional differences. The average removal efficiency of NH3-N is up to 80%. Large differences exist between the operating loads applied in different WWTPs. The average operating loading rate is approximately 83%, and 52% of WWTPs operate at loadings of <80%, treating up to 40% of the wastewater generated. The implementation of discharge standards has been low. Approximately 28% of WWTPs that achieved the Grade I-A Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002) were constructed after 2010. The sludge treatment and recycling rates are only 25%, and approximately 15% of wastewater is inefficiently treated. Approximately 60% of WWTPs have capacities of 1×10(4)m(3)/d-5×10(4)m(3)/d. Relatively high energy consumption is required for small-scale processing, and the utilization rate of recycled wastewater is low. The challenges of WWTPs are discussed with the aim of developing rational criteria and appropriate technologies for water recycling. Suggestions regarding potential technical and administrative measures are provided.

  19. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  20. Reference intervals: current status, recent developments and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ozarda, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Reliable and accurate reference intervals (RIs) for laboratory analyses are an integral part of the process of correct interpretation of clinical laboratory test results. RIs given in laboratory reports have an important role in aiding the clinician in interpreting test results in reference to values for healthy populations. Since the 1980s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) has been proactive in establishing recommendations to clarify the true significance of the term ‘RIs, to select the appropriate reference population and statistically analyse the data. The C28-A3 guideline published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and IFCC is still the most widely-used source of reference in this area. In recent years, protocols additional to the Guideline have been published by the IFCC, Committee on Reference Intervals and Decision Limits (C-RIDL), including all details of multicenter studies on RIs to meet the requirements in this area. Multicentric RIs studies are the most important development in the area of RIs. Recently, the C-RIDL has performed many multicentric studies to obtain common RIs. Confusion of RIs and clinical decision limits (CDLs) remains an issue and pediatric and geriatric age groups are a significant problem. For future studies of RIs, the genetic effect would seem to be the most challenging area.
The aim of the review is to present the current theory and practice of RIs, with special emphasis given to multicenter RIs studies, RIs studies for pediatric and geriatric age groups, clinical decision limits and partitioning by genetic effects on RIs. PMID:26981015

  1. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    currently under development. PMID:27032517

  2. Current status of surgical palliation of periampullary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lillemoe, K D; Sauter, P K; Pitt, H A; Yeo, C J; Cameron, J L

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, the use of nonoperative palliation for unresectable periampullary carcinoma has increased markedly, in part, because of the high morbidity and mortality rates after surgical palliation. The current analysis was undertaken to determine whether or not decreases in morbidity and mortality rates, recently observed after resection of periampullary carcinoma, are now being seen in the surgical palliation of unresectable periampullary carcinoma. During a 54 month period, 118 consecutive patients underwent surgical exploration with the finding of unresectable periampullary adenocarcinoma. Jaundice was the most common complaint at admission, being present in 73 percent of the patients. Abdominal or back pain, or both, was present in 71 percent of the patients and weight loss was observed in 61 percent of the patients. The most commonly performed procedure was combined biliary bypass and gastrojejunostomy, being performed upon 75 percent of the patients. A gastrojejunostomy was performed upon 107 of 118 patients (91 percent). The hospital mortality rate was 2.5 percent. Postoperative complications occurred in 37 percent of the patients but were seldom life-threatening. Wound infection was the most frequent postoperative complication (10 percent), followed by cholangitis (8 percent) and delayed gastric emptying (8 percent). During the late follow-up period, only 4 percent of the patients had gastric outlet obstruction, and only 2 percent had recurrent jaundice. The mean survival time postoperatively was 7.7 months. These results demonstrate that patients with unresectable periampullary carcinoma can undergo surgical palliation with minimal perioperative mortality, acceptable morbidity and good long term palliation. We conclude that surgical palliation is the treatment of choice for carefully selected patients with unresectable periampullary carcinoma.

