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Sample records for mammary adenocarcinoma cells

  1. Molecular Analysis of Motility in Metastatic Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Culture MTLn3 cells were clonally derived from a lung metastasis of the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma ( Neri et al., 1982) (kindly provided by Dr...MTLn3 cells were plated on collagen I coated MATTEK tissue culture dishes for 24 hours. Cells were plated at a density of 5000 cells/sq cm and...mM KOH; 4 mM MgC12 ; 10 mM EGTA pH 6.5 with 20 mM KOH; 5 1M phallacidin; 0.025 % saponin) was added to the culture well. After 15 seconds of extraction

  2. Modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis in murine mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shalinsky, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    In efforts to exploit the differential oxygen levels within the subcompartments of solid neoplasms, this project has focused on modulating prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cells (Line 4526), either intact or sonicated, were incubated with either 2.0 uM {sup 14}C-arachidonic acid (AA) or 20.0 uM {sup 14}C-PGH{sub 2}, respectively. Following metabolism, products were extracted, separated by thin layer chromatography and analyzed by radiochromatographic scan. PGE{sub 2} was predominantly formed with minimal amounts of PGF{sub 2a} or PGD{sub 2}. Indomethacin and ibuprofen inhibited the PGE{sub 2} formation from AA with an IC{sub 50} value of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and 9.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}M, respectively. Suspended cells in glass vials were made hypoxic by flushing with N{sub 2} for varying time intervals to study AA metabolism. A time-dependent inhibition of PG biosynthesis was observed under hypoxia, and by 30 min, the PGE{sub 2} synthesis was reduced by 50% which was further inhibited by indomethacin. Misonidazole, a 2-nitroimidazole analogue, partially reversed the inhibition of PGE{sub 2} synthesis under hypoxia by 49% at 100 uM. However, misonidazole did not affect PG biosynthesis under aerobic conditions. The stimulation of PGE{sub 2} biosynthesis by misonidazole under hypoxia was blocked by indomethacin, suggesting that misonidazole can not act independently of the cyclooxygenase.

  3. Characterization of spheres derived from canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Masaki; Akiyoshi, Rui; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Katsumoto, Takuo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Ohkusu-Tsukada, Kozo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sasaki, Nobuo; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells in several solid tumors, and these cancer stem cells have a potential role in tumor initiation, aggression, and recurrence. The stem cell-like properties of spheres derived from canine mammary tumors remain largely elusive. We attempted to induce sphere formation using four cell lines of canine mammary adenocarcinoma, and characterized the spheres derived from a CHMp line in vitro and in vivo. The CHMp-derived spheres showed predominantly CD44+CD24- population, higher expression of stem cell-related genes, such as CD133, Notch3 and MDR, and higher resistance to doxorubicin compared with the CHMp-derived adherent cells. Xenograft transplantations in nude mice demonstrated that only 1 × 10(4)sphere cells were sufficient for tumor formation. Use of the sphere assay on these sphere-derived tumors showed that sphere-forming cells were present in the tumors, and were maintained in serial transplantation. We propose that spheres derived from canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines possess a potential characteristic of cancer stem cells. Spheres derived from canine mammary tumors could be a powerful tool with which to investigate novel therapeutic drugs and to elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie tumorigenesis.

  4. Different muscarinc receptors are involved in the proliferation of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Español, Alejandro J; Sales, María E

    2004-02-01

    We described that two different murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines, LM3 and LM2 constitutively expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchR). We here demonstrate, by competitive binding experiments with the tritiated muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate that M2 subtype predominates in both tumor cell lines. Concordantly immunoblotting assays indicate that mAchR exhibit the following order of expression: M2 > M4 > M3 > M1 > M5 in both tumor cell lines. Activation of mAchR with carbachol (CARB) increased proliferation in both tumor cell lines in a concentration dependent manner. In LM3 cells CARB promoted proliferation via M3 receptor activation via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and nitric oxide production. CARB-induced LM2 cells proliferation needed both M2 and M1 receptor activation, promoting prostaglandin E2 liberation and arginase catabolism respectively, both of them involved in tumor cell growth.

  5. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  6. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  7. Glycosaminoglycan synthesis by subpopulations of epithelial cells from a mammary adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Angello, J.C.; Danielson, K.G.; Anderson, L.W.; Hosick, H.L.

    1982-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycan synthesis by two subpopulations of a mouse mammary tumor cell line was compared. The two sublines express distinctly different growth characteristics in vitro and in vivo which indicate differences in growth regulation. Newly made glycosaminoglycans were recovered from the culture media, the cell surfaces, and residual cellular material. The cell population which grows more aggressively in vivo (+SA subline, a subline that grows in soft agarose) incorporated about 8 times more (/sup 14/C)glucosamine per cell into total glycosaminoglycans than did the slower-growing population (-SA subline, which does not grow in soft agarose). Appropriate control experiments indicated that the apparent difference in rates of synthesis was not due to discrepancies in glucosamine uptake. The main residual cellular molecule labeled was heparan sulfate, but the predominant molecule at the cell surface and in the culture fluid was hyaluronic acid. Overall, +SA cells synthesized more hyaluronic acid and -SA cells synthesized more heparan sulfate; in both cell populations, these two molecules accounted for about 90% of total glycosaminoglycans produced.

  8. High and low dose radiation effects on mammary adenocarcinoma cells - an epigenetic connection.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidia; Filkowski, Jody; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of cancer, including breast cancer, depends largely on radiation therapy and proper diagnostics. The effect of ionizing radiation on cells and tissues depends on the radiation dose and energy level, but there is insufficient evidence concerning how tumor cells respond to the low and high doses of radiation that are often used in medical diagnostic and treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate radiation-induced gene expression changes in the MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line. Using microarray technology tools, we were able to screen the differential gene expressions profiles between various radiation doses applied to MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the substantial alteration in the expression level of genes after high-dose treatment. In contrast, no dramatic gene expression alterations were noticed after the application of low and medium doses of radiation. In response to a high radiation dose, MCF-7 cells exhibited down-regulation of biological pathways such as cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair and activation of the p53 pathway. Similar dose-dependent responses were seen on the epigenetic level, which was tested by a microRNA expression analysis. MicroRNA analysis showed dose-dependent radiation-induced microRNA expression alterations that were associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death. An increased rate of apoptosis was determined by an Annexin V assay. The results of this study showed that high doses of radiation affect gene expression genetically and epigenetically, leading to alterations in cell cycle, DNA replication, and apoptosis.

  9. High and low dose radiation effects on mammary adenocarcinoma cells – an epigenetic connection

    PubMed Central

    Luzhna, Lidia; Filkowski, Jody; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of cancer, including breast cancer, depends largely on radiation therapy and proper diagnostics. The effect of ionizing radiation on cells and tissues depends on the radiation dose and energy level, but there is insufficient evidence concerning how tumor cells respond to the low and high doses of radiation that are often used in medical diagnostic and treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate radiation-induced gene expression changes in the MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line. Using microarray technology tools, we were able to screen the differential gene expressions profiles between various radiation doses applied to MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the substantial alteration in the expression level of genes after high-dose treatment. In contrast, no dramatic gene expression alterations were noticed after the application of low and medium doses of radiation. In response to a high radiation dose, MCF-7 cells exhibited down-regulation of biological pathways such as cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair and activation of the p53 pathway. Similar dose-dependent responses were seen on the epigenetic level, which was tested by a microRNA expression analysis. MicroRNA analysis showed dose-dependent radiation-induced microRNA expression alterations that were associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death. An increased rate of apoptosis was determined by an Annexin V assay. The results of this study showed that high doses of radiation affect gene expression genetically and epigenetically, leading to alterations in cell cycle, DNA replication, and apoptosis. PMID:27226982

  10. Role of Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cell Transterrin Response In Breast Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-21

    for identifying dividing cells. Int. J. Cancer, 27::329-334. 13. Wrba, F., Ritzinger, E., Reiner, A., and Holzner , J.H. Transferrin receptor (TrfR...A., and Holzner , J.H. Transferrin receptor (TrfR) expression in breast carcinoma and its possible relationship to prognosis. An immunohistochemical

  11. Deoxyelephantopin impedes mammary adenocarcinoma cell motility by inhibiting calpain-mediated adhesion dynamics and inducing reactive oxygen species and aggresome formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Leng; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-04-15

    We previously showed that deoxyelephantopin (DET), a plant sesquiterpene lactone, exhibits more profound suppression than paclitaxel (PTX) of lung metastasis of mammary adenocarcinoma TS/A cells in mice. Proteomics studies suggest that DET affects actin cytoskeletal protein networks and downregulates calpain-mediated proteolysis of several actin-associated proteins, whereas PTX mainly interferes with microtubule proteins. Here, DET was observed to significantly deregulate adhesion formation in TS/A cells, probably through inhibition of m-calpain activity. Epithelial growth factor (EGF)-mediated activation of Rho GTPase Rac1 and formation of lamellipodia in TS/A cells were remarkably suppressed by DET treatment. Further, DET impaired vesicular trafficking of EGF and induced protein carbonylation and formation of centrosomal aggregates in TS/A cells. DET-induced reactive oxygen species were observed to be the upstream stimulus for the formation of centrosomal ubiquitinated protein aggregates that might subsequently restrict cancer cell motility. PTX, however, caused dramatic morphological changes, interfered with microtubule networking, and moderately inhibited calpain-mediated cytoskeletal and focal adhesion protein cleavage in TS/A cells. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the pharmacological action of DET against metastatic mammary cell migration and suggests that modulation of oxidative stress might be a potential strategy for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  12. Cystic mammary adenocarcinoma associated with a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma in a New Zealand white rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Sikoski, Paul; Trybus, James; Cline, J Mark; Muhammad, F Salih; Eckhoff, Andrew; Tan, Josh; Lockard, Mandy; Jolley, Tammy; Britt, Susan; Kock, Nancy D

    2008-06-01

    Pituitary adenoma in a rabbitA 44-mo-old, female, nulliparous New Zealand White Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) presented with bilaterally diffusely enlarged mammary glands with enlarged, discolored teats that exuded brown, mucoid discharge. The complete blood count and serum chemistry panels were within normal limits, bacteria were not isolated from a culture of the discharge, and the clinical signs did not resolve with antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography and serum prolactin levels supported the diagnosis of mammary gland dysplasia, possibly due to a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma. Histologic evaluation confirmed the presence of a pituitary adenoma, mammary hyperplasia, dysplasia, and cystic mammary adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of abundant prolactin secreting cells in the pituitary adenoma. This is the second report of hyperprolactinemia with mammary dysplasia in rabbits, and the first report of cystic mammary adenocarcinoma associated with a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma in a rabbit.

  13. Cystic Mammary Adenocarcinoma Associated with a Prolactin-secreting Pituitary Adenoma in a New Zealand White Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Sikoski, Paul; Trybus, James; Cline, J Mark; Muhammad, F Salih; Eckhoff, Andrew; Tan, Josh; Lockard, Mandy; Jolley, Tammy; Britt, Susan; Kock, Nancy D

    2008-01-01

    A 44-mo-old, female, nulliparous New Zealand White Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) presented with bilaterally diffusely enlarged mammary glands with enlarged, discolored teats that exuded brown, mucoid discharge. The complete blood count and serum chemistry panels were within normal limits, bacteria were not isolated from a culture of the discharge, and the clinical signs did not resolve with antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography and serum prolactin levels supported the diagnosis of mammary gland dysplasia, possibly due to a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma. Histologic evaluation confirmed the presence of a pituitary adenoma, mammary hyperplasia, dysplasia, and cystic mammary adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of abundant prolactin secreting cells in the pituitary adenoma. This is the second report of hyperprolactinemia with mammary dysplasia in rabbits, and the first report of cystic mammary adenocarcinoma associated with a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma in a rabbit. PMID:18589874

  14. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  15. MAMMARY GLAND ADENOCARCINOMA IN A MALE BORNEAN ORANGUTAN (PONGO PYGMAEUS).

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Nancy A; Crook, Erika K

    2017-03-01

    An adult male Bornean orangutan ( Pongo pygmaeus ) was diagnosed with invasive, poorly differentiated grade 9/9 mammary gland adenocarcinoma from a subcutaneous mass that was surgically removed during a routine preventative health examination. The tumor was tested for estrogen and progesterone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization (HER2 FISH). Whole blood was tested for breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) genes. The orangutan was treated orally with two common human breast cancer drugs; tamoxifen and anastrozole. The orangutan lived for 4.5 yr postdetection, dying from an unrelated cause. This is the first reported case of mammary gland adenocarcinoma in a male great ape.

  16. Aurora kinase-A overexpression in mouse mammary epithelium induces mammary adenocarcinomas harboring genetic alterations shared with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Treekitkarnmongkol, Warapen; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kai, Kazuharu; Sasai, Kaori; Jones, Jennifer Carter; Wang, Jing; Shen, Li; Sahin, Aysegul A; Gagea, Mihai; Ueno, Naoto T; Creighton, Chad J; Sen, Subrata

    2016-12-01

    Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis have revealed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) amplification and overexpression characterize a distinct subset of human tumors across multiple cancer types. Although elevated expression of AURKA has been shown to induce oncogenic phenotypes in cells in vitro, findings from transgenic mouse models of Aurora-A overexpression in mammary glands have been distinct depending on the models generated. In the present study, we report that prolonged overexpression of AURKA transgene in mammary epithelium driven by ovine β-lactoglobulin promoter, activated through multiple pregnancy and lactation cycles, results in the development of mammary adenocarcinomas with alterations in cancer-relevant genes and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The tumor incidence was 38.9% (7/18) in Aurora-A transgenic mice at 16 months of age following 4-5 pregnancy cycles. Aurora-A overexpression in the tumor tissues accompanied activation of Akt, elevation of Cyclin D1, Tpx2 and Plk1 along with downregulation of ERα and p53 proteins, albeit at varying levels. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of transgenic mouse mammary adenocarcinomas revealed copy gain of Glp1r and losses of Ercc5, Pten and Tcf7l2 loci. Review of human breast tumor transcriptomic data sets showed association of these genes at varying levels with Aurora-A gain of function alterations. Whole exome sequencing of the mouse tumors also identified gene mutations detected in Aurora-A overexpressing human breast cancers. Our findings demonstrate that prolonged overexpression of Aurora-A can be a driver somatic genetic event in mammary adenocarcinomas associated with deregulated tumor-relevant pathways in the Aurora-A subset of human breast cancer.

  17. Metastatic anaplastic adenocarcinoma suspected to be of mammary origin in an intact male rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Snyman, Heindrich N.; Lillie, Brandon N.

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old, intact male, pet dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was presented for a ventral abdominal subcutaneous mass. Histolopathology of the resected mass was suggestive of a mammary adenocarcinoma. Six months later, the rabbit died from severe dyspnea. Necropsy showed recurrence of the original mass with hepatic and pulmonary metastasis of the anaplastic adenocarcinoma, suspected to be of mammary origin. PMID:24790235

  18. SOX10-positive salivary gland tumors: a growing list, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of the salivary gland, sialoblastoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, basal cell adenoma/adenocarcinoma, and a subgroup of mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-10-01

    Transcription factor SRY-related HMG-box 10 (SOX10) is an important marker for melanocytic, schwannian, myoepithelial, and some salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate SOX10 expression more thoroughly in the salivary gland neoplasms, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma harboring specific genetic rearrangements. A new rabbit monoclonal anti-SOX10 antibody (clone EP268) was used to examine SOX10 expression in 14 different types of salivary gland tumors. We found that acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC), adenoid cystic carcinoma, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC), epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, sialoblastoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, basal cell adenoma, and pleomorphic adenoma were SOX10 positive. Salivary duct carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma, and oncocytoma were SOX10 negative. Earlier, mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) was considered a SOX10-negative tumor. This study identified a subgroup of SOX10-positive MEC cases with characteristic polygonal epithelial cells, pale-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm, and colloid-like dense eosinophilic material. Our data show SOX10 expression can be observed in salivary gland tumors with either one of the 4 cell types: acinic cells, cuboidal ductal cells with low-grade cytologic features, basaloid cells, and myoepithelial cells. In this article we thoroughly evaluated SOX10 expression in salivary gland tumors. SOX10 is useful in the differential diagnosis between myoepithelial carcinoma with clear cell features and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma. It can also be used to discriminate low-grade salivary duct carcinoma from high-grade ones. Pathologists should be cautious with the interpretation of SOX10 positivity in salivary gland tumors, and correlation with histologic feature is mandatory.

  19. Study of aggressiveness prediction of mammary adenocarcinoma by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Bitar, Renata; da Silva Martinho, Herculano; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; dos Santos Junior, Arnaldo Rodrigues; Silva Ramalho, Fernando; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2012-01-01

    Although there are many articles focused on in vivo or ex vivo Raman analysis for cancer diagnosis, to the best of our knowledge its potential to predict the aggressiveness of tumor has not been fully explored yet. In this work Raman spectra in the finger print region of ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured and associated to matrix metalloproteinase-19 (MMP-19) immunohistochemical exam. It was possible to verify that normal breast, benign lesions, and adenocarcinomas spectra, including the subtypes (cribriform, papillary and solid) could have their aggressiveness diagnosed by vibrational Raman bands. By using MMP- 19 exam it was possible to classify the samples by malignant graduation in accordance to the classification results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The spectra NM /MH were classified correctly in 100% of cases; CA/CPA group had 60 % of spectra correctly classified and for PA/AS 54% of the spectra were correctly classified.

  20. Cloning of Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    these parity-induced cells do represent a totipotent mammary stem cell population per se, but these cells might support stem cell maintenance as... Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 68198-6810 REPORT...Mammary Stem Cells DAMD17-00-1-0641 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  1. Characterization of mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea exposure--Potential for human male breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Yuki, Michiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Elmore, Susan A; Tsubura, Airo

    2016-05-01

    The frequency of breast cancer in men is extremely rare, reported to be less than 1% and there is currently no available animal model for male mammary tumors. We compared the characteristics of various immunohistochemical markers in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male and female Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats including: estrogen receptor α (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), androgen receptor (AR), receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2), GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Female mammary adenocarcinomas were strongly positive in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA and ER (100%) with only 60% and 53% expressing PgR and GATA3, respectively. 100% of male adenocarcinomas also exhibited strongly positive expression in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA, with 25% expressing AR and only 8% showing positivity for ER. Male carcinomas did not express PgR or GATA3 and none of the tumors, male or female, were positive for HER2. Based on the observed ER and PgR positivity and HER2 negativity within these tumors, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in female rats appear to be hormonally dependent, similar to human luminal A type breast cancer. In contrast, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats showed no reactivity for ER, PgR, HER2 or GATA3, suggesting no hormonal dependency. Both male and female adenocarcinomas showed high proliferating activity by PCNA immunohistochemistry. Based on our literature review, human male breast cancers are mainly dependent on ER and/or PgR, therefore the biological pathogenesis of MNU-induced male mammary cancer in rats may differ from that of male breast cancer in humans.

  2. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  3. Mast cells in canine cutaneous hemangioma, hemangiosarcoma and mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, Moges; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2010-02-01

    Mast cell count (MCC) in 45 dogs with cutaneous hemangioma (HA, n = 12), hemangiosarcoma (HSA, n = 12), mammary adenoma (AD, n = 9) and mammary adenocarcinoma (AC, n = 12) was made using Toluidine blue stained sections. Antibodies against endothelial cell markers, Factor VIII and VEGF were used to visualize and determine the hot spot micro-vessel density (MVD). Total MCC and MCC along the invasive edges were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in canine mammary AC than in AD. The total MCC did not significantly differ (p > 0.05), in HSAs (8.6 +/- 3.3) than in HAs (5.5 +/- 2.8). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.14) between the hot spot MCC and MVD in mammary AC, although not significant (p = 0.3172), indicating that mast cells are associated with angiogenesis in canine mammary AC. This study suggests that mast cells may play an important role in neovascularization of canine cutaneous vascular and mammary neoplasms. Detailed studies encompassing correlation of MCC and MVD with clinical outcomes and prognosis in these neoplasms are recommended.

  4. Differential transformation of mammary epithelial cells by Wnt genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G T; Gavin, B J; McMahon, A P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Wnt family includes at least 10 genes that encode structurally related secreted glycoproteins. Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 were originally identified as oncogenes activated by the insertion of mouse mammary tumor virus in virus-induced mammary adenocarcinomas, although they are not expressed in the normal mammary gland. However, five other Wnt genes are differentially expressed during development of adult mammary tissue, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in various phases of mammary gland growth and development. Induction of transformation by Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 may be due to interference with these normal regulatory events; however, there is no direct evidence for this hypothesis. We have tested Wnt family members for the ability to induce transformation of cultured mammary cells. The results demonstrate that the Wnt gene family can be divided into three groups depending on their ability to induce morphological transformation and altered growth characteristics of the C57MG mammary epithelial cell line. Wnt-1, Wnt-3A, and Wnt-7A were highly transforming and induced colonies which formed and shed balls of cells. Wnt-2, Wnt-5B, and Wnt-7B also induced transformation but with a lower frequency and an apparent decrease in saturation density. In contrast, Wnt-6 and two other family members which are normally expressed in C57MG cells, Wnt-4 and Wnt-5A, failed to induce transformation. These data demonstrate that the Wnt genes have distinct effects on cell growth and should not be regarded as functionally equivalent. Images PMID:8065359

  5. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  6. Transcriptome analysis of embryonic mammary cells reveals insights into mammary lineage establishment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The mammary primordium forms during embryogenesis as a result of inductive interactions between its constitutive tissues, the mesenchyme and epithelium, and represents the earliest evidence of commitment to the mammary lineage. Previous studies of embryonic mouse mammary epithelium indicated that, by mid-gestation, these cells are determined to a mammary cell fate and that a stem cell population has been delimited. Mammary mesenchyme can induce mammary development from simple epithelium even across species and classes, and can partially restore features of differentiated tissue to mouse mammary tumours in co-culture experiments. Despite these exciting properties, the molecular identity of embryonic mammary cells remains to be fully characterised. Methods Here, we define the transcriptome of the mammary primordium and the two distinct cellular compartments that comprise it, the mammary primordial bud epithelium and mammary mesenchyme. Pathway and network analysis was performed and comparisons of embryonic mammary gene expression profiles to those of both postnatal mouse and human mammary epithelial cell sub-populations and stroma were made. Results Several of the genes we have detected in our embryonic mammary cell signatures were previously shown to regulate mammary cell fate and development, but we also identified a large number of novel candidates. Additionally, we determined genes that were expressed by both embryonic and postnatal mammary cells, which represent candidate regulators of mammary cell fate, differentiation and progenitor cell function that could signal from mammary lineage inception during embryogenesis through postnatal development. Comparison of embryonic mammary cell signatures with those of human breast cells identified potential regulators of mammary progenitor cell functions conserved across species. Conclusions These results provide new insights into genetic regulatory mechanisms of mammary development, particularly

  7. Detection of differentially expressed genes in methylnitrosourea-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Lin, L; Crist, K A; Kelloff, G J; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; You, M; Wang, Y

    1997-01-01

    In this study, altered gene expression in five methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas was investigated using a newly developed competitive cDNA library screening assay. In order to detect the differentially expressed cDNA transcripts, three cDNA libraries (rat mammary, rat liver, and rat kidney) with over 18,000 clones were differentially screened with competing normal and neoplastic mammary cDNA probes. Ninety-eight clones indicated by competitive hybridization to be differentially expressed in tumors were verified by dot-blot hybridization analysis. Of these clones, 45 were found to be overexpressed while 53 were underexpressed in tumors. Forty-five of the confirmed clones were further analyzed by single-pass cDNA sequence determination. Four clones showed homology with cytochrome oxidase subunit I, polyoma virus PTA noncoding region, cytoplasmic beta-actin, and mouse secretory protein containing thrombospondin motifs. Further investigation into the potential roles of these identified genes should contribute significantly to our understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) of rat mammary tumorigenesis.

  8. Influence of thorax irradiation on the survival of mice with spontaneous or artificial lung metastases from a transplantable mammary adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of thorax irradiation on lung metastases, either occurring spontaneously from a primary mammary adenocarcinoma (M8013X) transplanted on the leg or artificially induced by intravenous injection of tumor cells was studied. Increasing the interval between the moment at which lung metastases are supposed to originate and the thorax irradiation resulted in a rapid decrease of the effectiveness of this treatment in preventing the development of lung metastases. Increasing the radiation dose led to an increased number of cures; however, an increased number of mice dying of lethal lung damage was also observed. Irradiation of the lungs of mice with 5 or 10 Gy, 24 hours, 7 days or 14 days prior to i.v. injection with tumor cells, did not significantly increase the number of mice with lung metastases. Immunological resistance against the tumor played a role in our experiments with both spontaneous and artificial lung metastases.

  9. A mammary adenocarcinoma murine model suitable for the study of cancer immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer immunoediting is a dynamic process composed of three phases: elimination (EL), equilibrium (EQ) and escape (ES) that encompasses the potential host-protective and tumor-sculpting functions of the immune system throughout tumor development. Animal models are useful tools for studying diseases such as cancer. The present study was designed to characterize the interaction between mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 and CBi, CBi− and CBi/L inbred mice lines. Results The mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 developed spontaneously in a CBi mouse. CBi/L and CBi− mice were artificially selected for body conformation from CBi. When CBi mice are s.c. challenged with M-406, tumor growths exponentially in 100% of animals, while in CBi− the tumor growths briefly and then begins a rejection process in 100% of the animals. In CBi/L the growth of the tumor shows the three phases: 51.6% in ES, 18.5% in EQ and 29.8% in EL. Conclusions The results obtained support the conclusion that the system M-406 plus the inbred mouse lines CBi, CBi− and CBi/L, is a good murine model to study the process of tumor immunoediting. PMID:24885995

  10. Stem cells and the developing mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Maisam; Spike, Benjamin T; Dravis, Christopher; Kannan, Nagarajan; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dynamic changes throughout life. In the mouse, these begin with initial morphogenesis of the gland in the mid-gestation embryo followed by hormonally regulated changes during puberty and later in adulthood. The adult mammary gland contains a hierarchy of cell types with varying potentials for self-maintenance and differentiation. These include cells able to produce complete, functional mammary glands in vivo and that contain daughter cells with the same remarkable regenerative potential, as well as cells with more limited clonogenic activity in vitro. Here we review how applying in vitro and in vivo methods for quantifying these cells in adult mammary tissue to fetal mammary cells has enabled the first cells fulfilling the functional criteria of transplantable, isolated mammary stem cells to be identified a few days before birth. Thereafter, the number of these cells increases rapidly. Populations containing these fetal stem cells display growth and gene expression programs that differ from their adult counterparts but share signatures characteristic of certain types of breast cancer. Such observations reinforce growing evidence of important differences between tissue-specific fetal and adult cells with stem cell properties and emphasize the merits of investigating their molecular basis.

  11. Muscarinic receptors participation in angiogenic response induced by macrophages from mammary adenocarcinoma-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Eulalia; Davel, Lilia; Jasnis, María A; Gotoh, Tomomi; de Lustig, Eugenia Sacerdote; Sales, María E

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The role of macrophages in tumor progression has generated contradictory evidence. We had previously demonstrated the ability of peritoneal macrophages from LMM3 murine mammary adenocarcinoma-bearing mice (TMps) to increase the angiogenicity of LMM3 tumor cells, mainly through polyamine synthesis. Here we investigate the ability of the parasympathetic nervous system to modulate angiogenesis induced by TMps through the activation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR). Methods Peritoneal macrophages from female BALB/c mice bearing a 7-day LMM3 tumor were inoculated intradermally (3 × 105 cells per site) into syngeneic mice. Before inoculation, TMps were stimulated with the muscarinic agonist carbachol in the absence or presence of different muscarinic antagonists or enzyme inhibitors. Angiogenesis was evaluated by counting vessels per square millimeter of skin. The expression of mAchR, arginase and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) isoforms was analyzed by Western blotting. Arginase and COX activities were evaluated by urea and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, respectively. Results TMps, which stimulate neovascularization, express functional mAchR, because carbachol-treated TMps potently increased new blood vessels formation. This response was completely blocked by preincubating TMps with pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP), M1 and M3 receptor antagonists, and partly by the M2 receptor antagonist methoctramine. M1 receptor activation by carbachol in TMps triggers neovascularization through arginase products because Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine reversed the agonist action. Preincubation of TMps with methoctramine partly prevented carbachol-stimulated urea formation. In addition, COX-derived liberation of PGE2 is responsible for the promotion of TMps angiogenic activity by M3 receptor. We also detected a higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in TMps than in macrophages from normal mice. Carbachol

  12. Adenocarcinoma of mammary-like glands of the vulva: Report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jared J; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2006-04-01

    Mammary-like glands are a poorly recognized structure of normal vulvar skin. Adenocarcinomas arising from these glands are rare and represent a distinct clinicopathologic entity that must be distinguished from metastatic tumors. We reviewed 19 cases reported in the literature and describe a 51-year-old patient with a long-standing nodule on her right interlabial sulcus. Excisional biopsy and Mohs micrographic surgery demonstrated an infiltrating adenocarcinoma of the mammary-like glands involving the dermis and subcutis. On review of all 20 cases, the mean age at diagnosis was 59.6 years, the labia majora were involved in 13 cases (65%), and the mean lesional size was 2.5 cm. The tumor's histologic patterns varied greatly, although the histomorphologic similarity among this neoplasm, sweat gland carcinomas, and invasive extramammary Paget disease suggested a morphologic spectrum among these tumors. Criteria for establishing the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of mammary-like glands include identifying transition zones between normal mammary-like glands and adenocarcinomatous areas. This tumor is best categorized as a locally aggressive neoplasm with a low risk for widespread metastasis. Use of aggressive surgical therapeutic regimens, particularly in the case of tumors localized to the skin, must be reassessed, especially given the likelihood of long-term morbidity with such regimens. In our patient, successful Mohs micrographic surgery suggests that alternate management may be adopted for tumors localized to the skin, especially in elderly patients.

  13. The antitumor effect of locoregional magnetic cobalt ferrite in dog mammary adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şincai, Mariana; Gângǎ, Diana; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau

    2001-01-01

    The endocytosis of nanosized magnetic particles by tumor cells led to numerous tests to establish the use of this phenomenon in antitumor therapy. The direct antitumor effect of a biocompatible cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid directly inoculated in bitch mammary tumors was studied. A direct correlation between tumor cell lysis and cobalt ferrite was established in tumors. Massive endocytosis of magnetic particles was observed 1 h after the contact of magnetic fluid with tumor cells.

  14. Transplantation of a mammary stromal cell line into a mammary fat pad: development of the site-specific in vivo analysis system for mammary stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Aoki, Naohito; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial and stromal tissue is considered to be important in breast tissue development. In this study, we developed a transplantation procedure for the mammary stromal fibroblastic cell line (MSF) to examine its life in vivo. First we established MSF cells which stably expressed lacZ (lacZ/MSF) and had characteristics of mammary stromal cells. The lacZ/MSF cells were then transplanted into a cleared mammary fat pad of syngenic mice with and without mammary primary epithelial organoids. Whole mount X-gal and carmine staining of the transplants revealed that a number of undifferentiated lacZ/MSF cells survived around the mammary epithelial tissue when transplanted with organoids. These results indicate that transplantation of MSF cells into mammary fat pad was accomplished by co-transplantation with primary mammary organoids. Finally, we discuss the application of transplantation procedure for in vivo studies of the mammary stromal tissue development and stromal-epithelial interactions.

  15. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  16. In vivo diagnosis of mammary adenocarcinoma using Raman spectroscopy: an animal model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar, R. A.; Ribeiro, D. G.; dos Santos, E. A. P.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.; Ramalho, F. S.; Martin, A. A.; Martinho, H. S.

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type in women Worldwide. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical breast examinations have been estimated from clinical trials to be approximately 54 % and 94 %, respectively. Further, approximately 95 % of all positive breast cancer screenings turn out to be false-positive. The optimal method for early detection should be both highly sensitive to ensure that all cancers are detected, and also highly specific to avoid the humanistic and economic costs associated with false-positive results. In vivo optical spectroscopy techniques, Raman in particular, have been pointed out as promising tools to improve the accuracy of screening mammography. The aim of the present study was to apply FT-Raman spectroscopy to discriminate normal and adenocarcinoma breast tissues of Sprague-Dawley female rats. The study was performed on 32 rats divided in the control (N=5) and experimental (N=27) groups. Histological analysis indicated that mammary hyperplasia, cribriform, papillary and solid adenocarcinomas were found in the experimental group subjects. The spectral collection was made using a commercial FT-Raman Spectrometer (Bruker RFS100) equipped with fiber-optic probe (RamProbe) and the spectral region between 900 and 1800 cm-1 was analyzed. Principal Components Analysis, Cluster Analysis, and Linear Discriminant Analysis with cross-validation were applied as spectral classification algorithm. As concluding remarks it is show that normal and adenocarcinoma tissues discriminations was possible (correct proportion for Transcutaneous collection mode was 80.80% and for "Open Sky" mode was 91.70%); however, a conclusive diagnosis among the four lesion subtypes was not possible.

  17. Stabilin-1 is expressed in human breast cancer and supports tumor growth in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Yin, Shuiping; Song, Bin; Avdic, Aida; Schledzewski, Kai; Ovsiy, Ilja; Gratchev, Alexei; Verdiell, Maria Llopis; Sticht, Carsten; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Schönhaber, Hiltrud; Weiss, Christel; Fields, Alan P.; Simon-Keller, Katja; Pfister, Frederick; Berlit, Sebastian; Marx, Alexander; Arnold, Bernd; Goerdt, Sergij; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Stabilin-1 is a multifunctional scavenger receptor expressed on alternatively-activated macrophages. Stabilin-1 mediates phagocytosis of “unwanted-self” components, intracellular sorting, and endocytic clearance of extracellular ligands including SPARC that modulates breast cancer growth. The expression of stabilin-1 was found on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in mouse and human cancers including melanoma, lymphoma, glioblastoma, and pancreatic insulinoma. Despite its tumor-promoting role in mouse models of melanoma and lymphoma the expression and functional role of stabilin-1 in breast cancer was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that stabilin-1 is expressed on TAM in human breast cancer, and its expression is most pronounced on stage I disease. Using stabilin-1 knockout (ko) mice we show that stabilin-1 facilitates growth of mouse TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma. Endocytosis assay on stabilin-1 ko TAM demonstrated impaired clearance of stabilin-1 ligands including SPARC that was capable of inducing cell death in TS/A cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis on purified TAM and reporter assays in stabilin-1 expressing cell lines demonstrated no influence of stabilin-1 expression on intracellular signalling. Our results suggest stabilin-1 mediated silent clearance of extracellular tumor growth-inhibiting factors (e.g. SPARC) as a mechanism of stabilin-1 induced tumor growth. Silent clearance function of stabilin-1 makes it an attractive candidate for delivery of immunomodulatory anti-cancer therapeutic drugs to TAM. PMID:27105498

  18. Hormone signaling requirements for the conversion of non-mammary mouse cells to mammary cell fate(s) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Rosenfield, Sonia M; George, Andrea L; Smith, Gilbert H

    2015-06-01

    Mammotropic hormones and growth factors play a very important role in mammary growth and differentiation. Here, hormones including Estrogen, Progesterone, Prolactin, their cognate receptors, and the growth factor Amphiregulin, are tested with respect to their roles in signaling non-mammary cells from the mouse to redirect to mammary epithelial cell fate(s). This was done in the context of glandular regeneration in pubertal athymic female mice. Our previous studies demonstrated that mammary stem cell niches are recapitulated during gland regeneration in vivo. During this process, cells of exogenous origin cooperate with mammary epithelial cells to form mammary stem cell niches and thus respond to normal developmental signals. In all cases tested with the possible exception of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), hormone signaling is dispensable for non-mammary cells to undertake mammary epithelial cell fate(s), proliferate, and contribute progeny to chimeric mammary outgrowths. Importantly, redirected non-mammary cell progeny, regardless of their source, have the ability to self-renew and contribute offspring to secondary mammary outgrowths derived from transplanted chimeric mammary fragments; thus suggesting that some of these cells are capable of mammary stem cell/progenitor functions.

  19. Exposure to light-at-night increases the growth of DMBA-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in rats.

    PubMed

    Cos, Samuel; Mediavilla, Dolores; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; González, Alicia; Alonso-González, Carolina; Sánchez-Barceló, Emilio J

    2006-04-28

    In order to assess whether light exposure at night influences the growth of mammary tumors, as well as the role of melatonin in this process, female rats bearing DMBA-induced mammary adenocarcinomas were exposed to different lighting environments. Animals exposed to light-at-night, especially those under a constant dim light during the darkness phase, showed: (a) significantly higher rates of tumor growth as well as lower survival than controls, (b) higher concentration of serum estradiol, and (c) lower nocturnal excretion of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, without there being differences between nocturnal and diurnal levels. These results suggest that circadian and endocrine disruption induced by light pollution, could induce the growth of mammary tumors.

  20. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  1. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 11 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A method for... Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human mammary epithelial stem cells with in vivo regenerative ability...Abstracts Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turshvili, Sam Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves, “Identification of Human Mammary

  2. Growth requirements of human mammary epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Shearer, M; Stoker, M G

    1977-12-15

    Colony-forming epithelial cells can be separated from the non-dividing "foam cells" in human milk by differential adhesion to glass and freezing. The growth of such partially purified mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by co-culture with non-dividing feeder cells. Foam cells, mitomycin-treated mouse fibroblast lines and human mammary fibroblasts and calf lens epithelial cells are all effective in promoting mammary epithelial cell growth. Contact between epithelial cells and feeders is not required for the growth-promoting effect. The mitogenic effect of epidermal growth factor on mammary epithelial cells also requires feeder cell activity.

  3. Canine mammary tumour cell lines established in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E

    1993-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumours in the female dog. The tumours have a complex histology and exist in epithelial, mixed and mesenchymal forms. To study the biology of canine mammary tumours, five cell lines have been established and characterized. The results indicate that canine mammary tumours might be derived from mammary stem cells and that the tumour growth is independent of oestrogens. The established canine mammary tumour cell lines will be valuable tools in further studies of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of these tumours.

  4. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    robust and reproducible methodology to detect, quantify and isolate stem cells in normal human mammary tissue, using a xenotransplantation system...covers the first year of the grant, during which substantial progress has been made in the development and validation of the xenotransplantation assay...Subrenal xenotransplantation surgery. The hair on the back of anesthetized mice was shaved, and the skin swabbed with 70% alcohol. An anterior to

  5. Morphological and histological characteristics of mammary dysplasias occurring in cell dissociation-derived murine mammary outgrowths

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, S.P.; Adams, L.M.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphological and histological characteristics of ductal dysplasias that were observed in mammary outgrowths derived from monodispersed mammary cells of carcinogen-treated mice are described. Mammary outgrowths were derived by injecting either 10(4) or 10(5) enzymatically dissociated mammary cells, obtained from control or carcinogen-treated BALB/c mice, into gland-free mammary fat pads of syngeneic hosts. The mammary dysplasias observed varied considerably in morphological and histological characteristics. The majority of the lesions were ductal in origin and were associated with epithelial hyperplasia which ranged from mild hyperplasia, in which only a few extra layers of epithelium were present, to severe hyperplasia, in which the ducts and end buds were occluded and distended with epithelial cells. In addition, papillary and lobular lesions were observed which were also associated with varying degrees of hyperplasia. The range of mammary dysplasias observed in these outgrowths closely resembles that of lesions associated with the pathogenesis of mammary carcinoma in mice, rats, and humans.

  6. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    PubMed

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  7. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize.

  8. A New Hitherto Unreported Histopathologic Manifestation of Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma: "Masked MASC" Associated With Low-grade Mucinous Adenocarcinoma and Low-grade In Situ Carcinoma Components.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Michal, Michael; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Grossmann, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2016-10-01

    We present a salivary gland tumor of the parotid gland in a 54-year-old woman, which contained a minor mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) component (20%) intermixed with a morphologically entirely different mucinous adenocarcinomatous component that comprised 80% of the tumor mass and a morphologically nondescript low-grade intraductal carcinoma (in situ) component. On fluorescence in situ hybridization, a break in the ETV6 gene was documented in the mucinous adenocarcinomatous, the conventional MASC, and the intraductal (in situ) components. RT-PCR failed to reveal an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion. The entire conventional MASC and only rare mucinous adenocarcinoma tumor cells were mammaglobin positive, whereas the low-grade intraductal carcinoma (in-situ) component was negative. S-100 protein stained only the MASC component.

  9. Mammary phenotypic expression induced in epidermal cells by embryonic mammary mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Cunha, G R; Young, P; Christov, K; Guzman, R; Nandi, S; Talamantes, F; Thordarson, G

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to establish methods for inducing mammary epithelial differentiation from nonmammary epithelium. For this purpose, mid-ventral or dorsal epidermis (skin epithelium; SKE) from 13-day rat or mouse embryos was associated with 13-day embryonic mouse mammary mesenchyme (mammary gland mesenchyme; MGM) (mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE). The resultant MGM+SKE recombinants as well as controls (homotypic mouse mammary recombinants, homotypic mouse skin recombinants and mouse mammary mesenchyme by itself) were grafted under the renal capsule of syngeneic or athymic female nude mouse hosts. Most female hosts were induced to undergo lactogenesis by grafting an adult pituitary which elicited a state of hyperprolactinemia. Tissue recombinants of mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE grown for 1 month in vivo formed a hair-bearing keratinized skin from which mammary ductal structures extended into the mesenchyme. The ducts were composed of columnar luminal epithelial cells as well as basal, actin-positive myoepithelial cells. When grown in pituitary-grafted hosts, the ductal epithelial cells expressed casein and alpha-lactalbumin as judged by immunocytochemistry. The expression of caseins in MGM+SKE recombinants was confirmed by Western blot. The epithelial cells in mouse MGM+rat SKE recombinants expressing milk proteins were shown to be rat cells while the surrounding connective tissue was composed of mouse cells based upon staining with Hoechst dye 33258. Using mammary-specific markers, these studies confirmed the earlier morphological studies of Propper and unequivocally demonstrated for the first time that embryonic mammary mesenchyme can induce morphological and functional mammary differentiation from nonmammary epithelium.

  10. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  11. CELL CONTACTS IN THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Pitelka, Dorothy R.; Hamamoto, Susan T.; Duafala, Joan G.; Nemanic, Michael K.

    1973-01-01

    The nature and distribution of cell contacts have been examined in thin sections and freeze-fracture replicas of mammary gland samples from female C3H/Crgl mice at stages from birth through pregnancy, lactation, and postweaning involution. Epithelial cells of major mammary ducts at all stages examined are linked at their luminal borders by junctional complexes consisting of tight junctions, variable intermediate junctions, occasional small gap junctions, and one or more series of desmosomes. Scattered desmosomes and gap junctions link ductal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in all combinations; hemidesmosomes attach myoepithelial cells to the basal lamina. Freeze-fracture replicas confirm the erratic distribution of gap junctions and reveal a loose, irregular network of ridges comprising the continuous tight-junctional belts. Alveoli develop early in gestation and initially resemble ducts. Later, as alveoli and small ducts become actively secretory, they lose all desmosomes and most intermediate junctions, whereas tight and gap junctions persist, The tight-junctional network becomes compact and orderly, its undulating ridges oriented predominantly parallel to the luminal surface. It is suggested that these changes in junctional morphology, occurring in secretory cells around parturition, may be related to the greatly enhanced rate of movement of milk precursors and products through the lactating epithelium, or to the profound and recurrent changes in shape of secretory cells that occur in relation to myoepithelial cell contraction, or to both. PMID:4569313

  12. Effect of ω-3 and ω-9 fatty acid rich oils on lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases enzymes and on the growth of a mammary adenocarcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nutritional factors play a major role in cancer initiation and development. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have the ability to induce modifications in the activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes that affect tumour growth. We studied the effect of two diets enriched in 6% Walnut and Peanut oils that are rich in ω-3 and ω9 PUFAs respectively on a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma as compared with the control (C) that received commercial diet. Results Peanut oil enriched diet induced an increase in membrane arachidonic acid (AA) content and the cyclooxygenase enzyme derived 12-HHT (p < 0.05) and simultaneously showed decrease in 12-LOX, 15-LOX-2, 15-LOX-1 and PGE activities (p < 0.05) that corresponded to higher apoptosis and lower mitosis seen in this group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, Peanut oil group showed lower T-cell infiltration (p < 0.05), number of metastasis (p < 0.05) and tumour volume (p < 0.05) and longer survival rate compared to other groups. Conclusions The results of the present study showed that Peanut oil-enriched diet protects against mammary cancer development by modulating tumour membrane fatty acids composition and LOX and COX enzyme activities. PMID:20932327

  13. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    9 Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 10 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A...Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turashvili, Samuel Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human...Eirew, Afshin Raouf, John Stingl, Gulisa Turashvili, Allen Delaney, Joanne Emerman, Marco Marra and Samuel Aparicio . “Stem Cells in the Mammary Gland

  14. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  15. Mouse mammary tumor virus suppresses apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells through ITAM-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung H; Grande, Shannon M; Monroe, John G; Ross, Susan R

    2012-12-01

    Many receptors in hematopoietic cells use a common signaling pathway that relies on a highly conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which signals through Src family tyrosine kinases. ITAM-bearing proteins are also found in many oncogenic viruses, including the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) envelope (Env). We previously showed that MMTV Env expression transformed normal mammary epithelial cells and that Src kinases were important mediators in this transformation. To study how ITAM signaling affects mammary cell transformation, we utilized mammary cell lines expressing two different ITAM-containing proteins, one encoding a MMTV provirus and the other a B cell receptor fusion protein. ITAM-expressing cells were resistant to both serum starvation- and chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, whereas cells transduced with these molecules bearing ITAM mutations were indistinguishable from untransduced cells in their sensitivity to these treatments. We also found that Src kinase was activated in the MMTV-expressing cells and that MMTV-induced apoptosis resistance was completely restored by the Src inhibitor PP2. In vivo, MMTV infection delayed involution-induced apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland. Our results show that MMTV suppresses apoptosis through ITAM-mediated Src tyrosine kinase signaling. These studies could lead to the development of effective treatment of nonhematopoietic cell cancers in which ITAM-mediated signaling plays a role.