  3. Current status of urban wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q H; Yang, W N; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Jin, P K; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Yang, S J; Wang, Q; Wang, X C; Ao, D

    2016-01-01

    The study reported and analyzed the current state of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban China from the perspective of treatment technologies, pollutant removals, operating load and effluent discharge standards. By the end of 2013, 3508 WWTPs have been built in 31 provinces and cities in China with a total treatment capacity of 1.48×10(8)m(3)/d. The uneven population distribution between China's east and west regions has resulted in notably different economic development outcomes. The technologies mostly used in WWTPs are AAO and oxidation ditch, which account for over 50% of the existing WWTPs. According to statistics, the efficiencies of COD and NH3-N removal are good in 656 WWTPs in 70 cities. The overall average COD removal is over 88% with few regional differences. The average removal efficiency of NH3-N is up to 80%. Large differences exist between the operating loads applied in different WWTPs. The average operating loading rate is approximately 83%, and 52% of WWTPs operate at loadings of <80%, treating up to 40% of the wastewater generated. The implementation of discharge standards has been low. Approximately 28% of WWTPs that achieved the Grade I-A Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002) were constructed after 2010. The sludge treatment and recycling rates are only 25%, and approximately 15% of wastewater is inefficiently treated. Approximately 60% of WWTPs have capacities of 1×10(4)m(3)/d-5×10(4)m(3)/d. Relatively high energy consumption is required for small-scale processing, and the utilization rate of recycled wastewater is low. The challenges of WWTPs are discussed with the aim of developing rational criteria and appropriate technologies for water recycling. Suggestions regarding potential technical and administrative measures are provided. PMID:27045705

  4. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W.; Wilson, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  5. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Gennery, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy using autologous haematopoietic stem cells offers a valuable treatment option for patients with primary immunodeficiencies who do not have access to an HLA-matched donor, although such treatments have not been without their problems. This review details gene therapy trials for X-linked and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). X-linked SCID was chosen for gene therapy because of previous 'natural' genetic correction through a reversion event in a single lymphoid precursor, demonstrating limited thymopoiesis and restricted T-lymphocyte receptor repertoire, showing selective advantage of progenitors possessing the wild-type gene. In early studies, patients were treated with long terminal repeats-intact gamma-retroviral vectors, without additional chemotherapy. Early results demonstrated gene-transduced cells, sustained thymopoiesis, and a diverse T-lymphocyte repertoire with normal function. Serious adverse effects were subsequently reported in 5 of 20 patients, with T-lymphocyte leukaemia developing, secondary to the viral vector integrating adjacent to a known oncogene. New trials using self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors are progressing. Trials for ADA-SCID using gamma-retroviral vectors have been successful, with no similar serious adverse effects reported; trials using lentiviral vectors are in progress. Patients with WAS and CGD treated with early gamma-retroviral vectors have developed similar lymphoproliferative adverse effects to those seen in X-SCID--current trials are using new-generation vectors. Targeted gene insertion using homologous recombination of corrected gene sequences by cellular DNA repair pathways following targeted DNA breakage will improve efficacy and safety of gene therapy. A number of new techniques are discussed.

  6. Anion Exchange Membranes: Current Status and Moving Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hickner, MA; Herring, AM; Coughlin, EB

    2013-10-29

    This short review is meant to provide the reader with highlights in anion exchange membrane research, describe current needs in the field, and point out promising directions for future work. Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) provide one possible route to low platinum or platinum-free fuel cells with the potential for facile oxidation of complex fuels beyond hydrogen and methanol. AEMs and related stable cationic polymers also have applications in energy storage and other electrochemical technologies such as water electrolyzers and redox flow batteries. While anion exchange membranes have been known for a long time in water treatment applications, materials for electrochemical technology with robust mechanical properties in thin film format have only recently become more widely available. High hydroxide and bicarbonate anion conductivity have been demonstrated in a range of AEM formats, but intrinsic stability of the polymers and demonstration of long device lifetime remain major roadblocks. Novel approaches to stable materials have focused on new types of cations that employ delocalization and steric shielding of the positive center to mitigate nucleophilic attack by hydroxide. A number of promising polymer backbones and membrane architectures have been identified, but limited device testing and a lack of understanding of the degradation mechanisms in operating devices is slowing progress on engineered systems with alkaline fuel cell technology. Our objective is to spur more research in this area to develop fuel cell systems that approach the costs of inexpensive batteries for large-scale applications. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2013, 51, 1727-1735, 2013

  7. Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever: history and current status.

    PubMed

    Gubler, Duane J

    2006-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an old disease; the first record of a clinically compatible disease being recorded in a Chinese medical encyclopaedia in 992. As the global shipping industry expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries, port cities grew and became more urbanized, creating ideal conditions for the principal mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Both the mosquitoes and the viruses were thus spread to new geographic areas causing major epidemics. Because dispersal was by sailing ship, however, there were long intervals (10-40 years) between epidemics. In the aftermath of World War II, rapid urbanization in Southeast Asia led to increased transmission and hyperendemicity. The first major epidemics of the severe and fatal form of disease, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), occurred in Southeast Asia as a direct result of this changing ecology. In the last 25 years of the 20th century, a dramatic global geographic expansion of epidemic DF/DHF occurred, facilitated by unplanned urbanization in tropical developing countries, modern transportation, lack of effective mosquito control and globalization. As we go into the 21st century, epidemic DF/DHF is one of the most important infectious diseases affecting tropical urban areas. Each year there are an estimated 50-100 million dengue infections, 500000 cases of DHF that must be hospitalized and 20000-25 000 deaths, mainly in children. Epidemic DF/DHF has an economic impact on the community of the same order of magnitude as malaria and other important infectious diseases. There are currently no vaccines nor antiviral drugs available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic DF/DHF is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti.

  8. Extended Range Prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon: Current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, A. K.; Abhilash, S.; Borah, N.; Joseph, S.; Chattopadhyay, R.; S, S.; Rajeevan, M.; Mandal, R.; Dey, A.

    2014-12-01

    added value to both deterministic and probability forecast compared to raw SME's and this better skill is probably flows from large spread and improved spread-error relationship. CGMME system is currently capable of generating ER prediction in real time and successfully delivering its experimental operational ER forecast of ISM for the last few years.

  9. Fabricated nanoparticles: current status and potential phytotoxic threats.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Tushar; Mungray, Alka A; Mungray, Arvind K

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers unique attributes to various industrial and consumer sectors, and has become a topic of high interest to scientific communities across the world. Our society has greatly benefitted from nanotechnology already, in that many products with novel properties and wide applicability have been developed and commercialized. However, the increased production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns about the environmental fate and toxicological implications of nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Research has revealed that various nanomaterials may be hazardous to living organisms. Among biota, plants are widely exposed to released nanomaterials and are sensitive to their effects. The accumulation of nannmaterials in the environment is a potential threat, not only because of potential damage to plants hut also because nanoparticles may enter the food chain. Although the literature that addresses the safety of nanoproducts is growing, little is known about the mechanisms by which these materials produce toxicity on natural species, including humans. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature relevant to what phytotoxic impact fabricated nanoparticles (e.g., carbon nanotubes, metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles, and certain other nanomaterials) have on plants. Nanoparticles produce several effects on plant physiology and morphology. Nanoparticles are known to affect root structure, seed germination, and cellular metabolism. Nanoparticles inhibit growth, induce oxidative stress, morphogenetic abnormalities and produce clastogenic disturbances in several plant species. The size, shape and surface coating of NPs play an important role in determining their level of toxicity. Of course, the dose, route of administration, type of dispersion media, and environmental exposure also contribute to how toxic nanoparticles are to plants. Currently, nanotoxicity studies are only in their initial phases of development and more research will be required to

  10. Current status on the development and treatment of myopia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jeffrey; Schulman, Erica; Jamal, Nadine