  16. Mammary gland stem cells and their application in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Baowei

    2017-02-07

    The mammary gland is an organ comprising two primary lineages, specifically the inner luminal and the outer myoepithelial cell layers. Mammary gland stem cells (MaSCs) are highly dynamic and self-renewing, and can give rise to these mammary gland lineages. The lineages are responsible for gland generation during puberty as well as expansion during pregnancy. In recent years, researchers have focused on understanding how MaSCs are regulated during mammary gland development and transformation of breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, and how they are regulated by the signaling transduction pathways, mammary gland microenvironment, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Moreover, we debate the evidence for their serving as the origin of breast cancer, and discuss the therapeutic perspectives of targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In conclusion, a better understanding of the key regulators of MaSCs is crucial for the clinical treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  18. Establishment of mammary gland model in vitro: culture and evaluation of a yak mammary epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei; Chen, Yabing; Xiong, Xianrong; Lan, Daoliang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to establish yak mammary epithelial cells (YMECs) for an in vitro model of yak mammary gland biology. The primary culture of YMECs was obtained from mammary gland tissues of lactating yak and then characterized using immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analysis. Whether foreign genes could be transfected into the YMECs were examined by transfecting the EGFP gene into the cells. Finally, the effect of Staphylococcus aureus infection on YMECs was determined. The established YMECs retained the mammary epithelial cell characteristics. A spontaneously immortalized yak mammary epithelial cell line was established and could be continuously subcultured for more than 60 passages without senescence. The EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the YMECs, and the transfected cells could be maintained for a long duration in the culture by continuous subculturing. The cells expressed more antimicrobial peptides upon S.aureus invasion. Therefore, the established cell line could be considered a model system to understand yak mammary gland biology.

  19. Immune cell location and function during post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Reed, Johanna R; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2010-09-01

    Post-natal mammary gland development requires complex interactions between the epithelial cells and various cell types within the stroma. Recent studies have illustrated the importance of immune cells and their mediators during the various stages of mammary gland development. However, the mechanisms by which these immune cells functionally contribute to mammary gland development are only beginning to be understood. This review provides an overview of the localization of immune cells within the mammary gland during the various stages of post-natal mammary gland development. Furthermore, recent studies are summarized that illustrate the mechanisms by which these cells are recruited to the mammary gland and their functional roles in mammary gland development.

  20. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2014-01-25

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programmed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer.

  1. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow.

  2. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  3. Mammary extracellular matrix directs differentiation of testicular and embryonic stem cells to form functional mammary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Fleming, Jodie M.; George, Andrea L.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Schedin, Pepper; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the ability of the normal mammary microenvironment (niche) to direct non-mammary cells including testicular and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to adopt a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) fate. These studies relied upon the interaction of transplanted normal MECs with non-mammary cells within the mammary fat-pads of recipient mice that had their endogenous epithelium removed. Here, we tested whether acellular mammary extracellular matrix (mECM) preparations are sufficient to direct differentiation of testicular-derived cells and ESCs to form functional mammary epithelial trees in vivo. We found that mECMs isolated from adult mice and rats were sufficient to redirect testicular derived cells to produce normal mammary epithelial trees within epithelial divested mouse mammary fat-pads. Conversely, ECMs isolated from omental fat and lung did not redirect testicular cells to a MEC fate, indicating the necessity of tissue specific components of the mECM. mECM preparations also completely inhibited teratoma formation from ESC inoculations. Further, a phenotypically normal ductal outgrowth resulted from a single inoculation of ESCs and mECM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a tissue specific ECM driving differentiation of cells to form a functional tissue in vivo. PMID:28071703

  4. Mammary Stem Cell Research in Veterinary Science: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Borena, Bizunesh M.; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an organ with a remarkable regenerative capacity that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Growing evidence suggests that these changes are driven by the coordinated division and differentiation of mammary stem cell populations (MaSC). Whereas information regarding MaSC and their role in comparative mammary gland physiology is readily available in human and mice, such information remains scarce in most veterinary mammal species such as cows, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, and dogs. We believe that a better knowledge on the MaSC in these species will not only help to gain more insights into mammary gland (patho) physiology in veterinary medicine, but will also be of value for human medicine. Therefore, this review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell isolation and characterization in different mammals of veterinary importance. PMID:23360296

  5. [Gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinoma: A distinct entity].

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Rouquette, Alexandre; Brezault, Catherine; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-04-01

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (GSRC) is a distinct entity. Their incidence is increasing. The pathologist plays a central role in the identification of this entity. Diagnosis is based on an adenocarcinoma containing a majority of signet ring cells (above 50 %). The prognosis of GSRC is the same as gastric adenocarcinoma while GSRC appeared more aggressive. Signet ring cells present a low sensitivity to chemotherapy. This review aimed to discuss the histological, the prognostic and the therapeutic aspect of this entity.

  6. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  7. Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    susceptibility to oncogenesis exist in the normal mammary tissue, the milk -forming ducts of the mammary gland (for review [2]). Coupled with information...HMECs [25]. proportion of preselection HMECs [8]. The senescence associated with the ’selection’ phase in Human milk is an easily available source of...which has precluded their detailed biochemical proliferation at this stage is dependent on the pRb/p16 study [2,18]. Most of the work on milk cells has

  8. Immunohistochemical characterization of mammary squamous cell carcinoma of the dog.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Francesco; Sarli, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Barbara; Morandi, Federico; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2008-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary gland is rare in both veterinary and human medicine. Whereas human metaplastic and squamous variants are known, the objectives of the current study were to ascertain the presence of such entities in canine mammary tumors and to distinguish them from other (epidermal, sweat gland) squamous tumors that may develop in the same area. A panel of antibodies (anti-cytokeratin [CK] 19, CK 14, CK 5/6, pancytokeratin, and vimentin) was used on 18 mammary gland malignancies with squamous features and 16 malignant skin tumors (11 squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and 5 sweat glands). Fifteen of the 18 mammary carcinomas were classified as metaplastic carcinomas, and the remaining 3 were classified as squamous cell carcinomas. The 2 most useful markers to establish the histogenesis of mammary tumors were pancytokeratin and CK 19. All other antibodies were equally expressed (CK 14 and 5/6) in all histotypes. The antibody panel discriminated primary epidermal squamous tumors (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 negative) from gland-derived squamous neoplasms (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 positive) but failed to distinguish primary mammary tumors from other squamous tumors of glandular origin.

  9. Slugging their way to immortality: driving mammary epithelial cells into a stem cell-like state.

    PubMed

    Soady, Kelly; Smalley, Matthew J

    2012-09-10

    Delineating the molecular factors that define and maintain the mammary stem cell state is vital for understanding normal development and tumourigenesis. A recent study by Guo and colleagues identifies two master transcriptional regulators of mammary stem cells, Slug and Sox9, ectopic expression of which confers stem cell attributes on differentiated mammary epithelial cells. Slug and Sox9 expression was also shown to determine in vivo metastatic potential of human breast cancer cell lines. Understanding these factors in the context of normal lineage differentiation is an important step toward elucidating the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy and the origins of cancer stem cells.

  10. Inhibitory effects of a polypeptide thymic factor on the development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthragene-induced mammary adenocarcinoma in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.; Danetskaya, E.V.; Morozov, V.G.; Khavinson, V.Kh.

    1980-01-01

    It has come to be recognized that tumor growth is accompanied by inhibition of cellular immunity and the function of the T lymphocytes. Restitution of T lymphocyte function by means of several pharmacologic agents such as levamisole, phenformin, or epithalamin (an epiphyseal factor) has, in a number of cases, been accompanied by growth inhibition of both spontaneous and induced tumors. In addition, the importance of the thymus in the regulation of T lymphocytes and in antitumor immunity has been recognized. Several indicators point to the fact that the thymus contains physiologically active substances which stimulate T cell-dependent immunity and prevent the occurrence of neoplasms. These considerations have led to attempts at isolation of active thymic factors and studies on their effects on the appearance and growth of tumors. Previously, a thymic factor - thymarin - had been isolated which imparted immunocompetence to the T lymphocytes. This factor differs from other thymic preparations, including thymosine, in terms of a number of physicochemical characteristics and is a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 5000. This study is concerned with its effects on tumor development - mammary gland adenocarcinoma induced in animals with a chemical carcinogen.

  11. Molecular Analysis of Motility in Metastatic Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    has been identified as a good candidate for nucleation of actin filaments in vivo. Originally identified from the cortex of Acanthamoeba (111), it... Acanthamoeba to mammalian fibroblasts (40,112,113). Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex can 38 specifically induce actin polymerization and nucleation at the

  12. The Analysis of Cell Population Dynamics in Mammary Gland Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    processes of mammary epithelial cell differentiation during developmentand tumorigenesis. Using FACS, mammary epithelial cell ( MEC ) populations from tumors...developed techniques for viral transduction andtransplantation of primary MECs . 15. SUBJECT TERMS mammary, stem cell, lentivirus, FACS, cancer, imaging 16...epithelial cell ( MEC ) populations from tumors and wildtype tissue was investigated for their outgrowth potential or tumorigenic capacity. We also developed

  13. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  14. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Boutinaud, Marion; Herve, Lucile; Lollivier, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analyzing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM) and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation, and stage of lactation). PMID:26579195

  15. Cooperative Interactions During Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Immortal Transformation of Cultured Human Mammary Epithelial Cells. Cellular Oncology, 26:248-251, 2004. Rodier , F., Kim, S-H., Nijjar, T., Yaswen, P...Promoter, Mol. Cell Biol.: 25:3923-3933, 2005. Goldstein, J, Rodier , F, Garbe, J, Stampfer, M, Campisi, J, Caspase-independent cytochrome c release is a

  16. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  17. Amphiregulin mediates self-renewal in an immortal mammary epithelial cell line with stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Brian W.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Anderson, Lisa H.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Brisken, Cathrin; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2010-02-01

    Amphiregulin (AREG), a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor, is required for mammary gland ductal morphogenesis and mediates estrogen actions in vivo, emerging as an essential growth factor during mammary gland growth and differentiation. The COMMA-D {beta}-geo (CD{beta}geo) mouse mammary cell line displays characteristics of normal mammary progenitor cells including the ability to regenerate a mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pad of a juvenile mouse, nuclear label retention, and the capacity to form anchorage-independent mammospheres. We demonstrate that AREG is essential for formation of floating mammospheres by CD{beta}geo cells and that the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in AREG-mediated mammosphere formation. Addition of exogenous AREG promotes mammosphere formation in cells where AREG expression is knocked down by siRNA and mammosphere formation by AREG{sup -/-} mammary epithelial cells. AREG knockdown inhibits mammosphere formation by duct-limited mammary progenitor cells but not lobule-limited mammary progenitor cells. These data demonstrate AREG mediates the function of a subset of mammary progenitor cells in vitro.

  18. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  19. Differential effects of dietary Oenothera, Zizyphus mistol, and corn oils, and essential fatty acid deficiency on the progression of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Piegari, M; Guzmán, C A; Eynard, A R

    1999-03-01

    The modulating effect of dietary enrichment in mistol seed oil (MO) containing 25% of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), evening primrose oil (EPO) enriched in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and corn oil (CO) as sources of omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids on the growth parameters of one transplantable mammary tumor were compared. Mice fed on different lipid formulae were inoculated with a mammary gland adenocarcinoma and different growth development tumor parameters were recorded. Results showed that corn oil feeding slowed down most of the tumor growth parameters, as did the EPO diet. MO also showed antitumor activity. Olein feeding, which induces an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), increased the incidence and the multiplicity of metastases when compared with the controls. It may be concluded that a diet enriched in omega-6 fatty acids did not behave as a tumor promoter in this mammary gland tumor model. The antitumor activities of EPO and MO are corroborated in present experiments, suggesting that both oils may be of value in nutritional approaches of mammary gland tumor therapies. In addition, present data add further experimental proof about the proposed protumorigenic proneness induced by the EFAD state.

  20. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cells express stem cell markers and differentiate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Haina; Dai, Wenting; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    The bovine mammary epithelial cell is a secretory cell, and its cell number and secretory activity determine milk production. In this study, we immortalized a bovine mammary epithelial cell line by SV40 large T antigen gene using a retrovirus based on Chinese Holstein primary mammary epithelial cells (CMEC) cultured in vitro. An immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line surpassed the 50-passage mark and was designated the CMEC-H. The immortalized mammary epithelial cells grew in close contact with each other and exhibited the typical cobblestone morphology characteristic with obvious boundaries. The telomerase expression of CMEC-H has consistently demonstrated the presence of telomerase activity as an immortalized cell line, but the cell line never induced tumor formation in nude mice. CMEC-H expressed epithelial (cytokeratins CK7, CK8, CK18, and CK19), mesenchymal (vimentin), and stem/progenitor (CD44 and p63) cell markers. The induced expression of milk proteins, αS1 -casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and butyrophilin, indicated that CMEC-H maintained the synthesis function of the mammary epithelial cells. The established immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line CMEC-H is capable of self-renewal and differentiation and can serve as a valuable reagent for studying the physiological mechanism of the mammary gland.

  1. Distinct FAK activities determine progenitor and mammary stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Song; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Mammary stem (MaSCs) and progenitor cells are important for mammary gland development and maintenance and may give rise to mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs). Yet there remains limited understanding of how these cells contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we show that conditional deletion of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in embryonic mammary epithelial cells (MaECs) decreases luminal progenitors (LPs) and basal MaSCs, reducing their colony-forming and regenerative potentials in a cell autonomous manner. Loss of FAK kinase activity in MaECs specifically impaired LP proliferation and alveologenesis, whereas a kinase-independent activity of FAK supported ductal invasion and basal MaSC activity. Deficiency in LPs suppressed tumorigenesis and MaCSC formation in a mouse model of breast cancer. In contrast to the general inhibitory effect of FAK attenuation, inhibitors of FAK kinase preferentially inhibited proliferation and tumorsphere formation of LP-like, but not MaSC-like, human breast cancer cells. Our findings establish distinct kinase dependent and independent activities of FAK that differentially regulate LPs and basal MaSCs. We suggest that targeting these distinct functions may tailor therapeutic strategies to address breast cancer heterogeneity more effectively. PMID:23832665

  2. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosinetreatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine (Xs) treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo ...

  3. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2013-01-01

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive “triple negative” human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2SAT transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells. PMID:24100291

  4. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  5. Allelotyping of butadiene-induced lung and mammary adenocarcinomas of B6C3F1 mice: frequent losses of heterozygosity in regions homologous to human tumor-suppressor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, R W; Cochran, C; Dietrich, W; Lander, E S; Söderkvist, P

    1994-01-01

    To identify the potential involvement of tumor-suppressor gene inactivation during neoplastic development in B6C3F1 mice, genetic losses were determined from allelotypes of butadiene-induced lung and mammary adenocarcinomas. By using length polymorphisms in restriction fragments and simple sequence repeats, or "microsatellites," markers on each autosome were analyzed for allele losses in tumor DNAs. Losses of heterozygosity on chromosome 11 were observed at several loci surrounding the p53 tumor-suppressor gene (Trp53) in 12 of 17 mammary tumors and 2 of 8 lung tumors. Although most of these alterations appeared to result from nondisjunction, at least two examples of somatic recombination or deletion were also observed. Southern analysis revealed a homozygous deletion of the remaining Trp53 allele of one of these mammary tumors. Losses of heterozygosity were also detected at the Rb-1 tumor-suppressor gene in 7 of 17 mammary tumors and 1 lung tumor. Finally, frequent allele losses were observed on chromosome 4 in lung tumors. Analysis of nine chromosome 4 loci defined an interstitial deletion containing the Ifa gene cluster in one of the lung tumors. A tumor-suppressor gene was previously mapped to this region of chromosome 4 in studies with somatic cell hybrids. In addition, homozygous deletions have been reported in a homologous region of human chromosome 9p for acute lymphocytic leukemias, glioblastomas, melanomas, and lung carcinomas. These findings suggest that the inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes including Trp53, Rb-1, and an unidentified gene on chromosome 4 plays a significant role during carcinogenesis in mice. Images PMID:8170984

  6. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, ML; Fitzgerald, MP; Zhong, W; Askeland, RW; Domann, FE

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  7. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, M L; Fitzgerald, M P; Zhong, W; Askeland, R W; Domann, F E

    2014-01-16

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  8. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Jessica L. F.; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C.; Mehta, Madhura S.; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R.; Hirshfield, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60–80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  10. Expression of novel, putative stem cell markers in prepubertal and lactating mammary glands of bovine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) are essential for growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium. Two main phases of mammary growth include ductal elongation prior to puberty and lobulo-alveolar growth and development during pregnancy. Some studies have utilized morphological characteristics and retenti...

  11. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Jelena R.; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K.; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J.; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S.; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J.; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H.

    2015-01-01

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49fhi/EpCAM− population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis. PMID:26071498

  12. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Jelena R; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H

    2015-09-15

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49f(hi)/EpCAM(-) population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis.

  13. Yin Yang 1 cooperates with activator protein 2 to stimulate ERBB2 gene expression in mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Begon, Dominique Y; Delacroix, Laurence; Vernimmen, Douglas; Jackers, Pascale; Winkler, Rosita

    2005-07-01

    Overexpression of the ERBB2 oncogene is observed in about 30% of breast cancers and is generally correlated with a poor prognosis. Previous results from our and other laboratories indicated that elevated transcriptional activity contributes significantly to the overexpression of ERBB2 mRNA in mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines. Activator protein 2 (AP-2) transcription factors account for this overexpression through two recognition sequences located 215 and 500 bp upstream from the transcription start site. Furthermore, AP-2 transcription factors are highly expressed in cancer cell lines overexpressing ERBB2. In this report, we examined the cooperative effect of Yin Yang 1 (YY1) on AP-2-induced activation of ERBB2 promoter activity. We detected high levels of YY1 transcription factor in mammary cancer cell lines. Notably, we showed that YY1 enhances AP-2alpha transcriptional activation of the ERBB2 promoter through an AP-2 site both in HepG2 and in HCT116 cells, whereas a carboxyl-terminal-truncated form of YY1 cannot. Moreover, we demonstrated the interaction between endogenous AP-2 and YY1 factors in the BT-474 mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In addition, inhibition of endogenous YY1 protein by an antisense decreased the transcription of an AP-2-responsive ERBB2 reporter plasmid in BT-474 breast cancer cells. Finally, we detected in vivo AP-2 and YY1 occupancy of the ERBB2 proximal promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our data thus provide evidence that YY1 cooperates with AP-2 to stimulate ERBB2 promoter activity through the AP-2 binding sites.

  14. Salivary gland tumor "wishes" to add to the next WHO Tumor Classification: sclerosing polycystic adenosis, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, cribriform adenocarcinoma of the tongue and other sites, and mucinous variant of myoepithelioma.

    PubMed

    Gnepp, Douglas R

    2014-03-01

    This review is a continuation of suggested tumor additions to the next WHO Tumor Classification. The author will focus on four salivary gland entities that have recently become accepted in the literature as new neoplastic entities: sclerosing polycystic adenosis, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, cribriform adenocarcinoma of the tongue and other sites, and mucinous variant of myoepithelioma.

  15. Signet cell adenocarcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Charles, Norman C; Ng, Diana D; Zoumalan, Christopher I

    2012-01-01

    A 24-year-old man developed abdominal carcinomatosis from signet cell carcinoma of the rectum. His only distal metastasis involved the superior orbit. Orbital pathology showed signet cells with a characteristic immunopathologic pattern. No hereditary syndrome was found. The authors identified only 5 cases in the literature describing colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the orbit, with 2 showing histopathology. The authors believe that this rare case represents the first illustrating bona fide signet cell colorectal cancer involving the orbit.

  16. Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0719 TITLE: Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse 5b. GRANT NUMBER Mammary Epithelium...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT SEE PAGE 4 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , Stem Cell niche, Immunohistochemistry, mammary gland, breast cancer 16

  17. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing.

  18. Control of Differentiation of a Mammary Cell Line by Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulbecco, Renato; Bologna, Mauro; Unger, Michael

    1980-03-01

    A rat mammary cell line (LA7) undergoes spontaneous differentiation into domes due to production of specific inducers by the cells. Some of these inducers may be lipids, and we show that lipids regulate this differentiation as both inducers and inhibitors. One inhibitor is the tumor promoter tetradecanoyl-13 phorbol 12-acetate. The inducers are saturated fatty acids of two groups: butyric acid and acids with chain lengths from C13 to C16, especially myristic acid (C14). Other inducers are myristoyl and palmitoyl lysolecithins, myristic acid methyl ester, and two cationic detergents with a tetradecenyl chain. We propose that the lipids with a C14-C16 alkyl chain affect differentiation by recognizing specific receptors through their alkyl chains and that the effects obtained depend on the head groups. These lipids may be physiological regulators in the mammary gland.

  19. Effect of Estrogen on Mutagenesis in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    estrogen signaling through the estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) may induce a mutator phenotype by suppressing DNA repair activity in ERa positive mammary...measure DNA MMR activity in live cells. We have also developed a method to measure mutation rate as a function of estrogen/ER signaling . Our goals were to...whether 1713-estradiol signaling through ER inhibits DNA MMR activity, we developed a method that can quantitatively assess MMR efficiency in live

  20. Expression of different phenotypes in cell lines from canine mammary spindle-cell tumours and osteosarcomas indicating a pluripotent mammary stem cell origin.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E; Moller, M; Blankenstein, M A; Andersson, L; Westermark, B

    2000-06-01

    Mammary spindle-cell tumours and sarcomas seem to be restricted to dogs and humans. Two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary spindle-cell tumours (CMT-U304 and CMT-U309) and two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary osteosarcomas (CMT-U334 and CMT-U335) were established to study the mesenchymal phenotypes of mammary tumours in the female dog. The cells from the spindle-cell tumours expressed cytokeratin, vimentin and smooth muscle actin filaments. When these cells were inoculated subcutaneously into female and male nude mice they formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as spindle-cell tumours, fibroma and rhabdomyoid tumours (n = 6/8). The cells from the osteosarcomas expressed vimentin filaments and also formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as chondroid, rhabdomyoid, smooth muscle-like and spindle-cell tumours (n = 6/10). The cell lines CMT-U304, CMT-U309 and CMT-U335 had receptors for progesterone but none of the four cell lines had receptors for estrogen. All four cell lines and their corresponding primary tumours showed identical allelic patterns in microsatellite analysis. By in situ hybridization with genomic DNA we could verify that all formed tumours but one were of canine origin. Our results support the hypothesis that canine mammary tumours are derived from pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Cellular quiescence in mammary stem cells and breast tumor stem cells: got testable hypotheses?

    PubMed

    Harmes, David C; DiRenzo, James

    2009-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is a state of reversible cell cycle arrest and has more recently been shown to be a blockade to differentiation and to correlate with resistance to cancer chemotherapeutics and other xenobiotics; features that are common to adult stem cells and possibly tumor stem cells. The biphasic kinetics of mammary regeneration, coupled to its cyclic endocrine control suggest that mammary stem cells most likely divide during a narrow window of the regenerative cycle and return to a state of quiescence. This would enable them to retain their proliferative capacity, resist differentiation signals and preserve their prolonged life span. There is accumulating evidence that mammary stem cells and other adult stem cells utilize quiescence for this purpose, however the degree to which tumor stem cells do so is largely unknown. The retained proliferative capacity of mammary stem cells likely enables them to accumulate and harbor mutations that lead to breast cancer initiation. However it is currently unclear if these causative lesions lead to defective or deranged quiescence in mammary stem cells. Evidence of such effects could potentially lead to the development of diagnostic systems that monitor mammary stem cell quiescence or activation. Such systems may be useful for the evaluation of patients who are at significant risk of breast cancer. Additionally quiescence has been postulated to contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. This review aims to evaluate what is known about the mechanisms governing cellular quiescence and the role of tumor stem cell quiescence in breast cancer recurrence.

  2. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  3. Paget cells in the esophagus: assessment of their histopathologic features and near-universal association with underlying esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Susan C; Wang, Huamin; Wang, Kenneth K; Wu, Tsung-Teh

    2008-07-01

    (complete loss in 1 and faint expression in 3, 57%). Overall, PAS-D was the most efficacious stain for highlighting Paget cells. A control group of 19 adenocarcinomas without Paget cells were also stained for E-cadherin; only 1 showed faint expression (5%) and none showed complete loss (P=0.01). These results demonstrate a low but significant prevalence (4.9%) of Paget cells in esophageal and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinomas. Unlike previously described cases of mammary, vulvar, and perianal Paget disease, esophageal Paget cells are almost universally associated with underlying adenocarcinoma and not with high grade dysplasia ("in situ" disease) or primary Paget disease. A commonality among cases with Paget cells is the presence of focal or diffuse, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with discohesive cells. E-cadherin alterations seem to play a less significant role.

  4. Establishment and Characterization of a Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Vijay; Dogra, Nilambra; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Sudarshan N.; Jena, Manoj K.; Malakar, Dhruba; Dang, Ajay K.; Mishra, Bishnu P.; Mukhopadhyay, Tapas K.; Kaushik, Jai K.; Mohanty, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to establish the buffalo mammary epithelial cell line (BuMEC) and characterize its mammary specific functions. Methodology Buffalo mammary tissue collected from the slaughter house was processed enzymatically to obtain a heterogenous population of cells containing both epithelial and fibroblasts cells. Epithelial cells were purified by selective trypsinization and were grown in a plastic substratum. The purified mammary epithelial cells (MECs) after several passages were characterized for mammary specific functions by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot. Principal Findings The established buffalo mammary epithelial cell line (BuMEC) exhibited epithelial cell characteristics by immunostaining positively with cytokeratin 18 and negatively with vimentin. The BuMEC maintained the characteristics of its functional differentiation by expression of β-casein, κ-casein, butyrophilin and lactoferrin. BuMEC had normal growth properties and maintained diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) before and after cryopreservation. A spontaneously immortalized buffalo mammary epithelial cell line was established after 20 passages and was continuously subcultured for more than 60 passages without senescence. Conclusions We have established a buffalo mammary epithelial cell line that can be used as a model system for studying mammary gland functions. PMID:22792341

  5. Isolation, cultivation and identification of human lung adenocarcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DE-GENG; JIANG, AI-GUI; LU, HUI-YU; ZHANG, LI-XIN; GAO, XIAO-YAN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that lung cancer is a stem cell disease. However, ideal cell surface markers for isolating stem cells in lung cancer are yet to be identified. In the present study, a cell population with a cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ phenotype was successfully isolated from a single cell suspension of lung adenocarcinoma tissue using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and enriched in a serum-free culture. In comparison to CD133− cells, the CD133+ cells exhibited an enhanced capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and a greater potential for in vivo tumor formation, in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Tumors could be induced in NOD/SCID mice by the transplantation of 102 stem-like cells per mouse. The results of the present study demonstrated that CD133 may serve as a specific cell surface marker for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells, and that MACS combined with serum-free culture is an effective method for isolating and enriching lung cancer stem cells. PMID:25435932

  6. Effect of caffeic acid esters on carcinogen-induced mutagenicity and human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Desai, D; Kaul, B; Amin, S; Reddy, B S

    1992-11-16

    Propolis, a honey bee hive product, is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and tumor growth inhibition; some of the observed biological activities may be due to caffeic acid (cinnamic acid) esters that are present in propolis. In the present study we synthesized three caffeic acid esters, namely methyl caffeate (MC), phenylethyl caffeate (PEC) and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate (PEDMC) and tested them against the 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, (DMAB, a colon and mammary carcinogen)-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100. Also, the effect of these agents on the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was studied. Mutagenicity was induced in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 plus S9 activation using 5 and 10 micrograms DMAB and antimutagenic activities of 0-150 microM MC, 0-60 microM PEC and 0-80 microM PEDMC were determined. The results indicate that MC, PEC and PEDMC were not mutagenic in the Salmonella tester system. DMAB-induced mutagenicity was significantly inhibited with 150 microM MC, 40-60 microM PEC and 40-80 microM PEDMC in both tester systems. Treatment of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with > 150 microM MC, 30 microM PEC and 20 microM PEDMC significantly inhibited the cell growth and syntheses of RNA, DNA and protein. ODC and PTK activities were also inhibited in HT-29 cells treated with different concentrations of MC, PEC and PEDMC. These results demonstrate that caffeic acid esters which are present in Propolis possess chemopreventive properties when tested in short-term assay systems.

  7. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  8. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  9. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex.

  10. Un(MaSC)ing Stem Cell Dynamics in Mammary Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Erin; Wrenn, Emma D; Cheung, Kevin J

    2017-02-27

    The properties of stem cells that participate in mammary gland branching morphogenesis remain contested. Reporting in Nature, Scheele et al. (2017) establish a model for post-pubertal mammary branching morphogenesis in which position-dependent, lineage-restricted stem cells undergo cell mixing in order to contribute to long-term growth.

  11. Cell hierarchy and lineage commitment in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2012-01-01

    The bovine mammary gland is a favorable organ for studying mammary cell hierarchy due to its robust milk-production capabilities that reflect the adaptation of its cell populations to extensive expansion and differentiation. It also shares basic characteristics with the human breast, and identification of its cell composition may broaden our understanding of the diversity in cell hierarchy among mammals. Here, Lin⁻ epithelial cells were sorted according to expression of CD24 and CD49f into four populations: CD24(med)CD49f(pos) (putative stem cells, puStm), CD24(neg)CD49f(pos) (Basal), CD24(high)CD49f(neg) (putative progenitors, puPgt) and CD24(med)CD49f(neg) (luminal, Lum). These populations maintained differential gene expression of lineage markers and markers of stem cells and luminal progenitors. Of note was the high expression of Stat5a in the puPgt cells, and of Notch1, Delta1, Jagged1 and Hey1 in the puStm and Basal populations. Cultured puStm and Basal cells formed lineage-restricted basal or luminal clones and after re-sorting, colonies that preserved a duct-like alignment of epithelial layers. In contrast, puPgt and Lum cells generated only luminal clones and unorganized colonies. Under non-adherent culture conditions, the puPgt and puStm populations generated significantly more floating colonies. The increase in cell number during culture provides a measure of propagation potential, which was highest for the puStm cells. Taken together, these analyses position puStm cells at the top of the cell hierarchy and denote the presence of both bi-potent and luminally restricted progenitors. In addition, a population of differentiated luminal cells was marked. Finally, combining ALDH activity with cell-surface marker analyses defined a small subpopulation that is potentially stem cell-enriched.

  12. In vivo 31P NMR Study of the Metabolism of Murine Mammary 16/C Adenocarcinoma and Its Response to Chemotherapy, X-Radiation, and Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanochko, W. T.; Ng, T. C.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR spectroscopy with surface coils has been used to monitor, in vivo, the phosphate metabolism of subcutaneously implanted mammary 16/C adenocarcinoma in C3H/He mice. This model tumor was studied during untreated tumor growth and after treatment with adriamycin, hyperthermia, and x-radiation. The mammary 16/C tumor exhibited a Gompertzian growth pattern. Levels of high-energy phosphate metabolites--phosphocreatine and ATP--decreased with increases in tumor mass. There was a concomitant increase in the level of Pi and a decrease in the apparent pH of the tumor. These spectral changes appear to reflect changes in tumor vascularization that accompany tumor growth, the tumor becoming progressively more hypoxic. Partial response of this tumor to chemotherapy with adriamycin was reflected in a small but measurable increase in the phosphocreatine resonance, a decrease in Pi, and a return of the intratumor pH to neutral. Hyperthermia resulted in progressive conversion of the 31P NMR spectrum to that of a dead tumor (high levels of Pi, small levels of residual sugar phosphates and pyridine dinucleotides, and acidic pH). X-irradiation (14.0 Gy) led to disappearance of the phosphocreatine peak within 15 min of treatment. Subsequently, this resonance grew back beyond its pretreatment level. As the tumor receded, its spectrum reflected the characteristics of aerobically metabolizing tissue (high levels of phosphocreatine and ATP and low levels of Pi and sugar phosphates).

  13. s-SHIP promoter expression marks activated stem cells in developing mouse mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lixia; Rohrschneider, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) play critical roles in normal development and perhaps tumorigenesis of the mammary gland. Using combined cell markers, adult MaSCs have been enriched in a basal cell population, but the exact identity of MaSCs remains unknown. We used the s-SHIP promoter to tag presumptive stem cells with GFP in the embryos of a transgenic mouse model. Here we show, in postnatal mammary gland development, that GFP+ cap cells in puberty and basal alveolar bud cells in pregnancy each exhibit self-renewal and regenerative capabilities for all mammary epithelial cells of a new functional mammary gland upon transplantation. Single GFP+ cells can regenerate the mammary epithelial network. GFP+ mammary epithelial cells are p63+, CD24mod, CD49fhigh, and CD29high; are actively proliferating; and express s-SHIP mRNA. Overall, our results identify the activated MaSC population in vivo at the forefront of rapidly developing terminal end buds (puberty) and alveolar buds (pregnancy) in the mammary gland. In addition, GFP+ basal cells are expanded in MMTV-Wnt1 breast tumors but not in ErbB2 tumors. These results enable MaSC in situ identification and isolation via a consistent single parameter using a new mouse model with applications for further analyses of normal and potential cancer stem cells. PMID:20810647

  14. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Booker, Evan; Kalathur, Madhuri; Rodewald, Rose; Lipianskaya, Julia; La, Justin; He, Marielle; Wright, Tracy; Klemke, Richard; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Gray, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers. PMID:24749068

  15. Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A primary thyroid adenocarcinoma harboring ETV6–NTRK3 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Dawson, Robert R; Shah, Jatin P; Sherman, Eric J; Tuttle, R Michael; Fagin, James A; Klimstra, David S; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    ETV6–NTRK3 fusion was identified in several cancers including the recently described mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary glands and a minority of papillary thyroid carcinomas. We describe three cases of primary MASC of the thyroid gland and provide a detailed clinical and pathological characterization of the tumor morphology, immunoprofile, and genetic background. Immunohistochemistry for PAX8, TTF-1, thyroglobulin, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, and p63 was used to define the tumor immunophenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6 rearrangement was performed in three, and the next-generation sequencing assay MSK-IMPACT™ (Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) was performed in two cases. Primary MASC of the thyroid occurred in two women and one man, age 47–72 years. All patients presented with high T stage, infiltrative, locally aggressive tumors with extrathyroidal extension. Two cases were associated with well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma. Histologically, they appeared as low-grade tumors, resembling MASC of the salivary glands and labeled positive for mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, p63, weakly positive for PAX8, and negative for TTF-1 and thyroglobulin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed ETV6 rearrangement in all cases. In two tested cases MSK-IMPACT™ confirmed the presence of ETV6–NTRK3 gene fusion. Two patients had at least two local recurrences, one was alive with disease, and one was alive and free of disease after 14 and 17 years, respectively. The third patient was alive and free of disease after 2 years. MASC of the thyroid is histologically, immunophenotypically, and genetically similar to its salivary gland counterpart. Thyroid MASC can be associated with a well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma component, supporting follicular cell origin. Clinically, these carcinomas may show frequent recurrences but are associated

  16. Human Milk Protein Production in Xenografts of Genetically Engineered Bovine Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martignani, Eugenio; Eirew, Peter; Accornero, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background In the bovine species milk production is well known to correlate with mammary tissue mass. However, most advances in optimizing milk production relied on improvements of breeding and husbandry practices. A better understanding of the cells that generate bovine mammary tissue could facilitate important advances in milk production and have global economic impact. With this possibility in mind, we show that a mammary stem cell population can be functionally identified and isolated from the bovine mammary gland. We also demonstrate that this stem cell population may be a promising target for manipulating the composition of cow's milk using gene transfer. Methods and Findings We show that the in vitro colony-forming cell assay for detecting normal primitive bipotent and lineage-restricted human mammary clonogenic progenitors are applicable to bovine mammary cells. Similarly, the ability of normal human mammary stem cells to regenerate functional bilayered structures in collagen gels placed under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice is shared by a subset of bovine mammary cells that lack aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. We also find that this activity is a distinguishing feature of luminal-restricted bovine progenitors. The regenerated structures recapitulate the organization of bovine mammary tissue, and milk could be readily detected in these structures when they were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. Transplantation of the bovine cells transduced with a lentivirus encoding human β-CASEIN led to expression of the transgene and secretion of the product by their progeny regenerated in vivo. Conclusions These findings point to a common developmental hierarchy shared by human and bovine mammary glands, providing strong evidence of common mechanisms regulating the maintenance and differentiation of mammary stem cells from both species. These results highlight the potential of novel engineering and transplant strategies for a variety of commercial

  17. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  18. Comparison of the transcriptpmes of long-tern label retaining-cells and C cells microdissected from mammary epithelium: an initial study to character potential stem/progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) account for the cell lineage of mammary epithelia and provide for mammary growth, development and tissue homeostasis. The presence of MaSC was clearly demonstrated by the generation of an entire mammary gland from a single cell implanted into epithelium-ablated mammary fat...

  19. Mammary stem cells: Novel markers and novel approaches to increase lactation efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue r...

  20. Diet Does Not Affect Putative Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells in Pre-weaned Holstein Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overfeeding prepubertal heifers can impair mammary epithelial growth and development, processes that depend on stem cells. In this study we evaluated effects of diet composition on putative bovine mammary epithelial stem cell populations using a 5-bromo-2-deoxyrudine (BrdU; a thymidine analog) label...

  1. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders. PMID:22873795

  2. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    2003). 12. Ibarra , I., Erlich, Y., Muthuswamy, S. K., Sachidanandam, R. & Hannon, G. J. A role for microRNAs in maintenance of mouse mammary...supplemented with 1mM EDTA, 25mM HEPES, 1%FBS and 100u/ml Pen/Strep. The FACS data were collected using LSRII (Becton Dickinson, San Jose CA). A total...epithelial stem/progenitor cells. BREAST CANCER RES. 2009;11(2):R20. 28. Ibarra I, Erlich Y, Muthuswamy SK et al. A role for microRNAs in maintenance

  3. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  4. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  5. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    breast is highly expressed by luminal epithelial cells and is less expressed by basal cells19,20. In contrast, CD49f (a6 integrin) has an inverse pattern...mouse stretched on its back. The hose and nose cone from the anesthetic vaporizer are securely attached to one side of the plate, and a heated pad is...the mouse by a nose cone. Check that the mouse has reached surgical anesthesia by loss of pedal withdrawal reflex . ! cautIon Institutional review

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the normal human mammary cell commitment and differentiation process.

    PubMed

    Raouf, Afshin; Zhao, Yun; To, Karen; Stingl, John; Delaney, Allen; Barbara, Mary; Iscove, Norman; Jones, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Emerman, Joanne; Aparicio, Samuel; Marra, Marco; Eaves, Connie

    2008-07-03

    Mature mammary epithelial cells are generated from undifferentiated precursors through a hierarchical process, but the molecular mechanisms involved, particularly in the human mammary gland, are poorly understood. To address this issue, we isolated highly purified subpopulations of primitive bipotent and committed luminal progenitor cells as well as mature luminal and myoepithelial cells from normal human mammary tissue and compared their transcriptomes obtained using three different methods. Elements unique to each subset of mammary cells were identified, and changes that accompany their differentiation in vivo were shown to be recapitulated in vitro. These include a stage-specific change in NOTCH pathway gene expression during the commitment of bipotent progenitors to the luminal lineage. Functional studies further showed NOTCH3 signaling to be critical for this differentiation event to occur in vitro. Taken together, these findings provide an initial foundation for future delineation of mechanisms that perturb primitive human mammary cell growth and differentiation.

  7. Progenitor Cell Fate Decisions in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    luminal progenitors contributing to transformation of ER- luminal and basal cells and development of treatment resistant breast cancer . We previously...proliferate and metastasize. Decreased DNA damage repair or altered epigenetic marks can dramatically affect the cellular composition of these tumors

  8. Dicer in Mammary Tumor Stem Cell Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT To date, most cancer research has focused on alterations in the sequence, gene structure, copy number and expression of...To address the role of miR-34in cancer formation and maintenance, we generated cell lines over express miR-34. We have demonstrated that ectopic...mediators of p53 tumor suppressor network, which plays an important role in many cancer types, including breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dicer

  9. Dicer in Mammary Tumor Stem Cell Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    a gene silencing pathway with roles in mRNA stability, translational control, chromatin organization and genome regulation. MicroRNAs ( miRNAs ) are a... miRNAs have been shown to collaborate with oncogenes in the progression of cancer , and in addition, miRNA expression profiling has revealed widespread... miRNA misregulation in cancer . To address the role of miRNAs in the onset and maintenance of breast cancer , we have created embryonic stem (ES) cells

  10. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  11. 5-Fluorouracil-radiation interactions in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, D.J.; Lepek, K.J.; Rich, T.A.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of cellular proliferation and cell cycle stage on the ability of postirradiation 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to radiosensitize cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Clone A cells. Cell survival curves were generated for irradiated: (a) log- and plateau-phase Clone A cells; and (b) Clone A cells separated by centrifugal elutriation into the various phases of the cell cycle; with and without postirradiation treatment with 100 {mu}g/ml 5-FU. Postirradiation treatment with 5-FU sensitized proliferating cells to a greater degree than it sensitized cells growing in plateau phase. The {beta} component of cell kill in log-phase cells was increased by a factor of 1.5 with a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.21 at the 0.01 survival level. Plateau-phase cells showed less radiosensitization (sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.13 at the 0.01 survival level); however, there was a mild increase in both {alpha} and {beta} kill in plateau-phase cells. Elutriated G{sub 1} cells were the most radiosensitive, independent of treatment with 5-FU. The phase of the cell cycle had little effect on the ability of fluorouracil to radiosensitize Clone A cells. Proliferating cells are more susceptible to radiosensitization with 5-FU than plateau-phase cells are, but this effect appears to be independent of the phase of the cell cycle. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Dicer in Mammary Tumor Stem Cell Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    MicroRNAs ( miRNAs ) are a set of small RNAs produced by the RNAi machinery that play important functions in tissue organization and maintenance of cell... factor p53 is a tumor-suppressor gene that is deleted or mutated in many human cancers . To identify miRNAs that may be part of the p53 pathway, we...identity. Several miRNAs have been shown to collaborate with oncogenes in the progression of cancer , and in addition, miRNA expression profiling has

  13. Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Norihisa; Chou, Yu-Chien; Galvez, Jose J; de-Candia, Paola; Cardiff, Robert D; Benezra, Robert; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2003-01-01

    Background The family of inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id) proteins is known to regulate development in several tissues. One member of this gene family, Id-1, has been implicated in mammary development and carcinogenesis. Mammary glands contain various cell types, among which the luminal epithelial cells are primarily targeted for proliferation, differentiation and carcinogenesis. Therefore, to assess the precise significance of Id-1 in mammary biology and carcinogenesis, we examined its cellular localization in vivo using immunohistochemistry. Methods Extracts of whole mammary glands from wild type and Id-1 null mutant mice, and tissue sections from paraffin-embedded mouse mammary glands from various developmental stages and normal human breast were subjected to immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. In both these procedures, an anti-Id-1 rabbit polyclonal antibody was used for detection of Id-1. Results In immunoblot analyses, using whole mammary gland extracts, Id-1 was detected. In immunohistochemical analyses, however, Id-1 was not detected in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands during any stage of development, but it was detected in vascular endothelial cells. Conclusion Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands. PMID:12631395

  14. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  15. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  16. Bimodal Analysis of Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration in Two Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Alka A.; Lu, Jenny; Jeon, Junhwan; Weaver, Alissa M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration paths of mammary epithelial cells (expressing different versions of the promigratory tyrosine kinase receptor Her2/Neu) were analyzed within a bimodal framework that is a generalization of the run-and-tumble description applicable to bacterial migration. The mammalian cell trajectories were segregated into two types of alternating modes, namely, the “directional-mode” (mode I, the more persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial run phase) and the “re-orientation-mode” (mode II, the less persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial tumble phase). Higher resolution (more pixel information, relative to cell size) and smaller sampling intervals (time between images) were found to give a better estimate of the deduced single cell dynamics (such as directional-mode time and turn angle distribution) of the various cell types from the bimodal analysis. The bimodal analysis tool permits the deduction of short-time dynamics of cell motion such as the turn angle distributions and turn frequencies during the course of cell migration compared to standard methods of cell migration analysis. We find that the two-hour mammalian cell tracking data do not fall into the diffusive regime implying that the often-used random motility expressions for mammalian cell motion (based on assuming diffusive motion) are invalid over the time steps (fraction of minute) typically used in modeling mammalian cell migration. PMID:18982450

  17. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and...

  18. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene expression profiles of...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0106 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve

  19. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion. We have used FAC sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0107 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic

  20. p16 loss rescues functional decline of Brca1-deficient mammary stem cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexandria; Bai, Feng; Chan, Ho Lam; Liu, Shiqin; Slingerland, Joyce M; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J; Pei, Xin-Hai

    2017-02-22

    Recent evidence indicates that the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage can induce senescence and limit the function of adult stem cells. It remains elusive whether deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with the functional alteration of mammary stem cells. In this article, we reported that senescence was induced in mammary epithelial cells during aging along with increased expression of p16Ink4a (p16), an inhibitor of CDK4 and CKD6. Loss of p16 abrogated the age-induced senescence in mammary epithelial cells and significantly increased mammary stem cell function. We showed that loss of Brca1, a tumor suppressor that functions in DNA damage repair, in the mammary epithelium induced senescence with induction of p16 and a decline of stem cell function, which was rescued by p16 loss. These data not only answer the question as to whether deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with the functional decline of mammary stem cells, but also identify the role of p16 in suppressing Brca1-deficient mammary stem cell function.

  1. Isolation of canine mammary cells with stem cell properties and tumour-initiating potential.

    PubMed

    Cocola, C; Anastasi, P; Astigiano, S; Piscitelli, E; Pelucchi, P; Vilardo, L; Bertoli, G; Beccaglia, M; Veronesi, M C; Sanzone, S; Barbieri, O; Reinbold, R A; Luvoni, G C; Zucchi, I

    2009-07-01

    Recent data suggest that mammary carcinogenesis may be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs) derived from mutated adult stem cells, which have acquired aberrant cell self-renewal or by progenitor cells that have acquired the capacity for cell self-renewal. Spontaneous mammary cancers in cats and dogs are important models for the understanding of human breast cancer and may represent alternative species model systems that can significantly contribute to the study of human oncogenesis. With the goal of identifying markers for isolating human breast CSCs, we have generated a canine model system to isolate and characterize normal and CSCs from dog mammary gland. Insight into the hierarchical organization of canine tumours may contribute to the development of universal concepts in oncogenesis by CSCs. Cells with stem cell properties were isolated from normal and tumoural canine breast tissue and propagated as mammospheres and tumourspheres in long-term non-adherent culture conditions. We showed that cells obtained from spheres that display self-renewing properties, have multi-lineage differentiation potential, could generate complex branched tubular structures in vitro and form tumours in NOD/SCID mice. We analysed these cells for the expression of human stem and CSC markers and are currently investigating the tumour-initiating properties of these cells and the hierarchical organization of normal and neoplastic canine mammary tissue.

  2. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  3. Mammary epithelial cell: Influence of extracellular matrix composition and organization during development and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine T.; Dembo, Micah; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal–epithelial interactions regulate mammary gland development and are critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The extracellular matrix, which is a proteinaceous component of the stroma, regulates mammary epithelial growth, survival, migration and differentiation through a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal–epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit a dialogue with the mammary epithelium through transmembrane integrin receptors to influence tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and malignant transformation. PMID:17719831

  4. Mammary cancer and epithelial stem cells: a problem or a solution?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert H

    2002-01-01

    The existing paradigms for stem cells in adult tissues include the integument, the alimentary canal, the lung, the liver, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. The mammary gland, by contrast, is the 'new kid on the block'. What little is known about stem cells in the mammary gland indicates that they possess a prodigious capacity for self-renewal. More importantly, in rodents, they persist with undiminished reproductive vigor throughout the organism's lifetime without regard to age or reproductive history. Do these stem cells represent primary targets for mammary neoplasia? If so, what are the implications for prevention/therapy?

  5. Effect of Chia oil (Salvia Hispanica) rich in omega-3 fatty acids on the eicosanoid release, apoptosis and T-lymphocyte tumor infiltration in a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Espada, C E; Berra, M A; Martinez, M J; Eynard, A R; Pasqualini, M E

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effects of certain dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and related eicosanoids on the growth and metastasis formation of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma. Salvia hispanica (ChO) and Carthamus tinctorius (SaO) vegetable oil sources of omega-3 and -6 PUFAs and a commercial diet as control (CO), were used. We analysed fatty acids of neoplastic cells (NC) membranes by GLC; the eicosanoids 12- HETE and 12-HHT (LOX and COX metabolites) by HPLC and apoptosis and T-lymphocyte infiltration by flow cytometry and microscopy. NC from ChO groups showed lower levels of arachidonic acid and of both eicosanoids compared to SaO and CO (p<0.05). The ChO diet decreased the tumor weight and metastasis number (p<0.05). Apoptosis and T-lymphocyte infiltration were higher and mitosis decreased with respect to the other diets (p<0.05). Present data showed that ChO, an ancient and almost unknown source of omega-3, inhibits growth and metastasis in this tumor model.

  6. Sulphamoylated 2-Methoxyestradiol Analogues Induce Apoptosis in Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Michelle; Theron, Anne; Mqoco, Thandi; Vieira, Warren; Prudent, Renaud; Martinez, Anne; Lafanechère, Laurence; Joubert, Annie

    2013-01-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is a naturally occurring estradiol metabolite which possesses antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and antitumor properties. However, due to its limited biological accessibility, synthetic analogues have been synthesized and tested in attempt to develop drugs with improved oral bioavailability and efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of three novel in silico-designed sulphamoylated 2ME2 analogues on the HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cell line and estrogen receptor-negative breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. A dose-dependent study (0.1–25 μM) was conducted with an exposure time of 24 hours. Results obtained from crystal violet staining indicated that 0.5 μM of all 3 compounds reduced the number of cells to 50%. Lactate dehydrogenase assay was used to assess cytotoxicity, while the mitotracker mitochondrial assay and caspase-6 and -8 activity assays were used to investigate the possible occurrence of apoptosis. Tubulin polymerization assays were conducted to evaluate the influence of these sulphamoylated 2ME2 analogues on tubulin dynamics. Double immunofluorescence microscopy using labeled antibodies specific to tyrosinate and detyrosinated tubulin was conducted to assess the effect of the 2ME2 analogues on tubulin dynamics. An insignificant increase in the level of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed in the compounds-treated cells. These sulphamoylated compounds caused a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation indicating apoptosis induction by means of the intrinsic pathway in HeLa and MDA-MB-231 cells. Microtubule depolymerization was observed after exposure to these three sulphamoylated analogues. PMID:24039728

  7. Clonogenic assay allows for selection of a primitive mammary epithelial cell population in bovine.

    PubMed

    Martignani, Eugenio; Cravero, Diego; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo; Baratta, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Adult mammary stem cells have been identified in several species including the bovine. They are responsible for the development of the gland and for cyclic remodeling during estrous cycles and pregnancy. Epithelial cell subpopulations exist within the mammary gland. We and others showed previously that the Colony Forming Cell (CFC) assay can be used to detect lineage-restricted mammary progenitors. We carried out CFCs with bovine mammary cells and manually separated colonies with specific morphologies associated with either a luminal or a myoepithelial phenotype. Expression of specific markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry or by flow cytometry to confirm that the manual separation resulted in isolation of phenotipically different cells. When transplanted in recipient immunodeficient mice, we found that only myoepithelial-like colonies gave rise to outgrowths that resembled bovine mammary alveoli, thus proving that adult stem cells were maintained during culture and segregated with myoepithelial cells. After recovery of the cells from the transplanted mice and subsequent progenitor content analysis, we found a tendency to detect a higher progenitor frequency when myoepithelial-like colonies were transplanted. We here demonstrate that bovine adult mammary stem cells can be sustained in short-term culture and that they can be enriched by manually selecting for basal-like morphology.

  8. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Maggie Y.; Lee, Tammy L.; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease. PMID:27764770

  9. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Maggie Y; Lee, Tammy L; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M; Donoghue, Daniel J; Haas, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease.

  10. Stem cells as the root of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Balic, Anamaria; Dorado, Jorge; Alonso-Gomez, Mercedes; Heeschen, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that stem cells play a crucial role not only in the generation and maintenance of different tissues, but also in the development and progression of malignancies. For the many solid cancers, it has now been shown that they harbor a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells that bear stem cell features and therefore, these cells are termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-propagating cells. CSC are exclusively tumorigenic and essential drivers for tumor progression and metastasis. Moreover, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma does not only contain one homogeneous population of CSC rather than diverse subpopulations that may have evolved during tumor progression. One of these populations is called migrating CSC and can be characterized by CXCR4 co-expression. Only these cells are capable of evading the primary tumor and traveling to distant sites such as the liver as the preferred site of metastatic spread. Clinically even more important, however, is the observation that CSC are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy resulting in their relative enrichment during treatment and rapid relapse of disease. Many laboratories are now working on the further in-depth characterization of these cells, which may eventually allow for the identification of their Achilles heal and lead to novel treatment modalities for fighting this deadly disease.

  11. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  12. Anti-Neoplastic Cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] in Dual-combination with Epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] against Chemotherapeutic-Resistant Mammary Adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) and the Complementary Effect of Mebendazole

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, CP; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Delineate the feasibility of simultaneous, dual selective “targeted” chemotherapeutic delivery and determine if this molecular strategy can promote higher levels anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity than if only one covalent immunochemotherapeutic is selectively “targeted” for delivery at a single membrane associated receptor over-expressed by chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma. Methodology Gemcitabine and epirubicin were covalently bond to anti-EGFR and anti-HER2/neu utilizing a rapid multi-phase synthetic organic chemistry reaction scheme. Determination that 96% or greater gemcitabine or epirubicin content was covalently bond to immunoglobulin fractions following size separation by micro-scale column chromatography was established by methanol precipitation analysis. Residual binding-avidity of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EG-FR] applied in dual-combination with epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] was determined by cell-ELIZA utilizing chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) populations. Lack of fragmentation or polymerization was validated by SDS-PAGE/immunodetection/chemiluminescent autoradiography. Anti-neoplastic cytotoxic potency was determined by vitality stain analysis of chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) monolayers known to uniquely over-express EGFR (2 × 105/cell) and HER2/neu (1 × 106/cell) receptor complexes. The covalent immunochemotherapeutics gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] were applied simultaneously in dual-combination to determine their capacity to collectively evoke elevated levels of anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity. Lastly, the tubulin/microtubule inhibitor mebendazole evaluated to determine if it’s potential to complemented the anti-neoplastic cytotoxic properties of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] in dual-combination with epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Results Dual-combination of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] with

  13. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  14. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  15. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Kai; Jin, Faguang

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  16. Proton Pump Inhibitors Display Antitumor Effects in Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Eduardo; Apostolova, Nadezda; Esplugues, Juan V.; García-González, María A.; Lanas, Ángel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can exert antineoplastic effects through the disruption of pH homeostasis by inhibiting vacuolar ATPase (H+-VATPase), a proton pump overexpressed in several tumor cells, but this aspect has not been deeply investigated in EAC yet. In the present study, the expression of H+-VATPase was assessed through the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the antineoplastic effects of PPIs and cellular mechanisms involved were evaluated in vitro. H+-VATPase expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paraffined-embedded samples or by immunofluorescence in cultured BE and EAC cell lines. Cells were treated with different concentrations of PPIs and parameters of citotoxicity, oxidative stress, and autophagy were evaluated. H+-VATPase expression was found in all biopsies and cell lines evaluated, showing differences in the location of the pump between the cell lines. Esomeprazole inhibited proliferation and cell invasion and induced apoptosis of EAC cells. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seemed to be involved in the cytotoxic effects observed since the addition of N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced esomeprazole-induced apoptosis in EAC cells. Esomeprazole also reduced intracellular pH of tumor cells, whereas only disturbed the mitochondrial membrane potential in OE33 cells. Esomeprazole induced autophagy in both EAC cells, but also triggered a blockade in autophagic flux in the metastatic cell line. These data provide in vitro evidence supporting the potential use of PPIs as novel antineoplastic drugs for EAC and also shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger PPIs cytotoxic effects, which differ upon the cell line evaluated. PMID:27932981

  17. Lactoferrin at basal side of mouse mammary epithelium derives in part from stroma cells.

    PubMed

    Pecorini, Chiara; Delpal, Serge; Truchet, Sandrine; Le Provost, Fabienne; Baldi, Antonella; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2009-11-01

    Lactoferrin is synthesized by glandular epithelial cells and neutrophils and is also present on both sides of the mammary epithelium. We have studied the origin of lactoferrin detected in the various compartments of mouse mammary tissue. As revealed by immunogold electron microscopy, lactoferrin is present in mammary epithelial cells and in the basal region of the epithelium, associated with connective tissue and stroma cells at all physiological stages studied. A perturbation of protein synthesis or transport after in vitro treatment with cycloheximide or brefeldin A does not abrogate lactoferrin labelling in the basal region of the epithelium. The expression of lactoferrin has also been observed in the fat pads of mammary glands from mice surgically depleted of epithelial cells. The sealing of one teat for 24 h is accompanied by an increase in both the number of stroma cells and the labelling of myoepithelial cells. Thus, the lactoferrin present in the interstitial space of the mouse mammary epithelium originates in part from stroma cells. Possible roles of lactoferrin at the basal side of the mammary epithelium are discussed.

  18. PARP Inhibitors Synergize With Loss of Checkpoint Control to Kill Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    term and long-term colony assays, inhibition of PARP1 CHK1 function enhanced the toxic effects of exposure to ionizing radiation (Fig. 3G). In Figs...3. Does PARP1inhibitor + Chk1 inhibitor treatment radiosensitize mammary tumor cells in vitro? Task 3 has been completed ( 1 ). We have extended...combination effect as tumors growing in the mammary fat pad. On-going studies are examining the effect of the drugs on MCF7 cells . Task 5

  19. Identification of mouse mammary epithelial cells by immunofluorescence with rabbit and guinea pig antikeratin antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Asch, B B; Burstein, N A; Vidrich, A; Sun, T T

    1981-01-01

    Few markers are available to identify the three types of mammary epithelial cells--ductal, alveolar, and myoepithelial--especially in pathological conditions and in cell cultures. We have used antisera to human keratins in immunofluorescence to facilitate the identification of the three mouse mammary epithelial cell types. In frozen tissue sections and primary cell cultures, a rabbit antikeratin antiserum specifically stained cytoplasmic filaments in all three types of epithelial cells. A guinea pig antiserum against the same keratin preparation, however, reacted preferentially with filaments in myoepithelial cells and readily detected this cell type in normal, dysplastic, and malignant mammary tissues and cell cultures. Neither antisera reacted with fibroblasts or any other mesenchymal cells. The combined use of the two antikeratin antisera thereby permits rapid surveys of tissue sections and cultures for the localization of not only all epithelial cells but also the subpopulation of myoepithelial cells. Moreover, when mammary cultures established from late-pregnant or lactating mice were stained simultaneously with guinea pig antikeratin and rabbit anticasein antisera, three populations of epithelial cells were mutually exclusive: those stained by anticasein antiserum, those stained by guinea pig antikeratin antiserum, and those stained by neither, consistent with properties of alveolar, myoepithelial, and ductal cells, respectively. These antisera thus offer a tool for studying different epithelial cell types during mammary development, tumorigenesis, and malignant progression. Images PMID:6170984

  20. Regeneration of Bovine Mammary Gland in Immunodeficient Mice by Transplantation of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells Mixed with Matrigel

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives With the global demand for dairy protein for consumption growing annually, there has been increasing activity in the research field of dairy protein synthesis and production. From a manipulation perspective, it is more difficult to use live cattle for laboratory studies on the production of milk as well as of dairy protein such as casein, as compared with using laboratory animals like rodents. Therefore, we aimed to develop a mouse model of bovine mammary alveolar ducts for laboratory-scale studies. We studied the formation of the bovine mammary gland ductal structure by transplanting the MAC-T bovine alveolar cell line into mice. Methods and Results MAC-T cells (1×107) were suspended in Matrigel and injected into the dorsal tissue of 8-week-old male BALB/C nude mice. Histological analysis of tissue dissected from the MAC-T cell-transplanted mice after 6 weeks showed the typical morphology of the tubuloalveolar female gland, as well as glands made up of branching ducts that were surrounded by smooth muscle with small alveoli budding off the ducts. In addition, the epithelial markers CK14 and CK18 were expressed within the duct-like structure. Prolactin was detected in the duct interior in these CK14+ and CK18+ cells but not in the non-transplanted MAC-T cells. Conclusions These results showed that duct-like tissue had been successfully formed after 6 weeks of transplantation of the CK14+ and CK18+ MAC-T cells into mice dorsal tissue. This mouse model will be a useful tool for further research on the bovine mammary gland. PMID:27788570

  1. Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa; Prisco, Marina; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Valiante, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The increase in the use of nanoparticles, as a promising tool for drug delivery or as a food additive, raises questions about their interaction with biological systems, especially in terms of evoked responses. In this work, we evaluated the kinetics of uptake of 44 nm (NP44) and 100 nm (NP100) unmodified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, as well as the endocytic mechanism involved, and the effect on cell viability and gene expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inflammation processes. We showed that NP44 accumulate rapidly and more efficiently in the cytoplasm of AGS compared to NP100; both PS-NPs showed an energy dependent mechanism of internalization and a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Dose response treatments revealed a non-linear curve. PS-NPs also affected cell viability, inflammatory gene expression and cell morphology. NP44 strongly induced an up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 genes, two of the most important cytokines involved in gastric pathologies. Our study suggests that parameters such as time, size and concentration of NPs must be taken carefully into consideration during the development of drug delivery systems based on NPs and for the management of nanoparticles associated risk factors.

  2. Cytotoxicity of selected magnetic fluids on human adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, Ingrid; Frühauf, Sylvia; Linß, Werner; Hiergeist, Robert; Andrä, Wilfried; Hergt, Rudolf; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2003-04-01

    Based on the knowledge that the magnetite particles seem to be well tolerated by the human body, the cytotoxic potential of coated particles was investigated, which had been selected for potential applications regarding the minimal-invasive elimination of breast tumors by magnetic thermoablation. Human adenocarcinoma cells (BT-20) were exposed (24, 48 and 72 h) to different magnetite particles with diverging total size (8, 10 and 220 nm) and coating (cationic and anionic). One sample contained only non-coated magnetite particles. The magnetite concentration ranged between 0.2 and 20 ng/cell. Cytotoxicity was estimated by measuring the succinate dehydrogenase activity. The morphologic features resulting from the interaction of magnetic fluids with BT-20 cells was determined by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to the non-coated magnetic particles, cationic particles induced the strongest decrease in cell survival rates depending on time and concentration. Morphologically, the cationic particle samples exerted a strong binding to cellular membranes. Changes in the subcellular structure were found in relation to the coated magnetic particles. In conclusion, our results show that the coated prototype magnetic particles, particularly those with a cationic surfactant, are cytotoxic to BT-20 cells. The cytotoxicity is attributed to electrostatic bindings with cellular membranes, influences of chemical components or non-physiologic pH. Considering the in vivo applications, adverse systemic effects are conceivable and more biocompatible coatings for the selected magnetic particles should be elaborated.

  3. Culture models of human mammary epithelial cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2000-11-10

    Human pre-malignant breast diseases, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)3 already display several of the aberrant phenotypes found in primary breast cancers, including chromosomal abnormalities, telomerase activity, inactivation of the p53 gene and overexpression of some oncogenes. Efforts to model early breast carcinogenesis in human cell cultures have largely involved studies in vitro transformation of normal finite lifespan human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to immortality and malignancy. We present a model of HMEC immortal transformation consistent with the know in vivo data. This model includes a recently described, presumably epigenetic process, termed conversion, which occurs in cells that have overcome stringent replicative senescence and are thus able to maintain proliferation with critically short telomeres. The conversion process involves reactivation of telomerase activity, and acquisition of good uniform growth in the absence and presence of TFGB. We propose th at overcoming the proliferative constraints set by senescence, and undergoing conversion, represent key rate-limiting steps in human breast carcinogenesis, and occur during early stage breast cancer progression.

  4. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M.; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development. PMID:25538248

  5. Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-02-21

    Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite

  6. Bovine mammary epithelial cells retain stem-like phenotype in long-term cultures.

    PubMed

    Cravero, Diego; Diego, Cravero; Martignani, Eugenio; Eugenio, Martignani; Miretti, Silvia; Silvia, Miretti; Macchi, Elisabetta; Elisabetta, Macchi; Accornero, Paolo; Paolo, Accornero; Baratta, Mario; Mario, Baratta

    2014-10-01

    The detection and characterization of bovine mammary stem cells may give a better understanding of the cyclic characteristic of mammary gland development. In turn, this could potentially offer techniques to manipulate lactation yield and for regenerative medicine. We previously demonstrated that adult stem cells reside in the bovine mammary gland and possess an intrinsic regenerative potential. In vitro maintenance and expansion of this primitive population is a challenging task that could make easier the study of adult mammary stem cells. The aim of this study is to investigate this possibility. Different subpopulations of mammary epithelial cells emerge when they are cultured in two defined culture conditions. Specific cell differentiation markers as cytokeratin 18 (CK18) and cytokeratin 14 (CK14) were expressed with significant differences according to culture conditions. Vimentin, a well-known fibroblast marker was observed to increase significantly (P < 0.5) only after day 20. In both conditions, after prolonged culture (25 days) a subset of cells still retained regenerative capabilities. These cells were able to form organized pseudo-alveoli when transplanted in immunodeficient mice as shown by the expression of cytokeratin 14 (CK14), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), p63 (a mammary basal cell layer marker) and Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM). We also were able to observe the presence of milk proteins signal in these regenerated structures, which is a specific marker of functional mammary alveoli. Progenitor content was also analyzed in vitro through Colony-Forming Cell (CFC) assays with no substantial differences among culture conditions and time points. These results demonstrate that long-term culture of a multipotent cell subpopulation with intrinsic regenerative potential is possible.

  7. PREPARATION OF EPITHELIAL AND MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS FROM MURINE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Guest, I.; Ilic, Z.; Ma, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a complex organ consisting of multiple cell types that undergo extensive remodeling during pregnancy and involution, cyclical changes that suggest the existence of a resident stem cell population that is responsible for this remarkable tissue regeneration. The basic functional unit of the mammary gland is the terminal duct lobular unit, which invades the stromal tissue (fat, connective tissue, blood vessels, etc.). Luminal epithelial cells line the ducts while outer myoepithelial cells secrete the basal lamina that separates the mammary gland parenchyma from the mesenchymal cells of the stroma. Within the epithelial cell population of the ducts resides the mammary gland stem cells and it is believed that this population is the origin of the mammary gland cancer stem cells as well. In the mouse, epithelial stem cells can be separated from mesenchymal cells on the basis of CD24, CD44 and CD49f expression. This allows for the determination of both normal and cancer stem cell potential of these two populations and permits investigation into their interaction in tumour development. PMID:22058055

  8. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines—ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4—all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC. PMID:27594985

  9. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lishan; Xian, Guozhe; Lv, Yinping; Lin, Yanliang; Wang, Yibing

    2017-03-18

    25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase in various organs and is involved in many processes, including lipid metabolism, inflammation and the immune response. However, the role of 25-HC in the migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that 0.1 μM 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion without affecting cell proliferation, especially after coculture with THP1-derived macrophages. Further investigation showed that 0.1 μM 25-HC significantly stimulated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in a coculture system and increased the expression of LXR and Snail. IL-1β also mimicked the effect of 25-HC. LXR knockdown notably blocked the 25-HC-induced Snail expression, migration and invasion in both the monoculture system and the coculture system, but it did not impact the effect of IL-1β, which suggested that IL-1β functioned in an LXR-independent manner. These results suggested that 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion in an LXR-dependent manner in the monoculture system but that in the coculture system, the 25-HC-induced IL-1β secretion enhanced the effect of 25-HC in an LXR-independent manner.

  10. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa E; Rahal, Omar M; Nakatani, Hajime; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2013-07-01

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and in rodent breast cancer models. Despite the suggested linkage between obesity and breast cancer, the local influence of bioactive dietary components on mammary adiposity for antitumor effects remains unknown. Herein, we report that post-weaning dietary exposure to soy protein isolate and its bioactive isoflavone genistein (GEN) lowered mammary adiposity and increased mammary tumor suppressor PTEN and E-cadherin expression in female mice, relative to control casein diet. To ascertain GEN's role in mammary adipose deposition that may affect underlying epithelial cell phenotype, we evaluated GEN's effects on SV40-immortalized mouse mammary stromal fibroblast-like (MSF) cells during differentiation into adipocytes. MSF cells cultured in a differentiation medium with 40 nM GEN showed reductions in mature adipocyte numbers, triglyceride accumulation, and Pparγ (Pparg) and fatty acid synthase transcript levels. GEN inhibition of adipose differentiation was accompanied by increased estrogen receptor β (Erβ (Esr2)) gene expression and was modestly recapitulated by ERβ-selective agonist 2,3-bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN). Reduction of Erβ expression by siRNA targeting increased Pparγ transcript levels and stromal fibroblast differentiation into mature adipocytes; the latter was reversed by GEN but not by DPN. Conditioned medium from GEN-treated adipocytes diminished anchorage-independent mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our results suggest a mechanistic pathway to support direct regulation of mammary adiposity by GEN for breast cancer prevention.

  11. Genes involved in immortalization of human mammary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2001-09-27

    Breast cancer progression is characterized by inappropriate cell growth. Normal cells cease growth after a limited number of cell divisions--a process called cellular senescence-while tumor cells may acquire the ability to proliferate indefinitely (immortality). Inappropriate expression of specific oncogenes in a key cellular signaling pathway (Ras, Raf) can promote tumorigenicity in immortal cells, while causing finite lifespan cells to undergo a rapid senescence-like arrest. We have studied when in the course of transformation of cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), the response to overexpressed oncogenic Raf changes from being tumor-suppressive to tumor enhancing, and what are the molecular underpinnings of this response. Our data indicate: (1) HMEC acquire the ability to maintain growth in the presence of oncogenic Raf not simply as a consequence of overcoming senescence, but as a result of a newly discovered step in the process of immortal transformation uncovered by our lab, termed conversion. Immortal cells that have not undergone conversion (e.g., cells immortalized by exogenous introduction of the immortalizing enzyme, telomerase) remain growth inhibited. (2) Finite lifespan HMEC growth arrest in response to oncogenic Raf using mediators of growth inhibition that are very different from those used in response to oncogenic Raf by rodent cells and certain other human cell types, including the connective tissue cells from the same breast tissue. While many diverse cell types appear to have in common a tumor-suppressive response to this oncogenic signal, they also have developed multiple mechanisms to elicit this response. Understanding how cancer cells acquire the crucial capacity to be immortal and to abrogate normal tumor-suppressive mechanisms may serve both to increase our understanding of breast cancer progression, and to provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. Our results indicate that normal HMEC have novel means of enforcing a Raf

  12. Expression of Putative Stem Cell Marker, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha, in Mammary Gland of Water Buffalo.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ratan K; Choudhary, Shanti; Kaur, Harmanjot; Pathak, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Buffaloes account for more than 56% of total milk production in India. Cyclic remodeling of mammary glands of human, mice, cow, sheep, and goat is determined by mammary stem cells. It is logical to assume that buffalo mammary gland will have mammary stem/progenitor cells. Thus far, no report exists on identification of buffalo mammary stem cells. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) is a candidate marker for hepatic progenitor cells and has recently been suggested as a marker of bovine mammary stem/progenitor cells. We hypothesized that ( 1 ) HNF4A identifies putative buffalo mammary stem/progenitor cells and ( 2 ) the number of HNF4A-positive cells increases during mastitis. Sixteen buffalo mammary samples were collected from a local slaughterhouse. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were performed on 5-micron thick sections and on the basis of gross examination and histomorphology of the mammary glands, physiological stages of the animals were estimated as non-lactating (n = 4), mastitis (n = 9), and prepubertal (n = 3). In total, 24048 cells were counted (5-10 microscopic fields/animal; n = 16 animals) of which, 40% cells were mammary epithelial cells (MEC) and 60% cells were the stromal cells. The percentage of MEC in non-lactating animals was higher compared to mastitic animals (47.3% vs. 37.3%), which was likely due to loss of MEC in mastitis. HNF4A staining was observed in nuclei of MEC of ducts, alveoli, and stromal cells. Basal location and low frequency of HNF4A-positive MEC (ranges from 0.4-4.5%) were consistent with stem cell characteristics. Preliminary study showed coexpression of HNF4A with MSI1 (a mammary stem cell marker in sheep), suggesting HNF4A was likely to be a putative mammary stem/progenitor cell marker in buffalo. HNF4A-positive MEC (basal and luminal; light and dark stained) tended to be higher in non-lactating than the mastitic animals (8.73 ± 1.71% vs. 4.29 ± 1.19%; P = 0.07). The first hypothesis that HNF4A identify

  13. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  14. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Mark of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    cells was established by transplantation experiments in mice. For example, a functioning ductal tree can be regenerated using very few transplanted...counterstained with DAPI (blue) and imaged for the expression of both Tomato (red) and GFP (green) proteins. 9 We have collected and transplanted Lin...determine the expression of cre recombinase in the mammary epithelium. We can detect EGFP but not Tomato in the mammary epithelium of these animals

  15. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  16. Relationship Between Organization of Mammary Tumors and the Ability of Tumor Cells to Replicate Mammary Tumor Virus and to Recognize Growth-Inhibitory Contact Signals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Charles M.; Nandi, S.; Young, Lawrence

    1972-01-01

    Mammary tumor virus (MTV) replication was confined primarily to cells organized as acini in intact mouse mammary glands. Primary mammary tumors maintained a high degree of acinar organization and cells therein continued to replicate MTV vegetatively. Nonacinar mammary cells, derived by serial transplantation of acinar tumor cells, no longer actively replicated MTV. This suggests that phenotypic differences exist among mammary epithelial cells in their ability to support virus replication, that a fundamental relationship exists between the organization of epithelium for secretion and active virus replication, and that this relationship is not altered as a primary consequence of neoplastic transformation. Mammary epithelial cells from pregnant, non-tumor-bearing, MTV-infected BALB/cfC3H mice or from acinar mammary tumors from a number of mouse strains were grown in primary monolayer cultures. Such cell cultures under the influence of insulin and cortisol exhibited the ability to organize into discrete three-dimensional structures called “domes.” MTV replication in such cultures took place primarily in cells within the organized domes. Cells cultured from nonacinar tumors did not exhibit any propensity to organize into domes, nor did they replicate MTV in primary culture. This suggests that the cell organizational requirement for MTV replication observed in vivo is conserved in primary culture. Dome formation is not an effect of virus replication, as cells from uninfected BALB/c animals organized into domes in culture without concomitant MTV replication. Growth-regulating signals, exerted between contiguous cells in cultures of non-MTV-infected mammary epithelium, were not modified by the occurrence of active virus replication nor as a direct consequence of neoplastic transformation. Cells derived from nontumor BALB/cfC3H glands and from spontaneous tumors exhibited cell growth kinetics, saturation densities, and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis kinetics nearly

  17. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  18. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  19. Initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that high linear-energy transfer (LET) charged particles can be more effective than x-rays and gamma-rays in inducing oncogenic transformation in cultured cells and tumors in animals. Based on these results, experiments were designed and performed with an immortal human mammary epithelial cell line (H184B5), and several clones transformed by heavy ions were obtained. Cell fusion experiments were subsequently done, and results indicate that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. Chromosome analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques also showed additional translocations in transformed human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, studies with these cell lines indicate that heavy ions can effectively induce deletion, break, and dicentrics. Deletion of tumor suppressor gene(s) and/or formation of translocation through DNA double strand breaks is a likely mechanism for the initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells.

  20. Hypoxia induced CCL28 promotes angiogenesis in lung adenocarcinoma by targeting CCR3 on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guichun; Tao, Leilei; Shen, Sunan; Chen, Longbang

    2016-06-02

    Tumor hypoxia is one of the important features of lung adenocarcinoma. Chemokines might mediate the effects caused by tumor hypoxia. As confirmed in tumor tissue and serum of patients, CC chemokine 28 (CCL28) was the only hypoxia induced chemokine in lung adenocarcinoma cells. CCL28 could promote tube formation, migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. In addition, angiogenesis was promoted by CCL28 in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and matrigel implanted in dorsal back of athymic nude mice (CByJ.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J). Tumors formed by lung adenocarcinoma cells with high expression of CCL28 grew faster and had a higher vascular density, whereas tumor formation rate of lung adenocarcinoma cells with CCL28 expression knockdown was quite low and had a lower vascular density. CCR3, receptor of CCL28, was highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells in lung adenocarcinoma when examining by immunohistochemistry. Further signaling pathways in endothelial cells, modulated by CCL28, were analyzed by Phosphorylation Antibody Array. CCL28/CCR3 signaling pathway could bypass that of VEGF/VEGFR on the levels of PI3K-Akt, p38 MAPK and PLC gamma. The effects could be neutralized by antibody against CCR3. In conclusion, CCL28, as a chemokine induced by tumor hypoxia, could promote angiogenesis in lung adenocarcinoma through targeting CCR3 on microvascular endothelial cells.

  1. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L

    2016-04-05

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC.

  2. Alveolar progenitor cells develop in mouse mammary glands independent of pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brian W; Boulanger, Corinne A; Smith, Gilbert H

    2007-09-01

    We have previously described pluripotent, parity-induced mammary epithelial cells (PI-MEC) marked by Rosa26-lacZ expression in the mammary glands of parous females. PI-MEC act as lobule-limited epithelial stem/progenitor cells. To determine whether parity is necessary to generate PI-MEC, we incubated mammary explant cultures from virgin mice in vitro with insulin alone (I), hydrocortisone alone (H), prolactin alone (Prl), or a combination of these lactogenic hormones (IHPrl). Insulin alone activated the WAP-Cre gene. Hydrocortisone and prolactin alone did not. Any combination of hormones that included insulin was effective. Only I, H and Prl together were able to induce secretory differentiation and milk protein synthesis. In addition, EGF, IGF-2 and IGF-1 added individually produced activated (lacZ(+)) PI-MEC in explant cultures. Neither estrogen nor progesterone induced WAP-Cre expression in the explants. None of these positive initiators of WAP-Cre expression in PI-MEC were effective in mammospheres or two-dimensional cultures of mammary epithelium, indicating the indispensability of epithelial-stromal interaction in PI-MEC activation. Like PI-MEC, lacZ(+) cells from virgin explants proliferated and contributed progeny to mammospheres in vitro and to epithelial outgrowths in vivo after transplantation. LacZ(+) cells induced in virgin mouse mammary explants were multipotent (like PI-MEC) in impregnated hosts producing lacZ(+) mammary alveolar structures comprised of both myoepithelial and luminal progeny. These data demonstrate PI-MEC, a mammary epithelial sub-population of lobule-limited progenitor cells, are present in nulliparous female mice before parity and, like the PI-MEC observed following parity, are capable of proliferation, self-renewal and the capacity to produce progeny of diverse epithelial cell fates.

  3. The effect of hyposmotic and isosmotic cell swelling on the intracellular [Ca2+] in lactating rat mammary acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; Grant, A C G; Gow, I F

    2002-04-01

    The effect of hyposmotic and isosmotic cell swelling on the free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in rat mammary acinar cells has been examined using the fura-2 dye technique. Ahyposmotic shock (40% reduction) increased the [Ca2+]i in rat mammary acinar cells in a fashion which was transient; the [Ca2+]i returned to a value similar to that found under isomotic conditions within 180 sec. The increase in the [Ca2+]i was dependent upon the extent of the osmotic shock. The hyposmotically-activated increase in the [Ca2+]i could not be attributed to a reduction in extracellular Na+ or a change in the ionic strength of the incubation medium. Thapsigargin (1 microM) enhanced the hyposmotically-activated increase in the [Ca2+]i. Isosmotic swelling of rat mammary acinar cells, using urea, had no significant effect on the [Ca2+]i. Similarly, a hyperosmotic shock did not affect the [Ca2+]i in rat mammary acinar cells. It appears that the effect of cell swelling on the [Ca2+]i in rat mammary acinar cells depends on how the cells are swollen (hyposmotic vs. isosmotic). This finding may have important physiological implications given that it is predicted that mammary cell volume will change in vivo under isomotic conditions.

  4. AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce extracellular vesicles that increase neighboring fibroblast cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Dzik, Luciana M.; Iglesia, Rebeca P.; Cruz, Mário C.; Zelanis, André; de Siqueira, Adriane S.; Serrano, Solange M.T.; Goldberg, Gary S.; Jaeger, Ruy G.; Freitas, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play important roles in tumor development. Many components of these structures, including microvesicles and exosomes, have been defined. However, mechanisms by which extracellular vesicles affect tumor progression are not fully understood. Here, we investigated vesicular communication between mammary carcinoma cells and neighboring nontransformed mammary fibroblasts. Nonbiased proteomic analysis found that over 1% of the entire proteome is represented in these vesicles, with the neuroblast differentiation associated protein AHNAK and annexin A2 being the most abundant. In particular, AHNAK was found to be the most prominent component of these vesicles based on peptide number, and appeared necessary for their formation. In addition, we report here that carcinoma cells produce vesicles that promote the migration of recipient fibroblasts. These data suggest that AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce and release extracellular vesicles that cause disruption of the stroma by surrounding fibroblasts. This paradigm reveals fundamental mechanisms by which vesicular communication between carcinoma cells and stromal cells can promote cancer progression in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27374178

  5. Control of mammary myoepithelial cell contractile function by α3β1 integrin signalling.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Karine; Cagnet, Stéphanie; Kreft, Maaike; Janssen, Hans; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Glukhova, Marina A

    2011-05-18

    In the functionally differentiated mammary gland, basal myoepithelial cells contract to eject the milk produced by luminal epithelial cells from the body. We report that conditional deletion of a laminin receptor, α3β1 integrin, from myoepithelial cells leads to low rates of milk ejection due to a contractility defect but does not interfere with the integrity or functional differentiation of the mammary epithelium. In lactating mammary gland, in the absence of α3β1, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation is impaired, the Rho/Rac balance is altered and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation is sustained. Cultured mammary myoepithelial cells depleted of α3β1 contract in response to oxytocin, but are unable to maintain the state of post-contractile relaxation. The expression of constitutively active Rac or its effector p21-activated kinase (PAK), or treatment with MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, rescues the relaxation capacity of mutant cells, strongly suggesting that α3β1-mediated stimulation of the Rac/PAK pathway is required for the inhibition of MLCK activity, permitting completion of the myoepithelial cell contraction/relaxation cycle and successful lactation. This is the first study highlighting the impact of α3β1 integrin signalling on mammary gland function.

  6. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in four colonic adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Broitman, S A

    1995-12-01

    Colon tumor cells, unlike normal human fibroblasts, exhibited an uncoupling of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol from cellular growth, when endogenous cholesterol synthesis was inhibited by mevinolin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR) competitive inhibitor [Fabricant, M., and Broitman, S.A. (1990) Cancer Res. 50, 632-636]. Further evaluation of cholesterol metabolism was conducted in two undifferentiated (SW480, SW1417) and two differentiated (HT29, CACO2) colonic adenocarcinoma (adeno-CA) cell lines and an untransformed human fibroblast, AG1519A. Cells grown in monolayer culture to near subconfluency were used to assess endogenous cholesterol synthesis by 14C-acetate incorporation, in response to the following treatments in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS)-supplemented minimum essential medium (MEM): LPDS alone, LDL, mevinolin, mevinolin with LDL, and 25-hydroxy-cholesterol (25-OH-CH). Complete fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented MEM was used as control. All colon tumor lines exhibited similarly high endogenous cholesterol synthesis in both FBS and LPDS relative to the fibroblasts which demonstrated low basal levels in FBS and maximal synthesis in LPDS. LDL treatment did not inhibit cholesterol synthesis in colon tumor cells, but suppressed that in the fibroblast by 70%. Sterol repression of cholesterol synthesis mediated by 25-OH-CH occurred in all cells. Mevinolin caused a reduction in cholesterol synthesis in the colonic cancer cell lines, which was not further decreased by concurrent addition of LDL. In contrast, in mevinolin-treated fibroblasts, LDL further inhibited cholesterol synthesis. When the effect of cell density on cholesterol synthesis regulation was evaluated under conditions of sparse density in SW480 and SW147, results indicated that (i) basal rates of cholesterol synthesis were higher, (ii) LDL inhibited cholesterol synthesis more effectively, and (iii) mevinolin or 25-OH-CH had a more pronounced effect than in

  7. Differentiation of the mammary epithelial cell during involution: implications for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Monks, Jenifer; Henson, Peter M

    2009-06-01

    That milk secretion is not the final differentiated state of the mammary alveolar cells is a relatively new concept. Recent work has suggested that secreting, mammary epithelial cells (MECs) have another function to perform before they undergo cell death in the involuting mammary gland. That is, they help in the final clearance and breakdown of their neighboring cells (and likely residual milk as well.) They become, for a short time, amateur phagocytes, or efferocytes, and then are believed to die and be cleared themselves. Although relatively little study has been made of this change in the functional state of the MEC, nevertheless we may speculate from the involution literature, and extend findings from other systems of apoptotic cell clearance, on some of the mechanisms involved. And with the finding that involution may represent a unique susceptibility window for the progression of metastatic breast cancer, we may suggest areas for future research along these lines as well.

  8. Snapshots of mammary gland interstitial cells: methylene-blue vital staining and c-kit immunopositivity.

    PubMed

    Popescu, L M; Andrei, F; Hinescu, M E

    2005-01-01

    We show here that methylene-blue supravital staining of specimens from normal human mammary gland reveals (selectively) interstitial (stromal) cells, with 2-3 long (20-80 microm), thin, moniliform processes. Such cells appear c-kit/CD117 positive, either by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or immunofluorescence (IF). Since these features (affinity for methylene blue, c-kit positivity, and characteristic processes) define archetypal interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in light microscopy, our results suggest the existence of Cajal-like cells in the interstitium of human normal mammary gland.

  9. Circulating Tumor Cells in the Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are elements of indisputable significance as they seem to be responsible for the onset of metastasis. Despite this, research into CTCs and their clinical application have been hindered by their rarity and heterogeneity at the molecular and cellular level, and also by a lack of technical standardization. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive cancer that is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Its incidence has increased so much in recent years that new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed. Preliminary findings suggest that CTCs could represent an effective, non-invasive, real-time assessable biomarker in all stages of EAC. This review provides an overview of EAC and CTC characteristics and reports the main research results obtained on CTCs in this setting. The need to carry out further basic and translational research in this area to confirm the clinical usefulness of CTCs and to provide oncologists with a tool to improve therapeutic strategies for EAC patients was herein highlighted. PMID:27527155

  10. Visfatin is present in bovine mammary epithelial cells, lactating mammary gland and milk, and its expression is regulated by cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomo; Haga, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takahashi, Tatsuyuki; Obara, Yoshiaki

    2006-12-11

    Visfatin was originally identified as a growth factor for immature B cells, and recently demonstrated to bind insulin receptor. Visfatin mRNA and protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in cloned bovine mammary epithelial cells, lactating bovine mammary gland and human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Immunocytochemical staining localized the visfatin protein in the cytosol and nucleus of both cells. Quantitative-RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of the visfatin mRNA was significantly elevated when treated with forskolin (500 microM), isopreterenol (1-10 microM) and dibutyric cyclic AMP (1 mM) for 24 h, and significantly reduced when treated with insulin (5-50 ng/ml) and dexsamethasone (0.5-250 nM) for 24 h. These results indicate that mammary epithelial cells express the visfatin protein and secrete them into the milk.

  11. Function of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in mammary gland epithelial cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chang-Wen; Huang, Charles; Bederman, Ilya; Yang, Jianqi; Beidelschies, Michelle; Hatzoglou, Maria; Puchowicz, Michelle; Croniger, Colleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that Pck1 expression in mammary gland adipocytes and white adipose tissue maintains triglyceride stores through glyceroneogenesis, and these lipids were used for synthesis of milk triglycerides during lactation. Reduced milk triglycerides during lactation resulted in patterning of the newborn for insulin resistance. In this study, the role of Pck1 in mammary gland epithelial cells was analyzed. The developmental expression of Pck1 decreased in isolated mouse mammary gland epithelial cells through development and during lactation. Using HC11, a clonal mammary epithelial cell line, we found that both Janus kinase 2 signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 and the AKT pathways contributed to the repression of Pck1 mRNA by prolactin. These pathways necessitate three accessory factor regions of the Pck1 promoter for repression by prolactin. Using [U-13C6]glucose, [U-13C3]pyruvate, and [U-13C3]glycerol in HC11 cells, we determined that Pck1 functions in the pathway for the conversion of gluconeogenic precursors to glucose and contributes to glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis through glyceroneogenesis. Therefore, Pck1 plays an important role in both the mammary gland adipocytes and epithelial cells during lactation. PMID:21504969

  12. A case of signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder with spontaneous urinary extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Sanish S.; Thachil, Joseph V.; Raja, T. `; Mani, Rama

    2011-01-01

    Primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (PSRCC) of the bladder is a relatively rare variant of adenocarcinoma of the bladder with poor prognosis. Also PSRCC of the bladder presenting with spontaneous urinary extravasation is very rare. We present the case of a 48-year male who presented with spontaneous urinary extravasation and was diagnosed to have PSRCC of the urinary bladder on evaluation. He was treated with radical cystectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. This report emphasizes the need to rule out other primary sites of adenocarcinoma in the body, which may metastasize to the urinary bladder. PMID:22022068

  13. Mouse Mammary Intraductal (MIND) Method for Transplantation of Patient Derived Primary DCIS Cells and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kittrell, Frances; Valdez, Kelli; Elsarraj, Hanan; Hong, Yan; Medina, Daniel; Behbod, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The MIND method involves intraductal injection of patient derived ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cells and DCIS cell lines (MCF10DCIS.COM and SUM225) inside the mouse mammary ducts [Video 1 and Figure 1 in Behbod et al. (2009)]. This method mimics the normal environment of DCIS and facilitates study of the natural progression of human DCIS, i.e., their initial growth as carcinoma in situ within the ducts, followed by invasion into the stroma through the myoepithelial cell layer and basement membrane (Behbod et al., 2009; Valdez et al., 2011). In order to demonstrate that transplantation procedure is successful, the transplanted mammary glands may be excised as early as two weeks following intraductal injection of cells followed by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining and/or immunofluorescence staining using human specific cytokeratin 5 and/or 19 [please see Figures 2–4 in Behbod et al. (2009)]. Additionally, the presence of trypan blue inside the mouse mammary ducts immediately following intraductal injection is the best indicator that the injection was successful (Video 1 starting at 4:33 sec). PMID:27446983

  14. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  15. Genetic Manipulation Of Mammary Stem Cells to Reconcile Tumor Stem Cell Theory with Breast Cancer Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    analyzed by reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR). GFP mRNA was not found in ΔN-p63-eGFPcre mammary gland. In the K14...transgene were selected by exploiting a neomycin resistance gene. The cells were then infected with an adenovirus bearing a gene for Cre- recombinase ...Successful genomic recombination was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA. RT-PCR analysis was used to determine

  16. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness.