    2012-05-01

    This is a review of the current literature describing the effect of atropine, bifocals, and/or contact lenses on slowing the progression of myopia. Cumulative data from a number of studies have demonstrated atropine instilled once a day in myopic eyes resulted in a 90% average reduction of myopia progression, as compared to untreated eyes, i.e., from 0.50 D/year to 0.05 D/year. Pirenzepine, a muscarinic pharmacological agent, has a minimal effect on pupil size and accommodation, and it has been shown to slow myopia by 44%. Bifocals and progressive lenses, which have been used for years to slow the progression of myopia, have recently been shown to produce, on average, only small, clinically insignificant treatment effects. However, their effectiveness is increased in children who are esophoric and have a large lag of accommodation, reducing myopia progression to between 0.25 and 0.40 D/year. Traditional correcting soft and gas permeable contact lenses, as well as novel spectacle lens designs, have not been shown to be effective in reducing myopic progression. Under-correction of the refractive error has been shown not only to be ineffective in slowing myopia, but has also been associated with an increased rate of myopia progression. Orthokeratology, using reverse geometry designed lenses, has been shown to be moderately effective in decreasing the progression of myopia by between 30 to 50% in a number of short-term, well-controlled studies, reducing myopia progression to between -0.25 and -0.35 D/year. Recently, there have been pilot studies using novel peripherally correcting soft contact lenses to slow the progression of myopia. Two of those lens designs have been shown to be moderately effective in slowing the progression of myopia, both of which had a 30% efficacy, reducing myopia progression to 0.35 D/year. In summary, myopia control is entering a new era with the use of contact lenses and pharmaceutical agents to effectively slow its progression with minimal

  11. Fabricated nanoparticles: current status and potential phytotoxic threats.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Tushar; Mungray, Alka A; Mungray, Arvind K

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers unique attributes to various industrial and consumer sectors, and has become a topic of high interest to scientific communities across the world. Our society has greatly benefitted from nanotechnology already, in that many products with novel properties and wide applicability have been developed and commercialized. However, the increased production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns about the environmental fate and toxicological implications of nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Research has revealed that various nanomaterials may be hazardous to living organisms. Among biota, plants are widely exposed to released nanomaterials and are sensitive to their effects. The accumulation of nannmaterials in the environment is a potential threat, not only because of potential damage to plants hut also because nanoparticles may enter the food chain. Although the literature that addresses the safety of nanoproducts is growing, little is known about the mechanisms by which these materials produce toxicity on natural species, including humans. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature relevant to what phytotoxic impact fabricated nanoparticles (e.g., carbon nanotubes, metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles, and certain other nanomaterials) have on plants. Nanoparticles produce several effects on plant physiology and morphology. Nanoparticles are known to affect root structure, seed germination, and cellular metabolism. Nanoparticles inhibit growth, induce oxidative stress, morphogenetic abnormalities and produce clastogenic disturbances in several plant species. The size, shape and surface coating of NPs play an important role in determining their level of toxicity. Of course, the dose, route of administration, type of dispersion media, and environmental exposure also contribute to how toxic nanoparticles are to plants. Currently, nanotoxicity studies are only in their initial phases of development and more research will be required to

  12. Waterborne parasites: a current status from the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    act as a platform of the current scenario for policymakers as water pollution is a key health issue in this region. PMID:24885105

  13. Marine Mammals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meith, Nikki

    Marine mammals have not only fascinated and inspired human beings for thousands of years, but they also support a big business by providing flesh for sea-borne factories, sustaining Arctic lifestyles and traditions, and attracting tourists to ocean aquaria. While they are being harpooned, bludgeoned, shot, netted, and trained to jump through…

  14. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    availability of (68)Ge-(68)Ga generators is increasing and studies involving prostate-specific membrane antigen or DOTA-chelated peptides or both are performed in at least seven countries. Although therapeutic radionuclide agents are mostly imported from outside the region, this does not limit the availability of therapies with (90)Y, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (131)I, (188)Re, and (89)Sr. Nevertheless, therapies based on alpha particle emitters are still largely not available in the region and are currently only available in Israel and Turkey. Regarding human resources, according to the data provided there are 1157 NM physicians, 1953 technologists, 586 medical physicists, and 173 radiopharmacists or radiochemists in the region. Approximately half of all available human resources are accounted for by Turkey. The region has great potential for expanding the applications of NM; this becomes especially important in view of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Further increasing awareness of the clinical applications of NM in healthcare and strengthening technical and human capacities including the establishment of training programs for all professionals and disciplines in the field are recognized as key components in advancing the practice of NM in the Middle East. PMID:27237437