  17. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mammary-like Organoids.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ying; Han, Bingchen; Gao, Bowen; Bose, Shikha; Gong, Yiping; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Giuliano, Armando E; Sareen, Dhruv; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2017-02-14

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can give rise to multiple cell types and hold great promise in regenerative medicine and disease-modeling applications. We have developed a reliable two-step protocol to generate human mammary-like organoids from iPSCs. Non-neural ectoderm-cell-containing spheres, referred to as mEBs, were first differentiated and enriched from iPSCs using MammoCult medium. Gene expression profile analysis suggested that mammary gland function-associated signaling pathways were hallmarks of 10-day differentiated mEBs. We then generated mammary-like organoids from 10-day mEBs using 3D floating mixed gel culture and a three-stage differentiation procedure. These organoids expressed common breast tissue, luminal, and basal markers, including estrogen receptor, and could be induced to produce milk protein. These results demonstrate that human iPSCs can be directed in vitro toward mammary lineage differentiation. Our findings provide an iPSC-based model for studying regulation of normal mammary cell fate and function as well as breast disease development.

  18. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  19. Met Receptor Acts Uniquely for Survival and Morphogenesis of EGFR-Dependent Normal Mammary Epithelial and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Francesca; Quaglino, Elena; Martignani, Eugenio; Baratta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Mammary gland development and breast cancer growth require multiple factors both of endocrine and paracrine origin. We analyzed the roles of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Hepatocyte Growth Factor Receptor (Met) in mammary epithelial cells and mammary tumor cells derived from a mutated-ErbB2 transgenic mice. By using highly specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors we found that MCF-10A and NMuMG mammary epithelial cell lines are totally dependent on EGFR activation for their growth and survival. Proliferation and 3D-morphogenesis assays showed that HGF had no role in maintaining mammary cell viability, but was the only cytokine able to rescue EGFR-inhibited mammary cells. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I), basic-Fibroblast Growth Factor (b-FGF) and Neuregulin, which are well known mammary morphogenic factors, did not rescue proliferation or morphogenesis in these cell lines, following EGFR inhibition. Similarly, ErbB2-driven tumor cells are EGFR-dependent and also display HGF-mediated rescue. Western-blot analysis of the signaling pathways involved in rescue after EGFR inhibition indicated that concomitant ERK1/2 and AKT activation was exclusively driven by Met, but not by IGF-I or b-FGF. These results describe a unique role for EGFR and Met in mammary epithelial cells by showing that similar pathways can be used by tumorigenic cells to sustain growth and resist to EGFR-directed anti-tumorigenic drugs. PMID:23028720

  20. Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Extracellular Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, Nancy; Sympson, C. J.; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J.

    1994-12-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) plays a major role in development and tissue regeneration. Basement membrane extracellular matrix (ECM), but not fibronectin or collagen, was shown to suppress apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells in tissue culture and in vivo. Apoptosis was induced by antibodies to beta 1 integrins or by overexpression of stromelysin-1, which degrades ECM. Expression of interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) correlated with the loss of ECM, and inhibitors of ICE activity prevented apoptosis. These results suggest that ECM regulates apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells through an integrin-dependent negative regulation of ICE expression.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for normal mammary gland development and stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Pond, Adam C; Bin, Xue; Batts, Torey; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling plays an important role in embryonic stem cells and adult tissue homeostasis, but the function of FGFs in mammary gland stem cells is less well defined. Both FGFR1 and FGFR2 are expressed in basal and luminal mammary epithelial cells (MECs), suggesting that together they might play a role in mammary gland development and stem cell dynamics. Previous studies have demonstrated that the deletion of FGFR2 resulted only in transient developmental defects in branching morphogenesis. Using a conditional deletion strategy, we investigated the consequences of FGFR1 deletion alone and then the simultaneous deletion of both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in the mammary epithelium. FGFR1 deletion using a keratin 14 promoter-driven Cre-recombinase resulted in an early, yet transient delay in development. However, no reduction in functional outgrowth potential was observed following limiting dilution transplantation analysis. In contrast, a significant reduction in outgrowth potential was observed upon the deletion of both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in MECs using adenovirus-Cre. Additionally, using a fluorescent reporter mouse model to monitor Cre-mediated recombination, we observed a competitive disadvantage following transplantation of both FGFR1/R2-null MECs, most prominently in the basal epithelial cells. This correlated with the complete loss of the mammary stem cell repopulating population in the FGFR1/R2-attenuated epithelium. FGFR1/R2-null MECs were partially rescued in chimeric outgrowths containing wild-type MECs, suggesting the potential importance of paracrine mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the basal epithelial stem cells. These studies document the requirement for functional FGFR signaling in mammary stem cells during development.

  2. Genetic Mechanisms in Apc-Mediated Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraguchi, Mari; Ohene-Baah, Nana Yaw; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Bronson, Roderick Terry; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2009-01-01

    Many components of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway also play critical roles in mammary tumor development, yet the role of the tumor suppressor gene APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) in breast oncongenesis is unclear. To better understand the role of Apc in mammary tumorigenesis, we introduced conditional Apc mutations specifically into two different mammary epithelial populations using K14-cre and WAP-cre transgenic mice that express Cre-recombinase in mammary progenitor cells and lactating luminal cells, respectively. Only the K14-cre–mediated Apc heterozygosity developed mammary adenocarcinomas demonstrating histological heterogeneity, suggesting the multilineage progenitor cell origin of these tumors. These tumors harbored truncation mutation in a defined region in the remaining wild-type allele of Apc that would retain some down-regulating activity of β-catenin signaling. Activating mutations at codons 12 and 61 of either H-Ras or K-Ras were also found in a subset of these tumors. Expression profiles of acinar-type mammary tumors from K14-cre; ApcCKO/+ mice showed luminal epithelial gene expression pattern, and clustering analysis demonstrated more correlation to MMTV-neu model than to MMTV-Wnt1. In contrast, neither WAP-cre–induced Apc heterozygous nor homozygous mutations resulted in predisposition to mammary tumorigenesis, although WAP-cre–mediated Apc deficiency resulted in severe squamous metaplasia of mammary glands. Collectively, our results suggest that not only the epithelial origin but also a certain Apc mutations are selected to achieve a specific level of β-catenin signaling optimal for mammary tumor development and explain partially the colon- but not mammary-specific tumor development in patients that carry germline mutations in APC. PMID:19197353

  3. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  4. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P; Vezina, Chad M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood) into the ductal lumen (milk). Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2) and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1) membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2). Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2) are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  5. Differential expression of living mammary epithelial cell subpopulations in milk during lactation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Baratta, M; Volpe, M G; Nucera, D; Gabai, G; Guzzo, N; Fustini, M; Faustini, M; Martignani, E

    2015-10-01

    Epithelial cells are shed into milk during lactation, and although they generally reflect the cellular characteristics of terminally differentiated luminal cells, previously the detection of more primitive cells was described in human milk where a cell population of epithelial lineage was detected expressing markers typical of progenitor cells. In this investigation, we report the development of flow cytometry analysis to allow multiparametric assessment of mammary epithelial cells observed in milk. Cells collected from milk samples of 10 healthy dairy cows were directly analyzed for 6 different markers: CD45, CD49f, cytokeratin 14, cytokeratin 18, presence of nucleus, and cell viability. Milk samples were collected in 3 different periods of lactation: early lactation (EL=d 0-30), mid-lactation (ML=d 90-120), and late lactation (LL=210-250). Here we identify the differential expression of precursor or differentiated cell markers (or both) in mammary epithelial cells present in bovine milk. Myoepithelial cells, as indicated by cells staining positively for cytokeratin 14(+)/cytokeratin 18(-), were observed to increase from EL to LL with a high correlation with nuclear staining inferring potential proliferative activity. Furthermore, a significant increase in CD49f(+) and cytokeratin 14(+)/cytokeratin 18(+) positive cells was observed in LL. This assay is a sensitive approach for evaluating the variations in the frequency and features of living epithelial cells, whose reciprocal balance may be significant in understanding mammary gland cellular function throughout lactation. These observations suggest that mammary epithelial cell immunophenotypes could be investigated as biomarkers for mammary gland function in dairy cows.

  6. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  7. The role of unfolded protein response in differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Koizumi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Satoko; Hanaoka, Miyuki; Tokutake, Yukako; Yonekura, Shinichi

    2017-03-18

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER provokes ER stress by increasing the demand for energy, chaperones, and other proteins that are needed to fold client proteins or to degrade unfoldable secretory cargo. This stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, recent accumulated data suggested that the UPR also provides important signals for regulating cell differentiation and maturation. However, the relationship between UPR and mammary gland development has not been fully elucidated. To define the involvement of the UPR in mammary gland development, mammary glands were collected from non-pregnant mice, at days 5, 10 and 15 of pregnancy, at days 1 and 7 of lactation, and the expression patterns of UPR-related genes were determined by real-time PCR. We found that the mRNA expression of ATF4 and XBP1 significant increased during pregnancy. Moreover, we found that both ATF4 and XBP1 proteins are expressed in mammary epithelial cells by immunohistological analysis. In order to know the role of ATF4 and XBP1 in the differentiation of mammary epithelial cell, we performed gene knockdown experiment using HC11 cells. We found that ATF4 or XBP1 knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression of beta-casein and lactogenic hormone receptor in differentiating HC11 cells. Our results demonstrate that XBP1 and ATF4, which are UPR-related transcription factors, directly or indirectly participate in cell differentiation mechanisms through the regulation of the expression of lactogenic hormone receptors in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  8. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  9. Stem/progenitor cells in non-lactating versus lactating equine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Spaas, Jan H; Chiers, Koen; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2012-11-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Based on the facts that (i) mammary stem/progenitor cells (MaSC) are proposed to be the driving forces behind mammary growth and function and (ii) variation exists between mammalian species with regard to physiological and pathological functioning of this organ, we believe that studying MaSC from different mammals is of great comparative interest. Over the years, important data has been gathered on MaSC of men and mice, although knowledge on MaSC in other mammals remains limited. Therefore, the aim of this work was to isolate and characterize MaSC from the mammary gland of horses. Hereby, our salient findings were that the isolated equine cells met the 2 in vitro hallmark properties of stem cells, namely the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, the cells were immunophenotyped using markers for CD29, CD44, CD49f, and Ki67. Finally, we propose the mammosphere assay as a valuable in vitro assay to study MaSC during different physiological phases since it was observed that equine lactating mammary gland contains significantly more mammosphere-initiating cells than the inactive, nonlactating gland (a reflection of MaSC self-renewal) and, moreover, that these spheres were significantly larger in size upon initial cultivation (a reflection of progenitor cell proliferation). Taken together, this study not only extends the current knowledge of mammary gland biology, but also benefits the comparative approach to study and compare MaSC in different mammalian species.

  10. Feline mammary basal-like adenocarcinomas: a potential model for human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with basal-like subtype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), an immunophenotype defined by the absence of immunolabeling for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 protein, has a highly aggressive behavior. A subpopulation of TNBCs exhibit a basal-like morphology with immunohistochemical positivity for cytokeratins 5/6 (CK5/6) and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and have a high incidence of BRCA (breast cancer susceptibility) mutations. Feline mammary adenocarcinomas (FMAs) are highly malignant and share a similar basal-like subtype. The purpose of this study was to classify FMAs according to the current human classification of breast cancer that includes evaluation of ER, PR and HER2 status and expression of basal CK 5/6 and EGFR. Furthermore, we selected triple negative, basal-like FMAs to screen for BRCA mutations similar to those described in human TNBC. Methods Twenty four FMAs were classified according to the current human histologic breast cancer classification including immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ER, PR HER2, CK5/6 and EGFR. Genetic alteration and loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were analyzed in triple negative, basal-like FMAs. Results IHC for ER, PR and HER2 identified 14 of the 24 (58%) FMAs as a triple negative. Furthermore, 11of these 14 (79%) triple negative FMAs had a basal-like subtype. However, no genetic abnormalities were detected in BRCA1 and BRCA2 by direct sequencing and loss of heterozygosity analysis. Conclusion FMAs are highly aggressive neoplasms that are commonly triple negative and exhibit a basal-like morphology. This is similar to human TNBC that are also commonly classified as a basal-like subtype. While sequencing of a select number of triple negative, basal-like FMAs and testing for loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 and BRCA2 did not identify mutations similar to those described in human TNBC, further in-depth evaluation is required

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in cancer stem cells from canine mammary carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Michishita, M; Akiyoshi, R; Suemizu, H; Nakagawa, T; Sasaki, N; Takemitsu, H; Arai, T; Takahashi, K

    2012-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that diverse solid tumours arise from a small population of cells known as cancer stem cells or tumour-initiating cells. Cancer stem cells in several solid tumours are enriched for aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. High levels of ALDH activity (ALDH(high)) were detected in four cell lines derived from canine mammary carcinomas. ALDH(high) cells were enriched in a CD44(+)CD24(-) population having self-renewal capacity. Xenotransplantation into immunodeficient mice demonstrated that 1×10(4) ALDH(high) cells were sufficient for tumour formation in all injected mice, whereas 1×10(4) ALDH(low) cells failed to initiate any tumours. ALDH(high)-derived tumours contained both ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) cells, indicating that these cells had cancer stem cell-like properties.

  12. Identification and characterization of cancer stem cells in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Rybicka, Agata; Król, Magdalena

    2016-12-19

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a small subpopulation of cells in malignant tumors that possess the unique ability to self-renew, differentiate and resist chemo- and radiotherapy. These cells have been postulated to be the basis for some of the difficulties in treating cancer, and therefore, numerous approaches have been developed to specifically target and eliminate CSC in diverse types of cancer, including breast cancer. Spontaneously occurring mammary tumors in canines share clinical and molecular similarities with the human counterpart, making the dog a potentially powerful model for the study of human breast cancer and clinical trials. Studies focused on canine mammary CSC might therefore enhance our understanding of the biology and possible treatment of the disease in both dogs and humans. In this review, we discuss various approaches currently in use to isolate and characterize canine mammary CSC.

  13. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Autophagy regulates keratin 8 homeostasis in mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kongara, Sameera; Kravchuk, Olga; Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Schulte, Jennifer; Moore, Dirk; Barnard, Nicola; Neumann, Carola A.; White, Eileen; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in response to cellular stressors and mediates lysosomal degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material and organelles as a temporary cell survival mechanism. Defective autophagy is implicated in human pathology, as disruption of protein and organelle homeostasis enables disease-promoting mechanisms such as toxic protein aggregation, oxidative stress, genomic damage and inflammation. We previously showed that autophagy-defective immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) are susceptible to metabolic stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. We now report that autophagy deficiency was associated with ER and oxidative stress, and deregulation of p62-mediated keratin homeostasis in mammary cells and allograft tumors and in mammary tissues from genetically engineered mice. In human breast tumors, high phospho(Ser73)-K8 levels inversely correlated with Beclin 1 expression. Thus, autophagy preserves cellular fitness by limiting ER and oxidative stress, a function potentially important in autophagy-mediated suppression of mammary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, autophagy regulates keratin homeostasis in the mammary gland via a p62-dependent mechanism. High phospho(Ser73)-K8 expression may be a marker of autophagy functional status in breast tumors and, as such, could have therapeutic implications for breast cancer patients. PMID:20530580

  15. Bovine CD49 positive-cell subpopulation remarkably increases in mammary epithelial cells that retain a stem-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cravero, Diego; Martignani, Eugenio; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo; Baratta, Mario

    2015-10-01

    We previously proved that adult stem cells reside in the bovine mammary gland and possess an intrinsic potential to generate a functional mammary outgrowth. The aim of this study was to investigate on the immunophenotyping features retained by mammary stem-like cells detected in long term culture. Flow cytometry analysis showed different subpopulations of mammary epithelial cells emerging according to the timing of cell culture. CD49f(+)-cells significantly increased during the culture (p<0.01) and a similar trend was observed, even if less regular, for CD29(+) and ALDH1 positive cell populations. No difference during the culture was observed for CD24 positive cells but after 35 days of culture a subset of cells, CD49f positive, still retained regenerative capabilities in in vivo xenotransplants. These cells were able to form organized pseudo-alveoli when transplanted in immunodeficient mice. These results prove the presence of a multipotent cell subpopulation that retain a strong epithelial induction, confirmed in in vivo xenotransplants with a presumable in vitro expansion of the primitive population of adult mammary stem cells.

  16. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  17. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  18. Sequestration of human cytomegalovirus by human renal and mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Twite, Nicolas; Andrei, Graciela; Kummert, Caroline; Donner, Catherine; Perez-Morga, David; De Vos, Rita; Snoeck, Robert; Marchant, Arnaud

    2014-07-15

    Urine and breast milk represent the main routes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) transmission but the contribution of renal and mammary epithelial cells to viral excretion remains unclear. We observed that kidney and mammary epithelial cells were permissive to HCMV infection and expressed immediate early, early and late antigens within 72 h of infection. During the first 24 h after infection, high titers of infectious virus were measured associated to the cells and in culture supernatants, independently of de novo synthesis of virus progeny. This phenomenon was not observed in HCMV-infected fibroblasts and suggested the sequestration and the release of HCMV by epithelial cells. This hypothesis was supported by confocal and electron microscopy analyses. The sequestration and progressive release of HCMV by kidney and mammary epithelial cells may play an important role in the excretion of the virus in urine and breast milk and may thereby contribute to HCMV transmission. - Highlights: • Primary renal and mammary epithelial cells are permissive to HCMV infection. • HCMV is sequestered by epithelial cells and this phenomenon does not require viral replication. • HCMV sequestration by epithelial cells is reduced by antibodies and IFN-γ.

  19. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doni Jayavelu, Naresh; Bar, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs) and target genes (TGs). The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA). Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE), mid-early (ME), mid-late (ML) and very late (VL). Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  20. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Che, Keying; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Xiao; Pang, Zhaofei; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Du, Jiajun; Shen, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Gastric carcinoma (GC) is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS) was statistically analyzed. Results Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145) of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186) and 16.9% (50) of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, P<0.001). Similarly, the OS of patients with single cell invasion and large cell invasion was reduced (single cell invasion, HR: 3.553, P<0.001; large cell invasion, HR: 2.466, P<0.001). Following multivariate analysis, tumor budding and single cell invasion were observed to be independent risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma (P<0.05). According to the Lauren classification, patients with intestinal-type adenocarcinoma had better outcomes than those with diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (HR: 2.563, P<0.001). Conclusion Tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:28255247

  1. Curcuminoid-phospholipid complex induces apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells by STAT-3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cucuzza, Laura Starvaggi; Motta, Massimiliano; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin (from the rhizome of Curcuma longa) is well documented for its medicinal properties in Indian and Chinese systems of medicine where it is widely used for the treatment of several diseases. Epidemiological observations are suggestive that curcumin consumption may reduce the risk of some form of cancers and provide other protective biological effects in humans. These biological properties have been attributed to curcuminoids that have been widely studied for their anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, antioxidant, wound healing and anti-cancer effects. In this study we have investigated on the effect of a curcumin phospholipid complex on mammary epithelial cell viability. HC11 and BME-UV cell lines, validated models to study biology of normal, not tumoral, mammary epithelial cells, were used to analyse these effects. We report that curcumin acts on STAT-3 signal pathway to reduce cell viability and increase apoptosis evaluated by the the amount of activated caspase 3. Further it reduces MAPK and AKT activations. JSI-124, a STAT-3 inhibitor (100 nM) was able to block the negative effect of curcumin on cell viability and caspase 3 activation. Finally the negative effect of cucumin on cell viability has been impaired in STAT-3i HC11, where STAT-3 protein was greatly reduced by shRNA-interference. These results indicate that curcumin presents a potential adverse effect to normal mammary epithelial cells and that it has a specific effect on signal trasduction in mammary epithelium. PMID:19116450

  2. Migration and invasion of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells are dependent on mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Dong Keon; Shin, Youngmi; Kim, Hee Yeon; Song, Bomin; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Jong Kwang; You, Hye Jin; Cheong, Heesun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo Youl; Jang, Hyonchol

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of cancer cells have stem-cell-like properties, are resistant to standard therapy and are associated with a poor prognosis. The metabolism of such drug-resistant cells differs from that of nearby non-resistant cells. In this study, the metabolism of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. The expression of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial membrane was negatively correlated with the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Because the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reflects the functional status of mitochondria and metastasis is the principal cause of death due to cancer, the relationship between MMP and metastasis was evaluated. Cells with a higher MMP exhibited greater migration and invasion than those with a lower MMP. Cells that survived treatment with cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug for lung adenocarcinoma, exhibited increased MMP and enhanced migration and invasion compared with parental cells. Consistent with these findings, inhibition of mitochondrial activity significantly impeded the migration and invasion of cisplatin-resistant cells. RNA-sequencing analysis indicated that the expression of mitochondrial complex genes was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. These results suggested that drug-resistant cells have a greater MMP and that inhibition of mitochondrial activity could be used to prevent metastasis of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27932791

  3. Transplantation of a cell line derived from a canine benign mixed mammary tumour into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Priosoeryanto, B P; Tateyama, S; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K

    1995-11-01

    The MCM-B2 canine mammary cell line was serially transplanted into nude mice. The tumour masses consisted of elongated pleomorphic cells of varying size in the first to third passages; oval cells, becoming rounder, in the sixth to eighth passages; and cord-like, glandular and duct-like structures with compact radiating projections in the ninth and tenth passages. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical examination of round cells confirmed their epithelial cell nature, but the morphology of the elongated and oval cells was identical with that of the original cell line. The findings suggest that the MCM-B2 cell line is a multipotential stem cell or is derived from glandular differentiation of mammary gland.

  4. Increased efficacy of photodynamic therapy of R3230AC mammary adenocarcinoma by intratumoral injection of Photofrin II.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, S. L.; van der Meid, K. R.; Murant, R. S.; Hilf, R.

    1990-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy consists of the systemic administration of a derivative of haematoporphyrin (Photofrin II) followed 24-72 h later by exposure of malignant lesions to photoradiation. We investigated the efficacy of this treatment after direct intratumoral injection of Photofrin II. This direct treatment regimen resulted in higher rates of inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (5.13% J-1 cm-2 x 10(-1) and succinate dehydrogenase (3.14% J-1 cm-2 x 10(-1] in vitro at 2 h after intratumoral injection compared to rates of inhibition obtained after intraperitoneal drug administration: 0.51 and 0.42% J-1 cm-2 x 10(-1), respectively. A significant delay in tumour growth in vivo was observed in animals that received intratumoral injections 2 h before photoradiation compared to animals injected intraperitoneally at either 2 or 24 h before photoradiation. The treatment protocols were compared with control groups, consisting of Photofrin II administration intratumorally or intraperitoneally without photoradiation, or photoradiation in the absence of Photofrin II. These data indicate that the intratumoral injection regimen with Photofrin II enhanced the efficacy of photodynamic therapy. The greater delay in tumour growth observed after intratumoral administration of Photofrin II suggests a mechanism favouring direct cell damage. PMID:2139578

  5. Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cells and Cancer Susceptibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    dependent mammary cancer; and 2) Brown Norway (BN), which is highly resistant. Major findings: ACI and BN rats likely exhibit significant differences in...stimulated states in two well characterized inbred rat strains: 1) ACI, which is highly susceptible to 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced/progesterone (P...MaSC number and/or responsiveness to hormone. Technical issues and loss of commercial source of BN rats led to revision of Aims. The data generated

  6. Anti-proliferative effect on a colon adenocarcinoma cell line exerted by a membrane disrupting antimicrobial peptide KL15

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Ye, Xin-Hong; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial and anticancer activities of an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) KL15 obtained through in silico modification on the sequences of 2 previously identified bacteriocins m2163 and m2386 from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 by us have been studied. While significant bactericidal effect on the pathogenic bacteria Listeria, Escherichia, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus is exerted by KL15, the AMP can also kill 2 human adenocarcinoma cells SW480 and Caco-2 with measured IC50 as 50 μg/ml or 26.3 μM. However, the IC50 determined for KL15 on killing the normal human mammary epithelial cell H184B5F5/M10 is 150 μg/ml. The conformation of KL15 dissolved in 50% 2,2,2-trifluroroethanol or in 2 large unilamellar vesicle systems determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy appears to be helical. Further, the cell membrane permeability of treated SW480 cells by KL15 appears to be significantly enhanced as studied by both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. As observed under a scanning electron microscope, the morphology of treated SW480 cells is also significantly changed as treating time by 80 μg/ml KL15 is increased. KL15 appears to be able to pierce the cell membrane of treated SW480 cells so that numerous porous structures are generated and observable. Therefore, KL15 is likely to kill the treated SW480 cells through the necrotic pathway similar to some recently identified AMPs by others. PMID:26147829

  7. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis: an extremely rare neoplasm of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, K-W; Lin, V C-H; Chang, I-W

    2013-12-01

    Clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCA) in the urinary tract is a rare neoplasm morphologically identical to the Müllerian counterpart. Clear cell adenocarcinoma is extremely rare in the upper urinary tract. We present a case with CCA of the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor exhibited exophytic growth with predominantly tubulocystic structures, as well as solid and papillary patterns. The neoplastic cells were cuboidal with clear to pale eosinophilic cytoplasm and abundant intracellular and extracellular eosinophilic hyaline globules. By immunohistochemically, the tumor was labeled by cytokeratins and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β. The patient was still alive without evidence of recurrence in the follow-up period of nineteen months after diagnosis.

  8. Induced p53 loss in mouse luminal cells causes clonal expansion and development of mammary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Luwei; Xiang, Dongxi; Xie, Ying; Bronson, Roderick T.; Li, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Most breast cancers may have a luminal origin. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in breast cancers. However, how p53 deficiency contributes to breast tumorigenesis from luminal cells remains elusive. Here we report that induced p53 loss in Krt8+ mammary luminal cells leads to their clonal expansion without directly affecting their luminal identity. All induced mice develop mammary tumours with 9qA1 (Yap1) and/or 6qA2 (Met) amplification(s). These tumours exhibit a mammary stem cell (MaSC)-like expression signature and most closely resemble claudin-low breast cancer. Thus, although p53 does not directly control the luminal fate, its loss facilitates acquisition of MaSC-like properties by luminal cells and predisposes them to development of mammary tumours with loss of luminal identity. Our data also suggest that claudin-low breast cancer can develop from luminal cells, possibly via a basal-like intermediate state, although further study using a different luminal promoter is needed to fully support this conclusion. PMID:28194015

  9. Imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation during early stages of mammary gland carcinogenesis in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Kutanzi, Kristy R; Koturbash, Igor; Bronson, Roderick T; Pogribny, Igor P; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2010-12-10

    Estrogen and ionizing radiation are well-documented human breast carcinogens, yet the exact mechanisms of their deleterious effects on mammary gland remain to be discerned. Here we analyze the balance between cellular proliferation and apoptosis in the mammary glands of rats exposed to estrogen and X-ray radiation and the combined action of these carcinogenic agents. For the first time, we show that combined exposure to estrogen and radiation has a synergistic effect on cell proliferation in the mammary glands of ACI rats, as evidenced by a substantially greater magnitude of cell proliferation, especially after 12 and 18 weeks of treatment, when compared to mammary glands of rats exposed to estrogen or radiation alone. We also demonstrate that an imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, rather than enhanced cell proliferation or apoptosis suppression alone, may be a driving force for carcinogenesis. Our studies further suggest that compromised functional activity of p53 may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance. In sum, the results of our study indicate that evaluation of the extent of cell proliferation and apoptosis before the onset of preneoplastic lesions may be a potential biomarker of breast cancer risk after exposure to breast carcinogens.

  10. Influence of selenium on the growth of N-nitrosomethylurea-induced mammary tumor cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Lewko, W.M.; McConnell, K.P.

    1985-10-01

    Selenium is an essential dietary trace element which has anticancer properties. Among its effects in rats, selenium has been shown to inhibit the development of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors by interfering with the post-initiation, promotion phase of carcinogenesis. We studied the effects of selenium on the growth of rat mammary tumor cells in primary culture. The objective was to determine whether selenium had any direct influence on cell growth which might explain its influence on tumor development. Rat mammary tumors were induced by N-nitrosomethylurea. The addition of low concentrations of sodium selenite, less than 1.0 ..mu..g/ml, stimulated tumor cell proliferation. Protein synthesis and the production of type IV collagen increased within the first hour of exposure, prior to any measurable increase in DNA synthesis. Concentrations of selenite greater than 1.0 ..mu..g/ml inhibited cell proliferation, the synthesis of protein, and the replication of DNA in a dose-related manner. These studies demonstrated that selenium has the potential to influence the post-initiation phase of rat mammary tumorigenesis by directly altering the growth of tumor cells, possibly through the regulation of protein synthesis.

  11. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  12. Regulated expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral genes in cells of the B lineage

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral (MMTV) transcripts during B cell ontogeny and compared levels of RNA in B lymphocytes and B cell lines with levels in other cells of the hematopoietic lineage and in a mammary cell line. We demonstrate that MMTV transcripts are expressed as early as the pro-B cell stage in ontogeny and are expressed at basal constitutive levels throughout most of the B cell developmental pathway. The level of MMTV expression in B cells is similar to constitutive levels in mammary tissues and two to three orders of magnitude greater than in activated T cells. Levels of MMTV transcripts in B cells are not solely due to positional effects. Transient transfection assays showed that MMTV upregulation resulted from transcriptional activation of the viral LTR, indicating that there are specific and inducible transcription factors that regulate MMTV expression in B cells. MMTV transcripts could not be upregulated in pre- B cell lines but could be induced in some mature B cell lines. There was a correlation between the ability to stimulate B cells to secrete antibody and the ability to induce upregulated MMTV expression. Evidence is presented that suggests that the principal transcription factors involved in MMTV expression do not include the B cell factors OTF-2 or NF-kappa B, but rather are likely to be novel factors that are induced during differentiation to antibody secretion. A hypothesis for why mammary tumor viruses are well adapted for expression in cells of the B lineage is proposed, and the implications of this for the documented influence of MMTV gene products on the T cell repertoire are discussed. PMID:1660524

  13. Developing a Novel Mouse Model for Breast Cancer by Targeting Oncogenes to Mammary Progenitor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    obtained and rederived into our facility this line of mice from another investigator Tom O’Brien (1). We are in the process of testing this line for...Breed K6-rtTA transgenic mice with established tetO-c-Myc mice. Transplant the mammary cells from the resulting bi -transgenic mice into 10 inguinal...concentrated RCAS-K-RasG12D-IRES-Cre virus to inguinal mammary glands of 10 pubertal and 10 estrogen-stimulated K6-TVA /p53flox/flox bi -genic females. Monitor

  14. Sesamin synergistically potentiates the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol in mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Akl, Mohamed R; Ayoub, Nehad M; Abuasal, Bilal S; Kaddoumi, Amal; Sylvester, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    γ-Tocotrienol and sesamin are phytochemicals that display potent anticancer activity. Since sesamin inhibits the metabolic degradation of tocotrienols, studies were conducted to determine if combined treatment with sesamin potentiates the antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol on neoplastic mouse (+SA) and human (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) mammary cancer cells. Results showed that treatment with γ-tocotrienol or sesamin alone induced a significant dose-responsive growth inhibition, whereas combination treatment with these agents synergistically inhibited the growth of +SA, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells, while similar treatment doses were found to have little or no effect on normal (mouse CL-S1 and human MCF-10A) mammary epithelial cell growth or viability. However, sesamin synergistic enhancement of γ-tocotrienol-induced anticancer effects was not found to be mediated from a reduction in γ-tocotrienol metabolism. Rather, combined treatment with subeffective doses of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin was found to induce G1 cell cycle arrest, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, phospho-Rb, and E2F1 levels, and increase in p27 and p16 levels. Additional studies showed that the antiproliferative effect of combination treatment did not initiate apoptosis or result in a decrease in mammary cancer cell viability. Taken together, these findings indicate that the synergistic antiproliferative action of combined γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment in mouse and human mammary cancer cells is cytostatic, not cytotoxic, and results from G1 cell cycle arrest.

  15. Simvastatin exhibits antiproliferative effects on spheres derived from canine mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian G; Olivares, Araceli; Stoore, Caroll

    2015-05-01

    Mammary cancer is the most frequent type of tumor in the female canine. Treatments are mainly limited to surgery and chemotherapy; however, these tumors may develop clinical recurrence, metastasis and chemoresistance. The existence of a subpopulation of cancer cells with stemness features called cancer stem-like cells, may explain in part these characteristics of tumor progression. The statins, potent blockers of cholesterol synthesis, have also shown antitumor effects on cancer mammary cells, changes mediated by a decrease in the isoprenylation of specific proteins. Few studies have shown that simvastatin, a lipophilic statin, sensitizes cancer stem-like cells eliminating drug resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on spheres derived from CF41.Mg canine mammary tumor cells, which were characterized by phenotypic and functional analyses. Spheres exhibited characteristics of stemness, primarily expressing a CD44⁺/CD24⁻/low phenotype, displaying auto-renewal and relative chemoresistance. Exposure to simvastatin induced a decrease in the sphere-forming capacity and cell viability, accompanied by a concentration- and time-dependent increase in caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, modulation of β-catenin and p53 expression was observed. Simvastatin triggered a synergistic effect with doxorubicin, sensitizing the spheres to the cytotoxic effect exerted by the drug. Invasiveness of spheres was decreased in response to simvastatin and this effect was counteracted by the presence of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Our results suggest that simvastatin targets canine mammary cancer stem-like cells, supporting its therapeutical application as a novel agent to treat canine mammary cancer.

  16. Characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in the MMTV-PyMT mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Lanza, Denise Grant; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells, the root of tumor growth, present challenges to investigate: Primary human breast cancer cells are difficult to establish in culture and inconsistently yield tumors after transplantation into immune-deficient recipient mice. Furthermore, there is limited characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in mice, the ideal model for the study of breast cancer. We herein describe a pre-clinical breast cancer stem cell model, based on the properties of cancer stem cells, derived from transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice. Using a defined set of cell surface markers to identify cancer stem cells by flow cytometry, at least four cell populations were recovered from primary mammary cancers. Only two of the four populations, one epithelial and one mesenchymal, were able to survive and proliferate in vitro. The epithelial population exhibited tumor initiation potential with as few as 10 cells injected into syngeneic immune-competent recipients. Tumors initiated from injected cell lines recapitulated the morphological and physiological components of the primary tumor. To highlight the stemness potential of the putative cancer stem cells, B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1) expression was knocked down via shRNA targeting Bmi-1. Without Bmi-1 expression, putative cancer stem cells could no longer initiate tumors, but tumor initiation was rescued with the introduction of a Bmi-1 overexpression vector in the Bmi-1 knockdown cells. In conclusion, our data show that primary mammary cancers from MMTV-PyMT mice contain putative cancer stem cells that survive in culture and can be used to create a model for study of mammary cancer stem cells.

  17. Neem leaf extract inhibits mammary carcinogenesis by altering cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Arunkumar; Agullo, Pamela; Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Nandy, Sushmita; Lopez, Rebecca; Gutierrez, Christina; Narayan, Mahesh; Rajkumar, Lakshmanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based medicines are useful in the treatment of cancer. Many breast cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine in parallel with conventional treatments. Neem is historically well known in Asia and Africa as a versatile medicinal plant with a wide spectrum of biological activities. The experiments reported herein determined whether the administration of an ethanolic fraction of Neem leaf (EFNL) inhibits progression of chemical carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rat models. Seven-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). Upon the appearance of palpable mammary tumors, the rats were divided into vehicle-treated control groups and EFNL-treated groups. Treatment with EFNL inhibited MNU-induced mammary tumor progression. EFNL treatment was also highly effective in reducing mammary tumor burden and in suppressing mammary tumor progression even after the cessation of treatment. Further, we found that EFNL treatment effectively upregulated proapoptotic genes and proteins such as p53, B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2-associated death promoter protein (Bad) caspases, phosphatase and tensin homolog gene (PTEN), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In contrast, EFNL treatment caused downregulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2), angiogenic proteins (angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGF-A]), cell cycle regulatory proteins (cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 [Cdk2], and Cdk4), and pro-survival signals such as NFκB, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1). The data obtained in this study demonstrate that EFNL exert a potent anticancer effect against mammary tumorigenesis by altering key signaling pathways. PMID:24146019

  18. The hedgehog signaling network, mammary stem cells, and breast cancer: connections and controversies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M T; Visbal, A P

    2006-01-01

    Several signal transduction networks have been implicated in the regulation of mammary epithelial stem cell self-renewal and maintenance (Kalirai and Clarke 2006; Liu et al. 2005). These signaling networks include those of the Wnt, Notch, TGFO, EGF, FGF, IGF, and most recently, the Hedgehog (Hh) families of secreted ligands. However, we currently know very little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which these signaling pathways function to regulate normal epithelial stem/progenitor cells. What is clear is that the regulatory signaling networks thought to control normal stem/progenitor cell self-renewal and maintenance are, with the current sole exception of the hedgehog network, well-documented to have contributory roles in mammary cancer development and disease progression when misregulated. In this review, genetic regulation of mammary gland development by hedgehog network genes is outlined, highlighting a developing controversy as to whether activated hedgehog signaling regulates normal regenerative mammary epithelial stem cells or, indeed, whether activated hedgehog signaling functions at all in ductal development. In addition, the question of whether inappropriate hedgehog network activation influences breast cancer development is addressed, with emphasis on the prospects for using hedgehog signaling antagonists clinically for breast cancer treatment or prevention.

  19. Effect of elevated selenium intakes on mammary cell proliferation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salbe, A.D.; Albanes, D.; Winick, M.; Taylor, P.R.; Levander, O.A. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Elevated selenium (Se) intakes and calorie restriction (CR) inhibit mammary tumorigenesis in experimental animals. The present study was designed to investigate cell proliferation in the mammary tissue gland. Female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control, 40% CR, 4 or 6 ppm Se in water as selenate. Control rats and Se rats were fed a control diet ad lib. CR rats were pair-fed 40% less than controls with a diet providing equal nutrients except carbohydrate calories. After 3 weeks, rats were injected with ({sup 3}H)-thymidine and killed 1 hr later. Se at 4 ppm significantly decreased only the number of ducts, whereas 6 ppm Se decreased both the number of ducts as well as the number and percent of labeled cells. CR had no effect on mammary cell proliferation. These results suggest that elevated Se intakes may protect against mammary tumorigenesis by decreasing cell proliferation, a mechanism which may affect the dose-response of the genotoxic chemicals frequently used as initiating agents in animal experiments.

  20. Myoepithelial cell differentiation markers in prepubertal bovine mammary gland: Effect of ovariectomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously reported that ovariectomy alters prepubertal development of mammary myoepithelial cells (MC), but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. We therefore analyzed the expression of the myoepithelial differentiation markers a-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and the common acute ly...

  1. The interplay of matrix metalloproteinases, morphogens and growth factors is necessary for branching of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Simian, Marina; Hirai, Yohei; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-03-06

    The mammary gland develops its adult form by a process referred to as branching morphogenesis. Many factors have been reported to affect this process. We have used cultured primary mammary epithelial organoids and mammary epithelial cell lines in three-dimensional collagen gels to elucidate which growth factors, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and mammary morphogens interact in branching morphogenesis. Branching stimulated by stromal fibroblasts, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 7, fibroblast growth factor 2 and hepatocyte growth factor was strongly reduced by inhibitors of MMPs, indicating the requirement of MMPs for three-dimensional growth involved in morphogenesis. Recombinant stromelysin 1/MMP-3 alone was sufficient to drive branching in the absence of growth factors in the organoids. Plasmin also stimulated branching; however, plasmin-dependent branching was abolished by both inhibitors of plasmin and MMPs, suggesting that plasmin activates MMPs. To differentiate between signals for proliferation and morphogenesis, we used a cloned mammary epithelial cell line that lacks epimorphin, an essential mammary morphogen. Both epimorphin and MMPs were required for morphogenesis, but neither was required for epithelial cell proliferation. These results provide direct evidence for a critical role of MMPs in branching in mammary epithelium and suggest that, in addition to epimorphin, MMP activity is a minimum requirement for branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland.

  2. The Immune System as a New Possible Cell Target for AFP 464 in a Spontaneous Mammary Cancer Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Callero, Mariana A; Rodriguez, Cristina E; Sólimo, Aldana; Bal de Kier Joffé, Elisa; Loaiza Perez, Andrea I

    2017-02-16

    Aminoflavone (AFP 464, NSC 710464), an antitumor agent which recently entered phase II clinical trials, acts against estrogen-positive breast cancer (ER +). AFP 464, which has a unique mechanism of action by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway, decreased tumor size and growth rate in the estrogen dependent, Tamoxifen-sensitive spontaneous M05 mouse model. Considering that AhR has recently emerged as a physiological regulator of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we investigated whether AFP 464 modulates the immune response in our mouse model. Studies on the effect of AFP 464 on the immune system were carried in BALB/c mice bearing M05 semi-differentiated mammary adenocarcinomas that express estrogen and progesterone receptors. Splenic cells and tumor inflammatory infiltrates were studied by cytometric analyses. The modulation of splenocytes cytotoxic activity by AFP 464 was also evaluated. We further investigated the effects of AFP 464 on peritoneal macrophages by evaluating metalloproteinase, arginase and iNOS activities. We found that AFP 464 increased splenic cytotoxic activity, diminished the number of systemic and local Treg lymphocytes and MDSCs, and induced a M1 phenotype in peritoneal macrophages of M05 tumor bearing mice. Therefore, we conclude that AFP 464 modulates immune response which collaborates with its anti-tumor activity. Our results place the immune system as a novel target for this anti-cancer agent to strengthen the rationale for its inclusion in breast cancer treatment regimens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. JS-K, a nitric oxide-releasing prodrug, induces breast cancer cell death while sparing normal mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, Vanity; Saavedra, Joseph E; Nieves-Alicea, René; Simeone, Ann-Marie; Keefer, Larry K; Tari, Ana M

    2011-04-01

    Targeted therapy with reduced side effects is a major goal in cancer research. We investigated the effects of JS-K, a nitric oxide (NO) prodrug designed to release high levels of NO when suitably activated, on human breast cancer cell lines, on non-transformed human MCF-10A mammary cells, and on normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Cell viability assay, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis were used to study the effects of JS-K on breast cancer and on mammary epithelial cells. After a 3-day incubation, the IC50s of JS-K against the breast cancer cells ranged from 0.8 to 3 µM. However, JS-K decreased the viability of the MCF-10A cells by only 20% at 10-µM concentration, and HMECs were unaffected by 10 µM JS-K. Flow cytometry indicated that JS-K increased the percentages of breast cancer cells under-going apoptosis. Interestingly, flow cytometry indicated that JS-K increased acidic vesicle organelle formation in breast cancer cells, suggesting that JS-K induced autophagy in breast cancer cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that JS-K-treated breast cancer cells underwent autophagic cell death. Western blot analysis showed that JS-K induced the expression of microtubule light chain 3-II, another autophagy marker, in breast cancer cells. However, JS-K did not induce apoptosis or autophagy in normal human mammary epithelial cells. These data indicate that JS-K selectively induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells while sparing normal mammary epithelial cells under the same conditions. The selective anti-tumor activity of JS-K warrants its further investigation in breast tumors.

  4. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-07

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  5. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  6. Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation by Rho GTPase through a Novel Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    cells lining the milk -forming ducts of the mammary gland (for review [2]). Deliberate transformation of these cells provides a practical window into human...from milk do not exhibit spontaneous immortalization and thus provide suitable models of human cell transformation. Immortalization of HMECs in culture...immortalize fully a large proportion of preselection HMECs [8]. Human milk is an easily available source of relatively pure HMECs that are thought to be

  7. Gene Regulation by Retinoid Receptors in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    altered response to rECM, ECM sig- (919) 668-2458. E-mail: seewa001@mcAuke.edu naling pathways may utilize tumor suppressor checkpoints *Abbreviations...1998). In the tumor suppressor p53 in ECM-induced growth arrest, po- normal mammary gland, the x3/13 1 integrin is expressed at larity, and apoptosis...as a tumor mune IgG and grown in rECM. Electron micrographs of suppressor and in promoting differentiation, little is known early passage p53- HMEC-E6

  8. Developmental signaling pathways regulating mammary stem cells and contributing to the etiology of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Maria Cristina; Bertolette, Daniel; Castro, Nadia P; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David S

    2016-04-01

    Cancer has been considered as temporal and spatial aberrations of normal development in tissues. Similarities between mammary embryonic development and cell transformation suggest that the underlying processes required for mammary gland development are also those perturbed during various stages of mammary tumorigenesis and breast cancer (BC) development. The master regulators of embryonic development Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin play key roles in modulating mammary gland morphogenesis and cell fate specification in the embryo through fetal mammary stem cells (fMaSC) and in the adult organism particularly within the adult mammary stem cells (aMaSC), which determine mammary progenitor cell lineages that generate the basal/myoepithelial and luminal compartments of the adult mammary gland. Together with recognized transcription factors and embryonic stem cell markers, these embryonic regulatory molecules can be inappropriately augmented during tumorigenesis to support the tumor-initiating cell (TIC)/cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment, and the effects of their deregulation may contribute for the etiology of BC, in particular the most aggressive subtype of BC, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This in depth review will present evidence of the involvement of Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin in the normal mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis, from fMaSC/aMaSC regulation to TIC generation and maintenance in TNBC. Specific therapies for treating TNBC by targeting these embryonic pathways in TICs will be further discussed, providing new opportunities to destroy not only the bulk tumor, but also TICs that initiate and promote the metastatic spread and recurrence of this aggressive subtype of BC.

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  10. Perturbation-Expression Analysis Identifies RUNX1 as a Regulator of Human Mammary Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Ethan S.; Miller, Daniel H.; Mathis, Robert A.; Gupta, Piyush B.

    2015-01-01

    The search for genes that regulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation has been hindered by a paucity of markers that uniquely label stem cells and early progenitors. To circumvent this difficulty we have developed a method that identifies cell-state regulators without requiring any markers of differentiation, termed Perturbation-Expression Analysis of Cell States (PEACS). We have applied this marker-free approach to screen for transcription factors that regulate mammary stem cell differentiation in a 3D model of tissue morphogenesis and identified RUNX1 as a stem cell regulator. Inhibition of RUNX1 expanded bipotent stem cells and blocked their differentiation into ductal and lobular tissue rudiments. Reactivation of RUNX1 allowed exit from the bipotent state and subsequent differentiation and mammary morphogenesis. Collectively, our findings show that RUNX1 is required for mammary stem cells to exit a bipotent state, and provide a new method for discovering cell-state regulators when markers are not available. PMID:25894653

  11. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  12. Models of breast morphogenesis based on localization of stem cells in the developing mammary lobule.

    PubMed

    Honeth, Gabriella; Schiavinotto, Tommaso; Vaggi, Federico; Marlow, Rebecca; Kanno, Tokuwa; Shinomiya, Ireneusz; Lombardi, Sara; Buchupalli, Bharath; Graham, Rosalind; Gazinska, Patrycja; Ramalingam, Vernie; Burchell, Joy; Purushotham, Anand D; Pinder, Sarah E; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Dontu, Gabriela

    2015-04-14

    Characterization of normal breast stem cells is important for understanding their role in breast development and in breast cancer. However, the identity of these cells is a subject of controversy and their localization in the breast epithelium is not known. In this study, we utilized a novel approach to analyze the morphogenesis of mammary lobules, by combining one-dimensional theoretical models and computer-generated 3D fractals. Comparing predictions of these models with immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections for candidate stem cell markers, we defined distinct areas where stem cells reside in the mammary lobule. An increased representation of stem cells was found in smaller, less developed lobules compared to larger, more mature lobules, with marked differences in the gland of nulliparous versus parous women and that of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers versus non-carriers.

  13. Differential Subcellular Localization Renders HAI-2 a Matriptase Inhibitor in Breast Cancer Cells but Not in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D.; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J.; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25786220

  14. Differential subcellular localization renders HAI-2 a matriptase inhibitor in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells.

  15. STAT5A Regulates the Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells and the Development of Mammary Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Bill Kemp, and Sandra Price for animal husbandry for 5 h in Tellyzinckys fixative, and stored in 70% ethanol until processed and technical support and...of tumor formation was the same as the control group. This suggested that the process of involution can remove significant numbers of cells that could...potentially contribute to the development of tumors. But it also suggested that there remained sufficient cells after the process of involution, that

  16. Antiproliferative effect of berberine on canine mammary gland cancer cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sefidabi, Reyhaneh; Mortazavi, Pejman; Hosseini, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Canine mammary gland tumors are the most frequent cause of cancer in female dogs. Numerous studies using cancer cell lines and clinical trials have indicated that various natural products and antioxidants reduce or possibly prevent the development of cancer. Berberine (BBR), the most important alkaloid in the Berberidaceae, which exerts a wide range of pharmacological and biochemical effects, has drawn much attention due to its particularly high antitumor activity in vitro and in animal studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of BBR against a canine mammary gland carcinoma cell line (CF41.Mg) in vitro. CF41.Mg cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 10% heat inactived fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 100 mg/ml peniciline-streptomycin. Subsequently the cells were treated with different concentrations of BBR chloride (10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM) at a density of 12,000 cells/well in 96-well plates. Following treatment, the MTT assay was used to detect cell viability after 24-, 48- and 72-h incubations at 37°C with 5% CO2. The results indicated that BBR inhibited proliferation of canine mammary gland carcinoma cells, as treatment with 100 µM BBR for 24 h resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability (P<0.005). As the present study demonstrated that BBR (10-200 µM) induced cancer cell death, it is proposed that BBR may serve as a candidate agent against canine mammary tumor cells via its antiproliferative activity.

  17. Canine mammary tumors contain cancer stem-like cells and form spheroids with an embryonic stem cell signature.

    PubMed

    Ferletta, Maria; Grawé, Jan; Hellmén, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of tentative stem-like cells in the canine mammary tumor cell line CMT-U229. This cell line is established from an atypical benign mixed mammary tumor, which has the property of forming duct-like structures in collagen gels. Stem cells in mammary glands are located in the epithelium; therefore we thought that the CMT-U229 cell line would be suitable for detection of tentative cancer stem-like cells. Side population (SP) analyses by flow cytometry were performed with cells that formed spheroids and with cells that did not. Flow cytometric, single sorted cells were expanded and re-cultured as spheroids. The spheroids were paraffin embedded and characterized by immunohistochemistry. SP analyses showed that spheroid forming cells (retenate) as well as single cells (filtrate) contained SP cells. Sca1 positive cells were single cell sorted and thereafter the SP population increased with repeated SP analyses. The SP cells were positively labeled with the cell surface-markers CD44 and CD49f (integrin alpha6); however the expression of CD24 was low or negative. The spheroids expressed the transcription factor and stem cell marker Sox2, as well as Oct4. Interestingly, only peripheral cells of the spheroids and single cells were positive for Oct4 expression. SP cells are suggested to correspond to stem cells and in this study, we have enriched for tentative tumor stem-like cells derived from a canine mammary tumor. All the used markers indicate that the studied CMT-U229 cell line contains SP cells, which in particular have cancer stem-like cell characteristics.

  18. MicroRNA-regulated gene networks during mammary cell differentiation are associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, Eylem; Katchy, Anne; Tsouko, Efrosini; Lin, Chin-Yo; Haldosén, Lars-Arne; Helguero, Luisa; Williams, Cecilia

    2012-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in stem cell biology, differentiation and oncogenesis and are of high interest as potential breast cancer therapeutics. However, their expression and function during normal mammary differentiation and in breast cancer remain to be elucidated. In order to identify which miRNAs are involved in mammary differentiation, we thoroughly investigated miRNA expression during functional differentiation of undifferentiated, stem cell-like, murine mammary cells using two different large-scale approaches followed by qPCR. Significant changes in expression of 21 miRNAs were observed in repeated rounds of mammary cell differentiation. The majority, including the miR-200 family and known tumor suppressor miRNAs, was upregulated during differentiation. Only four miRNAs, including oncomiR miR-17, were downregulated. Pathway analysis indicated complex interactions between regulated miRNA clusters and major pathways involved in differentiation, proliferation and stem cell maintenance. Comparisons with human breast cancer tumors showed the gene profile from the undifferentiated, stem-like stage clustered with that of poor-prognosis breast cancer. A common nominator in these groups was the E2F pathway, which was overrepresented among genes targeted by the differentiation-induced miRNAs. A subset of miRNAs could further discriminate between human non-cancer and breast cancer cell lines, and miR-200a/miR-200b, miR-146b and miR-148a were specifically downregulated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. We show that miR-200a/miR-200b can inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-characteristic morphological changes in undifferentiated, non-tumorigenic mammary cells. Our studies propose EphA2 as a novel and important target gene for miR-200a. In conclusion, we present evidentiary data on how miRNAs are involved in mammary cell differentiation and indicate their related roles in breast cancer.

  19. NR4A2 Is Regulated by Gastrin and Influences Cellular Responses of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K.; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells. PMID:24086717

  20. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  1. Non-autonomous cell proliferation in the mammary gland and cancer.

    PubMed

    Weber, Robert J; Desai, Tejal A; Gartner, Zev J

    2017-03-14

    Cells decide whether to grow and divide by integrating internal and external signals. Non-autonomous cell growth and proliferation occurs when microenvironmental signals from neighboring cells, both physical and secreted, license this decision. Understanding these processes is vital to developing an accurate framework for cell-cell interactions and cellular decision-making, and is useful for advancing new therapeutic strategies to prevent dysregulated growth. Here, we review some recent examples of non-autonomous cell growth in the mammary gland and tumor cell proliferation.

  2. Mammary epithelial cell phenotype disruption in vitro and in vivo through ERalpha36 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Chesnel, Amand; Morel, Chloé; Djermoune, El-Hadi; Boukhobza, Taha

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha 36 (ERα36) is a variant of the canonical estrogen receptor alpha (ERα66), widely expressed in hormone sensitive cancer cells and whose high expression level correlates with a poor survival prognosis for breast cancer patients. While ERα36 activity have been related to breast cancer progression or acquired resistance to treatment, expression level and location of ERα36 are poorly documented in the normal mammary gland. Therefore, we explored the consequences of a ERα36 overexpression in vitro in MCF-10A normal mammary epithelial cells and in vivo in a unique model of MMTV-ERα36 transgenic mouse strain wherein ERα36 mRNA was specifically expressed in the mammary gland. By a combination of bioinformatics and computational analyses of microarray data, we identified hierarchical gene networks, downstream of ERα36 and modulated by the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Concomitantly, ERα36 overexpression lowered proliferation rate but enhanced migration potential and resistance to staurosporin-induced apoptosis of the MCF-10A cell line. In vivo, ERα36 expression led to duct epithelium thinning and disruption in adult but not in prepubescent mouse mammary gland. These phenotypes correlated with a loss of E-cadherin expression. Here, we show that an enhanced expression of ERα36 is sufficient, by itself, to disrupt normal breast epithelial phenotype in vivo and in vitro through a dominant-positive effect on nongenomic estrogen signaling pathways. These results also suggest that, in the presence of adult endogenous steroid levels, ERα36 overexpression in vivo contributes to alter mammary gland architecture which may support pre-neoplastic lesion and augment breast cancer risk. PMID:28301550

  3. The different functions and clinical significances of caveolin-1 in human adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pin; Chen, Fuchun; Pan, Qi; Zhao, Xianda; Zhao, Chen; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Chen, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a major structural protein of caveolae, is an integral membrane protein which plays an important role in the progression of carcinoma. However, whether Cav-1 acts as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor still remains controversial. For example, the tumor-promoting function of Cav-1 has been found in renal cancer, prostate cancer, tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), lung SCC and bladder SCC. In contrast, Cav-1 also plays an inhibitory role in esophagus adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma and cutaneous SCC. The role of Cav-1 is still controversial in thyroid cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, oral SCC, laryngeal SCC, head and neck SCC, esophageal SCC and cervical SCC. Besides, it has been reported that the loss of stromal Cav-1 might predict poor prognosis in breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, oral SCC and esophageal SCC. However, the accumulation of stromal Cav-1 has been found to be promoted by the progression of tongue SCC. Taken together, Cav-1 seems playing a different role in different cancer subtypes even of the same organ, as well as acting differently in the same cancer subtype of different organs. Thus, we hereby explore the functions of Cav-1 in human adenocarcinoma and SCC from the perspective of clinical significances and pathogenesis. We envision that novel targets may come with the further investigation of Cav-1 in carcinogenesis. PMID:28243118

  4. Self-organization is a dynamic and lineage-intrinsic property of mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chanson, Lea; Brownfield, Douglas; Garbe, James C.; Kuhn, Irene; Stampfer, Martha R.; Bissell, Mina J.; LaBarge, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of organization is a principle feature of cancers; therefore it is important to understand how normal adult multilineage tissues, such as bilayered secretory epithelia, establish and maintain their architectures. The self-organization process that drives heterogeneous mixtures of cells to form organized tissues is well studied in embryology and with mammalian cell lines that were abnormal or engineered. Here we used a micropatterning approach that confined cells to a cylindrical geometry combined with an algorithm to quantify changes of cellular distribution over time to measure the ability of different cell types to self-organize relative to each other. Using normal human mammary epithelial cells enriched into pools of the two principal lineages, luminal and myoepithelial cells, we demonstrated that bilayered organization in mammary epithelium was driven mainly by lineage-specific differential E-cadherin expression, but that P-cadherin contributed specifically to organization of the myoepithelial layer. Disruption of the actomyosin network or of adherens junction proteins resulted in either prevention of bilayer formation or loss of preformed bilayers, consistent with continual sampling of the local microenvironment by cadherins. Together these data show that self-organization is an innate and reversible property of communities of normal adult human mammary epithelial cells. PMID:21300877

  5. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments†

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Petersen, Ole W.

    2010-01-01

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell–cell versus cell–ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages. PMID:20023793

  6. Self-organization is a dynamic and lineage-intrinsic property of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chanson, L.; Brownfield, D.; Garbe, J. C.; Kuhn, I.; Stampfer, M. R.; Bissell, M. J.; LaBarge, M. A.

    2011-02-07

    Loss of organization is a principle feature of cancers; therefore it is important to understand how normal adult multilineage tissues, such as bilayered secretory epithelia, establish and maintain their architectures. The self-organization process that drives heterogeneous mixtures of cells to form organized tissues is well studied in embryology and with mammalian cell lines that were abnormal or engineered. Here we used a micropatterning approach that confined cells to a cylindrical geometry combined with an algorithm to quantify changes of cellular distribution over time to measure the ability of different cell types to self-organize relative to each other. Using normal human mammary epithelial cells enriched into pools of the two principal lineages, luminal and myoepithelial cells, we demonstrated that bilayered organization in mammary epithelium was driven mainly by lineage-specific differential E-cadherin expression, but that P-cadherin contributed specifically to organization of the myoepithelial layer. Disruption of the actomyosin network or of adherens junction proteins resulted in either prevention of bilayer formation or loss of preformed bilayers, consistent with continual sampling of the local microenvironment by cadherins. Together these data show that self-organization is an innate and reversible property of communities of normal adult human mammary epithelial cells.

  7. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-02-08

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions.

  8. Tissue-specific ceruloplasmin gene expression in the mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, J L; Shimizu, N; Gitlin, J D

    1991-01-01

    Using a ceruloplasmin cDNA clone in RNA blot analysis, a single 3.7 kb ceruloplasmin-specific transcript was detected in rat mammary gland tissue from pregnant and lactating animals. Ceruloplasmin gene expression in the mammary gland was tissue-specific, with no evidence of expression in brain, heart or other extrahepatic tissues. Ceruloplasmin mRNA was also detected in mammary gland tissue from male, virgin female and non-pregnant/multiparous animals, and the abundance of ceruloplasmin-specific transcripts in virgin female rats was independent of their stage of oestrus. In virgin female mammary gland the content of ceruloplasmin mRNA was 20% of that in hepatic tissue from these animals and approx. 2-3-fold greater than that found in mammary gland tissue of pregnant or lactating animals. Development studies revealed ceruloplasmin gene expression in male and female mammary gland by only 2 weeks of age, prior to the onset of puberty. Biosynthetic studies indicated that the ceruloplasmin mRNA in mammary gland tissue was translated into a 132 kDa protein qualitatively similar to that synthesized in liver. By in situ hybridization, ceruloplasmin gene expression was localized to the epithelium lining the mammary gland alveolar ducts, without evidence of expression in the surrounding mesenchyme. Ceruloplasmin gene expression was also detected in a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line and in biopsy tissue from women with invasive ductal carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that the mammary gland is a prominent site of extrahepatic ceruloplasmin gene expression and add to the evidence that ceruloplasmin biosynthesis is associated with growth and differentiation in non-hepatic tissues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:1764031

  9. A role of ghrelin in canine mammary carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis and migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). They are often co-expressed in multiple human tumors and related cancer cell lines what can indicate that the ghrelin/GHS-R axis may have an important role in tumor growth and progression. However, a role of ghrelin in canine tumors remains unknown. Thus, the aim of our study was two-fold: (1) to assess expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer and (2) to examine the effect of ghrelin on carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines (isolated from primary tumors and their metastases) was examined using Real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. For apoptosis analysis the Annexin V and propidium iodide dual staining was applied whereas cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and BrdU incorporation test. The influence of ghrelin on cancer cells migration and invasion was assessed using Boyden chamber assays and wound healing assay. Results The highest expression of ghrelin was observed in metastatic cancers whereas the lowest expression of ghrelin receptor was detected in tumors of the 3rd grade of malignancy. Higher expression of ghrelin and its receptor was detected in cancer cell lines isolated from metastases than in cell lines isolated from primary tumors. In vitro experiments demonstrated that exposure to low doses of ghrelin stimulates cellular proliferation, inhibits apoptosis and promotes motility and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor inhibitor ([D-Lys3]-GHRP6) as well as RNA interference enhances early apoptosis. Conclusion The presence of ghrelin and GHS-R in all of the examined canine mammary tumors may indicate their biological role in cancer growth and development. Our experiments conducted in vitro confirmed that ghrelin promotes cancer development and metastasis. PMID:22999388

  10. The myoepithelial cell: its role in normal mammary glands and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sopel, M

    2010-02-01

    Mammary gland epithelium is composed of an inner layer of secretory cells (luminal) and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells (MEC) bordering the basal lamina which separates the epithelial layer from the extracellular matrix. Mature MECs morphologically resemble smooth muscle cells; however, they exhibit features typical for epithelial cells, such as the presence of specific cytokeratin filaments. During lactation, secretory cells synthesize milk components, which are collected in alveoli and duct lumen, and transported to the nipple as a result of MEC contraction. Although the induction of MEC contraction results from oxytocin action, also other, still unknown auto/paracrine mechanisms participate in the regulation of this process. As well as milk ejection, MECs are involved in mammary gland morphogenesis in all developmental stages, modulating proliferation and differentiation of luminal cells. They take part in the formation of extracellular matrix, synthesizing its components and secreting proteinases and their inhibitors. In addition, MECs are regarded as natural cancer suppressors, stabilizing the normal structure of the mammary gland, they secrete suppressor proteins (e.g. maspin) limiting cancer growth, invasiveness, and neoangiogenesis. The majority of malignant breast cancers are derived from luminal cells, whereas neoplasms of MEC origin are the most seldom and usually benign form of breast tumours. MECs are markedly resistant to malignant transformation and they are able to suppress the transformation of neighboring luminal cells. Therefore, a deeper insight into the role of MECs in the physiology and pathology of mammary glands would allow a better understanding of cancerogenesis mechanisms and possible application of specific MEC markers in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  11. Immunohistochemical characterization of endometrial carcinomas: endometrioid, serous and clear cell adenocarcinomas in association with genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    Developments in immunohistochemistry, which are closely linked with the advances in the analyses of genetic abnormalities and their associated molecular disorders as early and late histogenetic events, have contributed greatly to the improvement of pathological diagnostic confirmation and validation. Immunohistochemistry has also generated great benefit to the innovation of therapeutic strategies for various kinds of cancers. In this article, the three representative histological types of corpus cancer, namely, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, serous adenocarcinoma and clear cell adenocarcinoma, will be histologically approached in association with their immunohistochemical profiles as well as genetic disorders. First, the focus will be on 'Conventional/prototypic features,' followed by 'Controversy over conventional histological subclassification,' and subsequently 'Tumorigenesis and re-subclassification'.

  12. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  13. STAT5A Regulates the Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells and the Development of Mammary Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    cleared. Gel was dried according to the man- stored in 7 0% ethanol until processed by standard embedding and ufacturer’s protocol (Research Products...fixative, and stored in 70% ethanol until processed and technical support and Dr. J. Shillingford for developing the Stat5a by standard embedding and...that the process of involution could remove significant numbers of cells that could potentially contribute to the development of tumors. But it also

  14. Trichostatin A Inhibits β-Casein Expression in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Radisky, Derek; Levy, Dinah; Lacza, Charlemagne; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    Many aspects of cellular behavior are defined by the content of information provided by association of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and with cell membrane receptors. When cultured in the presence of laminin-containing ECM and prolactin (Prl), normal mammary epithelial cells express the milk protein β-casein. We have previously found that the minimal ECM- and Prl-responsive enhancer element BCE-1 was only active when stably integrated into chromatin, and that trichostatin A (TSA), a reagent that leads to alterations in chromatin structure, was able to activate the integrated enhancer element. We now show that endogenous β-casein gene, which is controlled by a genetic assembly that is highly similar to that of BCE-1 and which is also activated by incubation in ECM and Prl, is instead inhibited by TSA. We provide evidence that the differing response of β-casein and BCE-1 to TSA is neither due to an unusual effect of TSA on mammary epithelial cells, nor to secondary consequences from the expression of a separate gene, nor to a particular property of the BCE-1 construct. As a component of this investigation, we also showed that ECM mediated rapid histone deacetylation in mammary epithelial cells. These results are discussed in combination with previous work showing that TSA mediates the differentiation of many types of cancer cells but inhibits differentiation of some nonmalignant cell types. PMID:11746508

  15. Role of endothelial cells in bovine mammary gland health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ryman, Valerie E; Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Sordillo, Lorraine M

    2015-12-01

    The bovine mammary gland is a dynamic and complex organ composed of various cell types that work together for the purpose of milk synthesis and secretion. A layer of endothelial cells establishes the blood-milk barrier, which exists to facilitate the exchange of solutes and macromolecules necessary for optimal milk production. During bacterial challenge, however, endothelial cells divert some of their lactation function to protect the underlying tissue from damage by initiating inflammation. At the onset of inflammation, endothelial cells tightly regulate the movement of plasma components and leukocytes into affected tissue. Unfortunately, endothelial dysfunction as a result of exacerbated or sustained inflammation can negatively affect both barrier integrity and the health of surrounding extravascular tissue. The objective of this review is to highlight the role of endothelial cells in supporting milk production and regulating optimal inflammatory responses. The consequences of endothelial dysfunction and sustained inflammation on milk synthesis and secretion are discussed. Given the important role of endothelial cells in orchestrating the inflammatory response, a better understanding of endothelial function during mastitis may support development of targeted therapies to protect bovine mammary tissue and mammary endothelium.

  16. Trichostatin A inhibits beta-casein expression in mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Radisky, Derek; Levy, Dinah; Lacza, Charlemagne; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-02-22

    Many aspects of cellular behavior are affected by information derived from association of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and with cell membrane receptors. When cultured in the presence of laminin-containing ECM and prolactin (Prl), normal mammary epithelial cells express the milk protein beta-casein. Previously, we defined the minimal ECM- and Prl-responsive enhancer element BCE-1 from the upstream region of the beta-casein gene. We also found that BCE-1 was only active when stably integrated into chromatin, and that trichostatin A (TSA), a reagent that leads to alterations in chromatin structure, was able to activate the integrated enhancer element. We now show that endogenous b-casein gene, which is controlled by a genetic assembly that is highly similar to that of BCE-1 and which is also activated by incubation in ECM and Prl, is instead inhibited by TSA. We provide evidence that the differing response of b-casein and BCE-1 to TSA is neither due to an unusual effect of TSA on mammary epithelial cells, nor to secondary consequences from the expression of a separate gene, nor to a particular property of the BCE-1 construct. As a component of this investigation, we also showed that ECM could mediate rapid histone deacetylation in mammary epithelial cells. These results are discussed in combination with previous work showing that TSA mediates the differentiation of many types of cancer cells but inhibits differentiation of some nonmalignant cell types.

  17. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  18. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  19. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  20. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  1. Silencing of Kv4.1 potassium channels inhibits cell proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Choi, Changsun; Hong, Seong-Geun; Yarishkin, Oleg V.; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Jae Gon; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2009-06-26

    Potassium channel activity has been shown to facilitate cell proliferation in cancer cells. In the present study, the role of Kv4.1 channels in immortal and tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells was investigated. Kv4.1 protein expression was positively correlated with tumorigenicity. Moreover, transfection with siRNAs targeting Kv4.1 mRNA suppressed proliferation of tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Experiments using mRNA isolated from human breast cancer tissues revealed that the level of Kv4.1 mRNA expression varied depending on the stage of the tumor. Kv4.1 protein expression increased during stages T2 and T3 compared to normal tissue. These results demonstrated that Kv4.1 plays a role in proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, elevated Kv4.1 expression may be useful as a diagnostic marker for staging mammary tumors and selective blockers of Kv4.1 may serve to suppress tumor cell proliferation.

  2. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo- Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lisa Y; Cervantes-Arias, Alejandro; Else, Rod W; Argyle, David J

    2011-03-30

    Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Here we report that putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be isolated form a canine mammary carcinoma cell line, REM134. We show that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres, a characteristic of stem cells, and that they express embryonic stem cell markers associated with pluripotency. Moreover, canine CSCs are relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation, indicating that failure of clinical therapy to eradicate canine mammary cancer may be due to the survival of CSCs. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with cancer invasion, metastasis, and the acquisition of stem cell characteristics. Our results show that canine CSCs predominantly express mesenchymal markers and are more invasive than parental cells, indicating that these cells have a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, we show that canine mammary cancer cells can be induced to undergo EMT by TGFβ and that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres. Our findings indicate that EMT induction can enrich for cells with CSC properties, and provide further insight into canine CSC biology.

  3. Clumping factor A of Staphylococcus aureus interacts with AnnexinA2 on mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Shoaib; Cheng, Jing; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of major pathogens that can cause a series of diseases in different hosts. In the bovine, it mainly causes subclinical and contagious mastitis, but its mechanisms of infection are not fully understood. Considering the fact that virulence factors play key roles in interactions between the bacterium and host cells, this study aimed to identify if a binding partner of S. aureus clumping factor A (ClfA) exists on the bovine mammary epithelial cells. The ClfA protein was used as a bait to pull down lysates of cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T cells). One pull-down protein was identified through use of mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analyses as bovine AnnexinA2. The Western blot and in vitro binding assay confirmed that the full A domain of ClfA was necessary to bind to AnnexinA2. In addition, the interaction between ClfA and AnnexinA2 was validated biochemically by ELISA with a KD value of 418+/−93 nM. The confocal microscopy demonstrated that ClfA and AnnexinA2 partially co-localized in the plasma membrane and that the majority of them were transported into cytoplasm. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ClfA binds with AnnexinA2 and this interaction could mediate S. aureus invasion into bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:28102235

  4. Characterization of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells and their changes with aging in common marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Anqi; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Gao, Hui; Shi, Yuanshuo; Chen, Yuanhong; Zhang, Fuchuang; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wang, Danhan; Gorena, Karla M.; Huang, Changjiang; Tardif, Suzette; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Age is the number one risk factor for breast cancer, yet the underlying mechanisms are unexplored. Age-associated mammary stem cell (MaSC) dysfunction is thought to play an important role in breast cancer carcinogenesis. Non-human primates with their close phylogenetic relationship to humans provide a powerful model system to study the effects of aging on human MaSC. In particular, the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) with a relatively short life span is an ideal model for aging research. In the present study, we characterized for the first time the mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells in the common marmoset. The MaSC-enriched cells formed four major types of morphologically distinct colonies when cultured on plates pre-seeded with irradiated NIH3T3 fibroblasts, and were also capable of forming mammospheres in suspension culture and subsequent formation of 3D organoids in Matrigel culture. Most importantly, these 3D organoids were found to contain stem/progenitor cells that can undergo self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. We also observed a significant decrease of luminal-restricted progenitors with age. Our findings demonstrate that common marmoset mammary stem/progenitor cells can be isolated and quantified with established in vitro and in vivo assays used for mouse and human studies. PMID:27558284

  5. Vitamin D receptor regulates autophagy in the normal mammary gland and in luminal breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tavera-Mendoza, Luz E.; Westerling, Thomas; Libby, Eric; Marusyk, Andriy; Cato, Laura; Cassani, Raymundo; Cameron, Lisa A.; Ficarro, Scott B.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Klawitter, Jelena; Brown, Myles

    2017-01-01

    Women in North America have a one in eight lifetime risk of developing breast cancer (BC), and a significant proportion of these individuals will develop recurrent BC and will eventually succumb to the disease. Metastatic, therapy-resistant BC cells are refractory to cell death induced by multiple stresses. Here, we document that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) acts as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy. Activation of the VDR by vitamin D induces autophagy and an autophagic transcriptional signature in BC cells that correlates with increased survival in patients; strikingly, this signature is present in the normal mammary gland and is progressively lost in patients with metastatic BC. A number of epidemiological studies have shown that sufficient vitamin D serum levels might be protective against BC. We observed that dietary vitamin D supplementation in mice increases basal levels of autophagy in the normal mammary gland, highlighting the potential of vitamin D as a cancer-preventive agent. These findings point to a role of vitamin D and the VDR in modulating autophagy and cell death in both the normal mammary gland and BC cells. PMID:28242709

  6. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  7. Vitamin D receptor regulates autophagy in the normal mammary gland and in luminal breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tavera-Mendoza, Luz E; Westerling, Thomas; Libby, Eric; Marusyk, Andriy; Cato, Laura; Cassani, Raymundo; Cameron, Lisa A; Ficarro, Scott B; Marto, Jarrod A; Klawitter, Jelena; Brown, Myles

    2017-03-14

    Women in North America have a one in eight lifetime risk of developing breast cancer (BC), and a significant proportion of these individuals will develop recurrent BC and will eventually succumb to the disease. Metastatic, therapy-resistant BC cells are refractory to cell death induced by multiple stresses. Here, we document that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) acts as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy. Activation of the VDR by vitamin D induces autophagy and an autophagic transcriptional signature in BC cells that correlates with increased survival in patients; strikingly, this signature is present in the normal mammary gland and is progressively lost in patients with metastatic BC. A number of epidemiological studies have shown that sufficient vitamin D serum levels might be protective against BC. We observed that dietary vitamin D supplementation in mice increases basal levels of autophagy in the normal mammary gland, highlighting the potential of vitamin D as a cancer-preventive agent. These findings point to a role of vitamin D and the VDR in modulating autophagy and cell death in both the normal mammary gland and BC cells.

  8. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto; Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina; Thellung, Stefano; Daga, Antonio; Cilli, Michele; Ferrari, Angelo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  9. Ligand-Independent Canonical Wnt Activity in Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines Associated with Aberrant LEF1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    van Wolferen, Monique E.; Rao, Nagesha A. S.; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand–independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  10. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development.

  11. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  12. Subcellular localization of the human papillomavirus 16 E7 oncoprotein in CaSki cells and its detection in cervical adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Kerstin; Scheiden, René; Lener, Barbara; Ehehalt, Daniela; Pircher, Haymo; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Rostek, Ursula; Kaiser, Andreas; Fiedler, Marc; Ressler, Sigrun; Lechner, Stefan; Widschwendter, Andreas; Even, Jos; Capesius, Catherine; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Zwerschke, Werner

    2011-01-05

    E7 is the major oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) which causes cervical cancer. To date E7 oncoproteins have not been investigated in cervical adenocarcinoma. In this study we generated a rabbit monoclonal anti-HPV-16 E7 antibody, RabMab42-3, which recognizes a conformational epitope in the E7 carboxy-terminal zinc-finger resulting in a strong increase in the sensitivity for the detection of cell-associated HPV-16 E7 protein relative to conventional polyclonal anti-HPV-16 E7 antibodies. Using RabMab42-3, we show that the subcellular localization of endogenous HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein varies during the cell cycle in cervical cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein is abundantly expressed in cervical adenocarcinoma in situ and adenocarcinoma, suggesting an important role of HPV-16 E7 for the development of these tumors. Our findings suggest that the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein could be a useful marker for the detection of cervical adenocarcinoma and their precursors.

  13. Single-cell lineage tracing in the mammary gland reveals stochastic clonal dispersion of stem/progenitor cell progeny

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Felicity M.; Lloyd-Lewis, Bethan; Harris, Olivia B.; Kozar, Sarah; Winton, Douglas J.; Muresan, Leila; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes cycles of growth and regeneration throughout reproductive life, a process that requires mammary stem cells (MaSCs). Whilst recent genetic fate-mapping studies using lineage-specific promoters have provided valuable insights into the mammary epithelial hierarchy, the true differentiation potential of adult MaSCs remains unclear. To address this, herein we utilize a stochastic genetic-labelling strategy to indelibly mark a single cell and its progeny in situ, combined with tissue clearing and 3D imaging. Using this approach, clones arising from a single parent cell could be visualized in their entirety. We reveal that clonal progeny contribute exclusively to either luminal or basal lineages and are distributed sporadically to branching ducts or alveoli. Quantitative analyses suggest that pools of unipotent stem/progenitor cells contribute to adult mammary gland development. Our results highlight the utility of tracing a single cell and reveal that progeny of a single proliferative MaSC/progenitor are dispersed throughout the epithelium. PMID:27779190

  14. Description of glucose transport in isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells by a three-compartment model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Quinton, V Margaret; Cant, John P

    2004-04-01

    Initial rates of glucose entry into isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells display moderate degrees of asymmetry and cooperative interactions between export and import sites. The present study examined the hypothesis that these kinetic features are due to compartmentalization of intracellular glucose. Net uptake of 3-O-methyl-d-[1-(3)H]glucose (3-OMG) by isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells was measured at 37 degrees C. The time course of 3-OMG net uptake was better fitted by a double-exponential equation than by a single- or triple-exponential equation. Compartmental analysis of the time course curve suggested that translocated 3-OMG is distributed into two compartments with fractional volumes of 32.6 +/- 5.7% and 67.4 +/- 5.7%, respectively. The results support the view that glucose transport in bovine mammary epithelial cells is a multistep process consisting of two serial steps: fast, carrier-mediated, symmetric translocation of sugar across the cell plasma membrane into a small compartment and subsequent slow exchange of posttranslocated sugar between two intracellular compartments. A three-compartment model of this system successfully simulated the observed time course of 3-OMG net uptake and the observed dependence of unidirectional entry rates on intra- and extracellular 3-OMG concentrations. Simulations indicated that backflux of radiolabeled sugar from the small compartment to extracellular space during 15 s of incubation gives rise to the apparent asymmetry, trans-stimulation, and cooperativity of mammary glucose transport kinetics. The fixed-site carrier model overestimated the rate of glucose accumulation in cells, and its features can be accounted for by the compartmentalization of intracellular sugar.

  15. An essential role of CBL and CBL-B ubiquitin ligases in mammary stem cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Zutshi, Neha; An, Wei; Goetz, Benjamin; Arya, Priyanka; Bielecki, Timothy A; Mustaq, Insha; Storck, Matthew D; Meza, Jane L; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2017-03-15

    The ubiquitin ligases CBL and CBL-B are negative regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling with established roles in the immune system. However, their physiological roles in epithelial tissues are unknown. Here, we used MMTV-Cre-mediated Cbl gene deletion on a Cbl-b null background, as well as a tamoxifen-inducible mammary stem cell (MaSC)-specific Cbl and Cbl-b double knockout (Cbl/Cbl-b DKO) using Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2, to demonstrate a mammary epithelial cell-autonomous requirement of CBL and CBL-B in the maintenance of MaSCs. Using a newly engineered tamoxifen-inducible Cbl and Cbl-b deletion model with a dual fluorescent reporter (Cbl(flox/flox); Cbl-b(flox/flox); Rosa26-CreERT; mT/mG), we show that Cbl/Cbl-b DKO in mammary organoids leads to hyperactivation of AKT-mTOR signaling with depletion of MaSCs. Chemical inhibition of AKT or mTOR rescued MaSCs from Cbl/Cbl-b DKO-induced depletion. Our studies reveal a novel, cell-autonomous requirement of CBL and CBL-B in epithelial stem cell maintenance during organ development and remodeling through modulation of mTOR signaling.

  16. microRNAs and EMT in mammary cells and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wright, Josephine A; Richer, Jennifer K; Goodall, Gregory J

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs are master regulators of gene expression in many biological and pathological processes, including mammary gland development and breast cancer. The differentiation program termed the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) involves changes in a number of microRNAs. Some of these microRNAs have been shown to control cellular plasticity through the suppression of EMT-inducers or to influence cellular phenotype through the suppression of genes involved in defining the epithelial and mesenchymal cell states. This has led to the suggestion that microRNAs maybe a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss microRNAs that are involved in EMT in mammary cells and breast cancer.

  17. Identification of CCDC6-RET fusion in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, LC-2/ad.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Daisuke; Kanai, Yoshihiko; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Ohara, Shiori; Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Sakatani, Takashi; Oguni, Sachiko; Tamura, Tomoko; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Endo, Shunsuke; Murakami, Yoshinori; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Niki, Toshiro

    2012-12-01

    Rearranged during transfection (RET) fusions have been newly identified in approximately 1% of patients with primary lung tumors. However, patient-derived lung cancer cell lines harboring RET fusions have not yet been established or identified, and therefore, the effectiveness of an RET inhibitor on lung tumors with endogenous RET fusion has not yet been studied. In this study, we report identification of CCDC6-RET fusion in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line LC-2/ad. LC-2/ad showed distinctive sensitivity to the RET inhibitor, vandetanib, among 39 non-small lung cancer cell lines. The xenograft tumor of LC-2/ad showed cribriform acinar structures, a morphologic feature of primary RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas. LC-2/ad cells could provide useful resources to analyze molecular functions of RET-fusion protein and its response to RET inhibitors.

  18. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals.

  19. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals. PMID:26962394

  20. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations.

  1. Epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor receptors collaborate to induce multiple biological responses in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Accornero, P; Martignani, E; Miretti, S; Starvaggi Cucuzza, L; Baratta, M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this work was to explore whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) could increase the biological responses of a mammary epithelial cell line of bovine origin when added simultaneously. We also investigated a possible molecular mechanism underlying this cooperation. The development of mammary gland requires several circulating and locally produced hormones. Hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET), are expressed and temporally regulated during mammary development and differentiation. Epidermal growth factor receptor and its ligands have also been implicated in the growth and morphogenesis of the mammary epithelium. Both EGF and HGF seem to exert a morphogenic program in this tissue; therefore, we hypothesized that these cytokines could act cooperatively in bovine mammary epithelial cells. We have already shown that the bovine BME-UV cell line, a nontumorigenic mammary epithelial line, expresses both MET and EGF receptor. Simultaneous treatment with HGF and EGF elicited an increase in proliferation, dispersion, degradation of extracellular matrix, and motility. Following EGF treatment, BME-UV mammary cells exhibited an increase in MET expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Long-term treatment of BME-UV cells with HGF and EGF together increased the level of activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and protein kinase B signaling pathways when compared with HGF or EGF alone. These data outline a possible cooperative role of the EGF and HGF pathways and indicate that cross-talk between their respective receptors may modulate mammary gland development in the cow.

  2. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Bovine Epithelial Cells and Partial Redirection Toward a Mammary Phenotype In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cravero, Diego; Martignani, Eugenio; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paulo; Pauciullo, Alfredo; Sharma, Ruchi; Donadeu, Francesco Xavier; Baratta, Mario

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be grown robustly in vitro and differentiated into virtually any tissue, thus providing an attractive alternative for biomedical applications. Although iPSC technology is already being used in human biomedicine, its potential in animal production has not been investigated. Herein, we investigated the potential application of iPSCs in dairy production by generating bovine iPSCs and establishing their ability to generate mammary epithelial tissue. iPSCs were derived by retrovirus-mediated expression of murine Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc in mammary epithelium and dermal fibroblasts. The resulting reprogrammed cells stained positive for alkaline phosphatase and showed renewed expression of pluripotency genes, including Lin28, Rex1, Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog. In addition, injection of epithelial- or fibroblast-derived reprogrammed cells into nonobese diabetic (NOD/NOD) mice resulted in the formation of teratomas containing differentiated derivatives of the three germ layers, including cartilage, membranous ossification, stratified squamous epithelial tissue, hair follicles, neural pinwheels, and different types of glandular tissue. Finally, mammary epithelium-derived iPSCs could be induced to differentiate back to a mammary phenotype characterized by epithelial cells expressing cytokeratin 14 (CK14), CK18, and smooth muscle actin (SMA) as a result of treatment with 10 nM progesterone. This study reports for the first time the generation of iPSCs from bovine epithelial cells and demonstrates the potential of using iPSCs technology for generating bovine mammary tissue in vitro.

  3. Regulation of Stearoyl Coenzyme A Desaturase 1 Gene Promoter in Bovine Mammary Cells.

    PubMed

    di Martino, O; Troiano, A; Addi, L; Guarino, A; Calabrò, S; Tudisco, R; Murru, N; Cutrignelli, M I; Infascelli, F; Calabrò, V

    2015-01-01

    Stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1) belongs to the fatty acid family of desaturases. In lactating ruminants, the SCD1 protein is highly expressed in the mammary gland and is relevant for the fatty acid composition of milk and dairy products. Bovine mammary epithelial cells (BME-UV1), cultured in vitro, have been proposed as a model to reproduce the biology of the mammary gland. The present study was designed to investigate the responsiveness of bovine SCD1 promoter to serum, insulin, oleic acid, and NFY transcription factor in BME-UV1 cells. A luciferase-based reporter assay was used to monitor the transcriptional activity of the SCD1 promoter region in BME-UV1 cells treated or not with insulin and/or oleic acid. The level of endogenous SCD1 mRNA was evaluated by Real time PCR. Insulin (20 ng/mL) induced a 2.0 to 2.5-fold increase of SCD1 promoter activity. Additionally, the effect of insulin was inhibited by oleic acid, serum components, and NFY enforced expression. Serum and NFY showed no synergistic or additive effect on SCD1 promoter activity suggesting that they repress SCD1 transcription through the same responsive element.

  4. Paracrine influence of human perivascular cells on the proliferation of adenocarcinoma alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunbi; Na, Sunghun; An, Borim; Yang, Se-Ran; Kim, Woo Jin; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Ji Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the crosstalk mechanisms between perivascular cells (PVCs) and cancer cells might be beneficial in preventing cancer development and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the paracrine influence of PVCs derived from human umbilical cords on the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and erythroleukemia cells (TF-1α and K562) in vitro using Transwell® co-culture systems. PVCs promoted the proliferation of A549 cells without inducing morphological changes, but had no effect on the proliferation of TF-1α and K562 cells. To identify the factors secreted from PVCs, conditioned media harvested from PVC cultures were analyzed by antibody arrays. We identified a set of cytokines, including persephin (PSPN), a neurotrophic factor, and a key regulator of oral squamous cell carcinoma progression. Supplementation with PSPN significantly increased the proliferation of A549 cells. These results suggested that PVCs produced a differential effect on the proliferation of cancer cells in a cell-type dependent manner. Further, secretome analyses of PVCs and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms could facilitate the discovery of therapeutic target(s) for lung cancer. PMID:28280409

  5. Cytokine networks that mediate epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk in the mammary gland: implications for development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic interactions between the hormone responsive mammary gland epithelium and surrounding stromal macrophage populations are critical for normal development and function of the mammary gland. Macrophages are versatile cells capable of diverse roles in mammary gland development and maintenance of homeostasis, and their function is highly dependent on signals within the local cytokine microenvironment. The mammary epithelium secretes a number of cytokines, including colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) that affect the abundance, phenotype and function of macrophages. However, aberrations in these interactions have been found to increase the risk of tumour formation, and utilisation of stromal macrophage support by tumours can increase the invasive and metastatic potential of the cancer. Studies utilising genetically modified mouse models have shed light on the significance of epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk, and the cytokines that mediate this communication, in mammary gland development and tumourigenesis. This article reviews the current status of our understanding of the roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines in mammary gland development and cancer, with a focus on the crosstalk between epithelial cells and the local macrophage population.

  6. Identification and characterization of microRNA sequences from bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, D P; Nan, X M; Wang, F; Loor, J J; Wang, J Q

    2015-03-01

    The bovine mammary gland is composed of various cell types including bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMEC). The use of BMEC to uncover the microRNA (miRNA) profile would allow us to obtain a more specific profile of miRNA sequences that could be associated with lactation and avoid interference from other cell types. The objective of this study was to characterize the miRNA sequences expressed in isolated BMEC. The miRNA were identified by Solexa sequencing technology (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Furthermore, novel miRNA were uncovered by stem-loop reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing of PCR products. To detect tissue specificity, expression of novel miRNA sequences was measured by stem-loop RT-PCR and sequencing of PCR products in mammary gland, liver, adipose, ileum, spleen and kidney tissue from 3 lactating Holstein cows (50±10 d postpartum). After bioinformatics analysis, 12,323,451 reads were obtained by Solexa sequencing, of which 11,979,706 were clean reads, matching the bovine genome. Among clean reads, 9,428,122 belonged to miRNA sequences. Further analysis revealed that the miRNA bta-mir-184 had the most abundant expression, and 388 loci possessed the typical stem-loop structures matching known miRNA hairpins. In total, 38 loci with novel hairpins were identified as novel miRNA and were numbered from bta-U1 to bta-U38. One novel miRNA (bta-U21) was specific to mammary gland. Seven novel miRNA, including bta-U21, had tissue-restricted distribution. Uncovering the specific roles of these novel miRNA during lactation appears warranted.

  7. Mechanisms of modulation of the Egr gene family in mammary epithelial cells of different species.

    PubMed

    Santino, P; Martignani, E; Miretti, S; Baratta, M; Accornero, P

    2017-01-22

    In the adult female, within the estrous cycle, the mammary gland undergoes multiple rounds of growth, with increased cellular proliferation, and involution, with increased apoptosis. The increase in proliferation is elicited by endocrine (Estrogen, Progesterone), as well as locally produced (epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, etc) growth factors. Among the genes that are modulated during cellular proliferation, immediate early genes play a fundamental role, being rapidly upregulated and then downregulated within the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, allowing the progression to the subsequent phases. Egrs (1-4) are immediate early genes that encode for transcription factors that promote, within different cell types and depending on the strength and duration of the stimuli, several different responses like mitogenesis, differentiation, apoptosis or even anti-apoptosis. In this work we have studied the mechanisms of modulation of the Egr family, in mammary epithelial cells of different origin (bovine, canine, feline, murine). Following stimulation with growth medium, Egr mRNA expression showed a strong upregulation reaching a peak at 45-60min, that rapidly declined. Among several cytokines, particularly important for mammary morphogenesis, that we have tested (EGF, IGF-I, insulin, estrogen, progesterone), only EGF upregulated Egrs to levels close to those elicited by growth medium. In order to understand how the Egr transcription factors were regulated, we have inhibited Erk 1/2 and PI3K, molecules that drive two major intracellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of the Erk 1/2 pathway totally abolished Egr upregulation mediated by growth medium or EGF. On the other hand, the PI3K-Akt pathway played a minor role on Egr levels, with a strong inhibitory effect on cat GH2 cells only, that could be ascribed to reduced Erk phosphorylation following PI3K inhibition. Finally we showed that addition of growth medium also upregulated that the mammary luminal

  8. Cell death in cancer therapy of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zagryazhskaya, Anna; Gyuraszova, Katarina; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the main cause of all cancer-related deaths in the world, with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) being the most common subtype of this fatal disease. Lung ADC is often diagnosed at advanced stages involving disseminated metastatic tumors. This is particularly important for the successful development of new cancer therapy approaches. The high resistance of lung ADC to conventional radio- and chemotherapies represents a major challenge to treatment effectiveness. Here we discuss recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of ADC's broad resistance to treatment and its possible therapeutic implications. A number of driving oncogenic alterations were identified in a subset of lung ADCs, making them suitable for targeted therapies directed towards specific cancer-associated molecular changes. In addition, we discuss the molecular aberrations common in lung ADC that are currently being exploited or are potentially important for targeted cancer therapy, as well as limitations of this type of therapy. Furthermore, we highlight possible treatment modalities that hold promise for overcoming resistance to targeted therapies as well as alternative treatment options such as immunotherapies that are potentially promising for improving the clinical outcome of lung ADC patients.