  15. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    availability of (68)Ge-(68)Ga generators is increasing and studies involving prostate-specific membrane antigen or DOTA-chelated peptides or both are performed in at least seven countries. Although therapeutic radionuclide agents are mostly imported from outside the region, this does not limit the availability of therapies with (90)Y, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (131)I, (188)Re, and (89)Sr. Nevertheless, therapies based on alpha particle emitters are still largely not available in the region and are currently only available in Israel and Turkey. Regarding human resources, according to the data provided there are 1157 NM physicians, 1953 technologists, 586 medical physicists, and 173 radiopharmacists or radiochemists in the region. Approximately half of all available human resources are accounted for by Turkey. The region has great potential for expanding the applications of NM; this becomes especially important in view of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Further increasing awareness of the clinical applications of NM in healthcare and strengthening technical and human capacities including the establishment of training programs for all professionals and disciplines in the field are recognized as key components in advancing the practice of NM in the Middle East.

  16. Recent Developments, Current Status, and Enduring Legacy of "The Journal of Negro Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Frederick D.

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to (a) discuss recent activities of and changes in "The Journal of Negro Education" (JNE) during my tenure as Editor-in-Chief (July 1, 2004 to the present), (b) highlight the current status and legacy of The Journal and its importance as an archive for research and education, and (c) discuss current issues,…

  17. Current Status and Future Agenda for the Theory, Research, and Practice of Childhood Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultheiss, Donna E. Palladino

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and a future agenda for childhood career development theory, research, and practice. The fragmented nature of the current state of the literature is noted, and a call is made for a reexamination and reconsideration of the childhood developmental pathways of life's work. It is suggested that the study of…

  18. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the

  19. 2002 Small Mammal Inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    West, E; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    To assist the University of California in obtaining biological assessment information for the ''2004 Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)'', Jones & Stokes conducted an inventory of small mammals in six major vegetation communities at Site 300. These communities were annual grassland, native grassland, oak savanna, riparian corridor, coastal scrub, and seep/spring wetlands. The principal objective of this study was to assess the diversity and abundance of small mammal species in these communities, as well as the current status of any special-status small mammal species found in these communities. Surveys in the native grassland community were conducted before and after a controlled fire management burn of the grasslands to qualitatively evaluate any potential effects of fire on small mammals in the area.

  20. Assessment of Current Status of Women Farmers in Japan Using Empowerment Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijani, Sarafat A.; Yano, Izumi

    This research assessed the current status of Japanese women farmers using universal measurement of women empowerment. Two prefectures, Hiroshima and Shimane were selected. Stratified sampling technique was used to select respondents from each village while structured questionnaire was employed to collect data on economic, social, familial, legal, mobility and political status of the respondents. The result shows that status of women farmers was improved in the recent time compared to years back. This was revealed in the favourable responses to some statement questions such as; freedom and participation in voting, relationship with husband, participation in outside work and freedom of movement. However, their status as unpaid workers on family farms, lack of freedom to borrow and lend, inability to express their mind over the children to mother-in-law were the prevailing items of their disempowerment. Classifying respondents on the overall empowerment shows that majority of them were highly empowered. Inferential analysis using t-test to compare women farmers past and present status shows a significant difference, t = 4.827, p = 0.000. Relationship between personal characteristics of women farmers and their present empowerment status using Pearson Product Moment Correlation (PPMC) coefficient r shows negative correlation between age and all empowerment indicators. Also marital status has negative correlation with familial and legal empowerment while mother-in-law and familial empowerment were positively correlated. It therefore suggests that status of women farmer in Japan has improved, compare to their situation years back.