  9. Genistein chemoprevention: timing and mechanisms of action in murine mammary and prostate.

    PubMed

    Lamartiniere, Coral A; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Fritz, Wayne A; Wang, Jun; Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn; Elgavish, Ada

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the potential of genistein, the primary isoflavone of soy, to protect against breast and prostate cancers in animal models. For mammary cancer studies, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-76A diet plus minus 250 mg genistein/kg diet. Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene was administered by gavage at d 50 postpartum to induce mammary tumors. Mammary cancer chemoprevention was demonstrated after prepubertal and combined prepubertal and adult genistein treatments but not after prenatal- or adult-only treatments, demonstrating that the timing of exposure to genistein is important for mammary cancer chemoprevention. The cellular mechanism of action was found to be mammary gland and cell differentiation, as shown by whole-mount analysis and beta-casein expression. An imprinting effect was shown for epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary terminal end buds. For prostate cancer studies, we used two models. The first was a chemically (N-methylnitrosourea) induced prostate cancer rat model. Genistein in the diet inhibited the development of invasive adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner. The second model was a transgenic mouse model that resulted in spontaneously developing adenocarcinoma tumor of the prostate. Genistein in the diet reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 but not estrogen receptor-beta and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA expressions. We conclude that dietary genistein protects against mammary and prostate cancers by regulating specific sex steroid receptors and growth factor signaling pathways.

  10. CLCA2 Interactor EVA1 Is Required for Mammary Epithelial Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ramena, Grace; Yin, Yufang; Yu, Yang; Walia, Vijay; Elble, Randolph C.

    2016-01-01

    CLCA2 is a p53-, p63-inducible transmembrane protein that is frequently downregulated in breast cancer. It is induced during differentiation of human mammary epithelial cells, and its knockdown causes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). To determine how CLCA2 promotes epithelial differentiation, we searched for interactors using membrane dihybrid screening. We discovered a strong interaction with the cell junctional protein EVA1 (Epithelial V-like Antigen 1) and confirmed it by co-immunoprecipitation. Like CLCA2, EVA1 is a type I transmembrane protein that is regulated by p53 and p63. It is thought to mediate homophilic cell-cell adhesion in diverse epithelial tissues. We found that EVA1 is frequently downregulated in breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, especially those of mesenchymal phenotype. Moreover, knockdown of EVA1 in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) caused EMT, implying that EVA1 is essential for epithelial differentiation. Both EVA1 and CLCA2 co-localized with E-cadherin at cell-cell junctions. The interacting domains were delimited by deletion analysis, revealing the site of interaction to be the transmembrane segment (TMS). The primary sequence of the CLCA2 TMS was found to be conserved in CLCA2 orthologs throughout mammals, suggesting that its interaction with EVA1 co-evolved with the mammary gland. A screen for other junctional interactors revealed that CLCA2 was involved in two different complexes, one with EVA1 and ZO-1, the other with beta catenin. Overexpression of CLCA2 caused downregulation of beta catenin and beta catenin-activated genes. Thus, CLCA2 links a junctional adhesion molecule to cytosolic signaling proteins that modulate proliferation and differentiation. These results may explain how attenuation of CLCA2 causes EMT and why CLCA2 and EVA1 are frequently downregulated in metastatic breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26930581

  11. Regulation of adipocyte lipid homeostasis by genistein alters mammary epithelial cell differentiation: a paracrine mechanism for mammary tumor protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies have shown a negative correlation between breast cancer incidence and intake of soy rich foods. Our laboratory has studied soy protein isolate (SPI), the primary component of soy infant formula, as a paradigm to evaluate diet as a risk factor in mammary cancer. We ...

  12. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tian, Tian; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, we examined the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of histamine increased ALDH1 high population, which was consistent with the result that histamine enhanced the invasive ability and the resistance to anticancer drug. Among 4 types of histamine receptors, histamine H1 and H2 receptor (H1R and H2R) were expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of H1R agonist but not H2R agonist increased ALDH1. The antagonist H1R but not H2R inhibited the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression. These results indicated that histamine increased the expression of ALDH1 via H1R but not H2R. These findings may provide the evidence for exploring a new strategy to suppress CICs by inhibiting ALDH1 expression with histamine.

  13. Assessment of cytotoxicity of Portulaca oleracea Linn. against human colon adenocarcinoma and vero cell line

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Prashant Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portulaca oleracea Linn. (Portulacaceae) is commonly known as purslane in English. In traditional system it is used to cure diarrhea, dysentery, leprosy, ulcers, asthma, and piles, reduce small tumors and inflammations. Aim: To assess cytotoxic potential of chloroform extract of P. oleracea whole plant against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-15) and normal (Vero) cell line. Materials and Methods: Characterization of chloroform extract of P. oleracea by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was performed. Cytotoxicity (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay was used for assessment of cytotoxic potential of chloroform extract of P. oleracea. The concentrations of 1000–0.05 μg/ml were used in the experiment. Doxorubicin was considered as standard reference drug. Results: FTIR spectrum showed the peak at 1019.52 and 1396.21 center. The 50% cell growth inhibition (IC50) of chloroform extract of P. oleracea and doxorubicin was 1132.02 μg/ml and 460.13 μg/ml against human colon adenocarcinoma and 767.60 μg/ml and 2392.71 μg/ml against Vero cell line, respectively. Conclusion: Chloroform extract of P. oleracea whole plant was less efficient or does not have cytotoxic activity against human colon adenocarcinoma cell line. It was not safe to normal Vero cell line. But, there is a need to isolate, identify, and confirm the phytoconstituents present in extract by sophisticated analytical techniques. PMID:27833374

  14. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  15. PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules promote cell cycle arrest in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selol is an oily mixture of selenitetriacylglycerides that was obtained as a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite. Selol is effective against cancerous cells and less toxic to normal cells compared with inorganic forms of selenite. However, Selol’s hydrophobicity hinders its administration in vivo. Therefore, the present study aimed to produce a formulation of Selol nanocapsules (SPN) and to test its effectiveness against pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Results Nanocapsules were produced through an interfacial nanoprecipitation method. The polymer shell was composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) copolymer. The obtained nanocapsules were monodisperse and stable. Both free Selol (S) and SPN reduced the viability of A549 cells, whereas S induced a greater reduction in non-tumor cell viability than SPN. The suppressor effect of SPN was primarily associated to the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle, as was corroborated by the down-regulations of the CCNB1 and CDC25C genes. Apoptosis and necrosis were induced by Selol in a discrete percentage of A549 cells. SPN also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative cellular damage and to the overexpression of the GPX1, CYP1A1, BAX and BCL2 genes. Conclusions This study presents a stable formulation of PVM/MA-shelled Selol nanocapsules and provides the first demonstration that Selol promotes G2/M arrest in cancerous cells. PMID:25149827

  16. A Rare Case of an Adult with Untreated Bladder Exstrophy Presenting with Signet-Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma of Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikash; Kasat, Gaurav; Sawant, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Untreated bladder exstrophy in an adult is rare, as the defect is obvious and primary reconstruction is usually done in infancy. There are less than 90 reported cases of primary adenocarcinoma in an untreated bladder exstrophy in literature and only two such case reports from India. Of these, only one case was of signet-ring cell type of mucinous adenocarcinoma. Here we report the second case of signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma in a 63 year old male with untreated bladder exstrophy (oldest patient in literature), to highlight the extreme rarity, yet distinct possibility and challenges faced in surgical management of such cases. PMID:28050437

  17. Antiproliferative Effects of Oxytocin and Desmopressin on Canine Mammary Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Micaela Andrea; Bianchi, Carolina Paula; Imperiale, Fernanda; Aba, Marcelo Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasms of the mammary gland represent the most frequent tumor type in the female dog, and according to the histologic criteria, approximately 50% of them are malignant. In the most aggressive cases of mammary cancer, surgery is not enough to warrant a favorable outcome, and adjuvant therapies are needed to improve the patient’s overall survival. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of two peptides on proliferation of a canine mammary cancer cell line derived from a simple carcinoma. The cell line CMT-U27 was grown in 96-well plates, at two cell densities (4 × 103 and 8 × 103 cells/well). Cultures were treated with oxytocin (OT) or desmopressin at five concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 nM). After 72 h of incubation, cell proliferation was determined by the MTT assay. Results showed that with 4 × 103 cells/well, OT at 50, 500, and 1000 nM was growth inhibitory for the cells, being statistically significant at 1000 nM. On the contrary, no antiproliferative effect was observed with 10 or 100 nM. At 8 × 103 cells/well, OT showed a significant antiproliferative effect only with the highest concentration (1000 nM). Desmopressin at 4 × 103 cells/well decreased cell viability at concentrations of 50, 100, 500, and 1000 nM (statistically significant with the highest concentration), while no effect was observed with 10 nM. With 8 × 103 cells/well, this peptide reduced cell growth at 100, 500, and 1000 nM. In conclusion, we suggest that these peptides may be potential and promising compounds for the treatment of dogs with simple carcinomas of the mammary gland. In vivo studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:28083539

  18. Interaction of mouse mammary epithelial cells with collagen substrata: regulation of casein gene expression and secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, W.H.; Kaetzel, C.S.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete certain milk proteins only when cultured on floating collagen gels. The authors demonstrate that modulation of milk proteins by substrata is manifested at several regulatory levels; (i) cells cultured on floating collagen gels have 3- to 10-fold more casein mRNA than cells cultured on plastic or attached collagen gels. (ii) Cells on the latter two flat substrata, nevertheless, synthesize a significant amount of caseins, indicating that the remaining mRNA is functional. (iii) Cells on all substrata are inducible for casein mRNA and casein proteins by prolactin, but the extent of induction is greater on collagen than that on plastic - i.e., the substratum confers an altered degree of inducibility. (iv) Cells on all substrata synthesize casein proteins at rates proportional to the amount of casein mRNA, but the newly synthesized caseins in cells on plastic are degraded intracellularly, whereas those synthesized by cells on floating gels are secreted into the medium. (v) Cells on all substrata examined lose virtually all mRNA for whey acidic protein despite the fact that this mRNA is abundant in the mammary gland itself; the authors conclude that additional, as-yet-unknown, factors are necessary for synthesis and secretion of whey acidic protein in culture.

  19. Characterization of a myoepithelial cell line derived from a neonatal rat mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A clonal, myoepithelial-like cell line has been obtained from a primary culture established from the mammary gland of a 7-d-old rat. In a number of respects, this cell line, termed Rama 401, resembles the myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland, especially when grown on floating collagen gels. The cells grow as multilayers on the gel surface and form branching structures that do not appear to contain a lumen. They are rather elongated, with irregular-shaped, flattened nuclei that contain large amounts of peripheral chromatin. Elongated processes project from the cell surface and numerous membrane pinocytotic vesicles can be seen. The cytoplasm is filled with linear arrays of 5- to 7-nm filaments with occasional dense foci. Cell junctions with associated 8- to 11-nm tonofilaments are also observed. Immunofluorescence techniques reveal actin and myosin filaments and also intermediate filaments of both prekeratin and vimentin types. Rama 401 cells secrete an amorphous material that, when an immunoperoxidase technique is used, stains with antibodies to basement membrane-specific type IV collagen. Localized densities of the cell membrane, which resemble hemidesmosomes, are located adjacent to these extracellular deposits. Immunofluorescence staining and immunoprecipitation techniques reveal that the cells also synthesize two other basement membrane proteins, laminin and fibronectin. The type IV collagen consists of two chains with molecular weights of 195,000 and 185,000. PMID:7199047

  20. Cell division cycle 20 overexpression predicts poor prognosis for patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run; Sun, Qi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xin; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Wang, Anpeng; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Lin

    2017-03-01

    The cell division cycle 20, a key component of spindle assembly checkpoint, is an essential activator of the anaphase-promoting complex. Aberrant expression of cell division cycle 20 has been detected in various human cancers. However, its clinical significance has never been deeply investigated in non-small-cell lung cancer. By analyzing The Cancer Genome Atlas database and using some certain online databases, we validated overexpression of cell division cycle 20 in both messenger RNA and protein levels, explored its clinical significance, and evaluated the prognostic role of cell division cycle 20 in non-small-cell lung cancer. Cell division cycle 20 expression was significantly correlated with sex (p = 0.003), histological classification (p < 0.0001), and tumor size (p = 0.0116) in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. In lung adenocarcinoma patients, overexpression of cell division cycle 20 was significantly associated with bigger primary tumor size (p = 0.0023), higher MKI67 level (r = 0.7618, p < 0.0001), higher DNA ploidy level (p < 0.0001), and poor prognosis (hazard ratio = 2.39, confidence interval: 1.87-3.05, p < 0.0001). However, in lung squamous cell carcinoma patients, no significant association of cell division cycle 20 expression was observed with any clinical parameter or prognosis. Overexpression of cell division cycle 20 is associated with poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and its overexpression can also be used to identify high-risk groups. In conclusion, cell division cycle 20 might serve as a potential biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients.

  1. Isolation of mammary epithelial cells from three-dimensional mixed-cell spheroid co-culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Buchsbaum, Rachel J

    2012-04-30

    While enormous efforts have gone into identifying signaling pathways and molecules involved in normal and malignant cell behaviors(1-2), much of this work has been done using classical two-dimensional cell culture models, which allow for easy cell manipulation. It has become clear that intracellular signaling pathways are affected by extracellular forces, including dimensionality and cell surface tension(3-4). Multiple approaches have been taken to develop three-dimensional models that more accurately represent biologic tissue architecture(3). While these models incorporate multi-dimensionality and architectural stresses, study of the consequent effects on cells is less facile than in two-dimensional tissue culture due to the limitations of the models and the difficulty in extracting cells for subsequent analysis. The important role of the microenvironment around tumors in tumorigenesis and tumor behavior is becoming increasingly recognized(4). Tumor stroma is composed of multiple cell types and extracellular molecules. During tumor development there are bidirectional signals between tumor cells and stromal cells(5). Although some factors participating in tumor-stroma co-evolution have been identified, there is still a need to develop simple techniques to systematically identify and study the full array of these signals(6). Fibroblasts are the most abundant cell type in normal or tumor-associated stromal tissues, and contribute to deposition and maintenance of basement membrane and paracrine growth factors(7). Many groups have used three dimensional culture systems to study the role of fibroblasts on various cellular functions, including tumor response to therapies, recruitment of immune cells, signaling molecules, proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and invasion(8-15). We have optimized a simple method for assessing the effects of mammary fibroblasts on mammary epithelial cells using a commercially available extracellular matrix model to create three

  2. The dog as a natural animal model for study of the mammary myoepithelial basal cell lineage and its role in mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rasotto, R; Goldschmidt, M H; Castagnaro, M; Carnier, P; Caliari, D; Zappulli, V

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like tumours constitute 2-18% of all human breast cancers (HBCs). These tumours have a basal myoepithelial phenotype and it has been hypothesized that they originate from either myoepithelial cells or mammary progenitor cells. They are heterogeneous in morphology, clinical presentation, outcome and response to therapy. Canine mammary carcinomas (CMCs) have epidemiological and biological similarities to HBCs, are frequently biphasic and are composed of two distinct neoplastic populations (epithelial and myoepithelial). The present study evaluates the potential of CMCs as a natural model for basal-like HBCs. Single and double immunohistochemistry was performed on serial sections of 10 normal canine mammary glands and 65 CMCs to evaluate expression of cytokeratin (CK) 8/18, CK5, CK14, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), calponin (CALP), p63 and vimentin (VIM). The tumours were also evaluated for Ki67 and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 expression. A hierarchical model of cell differentiation was established, similar to that for the human breast. We hypothesized that progenitor cells (CK5(+), CK14(+), p63(+) and VIM(+)) differentiate into terminally-differentiated luminal glandular (CK8/18(+)) and myoepithelial (CALP(+), SMA(+) and VIM(+)) cells via intermediary luminal glandular cells (CK5(+), CK14(+) and CK8/CK18(+)) and intermediary myoepithelial cells (CK5(+), CK14(+), p63(+), SMA(+), CALP(+) and VIM(+)). Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in canine complex carcinomas had labelling similar to that of terminally-differentiated myoepithelial cells, while those of carcinomas-and-malignant myoepitheliomas with a more aggressive biological behaviour (i.e. higher frequency of vascular/lymph node invasion and visceral metastases and higher risk of tumour-related death) were comparable with intermediary myoepithelial cells and had significantly higher Ki67 expression. The majority of CMCs examined were negative for expression of HER-2. The biphasic appearance of

  3. Mediator subunits MED1 and MED24 cooperatively contribute to pubertal mammary gland development and growth of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Natsumi; Sumitomo, Akiko; Fujita, Azusa; Aritome, Nami; Mizuta, Shumpei; Matsui, Keiji; Ishino, Ruri; Inoue, Kana; Urahama, Norinaga; Nose, Junko; Mukohara, Toru; Kamoshida, Shingo; Roeder, Robert G; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    The Mediator subunit MED1 is essential for mammary gland development and lactation, whose contribution through direct interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) is restricted to involvement in pubertal mammary gland development and luminal cell differentiation. Here, we provide evidence that the MED24-containing submodule of Mediator functionally communicates specifically with MED1 in pubertal mammary gland development. Mammary glands from MED1/MED24 double heterozygous knockout mice showed profound retardation in ductal branching during puberty, while single haploinsufficient glands developed normally. DNA synthesis of both luminal and basal cells were impaired in double mutant mice, and the expression of ER-targeted genes encoding E2F1 and cyclin D1, which promote progression through the G(1)/S phase of the cell cycle, was attenuated. Luciferase reporter assays employing double mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed selective impairment in ER functions. Various breast carcinoma cell lines expressed abundant amounts of MED1, MED24, and MED30, and attenuated expression of MED1 and MED24 in breast carcinoma cells led to attenuated DNA synthesis and growth. These results indicate functional communications between the MED1 subunit and the MED24-containing submodule that mediate estrogen receptor functions and growth of both normal mammary epithelial cells and breast carcinoma cells.

  4. Aluminium chloride promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tenan, Mirna; Ferrari, Paolo; Sappino, André‐Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium salts, present in many industrial products of frequent use like antiperspirants, anti‐acid drugs, food additives and vaccines, have been incriminated in contributing to the rise in breast cancer incidence in Western societies. However, current experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis is limited. For example, no experimental evidence that aluminium promotes tumorigenesis in cultured mammary epithelial cells exists. We report here that long‐term exposure to concentrations of aluminium—in the form of aluminium chloride (AlCl3)—in the range of those measured in the human breast, transform normal murine mammary gland (NMuMG) epithelial cells in vitro as revealed by the soft agar assay. Subcutaneous injections into three different mouse strains with decreasing immunodeficiency, namely, NOD SCID gamma (NSG), NOD SCID or nude mice, revealed that untreated NMuMG cells form tumors and metastasize, to a limited extent, in the highly immunodeficient and natural killer (NK) cell deficient NSG strain, but not in the less permissive and NK cell competent NOD SCID or nude strains. In contrast, NMuMG cells transformed in vitro by AlCl3 form large tumors and metastasize in all three mouse models. These effects correlate with a mutagenic activity of AlCl3. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that concentrations of aluminium in the range of those measured in the human breast fully transform cultured mammary epithelial cells, thus enabling them to form tumors and metastasize in well‐established mouse cancer models. Our observations provide experimental evidence that aluminium salts could be environmental breast carcinogens. PMID:27541736

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Phenol-Soluble Modulins Impair Interleukin Expression in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deplanche, Martine; Alekseeva, Ludmila; Semenovskaya, Ksenia; Fu, Chih-Lung; Dessauge, Frederic; Finot, Laurence; Petzl, Wolfram; Zerbe, Holm; Le Loir, Yves; Rainard, Pascal; Smith, David G. E.; Germon, Pierre; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The role of the recently described interleukin-32 (IL-32) in Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis, an inflammation of the mammary gland, is unclear. We determined expression of IL-32, IL-6, and IL-8 in S. aureus- and Escherichia coli-infected bovine mammary gland epithelial cells. Using live bacteria, we found that in S. aureus-infected cells, induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression was less pronounced than in E. coli-infected cells. Notably, IL-32 expression was decreased in S. aureus-infected cells, while it was increased in E. coli-infected cells. We identified the staphylococcal phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides as key contributors to these effects, as IL-32, IL-6, and IL-8 expression by epithelial cells exposed to psm mutant strains was significantly increased compared to that in cells exposed to the isogenic S. aureus wild-type strain, indicating that PSMs inhibit the production of these interleukins. The use of genetically complemented strains confirmed this observation. Inasmuch as the decreased expression of IL-32, which is involved in dendritic cell maturation, impairs immune responses, our results support a PSM-dependent mechanism that allows for the development of chronic S. aureus-related mastitis. PMID:27001539

  6. Loss of p53 protein during radiation transformation of primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wazer, D E; Chu, Q; Liu, X L; Gao, Q; Safaii, H; Band, V

    1994-01-01

    The causative factors leading to breast cancer are largely unknown. Increased incidence of breast cancer following diagnostic or therapeutic radiation suggests that radiation may contribute to mammary oncogenesis. This report describes the in vitro neoplastic transformation of a normal human mammary epithelial cell strain, 76N, by fractionated gamma-irradiation at a clinically used dose (30 Gy). The transformed cells (76R-30) were immortal, had reduced growth factor requirements, and produced tumors in nude mice. Remarkably, the 76R-30 cells completely lacked the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Loss of p53 was due to deletion of the gene on one allele and a 26-bp deletion within the third intron on the second allele which resulted in abnormal splicing out of either the third or fourth exon from the mRNA. PCR with a mutation-specific primer showed that intron 3 mutation was present in irradiated cells before selection for immortal phenotype. 76R-30 cells did not exhibit G1 arrest in response to radiation, indicating a loss of p53-mediated function. Expression of the wild-type p53 gene in 76R-30 cells led to their growth inhibition. Thus, loss of p53 protein appears to have contributed to neoplastic transformation of these cells. This unique model should facilitate analyses of molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced breast cancer and allow identification of p53-regulated cellular genes in breast cells. Images PMID:7511207

  7. Citrate and celecoxib induce apoptosis and decrease necrosis in synergistic manner in canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, R; Safi, S; Farsinejad, A; Panahi, N

    2015-10-16

    Celecoxib and citrate have been shown to possess antitumor activity in a variety of cancer cells. However, the antitumor activities of these agents in canine mammary tumors have not been well demonstrated. The aim of our study was to investigate the apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of citrate and celecoxib, individually and in combination, on canine mammary tumor cell line CF41—Mg. MTT assay was performed to determine cell viability, and Annexin—PI test was performed to evaluate apoptosis induction. MTT assay results revealed that compared with the control groups, treatment groups, as both single and combined treatments, showed significant inhibition of tumor growth in a dose—dependent manner. IC50 concentrations of citrate and celecoxib were defined 26mM and 22μM, respectively. In another set of experiment, significant increase in cell apoptosis was observed at IC50 concentrations of citrate and celecoxib after 48h incubation. In spite of that, simultaneous treatment of cells with citrate and celecoxib eventuated with meaningful toxicity augmentation and induction of apoptosis at lower concentrations. Also necrotic cells were decreased by coadministration of the two agents. In conclusion, the present study indicates significant cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of citrate and celecoxib coadministration on CF41—Mg cells, and proposes new strategies for counteracting cancer cells proliferation and overcoming chemo resistance.

  8. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit B.; Wang, Qingde; Khillan, Jaspal S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  9. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0223 TITLE: Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion...COVERED 1Aug2014 - 31Jul2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0223...histologies of lung cancer is made difficult in part because of the extensive genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in lung carcinogenesis, the

  10. Distinct Effects of EGFR Ligands on Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Chandrani; Zhao, Xiangshan; Maroni, Dulce; Band, Vimla; Naramura, Mayumi

    2013-01-01

    Based on gene expression patterns, breast cancers can be divided into subtypes that closely resemble various developmental stages of normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Thus, understanding molecular mechanisms of MEC development is expected to provide critical insights into initiation and progression of breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands play essential roles in normal and pathological mammary gland. Signals through EGFR is required for normal mammary gland development. Ligands for EGFR are over-expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancers, and elevated expression of EGFR is associated with poorer clinical outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of signals through EGFR on MEC differentiation using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized human stem/progenitor MECs which express cytokeratin 5 but lack cytokeratin 19 (K5+K19- hMECs). As reported previously, these cells can be induced to differentiate into luminal and myoepithelial cells under appropriate culture conditions. K5+K19- hMECs acquired distinct cell fates in response to EGFR ligands epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AREG) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) in differentiation-promoting MEGM medium. Specifically, presence of EGF during in vitro differentiation supported development into both luminal and myoepithelial lineages, whereas cells differentiated only towards luminal lineage when EGF was replaced with AREG. In contrast, substitution with TGFα led to differentiation only into myoepithelial lineage. Chemical inhibition of the MEK-Erk pathway, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway, interfered with K5+K19- hMEC differentiation. The present data validate the utility of the K5+K19- hMEC cells for modeling key features of human MEC differentiation. This system should be useful in studying molecular/biochemical mechanisms of human MEC differentiation. PMID:24124521

  11. Distinct effects of EGFR ligands on human mammary epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Chandrani; Zhao, Xiangshan; Maroni, Dulce; Band, Vimla; Naramura, Mayumi

    2013-01-01

    Based on gene expression patterns, breast cancers can be divided into subtypes that closely resemble various developmental stages of normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Thus, understanding molecular mechanisms of MEC development is expected to provide critical insights into initiation and progression of breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands play essential roles in normal and pathological mammary gland. Signals through EGFR is required for normal mammary gland development. Ligands for EGFR are over-expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancers, and elevated expression of EGFR is associated with poorer clinical outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of signals through EGFR on MEC differentiation using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized human stem/progenitor MECs which express cytokeratin 5 but lack cytokeratin 19 (K5(+)K19(-) hMECs). As reported previously, these cells can be induced to differentiate into luminal and myoepithelial cells under appropriate culture conditions. K5(+)K19(-) hMECs acquired distinct cell fates in response to EGFR ligands epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AREG) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) in differentiation-promoting MEGM medium. Specifically, presence of EGF during in vitro differentiation supported development into both luminal and myoepithelial lineages, whereas cells differentiated only towards luminal lineage when EGF was replaced with AREG. In contrast, substitution with TGFα led to differentiation only into myoepithelial lineage. Chemical inhibition of the MEK-Erk pathway, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway, interfered with K5(+)K19(-) hMEC differentiation. The present data validate the utility of the K5(+)K19(-) hMEC cells for modeling key features of human MEC differentiation. This system should be useful in studying molecular/biochemical mechanisms of human MEC differentiation.

  12. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of tocopherols and tocotrienols on normal mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, B S; Briski, K P; Tirmenstein, M A; Fariss, M W; Gapor, A; Sylvester, P W

    2000-02-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the comparative effects of tocopherols and tocotrienols on normal mammary epithelial cell growth and viability. Cells isolated from midpregnant BALB/c mice were grown within collagen gels and maintained on serum-free media. Treatment with 0-120 microM alpha- and gamma-tocopherol had no effect, whereas 12.5-100m microM tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil (TRF), 100-120 microM delta-tocopherol, 50-60 microM alpha-tocotrienol, and 8-14 microM gamma- or delta-tocotrienol significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-responsive manner. In acute studies, 24-h exposure to 0-250 microM alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol had no effect, whereas similar treatment with 100-250 microM TRF, 140-250 microM alpha-, 25-100 microM gamma- or delta-tocotrienol significantly reduced cell viability. Growth-inhibitory doses of TRF, delta-tocopherol, and alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocotrienol were shown to induce apoptosis in these cells, as indicated by DNA fragmentation. Results also showed that mammary epithelial cells more easily or preferentially took up tocotrienols as compared to tocopherols, suggesting that at least part of the reason tocotrienols display greater biopotency than tocopherols is because of greater cellular accumulation. In summary, these findings suggest that the highly biopotent gamma- and delta-tocotrienol isoforms may play a physiological role in modulating normal mammary gland growth, function, and remodeling.

  13. Isolation and biological analysis of tumor stem cells from pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Wang, Chun-You; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wu, He-Shui; Liu, Tao; Xiong, Jiang-Xin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the method of isolation and biological analysis of tumor stem cells from pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line PANC-1. METHODS: The PANC-1 cells were cultured in Dulbecco modified eagle medium F12 (1:1 volume) (DMEM-F12) supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Subpopulation cells with properties of tumor stem cells were isolated from pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line PANC-1 according to the cell surface markers CD44 and CD24 by flow cytometry. The proliferative capability of these cells in vitro were estimated by 3-[4,5-dimehyl-2-thiazolyl]-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. And the tumor growth of different subpopulation cells which were injected into the hypodermisof right and left armpit of nude mice was studied, and expression of CD44 and CD24 of the CD44+CD24+ cell-formed nodules and PANC-1 cells were detected by avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: The 5.1%-17.5% of sorted PANC-1 cells expressed the cell surface marker CD44, 57.8% -70.1% expressed CD24, only 2.1%-3.5% of cells were CD44+ CD24+. Compared with CD44-CD24- cells, CD44+CD24+ cells had a lower growth rate in vitro. Implantation of 104 CD44-CD24- cells in nude mice showed no evident tumor growth at wk 12. In contrast, large tumors were found in nude mice implanted with 103 CD44+CD24+ cells at wk 4 (2/8), a 20-fold increase in tumorigenic potential (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). There was no obvious histological difference between the cells of the CD44+CD24+ cell-formed nodules and PANC-1 cells. CONCLUSION: CD44 and CD24 may be used as the cell surface markers for isolation of pancreatic cancer stem cells from pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line PANC-1. Subpopulation cells CD44+CD24+ have properties of tumor stem cells. Because cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and its recurrence after an initial response to chemotherapy, it may be a very promising target for new drug development. PMID

  14. Involvement of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF1) Stimulation of Proliferation of a Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) plays an important role in mammary gland development and lactation in part by stimulating proliferation of the milk-producing epithelial cells. In this study, we used the bovine mammary epithelial cell line MAC-T cells as a model to understand the mechanism by whi...

  15. A clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Dianbin; Shi, Xuetao; Zhao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old male was referred to our department for a gallbladder mass. He denied any history of alcohol consumption or cholecystitis and smoking. Hepatitis B surface antigen test and antihepatitis C antibody test were found to be negative. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen were elevated (CA19-9 was 59.92 U/mL and carcinoembryonic antigen was 12.64 ng/mL), whereas alpha-fetoprotein was below the normal limit (2.46 ng/mL). Computed tomography scan revealed a solid mass with measurements of 4.6×5.6×7.1 cm, which nearly filled the whole gallbladder space. Radical cholecystectomy, including segments IV B and V of the liver and lymphadenectomy, was performed. The neoplasm in gallbladder was completely resected, and the patient obtained a negative margin. Histological and immunohistochemical profile suggested a clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation. After reviewing the literature, we reported that this case is the first identified case of cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with extensive hepatoid differentiation. However, clinical features of clear cell adenocarcinoma with hepatoid differentiation remain unclear due to the extremely rare incidence. There was no indication of adjuvant chemotherapy and no literature has been reported on the application of chemotherapy. This case showed a promising clinical outcome after curative resection, which indicated that surgical treatment could be potentially considered for suitable patients. PMID:27703378

  16. Irradiation of juvenile, but not adult, mammary gland increases stem cell self-renewal and estrogen receptor negative tumors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Vijayakumar, Sangeetha; Martinez-Ruis, Haydeliz; Illa-Bochaca, Irineu; Nguyen, David H; Mao, Jian-Hua; Costes, Sylvain V; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2014-03-01

    Children exposed to ionizing radiation have a substantially greater breast cancer risk than adults; the mechanism for this strong age dependence is not known. Here we show that pubertal murine mammary glands exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation exhibit enrichment of mammary stem cell and Notch pathways, increased mammary repopulating activity indicative of more stem cells, and propensity to develop estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors thought to arise from stem cells. We developed a mammary lineage agent-based model (ABM) to evaluate cell inactivation, self-renewal, or dedifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as mechanisms by which radiation could increase stem cells. ABM rejected cell inactivation and predicted increased self-renewal would only affect juveniles while dedifferentiation could act in both juveniles and adults. To further test self-renewal versus dedifferentiation, we used the MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line, which recapitulates ductal morphogenesis in humanized fat pads, undergoes EMT in response to radiation and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and contains rare stem-like cells that are Let-7c negative or express both basal and luminal cytokeratins. ABM simulation of population dynamics of double cytokeratin cells supported increased self-renewal in irradiated MCF10A treated with TGFβ. Radiation-induced Notch concomitant with TGFβ was necessary for increased self-renewal of Let-7c negative MCF10A cells but not for EMT, indicating that these are independent processes. Consistent with these data, irradiating adult mice did not increase mammary repopulating activity or ER-negative tumors. These studies suggest that irradiation during puberty transiently increases stem cell self-renewal, which increases susceptibility to developing ER-negative breast cancer.

  17. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker for Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    experiments in mice. For example,  a functioning ductal  tree  can be regenerated using very few transplanted mammary cells carrying CD24  and CD49f cell...microscopy. MMTV‐cre‐mT/mG  mice express  red  ( Tomato )  fluorescence, but when  cre  recombinase  is expressed,  the mT  cassette  is  8    deleted and

  18. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  19. The Origin and Significance of Mammary Intraductal Foam Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    14. ABSTRACT Intraductal "foam cells" are the most commonly encountered cells in spontaneous nipple discharge, aspirates, and lavage, and...none 3 of 7 Introduction Intraductal "foam cells" are the most commonly encountered cells in spontaneous nipple discharge, nipple ...Body In our initial studies, bone marrow from wild type male C57 black mice and green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic male C57 black mice

  20. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    diverse transformed HMEC lines with defined genetic alterations may aid the identification of potential therapeutic treatments , including...human model systems to test potential therapeutics, could facilitate individualized treatment and possibly prevention. The main variables thought to...epithelial cells. Middle, corresponding cell culture models used in this study. Red, treatment or genetic manipulation used. Cell models are described in

  1. Fucan-coated silver nanoparticles synthesized by a green method induce human renal adenocarcinoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Rocha Amorim, Monica Oliveira; Lopes Gomes, Dayanne; Dantas, Larisse Araujo; Silva Viana, Rony Lucas; Chiquetti, Samanta Cristina; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Silva Costa, Leandro; Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    Polysaccharides containing sulfated L-fucose are often called fucans. The seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi synthesizes three fucans, among which fucan A is the most abundant. This polymer is not cytotoxic against various normal cell lines and is non-toxic to rats when administered at high doses. In addition, it exhibits low toxicity against tumor cells. With the aim of increasing the toxicity of fucan A, silver nanoparticles containing this polysaccharide were synthesized using a green chemistry method. The mean size of these nanoparticles was 210nm. They exhibited a spherical shape and negative surface charge and were stable for 14 months. When incubated with cells, these nanoparticles did not show any toxic effects against various normal cell lines; however, they decreased the viability of various tumor cells, especially renal adenocarcinoma cells 786-0. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the nanoparticles induced cell death responses of 786-0 cells through necrosis. Assays performed with several renal cell lines (HEK, VERO, MDCK) showed that these nanoparticles only induce death of 786-0 cells. The data obtained herein leads to the conclusion that fucan A nanoparticles are promising agents against renal adenocarcinoma.

  2. Effect of silencing SATB1 on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Zhou, Hongli; Wang, Siwang; Lang, Xian Ping; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics of special adenine-thymine-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1) in lung adenocarcinoma and its role in the proliferation, invasion, migration and apoptosis of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. The expression of SATB1 was first studied in tumor tissues of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non-tumor tissues. The siRNA green fluorescent protein expression vector of SATB1 was constructed and transfected into the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549, then a fluorescence microscope was used to study the transfection efficiency. Western blot analysis was adopted to measure the silencing efficiency. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), Transwell and scratch assays were used to study cell proliferation, invasion and migration activity, and the apoptosis rate was tested by flow cytometry. SATB1 expression was low in the adjacent non-tumor tissues but high in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, and it was reversely proportional to the differentiation degree. Following transfection with SATB1-siRNA, the expression of SATB1 in A549 cells was blocked (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of cells decreased significantly while the apoptosis rate increased significantly (P<0.01). In conclusion SATB1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis and development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27895736

  3. Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2005-03-03

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

  4. Giant cells in anaplastic mammary carcinoma of the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Della Salda, L; Sarli, G; Benazzi, C; Marcato, P S

    1993-11-01

    Four uncommon anaplastic mammary carcinomas containing numerous giant cells are described in three dogs and one cat. The giant cells of all cases were studied by means of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to detect epithelial (carcinoembryonic antigen and keratin) and mesenchymal (vimentin, lysozyme and S-100 protein) differentiation. Most of them proved to have an epithelial immunophenotype. Ultrastructurally, scattered bundles of tonofilaments but no lysosome-like bodies could be detected. One tumour had an additional, different type of giant cell, which had a benign multinucleated osteoclast-like appearance, gave positive staining for acid phosphatase, had a histiocytic-stromal immunohistochemical pattern, and was, ultrastructurally, multinucleate with irregular folds and no evidence of tonofilaments. In one case some giant cells had an epithelial immunophenotype and others a stromal immunophenotype, even though their histological and ultrastructural features were the same. In the least histologically differentiated tumour the giant cells presented a coexpression of intermediate filaments. This supported the theory that there might be a stem cell origin for most canine mammary tumours.

  5. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  6. Goblet cells carcinoid with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix: a step towards the unitary intestinal stem cell theory?

    PubMed

    Gravante, G; Yahia, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Mathew, G

    2014-06-01

    Associations of various histotypes in appendiceal neoplasms may help elucidate the histogenesis of such uncommon tumors. We present the fourth published case of Goblet Cell Carcinoid (GCC) associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix. This association has been described only for GCC and not for classic appendix carcinoids which are thought to originate from neuroendocrine-committed cells. The GCC-mucinous association adds more towards the theory of a pluripotent intestinal stem cell with amphicrine possibilities of differentiation.

  7. Differentiation dynamics of mammary epithelial stem cells from Korean holstein dairy cattle under ECM-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neelesh; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Sodhi, Simrinder Singh; Luong, Do Huynh; Kim, Sung-Woo; Oh, Sung Jong; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2015-01-01

    The "stem cells" are commonly defined as "cells capable of self-renewal through replication and differentiating into specific lineages". The mammary gland contains functional stem/progenitor cells. The current study was planned with the objectives to study the differentiation dynamics of Korean Holstein mammary epithelial stem cells (KHMESCs) under the optimum culture conditions. Lineage negative KHMESCs isolated from mammary tissue of lactating cows have shown the typical differentiation dynamics with formation of lobulo-alveolar structures in in vitro culture. This suggests the existence of bipotential mammary epithelial stem cells in the mammary gland. The strong mRNA expression of pluripotency factors indicates stemness, whereas expression of milk protein genes and epithelial cell-specific gene indicate their differentiation capabilities. Further, immunostaining results have shown the differentiation capabilities of KHMESCs into both luminal and basal lineages under the extracellular matrix (ECM, matrigel) free environment. However, under matrigel, the differentiation process was comparatively higher than without matrigel. Immunostaining results also suggested that differentiated cells could secrete milk proteins such as β-casein. To our knowledge, these data represent the first report on the differentiation dynamics and establishment of mammary epithelial stem cells from Korean Holstein with typical stemness properties. It was observed that isolated KHMESCs had normal morphology, growth pattern, differentiation ability, cytogenetic and secretory activity even without ECM. Therefore, it is concluded that established KHMESCs could be used for further studies on Korean Holstein dairy cows related to lactation studies, as non-GMO animal bioreactors and stem cell-based management of bovine mastitis including post-mastitis damage.

  8. CXCR2 expression in tumor cells is a poor prognostic factor and promotes invasion and metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Pierre; Massarelli, Erminia; Lin, Steven; Chen, Yulong; Goswami, Sangeeta; Erez, Baruch; O’Reilly, Michael S.; Liu, Diane; Lee, J. Jack; Zhang, Li; Ping, Yuan; Behrens, Carmen; Soto, Luisa M. Solis; Heymach, John V.; Kim, Edward S.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lippman, Scott M.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Hong, Waun Ki; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2012-01-01

    CXCR2 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been studied mainly in stromal cells and is known to increase tumor inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we examined the prognostic importance of CXCR2 in NSCLC and the role of CXCR2 and its ligands in lung cancer cells. The effect of CXCR2 expression on tumor cells was studied using stable knockdown clones derived from a murine KRAS/p53-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic potential and an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model and in vitro using a CXCR2 small molecule antagonist (SB225002). CXCR2 protein expression was analyzed in tumor cells from 262 NSCLC. Gene expression profiles for CXCR2 and its ligands (CXCR2 axis) were analyzed in 52 human NSCLC cell lines and 442 human lung adenocarcinomas. Methylation of CXCR2 axis promoters was determined in 70 human NSCLC cell lines. Invasion and metastasis were decreased in CXCR2 knockdown clones in vitro and in vivo. SB225002 decreased invasion in vitro. In lung adenocarcinomas, CXCR2 expression in tumor cells was associated with smoking and poor prognosis. CXCR2 axis gene expression profiles in human NSCLC cell lines and lung adenocarcinomas defined a cluster driven by CXCL5 and associated with smoking, poor prognosis and RAS pathway activation. Expression of CXCL5 was regulated by promoter methylation. The CXCR2 axis may be an important target in smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23204236

  9. Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Tan, Yaoxi; Liang, Yan; Li, Yan; Chen, Lei; Wu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Period2 (Per2) is a key mammalian circadian clock protein, and additionally has a tumor suppressive function. The present study aimed to investigate its role in drug resistance in A549/cisplatin (DDP) lung adenocarcinoma cells. Per2 knockdown and overexpression in A549/DDP cells were used to compare cell proliferation (by MTT assay), apoptosis (active-caspase 3 western blot) and clone forming assay. The activation of AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated by a western blot assay. The Per2 expression level was decreased in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells. Per2 knockdown by short hairpin RNA protects A549/DDP cells from apoptosis, and promotes proliferation and migration. Per2 knockdown results in increased activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Overexpression of Per2 in A549/DDP cells may reduce the activity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and promote apoptosis of A549 cells. The results of the present study suggest that Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  10. Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Tan, Yaoxi; Liang, Yan; Li, Yan; Chen, Lei; Wu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Period2 (Per2) is a key mammalian circadian clock protein, and additionally has a tumor suppressive function. The present study aimed to investigate its role in drug resistance in A549/cisplatin (DDP) lung adenocarcinoma cells. Per2 knockdown and overexpression in A549/DDP cells were used to compare cell proliferation (by MTT assay), apoptosis (active-caspase 3 western blot) and clone forming assay. The activation of AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated by a western blot assay. The Per2 expression level was decreased in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells. Per2 knockdown by short hairpin RNA protects A549/DDP cells from apoptosis, and promotes proliferation and migration. Per2 knockdown results in increased activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Overexpression of Per2 in A549/DDP cells may reduce the activity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and promote apoptosis of A549 cells. The results of the present study suggest that Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:28123577

  11. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  12. Primary cell culture of human adenocarcinomas--practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lerescu, Lucian; Tucureanu, Cătălin; Caraş, Iuliana; Neagu, Stefan; Melinceanu, Laura; Sălăgeanu, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture is one of the major tools for oncology research, being an excellent system in which to study the biochemistry and molecular biology associated with individual cancer types and to understand cancer cell physiology. Progress in understanding the biology of any type of carcinoma has been impeded by the inability to culture adequately malignant cells from most epithelial tissues. The ultimate in vitro tumor model would completely reflect the in vivo tumor microenvironment in function and mechanism. Unfortunately, such a model does not currently exist. Homogeneous cell lines that can be continuously propagated on plastic surfaces have been extensively used as a surrogate for tumor environment; however they are very different from the in vivo tumor cells. Model systems involving primary culture represent the situation most closely related to the original tissue although they have a number of disadvantages over cell lines, such as the limited ability to repeat studies with a well characterized culture system that can be used in multiple laboratories. The primary culture may contain many types of stromal and infiltrating cell types potentially complicating the interpretation of data. Yet, their properties better reflect the cellular interactions present in intact tissue. The present article reviews the critical steps in obtaining, routine maintenance and cryopreservation of primary tumor cell cultures, based on information from literature and personal experience on the subject. The article also includes an updated protocol for primary tumor cell isolation and culture.

  13. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M. S. S.; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  14. SLIT/ROBO2 Signaling Promotes Mammary Stem Cell Senescence by Inhibiting Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harburg, Gwyndolen; Compton, Jennifer; Liu, Wei; Iwai, Naomi; Zada, Shahrzad; Marlow, Rebecca; Strickland, Phyllis; Zeng, Yi Arial; Hinck, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Summary WNT signaling stimulates the self-renewal of many types of adult stem cells, including mammary stem cells (MaSCs), but mechanisms that limit this activity are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that SLIT2 restricts stem cell renewal by signaling through ROBO2 in a subset of basal cells to negatively regulate WNT signaling. The absence of SLIT/ROBO2 signaling leads to increased levels of nuclear β-catenin. Robo2 loss does not increase the number of stem cells; instead, stem cell renewal is enhanced in the absence of SLIT/ROBO2 signaling. This is due to repressed expression of p16INK4a, which, in turn, delays MaSC senescence. Together, our studies support a model in which SLITs restrict the expansion of MaSCs by countering the activity of WNTs and limiting self-renewal. PMID:25241737

  15. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1− and SSEA-1+ cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines. PMID:27456773

  16. Difference between mammary epithelial cells from mature virgin and primiparous mice.

    PubMed

    Vonderhaar, B K; Smith, G H; Pauley, R J; Rosen, J M; Topper, Y J

    1978-11-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from mature virgin mice are similar to those from primiparous mice in several respects. However, there is one known difference. The cells from the mature virgin must traverse the cell cycle in order to become competent to make casein and enzymatically active alpha-lactalbumin in vitro; those from the primiparous animal can make these proteins without first traversing the cycle. In this regard, cells from human placental lactogen- and prolactin-treated mature virgins are, after involution, similar to those from primiparous mice. The developemental block in the cells from the mature virgin, imposed by preventing cell cycle traversal, has been partially delineated. It does not appear to reside at the levels of ultrastructural maturation or the formation of casein messenger RNA. Rather, the lesion is postranscriptional and may be at the level of translation, or posttranslational modification, or both.

  17. Identification of mammary epithelial cells subject to chronic oxidative stress in mammary epithelium of young women and teenagers living in USA: implication for breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A; Murata, Erin; Patrick, Susan D; Han, Bing; Berg, Arthur; Clawson, Gary A

    2012-01-15

    Current knowledge of changes in the mammary epithelium relevant to breast carcinogenesis is limited to when histological changes are already present because of a lack of biomarkers needed to identify where such molecular changes might be ongoing at earlier during the of decades-long latent stages of breast carcinogenesis. Breast reduction tissues from young women and teenagers, representative of USA's high breast cancer incidence population, were studies using immunocytochemistry and targeted PCR arrays in order to learn whether a marker of chronic oxidative-stress [protein adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE)] can identify where molecular changes relevant to carcinogenesis might be taking place prior to any histological changes. 4HNE-immunopositive (4HNE+) mammary epithelial cell-clusters were identified in breast tissue sections from most women and from many teenagers (ages 14-30 y) and, in tissues from women ages 17-27 y with many vs. few 4HNE+ cells, the expression of 30 of 84 oxidative-stress associated genes was decreased and only one was increased > 2-fold. This is in contrast to increased expression of many of these genes known to be elicited by acute oxidative-stress. The findings validate using 4HNE-adducts to identify where molecular changes of potential relevance to carcinogenesis are taking place in histologically normal mammary epithelium and highlight differences between responses to acute vs. chronic oxidative-stress. We posit that the altered gene expression in 4HNE+ tissues reflect adaptive responses to chronic oxidative-stress that enable some cells to evade mechanisms that have evolved to prevent propagation of cells with oxidatively-damaged DNA and to accrue heritable changes needed to establish a cancer.

  18. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line of canine inflammatory mammary cancer: IPC-366.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J; Illera, Maria J; Lopez, Mirtha S; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  19. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J.; Illera, Maria J.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  20. Ultrastructural Assessment of 2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide activity on human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; de Lima, Luiza Rayanna Amorim; Longato, Giovanna Barbarini; Padilha, Rafael José Ribeiro; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Brayner, Fábio André; Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate ultrastructural changes induced by (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (APHCA) treatment on human breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells MCF-7, besides the evaluation of phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation in treated cells. Cell viability analysis demonstrated concentration and time-manner cytotoxicity. Treated MCF-7 cells did not expose phosphatidylserine residues to the external plasma membrane surface and DNA fragmentation was not visualized by electrophoresis. Light microscopy showed compromised cell density and presence of vacuolization after APHCA treatment with 60μM. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies revealed hallmarks of autophagy, namely the presence of membrane bebbling and autophagosomes, besides shrunken cells and cell debris in treated MCF-7 cells. However, more specific tests such as the quantification of mammalian autophagy proteins are necessary to determine the kind of death that is trigged by APHCA.

  1. Intracellular mechanisms mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Paul W; Shah, Sumit

    2005-01-01

    Tocotrienols and tocopherols represent the two subgroups that make up the vitamin E family of compounds. However, tocotrienols display significantly more potent apoptotic activity in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells than tocopherols. Studies were conducted to determine the intracellular mechanism(s) mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic +SA mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. An initial step in apoptosis is the activation of 'initiator' caspases (caspase-8 or -9) that subsequently activate 'effector' caspases (caspase-3, -6 and -7) and induce apoptosis. Treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol (20 microM) resulted in a time-dependent increase in caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity. Combined treatment with specific caspase-8 or caspase-3 inhibitors completely blocked alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis and caspase-8 or caspase-3 activity, respectively. In contrast, alpha-tocotrienol treatment had no effect on caspase-9 activation, and combined treatment with a specific caspase-9 inhibitor did not block alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in (+)SA cells. Since caspase-8 activation is associated with the activation of death receptors, such as Fas, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, studies were conducted to determine the exact death receptor(s) and ligand(s) involved in mediating tocotrienol-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Treatment with Fas-ligand (FasL), Fas-activating antibody, or TRAIL failed to induce cell death in (+)SA neoplastic mammary epithelial cells, suggesting that these cells are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol did not alter the intracellular levels of Fas, FasL, or Fas-associated death domain (FADD) in these cells. Western blot analysis also showed that alpha-tocotrienol did not induce FasL or FADD translocation from the cytosolic to membrane fraction in these cells. Finally

  2. Characterization of a slow-growing, transplantable rat mammary tumor (MCR-83): a model for endocrine-related cell kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    van Dierendonck, J.H.; Cornelisse, C.J.; van der Linden, P.W.; van Putten, L.M.; van de Velde, C.J.

    1987-08-01

    Out of 24 primary mammary tumors, arising in rats of the WAG/Rij Wistar strain after low dose irradiation, with or without prolonged treatment with estrogen, a slow-growing, well differentiated adenocarcinoma (MCR-83) was selected. This tumor, induced by radiation alone, is independent of estrogen pellets for growth after transplantation into adult female rats, but nontransplantable into males or ovariectomized females. Measurements of tumor growth and contents of both estrogen and progesterone receptors on three successive passages are not indicative of a rapid progression in growth rate or to hormone independency. Ovariectomy and treatment with tamoxifen give a pronounced inhibition of tumor growth, whereas neither methotrexate nor cyclophosphamide is effective. Growth rate is significantly increased when rats are given 17 beta-estradiol. Flow cytometric DNA analysis as well as in situ S-phase cell detection with anti-bromodeoxyuridine antibodies show a 3-fold increase in S-phase fraction cells within 4 days after the onset of estrogen treatment. No spontaneous metastases have been found so far, but lung nodules develop after i.v. inoculation of tumor cells. From one of these nodules a fast-growing, hormone independent subline (MCR-86) has been derived, showing both lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination upon s.c. transplantation. By showing several features of hormone responsive human disease in its early stage of progression the MCR-83 tumor system may be a clinically relevant model for studies on endocrine regulation of tumor growth and its therapeutic manipulation.

  3. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    using the LBNL HTA µarray core facility. These results are consistent with the immunologic data, and also indicate that the milk-derived cells...grown in a lower stress medium were more vulnerable to c-myc immortalization and telomerase upregulation. Indeed, early passage pre-stasis 184 HMEC... early and late passage cultures of 184 and 48R HMEC will be transduced first with p16sh, and then c-myc, to determine if cells that are closer to

  4. Role of p53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins . Annu Rev Genet 2004;38:413–43. 2... memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins . Annu. Rev. Genet. 38, 413–443. Rosenthal, N. (2005). Youthful prospects for human stem-cell...Javits Convention Center, New York City, NY 11 2007: “ Regulation of cell proliferation and senescence by Polycomb group

  5. A mammary stem cell population identified and characterized in late embryogenesis reveals similarities to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Spike, Benjamin T; Engle, Dannielle D; Lin, Jennifer C; Cheung, Samantha K; La, Justin; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2012-02-03

    Gene expression signatures relating mammary stem cell populations to breast cancers have focused on adult tissue. Here, we identify, isolate, and characterize the fetal mammary stem cell (fMaSC) state since the invasive and proliferative processes of mammogenesis resemble phases of cancer progression. fMaSC frequency peaks late in embryogenesis, enabling more extensive stem cell purification than achieved with adult tissue. fMaSCs are self-renewing, multipotent, and coexpress multiple mammary lineage markers. Gene expression, transplantation, and in vitro analyses reveal putative autocrine and paracrine regulatory mechanisms, including ErbB and FGF signaling pathways impinging on fMaSC growth. Expression profiles from fMaSCs and associated stroma exhibit significant similarities to basal-like and Her2+ intrinsic breast cancer subtypes. Our results reveal links between development and cancer and provide resources to identify new candidates for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy.

  6. Repression of p63 and induction of EMT by mutant Ras in mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoh, Kathryn E.; Regunath, Kausik; Guzman, Asja; Lee, Seung-Min; Pfister, Neil T.; Akanni, Olutosin; Kaufman, Laura J.; Prives, Carol; Prywes, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The p53-related transcription factor p63 is required for maintenance of epithelial cell differentiation. We found that activated forms of the Harvey Rat Sarcoma Virus GTPase (H-RAS) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) oncogenes strongly repress expression of ∆Np63α, the predominant p63 isoform in basal mammary epithelial cells. This regulation occurs at the transcriptional level, and a short region of the ∆Np63 promoter is sufficient for repression induced by H-RasV12. The suppression of ∆Np63α expression by these oncogenes concomitantly leads to an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, the depletion of ∆Np63α alone is sufficient to induce EMT. Both H-RasV12 expression and ∆Np63α depletion induce individual cell invasion in a 3D collagen gel in vitro system, thereby demonstrating how Ras can drive the mammary epithelial cell state toward greater invasive ability. Together, these results suggest a pathway by which RAS and PIK3CA oncogenes induce EMT through regulation of ∆Np63α. PMID:27681615

  7. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  8. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  9. The effect of neighboring cells on the stiffness of cancerous and non-cancerous human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Bonin, Keith; Scarpinato, Karin; Guthold, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with a 5.3 μm diameter spherical probe, we determined mechanical properties of individual human mammary epithelial cells. The cells were derived from a pair of cell lines that mimic cell progression through four phases of neoplastic transformation: normal (non-transformed), immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic. Measurements on cells in all four phases were taken over both the cytoplasmic and nuclear regions. Moreover, the measurements were made for cells in different microenvironments as related to cell-cell contacts: isolated cells; cells residing on the periphery of a contiguous cell monolayer; and cells on the inside of a contiguous cell monolayer. By fitting the AFM force versus indentation curves to a Hertz model, we determined the pseudo-elastic Young’s modulus, E. Combining all data for the cellular subregions (over nucleus and cytoplasm) and the different cell microenvironments, we obtained stiffness values for normal, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic cells of 870 Pa, 870 Pa, 490 Pa, and 580 Pa, respectively. That is, cells become softer as they advance to the tumorigenic phase and then stiffen somewhat in the final step to metastatic cells. We also found a distinct contrast in the influence of a cell’s microenvironment on cell stiffness. Normal mammary epithelial cells inside a monolayer are stiffer than peripheral cells, which are stiffer than isolated cells. However, the microenvironment had a slight, opposite effect on tumorigenic and little effect on immortal and metastatic cell stiffness. Thus, the stiffness of cancer cells is less sensitive to the microenvironment than normal cells. Our results show that the mechanical properties of a cell can depend on cancer progression and microenvironment (cell-cell interactions).

  10. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  11. Loss of chromosomal integrity in human mammary epithelial cells subsequent to escape from senescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Romanov, S. R.; Kozakiewicz, B. K.; Holst, C. R.; Haupt, L. M.; Crawford, Y. G.

    2001-01-01

    The genomic changes that foster cancer can be either genetic or epigenetic in nature. Early studies focused on genetic changes and how mutational events contribute to changes in gene expression. These point mutations, deletions and amplifications are known to activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. More recently, multiple epigenetic changes that can have a profound effect on carcinogenesis have been identified. These epigenetic events, such as the methylation of promoter sequences in genes, are under active investigation. In this review we will describe a methylation event that occurs during the propagation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in culture and detail the accompanying genetic alterations that have been observed.

  12. RORα Binds to E2F1 To Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Regulate Mammary Gland Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Gaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor alpha (RORα) is a potent tumor suppressor that reduces cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth. However, the molecular mechanism by which it inhibits cell proliferation remains unknown. We demonstrate a noncanonical nuclear receptor pathway in which RORα binds to E2F1 to inhibit cell cycle progression. We showed that RORα bound to the heptad repeat and marked box region of E2F1 and suppressed E2F1-regulated transcription in epithelial cells. Binding of RORα inhibited E2F1 acetylation and its DNA-binding activity by recruiting histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) to the protein complexes. Knockdown of HDAC1 or inhibition of HDAC activity at least partially rescued transcription factor activity of E2F1 that was repressed by RORα. Importantly, RORα levels were increased in mammary ducts compared to terminal end buds and inversely correlated with expression of E2F1 target genes and cell proliferation. Silencing RORα in mammary epithelial cells significantly enhanced cell proliferation in the ductal epithelial cells and promoted side branching of the mammary ducts. These results reveal a novel link between RORα and E2F1 in regulating cell cycle progression and mammary tissue morphogenesis. PMID:24891616

  13. Stat5 Promotes Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells through Transcriptional Activation of a Distinct Promoter in Akt1▿

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, Bradley A.; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Schmidt, Jeffrey W.; Triplett, Aleata A.; Moriggl, Richard; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) plays a pivotal role in the proliferation, secretory differentiation, and survival of mammary epithelial cells. However, there is little information about Stat5 target genes that facilitate these biological processes. We provide here experimental evidence that the prolactin-mediated phosphorylation of Stat5 regulates the transcriptional activation of the Akt1 gene. Stat5 binds to consensus sequences within the Akt1 locus in a growth factor-dependent manner to initiate transcription of a unique Akt1 mRNA from a distinct promoter, which is only active in the mammary gland. Elevating the levels of active Akt1 restores the expression of cyclin D1 and proliferation of Jak2-deficient mammary epithelial cells, which provides evidence that Akt1 acts downstream of Jak/Stat signaling. The ligand-inducible expression of Stat5 in transgenic females mediates a sustained upregulation of Akt1 in mammary epithelial cells during the onset of postlactational involution. Stat5-expressing mammary glands exhibit a delay in involution despite induction of proapoptotic signaling events. Collectively, the results of the present study elucidate an underlying mechanism by which active Stat5 mediates evasion from apoptosis and self-sufficiency in growth signals. PMID:20385773

  14. Downregulation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 7A1 expression is important in enhancing cell proliferation in adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nawneet; Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Dubey, Ravi C; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-22

    Mitochondrial Dysfunction has been implicated in multiple human diseases, including cancer. Among all cancer, lung cancer is the most common type of cancer worldwide with low survival rates. Mammals possess multiple subunits of the mitochondrial enzyme Cytochrome C oxidase (COX). The COX subunits are expressed in a tissue specific manner and have been implicated in cancer cell metabolism although their molecular and regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. In this study, we aimed at identifying novel gene signatures in lung cancer. We performed extensive analysis of seven different Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets pertaining to different stages of lung adenocarcinoma and identified that multiple subunits of COX genes are differentially expressed in these patients. Amongst all COX genes, the expression of COX7A1 gene was observed to be highly down regulated in these patients. In order to validate the GEO datasets, we looked at the expression of multiple COX genes using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Our results confirmed that COX 7A1 gene expression was indeed highly reduced in these cells. Overexpression of COX7A1 in human lung cancer cells led to inhibition of cell proliferation and increase in cell death via apoptosis. These results indicated that low level of COX7A1 gene expression is essential to regulate cell viability and inhibit cell death in lung adenocarcinoma. Our study has identified COX7A1 as a novel gene that might play a crucial role in the etiology of lung adenocarcinoma and can serve as a biomarker for lung cancer disease progression.

  15. Modulation of secreted proteins of mouse mammary epithelial cells by the collagenous substrata

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells retain their characteristic morphology and their ability to produce ..gamma..-casein, a member of the casein gene family, only if they are maintained on floating collagen gels. In this paper we show: (a) Cells on floating collagen gels secrete not only ..gamma..-casein but also ..cap alpha../sub 1/-, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-, and ..beta..-caseins. These are not secreted by cells on plastic and are secreted to only a very limited extent by cells on attached collagen gels. (b) The floating collagen gel regulates at the level of synthesis and/or stabilization of the caseins rather than at the level of secretion alone. Contraction of the floating gel is important in that cells cultured on floating glutaraldehyde cross-linked gels do not secrete any of the caseins. (c) The secretion of an 80,000-mol-wt protein, most probably transferrin, and a 67,000-mol-wt protein, probably butyrophilin, a major protein of the milk fat globule membrane, are partially modulated by substrata. However, in contrast to the caseins, these are always detectable in media from cells cultured on plastic and attached gels. (d) Whey acidic protein, a major whey protein, is actively secreted by freshly isolated cells but is secreted in extremely limited quantities in cultured cells regardless of the nature of the substratum used. Lactalbumin secretion is also decreased significantly in cultured cells. (e) A previously unreported set of proteins, which may be minor milk proteins, are prominently secreted by the mammary cells on all substrata tested. We conclude that while the substratum profoundly influences the secretion of the caseins, it does not regulate the expression of every milk-specific protein in the same way. The mechanistic implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Combined neuroendocrine cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tetsuya; Tajiri, Takashi; Akimaru, Koho; Arima, Yasuo; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Naito, Zenya

    2006-04-01

    A 58-year-old man with a chief complaint of epigastralgia was admitted to our hospital. Physical examination disclosed a large, firm mass in the right hypochondrium. Abdominal computed tomography confirmed thickening of the gallbladder wall and a 15 x 8 cm mass occupying almost all of the right lobe and medial segment of the liver. With a preoperative diagnosis of malignant gallbladder tumor infiltrating the liver, right hepatic trisegmentectomy was performed. Histopathologic examination showed atypical cells with small round to oval nuclei and sparse eosinophilic cytoplasm, proliferating in a solid and focal nesting pattern. Near this small cell proliferation was a focus of tubular adenocarcinoma that showed a zone of transition from the small cell neuroendocrine pattern. The small cells demonstrated immunohistochemical reactivity for chromogranin A. Electron microscopy disclosed neurosecretory granules 150 nm in diameter, representing dense round core vesicles, confirming a neuroendocrine cell lineage. The patient was diagnosed with neuroendocrine cell carcinoma combined with adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. Tumor recurrence became evident 3 months after surgery, and he died 4 months after surgery.

  17. Aptamers Selected to Postoperative Lung Adenocarcinoma Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zamay, Galina S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Glazyrin, Yury E; Krat, Alexey V; Zubkova, Olga; Spivak, Ekaterina; Wehbe, Mohammed; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Komarova, Mariia; Grigorieva, Valentina; Savchenko, Andrey; Modestov, Andrey A; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells and valuable clinical markers of prognosis of metastasis formation and prediction of patient survival. Most CTC analyses are based on the antibody-based detection of a few epithelial markers; therefore miss an important portion of mesenchymal cancer cells circulating in blood. In this work, we selected and identified DNA aptamers as specific affinity probes that bind to lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from postoperative tissues. The unique feature of our selection strategy is that aptamers are produced for lung cancer cell biomarkers in their native state and conformation without previous knowledge of the biomarkers. The aptamers did not bind to normal lung cells and lymphocytes, and had very low affinity to A549 lung adenocarcinoma culture. We applied these aptamers to detect CTCs, apoptotic bodies, and microemboli in clinical samples of peripheral blood of lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer patients. We identified aptamer-associated protein biomarkers for lung cancer such as vimentin, annexin A2, annexin A5, histone 2B, neutrophil defensin, and clusterin. Tumor-specific aptamers can be produced for individual patients and synthesized many times during anticancer therapy, thereby opening up the possibility of personalized diagnostics. PMID:26061649

  18. Role of p53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins . Annu...Paro R. Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins . Annu Rev Genet 2004;38:413–43. 2. Raaphorst FM...27, 2006 Monitoring Editor: John Cleveland Polycomb group (PcG) protein Bmi-1 is an important regulator of cell proliferation. It

  19. Role of P53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group ...Dimri. (2006) Mel-18, a polycomb group protein regulates senescence and oncogenesis via transcriptional repression of Bmi-1 and c-Myc...Oncogenesis” National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 11 1 Mel-18, a polycomb group protein regulates cell proliferation, senescence

  20. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites.

  1. Microsatellite instability in human mammary epithelial cells transformed by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanada, S.; Yang, T. C.; George, K.; Okayasu, R.; Ando, K.; Tsujii, H.

    1998-11-01

    We analyzed DNA and proteins obtained from normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells for studying the neoplastic transformation by high-LET irradiation in vitro. We also examined microsatellite instability in human mammary cells transformed to various stages of carcinogenesis, such as normal, growth variant and tumorigenic, using microsatellite marker D5S177 on the chromosome 5 and CY17 on the Chromosome 10. Microsatellite instabilities were detected in the tumorigenic stage. These results suggest that microsatellite instability may play a role in the progression of tumorigenecity. The cause of the genomic instability has been suggested as abnormalities of DNA-repair systems which may be due to one of the three reasons: 1) alterations of cell cycle regulating genes. 2) mutations in any of the DNA mismatch repair genes, 3) mutation in any of the DNA strand breaks repair genes. No abnormality of these genes and encoded proteins, however was found in the present studies. These studies thus suggest that the microsatellite instability is induced by an alternative mechanism.

  2. Asymmetric Expression of Connexins between luminal epithelial- and myoepithelial- cells is Essential for Contractile Function of the Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Inman, Jamie; Mott, Joni; Budunova, Irina; Bissell, Mina J.

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is essential for glandular functions and tissue homeostasis. Gap junctions couple cells homotypically and heterotypically and coordinate reciprocal responses between the different cell types. Connexins (Cxs) are the main mammalian gap junction proteins, and the distribution of some Cx subtypes in the heterotypic gap junctions is not symmetrical; in the murine mammary gland, Cx26, Cx30 and Cx32 are expressed only in the luminal epithelial cells and Cx43 is expressed only in myoepithelial cells. Expression of all four Cxs peaks during late pregnancy and throughout lactation suggesting essential roles for these proteins in the functional secretory activity of the gland. Transgenic (Tg) mice over-expressing Cx26 driven by keratin 5 promoter had an unexpected mammary phenotype: the mothers were unable to feed their pups to weaning age leading to litter starvation and demise in early to mid-lactation. The mammary gland of K5-Cx26 female mice developed normally and produced normal levels of milk protein, suggesting a defect in delivery rather than milk production. Because the mammary gland of K5-Cx26 mothers contained excessive milk, we hypothesized that the defect may be in an inability to eject the milk. Using ex vivo three-dimensional mammary organoid cultures, we showed that tissues isolated from wild-type FVB females contracted upon treatment with oxytocin, whereas, organoids from Tg mice failed to do so. Unexpectedly, we found that ectopic expression of Cx26 in myoepithelial cells altered the expression of endogenous Cx43 resulting in impaired gap junction communication, demonstrated by defective dye coupling in mammary epithelial cells of Tg mice. Inhibition of gap junction communication or knock-down of Cx43 in organoids from wild-type mice impaired contraction in response to oxytocin, recapitulating the observations from the mammary glands of Tg mice. We conclude that Cx26 acts as a trans-dominant negative for Cx43 function in

  3. Asymmetric expression of connexins between luminal epithelial- and myoepithelial- cells is essential for contractile function of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Rana; Inman, Jamie; Mott, Joni; Budunova, Irina; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-01

    Intercellular communication is essential for glandular functions and tissue homeostasis. Gap junctions couple cells homotypically and heterotypically and co-ordinate reciprocal responses between the different cell types. Connexins (Cxs) are the main mammalian gap junction proteins, and the distribution of some Cx subtypes in the heterotypic gap junctions is not symmetrical; in the murine mammary gland, Cx26, Cx30 and Cx32 are expressed only in the luminal epithelial cells and Cx43 is expressed only in myoepithelial cells. Expression of all four Cxs peaks during late pregnancy and throughout lactation suggesting essential roles for these proteins in the functional secretory activity of the gland. Transgenic (Tg) mice over-expressing Cx26 driven by keratin 5 promoter had an unexpected mammary phenotype: the mothers were unable to feed their pups to weaning age leading to litter starvation and demise in early to mid-lactation. The mammary gland of K5-Cx26 female mice developed normally and produced normal levels of milk protein, suggesting a defect in delivery rather than milk production. Because the mammary gland of K5-Cx26 mothers contained excessive milk, we hypothesized that the defect may be in an inability to eject the milk. Using ex vivo three-dimensional mammary organoid cultures, we showed that tissues isolated from wild-type FVB females contracted upon treatment with oxytocin, whereas, organoids from Tg mice failed to do so. Unexpectedly, we found that ectopic expression of Cx26 in myoepithelial cells altered the expression of endogenous Cx43 resulting in impaired gap junction communication, demonstrated by defective dye coupling in mammary epithelial cells of Tg mice. Inhibition of gap junction communication or knock-down of Cx43 in organoids from wild-type mice impaired contraction in response to oxytocin, recapitulating the observations from the mammary glands of Tg mice. We conclude that Cx26 acts as a trans-dominant negative for Cx43 function in

  4. Isolation, purification, culture and characterisation of myoepithelial cells from normal and neoplastic canine mammary glands using a magnetic-activated cell sorting separation system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, R; Maniscalco, L; Iussich, S; Martignani, E; Guil-Luna, S; De Maria, R; Martín de Las Mulas, J; Millán, Y

    2013-08-01

    Mammary gland tumours, the most common malignant neoplasm in bitches, often display myoepithelial (ME) cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to isolate, purify, culture and characterise ME cells from normal and neoplastic canine mammary glands. Monodispersed cells from three normal canine mammary glands and five canine mammary tumours were incubated with an anti-Thy1 antibody and isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). Cells isolated from two normal glands (cell lines CmME-N1 and CmME-N2) and four tumours (cell lines CmME-K1 from a complex carcinoma, CmME-K2 from a simple tubulopapillary carcinoma, and CmME-K3 and CmME-K4 from two carcinomas within benign tumours) were cultured in supplemented DMEM/F12 media for 40days. Cell purity was >90%. Tumour-derived ME cell lines exhibited heterogeneous morphology, growth patterns and immunocytochemical expression of cytokeratins, whereas cell lines from normal glands retained their morphology and levels of cytokeratin expression during culture. Cell lines from normal glands and carcinomas within benign tumours grew more slowly than those from simple and complex carcinomas. This methodology has the potential to be used for in vitro analysis of the role of ME cells in the growth and progression of canine mammary tumours.

  5. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  6. Mammary epithelial tubes elongate through MAPK-dependent coordination of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Robert J; Neumann, Neil M; Ewald, Andrew J

    2016-03-15

    Mammary branching morphogenesis is regulated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). We sought to determine how these RTK signals alter proliferation and migration to accomplish tube elongation in mouse. Both behaviors occur but it has been difficult to determine their relative contribution to elongation in vivo, as mammary adipocytes scatter light and limit the depth of optical imaging. Accordingly, we utilized 3D culture to study elongation in an experimentally accessible setting. We first used antibodies to localize RTK signals and discovered that phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK) was spatially enriched in cells near the front of elongating ducts, whereas phosphorylated AKT was ubiquitous. We next observed a gradient of cell migration speeds from rear to front of elongating ducts, with the front characterized by both high pERK and the fastest cells. Furthermore, cells within elongating ducts oriented both their protrusions and their migration in the direction of tube elongation. By contrast, cells within the organoid body were isotropically protrusive. We next tested the requirement for proliferation and migration. Early inhibition of proliferation blocked the creation of migratory cells, whereas late inhibition of proliferation did not block continued duct elongation. By contrast, pharmacological inhibition of either MEK or Rac1 signaling acutely blocked both cell migration and duct elongation. Finally, conditional induction of MEK activity was sufficient to induce collective cell migration and ductal elongation. Our data suggest a model for ductal elongation in which RTK-dependent proliferation creates motile cells with high pERK, the collective migration of which acutely requires both MEK and Rac1 signaling.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  8. Modulation of Notch Signaling Elicits Signature Tumors and Inhibits Hras1-Induced Oncogenesis in the Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kiaris, Hippokratis; Politi, Katerina; Grimm, Lisa M.; Szabolcs, Matthias; Fisher, Peter; Efstratiadis, Argiris; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2004-01-01

    Deregulation of Notch signaling, which normally affects a broad spectrum of cell fates, has been implicated in various neoplastic conditions. Here we describe a transgenic mouse model, which demonstrates that expression of a constitutively active form of the Notch1 receptor in the mammary epithelium induces the rapid development of pregnancy/lactation-dependent neoplasms that consistently exhibit a characteristic histopathological pattern. These signature tumors retain the ability to respond to apoptotic stimuli and regress on initiation of mammary gland involution, but eventually appear to progress in subsequent pregnancies to nonregressing malignant adenocarcinomas. Additionally, we present evidence indicating that cyclin D1 is an in vivo target of Notch signals in the mammary glands and demonstrate that we can effectively inhibit Hras1-driven, cyclin D1-dependent mammary oncogenesis by transgenic expression of the Notch antagonist Deltex. PMID:15277242

  9. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene delivery in pancreatic tumors

  10. Prognostic significance of stem cell-related marker expression and its correlation with histologic subtypes in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunhyang; Park, Soo Young; Sun, Ping-Li; Jin, Yan; Kim, Ji Eun; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Kwhanmien; Lee, Choon Taek

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of tumor cells that exhibit stem cell-like properties and contribute in treatment failure. To clarify the expression and prognostic significance of several CSC markers in non-small cell lung cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 368 patients with adenocarcinoma (n = 226) or squamous cell carcinoma (n = 142). We correlated the expression of six CSC markers – CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), octamer binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), and Nanog – with clinicopathologic and molecular variables and survival outcomes. In adenocarcinoma, CD133, ALDH1 and CD44 expression was associated with low pathologic stage and absence of lymphovascular invasion, while Nanog expression correlated with high histologic grade, lymphatic invasion and increased expression of Snail-1, a transcription factor associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. CSC marker expression was also associated with histologic subtypes in adenocarcinoma. Multivariate analysis showed that high Nanog expression was an independent factor associated with a poor prognosis in adenocarcinoma. CSC markers had no prognostic value in squamous cell carcinoma. These results suggest that Nanog is an independent negative prognostic factor that may be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27285762

  11. The WNT-controlled transcriptional regulator LBH is required for mammary stem cell expansion and maintenance of the basal lineage.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Linsey E; Curtis, Kevin M; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Rieger, Megan E; Robbins, David J; Briegel, Karoline J

    2015-03-01

    The identification of multipotent mammary stem cells (MaSCs) has provided an explanation for the unique regenerative capacity of the mammary gland throughout adult life. However, it remains unclear what genes maintain MaSCs and control their specification into the two epithelial lineages: luminal and basal. LBH is a novel transcription co-factor in the WNT pathway with hitherto unknown physiological function. LBH is expressed during mammary gland development and aberrantly overexpressed in aggressive 'basal' subtype breast cancers. Here, we have explored the in vivo role of LBH in mammopoiesis. We show that in postnatal mammary epithelia, LBH is predominantly expressed in the Lin(-)CD29(high)CD24(+) basal MaSC population. Upon conditional inactivation of LBH, mice exhibit pronounced delays in mammary tissue expansion during puberty and pregnancy, accompanied by increased luminal differentiation at the expense of basal lineage specification. These defects could be traced to a severe reduction in the frequency and self-renewal/differentiation potential of basal MaSCs. Mechanistically, LBH induces expression of key epithelial stem cell transcription factor ΔNp63 to promote a basal MaSC state and repress luminal differentiation genes, mainly that encoding estrogen receptor α (Esr1/ERα). Collectively, these studies identify LBH as an essential regulator of basal MaSC expansion/maintenance, raising important implications for its potential role in breast cancer pathogenesis.

  12. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Smart, Chanel E; Askarian Amiri, Marjan E; Wronski, Ania; Dinger, Marcel E; Crawford, Joanna; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Song, Sarah; Wiesner, Christiane; French, Juliet D; Dave, Richa K; da Silva, Leonard; Purdon, Amy; Andrew, Megan; Mattick, John S; Lakhani, Sunil R; Brown, Melissa A; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  13. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers. PMID:24903350

  14. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  15. Bax is not involved in the resveratrol-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-wei; Wang, Zhi-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a natural plant polyphenol widely present in foods such as grapes, wine, and peanuts. Previous studies indicate that RV has an ability to inhibit various stages of carcinogenesis and eliminate preneoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cell. In this report, we analyzed whether Bax translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria during RV-induced apoptosis in single living cell using onfocal microscopey. Cells were transfected with GFP-Bax plasmid. Cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibition of RV on the cells viability. Apoptotic activity of RV was detected by Hoechst 33258 and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Our results showed that RV induced a dose-dependent apoptosis in which Bax did not translocate to mitochondrias.

  16. MYC-induced apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells is associated with repression of lineage-specific gene signatures

    PubMed Central

    Haikala, Heidi M.; Klefström, Juha; Eilers, Martin; Wiese, Katrin E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apoptosis caused by deregulated MYC expression is a prototype example of intrinsic tumor suppression. However, it is still unclear how supraphysiological MYC expression levels engage specific sets of target genes to promote apoptosis. Recently, we demonstrated that repression of SRF target genes by MYC/MIZ1 complexes limits AKT-dependent survival signaling and contributes to apoptosis induction. Here we report that supraphysiological levels of MYC repress gene sets that include markers of basal-like breast cancer cells, but not luminal cancer cells, in a MIZ1-dependent manner. Furthermore, repressed genes are part of a conserved gene signature characterizing the basal subpopulation of both murine and human mammary gland. These repressed genes play a role in epithelium and mammary gland development and overlap with genes mediating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix organization. Strikingly, acute activation of oncogenic MYC in basal mammary epithelial cells is sufficient to induce luminal cell identity markers. We propose that supraphysiological MYC expression impacts on mammary epithelial cell identity by repressing lineage-specific target genes. Such abrupt cell identity switch could interfere with adhesion-dependent survival signaling and thus promote apoptosis in pre-malignant epithelial tissue. PMID:26873145

  17. Effects of polyamine inhibitors on zinc uptake by COMMA-1D mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.C.; Haedrich, L.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Zn uptake or transport is stimulated by glucocorticoids in many types of epithelial cells, including the COMMA-1D mouse mammary cell line. The current objective was to determine whether polyamines also mediate glucocorticoid stimulation of Zn-uptake. Initially, cells grown in lactogenic hormone supplemented-media had approximately 65% greater {sup 65}Zn-uptake over 24 h than cells in nonsupplemented growth media (GM). {sup 65}Zn-uptake from HM with 10{sup {minus}5}M methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) (s-adenosyl-methionine decarboxylase inhibitor to block polyamine synthesis) added was less than from GM. Exogenous spermidine added to the MGBG-HM media increased {sup 65}Zn-uptake. However, up to 10mM difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a more specific inhibitor of sperimidine synthesis, had no significant effect on 24-h {sup 65}Zn-uptake by cells in HM. In GM, DFMO caused a slight dose-dependent decrease in {sup 65}Zn-uptake over the range 10{sup {minus}6} to 5 {times} 10{sup 3}M. Also, with 8 h of incubation, DFMO tended to decrease {sup 65}Zn-uptake in HM-stimulated cells. These data cannot yet distinguish between the possibilities that DFMO is inactivated during the 24-h incubation or that the dramatic effects of MGBG on {sup 65}Zn-uptake in these mammary-derived cells is not related to its inhibition of polyamine synthesis. Because COMMA-1D cells alter Zn uptake in response to lactogenic hormones and MGBG, the model system is suitable for further studies of the mechanisms of zinc transport in epithelia.

  18. Therapeutic effects of sorafenib on the A549/DDP human lung adenocarcinoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Qi; Wang, Yu-Lan; Li, Zhi-Ying; Lin, Ting-Yan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of sorafenib on the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of A549/DDP cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells cultured in vitro. The A549/DDP cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell strain was cultured in vitro, the cell culture group incubated in culture medium only was set as the control group (Group S0) and the four concentration gradients of sorafenib were added to the culture groups as the experimental groups: S1, 2 µmol/l; S2, 4 µmol/l; S3, 8 µmol/l; and S4, 16 µmol/l. The MTT assay was used to determine the growth inhibition rate of the cells, which were respectively subjected to sorafenib treatment for 24, 48 and 72 h. Flow cytometry was used to determine the rate of apoptosis of cells in each group following sorafenib treatment for 72 h. Furthermore, the Transwell invasion experiment was used to determine the effect on A549/DDP cell invasion following sorafenib treatment for 24 h. Based on the MTT assay, it was found that the inhibition rates of A549/DDP cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells in groups S1-4 following sorafenib treatment for 24 h were 4.58±2.82, 14.93±2.62, 37.58±7.13 and 58.39±8.15%, respectively. For 48 h, inhibition rates in S1-4 were 14.98±2.93, 26.28±7.31, 63.00±3.05 and 78.84±3.96%, respectively, and for 72 h, inhibition rates were 18.80±2.82, 32.71±2.55, 75.51±4.73 and 87.50±3.36%, respectively. The difference in the inhibition rates of cells among the experimental groups for the same incubation time showed statistical significance (P<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the rate of apoptosis in the control group was 8.88±0.81% following sorafenib treatment for 72 h, and the rates of apoptosis in groups S1-4 were, 12.84±0.24, 17.27±0.78, 21.98±0.75 and 49.67±1.38%, respectively. The rate of apoptosis in each experimental group was higher compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). The difference in the rate of apoptosis

  19. Serotonin suppresses β-casein expression via PTP1B activation in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takeshi; Maeda, Tomoji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-04-22

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine, 5-HT) has an important role in milk volume homeostasis within the mammary gland during lactation. We have previously shown that the expression of β-casein, a differentiation marker in mammary epithelial cells, is suppressed via 5-HT-mediated inhibition of signal transduction and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) phosphorylation in the human mammary epithelial MCF-12A cell line. In addition, the reduction of β-casein in turn was associated with 5-HT7 receptor expression in the cells. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the 5-HT-mediated suppression of β-casein and STAT5 phosphorylation. The β-casein level and phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5)/STAT5 ratio in the cells co-treated with 5-HT and a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (KT5720) were significantly higher than those of cells treated with 5-HT alone. Exposure to 100 μM db-cAMP for 6 h significantly decreased the protein levels of β-casein and pSTAT5 and the pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio, and significantly increased PTP1B protein levels. In the cells co-treated with 5-HT and an extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK) inhibitor (FR180294) or Akt inhibitor (124005), the β-casein level and pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio were equal to those of cells treated with 5-HT alone. Treatment with 5-HT significantly induced PTP1B protein levels, whereas its increase was inhibited by KT5720. In addition, the PTP1B inhibitor sc-222227 increased the expression levels of β-casein and the pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio. Our observations indicate that PTP1B directly regulates STAT5 phosphorylation and that its activation via the cAMP/PKA pathway downstream of the 5-HT7 receptor is involved in the suppression of β-casein expression in MCF-12A cells.

  20. Dietary rosemary suppresses 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene binding to rat mammary cell DNA.

    PubMed

    Amagase, H; Sakamoto, K; Segal, E R; Milner, J A

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available ground rosemary powder was examined for its ability to modify the in vivo binding of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) metabolites to mammary cell DNA in 55-d-old rats fed diets containing varying quantities and types of lipids. Supplementing a casein-based diet containing 20% corn oil with 1 % rosemary for 2 wk reduced by 76% the occurrence of DMBA-induced DNA adducts occurring 24 h after treatment with 50 mg DMBA/kg body weight. A comparable reduction in DNA adducts (66%) occurred when 0.5% rosemary was added to a diet containing 20% corn oil, and the quantity of DMBA given was reduced to 25 mg/kg body weight. The reduction in the occurrence of adducts occurring 24 h after DMBA treatment caused by 0.5% dietary rosemary was greater (P < 0.05) when added to a diet containing 20% corn oil than when added to a diet containing 5% corn oil and 15% coconut oil. Rosemary, 1% but not 0.5%, reduced DMBA-induced DNA adducts when the diet contained 5% corn oil. These studies demonstrate that rosemary is effective in reducing the binding of DMBA metabolites to rat mammary cell DNA. Furthermore, the present studies demonstrate that the benefits of rosemary are dependent on the source and concentration of dietary lipids.

  1. Mammary stem cells and parity-induced breast cancer protection- new insights.

    PubMed

    Dall, Genevieve; Risbridger, Gail; Britt, Kara

    2016-02-22

    Parity (childbearing) significantly decreases a woman's risk of breast cancer and the protective effect is greater if the woman is younger and has more children. The mechanism/s of parity-induced protection are not known. Although several factors are postulated to play a role, we discuss how a reduction in the number of mammary stem cells (MaSCs) may lead to a reduction in breast cancer risk in parous women. Firstly we review the epidemiology linking childbearing to reduced breast cancer risk and discuss how additional births, a young age at first full term birth, and breastfeeding impact the protection. We then detail the mouse and human studies implicating MaSC in parity induced protection and the in-vivo work being performed in mice to directly investigate the effect of parity on MaSC. Finally we discuss the transplant and lineage tracing experiments assessing MaSC activity according to parity and the need to define if MaSC are indeed more carcinogen sensitive than mature mammary epithelial cells. Continuing and future studies attempting to define the parity induced mechanisms will aid in the development of preventative therapies.

  2. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype.

  3. Proteome analysis of functionally differentiated bovine (Bos indicus) mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Jamwal, Manu; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Saravanan; Panigrahi, Aswini K; Hariprasad, Gururao; Jena, Manoj K; Anand, Vijay; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kaushik, Jai K; Dang, Ajay K; Mukesh, Manishi; Mishra, Bishnu P; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Reddy, Vanga S; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2013-11-01

    Mammary gland is made up of a branching network of ducts that end in alveoli. Terminally differentiated mammary epithelial cells (MECs) constitute the innermost layer of aveoli. They are milk-secreting cuboidal cells that secrete milk proteins during lactation. Little is known about the expression profile of proteins in the metabolically active MECs during lactation or their functional role in the lactation process. In the present investigation, we have reported the proteome map of MECs in lactating cows using 2DE MALDI-TOF/TOF MS and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS. MECs were isolated from milk using immunomagnetic beads and confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS and 2DE-MS/MS based approaches led to identification of 431 and 134 proteins, respectively, with a total of 497 unique proteins. Proteins identified in this study were clustered into functional groups using bioinformatics tools. Pathway analysis of the identified proteins revealed 28 pathways (p < 0.05) providing evidence for involvement of various proteins in lactation function. This study further provides experimental evidence for the presence of many proteins that have been predicted in annotated bovine genome. The data generated further provide a set of bovine MEC-specific proteins that will help the researchers to understand the molecular events taking place during lactation.

  4. Overexpression of LMO4 induces mammary hyperplasia, promotes cell invasion, and is a predictor of poor outcome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sum, Eleanor Y. M.; Segara, Davendra; Duscio, Belinda; Bath, Mary L.; Field, Andrew S.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Visvader, Jane E.

    2005-01-01

    The zinc finger protein LMO4 is overexpressed in a high proportion of breast carcinomas. Here, we report that overexpression of a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Lmo4 transgene in the mouse mammary gland elicits hyperplasia and mammary intraepithelial neoplasia or adenosquamous carcinoma in two transgenic strains with a tumor latency of 13–18 months. To investigate cellular processes controlled by LMO4 and those that may be deregulated during oncogenesis, we used RNA interference. Down-regulation of LMO4 expression reduced proliferation of human breast cancer cells and increased differentiation of mouse mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, small-interfering-RNA-transfected breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) had a reduced capacity to migrate and invade an extracellular matrix. Conversely, overexpression of LMO4 in noninvasive, immortalized human MCF10A cells promoted cell motility and invasion. Significantly, in a cohort of 159 primary breast cancers, high nuclear levels of LMO4 were an independent predictor of death from breast cancer. Together, these findings suggest that deregulation of LMO4 in breast epithelium contributes directly to breast neoplasia by altering the rate of cellular proliferation and promoting cell invasion. PMID:15897450

  5. The cell cycle regulator ecdysoneless cooperates with H-Ras to promote oncogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Zhang, Ying; Ahmad Mir, Riyaz; Lin, Simon; Kim, Jun Hyun; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; West, William; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian ortholog of Drosophila ecdysoneless (Ecd) gene product regulates Rb-E2F interaction and is required for cell cycle progression. Ecd is overexpressed in breast cancer and its overexpression predicts shorter survival in patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Here, we demonstrate Ecd knock down (KD) in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) induces growth arrest, similar to the impact of Ecd Knock out (KO) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, whole-genome mRNA expression analysis of control vs. Ecd KD in hMECs demonstrated that several of the top 40 genes that were down-regulated were E2F target genes. To address the role of Ecd in mammary oncogenesis, we overexpressed Ecd and/or mutant H-Ras in hTERT-immortalized hMECs. Cell cycle analyses revealed hMECs overexpressing Ecd+Ras showed incomplete arrest in G1 phase upon growth factor deprivation, and more rapid cell cycle progression in growth factor-containing medium. Analyses of cell migration, invasion, acinar structures in 3-D Matrigel and anchorage-independent growth demonstrated that Ecd+Ras-overexpressing cells exhibit substantially more dramatic transformed phenotype as compared to cells expressing vector, Ras or Ecd. Under conditions of nutrient deprivation, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs exhibited better survival, with substantial upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3 both at the mRNA and protein levels. Significantly, while hMECs expressing Ecd or mutant Ras alone did not form tumors in NOD/SCID mice, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs formed tumors, clearly demonstrating oncogenic cooperation between Ecd and mutant Ras. Collectively, we demonstrate an important co-oncogenic role of Ecd in the progression of mammary oncogenesis through promoting cell survival.

  6. The cell cycle regulator ecdysoneless cooperates with H-Ras to promote oncogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Zhang, Ying; Ahmad Mir, Riyaz; Lin, Simon; Kim, Jun Hyun; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; West, William; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian ortholog of Drosophila ecdysoneless (Ecd) gene product regulates Rb-E2F interaction and is required for cell cycle progression. Ecd is overexpressed in breast cancer and its overexpression predicts shorter survival in patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Here, we demonstrate Ecd knock down (KD) in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) induces growth arrest, similar to the impact of Ecd Knock out (KO) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, whole-genome mRNA expression analysis of control vs. Ecd KD in hMECs demonstrated that several of the top 40 genes that were down-regulated were E2F target genes. To address the role of Ecd in mammary oncogenesis, we overexpressed Ecd and/or mutant H-Ras in hTERT-immortalized hMECs. Cell cycle analyses revealed hMECs overexpressing Ecd+Ras showed incomplete arrest in G1 phase upon growth factor deprivation, and more rapid cell cycle progression in growth factor-containing medium. Analyses of cell migration, invasion, acinar structures in 3-D Matrigel and anchorage-independent growth demonstrated that Ecd+Ras-overexpressing cells exhibit substantially more dramatic transformed phenotype as compared to cells expressing vector, Ras or Ecd. Under conditions of nutrient deprivation, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs exhibited better survival, with substantial upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3 both at the mRNA and protein levels. Significantly, while hMECs expressing Ecd or mutant Ras alone did not form tumors in NOD/SCID mice, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs formed tumors, clearly demonstrating oncogenic cooperation between Ecd and mutant Ras. Collectively, we demonstrate an important co-oncogenic role of Ecd in the progression of mammary oncogenesis through promoting cell survival. PMID:25616580

  7. Whey acidic protein (WAP) depresses the proliferation of mouse (MMT) and human (MCF-7) mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Nukumi, Naoko; Iwamori, Tokuko; Naito, Kunihiko; Tojo, Hideaki

    2005-10-01

    We previously reported that the enforced expression of exogenous whey acidic protein (WAP) significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC11 and EpH4/H6 cells). This paper presents the first evidence that WAP also depresses the proliferation of mammary tumor cells from mouse (MMT cells) and human (MCF-7 cells). We established WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cell lines, and confirmed the secretion of WAP from the WAP-clonal cells into culture medium. The enforced expression of WAP significantly inhibited the proliferation of MMT and MCF-7 cells in in vitro culture. FACScan analyses revealed that G0/G1 phase cell-cycle progression was disordered and elongated in the WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cells compared to that of the control cells. The expression of cyclin D1 was significantly decreased in the WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cells, suggesting that progression from the G1 to the S phase was delayed in the WAP-clonal cells. The present results indicate that WAP plays a negative regulatory role in the cell-cycle progression of mammary tumor cells via a paracrine mechanism.

  8. Sulforaphane‐induced apoptosis in Xuanwei lung adenocarcinoma cell line XWLC‐05

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lan; Yao, Qian; Huang, Yun‐chao; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Chuan‐qiong; Fan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Xuanwei district in Yunnan Province has the highest incidence of lung cancer in China, especially among non‐smoking women. Cruciferous vegetables can reduce lung cancer risk by prompting a protective mechanism against respiratory tract inflammation caused by air pollution, and are rich in sulforaphane, which can induce changes in gene expression. We investigated the effect of sulforaphane‐induced apoptosis in Xuanwei lung adenocarcinoma cell line (XWCL‐05) to explore the value of sulforaphane in lung cancer prevention and treatment. Methods Cell growth inhibition was determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay; cell morphology and apoptosis were observed under transmission electron microscope; cell cycle and apoptosis rates were detected using flow cytometry; B‐cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‐2) and Bcl‐2‐like protein 4 (Bax) messenger RNA expression were determined by quantitative PCR; and p53, p73, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), Bax, Bcl‐2, and caspase‐9 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. Results Sulforaphane inhibited XWLC‐05 cell growth with inhibitory concentration (IC)50 of 4.04, 3.38, and 3.02 μg/mL at 24, 48, and 72 hours, respectively. Sulforaphane affected the XWLC‐05 cell cycle as cells accumulated in the G2/M phase. The proportion of apoptotic cells observed was 27.6%. Compared with the control, the sulforaphane group showed decreased Bcl‐2 and p53 expression, and significantly increased p73, PUMA, Bax, and caspase‐9 protein expression (P < 0.05). Conclusion Sulforaphane induces Xuanwei lung adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis. Its possible mechanism may involve the upregulation of p73 expression and its effector target genes PUMA and Bax in lung cancer cells, downregulation of the anti‐apoptotic gene B cl ‐2, and activation of caspase‐9. It may also involve downregulation of the mutant p53 protein. PMID:27878984

  9. Characterization of cell lines derived from breast cancers and normal mammary tissues for the study of the intrinsic molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Prat, Aleix; Karginova, Olga; Parker, Joel S; Fan, Cheng; He, Xiaping; Bixby, Lisa; Harrell, J Chuck; Roman, Erick; Adamo, Barbara; Troester, Melissa; Perou, Charles M

    2013-11-01

    Five molecular subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like, and claudin-low) with clinical implications exist in breast cancer. Here, we evaluated the molecular and phenotypic relationships of (1) a large in vitro panel of human breast cancer cell lines (BCCLs), human mammary fibroblasts (HMFs), and human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs); (2) in vivo breast tumors; (3) normal breast cell subpopulations; (4) human embryonic stem cells (hESCs); and (5) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). First, by integrating genomic data of 337 breast tumor samples with 93 cell lines we were able to identify all the intrinsic tumor subtypes in the cell lines, except for luminal A. Secondly, we observed that the cell lines recapitulate the differentiation hierarchy detected in the normal mammary gland, with claudin-low BCCLs and HMFs cells showing a stromal phenotype, HMECs showing a mammary stem cell/bipotent progenitor phenotype, basal-like cells showing a luminal progenitor phenotype, and luminal B cell lines showing a mature luminal phenotype. Thirdly, we identified basal-like and highly migratory claudin-low subpopulations of cells within a subset of triple-negative BCCLs (SUM149PT, HCC1143, and HCC38). Interestingly, both subpopulations within SUM149PT were enriched for tumor-initiating cells, but the basal-like subpopulation grew tumors faster than the claudin-low subpopulation. Finally, claudin-low BCCLs resembled the phenotype of hMSCs, whereas hESCs cells showed an epithelial phenotype without basal or luminal differentiation. The results presented here help to improve our understanding of the wide range of breast cancer cell line models through the appropriate pairing of cell lines with relevant in vivo tumor and normal cell counterparts.

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation of maspin in normal mammary epithelia and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Odero-Marah, Valerie A; Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Schneider, Galen B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Koland, John G; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2002-07-26

    Maspin is a 42kDa tumor suppressor protein that belongs to the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family. It inhibits cell motility and invasion in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice; however, maspin's molecular mechanism of action has remained elusive. Maspin contains several tyrosine residues and we hypothesized that phosphorylation of maspin could play a role in its biological function. Our study reveals that maspin is phosphorylated on tyrosine moiety(ies) in normal mammary epithelial cells endogenously expressing maspin. In addition, transfection of the maspin gene, using either a stable or inducible system into maspin-deficient breast cancer cell lines, yields a protein product that is phosphorylated on tyrosine residue(s). Furthermore, recombinant maspin protein can be tyrosine-phosphorylated by the kinase domain from the epidermal growth factor receptor in vitro. These novel observations suggest that maspin, which deviates from the classical serpin, may be an important signal transduction molecule in its phosphorylated form.

  11. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Benjamin; Kang, Yibin

    2011-02-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy. In recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer. In particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ER/PR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/PR(+) tumors.

  12. The Par3 polarity protein is an exocyst receptor essential for mammary cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Mukhtar; Macara, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    The exocyst is an essential component of the secretory pathway required for delivery of basolateral proteins to the plasma membranes of epithelial cells. Delivery occurs adjacent to tight junctions (TJ), suggesting that it recognizes a receptor at this location. However, no such receptor has been identified. The Par3 polarity protein associates with TJs but has no known function in membrane traffic. We now show that, unexpectedly, Par3 is essential for mammary cell survival. Par3 silencing causes apoptosis, triggered by phosphoinositide trisphosphate depletion and decreased Akt phosphorylation, resulting from failure of the exocyst to deliver basolateral proteins to the cortex. A small region of PAR3 binds directly to Exo70 and is sufficient for exocyst docking, membrane-protein delivery and cell survival. PAR3 lacking this domain can associate with the cortex but cannot support exocyst function. We conclude that Par3 is the long-sought exocyst receptor required for targeted membrane-protein delivery. PMID:28358000

  13. Transfer of an expression YAC into goat fetal fibroblasts by cell fusion for mammary gland bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xufeng; Wu Guoxiang; Chen, Jian-Quan; Zhang Aimin; Liu Siguo; Jiao Binghua . E-mail: jiaobh@uninet.com.cn; Cheng Guoxiang . E-mail: Chenggx@cngenon.com

    2005-07-22

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) as transgenes in transgenic animals are likely to ensure optimal expression levels. Microinjection of YACs is the exclusive technique used to produce YACs transgenic livestock so far. However, low efficiency and high cost are its critical restrictive factors. In this study, we presented a novel procedure to produce YACs transgenic livestock as mammary gland bioreactor. A targeting vector, containing the gene of interest-a human serum albumin minigene (intron 1, 2), yeast selectable marker (G418R), and mammalian cell resistance marker (neo{sup r}), replaced the {alpha}-lactalbumin gene in a 210 kb human {alpha}-lactalbumin YAC by homogeneous recombination in yeasts. The chimeric YAC was introduced into goat fetal fibroblasts using polyethylene glycol-mediated spheroplast fusion. PCR and Southern analysis showed that intact YAC was integrated in the genome of resistant cells. Perhaps, it may offer a cell-based route by nuclear transfer to produce YACs transgenic livestock.

  14. Mammary cell activity and turnover in dairy cows treated with the prolactin-release inhibitor quinagolide and milked once daily.

    PubMed

    Boutinaud, M; Lollivier, V; Finot, L; Bruckmaier, R M; Lacasse, P

    2012-01-01

    To assess the regulation of mammary cell activity, survival, and proliferation by prolactin (PRL), 5 Holstein cows in early lactation received daily i.m. injections of 1mg of quinagolide, a suppressor of PRL release, for 9 wk, whereas 4 control cows received the vehicle (water) only. During the last week of treatment, one udder half was milked once a day (1×) and the other twice a day (2×). Mammary biopsies were harvested 1 wk before and 4 and 8 wk after the start of quinagolide treatment. The quinagolide injections reduced milk yield and resulted in lower levels of κ-casein and α-lactalbumin mRNA in the mammary biopsies at wk 4 compared with the control cows. In the mammary tissue of the quinagolide-treated cows at wk 8 of treatment, cell proliferation (as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling) was lower and apoptosis (as determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay) was higher than in the mammary tissue of the control cows. During differential milking, mammary epithelial cells (MEC) were extracted from the milk by centrifugation and purified by immunocytochemical binding to allow variations in the levels of mammary transcripts to be observed. After 9 wk of treatment, levels of α-lactalbumin and κ-casein mRNA were lower in the MEC isolated from milk of the quinagolide-treated cows. This effect was associated with lower PRL receptor mRNA levels and a tendency toward lower viability in the milk-isolated MEC from the 2×-milked glands. The decrease from 2× milking to 1× milking also downregulated α-lactalbumin and κ-casein transcripts in the milk-isolated MEC. Viability was higher for the MEC collected from the 1×-milked udder halves compared with the 2×-milked halves. In conclusion, the reduction in milk yield after chronic administration of the PRL-release inhibitor quinagolide is associated with a reduction in mammary cell activity, survival, and proliferation in lactating dairy cows

  15. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wu; Bai, Lin; Dai, Lyu-Xia; He, Xu; Zhou, Xian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions. Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations. In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19. Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33 and 17p13.1-13.3. And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG). Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis. We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33, and 17p13.1-13.3. Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. PMID:26879013

  16. Crinane alkaloids of the amaryllidaceae with cytotoxic effects in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Rárová, Lucie; Strnad, Miroslav; Bastida, Jaume; Cheesman, Lee; van Staden, Johannes

    2014-04-01

    The family Amaryllidaceae has a long history of usage in the traditional medicinal practices of the indigenous peoples of South Africa, with three of its species known to be used for cancer treatment. Furthermore, the Amaryllidaceae is widely recognized for its unique alkaloid constituents, several of which exhibit potent and selective cytotoxic activities. In this study, several crinane alkaloids derived from local Amaryllidaceae species were examined for cytotoxic effects against the human cervical adenocarcinoma cell line, of which distichamine was the most potent (IC50 2.2 microM).

  17. Using Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells to Teach Core Biology Concepts: A Simple Lab Module.

    PubMed

    McIlrath, Victoria; Trye, Alice; Aguanno, Ann

    2015-06-18

    Undergraduate biology students are required to learn, understand and apply a variety of cellular and molecular biology concepts and techniques in preparation for biomedical, graduate and professional programs or careers in science. To address this, a simple laboratory module was devised to teach the concepts of cell division, cellular communication and cancer through the application of animal cell culture techniques. Here the mouse mammary tumor (MMT) cell line is used to model for breast cancer. Students learn to grow and characterize these animal cells in culture and test the effects of traditional and non-traditional chemotherapy agents on cell proliferation. Specifically, students determine the optimal cell concentration for plating and growing cells, learn how to prepare and dilute drug solutions, identify the best dosage and treatment time course of the antiproliferative agents, and ascertain the rate of cell death in response to various treatments. The module employs both a standard cell counting technique using a hemocytometer and a novel cell counting method using microscopy software. The experimental procedure lends to open-ended inquiry as students can modify critical steps of the protocol, including testing homeopathic agents and over-the-counter drugs. In short, this lab module requires students to use the scientific process to apply their knowledge of the cell cycle, cellular signaling pathways, cancer and modes of treatment, all while developing an array of laboratory skills including cell culture and analysis of experimental data not routinely taught in the undergraduate classroom.

  18. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Ying; Ma, Li-Bing; He, Xiao-Ning; Si, Wan-Tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-06-30

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos.

  19. Specificity of gap junction communication among human mammary cells and connexin transfectants in culture

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In a previous paper (Lee et al., 1992), it was shown that normal human mammary epithelial cells (NMEC) express two connexin genes, Cx26 and Cx43, whereas neither gene is transcribed in a series of mammary tumor cell lines (TMEC). In this paper it is shown that normal human mammary fibroblasts (NMF) communicate and express Cx43 mRNA and protein. Transfection of either Cx26 or Cx43 genes into a tumor line, 21MT-2, induced the expression of the corresponding mRNAs and proteins as well as communication via gap junctions (GJs), although immunofluorescence demonstrated that the majority of Cx26 and Cx43 proteins present in transfected TMEC was largely cytoplasmic. Immunoblotting demonstrated that NMEC, NMF, and transfected TMEC each displayed a unique pattern of posttranslationally modified forms of Cx43 protein. The role of different connexins in regulating gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) was examined using a novel two-dye method to assess homologous and heterologous communication quantitatively. The recipient cell population was prestained with a permanent non-toxic lipophilic dye that binds to membranes irreversibly (PKH26, Zynaxis); and the donor population is treated with a GJ-permeable dye Calcein, a derivative of fluorescein diacetate (Molecular Probes). After mixing the two cell populations under conditions promoting GJ formation, cells were analyzed by flow cytometry to determine the percentage of cells containing both dyes. It is shown here that Cx26 and Cx43 transfectants display strong homologous communication, as do NMEC and NMF. Furthermore, NMEC mixed with NMF communicate efficiently, Cx26 transfectants communicate with NMEC but not with NMF, and Cx43 transfectants communicate with NMF. Communication between Cx26 TMEC transfectants and NMEC was asymetrical with preferential movement of calcein from TMEC to NMEC. Despite the presence of Cx43 as well as Cx26 encoded proteins in the GJs of NMEC, few Cx43 transfectants communicated with NMEC

  20. Maspin acts at the cell membrane to inhibit invasion and motility of mammary and prostatic cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, S; Carey, J; Seftor, E A; Dias, L; Hendrix, M J; Sager, R

    1996-01-01

    Maspin, a novel serine protease inhibitor (serpin), inhibits tumor invasion and metastasis of mammary carcinoma. We show here that recombinant maspin protein blocks the motility of these carcinoma cells in culture over 12 h, as demonstrated by time-lapse video microscopy. Lamellopodia are withdrawn but ruffling continues. Both exogenous recombinant maspin and maspin expressed by tumor transfectants exhibit inhibitory effects on cell motility and cell invasion as shown in modified Boyden chamber assays. In addition, three prostatic cancer cell lines treated with recombinant maspin exhibited similar inhibition of both invasion and motility, suggesting a similar mode of maspin action in these two glandular epithelial cancers. When mammary carcinoma cells were treated with recombinant maspin, the protein was shown by immunostaining to bind specifically to the cell surface, suggesting that maspin activity is membrane associated. When pretreated with antimaspin antibody, maspin loses its inhibitory effects on both invasion and motility. However, when maspin is added to these cells preceding antibody treatment, the activity of maspin is no longer inhibited by subsequent addition of the antibody. It is concluded therefore that the inhibition of invasion and motility by maspin is initially localized to the cell surface. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8876194

  1. Dietary compound isoliquiritigenin prevents mammary carcinogenesis by inhibiting breast cancer stem cells through WIF1 demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Xie, Xiaoming; Shen, Jiangang; Peng, Cheng; You, Jieshu; Peng, Fu; Tang, Hailin; Guan, Xinyuan; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered as the root of mammary tumorigenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that ISL efficiently limited the activities of breast CSCs. However, the cancer prevention activities of ISL and its precise molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we report a novel function of ISL as a natural demethylation agent targeting WIF1 to prevent breast cancer. ISL administration suppressed in vivo breast cancer initiation and progression, accompanied by reduced CSC-like populations. A global gene expression profile assay further identified WIF1 as the main response gene of ISL treatment, accompanied by the simultaneous downregulation of β-catenin signaling and G0/G1 phase arrest in breast CSCs. In addition, WIF1 inhibition significantly relieved the CSC-limiting effects of ISL and methylation analysis further revealed that ISL enhanced WIF1 gene expression via promoting the demethylation of its promoter, which was closely correlated with the inhibition of DNMT1 methyltransferase. Molecular docking analysis finally revealed that ISL could stably dock into the catalytic domain of DNMT1. Taken together, our findings not only provide preclinical evidence to demonstrate the use of ISL as a dietary supplement to inhibit mammary carcinogenesis but also shed novel light on WIF1 as an epigenetic target for breast cancer prevention. PMID:25918249

  2. Identification of specific relaxin-binding cells in the cervix, mammary glands, nipples, small intestine, and skin of pregnant pigs.

    PubMed

    Min, G; Sherwood, O D

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that relaxin promotes growth and softening of the cervix and development of the mammary glands in the pregnant pig. An important aspect of understanding relaxin's mechanism of action in these tissues is to identify the specific cell type(s) that contains relaxin receptors, that is, to identify those cells that initiate relaxin's effects. The objective of the present study was to identify relaxin-binding cells in tissues known to respond to relaxin (cervix and mammary gland) as well as in tissues suspected of being responsive to relaxin (nipple, small intestine, and skin) in the pregnant pig. To accomplish that objective we developed an in vitro modification of an immunohistochemical technique recently developed for identification of relaxin-binding cells. Two groups of pregnant gilts were used: intact control (group C) and ovariectomized progesterone-treated (group OP). Group OP was ovariectomized on Day 40 of gestation (Day 40) and treated with progesterone (50 mg/2 ml corn oil i.m., twice daily) until Day 110 to maintain pregnancy. On Day 110, tissues from both groups were removed, cut into cubes (2-3 cm3), frozen in liquid nitrogen, and cryosectioned (8 microns). Specific cell types that bind relaxin were identified by sequential application of a biotinylated relaxin probe, antibiotin immunoglobulin G conjugated to 1 nm colloidal gold, and silver for signal amplification. The study demonstrates for the first time that relaxin binds with specificity to 1) blood vessels (cervix, mammary glands, nipples, small intestine); 2) smooth muscles in small intestine (circular, longitudinal, muscularis mucosa); and 3) skin from sites other than the mammary nipples (back, ear, thigh, leg). In addition, consistent with previous findings in the rat, prominent labeling was observed in epithelial cells in the cervix, mammary glands, and nipples; in smooth muscle cells in the cervix and mammary nipples; and in the skin of the nipples. There were no

  3. Paracrine Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Enhances Mammary Tumorigenesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Ostrovich, Krisztina Kovács; Lambertz, Isabel; Colby, Jennifer K. L.; Tian, Jie; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Johnston, Dennis; Conti, Claudio J.; DiGiovanni, John; Fuchs-Young, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulates proliferation, regulates tissue development, protects against apoptosis, and promotes the malignant phenotype in the breast and other organs. Some epidemiological studies have linked high circulating levels of IGF-1 with an increased risk of breast cancer. To study the role of IGF-1 in mammary tumorigenesis in vivo, we used transgenic mice in which overexpression of IGF-1 is under the control of the bovine keratin 5 (BK5) promoter and is directed to either the myoepithelial or basal cells in a variety of organs, including the mammary gland. This model closely recapitulates the paracrine exposure of breast epithelium to stromal IGF-1 seen in women. Histologically, mammary glands from transgenic mice were hyperplastic and highly vascularized. Mammary glands from prepubertal transgenic mice had significantly increased ductal proliferation compared with wild-type tissues, although this difference was not maintained after puberty. Transgenic mice also had increased susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis, and 74% of the BK5.IGF-1 mice treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (20 μg/day) developed mammary tumors compared with 29% of the wild-type mice. Interestingly, 31% of the vehicle-treated BK5.IGF-1 animals, but none of the wild-type animals, spontaneously developed mammary cancer. The mammary tumors were moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas that expressed functional, nuclear estrogen receptor at both the protein and mRNA levels. These data support the hypothesis that tissue overexpression of IGF-1 stimulates mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:18688034

  4. Role of coagulation in the recruitment of colon adenocarcinoma cells to thrombus under shear

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Asako; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastases can appear on the peritoneum and in lymph nodes, liver, and lungs, suggesting both hematogenous and lymphatic spreading of the primary tumor. While antithrombotic agents have been shown to reduce both long-term incidence and metastasis, the role of coagulation in facilitating metastasis is ill defined. We investigated the kinetics and molecular mechanisms of metastatic colon adenocarcinoma cell recruitment to thrombi under shear flow, ex vivo. Platelet aggregates were formed by perfusing citrated anticoagulated whole blood over immobilized fibrinogen or fibrillar collagen. Thrombi were formed by perfusing recalcified whole blood over fibrinogen or fibrillar collagen in the presence of coagulation. Cultured colon adenocarcinoma cells (SW620) were perfused either during or following platelet aggregate or thrombus formation. The degree of transient tumor cell interactions (recruitment, rolling, and release) and the number of firmly adhered tumor cells were quantified using fluorescence microscopy. Platelet aggregates and thrombi formed on either fibrinogen- or fibrillar-collagen supported SW620 cell interactions and adhesion under shear. Thrombi or fibrin supported a greater degree of SW620 cell interactions and adhesion compared with platelet aggregates or fibrinogen, respectively, demonstrating that coagulation promoted SW620 cell recruitment under shear. Interestingly, in the absence of anticoagulation, we observed SW620 preferentially binding to thrombus-bound polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The addition of purified PMNs to thrombi resulted in a doubling of the number of interacting and bound SW620 cells. Since thrombi often accumulate and activate leukocytes, our findings suggest that leukocytes may play a role in localizing metastases to sites of thrombogenesis. PMID:23903698

  5. The effects of increased milking frequency during early lactation on metabolism and mammary cell proliferation in Holstein cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Primiparous (n=30) and multiparous (n=30) cows were assigned randomly at calving to one of 2 treatments to evaluate metabolic and mammary cell responses to increased milking frequency (IMF). Controls were milked twice daily (2X) for 119 d and the IMF group was milked four times daily (4X) from d 2 u...

  6. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  7. δ-Tocotrienol oxazine derivative antagonizes mammary tumor cell compensatory response to CoCl2-induced hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ananthula, Suryatheja; Parajuli, Parash; Behery, Fathy A; Alayoubi, Alaadin Y; Nazzal, Sami; El Sayed, Khalid; Sylvester, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    In response to low oxygen supply, cancer cells elevate production of HIF-1α, a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor that subsequently acts to stimulate blood vessel formation and promote survival. Studies were conducted to determine the role of δ-tocotrienol and a semisynthetic δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, on +SA mammary tumor cell hypoxic response. Treatment with 150 µM CoCl2 induced a hypoxic response in +SA mammary tumor cells as evidenced by a large increase in HIF-1α levels, and combined treatment with compound 44 attenuated this response. CoCl2-induced hypoxia was also associated with a large increase in Akt/mTOR signaling, activation of downstream targets p70S6K and eIF-4E1, and a significant increase in VEGF production, and combined treatment with compound 44 blocked this response. Additional in vivo studies showed that intralesional treatment with compound 44 in BALB/c mice bearing +SA mammary tumors significantly decreased the levels of HIF-1α, and this effect was associated with a corresponding decrease in Akt/mTOR signaling and activation of downstream targets p70S6 kinase and eIF-4E1. These findings demonstrate that treatment with the δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, significantly attenuates +SA mammary tumor cell compensatory responses to hypoxia and suggests that this compound may provide benefit in the treatment of rapidly growing solid breast tumors.

  8. EFFECTS OF ATRAZINE AND AN ATRAZINE METABOLITE MIXTURE ON DIFFERENTIATED MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL MILK PROTEIN PRODUCTION IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Atrazine and an Atrazine Metabolite Mixture on Differentiated Mammary Epithelial Cell Milk Protein Production in Culture

    E.P. Hines, R. Barbee, M. Blanton, M.S. Pooler, and S.E. Fenton. US EPA, ORD/NHEERL, RTD, RTP, NC, 27711, USA.

    Previous studies have ...

  9. New mammary epithelial and fibroblastic cell clones in coculture form structures competent to differentiate functionally

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have established and characterized a spontaneously immortalized, nontumorigenic mouse mammary cell line, designated IM-2. IM-2 cells synthesize large amounts of the milk protein beta-casein upon addition of lactogenic hormones. The induction of beta-casein occurs rapidly and does not require any exogenous extracellular matrix components. The IM- 2 cell line is morphologically heterogeneous and could be separated into cell clones with epithelial and fibroblastic characteristics. In monoculture, none of the epithelial clones could be induced to synthesize caseins. Coculture of epithelial and fibroblastic clones, however, rendered the epithelial cells competent to differentiate functionally; the addition of lactogenic hormones to these cocultures resulted in the synthesis of beta-casein in amounts comparable to that seen with the original IM-2 line. Using this unique cell system, we have investigated the interrelationships between different steps in differentiation leading to hormone-induced casein production. Independent of hormones, epithelial-fibroblastic cell contacts led to the formation of characteristic structures showing the deposition of laminin. We found that the epithelial cells located in these structures also exhibited significantly increased levels of cytokeratin intermediate filament polypeptides. Double immunofluorescence revealed that the cells inducible by hormones to synthesize casein, colocalized exactly with the areas of laminin deposition and with the cells showing greatly intensified cytokeratin expression. These results suggest that hormone-independent differentiation events take place in response to intercellular epithelial-mesenchymal contacts. These events in turn bring about a state of competence for functional differentiation after lactogenic hormonal stimulation. PMID:2466037

  10. Ethanolamine requirement of mammary epithelial cells is due to reduced activity of base exchange enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kano-Sueoka, T.; King, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Epithelial cells and some of their transformed derivatives require ethanolamine (Etn) to proliferate normally in defined culture medium. The amount of cellular phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) is considerably reduced when these cells are cultured without Etn. Using Etn-responsive and -nonresponsive rat mammary carcinoma cell lines, the biochemical mechanism of Etn-responsiveness of investigated. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)serine into phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and PtdEtn in Etn-responsive cells was 60 and 37%, respectively, of those in Etn-nonresponsive cells. There was no significant difference between the two cell types in the activities of enzymes involved in PtdEtn synthesis via CDP-Etn. The activity of PtdSer decarboxylase was also very similar in these two cell types. When these cells were cultured in the presence of (/sup 32/P)PtdEtn, the rate of accumulation of (/sup 32/P)-labeled PtdSer from the radioactive PtdEtn was considerably reduced in Etn-responsive cells as compared to Etn-nonresponsive cells. Whereas there was no significant difference in the accumulation of the labeled PtdSer from (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylcholine. These results demonstrate that the Etn-responsiveness is due to a limited ability to synthesize PtdSer resulting from a limited base exchange activity utilizing PtdEtn.

  11. siRNA targeting of Trop2 suppresses the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Ye-Han; Zhang, Li-Xin; Lu, Hui-Yu; Jiang, Ai-Gui

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced inhibition of the Trop2 gene on the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells. A recombinant adenovirus expression vector, which contained siRNA targeting open reading frames for Trop2 (rAd5-siTrop2), was transfected into lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells. Three groups were included in the study, namely the Ctrl (non-transfected control), rAd5-siCtrl (native control) and rAd5-siTrop2 (knockdown Trop2 gene) groups. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Trop2 were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of cyclin Dl and phospho-extracellular signal regulated kinase (p-ERK)-1 were detected using western blot analysis. The effects of Trop2 inhibition on the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells were investigated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Transwell assay. Trop2-targeted siRNA recombinant plasmids were successfully constructed. The recombinant adenovirus vector, rAd5-siTrop2, significantly downregulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of Trop2 in the lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells, with cyclin D1 and p-ERK-1 expression downregulated simultaneously. In addition, following the silencing of Trop2, the proliferation and invasion rates of the lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells were reduced. Therefore, the results indicated that Trop2 serves a key function in the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells in vitro.

  12. Data for comparative proteomics analysis of the antitumor effect of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Núñez de Villavicencio-Díaz, Teresa; Ramos Gómez, Yassel; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Fernández Masso, Julio R.; Rodríguez-Ulloa, Arielis; Cruz García, Yiliam; Guirola-Cruz, Osmany; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Javier González, Luis; Tiscornia, Inés; Victoria, Sabina; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Besada Pérez, Vladimir; Guerra Vallespi, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    CIGB-552 is a second generation antitumor peptide that displays potent cytotoxicity in lung and colon cancer cells. The nuclear subproteome of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells treated with CIGB-552 peptide was identified and analyzed [1]. This data article provides supporting evidence for the above analysis. PMID:26306321

  13. MiR-205 functions as a tumor suppressor in adenocarcinoma and an oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus.

    PubMed

    Hezova, Renata; Kovarikova, Alena; Srovnal, Josef; Zemanova, Milada; Harustiak, Tomas; Ehrmann, Jiri; Hajduch, Marian; Sachlova, Milana; Svoboda, Marek; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal cancer is a malignant disease with poor prognosis, increasing incidence, and ineffective treatment options. MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression involved in many biological processes including carcinogenesis. We determined miR-205 expression levels in tumor/non-tumor tissues of 45 esophageal cancer patients using qPCR and found that decreased level of miR-205 in tumor tissue correlates with poor overall survival in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients. Further, we observed significantly higher levels of miR-205 in tumor tissue of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Ectopic overexpression of miR-205 in adenocarcinoma cell line SK-GT-4 led to decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest in G1, and decreased migration ability. Conversely, in squamous cell line KYSE-150, same effects like inhibition of proliferation, migration, and colony-forming potential and cell cycle arrest in G2 were observed after silencing of miR-205. We performed global gene expression profiling and revealed that suppressive functioning of miR-205 in adenocarcinoma could be realized through regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), whereas oncogenic in squamous cell carcinoma by regulation of metalloproteinase 10. Our results suggest that miR-205 could serve as biomarker in esophageal cancer and acts as a tumor suppressor in esophageal adenocarcinoma and oncogene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. α2-Adrenoceptor action on cell proliferation and mammary tumour growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzone, A; Piñero, C Pérez; Castillo, L F; Sarappa, M G; Rojas, P; Lanari, C; Lüthy, I A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Breast cancer, the most common cancer in women in most countries, is a highly stressful disease. Catecholamines released during stress bind to adrenoceptors and we have recently described α2-adrenoceptors in human breast cell lines, linked to enhanced cell proliferation. The purpose was to assess the in vivo effects of compounds acting on α2-adrenoceptors in a reliable model of breast cancer. Experimental approach: The expression of α2-adrenoceptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and reverse transcription-PCR in the mouse mammary tumour cell line MC4-L5. Proliferation was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation and tumours were measured daily. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling. Key results: Incubation for 2 days with α2-adrenoceptor agonists (clonidine and dexmedetomidine) significantly enhanced proliferation of the mouse mammary tumour cell line MC4-L5. These agonists also significantly stimulated tumour growth of the progestin-dependent tumour C4-HD even in the presence of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). In every tumour tested (C4-HD, CC4-2-HD and CC4-3-HI), regardless of MPA sensitivity, clonidine significantly enhanced tumour growth in the absence of MPA. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine and rauwolscine, completely reversed the effects of clonidine. However, the group receiving yohimbine alone showed a nonsignificant but constant increase in tumour growth, whereas rauwolscine alone diminished tumour growth significantly, behaving as a reverse agonist. In CC4-3-HI tumours, rauwolscine treatment enhanced apoptosis and diminished the mitotic index, whereas clonidine had the inverse effect. Conclusions and implications: α2-Adrenoceptor agonists enhanced tumour growth and rauwolscine behaved in vivo as a reverse agonist, suggesting that it may be tested for adjuvant treatment. PMID:18604234

  15. Two-stage induced differentiation of OCT4+/Nanog+ stem-like cells in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meili; Lou, Yuqing; Zhang, Yanwei; Wu, Lixia; Chang, David W.; Zhao, Picheng; Dong, Qianggang; Wu, Xifeng; Han, Baohui

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like cells in solid tumors are purported to contribute to cancer development and poor treatment outcome. The abilities to self-renew, differentiate, and resist anticancer therapies are hallmarks of these rare cells, and steering them into lineage commitment may be one strategy to curb cancer development or progression. Vitamin D is a prohormone that can alter cell growth and differentiation and may induce the differentiation cancer stem-like cells. In this study, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4)-positive/Nanog homeobox (Nanog)- positive lung adenocarcinoma stem-like cells (LACSCs) were enriched from spheroid cultured SPC-A1 cells and differentiated by a two-stage induction (TSI) method, which involved knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) expression (first stage) followed by sequential induction with 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3, VD3) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) treatment (second stage). The results showed the HIF1α-knockdowned cells displayed diminished cell invasion and clonogenic activities. Moreover, the TSI cells highly expressed tumor suppressor protein p63 (P63) and forkhead box J1 (FOXJ1) and lost stem cell characteristics, including absent expression of OCT4 and Nanog. These cells regained sensitivity to cisplatin in vitro while losing tumorigenic capacity and decreased tumor cell proliferation in vivo. Our results suggest that induced transdifferentiation of LACSCs by vitamin D and SAHA may become novel therapeutic avenue to alter tumor cell phenotypes and improve patient outcome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development and progression of lung cancer may involve rare population of stem-like cells that have the ability to grow, differentiate, and resist drug treatment. However, current therapeutic strategies have mostly focused on tumor characteristics and neglected the potential source of cells that may contribute to poor clinical outcome. We generated lung adenocarcinoma stem-like cells from

  16. Protective autophagy is involved in resistance towards MET inhibitors in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Magali; Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M; Blaukat, Andree; Bladt, Friedhelm; Fey, Martin F; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Tschan, Mario P

    2013-02-08

    MET, also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an important role, both in normal cellular function as well as in oncogenesis. In many cancer types, abnormal activation of MET is related to poor prognosis and various strategies to inhibit its function, including small molecule inhibitors, are currently in preclinical and clinical evaluation. Autophagy, a self-digesting recycling mechanism with cytoprotective functions, is induced by cellular stress. This process is also induced upon cytotoxic drug treatment of cancer cells and partially allows these cells to escape cell death. Thus, since autophagy protects different tumor cells from chemotherapy-induced cell death, current clinical trials aim at combining autophagy inhibitors with different cancer treatments. We found that in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line GTL-16, where MET activity is deregulated due to receptor overexpression, two different MET inhibitors PHA665752 and EMD1214063 lead to cell death paralleled by the induction of autophagy. A combined treatment of MET inhibitors together with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or genetically impairing autophagy by knocking down the key autophagy gene ATG7 further decreased cell viability of gastric cancer cells. In general, we observed the induction of cytoprotective autophagy in MET expressing cells upon MET inhibition and a combination of MET and autophagy inhibition resulted in significantly decreased cell viability in gastric cancer cells.

  17. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  18. [Endometrial adenocarcinoma and clear cell carcinoma in a young woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Liu, Nan; Liu, Guo-Bing

    2016-05-01

    A 26-year-old unmarried woman with irregular menstruation for 4 years was admitted for an intrauterine space-occupying mass. Pathological examination before surgery showed moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopically assisted epifascial panhysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimens reported moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma and stage II clear cell carcinoma. The patient then received chemotherapy and remained alive without evidence of recurrence. Young women with polycystic ovarian syndrome are at high risk of developing endometrial carcinoma, but concurrent clear cell carcinoma is rare. Careful evaluation before and after treatment are essential to improve the patients prognosis.

  19. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Kwok-kin; Chen, Haiquan; Hou, Yingyong; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24531128

  20. Down-regulation of telomerase activity in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by tocotrienol

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo . E-mail: miyazawa@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    As high telomerase activity is detected in most cancer cells, inhibition of telomerase by drug or dietary food components is a new strategy for cancer prevention. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin E, with particular emphasis on tocotrienol (unsaturated vitamin E), on human telomerase in cell-culture study. As results, tocotrienol inhibited telomerase activity of DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in time- and dose-dependent manner, interestingly, with {delta}-tocotrienol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity. Tocotrienol inhibited protein kinase C activity, resulting in down-regulation of c-myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, thereby reducing telomerase activity. In contrast to tocotrienol, tocopherol showed very weak telomerase inhibition. These results provide novel evidence for First time indicating that tocotrienol acts as a potent candidate regulator of telomerase and supporting the anti-proliferative function of tocotrienol.

  1. Searching for mammary analogue [corrected] secretory carcinoma of salivary gland among its mimics.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andre; Nosé, Vania; Rojas, Claudia; Fan, Yao-Shan; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of salivary gland is a recently described entity with unique morphologic, clinical, and genetic characteristics, including the characteristic t(12;15)(p13;q25) with ETV6-NTRK3 translocation found in secretory carcinomas of the breast. Before their initial description, these salivary gland tumors were generally diagnosed as acinic cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. For the purpose of this study, all cases of salivary gland acinic cell carcinoma, cribriform cystadenocarcinoma, and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS), diagnosed over a 10-year period were retrieved from our surgical pathology files. There were a total of 11 cases diagnosed as acinic cell carcinoma, 10 cases of adenocarcinoma, NOS, and 6 cases of cribriform cystadenocarcinoma. All slides were reviewed by two pathologists (AP, CGF) and tumors that show morphologic features of mammary analog secretory carcinoma according to the recent literature were selected. This process narrowed down the initial number to six cases originally diagnosed as acinic cell carcinoma, three cases originally diagnosed as adenocarcinoma, NOS, and one case originally diagnosed as cribriform cystadenocarcinoma. The 10 cases were subjected to immunohistochemistry for S-100, mammaglobin, and ANO1, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for t(12;15)(p13;q25) with ETV6-NTRK3 fusion rearrangement. The ETV6-NTRK3 gene rearrangement was detected in three tumors. These three tumors, initially diagnosed as acinic cell carcinomas, stained positive for S-100 and mammaglobin, and negative for ANO1 by immunohistochemistry. Two of the three patients were male (2/3). In summary, mammary analog secretory carcinoma is a newly described diagnostic entity that should be in the differential diagnosis of salivary gland tumors that morphologically mimic other neoplasms, mainly acinic cell carcinomas. They differ from conventional acinic cell tumors immunohistochemically and molecularly

  2. Induction of cells with cancer stem cell properties from nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells by defined reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Nishi, M; Sakai, Y; Akutsu, H; Nagashima, Y; Quinn, G; Masui, S; Kimura, H; Perrem, K; Umezawa, A; Yamamoto, N; Lee, S W; Ryo, A

    2014-01-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and elusive population of undifferentiated cancer cells within tumors that drive tumor growth and recurrence, are believed to resemble normal stem cells. Although surrogate markers have been identified and compelling CSC theoretical models abound, actual proof for the existence of CSCs can only be had retrospectively. Hence, great store has come to be placed in isolating CSCs from cancers for in-depth analysis. On the other hand, although induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine, concern exists over the inadvertent co-transplantation of partially or undifferentiated stem cells with tumorigenic capacity. Here we demonstrate that the introduction of defined reprogramming factors (OCT4, SOX2, Klf4 and c-Myc) into MCF-10A nontumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, followed by partial differentiation, transforms the bulk of cells into tumorigenic CD44(+)/CD24(low) cells with CSC properties, termed here as induced CSC-like-10A or iCSCL-10A cells. These reprogrammed cells display a malignant phenotype in culture and form tumors of multiple lineages when injected into immunocompromised mice. Compared with other transformed cell lines, cultured iCSCL-10A cells exhibit increased resistance to the chemotherapeutic compounds, Taxol and Actinomycin D, but higher susceptibility to the CSC-selective agent Salinomycin and the Pin1 inhibitor Juglone. Restored expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4a abrogated the CSC properties of iCSCL-10A cells, by inducing cellular senescence. This study provides some insight into the potential oncogenicity that may arise via cellular reprogramming, and could represent a valuable in vitro model for studying the phenotypic traits of CSCs per se.

  3. Cloning mammary cell cDNAs from 17q12-q23 using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cerosaletti, K.M.; Shapero, M.H.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned human genes that are encoded in the region 17q12-q23 and expressed in breast tissue using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization. Two mouse microcell hybrids containing fragments of human chromosome 17 with a nonoverlap region at 17q12-q23 were generated by microcell transfer. Radiolabeled cDNA was synthesized from the hybrid cell containing the 17q12-q23 interval and was subtracted with an excess of RNA from the hybrid cell lacking the interval. Resulting cDNA probes enriched for sequences from 17q12-q23 were used to screen a human premenopausal breast cDNA library, and 60 cDNAs were identified. Three of these cDNAs mapped to the hybrid cell nonoverlap region. These cDNAs were expressed in mammary epithelial cell hybrids, although none appeared to be breast-specific. Sequence analysis of the cDNAs revealed that clone 93A represents a previously unidentified gene, clone 98C has homology to an expressed sequence tag from goat mammary tissue, and clone 200A is identical to the human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene. These genes map outside a 1-cM region linked to early onset familial breast cancer but may be useful genetic markers in the 17q12-q23 region. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Copper Uptake in Mammary Epithelial Cells Activates Cyclins and Triggers Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Nathália Villa; Matias, Andreza Cândido; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2015-01-01

    The toxicologic effects of copper (Cu) on tumor cells have been studied during the past decades, and it is suggested that Cu ion may trigger antiproliferative effects in vitro. However, in normal cells the toxicologic effects of high exposures of free Cu are not well understood. In this work, Cu uptake, the expression of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, and the levels of ROS production and related oxidative processes were evaluated in Cu-treated mammary epithelial MCF10A nontumoral cells. We have shown that the Cu additive is associated with the activation of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, as well as cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). These nontumor cells respond to Cu-induced changes in the oxidative balance by increase of the levels of reduced intracellular glutathione (GSH), decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and accumulation during progression of the cell cycle, thus preventing the cell abnormal proliferation or death. Taken together, our findings revealed an effect that contributes to prevent a possible damage of normal cells exposed to chemotherapeutic effects of drugs containing the Cu ion.

  5. Adhesion in Mammary Development: Novel Roles for E-Cadherin in Individual and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are essential for barrier function, secretion, and regulation of fluid transport. Their function requires cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion, mediated through intercellular junctions. Conversely, disruption of adhesion and polarity is thought to drive cancer progression. The mammary gland is an important model for cell adhesion due to its postnatal hormonally regulated development; ducts undergo branching morphogenesis in response to steroid hormones during puberty. These hormonal signals induce a transition from simple to stratified architecture, initiated by asymmetric luminal cell divisions. Ductal elongation is accomplished by this multilayered, low-polarity epithelium, and polarity is reestablished as elongation ceases. The requirement for cell adhesion has been tested in 3D culture and in vivo, using gene deletion, knockdown, and misexpression in both developmental and homeostatic contexts. Attention has focused on E-cadherin, the major classical cadherin in luminal epithelial cells. Classic studies revealed a requirement for E-cadherin during lactation, and E-cadherin loss is widely posited to promote metastasis. However, recent findings demonstrated a broader requirement for E-cadherin during branching morphogenesis and homeostasis and also, surprisingly, in epithelial dissemination. These studies suggest that longstanding models of the role of adhesion in epithelial biology need to be revisited. Advances in inducible gene expression and knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and fluorescent labeling of genetically modified cells offer the opportunity to test the roles of diverse adhesion systems and to develop a mechanistic understanding of how cell adhesion regulates development and cancer. PMID:25733146

  6. GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of diff